WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical genetics reveals

  1. Chemical genetics reveals an RGS/G-protein role in the action of a compound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fitzgerald

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here on a chemical genetic screen designed to address the mechanism of action of a small molecule. Small molecules that were active in models of urinary incontinence were tested on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the resulting phenotypes were used as readouts in a genetic screen to identify possible molecular targets. The mutations giving resistance to compound were found to affect members of the RGS protein/G-protein complex. Studies in mammalian systems confirmed that the small molecules inhibit muscarinic G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR signaling involving G-alphaq (G-protein alpha subunit. Our studies suggest that the small molecules act at the level of the RGS/G-alphaq signaling complex, and define new mutations in both RGS and G-alphaq, including a unique hypo-adapation allele of G-alphaq. These findings suggest that therapeutics targeted to downstream components of GPCR signaling may be effective for treatment of diseases involving inappropriate receptor activation.

  2. A chemical-genetic strategy reveals distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1 kinase in neuronal polarization and synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokat Kevan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons assemble into a functional network through a sequence of developmental processes including neuronal polarization and synapse formation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the serine/threonine SAD-1 kinase is essential for proper neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. To determine if SAD-1 activity regulates the establishment or maintenance of these neuronal structures, we examined its temporal requirements using a chemical-genetic method that allows for selective and reversible inactivation of its kinase activity in vivo. Results We generated a PP1 analog-sensitive variant of SAD-1. Through temporal inhibition of SAD-1 kinase activity we show that its activity is required for the establishment of both neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. However, while SAD-1 activity is needed strictly when neurons are polarizing, the temporal requirement for SAD-1 is less stringent in synaptic organization, which can also be re-established during maintenance. Conclusion This study reports the first temporal analysis of a neural kinase activity using the chemical-genetic system. It reveals that neuronal polarity and synaptic organization have distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1.

  3. Dynamic phosphoregulation of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and endocytic machinery revealed by real-time chemical genetic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiya-Kawasaki, Mariko; Groen, Aaron Chris; Cope, M. Jamie T.V.; Kaksonen, Marko; Watson, Hadiya A.; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Wendland, Beverly; McDonald, Kent L.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Drubin, David G.

    2003-01-01

    We used chemical genetics to control the activity of budding yeast Prk1p, which is a protein kinase that is related to mammalian GAK and AAK1, and which targets several actin regulatory proteins implicated in endocytosis. In vivo Prk1p inhibition blocked pheromone receptor endocytosis, and caused cortical actin patches to rapidly aggregate into large clumps that contained Abp1p, Sla2p, Pan1p, Sla1p, and Ent1p. Clump formation depended on Arp2p, suggesting that this phenotype might result from...

  4. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Paul A.; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E.; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R.; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J.; Pinho, Mariana G.; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation. PMID:27144276

  5. Chemical genetics reveals a specific requirement for Cdk2 activity in the DNA damage response and identifies Nbs1 as a Cdk2 substrate in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Wohlbold

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs that promote cell-cycle progression are targets for negative regulation by signals from damaged or unreplicated DNA, but also play active roles in response to DNA lesions. The requirement for activity in the face of DNA damage implies that there are mechanisms to insulate certain CDKs from checkpoint inhibition. It remains difficult, however, to assign precise functions to specific CDKs in protecting genomic integrity. In mammals, Cdk2 is active throughout S and G2 phases, but Cdk2 protein is dispensable for survival, owing to compensation by other CDKs. That plasticity obscured a requirement for Cdk2 activity in proliferation of human cells, which we uncovered by replacement of wild-type Cdk2 with a mutant version sensitized to inhibition by bulky adenine analogs. Here we show that transient, selective inhibition of analog-sensitive (AS Cdk2 after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR enhances cell-killing. In extracts supplemented with an ATP analog used preferentially by AS kinases, Cdk2(as phosphorylated the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome gene product Nbs1-a component of the conserved Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 complex required for normal DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling-dependent on a consensus CDK recognition site at Ser432. In vivo, selective inhibition of Cdk2 delayed and diminished Nbs1-Ser432 phosphorylation during S phase, and mutation of Ser432 to Ala or Asp increased IR-sensitivity. Therefore, by chemical genetics, we uncovered both a non-redundant requirement for Cdk2 activity in response to DNA damage and a specific target of Cdk2 within the DNA repair machinery.

  6. Comparative chemical screening and genetic analysis reveal tentoxin as a new virulence factor in Cochliobolus miyabeanus, the causal agent of brown spot disease on rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyne, Lieselotte; Van Poucke, Christof; Di Mavungu, Diana Jose; Zainudin, Nur Ain Izzati Mohd; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Vleesschauwer, David; Turgeon, B Gillian; De Saeger, Sarah; Höfte, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Brown spot disease, caused by Cochliobolus miyabeanus, is currently considered to be one of the most important yield reducers of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Despite its agricultural importance, little is known about the virulence mechanisms deployed by the fungus. Therefore, we set out to identify novel virulence factors with a role in disease development. This article reports, for the first time, the production of tentoxin by C. miyabeanus as a virulence factor during brown spot disease and the identification of the non-ribosomal protein synthetase (NRPS) CmNps3, responsible for tentoxin biosynthesis. We compared the chemical compounds produced by C. miyabeanus strains differing in virulence ability using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS). The production of tentoxin by a highly virulent strain was revealed by principal component analysis of the detected ions and confirmed by UHPLC coupled to tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The corresponding NRPS was identified by in silico genome analysis and confirmed by gene deletion. Infection tests with wild-type and Cmnps3 mutants showed that tentoxin acts as a virulence factor and is correlated with chlorosis development during the second phase of infection. Although rice has previously been classified as a tentoxin-insensitive plant species, our data demonstrate that tentoxin production by C. miyabeanus affects symptom development. PMID:26456797

  7. Genetic Recombination as a Chemical Reaction Network

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Stefan; Hofbauer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The process of genetic recombination can be seen as a chemical reaction network with mass-action kinetics. We review the known results on existence, uniqueness, and global stability of an equilibrium in every compatibility class and for all rate constants, from both the population genetics and the reaction networks point of view.

  8. Chemical Genetics: Budding Yeast as a Platform for Drug Discovery and Mapping of Genetic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorrit M. Enserink

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used model organism, and yeast genetic methods are powerful tools for discovery of novel functions of genes. Recent advancements in chemical-genetics and chemical-genomics have opened new avenues for development of clinically relevant drug treatments. Systematic mapping of genetic networks by high-throughput chemical-genetic screens have given extensive insight in connections between genetic pathways. Here, I review some of the recent developments in chemical-genetic techniques in budding yeast.

  9. A Chemical Genetic Approach To The Study Of Cellular Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieland, T.J.F.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the use of chemical genetics to study two different aspects of membrane biology, (a) the mechanisms underlying cellular lipid transport and (b) the intersection between endocytic and exocytic traffic. The broad goals of chemical genetics are to find novel chemical tool

  10. Systematic Mapping of Chemical-Genetic Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sundari; Schlecht, Ulrich; Xu, Weihong; Bray, Walter; Miranda, Molly; Davis, Ronald W; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Lokey, R Scott; St Onge, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Chemical-genetic interactions (CGIs) describe a phenomenon where the effects of a chemical compound (i.e., a small molecule) on cell growth are dependent on a particular gene. CGIs can reveal important functional information about genes and can also be powerful indicators of a compound's mechanism of action. Mapping CGIs can lead to the discovery of new chemical probes, which, in contrast to genetic perturbations, operate at the level of the gene product (or pathway) and can be fast-acting, tunable, and reversible. The simple culture conditions required for yeast and its rapid growth, as well as the availability of a complete set of barcoded gene deletion strains, facilitate systematic mapping of CGIs in this organism. This process involves two basic steps: first, screening chemical libraries to identify bioactive compounds affecting growth and, second, measuring the effects of these compounds on genome-wide collections of mutant strains. Here, we introduce protocols for both steps that have great potential for the discovery and development of new small-molecule tools and medicines. PMID:27587783

  11. Genetic substructure of Kuwaiti population reveals migration history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Alsmadi

    Full Text Available The State of Kuwait is characterized by settlers from Saudi Arabia, Iran, and other regions of the Arabian Peninsula. The settlements and subsequent admixtures have shaped the genetics of Kuwait. High prevalence of recessive disorders and metabolic syndromes (that increase risk of diabetes is seen in the peninsula. Understanding the genetic structure of its population will aid studies designed to decipher the underlying causes of these disorders. In this study, we analyzed 572,366 SNP markers from 273 Kuwaiti natives genotyped using the illumina HumanOmniExpress BeadChip. Model-based clustering identified three genetic subgroups with different levels of admixture. A high level of concordance (Mantel test, p=0.0001 for 9999 repeats was observed between the derived genetic clusters and the surname-based ancestries. Use of Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP data to understand admixtures in each group reveals the following: the first group (Kuwait P is largely of West Asian ancestry, representing Persians with European admixture; the second group (Kuwait S is predominantly of city-dwelling Saudi Arabian tribe ancestry, and the third group (Kuwait B includes most of the tent-dwelling Bedouin surnames and is characterized by the presence of 17% African ancestry. Identity by Descent and Homozygosity analyses find Kuwait's population to be heterogeneous (placed between populations that have large amount of ROH and the ones with low ROH with Kuwait S as highly endogamous, and Kuwait B as diverse. Population differentiation FST estimates place Kuwait P near Asian populations, Kuwait S near Negev Bedouin tribes, and Kuwait B near the Mozabite population. FST distances between the groups are in the range of 0.005 to 0.008; distances of this magnitude are known to cause false positives in disease association studies. Results of analysis for genetic features such as linkage disequilibrium decay patterns conform to Kuwait's geographical location at the nexus

  12. Prehistoric genomes reveal the genetic foundation and cost of horse domestication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Mikkel; Jáónsson, Hákon; Chang, Dan;

    2014-01-01

    genetics alone. We therefore sequenced two complete horse genomes, predating domestication by thousands of years, to characterize the genetic footprint of domestication. These ancient genomes reveal predomestic population structure and a significant fraction of genetic variation shared with the domestic...

  13. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Linneberg, Allan; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch; Fenger, Mogens; Dirksen, Asger; Vesterhauge, Søren; Werge, Thomas; Elberling, Jesper; Berg, Nikolaj Drimer

    2010-01-01

    study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding...

  14. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Berg Rasmussen, Henrik; Linneberg, Allan; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Fenger, Mogens; Dirksen, Asger; Vesterhauge, Søren; Werge, Thomas; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding...... compared in post hoc analyses with all individuals from the population sample (p=0.02). Genetic variants in paraoxonase 1 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase were not associated with MSC or with self-reported chemical sensitivity in the population sample. Our results suggest that variants in the genes...

  15. Microsatellite variability reveals high genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation in a critical giant panda population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiandong YANG; Zhihe ZHANG; Fujun SHEN; Xuyu YANG; Liang ZHANG; Limin CHEN; Wenping ZHANG; Qing ZHU; Rong HOU

    2011-01-01

    Understanding present patterns of genetic diversity is critical in order to design effective conservation and management strategies for endangered species.Tangjiahe Nature Reserve (NR) is one of the most important national reserves for giant pandas Ailuropoda melanoleuca in China.Previous studies have shown that giant pandas in Tangjiahe NR may be threatened by population decline and fragmentation.Here we used 10 microsatellite DNA markers to assess the genetic variability in the Tangjiahe population.The results indicate a low level of genetic differentiation between the Hongshihe and Motianling subpopulations in the reserve.Assignment tests using the Bayesian clustering method in STRUCTURE identified one genetic cluster from 42 individuals of the two subpopulations.All individuals from the same subpopulation were assigned to one cluster.This indicates high gene flow between subpopulations.F statistic analyses revealed a low Fls-value of 0.024 in the total population and implies a randomly mating population in Tangjiahe NR.Additionally,our data show a high level of genetic diversity for the Tangjiahe population.Mean allele number (A),Allelic richness (AR) and mean expected heterozygosity (HE) for the Tangiiahe population was 5.9,5.173 and 0.703,respectively.This wild giant panda population can be restored through concerted effort [Current Zoology 57 (6):717-724,2011].

  16. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Chemical Genetics of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyu Zu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical genetic studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs, rate-limiting enzymes in long chain fatty acid biosynthesis, have greatly advanced the understanding of their biochemistry and molecular biology and promoted the use of ACCs as targets for herbicides in agriculture and for development of drugs for diabetes, obesity and cancers. In mammals, ACCs have both biotin carboxylase (BC and carboxyltransferase (CT activity, catalyzing carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. Several classes of small chemicals modulate ACC activity, including cellular metabolites, natural compounds, and chemically synthesized products. This article reviews chemical genetic studies of ACCs and the use of ACCs for targeted therapy of cancers.

  18. Candida milleri species reveals intraspecific genetic and metabolic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; Antoniani, Davide; Roscini, Luca; Comasio, Andrea; Galafassi, Silvia; Picozzi, Claudia; Corte, Laura; Compagno, Concetta; Dal Bello, Fabio; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Foschino, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Candida milleri, together with Candida humilis, is the most representative yeast species found in type I sourdough ecosystems. In this work, comparison of the ITS region and the D1/D2 domain of 26S rDNA gene partial sequences, karyotyping, mtDNA-RFLP analysis, Intron Splice Site dispersion (ISS-PCR) and (GTG)5 microsatellite analyses, assimilation test of different carbohydrates, and metabolome assessment by FT-IR analysis, were investigated in seventeen strains isolated from four different companies as well as in type strains CBS6897(T) and CBS5658(T). Most isolates were ascribed to C. milleri, even if a strong relatedness was confirmed with C. humilis as well, particularly for three strains. Genetic characterization showed a high degree of intraspecific polymorphism since 12 different genotypes were discriminated. The number of chromosomes varied from 9 to 13 and their size ranged from less than 0.3 to over 2 Mbp. Phenotypic traits let to recognize 9 different profiles of carbon sources assimilation. FT-IR spectra from yeast cells cultivated in different media and collected at different growth phases revealed a diversity of behaviour among strains in accordance with the results of PCR-based fingerprinting. A clear evidence of the polymorphic status of C. milleri species is provided thus representing an important feature for the development of technological applications in bakery industries. PMID:24929720

  19. Genetic investigation within Lactococcus garvieae revealed two genomic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Ricci, Giovanni; Borgo, Francesca; Rollando, Alessandro; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2012-07-01

    The diversity of a collection of 49 Lactococcus garvieae strains, including isolates of dairy, fish, meat, vegetable and cereal origin, was explored using a molecular polyphasic approach comprising PCR-ribotyping, REP and RAPD-PCR analyses and a multilocus restriction typing (MLRT) carried out on six partial genes (atpA, tuf, dltA, als, gapC, and galP). This approach allowed high-resolution cluster analysis in which two major groups were distinguishable: one group included dairy isolates, the other group meat isolates. Unexpectedly, of the 12 strains coming from fish, four grouped with dairy isolates, whereas the others with meat isolates. Likewise, strains isolated from vegetables allocated between the two main groups. These findings revealed high variability within the species at both gene and genome levels. The observed genetic heterogeneity among L. garvieae strains was not entirely coherent with the ecological niche of origin of the strains, but rather supports the idea of an early separation of L. garvieae population into two independent genomic lineages. PMID:22568590

  20. New Genetic Susceptibility Factors for Sjögren's Syndrome Revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight on Research 2014 March 2014 (historical) New Genetic Susceptibility Factors for Sjögren’s Syndrome Revealed By analyzing ... syndrome. The findings, published in the journal Nature Genetics, could help researchers develop new strategies to diagnose ...

  1. Identifying Novel Cancer Therapies Using Chemical Genetics and Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Michelle; Fogley, Rachel; Zon, Leonard I

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genetics is the use of small molecules to perturb biological pathways. This technique is a powerful tool for implicating genes and pathways in developmental programs and disease, and simultaneously provides a platform for the discovery of novel therapeutics. The zebrafish is an advantageous model for in vivo high-throughput small molecule screening due to translational appeal, high fecundity, and a unique set of developmental characteristics that support genetic manipulation, chemical treatment, and phenotype detection. Chemical genetic screens in zebrafish can identify hit compounds that target oncogenic processes-including cancer initiation and maintenance, metastasis, and angiogenesis-and may serve as cancer therapies. Notably, by combining drug discovery and animal testing, in vivo screening of small molecules in zebrafish has enabled rapid translation of hit anti-cancer compounds to the clinic, especially through the repurposing of FDA-approved drugs. Future technological advancements in automation and high-powered imaging, as well as the development and characterization of new mutant and transgenic lines, will expand the scope of chemical genetics in zebrafish. PMID:27165351

  2. Landscape genetics reveals focal transmission of a human macroparasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D Criscione

    Full Text Available Macroparasite infections (e.g., helminths remain a major human health concern. However, assessing transmission dynamics is problematic because the direct observation of macroparasite dispersal among hosts is not possible. We used a novel landscape genetics approach to examine transmission of the human roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides in a small human population in Jiri, Nepal. Unexpectedly, we found significant genetic structuring of parasites, indicating the presence of multiple transmission foci within a small sampling area ( approximately 14 km(2. We analyzed several epidemiological variables, and found that transmission is spatially autocorrelated around households and that transmission foci are stable over time despite extensive human movement. These results would not have been obtainable via a traditional epidemiological study based on worm counts alone. Our data refute the assumption that a single host population corresponds to a single parasite transmission unit, an assumption implicit in many classic models of macroparasite transmission. Newer models have shown that the metapopulation-like pattern observed in our data can adversely affect targeted control strategies aimed at community-wide impacts. Furthermore, the observed metapopulation structure and local mating patterns generate an excess of homozygotes that can accelerate the spread of recessive traits such as drug resistance. Our study illustrates how molecular analyses complement traditional epidemiological information in providing a better understanding of parasite transmission. Similar landscape genetic approaches in other macroparasite systems will be warranted if an accurate depiction of the transmission process is to be used to inform effective control strategies.

  3. Genetic diversity revealed by AFLP markers in Albanian goat breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Anila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP technique with three EcoRI/TaqI primer combinations was used in 185 unrelated individuals, representative of 6 local goat breeds of Albania, and 107 markers were generated. The mean Nei’s expected heterozygosity value for the whole population was 0.199 and the mean Shannon index was 0.249, indicating a high level of within-breed diversity. Wright’s FST index, Nei’s unbiased genetic distance and Reynolds’ genetic distance were calculated. Pairwise Fst values among the populations ranged from 0.019 to 0.047. A highly significant average FST of 0.031 was estimated, showing a low level of breed subdivision. Most of the variation is accounted for by differences among individuals. Cluster analysis based on Reynolds’ genetic distance between breeds and PCA were performed. An individual UPGMA tree based on Jaccard’s similarity index showed clusters with individuals from all goat breeds. Analysis of population structure points to a high level of admixture among breeds.

  4. A fifth major genetic group among honeybees revealed in Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Alburaki, Mohamed; Bertrand, Bénédicte; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Alburaki, Ali; Sheppard, Walter Steven; Garnery, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Background Apiculture has been practiced in North Africa and the Middle-East from antiquity. Several thousand years of selective breeding have left a mosaic of Apis mellifera subspecies in the Middle-East, many uniquely adapted and survived to local environmental conditions. In this study we explore the genetic diversity of A. mellifera from Syria (n = 1258), Lebanon (n = 169) and Iraq (n = 35) based on 14 short tandem repeat (STR) loci in the context of reference populations from throughout ...

  5. The Evolution of Adenoviral Vectors through Genetic and Chemical Surface Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Capasso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges.

  6. The evolution of adenoviral vectors through genetic and chemical surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Cristian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Hirvinen, Mari; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2014-02-01

    A long time has passed since the first clinical trial with adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Despite being very promising, Ad vectors soon revealed their limitations in human clinical trials. The pre-existing immunity, the marked liver tropism and the high toxicity of first generation Ad (FG-Ad) vectors have been the main challenges for the development of new approaches. Significant effort toward the development of genetically and chemically modified adenoviral vectors has enabled researchers to create more sophisticated vectors for gene therapy, with an improved safety profile and a higher transduction ability of different tissues. In this review, we will describe the latest findings in the high-speed, evolving field of genetic and chemical modifications of adenoviral vectors, a field in which different disciplines, such as biomaterial research, virology and immunology, co-operate synergistically to create better gene therapy tools for modern challenges. PMID:24549268

  7. Genetic Algorithms for the Optimization of Catalysts in Chemical Engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holeňa, Martin

    Hong Kong : Newswood Limited, 2008, s. 969-974. ISBN 978-988-98671-0-2. - (Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science). [WCECS 2008. World Congress on Engineering and Computer Science. San Francisco (US), 22.10.2008-24.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/0802; GA ČR GEICC/08/E018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : genetic algorithms * chemical engineering * constrained optimization * mixed optimization * program generator Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  8. Ecological consequences, genetic and chemical variations in fragmented populations of a medicinal plant, justicia adhatoda and implications for its conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justicia adhatoda from Kohat Plateau was selected for genetic diversity studies, due to its fragmented habitat, importance in traditional and pharmaceutical medicine and a lack of population structure studies. We had two hypotheses: that habitat loss posed a greater threat to populations than loss of genetic diversity, and that chemical diversity would be higher among different populations than within populations. Genetic diversity within and among populations was evaluated using PBA (P450 based analogue) markers. AMOVA analysis revealed that there was higher genetic diversity within populations (90%) than among populations (10%). No genetic drift was observed, i.e., genetic diversity within populations was maintained despite fewer numbers of individuals in fragmented populations. Surveys of J. adhatoda populations revealed that they were growing in harsh conditions and were imperiled due to extensive harvesting for commercial and domestic purposes. Chemical diversity was evaluated by GC-MS (Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometry) analysis of 90% methanol and 1:2 chloroform:methanol extracts. GC-MS analysis of both the extracts showed nine and 18 chemical compounds, respectively, with higher chemical variations among populations. It is therefore recommended that efforts for the conservation of severely fragmented populations of J. adhatoda must be carried out along with sustainable harvesting. (author)

  9. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangjo [Bioinformatics Lab, Healthcare Group, SK Telecom, 9-1, Sunae-dong, Pundang-gu, Sungnam-si, Kyunggi-do 463-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minho [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyeshik [Department of Biological Science, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Miyoung [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corp., 8-11 Munpyeongseo-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Youn-Sig [Department of Applied Biology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hye-jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongsup [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Ook [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Inha University Hospital, 7-206 Sinheung-dong, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  10. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  11. The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Barrio, Alvaro; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Fan, Guangyi; Rafati, Nima; Pettersson, Mats; Zhang, He; Dainat, Jacques; Ekman, Diana; Höppner, Marc; Jern, Patric; Martin, Marcel; Nystedt, Björn; Liu, Xin; Chen, Wenbin; Liang, Xinming; Shi, Chengcheng; Fu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Kailong; Zhan, Xiao; Feng, Chungang; Gustafson, Ulla; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Sällman Almén, Markus; Blass, Martina; Casini, Michele; Folkvord, Arild; Laikre, Linda; Ryman, Nils; Ming-Yuen Lee, Simon; Xu, Xun; Andersson, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of reproduction. We identify almost 500 independent loci associated with a recent niche expansion from marine (Atlantic Ocean) to brackish waters (Baltic Sea), and more than 100 independent loci showing genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations irrespective of geographic origin. Our results show that both coding and non-coding changes contribute to adaptation. Haplotype blocks, often spanning multiple genes and maintained by selection, are associated with genetic differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12081.001 PMID:27138043

  12. The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Barrio, Alvaro; Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Fan, Guangyi; Rafati, Nima; Pettersson, Mats; Zhang, He; Dainat, Jacques; Ekman, Diana; Höppner, Marc; Jern, Patric; Martin, Marcel; Nystedt, Björn; Liu, Xin; Chen, Wenbin; Liang, Xinming; Shi, Chengcheng; Fu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Kailong; Zhan, Xiao; Feng, Chungang; Gustafson, Ulla; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Sällman Almén, Markus; Blass, Martina; Casini, Michele; Folkvord, Arild; Laikre, Linda; Ryman, Nils; Ming-Yuen Lee, Simon; Xu, Xun; Andersson, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of reproduction. We identify almost 500 independent loci associated with a recent niche expansion from marine (Atlantic Ocean) to brackish waters (Baltic Sea), and more than 100 independent loci showing genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations irrespective of geographic origin. Our results show that both coding and non-coding changes contribute to adaptation. Haplotype blocks, often spanning multiple genes and maintained by selection, are associated with genetic differentiation. PMID:27138043

  13. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Martins

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  14. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential. PMID:26580631

  15. Metabolomic profiling reveals deep chemical divergence between two morphotypes of the zoanthid Parazoanthus axinellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachet, Nadja; Genta-Jouve, Grégory; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Chevaldonné, Pierre; Sinniger, Frédéric; Culioli, Gérald; Pérez, Thierry; Thomas, Olivier P.

    2015-02-01

    Metabolomics has recently proven its usefulness as complementary tool to traditional morphological and genetic analyses for the classification of marine invertebrates. Among the metabolite-rich cnidarian order Zoantharia, Parazoanthus is a polyphyletic genus whose systematics and phylogeny remain controversial. Within this genus, one of the most studied species, Parazoanthus axinellae is prominent in rocky shallow waters of the Mediterranean Sea and the NE Atlantic Ocean. Although different morphotypes can easily be distinguished, only one species is recognized to date. Here, a metabolomic profiling approach has been used to assess the chemical diversity of two main Mediterranean morphotypes, the ``slender'' and ``stocky'' forms of P. axinellae. Targeted profiling of their major secondary metabolites revealed a significant chemical divergence between the morphotypes. While zoanthoxanthin alkaloids and ecdysteroids are abundant in both morphs, the ``slender'' morphotype is characterized by the presence of additional and bioactive 3,5-disubstituted hydantoin derivatives named parazoanthines. The absence of these specific compounds in the ``stocky'' morphotype was confirmed by spatial and temporal monitoring over an annual cycle. Moreover, specimens of the ``slender'' morphotype are also the only ones found as epibionts of several sponge species, particularly Cymbaxinella damicornis thus suggesting a putative ecological link.

  16. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora infestans populations in the Nordic European countries reveals high genetic variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brurberg, May Bente; Elameen, Abdelhameed; Le, Ving Hong;

    2011-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). The pathogen is highly adaptable and to get an overview of the genetic variation in the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden we have analyzed 200 isolates from...

  17. Epithelial structure revealed by chemical dissection and unembedded electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fey, E G; Capco, D G; Krochmalnic, G; Penman, S

    1984-01-01

    Cytoskeletal structures obtained after extraction of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell monolayers with Triton X-100 were examined in transmission electron micrographs of cell whole mounts and unembedded thick sections. The cytoskeleton, an ordered structure consisting of a peripheral plasma lamina, a complex network of filaments, and chromatin-containing nuclei, was revealed after extraction of intact cells with a nearly physiological buffer containing Triton X-100. The cytoskeleton w...

  18. At the brink of supercoloniality: genetic, behavioral and chemical assessments of population structure of the desert ant Cataglyphis niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eSaar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The nesting habits of ants play an important role in structuring ant populations. They vary from monodomy, a colony occupies a single nest, via polydomy, a colony occupies multiple adjacent nests, to supercoloniality, a colony spans over large territories comprising dozen to thousands nests without having any boundaries. The population structure of the desert ant Cataglyphis niger, previously considered to form supercolonies, was studied using genetic, chemical and behavioral tools in plots of 50x50 meters at two distinct populations. At the Palmahim site, the plot comprised 15 nests that according to the genetic analysis constituted three colonies. Likewise at the Rishon Leziyyon site 14 nests constituted 5 genetic colonies. In both sites, both chemical analysis and the behavioral (aggression tests confirmed the colony genetic architecture. The behavioral tests also revealed that aggression between colonies within a population was higher than that exhibited between colonies of different populations, suggesting the occurrence of the nasty neighbor phenomenon. In contrast to supercolony structure previously reported in another population of this species, the presently studied populations were composed of polydomous colonies. However, both the genetic and chemical data revealed that the inter-colonial differences between sites were larger than those within site, suggesting some within-site population viscosity. Thus, C. niger exhibits flexible nesting characteristics, from polydomy to supercoloniality, and can be considered at the brink of supercoloniality. We attribute the differences in population structure among sites to the intensity of intraspecific competition.

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Singh; Akshay Nag; Rajni Parmar; Sneha Ghosh; Brijmohan Singh Bhau; Ram Kumar Sharma

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis, is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (m : 3.37), low genetic differentiation (ST : 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  20. Systems genetics reveals key genetic elements of drought induced gene regulation in diploid potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Muijen, Dennis; Anithakumari, A M; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, C Gerard

    2016-09-01

    In plants, tolerance to drought stress is a result of numerous minor effect loci in which transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the observed phenotypes. Under severe drought conditions, a major expression quantitative trait loci hotspot was identified on chromosome five in potato. A putative Nuclear factor y subunit C4 was identified as key candidate in the regulatory cascade in response to drought. Further investigation of the eQTL hotspots suggests a role for a putative Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 in relation to drought in potato. Genes strongly co-expressed with Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 were plant growth regulators responsive to water deficit stress in Arabidopsis thaliana, implying a possible conserved mechanism. Integrative analysis of genetic, genomic, phenotypic and transcriptomic data provided insights in the downstream functional components of the drought response. The abscisic acid- and environmental stress-inducible protein TAS14 was highly induced by severe drought in potato and acts as a reliable biomarker for the level of stress perceived by the plant. The systems genetics approach supported a role for multiple genes responsive to severe drought stress of Solanum tuberosum. The combination of gene regulatory networks, expression quantitative trait loci mapping and phenotypic analysis proved useful for candidate gene selection. PMID:27353051

  1. Genetic variation in Phoca vitulina (the harbour seal) revealed by DNA fingerprinting and RAPDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappe, A.L.; van de Zande, L.; Vedder, E.J.; Bijlsma, R.; van Delden, Wilke

    1995-01-01

    Genetic variation in two harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) populations from the Dutch Wadden Sea and Scotland was examined by RAPD analysis and DNA fingerprinting. For comparison a population of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) was studied. The RAPD method revealed a very low number of polymorphic bands.

  2. Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    October M Sessions

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening acute disease throughout the tropical world. While drug development efforts are underway, there are concerns that resistant strains will emerge rapidly. Indeed, antiviral drugs that target even conserved regions in other RNA viruses lose efficacy over time as the virus mutates. Here, we sought to determine if there are regions in the DENV genome that are not only evolutionarily conserved but genetically constrained in their ability to mutate and could hence serve as better antiviral targets. High-throughput sequencing of DENV-1 genome directly from twelve, paired dengue patients' sera and then passaging these sera into the two primary mosquito vectors showed consistent and distinct sequence changes during infection. In particular, two residues in the NS5 protein coding sequence appear to be specifically acquired during infection in Ae. aegypti but not Ae. albopictus. Importantly, we identified a region within the NS3 protein coding sequence that is refractory to mutation during human and mosquito infection. Collectively, these findings provide fresh insights into antiviral targets and could serve as an approach to defining evolutionarily constrained regions for therapeutic targeting in other RNA viruses.

  3. Genetic diversity in Penaeus chinensis shrimp as revealed by RAPD technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄志猛; 石拓; 孔杰; 刘萍; 刘振辉; 孟宪红; 邓景耀

    2001-01-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was used to estimate genetic diversity in one successively cultivated stock and three wild stocks of Penaeus chinensis shrimp, two of which were collected from the spawning and wintering grounds in the west coast of Korean Peninsula, and one from the feeding ground in the China coast of the Yellow Sea. A random primer kit was employed to scan the genomic DNA in 20 individuals of each index stock. A total of 110 reproducible RAPD markers were obtained, 68.2 % of which showed a sound eonformability within all the individuals detected, implying that the genetic variability in P. chinensis is relatively low. The proportions of polymorphic loci among these four stocks ranged from 20% to 33.3%, while the degrees of genetic polymorphisms varied from 0.0093 to 0.0307. The genetic variability of inter-stocks was higher than that of intra-stock. The genetic diversity in different stocks differed from each other; that is, a less genetic differentiation in the spawning and wintering stocks from the west coast of Korean Peninsula was revealed and their genetic diversities were higher than that of the spawning stock in the Bohai Sea and the China coast of the Yellow Sea. As detected, the genetic diversity in the successively cultivated stock was the lowest among these four stocks. Through genetic distance analysis between a random pair of individuals, a dendrogram of the above-mentioned four stocks was constructed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. The results based on cluster analysis well fitted with the geographical distribution of P. chinensis in the Bohai and Yellow Seas.

  4. Identification of Chemical-Genetic Interactions via Parallel Analysis of Barcoded Yeast Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sundari; Schlecht, Ulrich; Xu, Weihong; Miranda, Molly; Davis, Ronald W; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; St Onge, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The Yeast Knockout Collection is a complete set of gene deletion strains for the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae In each strain, one of approximately 6000 open-reading frames is replaced with a dominant selectable marker flanked by two DNA barcodes. These barcodes, which are unique to each gene, allow the growth of thousands of strains to be individually measured from a single pooled culture. The collection, and other resources that followed, has ushered in a new era in chemical biology, enabling unbiased and systematic identification of chemical-genetic interactions (CGIs) with remarkable ease. CGIs link bioactive compounds to biological processes, and hence can reveal the mechanism of action of growth-inhibitory compounds in vivo, including those of antifungal, antibiotic, and anticancer drugs. The chemogenomic profiling method described here measures the sensitivity induced in yeast heterozygous and homozygous deletion strains in the presence of a chemical inhibitor of growth (termed haploinsufficiency profiling and homozygous profiling, respectively, or HIPHOP). The protocol is both scalable and amenable to automation. After competitive growth of yeast knockout collection cultures, with and without chemical inhibitors, CGIs can be identified and quantified using either array- or sequencing-based approaches as described here. PMID:27587778

  5. Identification of genetic and chemical modulators of zebrafish mechanosensory hair cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly N Owens

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Inner ear sensory hair cell death is observed in the majority of hearing and balance disorders, affecting the health of more than 600 million people worldwide. While normal aging is the single greatest contributor, exposure to environmental toxins and therapeutic drugs such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and antineoplastic agents are significant contributors. Genetic variation contributes markedly to differences in normal disease progression during aging and in susceptibility to ototoxic agents. Using the lateral line system of larval zebrafish, we developed an in vivo drug toxicity interaction screen to uncover genetic modulators of antibiotic-induced hair cell death and to identify compounds that confer protection. We have identified 5 mutations that modulate aminoglycoside susceptibility. Further characterization and identification of one protective mutant, sentinel (snl, revealed a novel conserved vertebrate gene. A similar screen identified a new class of drug-like small molecules, benzothiophene carboxamides, that prevent aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in zebrafish and in mammals. Testing for interaction with the sentinel mutation suggests that the gene and compounds may operate in different pathways. The combination of chemical screening with traditional genetic approaches is a new strategy for identifying drugs and drug targets to attenuate hearing and balance disorders.

  6. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  7. Microsatellite markers reveal genetic divergence among wild and cultured populations of Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, W W; Wang, D Q; Wang, C Y; Du, H; Wei, Q W

    2016-01-01

    Studies of genetic diversity and genetic population structure are critical for the conservation and management of endangered species. The Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus is a vulnerable monotypic species in China, which is at a risk of decline owing to fluctuations in effective population size and other demographic and environmental factors. We screened 11 microsatellite loci in 214 individuals to assess genetic differentiation in both wild and cultured populations. The single extant wild population had a higher number of alleles (13) than the cultured populations (average 7.3). High levels of genetic diversity, expressed as observed and expected heterozygosity (HO = 0.771, HE = 0.748, respectively), were found in both wild and cultured populations. We also report significant differentiation among wild and cultured populations (global FST = 0.023, P < 0.001). Both STRUCTURE analysis and neighbor-joining tree revealed three moderately divergent primary genetic clusters: the wild Yangtze population and the Sichuan population were each identified as an individual cluster, with the remaining populations clustered together. Twenty-two samples collected from the Yangtze River were assigned to the cultured population, demonstrating the efficacy of artificial propagation to avoid drastic reduction in the population size of M. asiaticus. These genetic data support the endangered status of the M. asiaticus and have implications for conservation management planning. PMID:27173283

  8. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Predisposition in a Large Family with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has become more widely used to reveal genetic defect in monogenic disorders. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, the leading cause of hereditary blindness worldwide, has been attributed to more than 67 disease-causing genes. Due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity, using general molecular screening alone is inadequate for identifying genetic predispositions in susceptible individuals. In order to identify underlying mutation rapidly, we utilized next-generation sequencing in a four-generation Chinese family with RP. Two affected patients and an unaffected sibling were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Through bioinformatics analysis and direct sequencing confirmation, we identified p.R135W transition in the rhodopsin gene. The mutation was subsequently confirmed to cosegregate with the disease in the family. In this study, our results suggest that whole exome sequencing is a robust method in diagnosing familial hereditary disease.

  9. Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium and prototrophic (minimal medium culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens and an important target.

  10. Genetic Code Evolution Reveals the Neutral Emergence of Mutational Robustness, and Information as an Evolutionary Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E. Massey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard genetic code (SGC is central to molecular biology and its origin and evolution is a fundamental problem in evolutionary biology, the elucidation of which promises to reveal much about the origins of life. In addition, we propose that study of its origin can also reveal some fundamental and generalizable insights into mechanisms of molecular evolution, utilizing concepts from complexity theory. The first is that beneficial traits may arise by non-adaptive processes, via a process of “neutral emergence”. The structure of the SGC is optimized for the property of error minimization, which reduces the deleterious impact of point mutations. Via simulation, it can be shown that genetic codes with error minimization superior to the SGC can emerge in a neutral fashion simply by a process of genetic code expansion via tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase duplication, whereby similar amino acids are added to codons related to that of the parent amino acid. This process of neutral emergence has implications beyond that of the genetic code, as it suggests that not all beneficial traits have arisen by the direct action of natural selection; we term these “pseudaptations”, and discuss a range of potential examples. Secondly, consideration of genetic code deviations (codon reassignments reveals that these are mostly associated with a reduction in proteome size. This code malleability implies the existence of a proteomic constraint on the genetic code, proportional to the size of the proteome (P, and that its reduction in size leads to an “unfreezing” of the codon – amino acid mapping that defines the genetic code, consistent with Crick’s Frozen Accident theory. The concept of a proteomic constraint may be extended to propose a general informational constraint on genetic fidelity, which may be used to explain variously, differences in mutation rates in genomes with differing proteome sizes, differences in DNA repair capacity and genome

  11. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models Reveal the Importance of Proteases as Drug Targets in Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Rachel E; Lu, Yongzhi; Tortorella, Micky D.; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    More than two decades of research has revealed a network of proteases that orchestrates cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. This network includes not only metalloproteinases that degrade the major macromolecules in cartilage, aggrecan and type II collagen, but also serine proteases and cysteine proteases, such as cathepsin K. The current review summarizes the role of proteases in osteoarthritis progression, based on studies in genetically engineered mouse models. In addition, a brief ove...

  12. Intestinal Origin of Sourdough Lactobacillus reuteri Isolates as Revealed by Phylogenetic, Genetic, and Physiological Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Oh, Phaik Lyn; Walter, Jens; Gänzle, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is both a gut symbiont and a stable member of sourdough microbiota. This study employed multilocus sequence analysis and an analysis of host-specific physiological and genetic traits to assign five sourdough isolates to rodent- or human-specific lineages. Comparative genome hybridization revealed that the model sourdough isolate LTH2584 had a genome content very similar to that of the model rodent isolate 100-23. These results demonstrate that sourdough isolates of L. re...

  13. Population genetics of Sargassum horneri (Fucales, Phaeophyta) in China revealed by ISSR and SRAP markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shenhui; Chong, Zhuo; Zhao, Fengjuan; Yao, Jianting; Duan, Delin

    2013-05-01

    Sargassum horneri is a common brown macro-alga that is found in the inter-tidal ecosystems of China. To investigate the current status of seaweed resources and provide basic data for its sustainable development, ISSR (inter simple sequence repeat) and SRAP (sequence related amplified polymorphism) markers were used to analyze the population genetics among nine natural populations of S. horneri. The nine studied populations were distributed over 2 000 km from northeast to south China. The percentage of polymorphic loci P % (ISSR, 99.44%; SRAP, 100.00%), Nei's genetic diversity H (ISSR, 0.107-0.199; SRAP, 0.100-0.153), and Shannon's information index I (ISSR, 0.157-0.291; SRAP, 0.148-0.219) indicated a fair amount of genetic variability among the nine populations. Moreover, the high degree of gene differentiation G st (ISSR, 0.654; SRAP, 0.718) and low gene flow N m (ISSR, 0.265; SRAP, 0.196) implied that there was significant among-population differentiation, possibly as a result of habitat fragmentation. The matrices of genetic distances and fixation indices ( F st) among the populations correlated well with their geographical distribution (Mantel test R =0.541 5, 0.541 8; P =0.005 0, 0.002 0 and R =0.728 6, 0.641 2; P =0.001 0, 0.001 0, respectively); the Rongcheng population in the Shandong peninsula was the only exception. Overall, the genetic differentiation agreed with the geographic isolation. The fair amount of genetic diversity that was revealed in the S. horneri populations in China indicated that the seaweed resources had not been seriously affected by external factors.

  14. Chemical inhibition of RNA viruses reveals REDD1 as a host defense factor

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel A. Mata; Satterly, Neal; Versteeg, Gijs A.; Frantz, Doug; Wei, Shuguang; Williams, Noelle; Schmolke, Mirco; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Brugarolas, James; Forst, Christian V.; White, Michael A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Roth, Michael G.; Fontoura, Beatriz M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A chemical genetics approach was taken to identify inhibitors of NS1, a major influenza A virus virulence factor that inhibits host gene expression. A high-throughput screen of 200,000 synthetic compounds identified small molecules that reversed NS1-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. A counterscreen for suppression of influenza virus cytotoxicity identified naphthalimides that inhibited replication of influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The mechanism of action occu...

  15. Chemical Inhibition of RNA Viruses Reveals REDD1 as Host Defense Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel A. Mata; Satterly, Neal; Versteeg, Gijs A.; Frantz, Doug; Wei, Shuguang; Williams, Noelle; Schmolke, Mirco; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Brugarolas, James; Forst, Christian; White, Michael A.; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Roth, Michael G.; Fontoura, Beatriz M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A chemical genetics approach was taken to identify inhibitors of NS1, a major influenza A virus virulence factor that inhibits host gene expression. A high-throughput screen of 200,000 synthetic compounds identified small molecules that reverted NS1-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. A counter-screen for suppression of influenza virus cytotoxicity identified naphthalimides that inhibited replication of influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. The mechanism of action was throu...

  16. Genetic triple dissociation reveals multiple roles for dopamine in reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael J; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Haughey, Heather M; Curran, Tim; Hutchison, Kent E

    2007-10-01

    What are the genetic and neural components that support adaptive learning from positive and negative outcomes? Here, we show with genetic analyses that three independent dopaminergic mechanisms contribute to reward and avoidance learning in humans. A polymorphism in the DARPP-32 gene, associated with striatal dopamine function, predicted relatively better probabilistic reward learning. Conversely, the C957T polymorphism of the DRD2 gene, associated with striatal D2 receptor function, predicted the degree to which participants learned to avoid choices that had been probabilistically associated with negative outcomes. The Val/Met polymorphism of the COMT gene, associated with prefrontal cortical dopamine function, predicted participants' ability to rapidly adapt behavior on a trial-to-trial basis. These findings support a neurocomputational dissociation between striatal and prefrontal dopaminergic mechanisms in reinforcement learning. Computational maximum likelihood analyses reveal independent gene effects on three reinforcement learning parameters that can explain the observed dissociations. PMID:17913879

  17. The Nature of Genetic Variation for Complex Traits Revealed by GWAS and Regional Heritability Mapping Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Armando; Tenesa, Albert; Keightley, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    We use computer simulations to investigate the amount of genetic variation for complex traits that can be revealed by single-SNP genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or regional heritability mapping (RHM) analyses based on full genome sequence data or SNP chips. We model a large population subject to mutation, recombination, selection, and drift, assuming a pleiotropic model of mutations sampled from a bivariate distribution of effects of mutations on a quantitative trait and fitness. The pleiotropic model investigated, in contrast to previous models, implies that common mutations of large effect are responsible for most of the genetic variation for quantitative traits, except when the trait is fitness itself. We show that GWAS applied to the full sequence increases the number of QTL detected by as much as 50% compared to the number found with SNP chips but only modestly increases the amount of additive genetic variance explained. Even with full sequence data, the total amount of additive variance explained is generally below 50%. Using RHM on the full sequence data, a slightly larger number of QTL are detected than by GWAS if the same probability threshold is assumed, but these QTL explain a slightly smaller amount of genetic variance. Our results also suggest that most of the missing heritability is due to the inability to detect variants of moderate effect (∼0.03-0.3 phenotypic SDs) segregating at substantial frequencies. Very rare variants, which are more difficult to detect by GWAS, are expected to contribute little genetic variation, so their eventual detection is less relevant for resolving the missing heritability problem. PMID:26482794

  18. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS.

  19. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle R; Brower, Meredith A; Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O

    2015-08-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS. PMID:26305227

  20. Time-series analysis reveals genetic responses to intensive management of razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Thomas E; Turner, Thomas F; Carson, Evan W; Saltzgiver, Melody J; Adams, Deborah; Kesner, Brian; Marsh, Paul C

    2014-03-01

    Time-series analysis is used widely in ecology to study complex phenomena and may have considerable potential to clarify relationships of genetic and demographic processes in natural and exploited populations. We explored the utility of this approach to evaluate population responses to management in razorback sucker, a long-lived and fecund, but declining freshwater fish species. A core population in Lake Mohave (Arizona-Nevada, USA) has experienced no natural recruitment for decades and is maintained by harvesting naturally produced larvae from the lake, rearing them in protective custody, and repatriating them at sizes less vulnerable to predation. Analyses of mtDNA and 15 microsatellites characterized for sequential larval cohorts collected over a 15-year time series revealed no changes in geographic structuring but indicated significant increase in mtDNA diversity for the entire population over time. Likewise, ratios of annual effective breeders to annual census size (N b /N a) increased significantly despite sevenfold reduction of N a. These results indicated that conservation actions diminished near-term extinction risk due to genetic factors and should now focus on increasing numbers of fish in Lake Mohave to ameliorate longer-term risks. More generally, time-series analysis permitted robust testing of trends in genetic diversity, despite low precision of some metrics. PMID:24665337

  1. Genetic structure along an elevational gradient in Hawaiian honeycreepers reveals contrasting evolutionary responses to avian malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Patrick J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae are one of the best-known examples of an adaptive radiation, but their persistence today is threatened by the introduction of exotic pathogens and their vector, the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Historically, species such as the amakihi (Hemignathus virens, the apapane (Himatione sanguinea, and the iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea were found from the coastal lowlands to the high elevation forests, but by the late 1800's they had become extremely rare in habitats below 900 m. Recently, however, populations of amakihi and apapane have been observed in low elevation habitats. We used twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate patterns of genetic structure, and to infer responses of these species to introduced avian malaria along an elevational gradient on the eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Results Our results indicate that amakihi have genetically distinct, spatially structured populations that correspond with altitude. We detected very few apapane and no iiwi in low-elevation habitats, and genetic results reveal only minimal differentiation between populations at different altitudes in either of these species. Conclusion Our results suggest that amakihi populations in low elevation habitats have not been recolonized by individuals from mid or high elevation refuges. After generations of strong selection for pathogen resistance, these populations have rebounded and amakihi have become common in regions in which they were previously rare or absent.

  2. Genetic structure along an elevational gradient in Hawaiian honeycreepers reveals contrasting evolutionary responses to avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, L.S.; Terwilliger, L.A.; Woodworth, B.L.; Hart, P.J.; Palmer, D.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background. The Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) are one of the best-known examples of an adaptive radiation, but their persistence today is threatened by the introduction of exotic pathogens and their vector, the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Historically, species such as the amakihi (Hemignathus virens), the apapane (Himatione sanguinea), and the iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) were found from the coastal lowlands to the high elevation forests, but by the late 1800's they had become extremely rare in habitats below 900 m. Recently, however, populations of amakihi and apapane have been observed in low elevation habitats. We used twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci to investigate patterns of genetic structure, and to infer responses of these species to introduced avian malaria along an elevational gradient on the eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Results. Our results indicate that amakihi have genetically distinct, spatially structured populations that correspond with altitude. We detected very few apapane and no iiwi in low-elevation habitats, and genetic results reveal only minimal differentiation between populations at different altitudes in either of these species. Conclusion. Our results suggest that amakihi populations in low elevation habitats have not been recolonized by individuals from mid or high elevation refuges. After generations of strong selection for pathogen resistance, these populations have rebounded and amakihi have become common in regions in which they were previously rare or absent. ?? 2008 Eggert et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. Genomic view of bipolar disorder revealed by whole genome sequencing in a genetic isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Georgi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA reveals genetic structuring of Pinna nobilis across the Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sanna

    Full Text Available Pinna nobilis is the largest endemic Mediterranean marine bivalve. During past centuries, various human activities have promoted the regression of its populations. As a consequence of stringent standards of protection, demographic expansions are currently reported in many sites. The aim of this study was to provide the first large broad-scale insight into the genetic variability of P. nobilis in the area that encompasses the western Mediterranean, Ionian Sea, and Adriatic Sea marine ecoregions. To accomplish this objective twenty-five populations from this area were surveyed using two mitochondrial DNA markers (COI and 16S. Our dataset was then merged with those obtained in other studies for the Aegean and Tunisian populations (eastern Mediterranean, and statistical analyses (Bayesian model-based clustering, median-joining network, AMOVA, mismatch distribution, Tajima's and Fu's neutrality tests and Bayesian skyline plots were performed. The results revealed genetic divergence among three distinguishable areas: (1 western Mediterranean and Ionian Sea; (2 Adriatic Sea; and (3 Aegean Sea and Tunisian coastal areas. From a conservational point of view, populations from the three genetically divergent groups found may be considered as different management units.

  5. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. Howard B. Lieberman

    2001-05-11

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage.

  6. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage

  7. Genetic effects of combined chemical-X-ray treatments in male mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have shown that the yield of genetic damage induced by radiation in male mouse germ cells can be modified by chemical treatments. Pre-treatments with radio-protecting agents have given contradictory results but this appears to be largely attributable to the different germ cell stages tested and dependent upon the level of radiation damage induced. Pre-treatments which enhance the yield of genetic damage have been reported although, as yet, no tests have been conducted with radio-sensitizers. Another form of interaction between chemicals and radiation is specifically found with spermatogonial stem cells. Chemicals that kill cells can, by population depletion, substantially and predictably modify the genetic response to subsequent radiation exposure over a period of several days, or even weeks. Enhancement and reduction in the genetic yield can be attained, dependent upon the interval between treatments, with the modification also varying with the type of genetic damage scored. Post-treatment with one chemical (TEM) has been shown to reduce the genetic response to radiation exposure. (author)

  8. Genetic introgression and species boundary of two geographically overlapping pine species revealed by molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Defang; Xia, Tao; Yan, Maomao; Dai, Xiaogang; Xu, Jin; Li, Shuxian; Yin, Tongming

    2014-01-01

    Gene introgression and hybrid barriers have long been a major focus of studies of geographically overlapping species. Two pine species, Pinus massoniana and P. hwangshanensis, are frequently observed growing adjacent to each other, where they overlap in a narrow hybrid zone. As a consequence, these species constitute an ideal system for studying genetic introgression and reproductive barriers between naturally hybridizing, adjacently distributed species. In this study, we sampled 270 pine trees along an elevation gradient in Anhui Province, China and analyzed these samples using EST-SSR markers. The molecular data revealed that direct gene flow between the two species was fairly low, and that the majority of gene introgression was intermediated by backcrossing. On the basis of empirical observation, the on-site distribution of pines was divided into a P. massoniana zone, a hybrid zone, and a P. hwangshanensis zone. STRUCTURE analysis revealed the existence of a distinct species boundary between the two pine species. The genetic boundary of the hybrid zone, on the other hand, was indistinct owing to intensive backcrossing with parental species. Compared with P. massoniana, P. hwangshanensis was found to backcross with the hybrids more intensively, consistent with the observation that morphological and anatomical characteristics of trees in the contact zone were biased towards P. hwangshanensis. The introgression ability of amplified alleles varied across species, with some being completely blocked from interspecific introgression. Our study has provided a living example to help explain the persistence of adjacently distributed species coexisting with their interfertile hybrids. PMID:24977711

  9. Genetic introgression and species boundary of two geographically overlapping pine species revealed by molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defang Zhang

    Full Text Available Gene introgression and hybrid barriers have long been a major focus of studies of geographically overlapping species. Two pine species, Pinus massoniana and P. hwangshanensis, are frequently observed growing adjacent to each other, where they overlap in a narrow hybrid zone. As a consequence, these species constitute an ideal system for studying genetic introgression and reproductive barriers between naturally hybridizing, adjacently distributed species. In this study, we sampled 270 pine trees along an elevation gradient in Anhui Province, China and analyzed these samples using EST-SSR markers. The molecular data revealed that direct gene flow between the two species was fairly low, and that the majority of gene introgression was intermediated by backcrossing. On the basis of empirical observation, the on-site distribution of pines was divided into a P. massoniana zone, a hybrid zone, and a P. hwangshanensis zone. STRUCTURE analysis revealed the existence of a distinct species boundary between the two pine species. The genetic boundary of the hybrid zone, on the other hand, was indistinct owing to intensive backcrossing with parental species. Compared with P. massoniana, P. hwangshanensis was found to backcross with the hybrids more intensively, consistent with the observation that morphological and anatomical characteristics of trees in the contact zone were biased towards P. hwangshanensis. The introgression ability of amplified alleles varied across species, with some being completely blocked from interspecific introgression. Our study has provided a living example to help explain the persistence of adjacently distributed species coexisting with their interfertile hybrids.

  10. A Chemical-Genomic Screen of Neglected Antibiotics Reveals Illicit Transport of Kasugamycin and Blasticidin S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiver, Anthony L; Osadnik, Hendrik; Kritikos, George; Li, Bo; Krogan, Nevan; Typas, Athanasios; Gross, Carol A

    2016-06-01

    Fighting antibiotic resistance requires a deeper understanding of the genetic factors that determine the antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria. Here we describe a chemical-genomic screen in Escherichia coli K-12 that was designed to discover new aspects of antibiotic resistance by focusing on a set of 26 antibiotics and other stresses with poorly characterized mode-of-action and determinants of resistance. We show that the screen identifies new resistance determinants for these antibiotics including a common signature from two antimicrobials, kasugamycin and blasticidin S, used to treat crop diseases like rice blast and fire blight. Following this signature, we further investigated the mechanistic basis for susceptibility to kasugamycin and blasticidin S in E. coli using both genetic and biochemical approaches. We provide evidence that these compounds hijack an overlapping set of peptide ABC-importers to enter the bacterial cell. Loss of uptake may be an underappreciated mechanism for the development of kasugamycin resistance in bacterial plant pathogens. PMID:27355376

  11. A Chemical-Genomic Screen of Neglected Antibiotics Reveals Illicit Transport of Kasugamycin and Blasticidin S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Shiver

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fighting antibiotic resistance requires a deeper understanding of the genetic factors that determine the antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria. Here we describe a chemical-genomic screen in Escherichia coli K-12 that was designed to discover new aspects of antibiotic resistance by focusing on a set of 26 antibiotics and other stresses with poorly characterized mode-of-action and determinants of resistance. We show that the screen identifies new resistance determinants for these antibiotics including a common signature from two antimicrobials, kasugamycin and blasticidin S, used to treat crop diseases like rice blast and fire blight. Following this signature, we further investigated the mechanistic basis for susceptibility to kasugamycin and blasticidin S in E. coli using both genetic and biochemical approaches. We provide evidence that these compounds hijack an overlapping set of peptide ABC-importers to enter the bacterial cell. Loss of uptake may be an underappreciated mechanism for the development of kasugamycin resistance in bacterial plant pathogens.

  12. Partitioning the Heritability of Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reveals Differences in Genetic Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lea K.; Yu, Dongmei; Keenan, Clare L.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Derks, Eske M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Yang, Jian; Lee, S. Hong; Evans, Patrick; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrio, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, Oscar J.; Bloch, Michael H.; Blom, Rianne M.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond; Cappi, Carolina; Cardona Silgado, Julio C.; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Conti, David V.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette A.; Deforce, Dieter; Delorme, Richard; Dion, Yves; Edlund, Christopher K.; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Haddad, Stephen; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Hounie, Ana G.; Illmann, Cornelia; Jankovic, Joseph; Jenike, Michael A.; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Macciardi, Fabio; McCracken, James T.; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias J.; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosàrio, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, E.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; McMahon, William; Wagner, Michael; Nicolini, Humberto; Posthuma, Danielle; Hanna, Gregory L.; Heutink, Peter; Denys, Damiaan; Arnold, Paul D.; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Wray, Naomi R.

    2013-01-01

    The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA) has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS), using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12) for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07) for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum) for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002). These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed) from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures. PMID:24204291

  13. Partitioning the heritability of Tourette syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder reveals differences in genetic architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea K Davis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and Tourette Syndrome (TS, using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12 for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07 for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs. Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002. These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures.

  14. Rangewide genetic analysis of Lesser Prairie-Chicken reveals population structure, range expansion, and possible introgression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; DeYoung, Randall W; Fike, Jennifer; Hagen, Christian A.; Johnson, Jeff A.; Larsson, Lena C; Patten, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) has been markedly reduced due to loss and fragmentation of habitat. Portions of the historical range, however, have been recolonized and even expanded due to planting of conservation reserve program (CRP) fields that provide favorable vegetation structure for Lesser Prairie-Chickens. The source population(s) feeding the range expansion is unknown, yet has resulted in overlap between Lesser and Greater Prairie-Chickens (T. cupido) increasing the potential for hybridization. Our objectives were to characterize connectivity and genetic diversity among populations, identify source population(s) of recent range expansion, and examine hybridization with the Greater Prairie-Chicken. We analyzed 640 samples from across the range using 13 microsatellites. We identified three to four populations corresponding largely to ecoregions. The Shinnery Oak Prairie and Sand Sagebrush Prairie represented genetically distinct populations (F ST > 0.034 and F ST > 0.023 respectively). The Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic and Mixed Grass ecoregions appeared admixed (F ST = 0.009). Genetic diversity was similar among ecoregions and N e ranged from 142 (95 % CI 99–236) for the Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic to 296 (95 % CI 233–396) in the Mixed Grass Prairie. No recent migration was detected among ecoregions, except asymmetric dispersal from both the Mixed Grass Prairie and to a lesser extent the Sand Sagebrush Prairie north into adjacent Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic (m = 0.207, 95 % CI 0.116–0.298, m = 0.097, 95 % CI 0.010–0.183, respectively). Indices investigating potential hybridization in the Shortgrass/CRP Mosaic revealed that six of the 13 individuals with hybrid phenotypes were significantly admixed suggesting hybridization. Continued monitoring of diversity within and among ecoregions is warranted as are actions promoting genetic connectivity and range expansion.

  15. Genetic variation of human papillomavirus type 16 in individual clinical specimens revealed by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Kukimoto

    Full Text Available Viral genetic diversity within infected cells or tissues, called viral quasispecies, has been mostly studied for RNA viruses, but has also been described among DNA viruses, including human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 present in cervical precancerous lesions. However, the extent of HPV genetic variation in cervical specimens, and its involvement in HPV-induced carcinogenesis, remains unclear. Here, we employ deep sequencing to comprehensively analyze genetic variation in the HPV16 genome isolated from individual clinical specimens. Through overlapping full-circle PCR, approximately 8-kb DNA fragments covering the whole HPV16 genome were amplified from HPV16-positive cervical exfoliated cells collected from patients with either low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL or invasive cervical cancer (ICC. Deep sequencing of the amplified HPV16 DNA enabled de novo assembly of the full-length HPV16 genome sequence for each of 7 specimens (5 LSIL and 2 ICC samples. Subsequent alignment of read sequences to the assembled HPV16 sequence revealed that 2 LSILs and 1 ICC contained nucleotide variations within E6, E1 and the non-coding region between E5 and L2 with mutation frequencies of 0.60% to 5.42%. In transient replication assays, a novel E1 mutant found in ICC, E1 Q381E, showed reduced ability to support HPV16 origin-dependent replication. In addition, partially deleted E2 genes were detected in 1 LSIL sample in a mixed state with the intact E2 gene. Thus, the methods used in this study provide a fundamental framework for investigating the influence of HPV somatic genetic variation on cervical carcinogenesis.

  16. Genetic basis of hidden phenotypic variation revealed by increased translational readthrough in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorossadat Torabi

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic release factors 1 and 3, encoded by SUP45 and SUP35, respectively, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are required for translation termination. Recent studies have shown that, besides these two key factors, several genetic and epigenetic mechanisms modulate the efficiency of translation termination. These mechanisms, through modifying translation termination fidelity, were shown to affect various cellular processes, such as mRNA degradation, and in some cases could confer a beneficial phenotype to the cell. The most studied example of such a mechanism is [PSI+], the prion conformation of Sup35p, which can have pleiotropic effects on growth that vary among different yeast strains. However, genetic loci underlying such readthrough-dependent, background-specific phenotypes have yet to be identified. Here, we used sup35(C653R, a partial loss-of-function allele of the SUP35 previously shown to increase readthrough of stop codons and recapitulate some [PSI+]-dependent phenotypes, to study the genetic basis of phenotypes revealed by increased translational readthrough in two divergent yeast strains: BY4724 (a laboratory strain and RM11_1a (a wine strain. We first identified growth conditions in which increased readthrough of stop codons by sup35(C653R resulted in different growth responses between these two strains. We then used a recently developed linkage mapping technique, extreme QTL mapping (X-QTL, to identify readthrough-dependent loci for the observed growth differences. We further showed that variation in SKY1, an SR protein kinase, underlies a readthrough-dependent locus observed for growth on diamide and hydrogen peroxide. We found that the allelic state of SKY1 interacts with readthrough level and the genetic background to determine growth rate in these two conditions.

  17. Quantum chemical calculations to reveal the relationship between the chemical structure and the fluorescence characteristics of phenylquinolinylethynes and phenylisoquinolinylethynes derivatives, and to predict their relative fluorescence intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Siavash; Beheshti, Abolghasem; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz

    2009-12-01

    In this paper the relationship between the chemical structure and fluorescence characteristics of 30 phenylquinolinylethyne (PhQE), and phenylisoquinolinylethyne (PhIE) derivatives compounds employing ab initio calculations have been elucidated. Quantum chemical calculations (6-31G) were carried out to obtain: the optimized geometry, energy levels, charges and dipole moments of these compounds, in the singlet (steady and excited states) and triplet states. The relationship between quantum chemical descriptors, and wavelength of maximum excitation and emission indicated that these two parameters have the most correlation with quantum chemical hardness (eta). Also, stokes shift has the most correlation with the square of difference between the maximum of positive charges in the singlet steady and singlet excited states. The quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) of PhQE and PhIE was studied for relative fluorescence intensity (RFI). The genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to select the variables that resulted in the best-fit models. After the variable selection, multiple linear regression (MLR) and support vector machine (SVM) were both utilized to construct linear and non-linear QSPR models, respectively. The SVM model demonstrated a better performance than that of the MLR model. The route mean square error (RMSE) in the training and the test sets for the SVM model was 0.195 and 0.324, and the correlation coefficients were 0.965 and 0.960, respectively, thus revealing the reliability of this model. The resulting data indicated that SVM could be used as a powerful modeling tool for QSPR studies. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on QSPR studies to predict RFI for a series of PhQE and PhIE derivative compounds using SVM. PMID:19854100

  18. Linking tumor mutations to drug responses via a quantitative chemical-genetic interaction map

    OpenAIRE

    Maria M. Martins; Zhou, Alicia Y.; Corella, Alexandra; Horiuchi, Dai; Yau, Christina; Rakshandehroo, Taha; Gordan, John D; Levin, Rebecca S.; Johnson, Jeff; Jascur, John; Shales, Mike; Sorrentino, Antonio; Cheah, Jaime; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need in oncology to link molecular aberrations in tumors with therapeutics that can be administered in a personalized fashion. One approach identifies synthetic-lethal genetic interactions or dependencies that cancer cells acquire in the presence of specific mutations. Using engineered isogenic cells, we generated a systematic and quantitative chemical-genetic interaction map that charts the influence of 51 aberrant cancer genes on 90 drug responses. The dataset strongly pr...

  19. Prediction of Synergism from Chemical-Genetic Interactions by Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenhain, Jan; Spitzer, Michaela; Dolma, Sonam; Jarvik, Nick; White, Rachel; Roy, Marcia; Griffiths, Emma; Bellows, David S; Wright, Gerard D; Tyers, Mike

    2015-12-23

    The structure of genetic interaction networks predicts that, analogous to synthetic lethal interactions between non-essential genes, combinations of compounds with latent activities may exhibit potent synergism. To test this hypothesis, we generated a chemical-genetic matrix of 195 diverse yeast deletion strains treated with 4,915 compounds. This approach uncovered 1,221 genotype-specific inhibitors, which we termed cryptagens. Synergism between 8,128 structurally disparate cryptagen pairs was assessed experimentally and used to benchmark predictive algorithms. A model based on the chemical-genetic matrix and the genetic interaction network failed to accurately predict synergism. However, a combined random forest and Naive Bayesian learner that associated chemical structural features with genotype-specific growth inhibition had strong predictive power. This approach identified previously unknown compound combinations that exhibited species-selective toxicity toward human fungal pathogens. This work demonstrates that machine learning methods trained on unbiased chemical-genetic interaction data may be widely applicable for the discovery of synergistic combinations in different species. PMID:27136353

  20. Chemical-genetic profile analysis of five inhibitory compounds in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamgir Md

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical-genetic profiling of inhibitory compounds can lead to identification of their modes of action. These profiles can help elucidate the complex interactions between small bioactive compounds and the cell machinery, and explain putative gene function(s. Results Colony size reduction was used to investigate the chemical-genetic profile of cycloheximide, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, paromomycin, streptomycin and neomycin in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These compounds target the process of protein biosynthesis. More than 70,000 strains were analyzed from the array of gene deletion mutant yeast strains. As expected, the overall profiles of the tested compounds were similar, with deletions for genes involved in protein biosynthesis being the major category followed by metabolism. This implies that novel genes involved in protein biosynthesis could be identified from these profiles. Further investigations were carried out to assess the activity of three profiled genes in the process of protein biosynthesis using relative fitness of double mutants and other genetic assays. Conclusion Chemical-genetic profiles provide insight into the molecular mechanism(s of the examined compounds by elucidating their potential primary and secondary cellular target sites. Our follow-up investigations into the activity of three profiled genes in the process of protein biosynthesis provided further evidence concerning the usefulness of chemical-genetic analyses for annotating gene functions. We termed these genes TAE2, TAE3 and TAE4 for translation associated elements 2-4.

  1. Design and optimization of pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI using a multiobjective genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimaru, Eriko S.; Randtke, Edward A.; Pagel, Mark D.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI experimental parameters and RF saturation pulse shapes were optimized using a multiobjective genetic algorithm. The optimization was carried out for RF saturation duty cycles of 50% and 90%, and results were compared to continuous wave saturation and Gaussian waveform. In both simulation and phantom experiments, continuous wave saturation performed the best, followed by parameters and shapes optimized by the genetic algorithm and then followed by Gaussian waveform. We have successfully demonstrated that the genetic algorithm is able to optimize pulse CEST parameters and that the results are translatable to clinical scanners.

  2. The chemical structure of the ZnO/SiC heterointerface as revealed by electron spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZnO layers were deposited on 6H-SiC single crystalline wafers by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The chemical structure of the ZnO/SiC interface was studied by x-ray photoelectron and x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. A complex chemical structure, involving not only silicon–carbon and zinc–oxygen bonds but also silicon–oxygen and zinc–silicon–oxygen bonds was revealed to form at the ZnO/SiC interface. Based on the comparison with the presumably inert (i.e. chemically abrupt) ZnO/Mo interface, it was concluded that a willemite-like zinc silicate (i.e. Zn2SiO4) interface species develops between ZnO and SiC. The presence of this species at the ZnO/SiC interface will affect the electronic structure of the heterojunction and thus needs to be considered for device optimization. (paper)

  3. Analysis of small nucleolar RNAs reveals unique genetic features in malaria parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Amit

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosome biogenesis is an energy consuming and stringently controlled process that involves hundreds of trans-acting factors. Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs, important components of ribosome biogenesis are non-coding guide RNAs involved in rRNA processing, nucleotide modifications like 2'-O-ribose methylation, pseudouridylation and possibly gene regulation. snoRNAs are ubiquitous and are diverse in their genomic organization, mechanism of transcription and process of maturation. In vertebrates, most snoRNAs are present in introns of protein coding genes and are processed by exonucleolytic cleavage, while in plants they are transcribed as polycistronic transcripts. Results This is a comprehensive analysis of malaria parasite snoRNA genes and proteins that have a role in ribosomal biogenesis. Computational and experimental approaches have been used to identify several box C/D snoRNAs from different species of Plasmodium and confirm their expression. Our analyses reveal that the gene for endoribonuclease Rnt1 is absent from Plasmodium falciparum genome, which indicates the existence of alternative pre-rRNA processing pathways. The structural features of box C/D snoRNAs are highly conserved in Plasmodium genus; however, unlike other organisms most parasite snoRNAs are present in single copy. The genomic localization of parasite snoRNAs shows mixed patterns of those observed in plants, yeast and vertebrates. We have localized parasite snoRNAs in untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs, and this is an unprecedented and novel genetic feature. Akin to mammalian snoRNAs, those in Plasmodium may also behave as mobile genetic elements. Conclusion This study provides a comprehensive overview on trans-acting genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and also a genetic insight into malaria parasite snoRNA genes.

  4. Genetic patterns in European geometrid moths revealed by the Barcode Index Number (BIN system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Hausmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The geometrid moths of Europe are one of the best investigated insect groups in traditional taxonomy making them an ideal model group to test the accuracy of the Barcode Index Number (BIN system of BOLD (Barcode of Life Datasystems, a method that supports automated, rapid species delineation and identification. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study provides a DNA barcode library for 219 of the 249 European geometrid moth species (88% in five selected subfamilies. The data set includes COI sequences for 2130 specimens. Most species (93% were found to possess diagnostic barcode sequences at the European level while only three species pairs (3% were genetically indistinguishable in areas of sympatry. As a consequence, 97% of the European species we examined were unequivocally discriminated by barcodes within their natural areas of distribution. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BINs and traditionally recognized species for 67% of these species. Another 17% of the species (15 pairs, three triads shared BINs, while specimens from the remaining species (18% were divided among two or more BINs. Five of these species are mixtures, both sharing and splitting BINs. For 82% of the species with two or more BINs, the genetic splits involved allopatric populations, many of which have previously been hypothesized to represent distinct species or subspecies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms the effectiveness of DNA barcoding as a tool for species identification and illustrates the potential of the BIN system to characterize formal genetic units independently of an existing classification. This suggests the system can be used to efficiently assess the biodiversity of large, poorly known assemblages of organisms. For the moths examined in this study, cases of discordance between traditionally recognized species and BINs arose from several causes including overlooked species, synonymy, and cases where DNA barcodes revealed

  5. Genetic diversity of Clavispora lusitaniae isolated from Agave fourcroydes Lem, as revealed by DNA fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Brito, Daisy; Magaña-Alvarez, Anuar; Lappe-Oliveras, Patricia; Cortes-Velazquez, Alberto; Torres-Calzada, Claudia; Herrera-Suarez, Teófilo; Larqué-Saavedra, Alfonso; Tapia-Tussell, Raul

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized Clavispora lusitaniae strains isolated from different stages of the processing and early fermentation of a henequen (Agave fourcroydes) spirit produced in Yucatan, Mexico using a molecular technique. Sixteen strains identified based on morphological features, obtained from different substrates, were typed molecularly. Nine different versions of the divergent D1/D2 domain of the large-subunit ribosomal DNA sequence were identified among the C. lusitaniae strains. The greatest degree of polymorphism was found in the 90-bp structural motif of the D2 domain. The MSP-PCR technique was able to differentiate 100% of the isolates. This study provides significant insight into the genetic diversity of the mycobiota present during the henequen fermentation process, especially that of C. lusitaniae, for which only a few studies in plants have been published. The applied MSP-PCR markers were very efficient in revealing olymorphisms between isolates of this species. PMID:25557477

  6. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Brazilian wildlife revealed abundant new genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Vitaliano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to isolate and genotype T. gondii from Brazilian wildlife. For this purpose, 226 samples were submitted to mice bioassay and screened by PCR based on 18S rRNA sequences. A total of 15 T. gondii isolates were obtained, including samples from four armadillos (three Dasypus novemcinctus, one Euphractus sexcinctus, three collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla, three whited-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari, one spotted paca (Cuniculus paca, one oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus, one hoary fox (Pseudalopex vetulus, one lineated woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus and one maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus. DNA from the isolates, originated from mice bioassay, and from the tissues of the wild animal, designated as “primary samples”, were genotyped by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP, using 12 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L258, PK1, CS3 and Apico. A total of 17 genotypes were identified, with 13 identified for the first time and four already reported in published literature. Results herein obtained corroborate previous studies in Brazil, confirming high diversity and revealing unique genotypes in this region. Given most of genotypes here identified are different from previous studies in domestic animals, future studies on T. gondii from wildlife is of interest to understand population genetics and structure of this parasite.

  7. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Brazilian wildlife revealed abundant new genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, S N; Soares, H S; Minervino, A H H; Santos, A L Q; Werther, K; Marvulo, M F V; Siqueira, D B; Pena, H F J; Soares, R M; Su, C; Gennari, S M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to isolate and genotype T. gondii from Brazilian wildlife. For this purpose, 226 samples were submitted to mice bioassay and screened by PCR based on 18S rRNA sequences. A total of 15 T. gondii isolates were obtained, including samples from four armadillos (three Dasypus novemcinctus, one Euphractus sexcinctus), three collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla), three whited-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari), one spotted paca (Cuniculus paca), one oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), one hoary fox (Pseudalopex vetulus), one lineated woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus) and one maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). DNA from the isolates, originated from mice bioassay, and from the tissues of the wild animal, designated as "primary samples", were genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP), using 12 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L258, PK1, CS3 and Apico). A total of 17 genotypes were identified, with 13 identified for the first time and four already reported in published literature. Results herein obtained corroborate previous studies in Brazil, confirming high diversity and revealing unique genotypes in this region. Given most of genotypes here identified are different from previous studies in domestic animals, future studies on T. gondii from wildlife is of interest to understand population genetics and structure of this parasite. PMID:25426424

  8. Comparative sequence and genetic analyses of asparagus BACs reveal no microsynteny with onion or rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakse, Jernej; Telgmann, Alexa; Jung, Christian; Khar, Anil; Melgar, Sergio; Cheung, Foo; Town, Christopher D; Havey, Michael J

    2006-12-01

    The Poales (includes the grasses) and Asparagales [includes onion (Allium cepa L.) and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.)] are the two most economically important monocot orders. The Poales are a member of the commelinoid monocots, a group of orders sister to the Asparagales. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed a high degree of synteny among the grasses; however, it is not known if this synteny extends to other major monocot groups such as the Asparagales. Although we previously reported no evidence for synteny at the recombinational level between onion and rice, microsynteny may exist across shorter genomic regions in the grasses and Asparagales. We sequenced nine asparagus BACs to reveal physically linked genic-like sequences and determined their most similar positions in the onion and rice genomes. Four of the asparagus BACs were selected using molecular markers tightly linked to the sex-determining M locus on chromosome 5 of asparagus. These BACs possessed only two putative coding regions and had long tracts of degenerated retroviral elements and transposons. Five asparagus BACs were selected after hybridization of three onion cDNAs that mapped to three different onion chromosomes. Genic-like sequences that were physically linked on the cDNA-selected BACs or genetically linked on the M-linked BACs showed significant similarities (e asparagus and rice across these regions. Genic-like sequences that were linked in asparagus were used to identify highly similar (e asparagus and genetic linkages in onion. These results further indicate that synteny among grass genomes does not extend to a sister order in the monocots and that asparagus may not be an appropriate smaller genome model for plants in the Asparagales with enormous nuclear genomes. PMID:17016688

  9. Chemical genetic screening of KRAS-based synthetic lethal inhibitors for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Zhenyu; Mei, Fang C; Lory, Pedro L.; Gilbertson, Scott R.; Chen, Yijun; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest diseases largely due to difficulty in early diagnosis and the lack of effective treatments. KRAS is mutated in more than 90% of pancreatic cancer patients, and oncogenic KRAS contributes to pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and progression. In this report, using an oncogenic KRASV12-based pancreatic cancer cell model, we developed a chemical genetic screen to identify small chemical inhibitors that selectively target pancreatic cancer cells with gain-of...

  10. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data. PMID:25647718

  11. Genetic analysis reveals candidate species in the Scinax catharinae clade (Amphibia: Anura) from Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lídia; Solé, Mirco; Siqueira, Sérgio; Affonso, Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello; Strüssmann, Christine; Sampaio, Iracilda

    2016-03-01

    Scinax (Anura: Hylidae) is a species-rich genus of amphibians (113 spp.), divided into five species groups by morphological features. Cladistic analyses however revealed only two monophyletic clades in these groups: Scinax catharinae and Scinax ruber. Most species from the S. catharinae clade are found in Atlantic rainforest, except for Scinax canastrensis,S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi,S. pombali and S. skaios. In the present work, specimens of Scinax collected in Chapada dos Guimarães, central Brazil, were morphologically compatible with species from theS. catharinae group. On the other hand, genetic analysis based on mitochondrial (16S and 12S) and nuclear (rhodopsin) sequences revealed a nucleotide divergence of 6 to 20% between Scinax sp. and other congeners from the Brazilian savannah (Cerrado). Accordingly, Bayesian inference placed Scinax sp. in the S. catharinae clade with high support values. Hence, these findings strongly indicate the presence of a new species in the S. catharinae clade from the southwestern portion of the Brazilian savannah. To be properly validated as a novel species, detailed comparative morphological and bioacustic studies with other taxa from Brazil such asS. canastrensis, S. centralis, S. luizotavioi, S. machadoi, S. pombali and S. skaios are required. PMID:27007898

  12. Genetic modifier screens reveal new components that interact with the Drosophila dystroglycan-dystrophin complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya M Kucherenko

    Full Text Available The Dystroglycan-Dystrophin (Dg-Dys complex has a capacity to transmit information from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton inside the cell. It is proposed that this interaction is under tight regulation; however the signaling/regulatory components of Dg-Dys complex remain elusive. Understanding the regulation of the complex is critical since defects in this complex cause muscular dystrophy in humans. To reveal new regulators of the Dg-Dys complex, we used a model organism Drosophila melanogaster and performed genetic interaction screens to identify modifiers of Dg and Dys mutants in Drosophila wing veins. These mutant screens revealed that the Dg-Dys complex interacts with genes involved in muscle function and components of Notch, TGF-beta and EGFR signaling pathways. In addition, components of pathways that are required for cellular and/or axonal migration through cytoskeletal regulation, such as Semaphorin-Plexin, Frazzled-Netrin and Slit-Robo pathways show interactions with Dys and/or Dg. These data suggest that the Dg-Dys complex and the other pathways regulating extracellular information transfer to the cytoskeletal dynamics are more intercalated than previously thought.

  13. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-01

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  14. Genetic integrity of somaclonal variants in tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O Kuntze) as revealed by inter simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jibu; Vijayan, Deepu; Joshi, Sarvottam D; Joseph Lopez, S; Raj Kumar, R

    2006-05-17

    Adoption of inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) technique to analyze the genetic variability of somatic embryo derived tea plants was evaluated. Morphological characterisation of the field grown plants revealed no identical character aligning with the parent, UPASI-10. Out of 40 primers, 15 exhibited concurrent polymorphism were selected for the study. Genetic variability of somaclones derived from single line cotyledonary culture ranged from 33.0 to 55.0%. A unique fragment of 1.2Kb was visible in majority of the accessions whereas the fragments below the length of 0.6Kb were noticed only in 50% of the variants. Out of 120 interactions attempted using Pearson's coefficient correlation, only 9.2% of somaclones exhibited significant similarity at genetic level. Dendrogram constructed based on simple matching coefficient revealed a distance of 2.257-3.317 between the final clusters. This strengthens the existence of wide genetic variation among the somaclones. PMID:16360228

  15. Spectral Analysis by XANES Reveals that GPNMB Influences the Chemical Composition of Intact Melanosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Haraszti; C Trantow; A Hedberg-Buenz; M Grunze; M Anderson

    2011-12-31

    GPNMB is a unique melanosomal protein. Unlike many melanosomal proteins, GPNMB has not been associated with any forms of albinism, and it is unclear whether GPNMB has any direct influence on melanosomes. Here, melanosomes from congenic strains of C57BL/6J mice mutant for Gpnmb are compared to strain-matched controls using standard transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis (XANES). Whereas electron microscopy did not detect any ultrastructural changes in melanosomes lacking functional GPNMB, XANES uncovered multiple spectral phenotypes. These results directly demonstrate that GPNMB influences the chemical composition of melanosomes and more broadly illustrate the potential for using genetic approaches in combination with nano-imaging technologies to study organelle biology.

  16. University Students’ Reflections on Representations in Genetics and Stereochemistry Revealed by a Focus Group Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Edfors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representations in introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations. The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in their problem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiar to the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”. The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways of interpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’ representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a university context to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitful way.

  17. Comprehensive analyses of imprinted differentially methylated regions reveal epigenetic and genetic characteristics in hepatoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant methylation at imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in human 11p15.5 has been reported in many tumors including hepatoblastoma. However, the methylation status of imprinted DMRs in imprinted loci scattered through the human genome has not been analyzed yet in any tumors. The methylation statuses of 33 imprinted DMRs were analyzed in 12 hepatoblastomas and adjacent normal liver tissue by MALDI-TOF MS and pyrosequencing. Uniparental disomy (UPD) and copy number abnormalities were investigated with DNA polymorphisms. Among 33 DMRs analyzed, 18 showed aberrant methylation in at least 1 tumor. There was large deviation in the incidence of aberrant methylation among the DMRs. KvDMR1 and IGF2-DMR0 were the most frequently hypomethylated DMRs. INPP5Fv2-DMR and RB1-DMR were hypermethylated with high frequencies. Hypomethylation was observed at certain DMRs not only in tumors but also in a small number of adjacent histologically normal liver tissue, whereas hypermethylation was observed only in tumor samples. The methylation levels of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) did not show large differences between tumor tissue and normal liver controls. Chromosomal abnormalities were also found in some tumors. 11p15.5 and 20q13.3 loci showed the frequent occurrence of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Our analyses revealed tumor-specific aberrant hypermethylation at some imprinted DMRs in 12 hepatoblastomas with additional suggestion for the possibility of hypomethylation prior to tumor development. Some loci showed both genetic and epigenetic alterations with high frequencies. These findings will aid in understanding the development of hepatoblastoma

  18. Genetic tracing reveals a stereotyped sensory map in the olfactory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhihua; Horowitz, Lisa F.; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Snapper, Scott; Buck, Linda B.

    2001-11-01

    The olfactory system translates myriad chemical structures into diverse odour perceptions. To gain insight into how this is accomplished, we prepared mice that coexpressed a transneuronal tracer with only one of about 1,000 different odorant receptors. The tracer travelled from nasal neurons expressing that receptor to the olfactory bulb and then to the olfactory cortex, allowing visualization of cortical neurons that receive input from a particular odorant receptor. These studies revealed a stereotyped sensory map in the olfactory cortex in which signals from a particular receptor are targeted to specific clusters of neurons. Inputs from different receptors overlap spatially and could be combined in single neurons, potentially allowing for an integration of the components of an odorant's combinatorial receptor code. Signals from the same receptor are targeted to multiple olfactory cortical areas, permitting the parallel, and perhaps differential, processing of inputs from a single receptor before delivery to the neocortex and limbic system.

  19. Fine-Scale Analysis Reveals Cryptic Landscape Genetic Structure in Desert Tortoises

    OpenAIRE

    Emily K Latch; Boarman, William I.; Andrew Walde; Robert C Fleischer

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the effects of landscape features on genetic variation is essential for understanding how landscapes shape patterns of gene flow and spatial genetic structure of populations. Most landscape genetics studies have focused on patterns of gene flow at a regional scale. However, the genetic structure of populations at a local scale may be influenced by a unique suite of landscape variables that have little bearing on connectivity patterns observed at broader spatial scales. We inves...

  20. Gene invasion in distant eukaryotic lineages: discovery of mutually exclusive genetic elements reveals marine biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Adam; Sudek, Sebastian; Fast, Naomi M; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2013-09-01

    Inteins are rare, translated genetic parasites mainly found in bacteria and archaea, while spliceosomal introns are distinctly eukaryotic features abundant in most nuclear genomes. Using targeted metagenomics, we discovered an intein in an Atlantic population of the photosynthetic eukaryote, Bathycoccus, harbored by the essential spliceosomal protein PRP8 (processing factor 8 protein). Although previously thought exclusive to fungi, we also identified PRP8 inteins in parasitic (Capsaspora) and predatory (Salpingoeca) protists. Most new PRP8 inteins were at novel insertion sites that, surprisingly, were not in the most conserved regions of the gene. Evolutionarily, Dikarya fungal inteins at PRP8 insertion site a appeared more related to the Bathycoccus intein at a unique insertion site, than to other fungal and opisthokont inteins. Strikingly, independent analyses of Pacific and Atlantic samples revealed an intron at the same codon as the Bathycoccus PRP8 intein. The two elements are mutually exclusive and neither was found in cultured Bathycoccus or other picoprasinophyte genomes. Thus, wild Bathycoccus contain one of few non-fungal eukaryotic inteins known and a rare polymorphic intron. Our data indicate at least two Bathycoccus ecotypes exist, associated respectively with oceanic or mesotrophic environments. We hypothesize that intein propagation is facilitated by marine viruses; and, while intron gain is still poorly understood, presence of a spliceosomal intron where a locus lacks an intein raises the possibility of new, intein-primed mechanisms for intron gain. The discovery of nucleus-encoded inteins and associated sequence polymorphisms in uncultivated marine eukaryotes highlights their diversity and reveals potential sexual boundaries between populations indistinguishable by common marker genes. PMID:23635865

  1. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaik-Eem Lim

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%. Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies.

  2. Distinct genetic lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) revealed by COI and 16S DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia was distinctly different from B. caudata of Bali and Lombok, without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades, indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for COI sequences between B. caudata of Malaysia-Thailand-China and B. caudata of Bali-Lombok was 5.65%, for 16S sequences from 2.76 to 2.99%, and for combined COI and 16S sequences 4.45 to 4.46%. The 'p' values are distinctly different from intraspecific 'p' distance (0-0.23%). Both the B. caudata lineages are distinctly separated from related species in the subgenus Zeugodacus - B. ascita, B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora, B. tau, B. cucurbitae, and B. depressa. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates that the B. caudata lineages are closely related to B. ascita sp. B, and form a clade with B. scutellata, B. ishigakiensis, B. diaphora and B. ascita sp. A. This study provides additional baseline for the phylogenetic relationships of Bactrocera fruit flies of the subgenus Zeugodacus. Both the COI and 16S genes could be useful markers for the molecular differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of tephritid fruit flies. PMID:22615962

  3. Genetic characterization of Amazonian bovine papillomavirus reveals the existence of four new putative types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Flavio R C; Daudt, Cíntia; Streck, André F; Weber, Matheus N; Filho, Ronaldo V Leite; Driemeier, David; Canal, Cláudio W

    2015-08-01

    Papillomaviruses are small and complex viruses that belong to the Papillomaviridae family, which comprises 39 genera. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) causes an infectious disease that is characterized by chronic and proliferative benign tumors that affect cattle worldwide. Different genotypes of BPVs can cause distinct skin and mucosal lesions and the immunity they raise has low cross-protection. This report aimed to genotype BPVs in cattle from Northern Brazil based on nucleotide partial sequences of the L1 ORF. Skin wart samples from 39 bovines clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as cutaneous papillomatosis from Acre and Rondônia States were analyzed. The results revealed four already reported BPV types (BPVs 1, 2, 11, and 13), nine putative new BPV subtypes and four putative new BPV types as well as two putative new BPV types that were already reported. To our knowledge, this is the first record of BPVs from the Brazilian Amazon region that identified new possible BPV types and subtypes circulating in this population. These findings point to the great genetic diversity of BPVs that are present in this region and highlight the importance of this knowledge before further studies about vaccination are attempted. PMID:26116287

  4. Heme dynamics and trafficking factors revealed by genetically encoded fluorescent heme sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David A; Harvey, Raven M; Martinez-Guzman, Osiris; Yuan, Xiaojing; Chandrasekharan, Bindu; Raju, Gheevarghese; Outten, F Wayne; Hamza, Iqbal; Reddi, Amit R

    2016-07-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor and signaling molecule. Heme acquisition by proteins and heme signaling are ultimately reliant on the ability to mobilize labile heme (LH). However, the properties of LH pools, including concentration, oxidation state, distribution, speciation, and dynamics, are poorly understood. Herein, we elucidate the nature and dynamics of LH using genetically encoded ratiometric fluorescent heme sensors in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae We find that the subcellular distribution of LH is heterogeneous; the cytosol maintains LH at ∼20-40 nM, whereas the mitochondria and nucleus maintain it at concentrations below 2.5 nM. Further, we find that the signaling molecule nitric oxide can initiate the rapid mobilization of heme in the cytosol and nucleus from certain thiol-containing factors. We also find that the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase constitutes a major cellular heme buffer, and is responsible for maintaining the activity of the heme-dependent nuclear transcription factor heme activator protein (Hap1p). Altogether, we demonstrate that the heme sensors can be used to reveal fundamental aspects of heme trafficking and dynamics and can be used across multiple organisms, including Escherichia coli, yeast, and human cell lines. PMID:27247412

  5. Reveal, A General Reverse Engineering Algorithm for Inference of Genetic Network Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shoudan; Fuhrman, Stefanie; Somogyi, Roland

    1998-01-01

    Given the immanent gene expression mapping covering whole genomes during development, health and disease, we seek computational methods to maximize functional inference from such large data sets. Is it possible, in principle, to completely infer a complex regulatory network architecture from input/output patterns of its variables? We investigated this possibility using binary models of genetic networks. Trajectories, or state transition tables of Boolean nets, resemble time series of gene expression. By systematically analyzing the mutual information between input states and output states, one is able to infer the sets of input elements controlling each element or gene in the network. This process is unequivocal and exact for complete state transition tables. We implemented this REVerse Engineering ALgorithm (REVEAL) in a C program, and found the problem to be tractable within the conditions tested so far. For n = 50 (elements) and k = 3 (inputs per element), the analysis of incomplete state transition tables (100 state transition pairs out of a possible 10(exp 15)) reliably produced the original rule and wiring sets. While this study is limited to synchronous Boolean networks, the algorithm is generalizable to include multi-state models, essentially allowing direct application to realistic biological data sets. The ability to adequately solve the inverse problem may enable in-depth analysis of complex dynamic systems in biology and other fields.

  6. Genetic Diversity Revealed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in a Worldwide Germplasm Collection of Durum Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Luo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure in crops has important implications for plant breeding programs and the conservation of genetic resources. Newly developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers are effective in detecting genetic diversity. In the present study, a worldwide durum wheat collection consisting of 150 accessions was used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using 946 polymorphic SNP markers covering the whole genome of tetraploid wheat. Genetic structure was greatly impacted by multiple factors, such as environmental conditions, breeding methods reflected by release periods of varieties, and gene flows via human activities. A loss of genetic diversity was observed from landraces and old cultivars to the modern cultivars released during periods of the Early Green Revolution, but an increase in cultivars released during the Post Green Revolution. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of genetic diversity among the 10 mega ecogeographical regions indicated that South America, North America, and Europe possessed the richest genetic variability, while the Middle East showed moderate levels of genetic diversity.

  7. Genomewide mapping reveals a combination of different genetic effects causing the genetic basis of heterosis in two elite rice hybrids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lanzhi Li; Xiaohong He; Hongyan Zhang; Zhiming Wang; Congwei Sun; Tongmin Mou; Xinqi Li; Yuanming Zhang; Zhongli Hu

    2015-06-01

    North Carolina design III (NCIII) is one of the most powerful and widely used mating designs for understanding the genetic basis of heterosis. However, the quantitative trait mapping (QTL) conducted in previous studies with this design was mainly based on analysis of variance (ANOVA), composite interval or multiple interval mapping methods. These methodologies could not investigate all kinds of genetic effects, especially epistatic effects, simultaneously on the whole genome. In this study, with a statistical method for mapping epistatic QTL associated with heterosis using the recombinant inbred line (RIL)-based NCIII design, we conducted QTL mapping for nine agronomic traits of two elite hybrids to characterize the mode of gene action contributing to heterosis on a whole genomewide scale. In total, 23 main-effect QTL (M-QTL) and 23 digenic interactions in IJ (indica × japonica) hybrids, 11 M-QTL and 82 digenic interactions in II (indica × indica) hybrid QTLs were identified in the present study. The variation explained by individual M-QTL or interactions ranged from 2.3 to 11.0%. The number of digenic interactions and the total variation explained by interactions of each trait were larger than those of M-QTL. The augmented genetic effect ratio of most M-QTL and digenic interactions in (L1–L2) data of two backcross populations (L1 and L2) showed complete dominance or overdominance, and in (L1 + L2) data showed an additive effect. Our results indicated that the dominance, overdominance and epistatic effect were important in conditioning the genetic basis of heterosis of the two elite hybrids. The relative contributions of the genetic components varied with traits and the genetic basis of the two hybrids was different.

  8. A chemical screen for biological small molecule-RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R

    2009-05-12

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3'-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5'-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule-RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule-RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule-RNA conjugates, including 3'-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5' terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (approximately < 200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  9. A chemical screen for biological small molecule–RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E.; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3′-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5′-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule–RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule–RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule–RNA conjugates, including 3′-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5′ terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (≲200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  10. Genetic diversity and relationship in American and African oil palm as revealed by RFLP and AFLP molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcelos Edson

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the genetic diversity, its organization and the genetic relationships within oil palm (Elaeis oleifera (Kunth Cortés, from America, and E. guineensis (Jacq., from Africa germplasm using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP. In complement to a previous RFLP study on 241 E. oleifera accessions, 38 E. guineensis accessions were analyzed using the same 37 cDNA probes. These accessions covered a large part of the geographical distribution areas of these species in America and Africa. In addition, AFLP analysis was performed on a sub-set of 40 accessions of E. oleifera and 22 of E. guineensis using three pairs of enzyme/primer combinations. Data were subjected to Factorial Analysis of Correspondence (FAC and cluster analysis, with parameters of genetic diversity being also studied. Results appeared congruent between RFLP and AFLP. In the E. oleifera, AFLP confirmed the strong structure of genetic diversity revealed by RFLP, according to geographical origin of the studied material, with the identification of the same four distinct genetic groups: Brazil, French Guyana/Surinam, Peru, north of Colombia/Central America. Both markers revealed that genetic divergence between the two species is of the same magnitude as that among provenances of E. oleifera. This finding is in discrepancy with the supposed early tertiary separation of the two species.

  11. Genetic Diversity of the Critically Endangered Thuja sutchuenensis Revealed by ISSR Markers and the Implications for Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeping Jiang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thuja sutchuenensis Franch. is a critically endangered plant endemic to the North-East Chongqing, China. Genetic variation was studied to assess the distribution of genetic diversity within and among seven populations from the single remnant locations, using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers. A total of 15 primers generated 310 well defined bands, with an average of 20.7 bands per primer. The seven populations revealed a relatively high level of genetic diversity in the species. The percentage of polymorphic bands, Nei’s gene diversity and Shannon’s information index at the population and species level were 76.1%, 0.155, 0.252 and 100%, 0.165, 0.295, respectively. A low level of genetic differentiation among populations (GST = 0.102, in line with the results of Analyses of Molecular Variance (AMOVA, and a high level of gene flow (Nm = 4.407 were observed. Both the Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmatic Mean (UPGMA cluster analysis and Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA supported the grouping of all seven populations into two groups. In addition, Mantel test revealed no significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances (r = 0.329, p = 0.100. The low genetic differentiation among populations implies that the conservation efforts should aim to preserve all the extant populations of this endangered species.

  12. Population genetic structure and migration patterns of Liriomyza sativae in China: moderate subdivision and no Bridgehead effect revealed by microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X-T; Ji, Y; Chang, Y-W; Shen, Y; Tian, Z-H; Gong, W-R; Du, Y-Z

    2016-02-01

    While Liriomyza sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae), an important invasive pest of ornamentals and vegetables has been found in China for the past two decades, few studies have focused on its genetics or route of invasive. In this study, we collected 288 L. sativae individuals across 12 provinces to explore its population genetic structure and migration patterns in China using seven microsatellites. We found relatively low levels of genetic diversity but moderate population genetic structure (0.05 < F ST < 0.15) in L. sativae from China. All populations deviated significantly from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to heterozygote deficiency. Molecular variance analysis revealed that more than 89% of variation was among samples within populations. A UPGMA dendrogram revealed that SH and GXNN populations formed one cluster separate from the other populations, which is in accordance with STRUCTURE and GENELAND analyses. A Mantel test indicated that genetic distance was not correlated to geographic distance (r = -0.0814, P = 0.7610), coupled with high levels of gene flow (M = 40.1-817.7), suggesting a possible anthropogenic influence on the spread of L. sativae in China and on the effect of hosts. The trend of asymmetrical gene flow was from southern to northern populations in general and did not exhibit a Bridgehead effect during the course of invasion, as can be seen by the low genetic diversity of southern populations. PMID:26615869

  13. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum) to an isolated island ecosystem with nai??ve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein) gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods: A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai) and KV115 (Hawaii) that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results: RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion: Avian malaria (P. relictum) and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian avifauna. This

  14. Genetic variation in wild populations of the tuber crop Amorphophallus konjac (Araceae) in central China as revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C; Gichira, A W; Chen, J M

    2015-01-01

    Amorphophallus konjac is an economically important crop. In order to provide baseline information for sustainable development and conservation of the wild plant resources of A. konjac, we studied the genetic diversity and population structure of this species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) molecular markers. We sampled 139 individuals from 10 wild populations of A. konjac in central China. Using five AFLP primer combinations, we scored a total of 270 DNA fragments, most of which were polymorphic (98.2%). Percentage of polymorphic loci, Nei's genetic diversity index, and Shannon's information index showed high levels of genetic variation within A. konjac populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the variance (68%) resided within populations. The coefficient of genetic differentiation between populations was 0.348 and the estimated gene flow was 0.469, indicating that there was limited gene flow among the populations. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis and principal coordinates analysis indicated that geographically close populations were more likely to cluster together. The Mantel test revealed a significant correlation between geographic and genetic distances (R2 = 0.2521, P konjac and the complex geography of central China are likely to have contributed to the current pattern of genetic variation of this species. In the present study, we provide several suggestions on the future protection of the wild plant genetic resources of A. konjac. PMID:26782525

  15. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line; Drijfhout, Falko; Kronauer, Daniel;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14...... populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We evaluate the relative informative power of the three methodological approaches and estimate both the number of...... independent introduction events from a yet unknown native range somewhere in the Black Sea area, and the invasive potential of the existing introduced populations. RESULTS: Three clusters of genetically similar populations were detected, and all but one population had a similar chemical profile. Aggression...

  16. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: Integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Boomsma Jacobus J; Kronauer Daniel JC; Drijfhout Falko P; Ugelvig Line V; Pedersen Jes S; Cremer Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14 populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We eva...

  17. The genetic code degeneracy and the amino acids chemical composition are connected

    OpenAIRE

    Negadi, Tidjani

    2009-01-01

    We show that our recently published Arithmetic Model of the genetic code based on Godel Encoding is robust against symmetry transformations, specially Rumer s one U > G, A > C, and constitutes a link between the degeneracy structure and the chemical composition of the 20 canonical amino acids. As a result, several remarkable atomic patterns involving hydrogen, carbon, nucleon and atom numbers are derived. This study has no obvious practical application(s) but could, we hope, add some new know...

  18. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  19. High Resolution Genomic Scans Reveal Genetic Architecture Controlling Alcohol Preference in Bidirectionally Selected Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chiao-Ling; Lossie, Amy C; Liang, Tiebing; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Lumeng, Lawrence; Zhou, Feng C; Muir, William M

    2016-08-01

    Investigations on the influence of nature vs. nurture on Alcoholism (Alcohol Use Disorder) in human have yet to provide a clear view on potential genomic etiologies. To address this issue, we sequenced a replicated animal model system bidirectionally-selected for alcohol preference (AP). This model is uniquely suited to map genetic effects with high reproducibility, and resolution. The origin of the rat lines (an 8-way cross) resulted in small haplotype blocks (HB) with a corresponding high level of resolution. We sequenced DNAs from 40 samples (10 per line of each replicate) to determine allele frequencies and HB. We achieved ~46X coverage per line and replicate. Excessive differentiation in the genomic architecture between lines, across replicates, termed signatures of selection (SS), were classified according to gene and region. We identified SS in 930 genes associated with AP. The majority (50%) of the SS were confined to single gene regions, the greatest numbers of which were in promoters (284) and intronic regions (169) with the least in exon's (4), suggesting that differences in AP were primarily due to alterations in regulatory regions. We confirmed previously identified genes and found many new genes associated with AP. Of those newly identified genes, several demonstrated neuronal function involved in synaptic memory and reward behavior, e.g. ion channels (Kcnf1, Kcnn3, Scn5a), excitatory receptors (Grin2a, Gria3, Grip1), neurotransmitters (Pomc), and synapses (Snap29). This study not only reveals the polygenic architecture of AP, but also emphasizes the importance of regulatory elements, consistent with other complex traits. PMID:27490364

  20. VNTR analysis reveals unexpected genetic diversity within Mycoplasma agalactiae, the main causative agent of contagious agalactia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayling Roger D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma agalactiae is the main cause of contagious agalactia, a serious disease of sheep and goats, which has major clinical and economic impacts. Previous studies of M. agalactiae have shown it to be unusually homogeneous and there are currently no available epidemiological techniques which enable a high degree of strain differentiation. Results We have developed variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis using the sequenced genome of the M. agalactiae type strain PG2. The PG2 genome was found to be replete with tandem repeat sequences and 4 were chosen for further analysis. VNTR 5 was located within the hypothetical protein MAG6170 a predicted lipoprotein. VNTR 14 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG3350 and the hypothetical protein MAG3340. VNTR 17 was intergenic between the hypothetical protein MAG4060 and the hypothetical protein MAG4070 and VNTR 19 spanned the 5' end of the pseudogene for a lipoprotein MAG4310 and the 3' end of the hypothetical lipoprotein MAG4320. We have investigated the genetic diversity of 88 M. agalactiae isolates of wide geographic origin using VNTR analysis and compared it with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. Simpson's index of diversity was calculated to be 0.324 for PFGE and 0.574 for VNTR analysis. VNTR analysis revealed unexpected diversity within M. agalactiae with 9 different VNTR types discovered. Some correlation was found between geographical origin and the VNTR type of the isolates. Conclusion VNTR analysis represents a useful, rapid first-line test for use in molecular epidemiological analysis of M. agalactiae for outbreak tracing and control.

  1. Analysis of genome sequences from plant pathogenic Rhodococcus reveals genetic novelties in virulence loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Creason

    Full Text Available Members of Gram-positive Actinobacteria cause economically important diseases to plants. Within the Rhodococcus genus, some members can cause growth deformities and persist as pathogens on a wide range of host plants. The current model predicts that phytopathogenic isolates require a cluster of three loci present on a linear plasmid, with the fas operon central to virulence. The Fas proteins synthesize, modify, and activate a mixture of growth regulating cytokinins, which cause a hormonal imbalance in plants, resulting in abnormal growth. We sequenced and compared the genomes of 20 isolates of Rhodococcus to gain insights into the mechanisms and evolution of virulence in these bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer was identified as critical but limited in the scale of virulence evolution, as few loci are conserved and exclusive to phytopathogenic isolates. Although the fas operon is present in most phytopathogenic isolates, it is absent from phytopathogenic isolate A21d2. Instead, this isolate has a horizontally acquired gene chimera that encodes a novel fusion protein with isopentyltransferase and phosphoribohydrolase domains, predicted to be capable of catalyzing and activating cytokinins, respectively. Cytokinin profiling of the archetypal D188 isolate revealed only one activate cytokinin type that was specifically synthesized in a fas-dependent manner. These results suggest that only the isopentenyladenine cytokinin type is synthesized and necessary for Rhodococcus phytopathogenicity, which is not consistent with the extant model stating that a mixture of cytokinins is necessary for Rhodococcus to cause leafy gall symptoms. In all, data indicate that only four horizontally acquired functions are sufficient to confer the trait of phytopathogenicity to members of the genetically diverse clade of Rhodococcus.

  2. Evolutionary history of barley cultivation in Europe revealed by genetic analysis of extant landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Huw

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the evolution of cultivated barley is important for two reasons. First, the evolutionary relationships between different landraces might provide information on the spread and subsequent development of barley cultivation, including the adaptation of the crop to new environments and its response to human selection. Second, evolutionary information would enable landraces with similar traits but different genetic backgrounds to be identified, providing alternative strategies for the introduction of these traits into modern germplasm. Results The evolutionary relationships between 651 barley landraces were inferred from the genotypes for 24 microsatellites. The landraces could be divided into nine populations, each with a different geographical distribution. Comparisons with ear row number, caryopsis structure, seasonal growth habit and flowering time revealed a degree of association between population structure and phenotype, and analysis of climate variables indicated that the landraces are adapted, at least to some extent, to their environment. Human selection and/or environmental adaptation may therefore have played a role in the origin and/or maintenance of one or more of the barley landrace populations. There was also evidence that at least some of the population structure derived from geographical partitioning set up during the initial spread of barley cultivation into Europe, or reflected the later introduction of novel varieties. In particular, three closely-related populations were made up almost entirely of plants with the daylength nonresponsive version of the photoperiod response gene PPD-H1, conferring adaptation to the long annual growth season of northern Europe. These three populations probably originated in the eastern Fertile Crescent and entered Europe after the initial spread of agriculture. Conclusions The discovery of population structure, combined with knowledge of associated phenotypes and

  3. Genetic and Ultrastructural Analysis Reveals the Key Players and Initial Steps of Bacterial Magnetosome Membrane Biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschdorf, Oliver; Forstner, Yvonne; Kolinko, Isabel; Uebe, René; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Magnetosomes of magnetotactic bacteria contain well-ordered nanocrystals for magnetic navigation and have recently emerged as the most sophisticated model system to study the formation of membrane bounded organelles in prokaryotes. Magnetosome biosynthesis is thought to begin with the formation of a dedicated compartment, the magnetosome membrane (MM), in which the biosynthesis of a magnetic mineral is strictly controlled. While the biomineralization of magnetosomes and their subsequent assembly into linear chains recently have become increasingly well studied, the molecular mechanisms and early stages involved in MM formation remained poorly understood. In the Alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, approximately 30 genes were found to control magnetosome biosynthesis. By cryo-electron tomography of several key mutant strains we identified the gene complement controlling MM formation in this model organism. Whereas the putative magnetosomal iron transporter MamB was most crucial for the process and caused the most severe MM phenotype upon elimination, MamM, MamQ and MamL were also required for the formation of wild-type-like MMs. A subset of seven genes (mamLQBIEMO) combined within a synthetic operon was sufficient to restore the formation of intracellular membranes in the absence of other genes from the key mamAB operon. Tracking of de novo magnetosome membrane formation by genetic induction revealed that magnetosomes originate from unspecific cytoplasmic membrane locations before alignment into coherent chains. Our results indicate that no single factor alone is essential for MM formation, which instead is orchestrated by the cumulative action of several magnetosome proteins. PMID:27286560

  4. Genetic diversity in Chinese modern wheat varieties revealed by microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO; Chenyang; WANG; Lanfen; ZHANG; Xueyong; YOU; Guangxia; DONG; Yushen; JIA; Jizeng; LIU; Xu; SHANG; Xunwu; LIU; Sancai; CAO; Yongsheng

    2006-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 1680 modern varieties in Chinese candidate core collections was analyzed at 78 SSR loci by fluorescence detection system. A total of 1336 alleles were detected, of which 1253 alleles could be annotated into 71 loci. For these 71 loci, the alleles ranged from 4 to 44 with an average of 17.6, and the PIC values changed from 0.19 to 0.89 with an average of 0.69. (1) In the three genomes of wheat, the average genetic richness was B>A>D, and the genetic diversity indexes were B>D>A. (2) Among the seven homoeologous groups, the average genetic richness was 2=7>3>4>6>5>1, and the genetic diversity indexes were 7>3>2>4>6>5>1. As a whole, group 7 possessed the highest genetic diversity, while groups 1 and 5 were the lowest. (3) In the 21 wheat chromosomes, 7A, 3B and 2D possessed much higher genetic diversity, while 2A, 1B, 4D, 5D and 1D were the lowest. (4) The highest average genetic diversity index existed in varieties bred in the 1950s, and then it declined continually. However, the change tendency of genetic diversity among decades was not greatly sharp. This was further illustrated by changes of the average genetic distance between varieties. In the 1950s it was the largest (0.731). Since the 1960s, it has decreased gradually (0.711, 0.706, 0.696, 0.695). The genetic base of modern varieties is becoming narrower and narrower. This should be given enough attention by breeders and policy makers.

  5. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: Integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14 populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We evaluate the relative informative power of the three methodological approaches and estimate both the number of independent introduction events from a yet unknown native range somewhere in the Black Sea area, and the invasive potential of the existing introduced populations. Results Three clusters of genetically similar populations were detected, and all but one population had a similar chemical profile. Aggression between populations could be predicted from their genetic and chemical distance, and two major clusters of non-aggressive groups of populations were found. However, populations of L. neglectus did not separate into clear supercolonial associations, as is typical for other invasive ants. Conclusion The three methodological approaches gave consistent and complementary results. All joint evidence supports the inference that the 14 introduced populations of L. neglectus in Europe likely arose from only very few independent introductions from the native range, and that new infestations were typically started through introductions from other invasive populations. This indicates that existing introduced populations have a very high invasive potential when the ants are inadvertently spread by human transport.

  6. Temporal genetic variation as revealed by a microsatellite analysis of European sardine ( Sardina pilchardus) archived samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Splendiani, Andrea; Bonanomi, Sara;

    2012-01-01

    ) that explain the genetic diversity variation, while the same parameters turned out to be more stable in the southern samples. In addition, we detected the presence of a genetic bottleneck and low effective population size ( Ne) values in several northern samples. Even if the northern and southern...

  7. Genetic homogeneity of Taylorella equigenitalis from Norwegian trotting horses revealed by chromosomal DNA fingerprinting.

    OpenAIRE

    Thoresen, S I; Jenkins, A.; Ask, E

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA fingerprinting indicated that Norwegian Taylorella equigenitalis strains are genetically homogeneous and similar to some Swedish isolates but different from other European strains. As contagious equine metritis is rarely a serious disease in Norwegian horses, we conclude that the dominant T. equigenitalis strain in Norway is a genetically homogeneous clone of low virulence.

  8. Revealing the Genetic Variation and Allele Heterozygote Javanese and Arab Families in Malang East Java Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nila Kartika Sari

    2014-02-01

    Results: Our result showed that the genetic variability and heterozygote allele increasing by using the 13 CODIS markers from the first generation to the next generation with paternity testing from each family were matched. Conclusion: We can conclude that in a Javanese-Arab family ethnic seems stimulate the increasing genetic variation and allele heterozygote.

  9. Genetic diversity of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cultivars revealed by analysis of SSR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work we evaluate a collection of 88 carrot cultivars and landraces for polymorphisms at SSR loci and use the obtained markers to assess the genetic diversity, and we show molecular evidence for divergence between Asiatic and Western carrot genetic pools. The use of primer pairs flanking repe...

  10. Genome-wide scan revealed genetic loci for energy metabolism in Hispanic children and adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome-wide scans were conducted in a search for genetic locations linked to energy expenditure and substrate oxidation in children. Pedigreed data of 1030 Hispanic children and adolescents were from the Viva La Familia Study, which was designed to investigate genetic and environmental risk factors ...

  11. Application of 2D-GCMS reveals many industrial chemicals in airborne particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammed S.; West, Charles E.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Rowland, Steven J.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2013-02-01

    Samples of airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) have been collected in Birmingham, UK and extracted with dichloromethane prior to analysis by two-dimensional GC separation and TOFMS analysis. Identification of compounds using the NIST spectral library has revealed a remarkable diversity of compounds, some of which have not been previously reported in airborne analyses. Groups of compounds identified in this study include a large number of oxygenated VOC including linear and branched compounds, substituted aromatic compounds and alicyclic compounds, oxygenated polycyclic aromatic and alicyclic compounds, organic nitrogen compounds, branched chain VOC and substituted aromatic VOC, phthalates, organo-phosphates and organo-sulphate compounds. Many of the compounds identified are mass production chemicals, which due to their semi-volatility enter the atmosphere and subsequently partition onto pre-existing aerosol. Their contribution to the toxicity of airborne particulate matter is currently unknown but might be significant. The diverse industrial uses and potential sources of the identified compounds are reported.

  12. Genome-wide view of genetic diversity reveals paths of selection and cultivar differentiation in peach domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Takashi; Hanada, Toshio; Yaegaki, Hideaki; Gradziel, Thomas M; Tao, Ryutaro

    2016-06-01

    Domestication and cultivar differentiation are requisite processes for establishing cultivated crops. These processes inherently involve substantial changes in population structure, including those from artificial selection of key genes. In this study, accessions of peach (Prunus persica) and its wild relatives were analysed genome-wide to identify changes in genetic structures and gene selections associated with their differentiation. Analysis of genome-wide informative single-nucleotide polymorphism loci revealed distinct changes in genetic structures and delineations among domesticated peach and its wild relatives and among peach landraces and modern fruit (F) and modern ornamental (O-A) cultivars. Indications of distinct changes in linkage disequilibrium extension/decay and of strong population bottlenecks or inbreeding were identified. Site frequency spectrum- and extended haplotype homozygosity-based evaluation of genome-wide genetic diversities supported selective sweeps distinguishing the domesticated peach from its wild relatives and each F/O-A cluster from the landrace clusters. The regions with strong selective sweeps harboured promising candidates for genes subjected to selection. Further sequence-based evaluation further defined the candidates and revealed their characteristics. All results suggest opportunities for identifying critical genes associated with each differentiation by analysing genome-wide genetic diversity in currently established populations. This approach obviates the special development of genetic populations, which is particularly difficult for long-lived tree crops. PMID:27085183

  13. Genome-wide view of genetic diversity reveals paths of selection and cultivar differentiation in peach domestication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Takashi; Hanada, Toshio; Yaegaki, Hideaki; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Tao, Ryutaro

    2016-01-01

    Domestication and cultivar differentiation are requisite processes for establishing cultivated crops. These processes inherently involve substantial changes in population structure, including those from artificial selection of key genes. In this study, accessions of peach (Prunus persica) and its wild relatives were analysed genome-wide to identify changes in genetic structures and gene selections associated with their differentiation. Analysis of genome-wide informative single-nucleotide polymorphism loci revealed distinct changes in genetic structures and delineations among domesticated peach and its wild relatives and among peach landraces and modern fruit (F) and modern ornamental (O-A) cultivars. Indications of distinct changes in linkage disequilibrium extension/decay and of strong population bottlenecks or inbreeding were identified. Site frequency spectrum- and extended haplotype homozygosity-based evaluation of genome-wide genetic diversities supported selective sweeps distinguishing the domesticated peach from its wild relatives and each F/O-A cluster from the landrace clusters. The regions with strong selective sweeps harboured promising candidates for genes subjected to selection. Further sequence-based evaluation further defined the candidates and revealed their characteristics. All results suggest opportunities for identifying critical genes associated with each differentiation by analysing genome-wide genetic diversity in currently established populations. This approach obviates the special development of genetic populations, which is particularly difficult for long-lived tree crops. PMID:27085183

  14. Genetic differentiation and genetic diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae, the dominant tree species in Japanese broadleaved evergreen forests, revealed by analysis of EST-associated microsatellites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Aoki

    Full Text Available The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata. Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may

  15. The genetic diversity of the mangrove kandelia obovata in China revealed by ISSR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic diversity of 7 populations of Kandelia obovata in China was characterized using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) technique. A total of 50 primers were screened, of which 9 polymorphic and informative patterns were selected to determine genetic relationships. ISSR amplification was conducted on 140 individuals from 7 populations, and 88 polymorphic loci were detected from 106 total loci. The total percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL) was 83.02%. The percentage of PPL at the population level ranged from 32.08% to 47.17%, with an average of 39.89%. Nei's gene diversity (H) and Shannon's information index (I) of K. obovata at the species level were 0.3631 and 0.5203, respectively. The genetic differentiation coefficient (Gst) among populations was 0.5548. Among populations component accounted for 55.48% of the total variation, whereas the within populations component accounted for 44.52%, suggesting that genetic differentiation among K. obovata populations was relatively high. The gene flow among populations was 0.4012, indicating that gene flow was low among geographically diverse populations of K. obovata. The results of the genetic diversity and cluster analysis suggest that geographical isolation of K. obovata populations mainly results in low gene flow and random genetic drift, leading to genetic differentiation. (author)

  16. Genetic diversity revealed by genomic-SSR and EST-SSR markers among common wheat, spelt and compactum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xinquan; LIU Peng; HAN Zongfu; NI Zhongfu; SUN Qixin

    2005-01-01

    In this study, two SSR molecular markers, named genomic-SSR and EST-SSR, are used to measure the genetic diversity among three hexaploid wheat populations, which include 28 common wheat ( Triticum aestivum L. ), 13 spelt ( Triticum spelta L. ),and 11 compactum ( Triticum compactum Host. ). The results show that common wheat has the highest genetic polymorphism, followed by spelt and then compactum. The mean genetic distance between the populations is higher than that within a population, and similar tendency is detected for individual genomes A, B and D. Therefore, spelt and compactum can be used as potential germplasms for wheat breeding, especially for enriching the genetic variation in genome D. As compared with spelt, the genetic diversity between common wheat and compactum is much smaller, indicating a closer consanguine relationship between these two species. Although the polymorphism revealed by EST-SSR is lower than that by genomic-SSR, it can effectively differentiate diverse genotypes as well. Together with our present results, it is concluded that EST-SSR marker is an ideal marker for assessing the genetic diversity in wheat. Meanwhile, the origin and evolution of hexaploid wheat is also analyzed and discussed.

  17. Fine-scale analysis reveals cryptic landscape genetic structure in desert tortoises.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Latch

    Full Text Available Characterizing the effects of landscape features on genetic variation is essential for understanding how landscapes shape patterns of gene flow and spatial genetic structure of populations. Most landscape genetics studies have focused on patterns of gene flow at a regional scale. However, the genetic structure of populations at a local scale may be influenced by a unique suite of landscape variables that have little bearing on connectivity patterns observed at broader spatial scales. We investigated fine-scale spatial patterns of genetic variation and gene flow in relation to features of the landscape in desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii, using 859 tortoises genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci with associated data on geographic location, sex, elevation, slope, and soil type, and spatial relationship to putative barriers (power lines, roads. We used spatially explicit and non-explicit Bayesian clustering algorithms to partition the sample into discrete clusters, and characterize the relationships between genetic distance and ecological variables to identify factors with the greatest influence on gene flow at a local scale. Desert tortoises exhibit weak genetic structure at a local scale, and we identified two subpopulations across the study area. Although genetic differentiation between the subpopulations was low, our landscape genetic analysis identified both natural (slope and anthropogenic (roads landscape variables that have significantly influenced gene flow within this local population. We show that desert tortoise movements at a local scale are influenced by features of the landscape, and that these features are different than those that influence gene flow at larger scales. Our findings are important for desert tortoise conservation and management, particularly in light of recent translocation efforts in the region. More generally, our results indicate that recent landscape changes can affect gene flow at a local scale and that their

  18. Subpopulation genetic structure of a plant panmictic population of Castanea sequinii as revealed by microsatellite markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; KANG Ming; HUANG Hongwen

    2007-01-01

    Castanea squinii Dode,an endemic tree widely distributed in China,plays an important role both in chestnut breeding and forest ecosystem function.The spatial genetic structure within and among populations is an important part of the evolutionary and ecological genetic dynamics of natural populations,and can provide insights into effective conservation of genetic resources.In the present study,the spatial genetic structure of a panmictic natural population of C.sequinii in the Dabie Mountain region was investigated using microsatellite markers.Nine prescreened microsatellite loci generated 29-33 alleles each,and were used for spatial autocorrelation analysis.Based on Moran's I coefficient,a panmictic population of C.sequinii in the Dabie Mountain region was found to be lacking a spatial genetic structure.These results suggest that a high pollen-mediated gene flow among subpopulations counteract genetic drift and/or genetic differentiation and plays an important role in maintaining a random and panmictic population structure in C.sequinii populations.Further,a spatial genetic structure was detected in each subpopulation's scale (0.228 km),with all three subpopulations showing significant fine-scale structure.The genetic variation was found to be nonrandomly distributed within 61 m in each subpopulation (Moran's I positive values).Although Moran's I values varied among the different subpopulations,Moran's I in all the three subpopulations reached the expected values with an increase in distances,suggesting a generally patchy distribution in the subpopulations.The fine-scale structure seems to reflect restricted seed dispersal and microenvironment selection in C.sequinii.These results have important implications for understanding the evolutionary history and ecological process of the natural population of C.sequinii and provide baseline data for formulating a conservation strategy of Castanea species.

  19. Genetic variability of brazilian Alternaria spp. isolates as revealed by RAPD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigano Myrian Silvana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variability of 22 isolates of the fungi Alternaria alternata and A. cassiae, obtained from Senna obtusifolia, was studied by RAPD analysis. A total of 491 scorable bands were produced with the use of 28 primers. Cluster analysis based on similarities computed from RAPD markers showed two distinct genetic groups of isolates related to both species. RAPD analysis proved to be an efficient method for detecting genetic variability of A. cassiae and A. alternata isolates occurring in S. obtusifolia, and also for distinguishing Alternaria species.

  20. Optimization of a Reduced Chemical Kinetic Model for HCCI Engine Simulations by Micro-Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A reduced chemical kinetic model (44 species and 72 reactions) for the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion of n-heptane was optimized to improve its autoignition predictions under different engine operating conditions. The seven kinetic parameters of the optimized model were determined by using the combination of a micro-genetic algorithm optimization methodology and the SENKIN program of CHEMKIN chemical kinetics software package. The optimization was performed within the range of equivalence ratios 0.2-1.2, initial temperature 310-375 K and initial pressure 0.1-0.3 MPa. The engine simulations show that the optimized model agrees better with the detailed chemical kinetic model (544 species and 2 446 reactions) than the original model does.

  1. Genetic dissection of an elite rice hybrid revealed that heterozygotes are not always advantageous for performance.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, J P; Xing, Y Z; Xu, C. G.; Sun, X L; Yu, S B; Zhang, Qifa

    2002-01-01

    We introduced an experimental design that produced an "immortalized F(2)" population allowing for complete dissection of genetic components underlying quantitative traits. Data for yield and three component traits of the immortalized F(2) were collected from replicated field trials over 2 years. Using 231 marker loci, we resolved the genetic effects into individual components and assessed relative performance of all the genotypes at both single- and two-locus levels. Single-locus analysis det...

  2. A Genetic Strategy to Measure Circulating Drosophila Insulin Reveals Genes Regulating Insulin Production and Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Sangbin Park; Alfa, Ronald W.; Topper, Sydni M.; Grace E S Kim; Lutz Kockel; Kim, Seung K.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a major regulator of metabolism in metazoans, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest a genetic basis for reductions of both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, phenotypes commonly observed in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To identify molecular functions of genes linked to T2DM risk, we developed a genetic tool to measure insulin-like peptide 2 (Ilp2) levels in Drosophila, a model organism with superb exp...

  3. Genetic structure of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) from the Bolivian altiplano as revealed by RAPD markers

    OpenAIRE

    Del Castillo, C.; Winkel, T.; Mahy, Grégory; Bizoux, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a pseudocereal originated from the Andes important for small farmers’ food security as well as for commercial production. Recently, it has been claimed that in Bolivia genetic erosion could result from the marginalization of the crop in the north and from its commercial standardization in the south. The aim of this study was to quantify the hierarchical structure of the genetic variation present in eight quinoa field populations, consisting of cultivat...

  4. Genetic contributions to white matter architecture revealed by diffusion tensor imaging in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marenco, Stefano; Michael A Siuta; Kippenhan, J. Shane; Grodofsky, Samuel; Chang, Wei-li; Kohn, Philip; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Morris, Colleen A.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Pierpaoli, Carlo; Berman, Karen Faith

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about genetic regulation of the development of white matter. This knowledge is critical in understanding the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental syndromes associated with altered cognition as well as in elucidating the genetics of normal human cognition. The hemideletion of ≈25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23 that causes Williams syndrome (WS) includes genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics in neurons, especially LIMK1 and CYLN2, and therefore offers the opportunity to invest...

  5. A Simple Test of Class-Level Genetic Association Can Reveal Novel Cardiometabolic Trait Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Jing; Nunez, Sara; Reed, Eric; Reilly, Muredach P.; Foulkes, Andrea S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterizing the genetic determinants of complex diseases can be further augmented by incorporating knowledge of underlying structure or classifications of the genome, such as newly developed mappings of protein-coding genes, epigenetic marks, enhancer elements and non-coding RNAs. Methods We apply a simple class-level testing framework, termed Genetic Class Association Testing (GenCAT), to identify protein-coding gene association with 14 cardiometabolic (CMD) related traits acro...

  6. Tracing the genetic origin of Europe's first farmers reveals insights into their social organization

    OpenAIRE

    Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Brandt, Guido; Haak, Wolfgang; Keerl, Victoria; Jakucs, János; Möller-Rieker, Sabine; Köhler, Kitti; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Oross, Krisztián; Marton, Tibor; Osztás, Anett; Kiss, Viktória; Fecher, Marc; Pálfi, György; Molnár, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Farming was established in Central Europe by the Linearbandkeramik culture (LBK), a well-investigated archaeological horizon, which emerged in the Carpathian Basin, in today's Hungary. However, the genetic background of the LBK genesis is yet unclear. Here we present 9 Y chromosomal and 84 mitochondrial DNA profiles from Mesolithic, Neolithic Starčevo and LBK sites (seventh/sixth millennia BC) from the Carpathian Basin and southeastern Europe. We detect genetic continuity of both maternal and...

  7. Genetic triple dissociation reveals multiple roles for dopamine in reinforcement learning

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Michael J.; Ahmed A. Moustafa; Haughey, Heather M.; Curran, Tim; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2007-01-01

    What are the genetic and neural components that support adaptive learning from positive and negative outcomes? Here, we show with genetic analyses that three independent dopaminergic mechanisms contribute to reward and avoidance learning in humans. A polymorphism in the DARPP-32 gene, associated with striatal dopamine function, predicted relatively better probabilistic reward learning. Conversely, the C957T polymorphism of the DRD2 gene, associated with striatal D2 receptor function, predicte...

  8. Population survey and genetic diversity of snow leopards Panthera uncia as revealed by fecal DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu-Guang; Janecka, Jan E; LI Di-Qiang; DUO Hai-Rui; R. Jackson; Murphy, W J

    2008-01-01

    Snow leopards (Panthera uncia) occur in rugged, high altitude regions of Central Asia, where they are endangered as a result of human induced factors including low prey densities and poaching. Information on the status of this felid is limited in many regions. We examined the feasibility of using noninvasive genetic methods to monitor snow leopard populations and to study their genetic diversity. We observed snow leopard scats in three separate geographic regions during brief surveys and coll...

  9. Genetic variation in two sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) stocks revealed by ISSR markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Bing; HU Xiaoli; BAO Zhenmin; LU Wei; HU Jingjie

    2007-01-01

    Sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus samples were collected in Changdao, Penglai (PL),27 individuals, and Lingshandao, Qingdao (QD), 30 individuals, in the Shandong Peninsula, China. Ten SSR primers were used to assess the genetic variation and relationship between and within the two stocks.Respectively, for each stock, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 85.2% and 86.9%; the gene diversity was 0.360 5 and 0.342 8; and the Shannon's information index was 0.515 0 and 0.499 0. At species level, the percentage of polymorphic bands was 92.2%, the total gene diversity was 0.378 9 and the Shannon's information index was 0.550 4. The coefficient of overall genetic differentiation and the genetic distances between the stocks were also calculated to be 0.073 0 and 0.079 6 using the POPGENE program. Results show that the genetic diversity of the two stocks is still large but the genetic distance between the two stocks is close. A dendrogram was constructed for the 57 individuals from the two stocks,showing that the genetic structure was unitary for PL stock but complex for QD stock.

  10. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia, Morena; Escalante, Ana E; Rebollar, Eria A; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there is little understanding of the processes determining their diversity. Here we analyzed the patterns of genetic diversity in coexisting populations of three genera of bacteria (Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Pseudomonas) that are abundant in the aquatic systems of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that a common habitat leaves a signature upon the genetic variation present in bacterial populations, independent of phylogenetic relationships. We used multilocus markers to assess genetic diversity and (1) performed comparative phylogenetic analyses, (2) described the genetic structure of bacterial populations, (3) calculated descriptive parameters of genetic diversity, (4) performed neutrality tests, and (5) conducted coalescent-based historical reconstructions. Our results show a trend of synchronic expansions across most populations independent of both lineage and sampling site. Thus, we provide empirical evidence supporting the analysis of coexisting bacterial lineages in natural environments to advance our understanding of bacterial evolution beyond medical or health-related microbes. PMID:25548732

  11. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morena Avitia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there is little understanding of the processes determining their diversity. Here we analyzed the patterns of genetic diversity in coexisting populations of three genera of bacteria (Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Pseudomonas that are abundant in the aquatic systems of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that a common habitat leaves a signature upon the genetic variation present in bacterial populations, independent of phylogenetic relationships. We used multilocus markers to assess genetic diversity and (1 performed comparative phylogenetic analyses, (2 described the genetic structure of bacterial populations, (3 calculated descriptive parameters of genetic diversity, (4 performed neutrality tests, and (5 conducted coalescent-based historical reconstructions. Our results show a trend of synchronic expansions across most populations independent of both lineage and sampling site. Thus, we provide empirical evidence supporting the analysis of coexisting bacterial lineages in natural environments to advance our understanding of bacterial evolution beyond medical or health-related microbes.

  12. Chemical Proteomics Reveals Ferrochelatase as a Common Off-target of Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaeger, Susan; Gohlke, Bjoern; Perrin, Jessica; Gupta, Vipul; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Helm, Dominic; Qiao, Huichao; Bergamini, Giovanna; Handa, Hiroshi; Savitski, Mikhail M; Bantscheff, Marcus; Médard, Guillaume; Preissner, Robert; Kuster, Bernhard

    2016-05-20

    Many protein kinases are valid drug targets in oncology because they are key components of signal transduction pathways. The number of clinical kinase inhibitors is on the rise, but these molecules often exhibit polypharmacology, potentially eliciting desired and toxic effects. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment of a compound's target space is desirable for a better understanding of its biological effects. The enzyme ferrochelatase (FECH) catalyzes the conversion of protoporphyrin IX into heme and was recently found to be an off-target of the BRAF inhibitor Vemurafenib, likely explaining the phototoxicity associated with this drug in melanoma patients. This raises the question of whether FECH binding is a more general feature of kinase inhibitors. To address this, we applied a chemical proteomics approach using kinobeads to evaluate 226 clinical kinase inhibitors for their ability to bind FECH. Surprisingly, low or submicromolar FECH binding was detected for 29 of all compounds tested and isothermal dose response measurements confirmed target engagement in cells. We also show that Vemurafenib, Linsitinib, Neratinib, and MK-2461 reduce heme levels in K562 cells, verifying that drug binding leads to a loss of FECH activity. Further biochemical and docking experiments identified the protoporphyrin pocket in FECH as one major drug binding site. Since the genetic loss of FECH activity leads to photosensitivity in humans, our data strongly suggest that FECH inhibition by kinase inhibitors is the molecular mechanism triggering photosensitivity in patients. We therefore suggest that a FECH assay should generally be part of the preclinical molecular toxicology package for the development of kinase inhibitors. PMID:26863403

  13. Bio-inspired Silicification of Silica-binding Peptide-Silk Protein Chimeras: Comparison of Chemically and Genetically Produced Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L.S.; Belton, David J.; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of ‘silk’ and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG]n) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 25 equivalents of t...

  14. Chemical Stimulants and Genetic Sexing Boost the SIT: Evidence from Ceratitis capitata and Bactrocera Dorsalis in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic and chemical means have been developed to significantly improve the effectiveness of the sterile insect technique against tephritid fruit flies in recent years. Beginning with the development of genetic sexing techniques some 25 years ago, all-male strains of several species of fruit flies h...

  15. Correlation and regression analyses of genetic effects for different types of cells in mammals under radiation and chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data about genetic mutations under radiation and chemical treatment for different types of cells have been analyzed with correlation and regression analyses. Linear correlation between different genetic effects in sex cells and somatic cells have found. The results may be extrapolated on sex cells of human and mammals. (authors)

  16. Genetic homogeneity in the commercial pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis revealed by COI barcoding gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, S. S. A.; Terossi, M.; Costa, R. C.; Mantelatto, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    The pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis is one of the most commercially exploited species in Brazil's South and Southeastern regions. Specific information about the status of its genetic variation is necessary to promote more effective management procedures. The genetic variation of the population of F. paulensis was investigated in five localities along southern and southeastern coast of Brazil. Sampling was performed with a commercial fishing boat. Total genomic DNA was extracted from abdominal muscle tissues and was used to DNA amplification by PCR. The COI gene was used as a DNA barcoding marker. The 570 bp COI gene sequences were obtained from all 45 individuals. The haplotype network showed no genetic variability among the population stocks, which was confirmed by Molecular Variance Analysis. The final alignment showed that inside species there is haplotype sharing among the sampled localities, since one haplotype is shared by 38 individuals belonging to all the five sampled regions, with no biogeographic pattern. This result is reasonable since there are no geographical barriers or habitat disjunction that might serve as a barrier to gene flow among the sampled localities. Possible reasons and consequences of the genetic homogeneity found are discussed. The results complement ecological studies concerning the offseason: since it is a single stock, the same protection strategy can be applied. However, the genetic homogeneity found in this study combined with the intensive fishery effort and the species biology can result in severe consequences for the F. paulensis.

  17. Genetic Diversity in Lens Species Revealed by EST and Genomic Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Kumar Dikshit

    Full Text Available Low productivity of pilosae type lentils grown in South Asia is attributed to narrow genetic base of the released cultivars which results in susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses. For enhancement of productivity and production, broadening of genetic base is essentially required. The genetic base of released cultivars can be broadened by using diverse types including bold seeded and early maturing lentils from Mediterranean region and related wild species. Genetic diversity in eighty six accessions of three species of genus Lens was assessed based on twelve genomic and thirty one EST-SSR markers. The evaluated set of genotypes included diverse lentil varieties and advanced breeding lines from Indian programme, two early maturing ICARDA lines and five related wild subspecies/species endemic to the Mediterranean region. Genomic SSRs exhibited higher polymorphism in comparison to EST SSRs. GLLC 598 produced 5 alleles with highest gene diversity value of 0.80. Among the studied subspecies/species 43 SSRs detected maximum number of alleles in L. orientalis. Based on Nei's genetic distance cultivated lentil L. culinaris subsp. culinaris was found to be close to its wild progenitor L. culinaris subsp. orientalis. The Prichard's structure of 86 genotypes distinguished different subspecies/species. Higher variability was recorded among individuals within population than among populations.

  18. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjur Reppe

    Full Text Available Bone Mineral Density (BMD is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity.

  19. Comparative Genomics Revealed Genetic Diversity and Species/Strain-Level Differences in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Three Probiotic Bifidobacterial Species

    OpenAIRE

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Horigome, Ayako; SUGAHARA, Hirosuke; Hashikura, Nanami; Minami, Junichi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium animalis are widely used as probiotics in the food industry. Although numerous studies have revealed the properties and functionality of these strains, it is uncertain whether these characteristics are species common or strain specific. To address this issue, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of 49 strains belonging to these three bifidobacterial species to describe their genetic diversity and to evaluate ...

  20. Production and Characterization of Chemically Inactivated Genetically Engineered Clostridium difficile Toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidunas, Eugene; Mathews, Antony; Weaver, Michele; Cai, Ping; Koh, Eun Hee; Patel-Brown, Sujata; Yuan, Hailey; Zheng, Zi-Rong; Carriere, Marjolaine; Johnson, J Erik; Lotvin, Jason; Moran, Justin

    2016-07-01

    A recombinant Clostridium difficile expression system was used to produce genetically engineered toxoids A and B as immunogens for a prophylactic vaccine against C. difficile-associated disease. Although all known enzymatic activities responsible for cytotoxicity were genetically abrogated, the toxoids exhibited residual cytotoxic activity as measured in an in vitro cell-based cytotoxicity assay. The residual cytotoxicity was eliminated by treating the toxoids with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide. Mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis of the EDC-inactivated toxoids identified crosslinks, glycine adducts, and β-alanine adducts. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that modifications resulting from the chemical treatment did not appreciably affect recognition of epitopes by both toxin A- and B-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Compared to formaldehyde-inactivated toxoids, the EDC/N-hydroxysuccinimide-inactivated toxoids exhibited superior stability in solution with respect to reversion of cytotoxic activity. PMID:27233688

  1. Problems and solutions in the estimation of genetic risks from radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive investigations with mice on the effects of various physical and biological factors, such as dose rate, sex and cell stage, on radiation-induced mutation have provided an evaluation of the genetics hazards of radiation in man. The mutational results obtained in both sexes with progressive lowering of the radiation dose rate have permitted estimation of the mutation frequency expected under the low-level radiation conditions of most human exposure. Supplementing the studies on mutation frequency are investigations on the phenotypic effects of mutations in mice, particularly anatomical disorders of the skeleton, which allow an estimation of the degree of human handicap associated with the occurrence of parallel defects in man. Estimation of the genetic risk from chemical mutagens is much more difficult, and the research is much less advanced. Results on transmitted mutations in mice indicate a poor correlation with mutation induction in non-mammalian organisms

  2. Genetic diversity across natural populations of three montane plant species from the Western Ghats, India revealed by intersimple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, A U; Apte, G S; Bahulikar, R A; Lagu, M D; Kulkarni, B G; Suresh, H S; Singh, N P; Rao, M K; Gupta, V S; Pant, A; Ranjekar, P K

    2001-10-01

    We analysed genetic diversity across the natural populations of three montane plant species in the Western Ghats, India; Symplocos laurina, Gaultheria fragrantissima and Eurya nitida using intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. These markers revealed genetic diversity within the populations of these plants from Nilgiri and also between two populations of S. laurina from Nilgiri and Amboli. Genetic variation within and between populations was analysed using various parameters such as total heterozygosity (HT), heterozygosity within population (HS), diversity between populations (DST), coefficient of population differentiation (GST), genetic distance (D) and gene flow (Nm). Total heterozygosity (HT) was higher for S. laurina (0.238) than for G. fragrantissima (0.172) and E. nitida (0.182). Two populations of S. laurina, separated by > 1000 km, showed a high within-population variation (53.7%) and a low gene flow (Nm = 0.447). upgma phenograms depicted a tendency of accessions to group according to their geographical locations in all the three plant species. The insight gained into the genetic structure of these plant populations might have implications in developing in situ and ex situ conservation strategies. PMID:11742544

  3. [Mental disease a heritage. New genetic knowledge can reveal "public diseases" such as autism, dyslexia, alcoholism, anorexia, schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterberg, L

    2000-02-01

    Family and adoption studies indicate that genetic factors play a role in the development of many psychiatric disorders. A variable number of possible interacting genes predisposing to the diseases is likely. The genetic dissection has been hampered by genetic complexity as well as by difficulties in defining the phenotypes. Genetic mapping efforts using sib pairs, twins and individual large families has revealed preliminary or tentative evidence for susceptibility loci for a number of psychiatric disorders. Illnesses include the prion disease familial fatal insomnia (FFI), alcoholism, anorexia nervosa, autism, bipolar affective disorder, dyslexia, enuresis nocturnal, epilepsia, obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), schizophrenia, as well as the dementias, Alzheimer's disease and frontal lobe dementia, and mental retardation. The genes and proteins related to the newly discovered transmitter in the central nervous system, nitric oxide (NO), and its genes and proteins are also reviewed. The number of mapped human genes now exceeds 30,000 of the estimated total number of 60,000 to 100,000 genes. This rapid development will facilitate gene mapping, as well as efforts to isolate and identify the genes responsible for symptom susceptibility in many of the etiologically unclear psychiatric diseases with complex genetic origin. PMID:10707480

  4. Field tests reveal genetic variation for performance atlow temperatures in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Jensen, Louise Toft;

    2010-01-01

    that never left the release site (‘stationary') were reared to the F1 and F2 generation in the laboratory. Subsequent field releases with these flies demonstrated a clear genetic differentiation between mobile and stationary flies in their ability to reach resources at low temperatures in the field...... measured in field recapture studies and the association between field performance and fitness measures estimated in the laboratory. 3. We performed one generation of selection on the ability to reach a resource at low temperature under field conditions. Flies that reached a resource (‘mobile') and those....... This indicates that mobility at low temperature is under additive genetic influence. In contrast mobile and stationary flies were generally indistinguishable when tested in standard laboratory tests of cold performance. The genetic differentiation between the two sub-populations was not linked to...

  5. Population genetic analysis of Colombian Trypanosoma cruzi isolates revealed by enzyme electrophoretic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruiz-Garcia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Colombia presents an enormous biological diversity, few studies have been conducted on the population genetics of Trypanosoma cruzi. This study was carried out with 23 Colombian stocks of this protozoa analyzed for 13 isoenzymatic loci. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the genetic diversity and heterogeneity, the genetic relationships and the possible spatial structure of these 23 Colombian stocks of T. cruzi were estimated. The majority of results obtained are in agreement with a clonal population structure. Nevertheless, two aspects expected in a clonal structure were not discovered in the Colombian T. cruzi stocks. There was an absence of given zymodemes over-represented from a geographical point of view and the presumed temporal stabilizing selective phenomena was not observed either in the Colombian stocks sampled several times through the years of the study. Some hypotheses are discussed in order to explain the results found.

  6. Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milano, I.; Babbucci, M.; Cariani, A.;

    2014-01-01

    fishery. Analysis of 850 individuals from 19 locations across the entire distribution range showed evidence for several outlier loci, with significantly higher resolving power. While 299 putatively neutral SNPs confirmed the genetic break between basins (FCT = 0.016) and weak differentiation within basins...... even when neutral markers provide genetic homogeneity across populations. Here, 381 SNPs located in transcribed regions were used to assess largeand fine-scale population structure in the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), a widely distributed demersal species of high priority for the European...... integrating information from neutral and adaptive evolutionary patterns towards a better assessment of genetic diversity. Accordingly, the generated outlier SNP data could be used for tackling illegal practices in hake fishing and commercialization as well as to develop explicit spatial models for defining...

  7. Ladakh, India: the land of high passes and genetic heterogeneity reveals a confluence of migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Diane J; Benedico, David Perez; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Alfonso-Sanchez, Miguel A; Gayden, Tenzin; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-03-01

    Owing to its geographic location near the longitudinal center of Asia, Ladakh, the land of high passes, has witnessed numerous demographic movements during the past millenniums of occupation. In an effort to view Ladakh's multicultural history from a paternal genetic perspective, we performed a high-resolution Y-chromosomal survey of Ladakh, within the context of Y haplogroup and haplotype distributions of 41 Asian reference populations. The results of this investigation highlight the rich ethnic and genetic diversity of Ladkah which includes genetic contributions from disparate regions of the continent including, West, East, South and Central Asia. The phylogenetic signals from Ladakh are consistent with the Indo-Aryans' occupation during the Neolithic age and its historic connection with Tibet, as well as the East-West gene flow associated with the Silk Road. PMID:25966630

  8. HLA variation reveals genetic continuity rather than population group structure in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Da; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2014-03-01

    Genetic differences between Northeast Asian (NEA) and Southeast Asian (SEA) populations have been observed in numerous studies. At the among-population level, despite a clear north-south differentiation observed for many genetic markers, debates were led between abrupt differences and a continuous pattern. At the within-population level, whether NEA or SEA populations have higher genetic diversity is also highly controversial. In this study, we analyzed a large set of HLA data from East Asia in order to map the genetic variation among and within populations in this continent and to clarify the distribution pattern of HLA lineages and alleles. We observed a genetic differentiation between NEA and SEA populations following a continuous pattern from north to south, and we show a significant and continuous decrease of HLA diversity by the same direction. This continuity is shaped by clinal distributions of many HLA lineages and alleles with increasing or decreasing frequencies along the latitude. These results bring new evidence in favor of the "overlapping model" proposed previously for East Asian peopling history, whereby modern humans migrated eastward from western Eurasia via two independent routes along each side of the Himalayas and, later, overlapped in East Asia across open land areas. Our study strongly suggests that intensive gene flow between NEA and SEA populations occurred and shaped the latitude-related continuous pattern of genetic variation and the peculiar HLA lineage and allele distributions observed in this continent. Probably for a very long period, the exact duration of these events remains to be estimated. PMID:24449274

  9. Revealing growth defects in non-linear borate single crystals by chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péter, Á.; Polgár, K.; Beregi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Inorganic cyclic borates such as β-BaB 2O 4 (BBO), LiB 3O 5 (LBO), CsLiB 6O 10 (CLBO) and Li 2B 4O 7 (LTB) are excellent non-linear optical (NLO) materials, particularly in the ultraviolet region. Another type of borate is YAl 3(BO 3) 4 (YAB) which is utilized as a laser host and for self-frequency doubling. Growth imperfections causing scattering and absorption of laser beams affect the performance and the use of borate single crystals. Defects, like inclusions, twins, grain boundaries and dislocations form readily in crystals grown by both the high temperature top-seeded solution growth (HTTSSG) method (BBO, LBO, YAB) and the Czochralski technique (CLBO, LTB). Chemical etching methods have been developed on various planes of the different borate crystals, in order to reveal the nature and the distribution of these defects. These methods have successfully been used to characterize NLO borate crystals. The origins of lattice defect formation are discussed in terms of the growth parameters.

  10. Zebrafish chemical screening reveals the impairment of dopaminergic neuronal survival by cardiac glycosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Sun

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the prominent degeneration of dopaminergic (DA neurons among other cell types. Here we report a first chemical screen of over 5,000 compounds in zebrafish, aimed at identifying small molecule modulators of DA neuron development or survival. We find that Neriifolin, a member of the cardiac glycoside family of compounds, impairs survival but not differentiation of both zebrafish and mammalian DA neurons. Cardiac glycosides are inhibitors of Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity and widely used for treating heart disorders. Our data suggest that Neriifolin impairs DA neuronal survival by targeting the neuronal enriched Na(+/K(+ ATPase α3 subunit (ATP1A3. Modulation of ionic homeostasis, knockdown of p53, or treatment with antioxidants protects DA neurons from Neriifolin-induced death. These results reveal a previously unknown effect of cardiac glycosides on DA neuronal survival and suggest that it is mediated through ATP1A3 inhibition, oxidative stress, and p53. They also elucidate potential approaches for counteracting the neurotoxicity of this valuable class of medications.

  11. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

  12. Genetic diversity and relationship of global faba bean (Vicia faba L.) germplasm revealed by ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Fei; Zong, Xu-Xiao; Guan, Jian-Ping; Yang, Tao; Sun, Xue-Lian; Ma, Yu; Redden, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships of 802 faba bean (Vicia faba L.) landraces and varieties from different geographical locations of China and abroad were examined using ISSR markers. A total of 212 repeatable amplified bands were generated with 11 ISSR primers, of which 209 were polymorphic. Accessions from North China showed highest genetic diversity, while accessions from central China showed low level of diversity. Chinese spring faba bean germplasm was clearly separated from Chinese winter faba bean, based on principal component analysis and UPGMA clustering analysis. Winter accessions from Zhejiang (East China), Jiangxi (East China), Sichuan (Southwest China) and Guizhou (Southwest China) were quite distinct to that from other provinces in China. Great differentiation between Chinese accessions and those from rest of the world was shown with a UPGMA dendrogram. AMOVA analyses demonstrated large variation and differentiation within and among groups of accessions from China. As a continental geographic group, accessions from Europe were genetically closer to those from North Africa. Based on ISSR data, grouping results of accessions from Asia, Europe and Africa were obviously associated with their geographical origin. The overall results indicated that the genetic relationship of faba bean germplasm was closely associated with their geographical origin and their ecological habit. PMID:22204023

  13. Genetic sharing with cardiovascular disease risk factors and diabetes reveals novel bone mineral density loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Reppe (Sjur); Y. Wang (Yunpeng); W.K. Thompson (Wesley K.); L.K. McEvoy (Linda K.); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); V. Zuber (Verena); M. Leblanc (Marissa); F. Bettella (Francesco); I.G. Mills (Ian G.); R.S. Desikan (Rahul S.); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); K.M. Gautvik (Kaare); A.M. Dale (Anders); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); Y.-H. Hsu; E.L. Duncan (Emma); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); L. Oei; O.M.E. Albagha (Omar M.); N. Amin (Najaf); J.P. Kemp (John); D.L. Koller (Daniel); G. Li (Guo); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); R.L. Minster (Ryan); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); D. Willner (Dana); S.-M. Xiao (Su-Mei); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); H.-F. Zheng (Hou-Feng); N. Alonso (Nerea); J. Eriksson (Joel); C.M. Kammerer (Candace); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); P.J. Leo (Paul); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.G. Wilson (Scott); J.F. Wilson (James F); V. Aalto (Ville); M. Alen (Markku); A.K. Aragaki (Aaron); T. Aspelund (Thor); J.R. Center (Jacqueline); Z. Dailiana (Zoe); C. Duggan; M. Garcia (Melissa); N. Garcia-Giralt (Natàlia); S. Giroux (Sylvie); G. Hallmans (Göran); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); L.B. Husted; K. Jameson (Karen); R. Khusainova (Rita); G.S. Kim (Ghi Su); C. Kooperberg (Charles); T. Koromila (Theodora); M. Kruk (Marcin); M. Laaksonen (Marika); A.Z. Lacroix (Andrea Z.); S.H. Lee (Seung Hun); P.C. Leung (Ping C.); J.R. Lewis (Joshua); L. Masi (Laura); S. Mencej-Bedrac (Simona); T.V. Nguyen (Tuan); X. Nogues (Xavier); M.S. Patel (Millan); J. Prezelj (Janez); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S. Scollen (Serena); K. Siggeirsdottir (Kristin); G.D. Smith; O. Svensson (Olle); S. Trompet (Stella); O. Trummer (Olivia); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); J. Woo (Jean); K. Zhu (Kun); S. Balcells (Susana); M.L. Brandi; B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Cheng (Sulin); C. Christiansen; C. Cooper (Charles); G.V. Dedoussis (George); I. Ford (Ian); M. Frost (Morten); D. Goltzman (David); J. González-Macías (Jesús); M. Kähönen (Mika); M. Karlsson (Magnus); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); J.-M. Koh (Jung-Min); P. Kollia (Panagoula); B.L. Langdahl (Bente); W.D. Leslie (William D.); P. Lips (Paul); O.̈. Ljunggren; R. Lorenc (Roman); J. Marc (Janja); D. Mellström (Dan); B. Obermayer-Pietsch (Barbara); D. Olmos (David); U. Pettersson-Kymmer (Ulrika); D.M. Reid (David); J.A. Riancho; P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); N.L.S. Tang (Nelson L.S.); R. Urreizti (Roser); W. Van Hul (Wim); J. Viikari (Jorma); M.T. Zarrabeitia (María); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); E. Grundberg (Elin); L. Herrera (Lizbeth); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); H. Johannsdottir (Hrefna); T. Kwan (Tony); R. Li (Rui); R.N. Luben (Robert); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); S.T. Palsson (Stefan Th); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); D.J. Verlaan (Dominique); F.M. Williams (Frances); A.R. Wood (Andrew); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); J.A. Cauley (Jane); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); G.R. Clark (Graeme); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); P. Danoy (Patrick); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); R. Eastell (Richard); J.A. Eisman (John); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hofman (Albert); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); G. Jones (Graeme); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); K.T. Khaw; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Liu (Yongmei); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); E. McCloskey (Eugene); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K. Nandakumar (Kannabiran); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); H.A.P. Pols (Huibert A. P.); R.L. Prince (Richard); O. Raitakari (Olli); I.R. Reid (Ian); J. Robbins (John); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); P.C. Sham (Pak Chung); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); F.A. Tylavsky (Frances); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); M.J. Econs (Michael); D.M. Evans (David); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A.W.C. Kung (Annie Wai Chee); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J. Reeve (Jonathan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C. Ohlsson (Claes); D. Karasik (David); J.B. Richards (J. Brent); M.A. Brown (Matthew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John P.A.); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. W

  14. Genetic diversity in bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) landraces revealed by AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massawe, F J; Dickinson, M; Roberts, J A; Azam-Ali, S N

    2002-12-01

    Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc), an African indigenous legume, is popular in most parts of Africa. The present study was undertaken to establish genetic relationships among 16 cultivated bambara groundnut landraces using fluorescence-based amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Seven selective primer combinations generated 504 amplification products, ranging from 50 to 400 bp. Several landrace-specific products were identified that could be effectively used to produce landrace-specific markers for identification purposes. On average, each primer combination generated 72 amplified products that were detectable by an ABI Prism 310 DNA sequencer. The polymorphisms obtained ranged from 68.0 to 98.0%, with an average of 84.0%. The primer pairs M-ACA + P-GCC and M-ACA + P-GGA produced more polymorphic fragments than any other primer pairs and were better at differentiating landraces. The dendrogram generated by the UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging) grouped 16 landraces into 3 clusters, mainly according to their place of collection or geographic origin. DipC1995 and Malawi5 were the most genetically related landraces. AFLP analysis provided sufficient polymorphism to determine the amount of genetic diversity and to establish genetic relationships in bambara groundnut landraces. The results will help in the formulation of marker-assisted breeding in bambara groundnut. PMID:12502264

  15. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations. PMID:19414523

  16. Involvement of surfactant protein D in emphysema revealed by genetic association study

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Takeo; Hagiwara, Koichi; Kamio, Koichiro; Ikeda, Shinobu; Arai, Tomio; Mieno, Makiko Naka; Kumasaka, Toshio; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sawabe, Motoji; Gemma, Akihiko; Kida, Kozui

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SFTPD) induces emphysema in knockout mice, but the association of SFTPD with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema in humans is unclear. Therefore, we aimed to determine the association between genetic variations in SFTPD and susceptibility to COPD and emphysema.

  17. Microsatellite analysis reveals genetically distinct populations of red pine (Pinus resinosa, Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boys, Jacquelyn; Cherry, Marilyn; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2005-05-01

    Red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) is an ecologically and economically important forest tree species of northeastern North America and is considered one of the most genetically depauperate conifer species in the region. We have isolated and characterized 13 nuclear microsatellite loci by screening a partial genomic library with di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeat oligonucleotide probes. In an analysis of over 500 individuals representing 17 red pine populations from Manitoba through Newfoundland, five polymorphic microsatellite loci with an average of nine alleles per locus were identified. The mean expected and observed heterozygosity values were 0.508 and 0.185, respectively. Significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with excess homozygosity indicating high levels of inbreeding were evident in all populations studied. The population differentiation was high with 28-35% of genetic variation partitioned among populations. The genetic distance analysis showed that three northeastern (two Newfoundland and one New Brunswick) populations are genetically distinct from the remaining populations. The coalescence-based analysis suggests that "northeastern" and "main" populations likely became isolated during the most recent Pleistocene glacial period, and severe population bottlenecks may have led to the evolution of a highly selfing mating system in red pine. PMID:21652464

  18. Genetic diversity of Chinese summer soybean germplasm revealed by SSR markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hua; GUAN Rongxia; CHANG Ruzhen; QIU Lijuan

    2005-01-01

    There are abundant soybean germplasm in China. In order to assess genetic diversity of Chinese summer soybean germplasm, 158 Chinese summer soybean accessions from the primary core collection of G. max were used to analyze genetic variation at 67 SSR loci. A total of 460 alleles were detected, in which 414 and 419 alleles occurred in the 80 Huanghuai and the 78 Southern summer accessions, respectively. The average number of alleles per locus was 6.9 for all the summer accessions, and 6.2 for both Huanghuai and Southern summer accessions. Marker diversity (D) per locus ranged from 0.414 to 0.905 with an average of 0.735 for all the summer accessions, from 0.387 to 0.886 with an average of 0.708 for the Huanghuai summer accessions, and from 0.189 to 0.884 with an average of 0.687 for the Southern summer accessions. The Huanghuai and Southern summer germplasm were different in the specific alleles, allelic-frequencies and pairwise genetic similarities. UPGMA cluster analysis based on the similarity data clearly separated the Huanghuai from Southern summer soybean accessions, suggesting that they were different gene pools. The results indicate that Chinese Huanghuai and Southern summer soybean germplasm can be used to enlarge genetic basis for developing elite summer soybean cultivars by exchanging their germplasm.

  19. Genetic and genomic analysis of a fat mass trait with complex inheritance reveals marked sex specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The integration of expression profiling with linkage analysis has increasingly been used to identify genes underlying complex phenotypes. The effects of gender on the regulation of many physiological traits are well documented; however, "genetical genomic" analyses have not yet addressed the degree to which their conclusions are affected by sex. We constructed and densely genotyped a large F2 intercross derived from the inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ on an apolipoprotein E null (ApoE-/- background. This BXH.ApoE-/- population recapitulates several "metabolic syndrome" phenotypes. The cross consists of 334 animals of both sexes, allowing us to specifically test for the dependence of linkage on sex. We detected several thousand liver gene expression quantitative trait loci, a significant proportion of which are sex-biased. We used these analyses to dissect the genetics of gonadal fat mass, a complex trait with sex-specific regulation. We present evidence for a remarkably high degree of sex-dependence on both the cis and trans regulation of gene expression. We demonstrate how these analyses can be applied to the study of the genetics underlying gonadal fat mass, a complex trait showing significantly female-biased heritability. These data have implications on the potential effects of sex on the genetic regulation of other complex traits.

  20. Next-generation sequencing reveals substantial genetic contribution to dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Joshua T; Ding, Jinhui; Crain, Barbara; Pletnikova, Olga; Letson, Christopher; Dawson, Ted M; Rosenthal, Liana S; Pantelyat, Alexander; Gibbs, J Raphael; Albert, Marilyn S; Hernandez, Dena G; Hillis, Argye E; Stone, David J; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John A; Troncoso, Juan C; Scholz, Sonja W

    2016-10-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Although an increasing number of genetic factors have been connected to this debilitating condition, the proportion of cases that can be attributed to distinct genetic defects is unknown. To provide a comprehensive analysis of the frequency and spectrum of pathogenic missense mutations and coding risk variants in nine genes previously implicated in DLB, we performed exome sequencing in 111 pathologically confirmed DLB patients. All patients were Caucasian individuals from North America. Allele frequencies of identified missense mutations were compared to 222 control exomes. Remarkably, ~25% of cases were found to carry a pathogenic mutation or risk variant in APP, GBA or PSEN1, highlighting that genetic defects play a central role in the pathogenesis of this common neurodegenerative disorder. In total, 13% of our cohort carried a pathogenic mutation in GBA, 10% of cases carried a risk variant or mutation in PSEN1, and 2% were found to carry an APP mutation. The APOE ε4 risk allele was significantly overrepresented in DLB patients (p-value genetic testing to patients diagnosed with Lewy body dementia. PMID:27312774

  1. Large-scale SNP analysis reveals clustered and continuous patterns of human genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriver Mark D

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding the distribution of human genetic variation is an important foundation for research into the genetics of common diseases. Some of the alleles that modify common disease risk are themselves likely to be common and, thus, amenable to identification using gene-association methods. A problem with this approach is that the large sample sizes required for sufficient statistical power to detect alleles with moderate effect make gene-association studies susceptible to false-positive findings as the result of population stratification 12. Such type I errors can be eliminated by using either family-based association tests or methods that sufficiently adjust for population stratification 345. These methods require the availability of genetic markers that can detect and, thus, control for sources of genetic stratification among populations. In an effort to investigate population stratification and identify appropriate marker panels, we have analysed 11,555 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 203 individuals from 12 diverse human populations. Individuals in each population cluster to the exclusion of individuals from other populations using two clustering methods. Higher-order branching and clustering of the populations are consistent with the geographic origins of populations and with previously published genetic analyses. These data provide a valuable resource for the definition of marker panels to detect and control for population stratification in population-based gene identification studies. Using three US resident populations (European-American, African-American and Puerto Rican, we demonstrate how such studies can proceed, quantifying proportional ancestry levels and detecting significant admixture structure in each of these populations.

  2. Genetic Variation of Three Populations of Indian Frog (Hoplobatrachus tigerinus Revealed by Allozyme Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Belal Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian bullfrog, Hoplobatrachus tigerinus plays a significant role in maintaining the natural balance in the ecosystems. It plays an important role in controlling the various agricultural pests because of its omnivorous feeding habit. The aim of the present study is to know the genetic variation of H. tigerinus in three natural habitats. Samples collected from three districts of Bangladesh were analyzed with five enzymes (MDH, LDH, GPI, PGM and EST in CA 6.1 buffer system for their genetic variation. Four polymorphic loci (Mdh-1, Est-1, Gpi-1 and Pgm were interpretable in muscle with starch gel electrophoresis. Among the 5 presumptive loci, the mean proportion of polymorphic loci was observed 80, 80 and 60% in Rangpur, Khulna and Mymensingh populations, respectively. The highest mean number of allele per locus and mean proportion of heterozygous loci per individual were observed in the Rangpur population. The average observed heterozygosity (Ho was 0.163 and expected heterozygosity (He was 0.469. In pair-wise analysis, comparatively higher Nm value (5.507 was estimated between the Rangpur and Khulna populations corresponding lower level of FST value (0.043. The UPGMA dendrogram showed two clusters among the three Indian bullfrog populations. Rangpur and Khulna populations formed one cluster while Mymensingh population formed another cluster. The Mymensingh population separated from Rangpur and Khulna by a genetic distance of 0.177 whereas, the Khulna population is different from the Rangpur population by the genetic distance of 0.052. The results suggested that the considerable genetic variation is maintained among the natural H. tigerinus populations.

  3. Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Reveal Genetic Differentiation between Two Sympatric Types of Galaxea fascicularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Nakajima

    Full Text Available The reef-building, scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis, is classified into soft and hard types, based on nematocyst morphology. This character is correlated with the length of the mitochondrial non-coding region (mt-Long: soft colony type, and nematocysts with wide capsules and long shafts; mt-Short: hard colony type, and nematocysts with thin capsules and short shafts. We isolated and characterized novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for G. fascicularis using next-generation sequencing. Based upon the mitochondrial non-coding region, 53 of the 97 colonies collected were mt-Long (mt-L and 44 were mt-Short (mt-S. Among the 53 mt-L colonies, 27 loci were identified as amplifiable, polymorphic microsatellite loci, devoid of somatic mutations and free of scoring errors. Eleven of those 27 loci were also amplifiable and polymorphic in the 44 mt-S colonies; these 11 are cross-type microsatellite loci. The other 16 loci were considered useful only for mt-L colonies. These 27 loci identified 10 multilocus lineages (MLLs among the 53 mt-L colonies (NMLL/N = 0.189, and the 11 cross-type loci identified 7 MLLs in 44 mt-S colonies (NMLL/N = 0.159. Significant genetic differentiation between the two types was detected based on the genetic differentiation index (FST = 0.080, P = 0.001. Bayesian clustering also indicated that these two types are genetically isolated. While nuclear microsatellite genotypes also showed genetic differentiation between mitochondrial types, the mechanism of divergence is not yet clear. These markers will be useful to estimate genetic diversity, differentiation, and connectivity among populations, and to understand evolutionary processes, including divergence of types in G. fascicularis.

  4. Population genetics of the Sao Tome caecilian (Gymnophiona: Dermophiidae: Schistometopum thomense reveals strong geographic structuring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricka E Stoelting

    Full Text Available Islands provide exciting opportunities for exploring ecological and evolutionary mechanisms. The oceanic island of São Tomé in the Gulf of Guinea exhibits high diversity of fauna including the endemic caecilian amphibian, Schistometopum thomense. Variation in pigmentation, morphology and size of this taxon over its c. 45 km island range is extreme, motivating a number of taxonomic, ecological, and evolutionary hypotheses to explain the observed diversity. We conducted a population genetic study of S. thomense using partial sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes (ND4 and 16S, together with morphological examination, to address competing hypotheses of taxonomic or clinal variation. Using Bayesian phylogenetic analysis and Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variance, we found evidence of four geographic clades, whose range and approximated age (c. 253 Kya-27 Kya are consistent with the spread and age of recent volcanic flows. These clades explained 90% of variation in ND4 (φCT = 0.892, and diverged by 4.3% minimum pairwise distance at the deepest node. Most notably, using Mismatch Distributions and Mantel Tests, we identified a zone of population admixture that dissected the island. In the northern clade, we found evidence of recent population expansion (Fu's Fs = -13.08 and Tajima's D = -1.80 and limited dispersal (Mantel correlation coefficient = 0.36, p = 0.01. Color assignment to clades was not absolute. Paired with multinomial regression of chromatic data, our analyses suggested that the genetic groups and a latitudinal gradient together describe variation in color of S. thomense. We propose that volcanism and limited dispersal ability are the likely proximal causes of the observed genetic structure. This is the first population genetic study of any caecilian and demonstrates that these animals have deep genetic divisions over very small areas in accordance with previous speculations of low dispersal abilities.

  5. The Genetics of Bene Israel from India Reveals Both Substantial Jewish and Indian Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Natalie R.; Billing-Ross, Paul; Dubrovsky, Maya; Campbell, Christopher L.; Oddoux, Carole; Friedman, Eitan; Atzmon, Gil; Halperin, Eran; Ostrer, Harry; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The Bene Israel Jewish community from West India is a unique population whose history before the 18th century remains largely unknown. Bene Israel members consider themselves as descendants of Jews, yet the identity of Jewish ancestors and their arrival time to India are unknown, with speculations on arrival time varying between the 8th century BCE and the 6th century CE. Here, we characterize the genetic history of Bene Israel by collecting and genotyping 18 Bene Israel individuals. Combining with 486 individuals from 41 other Jewish, Indian and Pakistani populations, and additional individuals from worldwide populations, we conducted comprehensive genome-wide analyses based on FST, principal component analysis, ADMIXTURE, identity-by-descent sharing, admixture linkage disequilibrium decay, haplotype sharing and allele sharing autocorrelation decay, as well as contrasted patterns between the X chromosome and the autosomes. The genetics of Bene Israel individuals resemble local Indian populations, while at the same time constituting a clearly separated and unique population in India. They are unique among Indian and Pakistani populations we analyzed in sharing considerable genetic ancestry with other Jewish populations. Putting together the results from all analyses point to Bene Israel being an admixed population with both Jewish and Indian ancestry, with the genetic contribution of each of these ancestral populations being substantial. The admixture took place in the last millennium, about 19–33 generations ago. It involved Middle-Eastern Jews and was sex-biased, with more male Jewish and local female contribution. It was followed by a population bottleneck and high endogamy, which can lead to increased prevalence of recessive diseases in this population. This study provides an example of how genetic analysis advances our knowledge of human history in cases where other disciplines lack the relevant data to do so. PMID:27010569

  6. Genetic diversity of Bemisia tabaci (Genn. Populations in Brazil revealed by RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H.C. Lima

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci (Genn. was considered a secondary pest in Brazil until 1990, despite being an efficient geminivirus vector in beans and soybean. In 1991, a new biotype, known as B. tabaci B biotype (=B. argentifolii was detected attacking weed plants and causing phytotoxic problems in Cucurbitaceae. Nowadays, B. tabaci is considered one of the most damaging whitefly pests in agricultural systems worldwide that transmits more than 60 different plant viruses. Little is known about the genetic variability of these populations in Brazil. Knowledge of the genetic variation within whitefly populations is necessary for their efficient control and management. The objectives of the present study were to use RAPD markers (1 to estimate the genetic diversity of B. tabaci populations, (2 to study the genetic relationships among B. tabaci biotypes and two other whitefly species and (3 to discriminate between B. tabaci biotypes. A sample of 109 B. tabaci female individuals obtained from 12 populations in Brazil were analyzed and compared to the A biotype from Arizona (USA and B biotype from California (USA and Paraguay. Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Aleurodicus cocois samples were also included. A total of 72 markers were generated by five RAPD primers and used in the analysis. All primers produced RAPD patterns that clearly distinguished the Bemisia biotypes and the two other whitefly species. Results also showed that populations of the B biotype have considerable genetic variability. An average Jaccard similarity of 0.73 was observed among the B biotype individuals analyzed. Cluster analysis demonstrated that, in general, Brazilian biotype B individuals are scattered independently in the localities where samples were collected. Nevertheless, some clusters were evident, joining individuals according to the host plants. AMOVA showed that most of the total genetic variation is found within populations (56.70%, but a significant portion of the variation is found

  7. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  8. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Vanholme, Ruben; Decou, Raphaël; Goeminne, Geert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long; Höfer, René; Pesquet, Edouard; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2016-09-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  9. Dengue in China: Comprehensive Phylogenetic Evaluation Reveals Evidence of Endemicity and Complex Genetic Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rubing; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing threat of dengue outbreaks in China, it is still considered as an imported disease and its introduction and/or circulation patterns remain obscure. On the basis of the most extensive phylogenetic analysis to date, we showed highly complex genetic diversity of dengue viruses (DENVs) in south China with up to 20 different clades/lineages from multiple serotypes co-circulating in the same year. Despite that most of these clades/lineages were resulted from imported cases, evidence of local persistence of DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) was observed, indicating its potential endemicity in Guangdong province. This study, therefore, provided an overview of DENV genetic diversity and evolutionary dynamics in China, which will be useful for developing policies to prevent and control future dengue outbreaks in China. PMID:26458780

  10. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the...... porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. METHODS: Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential...... expression analysis was performed using the Obesity Index as a continuous variable in a linear model. eQTL mapping was then performed to integrate 60 K porcine SNP chip data with the RNA sequencing data. Results were restricted based on genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, detected...

  11. Genetic differentiation of watermelon landrace types in Mali revealed by microsatellite (SSR) markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nantoume, Aminata Dolo; Andersen, Sven Bode; Jensen, Brita Dahl

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the genetic differentiation of a collection of 134 watermelon landrace accessions from Mali, representing red fleshed dessert and white fleshed seed and cooking type watermelons from five regions, plus three commercial dessert type cultivars with red flesh. The material was...... accessions into use groups (dessert, cooking, seed processing) explained 25 % of the variation. When categorising the accessions further into 10 landrace types, differentiated on the basis of use groups, local accession name, flesh colour and seed phenotype, these landrace types explained 26 % of the......-groups. One group included again the red fleshed dessert types with local and commercial origin, while the remaining seven genetic sub-groups comprised the white fleshed landrace types used for seed processing and cooking, as well as white fleshed types of one dessert type. Some of the seed and cooking types...

  12. Multilocus analysis reveals large genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus strains isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, Giuseppe; Barrio, Eladio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belloch, Carmela

    2016-09-16

    In the present study, we have analysed the genetic diversity in Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola cheesemaking environment. Molecular typing methods inter-RTL fingerprint and mtDNA RFLPs, as well as, sequence diversity and heterozygosity in the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes and analysis of the mating locus were applied to 54 K. marxianus strains. Inter-RTL fingerprint revealed a large degree of genetic heterogeneity and clustering allowed differentiation of K. marxianus strains from different geographical origins. In general, inter-LTR profiles were more discriminating than RFLPs of mtDNA; however our results also indicate that both techniques could be complementary unveiling different degrees of genetic diversity. Sequence analysis of the intergenic region between KmSSB1 and KmRIO2 genes revealed 26 variable positions in which a double peak could be observed in the sequence chromatogram. Further analysis revealed the presence of heterozygous strains in the K. marxianus population isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano. On the other hand, all strains isolated from Pecorino di Farindola were homozygous. Two very different groups of haplotypes could be observed as well as mixtures between them. Phylogenetic reconstruction divided K. marxianus dairy strains into two separate populations. A few heterozygous strains in an intermediate position between them could also be observed. Mating type locus analysis revealed a large population of diploid strains containing both MATa and MATα alleles and few haploid strains, most of them presenting the MATα allele. Different scenarios explaining the presence and maintaining of homozygous and heterozygous diploids as well as hybrids between them in the Parmigiano Reggiano K. marxianus population are proposed. A principal component analysis supported the large differences between K. marxianus isolated from Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino di Farindola. PMID:27294555

  13. Genetic and genomic dissection of Prolactin revealed potential association with milk production traits in riverine buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, A; Maryam, J

    2016-08-01

    Milk yield and quality has been a major selection criterion for genetic improvement in livestock species. Role of Prolactin gene in determining milk quality in terms of protein profile, lactose, lipids and other imperative macromolecules is very important. In this context, genetic profiling of Prolactin gene in riverine buffalo of Pakistan was performed and potential genetic markers were identified illustrating worth of this gene in marker-assisted selection of superior dairy buffaloes. Series of wet and dry lab experimentation was performed starting with genomic DNA isolation from true to breed representatives of indigenous river buffalo (Nili-Ravi). After amplification of coding regions of Prolactin gene, products were eluted and sequenced by Sanger's chain termination method and aligned to get variations in genomic region. A total of 15 novel variations were identified and analyzed statistically for their significance at population level, haplotypes were constructed, and association was estimated. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to evaluate the rate of evolution for Prolactin gene in various mammalian species. Lastly, biological networking for this molecule was predicted to get the bigger pictorial of its functional machinery. Pathway analysis was performed to find its physiological mode of action in milk synthesis. This is a first report toward complete genetic screening of Prolactin gene in Pakistani buffaloes. Results of this study not only provide an insight for potential role of Prolactin gene in milk-producing abilities of buffalo but also suggest new directions for exploration of more genes that may have promising role to enhance future milk production capabilities of river buffalo breeds of Asian region through marker-assisted selection. PMID:27240674

  14. Time-series analysis reveals genetic responses to intensive management of razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus)

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas E Dowling; Turner, Thomas F.; Carson, Evan W; Saltzgiver, Melody J; Adams, Deborah; Kesner, Brian; Paul C Marsh

    2013-01-01

    Time-series analysis is used widely in ecology to study complex phenomena and may have considerable potential to clarify relationships of genetic and demographic processes in natural and exploited populations. We explored the utility of this approach to evaluate population responses to management in razorback sucker, a long-lived and fecund, but declining freshwater fish species. A core population in Lake Mohave (Arizona-Nevada, USA) has experienced no natural recruitment for decades and is m...

  15. Genetic Introgression and Species Boundary of Two Geographically Overlapping Pine Species Revealed by Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Defang; Xia, Tao; Yan, Maomao; Dai, Xiaogang; Xu, Jin; Li, Shuxian; Yin, Tongming

    2014-01-01

    Gene introgression and hybrid barriers have long been a major focus of studies of geographically overlapping species. Two pine species, Pinus massoniana and P. hwangshanensis, are frequently observed growing adjacent to each other, where they overlap in a narrow hybrid zone. As a consequence, these species constitute an ideal system for studying genetic introgression and reproductive barriers between naturally hybridizing, adjacently distributed species. In this study, we sampled 270 pine tre...

  16. The Genetics of Bene Israel from India Reveals Both Substantial Jewish and Indian Ancestry

    OpenAIRE

    Waldman, Yedael Y.; Biddanda, Arjun; Davidson, Natalie R.; Billing-Ross, Paul; Dubrovsky, Maya; Campbell, Christopher L.; Oddoux, Carole; Friedman, Eitan; Atzmon, Gil; Halperin, Eran; Ostrer, Harry; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The Bene Israel Jewish community from West India is a unique population whose history before the 18th century remains largely unknown. Bene Israel members consider themselves as descendants of Jews, yet the identity of Jewish ancestors and their arrival time to India are unknown, with speculations on arrival time varying between the 8th century BCE and the 6th century CE. Here, we characterize the genetic history of Bene Israel by collecting and genotyping 18 Bene Israel individuals. Combinin...

  17. Genome-wide Screening Reveals the Genetic Determinants of an Antibiotic Insecticide in Bacillus thuringiensis*

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Ruan, Li-Fang; Hu, Zhen-Fei; Peng, Dong-hai; Cao, Shi-Yun; Yu, Zi-Niu; Liu, Yao; Zheng, Jin-Shui; Sun, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Thuringiensin is a thermostable secondary metabolite in Bacillus thuringiensis and has insecticidal activity against a wide range of insects. Until now, the regulatory mechanisms and genetic determinants involved in thuringiensin production have remained unclear. Here, we successfully used heterologous expression-guided screening in an Escherichia coli–Bacillus thuringiensis shuttle bacterial artificial chromosome library, to clone the intact thuringiensin synthesis (thu) cluster. Then the th...

  18. Genetic variation within the endangered species Aldrovanda vesiculosa (Droseraceae) as revealed by RAPD analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maldonado, Andrea; Adamec, Lubomír; Suda, Jan; Mes, T. H. M.; Štorchová, Helena

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 2 (2003), s. 159-172. ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A081; GA AV ČR IAA5038907 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908; CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Aldrovanda vesiculosa * Compatibility test * Genetic variation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2003

  19. Conditional, genetic disruption of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors reveals a role in adult motor neuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Robitz, Rachel; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J; Karpman, Adam M; Mahler, Ashley M.; Cronier, Samantha A.; Vesey, Rachel; Spearry, Rachel P.; Zolotukhin, Sergei; MacLennan, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling can promote motor neuron (MN) survival in the adult. If so, proper targeting of this signaling may selectively counteract the effects of adult MN diseases. However, direct evidence for CNTF receptor involvement in adult MN survival is lacking, presumably because the unconditional blockade of the mouse CNTF receptor in vivo [through genetic disruption of the essential CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene]...

  20. University students' reflections on representations in genetics and stereochemistry revealed by a focus group approach

    OpenAIRE

    Inger Edfors; Susanne Wikman; Brita Johansson Cederblad; Cedric Linder

    2015-01-01

    Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on re...

  1. Genetically Induced Cell Death in Bulge Stem Cells Reveals Their Redundancy for Hair and Epidermal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Set...

  2. Genetic relationship and diversity among coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) accessions revealed through SCoT analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh, M. K.; Sabana, A. A.; Rachana, K. E.; Rahman, Shafeeq; Jerard, B. A.; Karun, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is one of the important palms grown both as a homestead and plantation crop in countries and most island territories of tropical regions. Different DNA-based marker systems have been utilized to assess the extent of genetic diversity in coconut. Advances in genomics research have resulted in the development of novel gene-targeted markers. In the present study, we have used a simple and novel marker system, start codon targeted polymorphism (SCoT), for its evaluatio...

  3. Comparative Genomic Hybridizations of Entamoeba Strains Reveal Unique Genetic Fingerprints That Correlate with Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Preetam H.; MacFarlane, Ryan C.; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Matese, John C.; Demeter, Janos; Stroup, Suzanne E.; Singh, Upinder

    2005-01-01

    Variable phenotypes have been identified for Entamoeba species. Entamoeba histolytica is invasive and causes colitis and liver abscesses but only in ∼10% of infected individuals; 90% remain asymptomatically colonized. Entamoeba dispar, a closely related species, is avirulent. To determine the extent of genetic diversity among Entamoeba isolates and potential genotype-phenotype correlations, we have developed an E. histolytica genomic DNA microarray and used it to genotype strains of E. histol...

  4. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Morena Avitia; Escalante, Ana E.; Rebollar, Eria A.; Alejandra Moreno-Letelier; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Valeria Souza

    2014-01-01

    Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there ...

  5. Genetic analysis reveals the complex structure of HIV-1 transmission within defined risk groups

    OpenAIRE

    HUE,S; Pillay, D; Clewley, J. P.; Pybus, O. G.

    2005-01-01

    We explored the epidemic history of HIV-1 subtype B in the United Kingdom using statistical methods that infer the population history of pathogens from sampled gene sequence data. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 pol gene sequences from Britain showed at least six large transmission chains, indicating a genetically variable, but epidemiologically homogeneous, epidemic among men having sex with men. Through coalescent-based analysis we showed that these chains arose through separa...

  6. Genetic diversity of Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) Populations in Brazil revealed by RAPD markers

    OpenAIRE

    L.H.C. Lima; Campos, L; M.C. Moretzsohn; D. Návia; M.R.V. de Oliveira

    2002-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) was considered a secondary pest in Brazil until 1990, despite being an efficient geminivirus vector in beans and soybean. In 1991, a new biotype, known as B. tabaci B biotype (=B. argentifolii) was detected attacking weed plants and causing phytotoxic problems in Cucurbitaceae. Nowadays, B. tabaci is considered one of the most damaging whitefly pests in agricultural systems worldwide that transmits more than 60 different plant viruses. Little is known about the genetic ...

  7. New inducible genetic method reveals critical roles of GABA in the control of feeding and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fantao; Han, Yong; Srisai, Dollada; Belakhov, Valery; Farias, Monica; Xu, Yong; Palmiter, Richard D; Baasov, Timor; Wu, Qi

    2016-03-29

    Currently available inducibleCre/loxPsystems, despite their considerable utility in gene manipulation, have pitfalls in certain scenarios, such as unsatisfactory recombination rates and deleterious effects on physiology and behavior. To overcome these limitations, we designed a new, inducible gene-targeting system by introducing an in-frame nonsense mutation into the coding sequence of Cre recombinase (nsCre). Mutant mRNAs transcribed fromnsCretransgene can be efficiently translated into full-length, functional Cre recombinase in the presence of nonsense suppressors such as aminoglycosides. In a proof-of-concept model, GABA signaling from hypothalamic neurons expressing agouti-related peptide (AgRP) was genetically inactivated within 4 d after treatment with a synthetic aminoglycoside. Disruption of GABA synthesis in AgRP neurons in young adult mice led to a dramatic loss of body weight due to reduced food intake and elevated energy expenditure; they also manifested glucose intolerance. In contrast, older mice with genetic inactivation of GABA signaling by AgRP neurons had only transient reduction of feeding and body weight; their energy expenditure and glucose tolerance were unaffected. These results indicate that GABAergic signaling from AgRP neurons plays a key role in the control of feeding and metabolism through an age-dependent mechanism. This new genetic technique will augment current tools used to elucidate mechanisms underlying many physiological and neurological processes. PMID:26976589

  8. Ecological and genetic differences between Cacopsylla melanoneura (Hemiptera, Psyllidae populations reveal species host plant preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Malagnini

    Full Text Available The psyllid Cacopsylla melanoneura is considered one of the vectors of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali', the causal agent of apple proliferation disease. In Northern Italy, overwintered C. melanoneura adults reach apple and hawthorn around the end of January. Nymph development takes place between March and the end of April. The new generation adults migrate onto conifers around mid-June and come back to the host plant species after overwintering. In this study we investigated behavioural differences, genetic differentiation and gene flow between samples of C. melanoneura collected from the two different host plants. Further analyses were performed on some samples collected from conifers. To assess the ecological differences, host-switching experiments were conducted on C. melanoneura samples collected from apple and hawthorn. Furthermore, the genetic structure of the samples was studied by genotyping microsatellite markers. The examined C. melanoneura samples performed better on their native host plant species. This was verified in terms of oviposition and development of the offspring. Data resulting from microsatellite analysis indicated a low, but statistically significant difference between collected-from-apple and hawthorn samples. In conclusion, both ecological and genetic results indicate a differentiation between C. melanoneura samples associated with the two host plants.

  9. Artificial Selection Reveals High Genetic Variation in Phenology at the Trailing Edge of a Species Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Seema Nayan; Angert, Amy Lauren

    2016-02-01

    Species responses to climate change depend on the interplay of migration and adaptation, yet we know relatively little about the potential for adaptation. Genetic adaptations to climate change often involve shifts in the timing of phenological events, such as flowering. If populations at the edge of a species range have lower genetic variation in phenological traits than central populations, then their persistence under climate change could be threatened. To test this hypothesis, we performed artificial selection experiments using the scarlet monkeyflower (Mimulus cardinalis) and compared genetic variation in flowering time among populations at the latitudinal center, northern edge, and southern edge of the species range. We also assessed whether selection on flowering time yielded correlated responses in functional traits, potentially representing a cost associated with early or late flowering. Contrary to prediction, southern populations exhibited greater responses to selection on flowering time than central or northern populations. Further, selection for early flowering resulted in correlated increases in specific leaf area and leaf nitrogen, whereas selection for late flowering led to decreases in these traits. These results provide critical insights about how spatial variation in the potential for adaptation may affect population persistence under changing climates. PMID:26807746

  10. Evolution of metastasis revealed by mutational landscapes of chemically induced skin cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human tumors show a high level of genetic heterogeneity, but the processes that influence the timing and route of metastatic dissemination of the subclones are unknown. Here we have used whole-exome sequencing of 103 matched benign, malignant and metastatic skin tumors from genetically heterogeneous mice to demonstrate that most metastases disseminate synchronously from the primary tumor, supporting parallel rather than linear evolution as the predominant model of metastasis.

  11. Genetic and chemical modifiers of a CUG toxicity model in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Garcia-Lopez

    Full Text Available Non-coding CUG repeat expansions interfere with the activity of human Muscleblind-like (MBNL proteins contributing to myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1. To understand this toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism we developed a Drosophila model expressing 60 pure and 480 interrupted CUG repeats in the context of a non-translatable RNA. These flies reproduced aspects of the DM1 pathology, most notably nuclear accumulation of CUG transcripts, muscle degeneration, splicing misregulation, and diminished Muscleblind function in vivo. Reduced Muscleblind activity was evident from the sensitivity of CUG-induced phenotypes to a decrease in muscleblind genetic dosage and rescue by MBNL1 expression, and further supported by the co-localization of Muscleblind and CUG repeat RNA in ribonuclear foci. Targeted expression of CUG repeats to the developing eye and brain mushroom bodies was toxic leading to rough eyes and semilethality, respectively. These phenotypes were utilized to identify genetic and chemical modifiers of the CUG-induced toxicity. 15 genetic modifiers of the rough eye phenotype were isolated. These genes identify putative cellular processes unknown to be altered by CUG repeat RNA, and they include mRNA export factor Aly, apoptosis inhibitor Thread, chromatin remodelling factor Nurf-38, and extracellular matrix structural component Viking. Ten chemical compounds suppressed the semilethal phenotype. These compounds significantly improved viability of CUG expressing flies and included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (ketoprofen, muscarinic, cholinergic and histamine receptor inhibitors (orphenadrine, and drugs that can affect sodium and calcium metabolism such as clenbuterol and spironolactone. These findings provide new insights into the DM1 phenotype, and suggest novel candidates for DM1 treatments.

  12. Genetic characteristics of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in Chinese mainland, revealing genetic markers of classical and variant virulent parental/attenuated strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangzhou; Ku, Xugang; Li, Zhonghua; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Ye, Shiyi; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhou, Chunling; Yao, Li; Meng, Xianrong; He, Qigai

    2016-08-15

    Since October 2010, porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) caused by variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has led great economic losses to the global pig industry, especially in China. To study the genetic characteristics of PEDV strains in Chinese mainland, a total of 603 clinical samples from nine provinces/districts of Chinese mainland from January 2014 to December 2015 were collected for RT-PCR detection and 1-1323bp of S gene of 91 isolates and ORF3 gene of 46 isolates were sequenced. The results showed that the variant PEDV were the dominant pathogens of viral diarrhea diseases in these areas. Six novel variant PEDV strains (FJAX1, FJAX2, HeNPDS1, HeNPDS2, HeNPY3, and HeNPY4) with two amino acids (aa) deletion at the 56-57 aa of S protein were identified. A total of 405 Chinese PEDV strains were subjected to phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis. The results revealed that the subgroup Va in variant PEDV group were the dominant subgroup and the spread trend of variant PEDV strains seemed to be from the southeast coastal districts to other coastal districts and interior districts. The N-terminal of S gene (1-750bp), to some extent, could represent S1 or full length S gene for phylogenetic, similarity, antigen index, hydrophilicity plot, and differentiation analyses. The 404-472bp of S gene contained the three genetic markers, i.e., "TAA" insertion at 404-405bp, "ACAGGT" deletion at 430-435bp, and "ATA" deletion at 455-457bp can be used to differentiate the classical and variant virulent parental/attenuated PEDV strains and help us to learn the infectious and genetic characteristics of PEDV strains more convenient and cheaper. This study has important implication for understanding the infectious, genetic, and evolutionary aspects of PEDV strains in Chinese mainland. PMID:27178127

  13. Genetic analyses reveal a role for vitamin D insufficiency in HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Lange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vitamin D insufficiency has been associated with the occurrence of various types of cancer, but causal relationships remain elusive. We therefore aimed to determine the relationship between genetic determinants of vitamin D serum levels and the risk of developing hepatitis C virus (HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Associations between CYP2R1, GC, and DHCR7 genotypes that are determinants of reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D3 serum levels and the risk of HCV-related HCC development were investigated for 1279 chronic hepatitis C patients with HCC and 4325 without HCC, respectively. The well-known associations between CYP2R1 (rs1993116, rs10741657, GC (rs2282679, and DHCR7 (rs7944926, rs12785878 genotypes and 25(OHD3 serum levels were also apparent in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The same genotypes of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that are associated with reduced 25(OHD3 serum levels were found to be associated with HCV-related HCC (P = 0.07 [OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.99-1.28] for CYP2R1, P = 0.007 [OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.12-2.15] for GC, P = 0.003 [OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.13-1.78] for DHCR7; ORs for risk genotypes. In contrast, no association between these genetic variations and liver fibrosis progression rate (P>0.2 for each SNP or outcome of standard therapy with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (P>0.2 for each SNP was observed, suggesting a specific influence of the genetic determinants of 25(OHD3 serum levels on hepatocarcinogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest a relatively weak but functionally relevant role for vitamin D in the prevention of HCV-related hepatocarcinogenesis.

  14. Human genetic deficiencies reveal the roles of complement in the inflammatory network: lessons from nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Christiansen, Dorte; Pharo, Anne;

    2009-01-01

    does not interfere with the complement system. Expression of tissue factor, cell adhesion molecules, and oxidative burst depended highly on C5, mediated through the activation product C5a, whereas granulocyte enzyme release relied mainly on C3 and was C5a-independent. Release of cytokines and......Complement component C5 is crucial for experimental animal inflammatory tissue damage; however, its involvement in human inflammation is incompletely understood. The responses to gram-negative bacteria were here studied taking advantage of human genetic complement-deficiencies--nature's own...

  15. Muscle MRI reveals distinct abnormalities in genetically proven non-dystrophic myotonias ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, J. M.; Matthews, E.; Raja Rayan, D.L.; Fischmann, A.; Sinclair, C. D.; Reilly, M.M.; Thornton, J. S.; Hanna, M G.; Yousry, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the presence, frequency and pattern of MRI abnormalities in non-dystrophic myotonia patients. We reviewed T1-weighted and STIR (short-tau-inversion-recovery) 3T MRI sequences of lower limb muscles at thigh and calf level in 21 patients with genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia: 11 with CLCN1 mutations and 10 with SCN4A mutations, and 19 healthy volunteers. The MRI examinations of all patients showed hyperintensity within muscles on either T1-weighted or STIR images. Mild ...

  16. Population survey and genetic diversity of snow leopards Panthera uncia as revealed by fecal DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yu-Guang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Snow leopards (Panthera uncia occur in rugged, high altitude regions of Central Asia, where they are endangered as a result of human induced factors including low prey densities and poaching. Information on the status of this felid is limited in many regions. We examined the feasibility of using noninvasive genetic methods to monitor snow leopard populations and to study their genetic diversity. We observed snow leopard scats in three separate geographic regions during brief surveys and collected 109 scats from southwestern India (Ladakh, western China (Qinghai, and southern Mongolia (South Gobi. We used a panel of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA primers and seven domestic cat Felis catus microsatellite loci to survey the snow leopard population and to examine their genetic diversity. Of the 32 scat samples found in Ladakh, 50 found in Qinghai, and 27 found in Mongolia, 80% produced positive species identification. Positive snow leopard identification was made in 17 of 32 scats collected in Ladakh, where 6 red fox and 2 wolf/dog scats were also detected. In Qinghai, 36 scats were identified by mtDNA analysis, including 3 snow leopard, 10 lynx, 21 red fox, and 2 wolf/dog. Only snow leopard (11 and red fox (13 scats were observed in South Gobi. We genotyped 31 confirmed snow leopard scats with the 7 microsatellites selected. There were a total of 9 unique genotypes detected: 4 in Ladakh and 5 in South Gobi. Using the Y-linked AMELY marker, we identified 2 males and 2 females in Ladakh, and 3 males and 2 females in South Gobi. All 7 loci were polymorphic in both Ladakh and South Gobi with numbers of alleles ranging from 2 to 4. No loci were found to be out of HW equilibrium after sequential Bonferroni correction of significance levels. The numbers of alleles and heterozygosity were lower in South Gobi, although our sample sizes were too small to test for significance. The Fst estimated between the two areas was 0.171. Our findings highlight the efficacy

  17. Genetic variation between Schistosoma japonicum lineages from lake and mountainous regions in China revealed by resequencing whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingbo; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Bin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhong; Feng, Zheng; Han, Ze-Guang; Hu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Schistosomiasis japonica is endemic in mainland China along the Yangtze River, typically distributed in two geographical categories of lake and mountainous regions. Study on schistosome genetic diversity is of interest in respect of understanding parasite biology and transmission, and formulating control strategy. Certain genetic variations may be associated with adaptations to different ecological habitats. The aim of this study is to gain insight into Schistosoma japonicum genetic variation, evolutionary origin and associated causes of different geographic lineages through examining homozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) based on resequenced genome data. We collected S. japonicum samples from four sites, three in the lake regions (LR) of mid-east (Guichi and Tonglin in Anhui province, Laogang in Hunan province) and one in mountainous region (MR) (Xichang in Sichuan province) of south-west of China, resequenced their genomes using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology, and made use of the available database of S. japonicum draft genomic sequence as a reference in genome mapping. A total of 14,575 SNPs from 2059 genes were identified in the four lineages. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed significant genetic variation exhibited between the different geographical lineages, and further revealed that the MR Xichang lineage is phylogenetically closer to LR Guich lineage than to other two LR lineages, and the MR lineage might be evolved from LR lineages. More than two thirds of detected SNPs were nonsynonymous; functional annotation of the SNP-containing genes showed that they are involved mainly in biological processes such as signaling and response to stimuli. Notably, unique nonsynonymous SNP variations were detected in 66 genes of MR lineage, inferring possible genetic adaption to mountainous ecological condition. PMID:27207135

  18. A forward genetic screen reveals that calcium-dependent protein kinase 3 regulates egress in Toxoplasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Garrison

    Full Text Available Egress from the host cell is a crucial and highly regulated step in the biology of the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Active egress depends on calcium fluxes and appears to be a crucial step in escaping the attack from the immune system and, potentially, in enabling the parasites to shuttle into appropriate cells for entry into the brain of the host. Previous genetic screens have yielded mutants defective in both ionophore-induced egress and ionophore-induced death. Using whole genome sequencing of one mutant and subsequent analysis of all mutants from these screens, we find that, remarkably, four independent mutants harbor a mis-sense mutation in the same gene, TgCDPK3, encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase. All four mutations are predicted to alter key regions of TgCDPK3 and this is confirmed by biochemical studies of recombinant forms of each. By complementation we confirm a crucial role for TgCDPK3 in the rapid induction of parasite egress and we establish that TgCDPK3 is critical for formation of latent stages in the brains of mice. Genetic knockout of TgCDPK3 confirms a crucial role for this kinase in parasite egress and a non-essential role for it in the lytic cycle.

  19. Genetic relationship of Chinese and Japanese gamecocks revealed by mtDNA sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Qing; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2006-02-01

    Cockfighting has a very long history dating back to as early as 2500 years ago in China. Cockfighting was intertwined with human cultural traditions, helped disperse chickens across the world, and influenced the subsequent breed selection. Therefore, tracing the origin of gamecocks could mirror the distribution of the cockfighting culture. In this study, we compared the available mtDNA control region sequences in Chinese and Japanese gamecocks to test the recently proposed hypothesis behind the dual origin of the Japanese cockfighting culture (from China and Southeast Asia independently). We assigned gamecock mtDNAs to different matrilineal components (or phylogenetic clades) that emerged from the phylogenetic tree and network profile, and compared the frequency differences between Chinese and Japanese gamecocks. Among the six clades (A-F) identified, Japanese gamecocks were most frequently found in clades C and D (74%, 32/43), whereas more than half of the Chinese gamecock samples (69%, 35/51) were grouped in clades A and B. Haplotypes in Japanese gamecocks assigned to clades A, B, and E were either shared with those of the Chinese samples or differed from the close Chinese types by no more than a three-mutation distance. This genetic pattern is in accordance with the proposed dual origin of Japanese gamecocks but has left room for single origin of Japanese gamecocks from China. The genetic structure of gamecocks in China and Japan might also be influenced by subsequent breed selection and conservation after the initial gamecock introduction. PMID:16648993

  20. Understanding the molecular basis of celiac disease: what genetic studies reveal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsuur, Alienke J; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by a chronic immune reaction in the small intestine to the gluten proteins that are present in a (Western) daily diet. Besides the well known involvement of the HLA class II histocompatibility antigen (HLA)-DQ2.5 and -DQ8 heterodimers (encoded by particular combinations of the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 gene) in CD and the minor contribution of the CTLA-4 gene, recently the myosin IXB (MYO9B) gene has also been found to be genetically associated. This review covers the general aspects of CD as well as current insight into important molecular aspects. We evaluate the role of susceptibility genes in CD by following gluten along its path from ingestion to uptake in the body, which leads us through the three aspects of CD's pathology. The first is the presence of gluten in the lumen of the intestine, where it is broken down by several enzymes. The second is the intestinal barrier through which gluten peptides pass. The third is the reaction of the immune system in response to gluten peptides, in which both the innate and the adaptive immune systems play a role. Our main conclusion, based on the current genetic and functional studies, is that we should look for causal genes in the barrier function as well as in the immune systems. PMID:17438672

  1. Mark-recapture using tetracycline and genetics reveal record-high bear density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, E.; Titus, K.; Garshelis, D.L.; Peacock, M.M.; Kuc, M.

    2011-01-01

    We used tetracycline biomarking, augmented with genetic methods to estimate the size of an American black bear (Ursus americanus) population on an island in Southeast Alaska. We marked 132 and 189 bears that consumed remote, tetracycline-laced baits in 2 different years, respectively, and observed 39 marks in 692 bone samples subsequently collected from hunters. We genetically analyzed hair samples from bait sites to determine the sex of marked bears, facilitating derivation of sex-specific population estimates. We obtained harvest samples from beyond the study area to correct for emigration. We estimated a density of 155 independent bears/100 km2, which is equivalent to the highest recorded for this species. This high density appears to be maintained by abundant, accessible natural food. Our population estimate (approx. 1,000 bears) could be used as a baseline and to set hunting quotas. The refined biomarking method for abundance estimation is a useful alternative where physical captures or DNA-based estimates are precluded by cost or logistics. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  2. Virtual mutagenesis of the yeast cyclins genetic network reveals complex dynamics of transcriptional control networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliska Vohradska

    Full Text Available Study of genetic networks has moved from qualitative description of interactions between regulators and regulated genes to the analysis of the interaction dynamics. This paper focuses on the analysis of dynamics of one particular network--the yeast cyclins network. Using a dedicated mathematical model of gene expression and a procedure for computation of the parameters of the model from experimental data, a complete numerical model of the dynamics of the cyclins genetic network was attained. The model allowed for performing virtual experiments on the network and observing their influence on the expression dynamics of the genes downstream in the regulatory cascade. Results show that when the network structure is more complicated, and the regulatory interactions are indirect, results of gene deletion are highly unpredictable. As a consequence of quantitative behavior of the genes and their connections within the network, causal relationship between a regulator and target gene may not be discovered by gene deletion. Without including the dynamics of the system into the network, its functional properties cannot be studied and interpreted correctly.

  3. Expression weighted cell type enrichments reveal genetic and cellular nature of major brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Gerald Skene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression of a cell type specific marker, methods are required for the common polygenic disorders. We developed the Expression Weighted Cell Type Enrichment (EWCE method that uses single cell transcriptomes to generate the probability distribution associated with a gene list having an average level of expression within a cell type. Following validation, we applied EWCE to human genetic data from cases of epilepsy, Schizophrenia, Autism, Intellectual Disability, Alzheimer’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis and anxiety disorders. Genetic susceptibility primarily affected microglia in Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis; was shared between interneurons and pyramidal neurons in Autism and Schizophrenia; while intellectual disabilities and epilepsy were attributable to a range of cell-types, with the strongest enrichment in interneurons. We hypothesised that the primary cell type pathology could trigger secondary changes in other cell types and these could be detected by applying EWCE to transcriptome data from diseased tissue. In Autism, Schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease we find evidence of pathological changes in all of the major brain cell types. These findings give novel insight into the cellular origins and progression in common brain disorders. The methods can be applied to any tissue and disorder and have applications in validating mouse models.

  4. Microarray analysis reveals genetic pathways modulated by tipifarnib in acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors (FTIs) were originally developed to inhibit oncogenic ras, however it is now clear that there are several other potential targets for this drug class. The FTI tipifarnib (ZARNESTRA™, R115777) has recently demonstrated clinical responses in adults with refractory and relapsed acute leukemias. This study was conducted to identify genetic markers and pathways that are regulated by tipifarnib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Tipifarnib-mediated gene expression changes in 3 AML cell lines and bone marrow samples from two patients with AML were analyzed on a cDNA microarray containing approximately 7000 human genes. Pathways associated with these expression changes were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. The expression analysis identified a common set of genes that were regulated by tipifarnib in three leukemic cell lines and in leukemic blast cells isolated from two patients who had been treated with tipifarnib. Association of modulated genes with biological functional groups identified several pathways affected by tipifarnib including cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, immunity, and apoptosis. Gene expression changes were verified in a subset of genes using real time RT-PCR. Additionally, regulation of apoptotic genes was found to correlate with increased Annexin V staining in the THP-1 cell line but not in the HL-60 cell line. The genetic networks derived from these studies illuminate some of the biological pathways affected by FTI treatment while providing a proof of principle for identifying candidate genes that might be used as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity

  5. Population genetic analysis reveals cryptic sex in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing-Wen; Zhu, Wen; He, Meng-Han; Wu, E-Jiao; Duan, Guo-Hua; Xie, Ye-Kun; Jin, Yu-Jia; Yang, Li-Na; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive mode can impact population genetic dynamics and evolutionary landscape of plant pathogens as well as on disease epidemiology and management. In this study, we monitored the spatial dynamics and mating type idiomorphs in ~700 Alternaria alternata isolates sampled from the main potato production areas in China to infer the mating system of potato early blight. Consistent with the expectation of asexual species, identical genotypes were recovered from different locations separated by hundreds of kilometers of geographic distance and spanned across many years. However, high genotype diversity, equal MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 frequencies within and among populations, no genetic differentiation and phylogenetic association between two mating types, combined with random association amongst neutral markers in some field populations, suggested that sexual reproduction may also play an important role in the epidemics and evolution of the pathogen in at least half of the populations assayed despite the fact that no teleomorphs have been observed yet naturally or artificially. Our results indicated that A. alternata may adopt an epidemic mode of reproduction by combining many cycles of asexual propagation with fewer cycles of sexual reproduction, facilitating its adaptation to changing environments and making the disease management on potato fields even more difficult. PMID:26666175

  6. Comparative phylogeography and population genetics within Buteo lineatus reveals evidence of distinct evolutionary lineages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J.M.; Strobel, Bradley N.; Boal, C.W.; Hull, A.C.; Dykstra, C.R.; Irish, A.M.; Fish, A.M.; Ernest, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional subspecies classifications may suggest phylogenetic relationships that are discordant with evolutionary history and mislead evolutionary inference. To more accurately describe evolutionary relationships and inform conservation efforts, we investigated the genetic relationships and demographic histories of Buteo lineatus subspecies in eastern and western North America using 21 nuclear microsatellite loci and 375-base pairs of mitochondrial control region sequence. Frequency based analyses of mitochondrial sequence data support significant population distinction between eastern (B. l. lineatus/alleni/texanus) and western (B. l. elegans) subspecies of B. lineatus. This distinction was further supported by frequency and Bayesian analyses of the microsatellite data. We found evidence of differing demographic histories between regions; among eastern sites, mitochondrial data suggested that rapid population expansion occurred following the end of the last glacial maximum, with B. l. texanus population expansion preceding that of B. l. lineatus/alleni. No evidence of post-glacial population expansion was detected among western samples (B. l. elegans). Rather, microsatellite data suggest that the western population has experienced a recent bottleneck, presumably associated with extensive anthropogenic habitat loss during the 19th and 20th centuries. Our data indicate that eastern and western populations of B. lineatus are genetically distinct lineages, have experienced very different demographic histories, and suggest management as separate conservation units may be warranted. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole genome sequencing and complete genetic analysis reveals novel pathways to glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Renzoni

    Full Text Available The precise mechanisms leading to the emergence of low-level glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. In this study, we used whole genome deep sequencing to detect differences between two isogenic strains: a parental strain and a stable derivative selected stepwise for survival on 4 µg/ml teicoplanin, but which grows at higher drug concentrations (MIC 8 µg/ml. We uncovered only three single nucleotide changes in the selected strain. Nonsense mutations occurred in stp1, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, and in yjbH, encoding a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the redox/thiol stress sensor and global transcriptional regulator, Spx. A missense mutation (G45R occurred in the histidine kinase sensor of cell wall stress, VraS. Using genetic methods, all single, pairwise combinations, and a fully reconstructed triple mutant were evaluated for their contribution to low-level glycopeptide resistance. We found a synergistic cooperation between dual phospho-signalling systems and a subtle contribution from YjbH, suggesting the activation of oxidative stress defences via Spx. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic demonstration of multiple sensor and stress pathways contributing simultaneously to glycopeptide resistance development. The multifactorial nature of glycopeptide resistance in this strain suggests a complex reprogramming of cell physiology to survive in the face of drug challenge.

  8. Transcriptome comparison reveals a genetic network regulating the lower temperature limit in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Liu, Yimeng; Wang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Dong; Niu, Hongbo; Jiang, Shouwen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dongsheng; Han, Bingshe; Xu, Qianghua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional plasticity is a major driver of phenotypic differences between species. The lower temperature limit (LTL), namely the lower end of survival temperature, is an important trait delimiting the geographical distribution of a species, however, the genetic mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the inter-species transcriptional diversification in cold responses between zebrafish Danio rerio and tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, which were reared at a common temperature (28 °C) but have distinct LTLs. We identified significant expressional divergence between the two species in the orthologous genes from gills when the temperature cooled to the LTL of tilapia (8 °C). Five KEGG pathways were found sequentially over-represented in the zebrafish/tilapia divergently expressed genes in the duration (12 hour) of 8 °C exposure, forming a signaling cascade from metabolic regulation to apoptosis via FoxO signaling. Consistently, we found differential progression of apoptosis in the gills of the two species in which zebrafish manifested a delayed and milder apoptotic phenotype than tilapia, corresponding with a lower LTL of zebrafish. We identified diverged expression in 25 apoptosis-related transcription factors between the two species which forms an interacting network with diverged factors involving the FoxO signaling and metabolic regulation. We propose a genetic network which regulates LTL in fishes. PMID:27356472

  9. The genetic landscape of Ceratocystis albifundus populations in South Africa reveals a recent fungal introduction event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hyeon; Roux, Jolanda; Wingfield, Brenda D; Barnes, Irene; Mostert, Lizel; Wingfield, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Geographical range expansion or host shifts is amongst the various evolutionary forces that underlie numerous emerging diseases caused by fungal pathogens. In this regard, Ceratocystis albifundus, the causal agent of a serious wilt disease of Acacia mearnsii trees in Africa, was recently identified killing cultivated Protea cynaroides in the Western Cape (WC) Province of South Africa. Protea cynaroides is an important native plant in the area and a key component of the Cape Floristic Region. The appearance of this new disease outbreak, together with isolates of C. albifundus from natural ecosystems as well as plantations of nonnative trees, provided an opportunity to consider questions relating to the possible origin and movement of the pathogen in South Africa. Ten microsatellite markers were used to determine the genetic diversity, population structure, and possible gene flow in a collection of 193 C. albifundus isolates. All populations, other than those from the WC, showed high levels of genetic diversity. An intermediate level of gene flow was found amongst populations of the pathogen. The results suggest that a limited number of individuals have recently been introduced into the WC, resulting in a novel disease problem in the area. PMID:27109366

  10. Mammalian Reverse Genetics without Crossing Reveals Nr3a as a Short-Sleeper Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Genshiro A; Sumiyama, Kenta; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Perrin, Dimitri; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Ukai, Hideki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shi, Shoi; Ohno, Rei-ichiro; Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Tone, Daisuke; Ode, Koji L; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-01-26

    The identification of molecular networks at the system level in mammals is accelerated by next-generation mammalian genetics without crossing, which requires both the efficient production of whole-body biallelic knockout (KO) mice in a single generation and high-performance phenotype analyses. Here, we show that the triple targeting of a single gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system achieves almost perfect KO efficiency (96%-100%). In addition, we developed a respiration-based fully automated non-invasive sleep phenotyping system, the Snappy Sleep Stager (SSS), for high-performance (95.3% accuracy) sleep/wake staging. Using the triple-target CRISPR and SSS in tandem, we reliably obtained sleep/wake phenotypes, even in double-KO mice. By using this system to comprehensively analyze all of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family members, we found Nr3a as a short-sleeper gene, which is verified by an independent set of triple-target CRISPR. These results demonstrate the application of mammalian reverse genetics without crossing to organism-level systems biology in sleep research. PMID:26774482

  11. Field data reveal low critical chemical concentrations for river benthic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Elisabeth; Haase, Peter; Oetken, Matthias; Sundermann, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    River ecosystems are of immense ecological and social importance. Despite the introduction of wastewater treatment plants and advanced chemical authorization procedures in Europe, chemical pollution is still a major threat to freshwater ecosystems. Here, large-scale monitoring data was exploited to identify taxon-specific chemical concentrations beyond which benthic invertebrate taxa are unlikely to occur using Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN). 365 invertebrate taxa and 25 organic chemicals including pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plasticisers, flame retardants, complexing agents, a surfactant and poly- and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a total of 399 sites were analysed. The number of taxa that responded to each of these chemicals varied between 0% and 21%. These sensitive taxa belonged predominantly to the groups Plecoptera, Coleoptera, Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, Turbellaria, Megaloptera, Crustacea, and Diptera. Strong effects were observed in response to wastewater-associated compounds, confirming that wastewater is an important cause of biological degradation. The majority of change points identified for each compound were well below predicted no-effect concentrations derived from laboratory toxicity studies. Thus, the results show that chemicals are likely to induce effects in the environment at concentrations much lower than expected based on laboratory experiments. Overall, it is confirmed that chemical pollution is still an important factor shaping the distribution of invertebrate taxa, suggesting the need for continued efforts to reduce chemical loads in rivers. PMID:26706759

  12. Merging disciplines: Chemical bases of life processes are revealed by X-ray crystallography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YONATH Ada

    2011-01-01

    This article has been written for concluding the International Year of Chemistry.Chemistry dominates almost all branches of modern science,since once reaching the molecular level,chemical events are being investigated.In life sciences the borders between the traditional scientific categories are practically vanishing.Thus,almost all biological questions are answered in chemical terms.

  13. Analysis of a slow-growing line reveals wide genetic variability of carcass and meat quality-related traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabault Marie

    2012-10-01

    was highly heritable and strongly correlated with the colour and water-holding capacity of the meat. Moreover, this study revealed for the first time that the behaviour at slaughter is partly genetically determined in the chicken.

  14. Quantum Chemical Simulations Reveal Acetylene-Based Growth Mechanisms in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Wang, Ying [Nagoya University, Japan; Gao, Xingfa [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; Qian, Hu-Jun [Jilin University, Changchun; Ohta, Yasuhito [Fukui Institute of Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan; Wu, Xiaona [Nagoya University, Japan; Morokuma, Keiji [Fukui Institute of Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan; Irle, Stephan [WPI-Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules and Department of Chemistry, Nagoya University, Japan

    2014-01-01

    Nonequilibrium quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulation of early stages in the nucleation process of carbon nanotubes from acetylene feedstock on an Fe38 cluster was performed based on the density-functional tight-binding (DFTB) potential. Representative chemical reactions were studied by complimentary static DFTB and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oligomerization and cross-linking reactions between carbon chains were found as the main reaction pathways similar to that suggested in previous experimental work. The calculations highlight the inhibiting effect of hydrogen for the condensation of carbon ring networks, and a propensity for hydrogen disproportionation, thus enriching the hydrogen content in already hydrogen-rich species and abstracting hydrogen content in already hydrogen-deficient clusters. The ethynyl radical C2H was found as a reactive, yet continually regenerated species, facilitating hydrogen transfer reactions across the hydrocarbon clusters. The nonequilibrium QM/MD simulations show the prevalence of a pentagon-first nucleation mechanism where hydrogen may take the role of one arm of an sp2 carbon Y-junction. The results challenge the importance of the metal carbide formation for SWCNT cap nucleation in the VLS model and suggest possible alternative routes following hydrogen-abstraction acetylene addition (HACA)-like mechanisms commonly discussed in combustion synthesis.

  15. Molecular diagnosis reveals genetic heterogeneity for the overlapping MKKS and BBS phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Elise; Durand, Myriam; Stoetzel, Corinne; Doray, Bérénice; Viville, Brigitte; Hellé, Sophie; Danse, Jean-Marc; Hamel, Christian; Bitoun, Pierre; Goldenberg, Alice; Finck, Sonia; Faivre, Laurence; Sigaudy, Sabine; Holder, Muriel; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Marion, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Verloes, Alain; Nisand, Israël; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly diagnosed in the prenatal period or early childhood may raise diagnostic dilemmas especially in distinguishing McKusick-Kaufman syndrome (MKKS) and the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). These two conditions can initially overlap. With time, the additional features of BBS appearing in childhood, such as retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, learning disabilities and progressive renal dysfunction allow clear differentiation between BBS and MKKS. Genotype overlap also exists, as mutations in the MKKS-BBS6 gene are found in both syndromes. We report 7 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period with hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly who carry mutations in various BBS genes (BBS6, BBS2, BBS10, BBS8 and BBS12), stressing the importance of wide BBS genotyping in patients with this clinical association for diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counselling. PMID:21044901

  16. Pharmacogenetic analysis of adverse drug effect reveals genetic variant for susceptibility to liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Gonzalo; Foernzler, Dorothee; Leong, Diane; Rabbia, Michael; Smit, Ralf; Dorflinger, Ernest; Gasser, Rodolfo; Hoh, Josephine; Ott, Jürg; Borroni, Edilio; To, Zung; Thompson, Annick; Li, Jia; Hashimoto, Lara; Lindpaintner, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    A retrospective pharmacogenetic study was conducted to identify possible genetic susceptibility factors in patients in whom the administration of the anti-Parkinson drug, tolcapone (TASMAR), was associated with hepatic toxicity. We studied 135 cases of patients with elevated liver transaminase levels (ELT) of >/=1.5 times above the upper limit of normal, in comparison with matched controls that had also received the drug but had not experienced ELT. DNA samples were genotyped for 30 previously described or newly characterized bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), representing 12 candidate genes selected based on the known metabolic pathways involved in the tolcapone elimination. SNPs located within the UDP-glucuronosyl transferase 1A gene complex, which codes for the enzymes involved in the main elimination pathway of the drug, were found to be significantly associated with the occurrence of tolcapone-associated ELTs. PMID:12439739

  17. Genetic Diversity in Southeast European Soybean Germplasm Revealed by SSR Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ristova

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess genetic diversity and relationships of 23 soybean genotypes representing several independent breeding sources from Southeastern Europe and five plant introductions from Western Europe and Canada using 20 SSR markers. In total 80 alleles were detected among 28 genotypes with an average of four alleles per locus and an average marker diversity of 0.585. Allele frequency distribution was characterised with a high proportion of alleles at very low frequencies with 11 % of unique alleles. Cluster analysis clearly separated all genotypes from each other assigning them into three major clusters, which largely corresponded to their origin. Results of clustering were mainly in accordance with the known pedigrees.

  18. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z. A.; Norazmi, Mohd N.; Edinur, Hisham A.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA), comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu) using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek) while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA) plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159) observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73) and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations. PMID:26565719

  19. Ancient Genetic Signatures of Orang Asli Revealed by Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Gene Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z A; Norazmi, Mohd N; Edinur, Hisham A; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin

    2015-01-01

    The aboriginal populations of Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Orang Asli (OA), comprise three major groups; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. Here, we analyzed for the first time KIR gene polymorphisms for 167 OA individuals, including those from four smallest OA subgroups (Che Wong, Orang Kanaq, Lanoh and Kensiu) using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) analyses. The observed distribution of KIR profiles of OA is heterogenous; Haplotype B is the most frequent in the Semang subgroups (especially Batek) while Haplotype A is the most common type in the Senoi. The Semang subgroups were clustered together with the Africans, Indians, Papuans and Australian Aborigines in a principal component analysis (PCA) plot and shared many common genotypes (AB6, BB71, BB73 and BB159) observed in these other populations. Given that these populations also display high frequencies of Haplotype B, it is interesting to speculate that Haplotype B may be generally more frequent in ancient populations. In contrast, the two Senoi subgroups, Che Wong and Semai are displaced toward Southeast Asian and African populations in the PCA scatter plot, respectively. Orang Kanaq, the smallest and the most endangered of all OA subgroups, has lost some degree of genetic variation, as shown by their relatively high frequency of the AB2 genotype (0.73) and a total absence of KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 genes. Orang Kanaq tradition that strictly prohibits intermarriage with outsiders seems to have posed a serious threat to their survival. This present survey is a demonstration of the value of KIR polymorphisms in elucidating genetic relationships among human populations. PMID:26565719

  20. Genetically engineered maize plants reveal distinct costs and benefits of constitutive volatile emissions in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Christelle Aurélie Maud; Erb, Matthias; Hiltpold, Ivan; Hibbard, Bruce Elliott; Gaillard, Mickaël David Philippe; Bilat, Julia; Degenhardt, Jörg; Cambet-Petit-Jean, Xavier; Turlings, Ted Christiaan Joannes; Zwahlen, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    Genetic manipulation of plant volatile emissions is a promising tool to enhance plant defences against herbivores. However, the potential costs associated with the manipulation of specific volatile synthase genes are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the physiological and ecological effects of transforming a maize line with a terpene synthase gene in field and laboratory assays, both above- and below ground. The transformation, which resulted in the constitutive emission of (E)-β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, was found to compromise seed germination, plant growth and yield. These physiological costs provide a possible explanation for the inducibility of an (E)-β-caryophyllene-synthase gene in wild and cultivated maize. The overexpression of the terpene synthase gene did not impair plant resistance nor volatile emission. However, constitutive terpenoid emission increased plant apparency to herbivores, including adults and larvae of the above ground pest Spodoptera frugiperda, resulting in an increase in leaf damage. Although terpenoid overproducing lines were also attractive to the specialist root herbivore Diabrotica virgifera virgifera below ground, they did not suffer more root damage in the field, possibly because of the enhanced attraction of entomopathogenic nematodes. Furthermore, fewer adults of the root herbivore Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardii were found to emerge near plants that emitted (E)-β-caryophyllene and α-humulene. Yet, overall, under the given field conditions, the costs of constitutive volatile production overshadowed its benefits. This study highlights the need for a thorough assessment of the physiological and ecological consequences of genetically engineering plant signals in the field to determine the potential of this approach for sustainable pest management strategies. PMID:23425633

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of the synthetic Pannon White rabbit revealed by pedigree analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, I; Curik, I; Radnai, I; Cervantes, I; Gyovai, P; Baumung, R; Farkas, J; Szendro, Z

    2010-04-01

    Demographic history, current status, and efficiency of the mating strategy were analyzed using the pedigree of Pannon White (PW) rabbits born between 1992 and 2007. Potential accumulation of detrimental effects and loss of genetic diversity were also considered. Calculations and estimates were done most often for rabbits born in 2007, whereas other reference populations (REFPOPXXXX) were specified explicitly. The pedigree contained 4,749 individuals and 580 founders, and its completeness was 82.1% up to 10 and 94.5% up to 5 generations, respectively. Generation intervals through different pathways averaged 1.2 yr. When adjusted to the pedigree completeness, the amount of inbreeding (F(i)) of rabbits was comparable (5.54%) with that of other livestock populations, whereas the 10 (30) founders contributing the most to inbreeding explained a large part of the population inbreeding [i.e., 42.24% (73.18%)]. The ancestral inbreeding coefficient of REFPOP2004 (10.67%) was one-half that of REFPOP2007 (20.66%), showing its strong dependence on pedigree length. Family variance, inbreeding, and realized effective population size were 84.18 (REFPOP2006; this variable could not be calculated for the last year examined), 37.19, and 91.08, respectively. The effective numbers of ancestors, founders, and founder genomes were 48, 26, and 7.33, respectively. Although the circular mating scheme applied was generally effective, the large accumulated reduction in genetic variability indicates the need to revise and improve the current breeding strategy. PMID:20023134

  2. Genetic and genomic diversity studies of Acacia symbionts in Senegal reveal new species of Mesorhizobium with a putative geographical pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatou Diouf

    Full Text Available Acacia senegal (L Willd. and Acacia seyal Del. are highly nitrogen-fixing and moderately salt tolerant species. In this study we focused on the genetic and genomic diversity of Acacia mesorhizobia symbionts from diverse origins in Senegal and investigated possible correlations between the genetic diversity of the strains, their soil of origin, and their tolerance to salinity. We first performed a multi-locus sequence analysis on five markers gene fragments on a collection of 47 mesorhizobia strains of A. senegal and A. seyal from 8 localities. Most of the strains (60% clustered with the M. plurifarium type strain ORS 1032T, while the others form four new clades (MSP1 to MSP4. We sequenced and assembled seven draft genomes: four in the M. plurifarium clade (ORS3356, ORS3365, STM8773 and ORS1032T, one in MSP1 (STM8789, MSP2 (ORS3359 and MSP3 (ORS3324. The average nucleotide identities between these genomes together with the MLSA analysis reveal three new species of Mesorhizobium. A great variability of salt tolerance was found among the strains with a lack of correlation between the genetic diversity of mesorhizobia, their salt tolerance and the soils samples characteristics. A putative geographical pattern of A. senegal symbionts between the dryland north part and the center of Senegal was found, reflecting adaptations to specific local conditions such as the water regime. However, the presence of salt does not seem to be an important structuring factor of Mesorhizobium species.

  3. Quantitative genome-wide genetic interaction screens reveal global epistatic relationships of protein complexes in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale proteomic analyses in Escherichia coli have documented the composition and physical relationships of multiprotein complexes, but not their functional organization into biological pathways and processes. Conversely, genetic interaction (GI screens can provide insights into the biological role(s of individual gene and higher order associations. Combining the information from both approaches should elucidate how complexes and pathways intersect functionally at a systems level. However, such integrative analysis has been hindered due to the lack of relevant GI data. Here we present a systematic, unbiased, and quantitative synthetic genetic array screen in E. coli describing the genetic dependencies and functional cross-talk among over 600,000 digenic mutant combinations. Combining this epistasis information with putative functional modules derived from previous proteomic data and genomic context-based methods revealed unexpected associations, including new components required for the biogenesis of iron-sulphur and ribosome integrity, and the interplay between molecular chaperones and proteases. We find that functionally-linked genes co-conserved among γ-proteobacteria are far more likely to have correlated GI profiles than genes with divergent patterns of evolution. Overall, examining bacterial GIs in the context of protein complexes provides avenues for a deeper mechanistic understanding of core microbial systems.

  4. Distinct Genetic Lineages of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae) Revealed by COI and 16S DNA Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Phaik-Eem Lim; Ji Tan; I WAYAN SUANA; Praphathip Eamsobhana; Hoi Sen Yong

    2012-01-01

    The fruit fly Bactrocera caudata is a pest species of economic importance in Asia. Its larvae feed on the flowers of Cucurbitaceae such as Cucurbita moschata. To-date it is distinguished from related species based on morphological characters. Specimens of B. caudata from Peninsular Malaysia and Indonesia (Bali and Lombok) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 16S rRNA genes. Both gene sequences revealed that B. caudata from Peninsular Malays...

  5. Bioinspired silicification of silica-binding peptide-silk protein chimeras: comparison of chemically and genetically produced proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L S; Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C

    2012-03-12

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of "silk" and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG](n)) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 28 equiv of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial-compatible conditions, the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared with the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein/chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk-based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source), and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to "tune" the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach that can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor-based applications. PMID:22229696

  6. Combinations of protein-chemical complex structures reveal new targets for established drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinina, Olga V.; Oliver Wichmann; Gordana Apic; Russell, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Biological networks are powerful tools for predicting undocumented relationships between molecules. The underlying principle is that existing interactions between molecules can be used to predict new interactions. Here we use this principle to suggest new protein-chemical interactions via the network derived from three-dimensional structures. For pairs of proteins sharing a common ligand, we use protein and chemical superimpositions combined with fast structural compatibility screens to predi...

  7. Protection against genetic hazards from environmental chemical mutagens: experience with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation protection, the recurrent theme is, and always has been, dose limitation whether it is for occupational workers, individual members of the public or the population as a whole. The key words are 'dose' and 'limitation'. The quantitative system of dose limitation has been achieved because of a number of conceptual developments in our understanding of the mechanism of radiation action, development of radiation dosimetry, the accumulation of a vast body of quantitative information on dose-effect relationships and the effects of various biological and physical variables that affect these relationships of data on patterns and levels of exposures likely to be encountered to make estimates of the effects expected to result from such exposures, and balancing of risks to society against the benefits derived, the latter a matter of informed judgement. The philosophy has always been to avoid all unnecessary exposures and to limit the necessary exposures (justified by the benefits expected) to as low a level as reasonably achievable, social and economic factors being taken into acccount. The introduction of the concept that the system of dose limitation to the population should be based on genetic risks has stressed the need for careful planning to ensure that our genetic heritage is not endangered. Transfer of this knowledge to the field of chemical protection is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Germ cell toxicity: significance in genetic and fertility effects of radiation and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakberg, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the male and female to radiation and chemicals is different. Any loss of oocytes in the female cannot be replaced, and if severe enough, will result in a shortening of the reproductive span. In the male, a temporary sterile period may be induced owing to destruction of the differentiating spermatogonia, but the stem cells are the most resistant spermatogonial type, are capable of repopulating the seminiferous epithelium, and fertility usually returns. The response of both the male and female changes with development of the embryonic to the adult gonad, and with differentiation and maturation in the adult. The primordial germ cells, early oocytes, and differentiating spermatogonia of the adult male are unusually sensitive to the cytotoxic action of noxious agents, but each agent elicits a specific response owing to the intricate biochemical and physiological changes associated with development and maturation of the gametes. The relationship of germ cell killing to fertility is direct, and long-term fertility effects can be predicted from histological analysis of the gonads. The relationship to genetic effects, on the other hand, is indirect, and acts primarily by limiting the cell stages available for testing, by affecting the distribution of mitotically active stem cells among the different stages of the mitotic cycle, and thereby, changing both the type and frequency of genetic effects observed. 100 references, 38 figures, 7 tables.

  9. Germ cell toxicity: significance in genetic and fertility effects of radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of the male and female to radiation and chemicals is different. Any loss of oocytes in the female cannot be replaced, and if severe enough, will result in a shortening of the reproductive span. In the male, a temporary sterile period may be induced owing to destruction of the differentiating spermatogonia, but the stem cells are the most resistant spermatogonial type, are capable of repopulating the seminiferous epithelium, and fertility usually returns. The response of both the male and female changes with development of the embryonic to the adult gonad, and with differentiation and maturation in the adult. The primordial germ cells, early oocytes, and differentiating spermatogonia of the adult male are unusually sensitive to the cytotoxic action of noxious agents, but each agent elicits a specific response owing to the intricate biochemical and physiological changes associated with development and maturation of the gametes. The relationship of germ cell killing to fertility is direct, and long-term fertility effects can be predicted from histological analysis of the gonads. The relationship to genetic effects, on the other hand, is indirect, and acts primarily by limiting the cell stages available for testing, by affecting the distribution of mitotically active stem cells among the different stages of the mitotic cycle, and thereby, changing both the type and frequency of genetic effects observed. 100 references, 38 figures, 7 tables

  10. Comparative human and rat neurospheres reveal species differences in chemical effects on neurodevelopmental key events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Jenny; Gassmann, Kathrin; Masjosthusmann, Stefan; DeBoer, Denise; Bendt, Farina; Giersiefer, Susanne; Fritsche, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    The developing brain is highly vulnerable to the adverse effects of chemicals, resulting in neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. Currently, animal experiments in the rat are the gold standard for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing; however, these guideline studies are insufficient in terms of animal use, time and costs and bear the issue of species extrapolation. Therefore, the necessity for alternative methods that predict DNT of chemicals faster, cheaper and with a high predictivity for humans is internationally agreed on. In this respect, we developed an in vitro model for DNT key event screening, which is based on primary human and rat neural progenitor cells grown as neurospheres. They are able to mimic basic processes of early fetal brain development and enable an investigation of species differences between humans and rodents in corresponding cellular models. The goal of this study was to investigate to what extent human and rat neurospheres were able to correctly predict the DNT potential of a well-characterized training set of nine chemicals by investigating effects on progenitor cell proliferation, migration and neuronal differentiation in parallel to cell viability, and to compare these chemical responses between human and rat neurospheres. We demonstrate that (1) by correlating these human and rat in vitro results to existing in vivo data, human and rat neurospheres classified most compounds correctly and thus may serve as a valuable component of a modular DNT testing strategy and (2) human and rat neurospheres differed in their sensitivity to most chemicals, reflecting toxicodynamic species differences of chemicals. PMID:26216354

  11. Genetic structure and ecogeographical adaptation in wild barley (Hordeum chilense Roemer et Schultes as revealed by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourdille Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-allelic microsatellite markers have become the markers of choice for the determination of genetic structure in plants. Synteny across cereals has allowed the cross-species and cross-genera transferability of SSR markers, which constitute a valuable and cost-effective tool for the genetic analysis and marker-assisted introgression of wild related species. Hordeum chilense is one of the wild relatives with a high potential for cereal breeding, due to its high crossability (both interspecies and intergenera and polymorphism for adaptation traits. In order to analyze the genetic structure and ecogeographical adaptation of this wild species, it is necessary to increase the number of polymorphic markers currently available for the species. In this work, the possibility of using syntenic wheat SSRs as a new source of markers for this purpose has been explored. Results From the 98 wheat EST-SSR markers tested for transferability and polymorphism in the wild barley genome, 53 primer pairs (54.0% gave cross-species transferability and 20 primer pairs (20.4% showed polymorphism. The latter were used for further analysis in the H. chilense germplasm. The H. chilense-Triticum aestivum addition lines were used to test the chromosomal location of the new polymorphic microsatellite markers. The genetic structure and diversity was investigated in a collection of 94 H. chilense accessions, using a set of 49 SSR markers distributed across the seven chromosomes. Microsatellite markers showed a total of 351 alleles over all loci. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 27, with a mean of 7.2 alleles per locus and a mean Polymorphic Information Content (PIC of 0.5. Conclusions According to the results, the germplasm can be divided into two groups, with morphological and ecophysiological characteristics being key determinants of the population structure. Geographic and ecological structuring was also revealed in the analyzed

  12. Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees reveals healthier and broader communities when colonies are genetically diverse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather R Mattila

    Full Text Available Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies the active bacterial communities that are found on honey bees, in their digestive tracts, and in bee bread. This method provided insights that have not been revealed by past studies into the content and benefits of honey bee-associated microbial communities. Colony microbiotas differed substantially between sampling environments and were dominated by several anaerobic bacterial genera never before associated with honey bees, but renowned for their use by humans to ferment food. Colonies with genetically diverse populations of workers, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from greater microbial diversity, reduced pathogen loads, and increased abundance of putatively helpful bacteria, particularly species from the potentially probiotic genus Bifidobacterium. Across all colonies, Bifidobacterium activity was negatively correlated with the activity of genera that include pathogenic microbes; this relationship suggests a possible target for understanding whether microbes provide protective benefits to honey bees. Within-colony diversity shapes microbiotas associated with honey bees in ways that may have important repercussions for colony function and health. Our findings illuminate the importance of honey bee-bacteria symbioses and examine their intersection with nutrition, pathogen load, and genetic diversity, factors that are considered key to understanding honey bee decline.

  13. Comparison of morphological and genetic analyses reveals cryptic divergence and morphological plasticity in Stylophora (Cnidaria, Scleractinia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Fabrizio; Benzoni, F.; Yang, S.-Y.; Pichon, M.; Galli, P.; Chen, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A combined morphological and genetic study of the coral genus Stylophora investigated species boundaries in the Gulf of Aden, Yemen. Two mitochondrial regions, including the hypervariable IGS9 spacer and the control region, and a fragment of rDNA were used for phylogenetic analysis. Results were compared by multivariate analysis on the basis of branch morphology and corallite morphometry. Two species were clearly discriminated by both approaches. The first species was characterised by small corallites and a low morphological variability and was ascribed to a new geographical record of Stylophora madagascarensis on the basis of its phylogenetic distinction and its morphological similarity to the type material. The second species was characterised by larger corallite size and greater morphological variability and was ascribed to Stylophora pistillata. The analysis was extended to the intrageneric level for other S. pistillata populations from the Red Sea and the Pacific Ocean. Strong internal divergence was evident in the genus Sty lophora. S. pistillata populations were split into two highly divergent Red Sea/Gulf of Aden and western Pacific lineages with significant morphological overlap, which suggests they represent two distinct cryptic species. The combined use of morphological and molecular approaches, so far proved to be a powerful tool for the re-delineation of species boundaries in corals, provided novel evidence of cryptic divergence in this group of marine metazoans.

  14. Genetic Disruption of 2-Arachidonoylglycerol Synthesis Reveals a Key Role for Endocannabinoid Signaling in Anxiety Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Shonesy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoid (eCB signaling has been heavily implicated in the modulation of anxiety and depressive behaviors and emotional learning. However, the role of the most-abundant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in the physiological regulation of affective behaviors is not well understood. Here, we show that genetic deletion of the 2-AG synthetic enzyme diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα in mice reduces brain, but not circulating, 2-AG levels. DAGLα deletion also results in anxiety-like and sex-specific anhedonic phenotypes associated with impaired activity-dependent eCB retrograde signaling at amygdala glutamatergic synapses. Importantly, acute pharmacological normalization of 2-AG levels reverses both phenotypes of DAGLα-deficient mice. These data suggest 2-AG deficiency could contribute to the pathogenesis of affective disorders and that pharmacological normalization of 2-AG signaling could represent an approach for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders.

  15. Integrative transcriptome, proteome, phosphoproteome and genetic mapping reveals new aspects in a fiberless mutant of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qi-Feng; Wu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Man; Pei, Wen-Feng; Li, Xing-Li; Wang, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Ji-Wen; Yu, Shu-Xun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of fiber initiation in cotton (Gossypium spp.), an integrated approach combining transcriptome, iTRAQ-based proteome and genetic mapping was taken to compare the ovules of the Xuzhou 142 wild type (WT) with its fuzzless-lintless (fl) mutant at -3 and 0 day post-anthesis. A total of 1,953 mRNAs, 187 proteins, and 131 phosphoproteins were differentially expressed (DE) between WT and fl, and the levels of transcripts and their encoded proteins and phosphoproteins were highly congruent. A functional analysis suggested that the abundance of proteins were mainly involved in amino sugar, nucleotide sugar and fatty acid metabolism, one carbon pool for folate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis. qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzymatic assays were performed to confirm the regulation of these transcripts and proteins. A molecular mapping located the lintless gene li3 in the fl mutant on chromosome 26 for the first time. A further in-silico physical mapping of DE genes with sequence variations between fl and WT identified one and four candidate genes in the li3 and n2 regions, respectively. Taken together, the transcript abundance, phosphorylation status of proteins at the fiber initiation stage and candidate genes have provided insights into regulatory processes underlying cotton fiber initiation. PMID:27075604

  16. Energy-efficient waveform shapes for neural stimulation revealed with a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2010-08-01

    The energy efficiency of stimulation is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to a computational model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. As the GA progressed, waveforms became increasingly energy efficient and converged upon an energy-optimal shape. The results of the GA were consistent across several trials, and resulting waveforms resembled truncated Gaussian curves. When constrained to monophasic cathodic waveforms, the GA produced waveforms that were symmetric about the peak, which occurred approximately during the middle of the pulse. However, when the cathodic waveforms were coupled to rectangular charge-balancing anodic pulses, the location and sharpness of the peak varied with the duration and timing (i.e., before or after the cathodic phase) of the anodic phase. In a model of a population of mammalian axons and in vivo experiments on a cat sciatic nerve, the GA-optimized waveforms were more energy efficient and charge efficient than several conventional waveform shapes used in neural stimulation. If used in implantable neural stimulators, GA-optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the frequency of recharge intervals, the volume of implanted pulse generators, and the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgeries.

  17. Analysis of dsDNA and RNA viromes in methanogenic digesters reveals novel viral genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calusinska, Magdalena; Marynowska, Martyna; Goux, Xavier; Lentzen, Esther; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Although viruses are not the key players of the anaerobic digestion process, they may affect the dynamics of bacterial and archaeal populations involved in biogas production. Until now viruses have received very little attention in this specific habitat; therefore, as a first step towards their characterization, we optimized a virus filtration protocol from anaerobic sludge. Afterwards, to assess dsDNA and RNA viral diversity in sludge samples from nine different reactors fed either with waste water, agricultural residues or solid municipal waste plus agro-food residues, we performed metagenomic analyses. As a result we showed that, while the dsDNA viromes (21 assigned families in total) were dominated by dsDNA phages of the order Caudovirales, RNA viruses (14 assigned families in total) were less diverse and were for the main part plant-infecting viruses. Interestingly, less than 2% of annotated contigs were assigned as putative human and animal pathogens. Our study greatly extends the existing view of viral genetic diversity in methanogenic reactors and shows that these viral assemblages are distinct not only among the reactor types but also from nearly 30 other environments already studied, including the human gut, fermented food, deep sea sediments and other aquatic habitats. PMID:26568175

  18. Sequencing wild and cultivated cassava and related species reveals extensive interspecific hybridization and genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeson, Jessen V; Lyons, Jessica B; Prochnik, Simon E; Wu, G Albert; Ha, Cindy M; Edsinger-Gonzales, Eric; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rabbi, Ismail Y; Egesi, Chiedozie; Nauluvula, Poasa; Lebot, Vincent; Ndunguru, Joseph; Mkamilo, Geoffrey; Bart, Rebecca S; Setter, Tim L; Gleadow, Roslyn M; Kulakow, Peter; Ferguson, Morag E; Rounsley, Steve; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2016-05-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) provides calories and nutrition for more than half a billion people. It was domesticated by native Amazonian peoples through cultivation of the wild progenitor M. esculenta ssp. flabellifolia and is now grown in tropical regions worldwide. Here we provide a high-quality genome assembly for cassava with improved contiguity, linkage, and completeness; almost 97% of genes are anchored to chromosomes. We find that paleotetraploidy in cassava is shared with the related rubber tree Hevea, providing a resource for comparative studies. We also sequence a global collection of 58 Manihot accessions, including cultivated and wild cassava accessions and related species such as Ceará or India rubber (M. glaziovii), and genotype 268 African cassava varieties. We find widespread interspecific admixture, and detect the genetic signature of past cassava breeding programs. As a clonally propagated crop, cassava is especially vulnerable to pathogens and abiotic stresses. This genomic resource will inform future genome-enabled breeding efforts to improve this staple crop. PMID:27088722

  19. The genetic ghost of an invasion past: colonization and extinction revealed by historical hybridization in Senecio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelser, Pieter B; Abbott, Richard J; Comes, Hans P; Milton, Joseph J; Möller, Michael; Looseley, Mark E; Cron, Glynis V; Barcelona, Julie F; Kennedy, Aaron H; Watson, Linda E; Barone, Rubén; Hernández, Fabián; Kadereit, Joachim W

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization is an important evolutionary factor in the diversification of many plant and animal species. Of particular interest is that historical hybridization resulting in the origin of new species or introgressants has occurred between species now geographically separated by great distances. Here, we report that Senecio massaicus, a tetraploid species native to Morocco and the Canary Islands, contains genetic material of two distinct, geographically separated lineages: a Mediterranean lineage and a mainly southern African lineage. A time-calibrated internal transcribed spacer phylogeny indicates that the hybridization event took place up to 6.18 Ma. Because the southern African lineage has never been recorded from Morocco or the Canary Islands, we hypothesize that it reached this area in the distant past, but never became permanently established. Interestingly, the southern African lineage includes S. inaequidens, a highly invasive species that has recently become widespread throughout Europe and was introduced at the end of the 19th century as a 'wool alien'. Our results suggest that this more recent invasion of Europe by S. inaequidens represents the second arrival of this lineage into the region. PMID:22171696

  20. Comparative analysis of the domestic cat genome reveals genetic signatures underlying feline biology and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Michael J; Li, Gang; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Aken, Bronwen L; Searle, Steven M J; Minx, Patrick; Hillier, LaDeana W; Koboldt, Daniel C; Davis, Brian W; Driscoll, Carlos A; Barr, Christina S; Blackistone, Kevin; Quilez, Javier; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Thomas, Gregg W C; Hahn, Matthew W; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; O'Brien, Stephen J; Wilson, Richard K; Lyons, Leslie A; Murphy, William J; Warren, Wesley C

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the genetic changes that distinguish domestic cat populations from their wild progenitors. Here we describe a high-quality domestic cat reference genome assembly and comparative inferences made with other cat breeds, wildcats, and other mammals. Based upon these comparisons, we identified positively selected genes enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolism that underpin adaptations to a hypercarnivorous diet. We also found positive selection signals within genes underlying sensory processes, especially those affecting vision and hearing in the carnivore lineage. We observed an evolutionary tradeoff between functional olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene repertoires in the cat and dog genomes, with an expansion of the feline chemosensory system for detecting pheromones at the expense of odorant detection. Genomic regions harboring signatures of natural selection that distinguish domestic cats from their wild congeners are enriched in neural crest-related genes associated with behavior and reward in mouse models, as predicted by the domestication syndrome hypothesis. Our description of a previously unidentified allele for the gloving pigmentation pattern found in the Birman breed supports the hypothesis that cat breeds experienced strong selection on specific mutations drawn from random bred populations. Collectively, these findings provide insight into how the process of domestication altered the ancestral wildcat genome and build a resource for future disease mapping and phylogenomic studies across all members of the Felidae. PMID:25385592

  1. Genetic Diversity and Linkage Disequilibrium in Chinese Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Revealed by SSR Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Chenyang; Wang, Lanfen; Ge, Hongmei; Dong, Yuchen; Zhang, Xueyong

    2011-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty bread wheat lines, mainly Chinese mini core accessions, were assayed for polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium (LD) based on 512 whole-genome microsatellite loci representing a mean marker density of 5.1 cM. A total of 6,724 alleles ranging from 1 to 49 per locus were identified in all collections. The mean PIC value was 0.650, ranging from 0 to 0.965. Population structure and principal coordinate analysis revealed that landraces and modern varieties were two relativel...

  2. Phylogenetic and Molecular Variability Studies Reveal a New Genetic Clade of Citrus leprosis virus C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Breton, Michèle Claire; Arena, Gabriella Dias; Nunes, Maria Andreia; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) causes a severe disease affecting citrus orchards in the Western hemisphere. This study reveals the molecular variability of the virus by analyzing four genomic regions (p29, p15, MP and RNA2-intergenic region) distributed over its two RNAs. Nucleotide diversity (π) values were relatively low but statistically different over the analyzed genes and subpopulations, indicating their distinct evolutionary history. Values of πp29 and πMP were higher than those of πp15 and πRNA2–IR, whereas πMP was increased due to novel discovered isolates phylogenetically clustered in a divergent clade that we called SJP. Isolate BR_SP_SJP_01 RNA1 and RNA2 sequences, clade SJP, showed an identity of 85.6% and 88.4%, respectively, with those corresponding to CiLV-C, the type member of the genus Cilevirus, and its RNA2 5′-proximal region was revealed as a minor donor in a putative inter-clade recombination event. In addition to citrus, BR_SP_SJP_01 naturally infects the weed Commelina benghalensis and is efficiently transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi mites. Our data demonstrated that negative selection was the major force operating in the evaluated viral coding regions and defined amino acids putatively relevant for the biological function of cilevirus proteins. This work provides molecular tools and sets up a framework for further epidemiological studies. PMID:27275832

  3. Genetic rearrangements of six wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P addition lines revealed by molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Han

    Full Text Available Agropyron cristatum (L. Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat-A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH, SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering.

  4. Genetic association for renal traits among participants of African ancestry reveals new loci for renal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ti Liu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an increasing global public health concern, particularly among populations of African ancestry. We performed an interrogation of known renal loci, genome-wide association (GWA, and IBC candidate-gene SNP association analyses in African Americans from the CARe Renal Consortium. In up to 8,110 participants, we performed meta-analyses of GWA and IBC array data for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, CKD (eGFR 30 mg/g and interrogated the 250 kb flanking region around 24 SNPs previously identified in European Ancestry renal GWAS analyses. Findings were replicated in up to 4,358 African Americans. To assess function, individually identified genes were knocked down in zebrafish embryos by morpholino antisense oligonucleotides. Expression of kidney-specific genes was assessed by in situ hybridization, and glomerular filtration was evaluated by dextran clearance. Overall, 23 of 24 previously identified SNPs had direction-consistent associations with eGFR in African Americans, 2 of which achieved nominal significance (UMOD, PIP5K1B. Interrogation of the flanking regions uncovered 24 new index SNPs in African Americans, 12 of which were replicated (UMOD, ANXA9, GCKR, TFDP2, DAB2, VEGFA, ATXN2, GATM, SLC22A2, TMEM60, SLC6A13, and BCAS3. In addition, we identified 3 suggestive loci at DOK6 (p-value = 5.3×10(-7 and FNDC1 (p-value = 3.0×10(-7 for UACR, and KCNQ1 with eGFR (p = 3.6×10(-6. Morpholino knockdown of kcnq1 in the zebrafish resulted in abnormal kidney development and filtration capacity. We identified several SNPs in association with eGFR in African Ancestry individuals, as well as 3 suggestive loci for UACR and eGFR. Functional genetic studies support a role for kcnq1 in glomerular development in zebrafish.

  5. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  6. A Genetic Mosaic Screen Reveals Ecdysone-Responsive Genes Regulating Drosophila Oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Elizabeth T; Hwang, Grace H; Finger, Danielle S; Hinnant, Taylor D; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Multiple aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, including germline stem cell activity, germ cell differentiation, and follicle survival, are regulated by the steroid hormone ecdysone. While the transcriptional targets of ecdysone signaling during development have been studied extensively, targets in the ovary remain largely unknown. Early studies of salivary gland polytene chromosomes led to a model in which ecdysone stimulates a hierarchical transcriptional cascade, wherein a core group of ecdysone-sensitive transcription factors induce tissue-specific responses by activating secondary branches of transcriptional targets. More recently, genome-wide approaches have identified hundreds of putative ecdysone-responsive targets. Determining whether these putative targets represent bona fide targets in vivo, however, requires that they be tested via traditional mutant analysis in a cell-type specific fashion. To investigate the molecular mechanisms whereby ecdysone signaling regulates oogenesis, we used genetic mosaic analysis to screen putative ecdysone-responsive genes for novel roles in the control of the earliest steps of oogenesis. We identified a cohort of genes required for stem cell maintenance, stem and progenitor cell proliferation, and follicle encapsulation, growth, and survival. These genes encode transcription factors, chromatin modulators, and factors required for RNA transport, stability, and ribosome biogenesis, suggesting that ecdysone might control a wide range of molecular processes during oogenesis. Our results suggest that, although ecdysone target genes are known to have cell type-specific roles, many ecdysone response genes that control larval or pupal cell types at developmental transitions are used reiteratively in the adult ovary. These results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which ecdysone signaling controls oogenesis, laying new ground for future studies. PMID:27226164

  7. Molecular mechanisms of fiber differential development between G. barbadense and G. hirsutum revealed by genetical genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Chen

    Full Text Available Cotton fiber qualities including length, strength and fineness are known to be controlled by genes affecting cell elongation and secondary cell wall (SCW biosynthesis, but the molecular mechanisms that govern development of fiber traits are largely unknown. Here, we evaluated an interspecific backcrossed population from G. barbadense cv. Hai7124 and G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 for fiber characteristics in four-year environments under field conditions, and detected 12 quantitative trait loci (QTL and QTL-by-environment interactions by multi-QTL joint analysis. Further analysis of fiber growth and gene expression between TM-1 and Hai7124 showed greater differences at 10 and 25 days post-anthesis (DPA. In this two period important for fiber performances, we integrated genome-wide expression profiling with linkage analysis using the same genetic materials and identified in total 916 expression QTL (eQTL significantly (P<0.05 affecting the expression of 394 differential genes. Many positional cis-/trans-acting eQTL and eQTL hotspots were detected across the genome. By comparative mapping of eQTL and fiber QTL, a dataset of candidate genes affecting fiber qualities was generated. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the major differential genes regulating fiber cell elongation or SCW synthesis. These data collectively support molecular mechanism for G. hirsutum and G. barbadense through differential gene regulation causing difference of fiber qualities. The down-regulated expression of abscisic acid (ABA and ethylene signaling pathway genes and high-level and long-term expression of positive regulators including auxin and cell wall enzyme genes for fiber cell elongation at the fiber developmental transition stage may account for superior fiber qualities.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Fiber Differential Development between G. barbadense and G. hirsutum Revealed by Genetical Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangdong; Guo, Wangzhen; Liu, Bingliang; Zhang, Yuanming; Song, Xianliang; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2012-01-01

    Cotton fiber qualities including length, strength and fineness are known to be controlled by genes affecting cell elongation and secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis, but the molecular mechanisms that govern development of fiber traits are largely unknown. Here, we evaluated an interspecific backcrossed population from G. barbadense cv. Hai7124 and G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 for fiber characteristics in four-year environments under field conditions, and detected 12 quantitative trait loci (QTL) and QTL-by-environment interactions by multi-QTL joint analysis. Further analysis of fiber growth and gene expression between TM-1 and Hai7124 showed greater differences at 10 and 25 days post-anthesis (DPA). In this two period important for fiber performances, we integrated genome-wide expression profiling with linkage analysis using the same genetic materials and identified in total 916 expression QTL (eQTL) significantly (P<0.05) affecting the expression of 394 differential genes. Many positional cis-/trans-acting eQTL and eQTL hotspots were detected across the genome. By comparative mapping of eQTL and fiber QTL, a dataset of candidate genes affecting fiber qualities was generated. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis confirmed the major differential genes regulating fiber cell elongation or SCW synthesis. These data collectively support molecular mechanism for G. hirsutum and G. barbadense through differential gene regulation causing difference of fiber qualities. The down-regulated expression of abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene signaling pathway genes and high-level and long-term expression of positive regulators including auxin and cell wall enzyme genes for fiber cell elongation at the fiber developmental transition stage may account for superior fiber qualities. PMID:22253876

  9. Molecular genetics of blood-fleshed peach reveals activation of anthocyanin biosynthesis by NAC transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Wang, Huiliang; Gu, Chao; Dare, Andrew P; Espley, Richard V; He, Huaping; Allan, Andrew C; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-04-01

    Anthocyanin pigmentation is an important consumer trait in peach (Prunus persica). In this study, the genetic basis of the blood-flesh trait was investigated using the cultivar Dahongpao, which shows high levels of cyanidin-3-glucoside in the mesocarp. Elevation of anthocyanin levels in the flesh was correlated with the expression of an R2R3 MYB transcription factor, PpMYB10.1. However, PpMYB10.1 did not co-segregate with the blood-flesh trait. The blood-flesh trait was mapped to a 200-kb interval on peach linkage group (LG) 5. Within this interval, a gene encoding a NAC domain transcription factor (TF) was found to be highly up-regulated in blood-fleshed peaches when compared with non-red-fleshed peaches. This NAC TF, designated blood (BL), acts as a heterodimer with PpNAC1 which shows high levels of expression in fruit at late developmental stages. We show that the heterodimer of BL and PpNAC1 can activate the transcription of PpMYB10.1, resulting in anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco. Furthermore, silencing the BL gene reduces anthocyanin pigmentation in blood-fleshed peaches. The transactivation activity of the BL-PpNAC1 heterodimer is repressed by a SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like TF, PpSPL1. Low levels of PpMYB10.1 expression in fruit at early developmental stages is probably attributable to lower levels of expression of PpNAC1 plus the presence of high levels of repressors such as PpSPL1. We present a mechanism whereby BL is the key gene for the blood-flesh trait in peach via its activation of PpMYB10.1 in maturing fruit. Partner TFs such as basic helix-loop-helix proteins and NAC1 are required, as is the removal of transcriptional repressors. PMID:25688923

  10. Application of INAA to reveal the chemical evolution of selected volcanic eruptiva from Santorini, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pumiceous products of the large-scale explosive eruptions at Santorini show a high grade of similarity in their optical appearance as well as in their chemical composition. The demand for a clear classification of these eruption products was raised from archaeological research, where pumice can be interpreted as a 'post-eruption' time marker. Elements that underwent significant changes because of geochemical processes and that could be indicative for a distinction of pumice produced by the five major explosive eruptions were looked for. INAA of 25 elements allows a clear classification and contributes new information to the chemical evolution of Santorini volcano. (author)

  11. A chemical screen for biological small molecule–RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Kowtoniuk, Walter Eugene; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David Ruchien

    2009-01-01

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3'-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5'-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule-RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved ...

  12. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment

  13. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Holly M., E-mail: mortensen.holly@epa.gov [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, 109 TW Alexander Dr., Mailcode B205-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, US EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Mail Code 8623P, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  14. Gray box modeling of MSW degradation: Revealing its dominant (bio)chemical mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Turnhout, A.G.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach to describe organic degradation within immobile water regions of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills which is best described by the term “gray box” model. We use a simplified set of dominant (bio)chemical and physical reactions and realistic environmental condi

  15. Genetic evidence for gonochoristic reproduction in gynogenetic silver crucian carp (Carassius auratus gibelio bloch) as revealed by RAPD assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Wang, Y; Gui, J F

    2000-11-01

    Sex evolution has been a debating focus in evolutionary genetics. In lower vertebrates of reptiles, amphibians, and fish, a species or a bioform reproduces either sexually or asexually but never both. A few species were found to consist of all females in fish. These all-female species can propagate by asexual reproduction modes, such as gynogenesis and hybridogenesis. However, the coexistence of sexuality and asexuality in a single species was recently noted only in a cyprinid fish silver crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio. This fish had been demonstrated to be capable of gynogenesis stimulated by sperm from other related species. Surprisingly, natural populations of this fish consist of a minor but significant portion (approx. 20%) of males. As different clones with specific phenotypic and genetic characteristics have been found, and RAPD markers specific to each clone have recently been identified, this fish offers many advantages for analyzing whether or not genetic recombination occurs between different clones. In this study, artificial propagation was performed in clone F and clone D. Ovulated eggs from clone F were divided into two parts and respectively inseminated with sperm from a clone D male and from a red common carp (Cyprinus carpio) male. The control clone D individuals were selected from gynogenetic offspring of clone D activated by sperm of red common carp. The phenotype and sex ratio in the experimental groups were also observed. Using RAPD molecular markers, which allow for reliable discrimination and genetic analysis of different clones, we have revealed direct molecular evidence for gonochoristic reproduction in the gynogenetic silver crucian carp and confirmed a previous hypothesis that the silver crucian carp might reproduce both gynogenetically and gonochoristically. Therefore, we conclude that the silver crucian carp possesses two reproductive modes, i.e., gynogenetic and gonochoristic reproduction. The response mechanism of two

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Critically Endangered Yangtze Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis as Revealed by Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecological surveys have indicated that the population of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (YFP, Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis is becoming increasingly small and fragmented, and will be at high risk of extinction in the near future. Genetic conservation of this population will be an important component of the long-term conservation effort. We used a 597 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region and 11 microsatellite loci to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of the YFP. The analysis of both mtDNA and microsatellite loci suggested that the genetic diversity of the YFP will possibly decrease in the future if the population keeps declining at a rapid rate, even though these two types of markers revealed different levels of genetic diversity. In addition, mtDNA revealed strong genetic differentiation between one local population, Xingchang–Shishou (XCSS, and the other five downstream local populations; furthermore, microsatellite DNA unveiled fine but significant genetic differentiation between three of the local populations (not only XCSS but also Poyang Lake (PY and Tongling (TL and the other local populations. With an increasing number of distribution gaps appearing in the Yangtze main steam, the genetic differentiation of local populations will likely intensify in the future. The YFP is becoming a genetically fragmented population. Therefore, we recommend attention should be paid to the genetic conservation of the YFP.

  17. Assessment of genetic response and character association for yield and yield components in Lentil (Lens culinaris L. population developed through chemical mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Amin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is imperative to any plant improvement program. Therefore, this study was primarily based on this aspect of inducing desirable genetic variation for enhancement of the available lentil genetic diversity. The lentil seeds were treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS alone and in combination with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO for inducing polygenic variation as well as determining the impact of DMSO on mutagenecity of MMS. Comparative observations were recorded for bio-physiological damages, morphological variation, and quantitative traits to assess the genetic response of the lentil cultivar L 4076 toward the different concentrations of chemicals. Significant statistics suggested that the DMSO interfere with the extent of mutagenecity of MMS in lentil which could be attributed to either synergistic action of both or variation in MMS uptake. The outcome of mutagenesis on the character association study revealed that mutagenic treatments can modify significantly the manner of association between any two traits in lentil. The moderate doses of MMS in combination with 2% DMSO showed notable diminution in the biological damages while accelerating the rate of desirable high-yielding mutants had proved to be economical. The segregate of the selected mutants in future generations will definitely contribute to the improvement of Lentil genotype.

  18. Homeostatic Mechanisms for Iron Storage Revealed by Genetic Manipulations and Live Imaging of Drosophila Ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlis, Fanis; Kosmidis, Stylianos; Brody, Tom; Mavrakis, Manos; Holmberg, Sara; Odenwald, Ward F.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    Ferritin is a symmetric, 24-subunit iron-storage complex assembled of H and L chains. It is found in bacteria, plants, and animals and in two classes of mutations in the human L-chain gene, resulting in hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome or in neuroferritinopathy. Here, we examined systemic and cellular ferritin regulation and trafficking in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. We showed that ferritin H and L transcripts are coexpressed during embryogenesis and that both subunits are essential for embryonic development. Ferritin overexpression impaired the survival of iron-deprived flies. In vivo expression of GFP-tagged holoferritin confirmed that iron-loaded ferritin molecules traffic through the Golgi organelle and are secreted into hemolymph. A constant ratio of ferritin H and L subunits, secured via tight post-transcriptional regulation, is characteristic of the secreted ferritin in flies. Differential cellular expression, conserved post-transcriptional regulation via the iron regulatory element, and distinct subcellular localization of the ferritin subunits prior to the assembly of holoferritin are all important steps mediating iron homeostasis. Our study revealed both conserved features and insect-specific adaptations of ferritin nanocages and provides novel imaging possibilities for their in vivo characterization. PMID:17603097

  19. Genetic Screen Reveals the Role of Purine Metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus Persistence to Rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Yee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infections with Staphylococcus aureus such as septicemia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and biofilm infections are difficult to treat because of persisters. Despite many efforts in understanding bacterial persistence, the mechanisms of persister formation in S. aureus remain elusive. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen of a transposon mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in persistence of community-acquired S. aureus. Screening of the library for mutants defective in persistence or tolerance to rifampicin revealed many genes involved in metabolic pathways that are important for antibiotic persistence. In particular, the identified mutants belonged to metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, vitamin and purine biosynthesis. Five mutants played a role in purine biosynthesis and two mutants, purB, an adenylosuccinate lyase, and purM, a phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, were selected for further confirmation. Mutants purB and purM showed defective persistence compared to the parental strain USA300 in multiple stress conditions including various antibiotics, low pH, and heat stress. The defect in persistence was restored by complementation with the wildtype purB and purM gene in the respective mutants. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of persistence in S. aureus and provide novel therapeutic targets for developing more effective treatment for persistent infections due to S. aureus.

  20. Genetic variation in gamma ray induced mutants in blackgram as revealed by RAPD and ISSR markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to study the DNA polymorphism in 12 gamma ray induced morphological mutants of blackgram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper]. Of the 35 random and eight ISSR primers used, 15 random and five ISSR primers detected polymorphism among the mutants. Total number of bands varied from 2 to 9 for RAPD and from 6 to 10 for ISSR. The number of polymorphic bands varied from 1 to 3 for RAPD and from 1 to 6 for ISSR. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 12.5 to 50.0 for RAPD and 12.5 to 44.4 for ISSR. Significant DNA polymorphism among the mutants were observed using RAPD (25.8%) and ISSR (33.3%) marker. An young leaf chlorine mutant and a smooth pod mutant showed more DNA polymorphism as compared to the parent. DNA polymorphism data revealed by RAPD and ISSR could facilitate selection of mutants to be involved in cross breeding and genome mapping

  1. Molecular and iridescent feather reflectance data reveal recent genetic diversification and phenotypic differentiation in a cloud forest hummingbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; González, Clementina; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E; García-Moreno, Jaime

    2016-02-01

    The present day distribution and spatial genetic diversity of Mesoamerican biota reflects a long history of responses to habitat change. The hummingbird Lampornis amethystinus is distributed in northern Mesoamerica, with geographically disjunct populations. Based on sampling across the species range using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and nuclear microsatellites jointly analysed with phenotypic and climatic data, we (1) test whether the fragmented distribution is correlated with main evolutionary lineages, (2) assess body size and plumage color differentiation of populations in geographic isolation, and (3) evaluate a set of divergence scenarios and demographic patterns of the hummingbird populations. Analysis of genetic variation revealed four main groups: blue-throated populations (Sierra Madre del Sur); two groups of amethyst-throated populations (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and Sierra Madre Oriental); and populations east of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (IT) with males showing an amethyst throat. The most basal split is estimated to have originated in the Pleistocene, 2.39-0.57 million years ago (MYA), and corresponded to groups of populations separated by the IT. However, the estimated recent divergence time between blue- and amethyst-throated populations does not correspond to the 2-MY needed to be in isolation for substantial plumage divergence, likely because structurally iridescent colors are more malleable than others. Results of species distribution modeling and Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis fit a model of lineage divergence west of the Isthmus after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and that the species' suitable habitat was disjunct during past and current conditions. These results challenge the generality of the contraction/expansion glacial model to cloud forest-interior species and urges management of cloud forest, a highly vulnerable ecosystem to climate change and currently facing destruction, to prevent further loss of genetic

  2. Germ cell toxicity: significance in genetic and fertility effects of radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primordial germ cells originate in the region of the caudal end of the primitive streak, root of the allantois, and yolk sac splanchnopleure, and migrate to the gonadal ridges where they divide to form the oogonia of the female and gonocytes of the male. In the female, the transition to oocytes occurs in utero, and the female mammal is born with a finite number of oocytes that cannot be replaced. By contrast, the gonocytes of the male initiate divisions soon after birth to form the spermatogonial stem cells, which persist throughout reproductive life of the male and are capable of regenerating the seminiferous epithelium after injury. As a result of these basic differences in gametogenesis, the response of the male and female to radiation and chemicals is different. The response of both the male and female changes with development of the embryonic to the adult gonad, and with differentiation and maturation in the adult. The primordial germ cells, early oocytes, and differentiating spermatogonia of the adult male are unusually sensitive to the cytotoxic action of noxious agents, but each agent elicits a specific response owing to the intricate biochemical and physiological changes associated with development and maturation of the gametes. The relationship of germ cell killing to fertility is direct, and long-term fertility effects can be predicted from histological analysis of the gonads. The relationship to genetic effects, on the other hand, is indirect, and acts primarily by limiting the cell stages available for testing, by affecting the distribution of mitotically active stem cells among the different stages of the mitotic cycle, and thereby changing both the type and frequency of genetic effects observed

  3. Internal Domains of Natural Porous Media Revealed: Critical Locations for Transport, Storage, and Chemical Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Brantley, Susan L.; Chorover, Jon D.; Ewing, Robert P.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan; Perfect, E.; Rother, Gernot; Stack, Andrew G.

    2016-03-16

    Internal pore domains exist within rocks, lithic fragments, subsurface sediments and soil aggregates. These domains, which we term internal domains in porous media (IDPM), contain a significant fraction of their porosity as nanopores, dominate the reactive surface area of diverse porous media types, and are important locations for chemical reactivity and hydrocarbon storage. Traditionally difficult to interrogate, advances in instrumentation and imaging methods are providing new insights on the physical structures and chemical attributes of IDPM. In this review we: discuss analytical methods to characterize IDPM, evaluate what has been learned about their size distributions, connectivity, and extended structures; determine whether they exhibit unique chemical reactivity; and assess potential for their inclusion in reactive transport models. Three key findings are noteworthy. 1) A combination of methods now allows complete characterization of the porosity spectrum of natural materials and its connectivity; while imaging microscopies are providing three dimensional representations of the interconnected pore network. 2) Chemical reactivity in pores <10 nm is expected to be different from micro and macropores, yet research performed to date is inconclusive on the nature, direction, and magnitude of effect. 3) Existing continuum reactive transport models treat IDPM as a sub-grid feature with average, empirical, scale-dependent parameters; and are not formulated to include detailed information on pore networks. Overall we find that IDPM are key features controlling hydrocarbon release from shales in hydrofracking systems, organic matter stabilization and recalcitrance in soil, weathering and soil formation, and long term inorganic and organic contaminant behavior in the vadose zone and groundwater. We conclude with an assessment of impactful research opportunities to advance understanding of IDPM, and to incorporate their important effects in reactive transport models

  4. Gray box modeling of MSW degradation: Revealing its dominant (bio)chemical mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Van Turnhout, A.G.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach to describe organic degradation within immobile water regions of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills which is best described by the term “gray box” model. We use a simplified set of dominant (bio)chemical and physical reactions and realistic environmental conditions. All equations, relationships and inhibitions are based on semi-empirical or fundamental relationships which have proven to be applicable in the peer reviewed literature. As much as possible ...

  5. Unintended Changes in Genetically Modified Rice Expressing the Lysine-Rich Fusion Protein Gene Revealed by a Proteomics Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang-xiang; TANG Tang; LIU Fu-xia; LU Chang-li; HU Xiao-lan; JI Li-lian; LIU Qiao-quan

    2013-01-01

    Development of new technologies for evaluating genetically modiifed (GM) crops has revealed that there are unintended insertions and expression changes in GM crops. Proifling techniques are non-targeted approaches and are capable of detecting more unintended changes in GM crops. Here, we report the application of a comparative proteomic approach to investigate the protein proifle differences between a GM rice line, which has a lysine-rich protein gene, and its non-transgenic parental line. Proteome analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrum analysis of the seeds identiifed 22 differentially expressed protein spots. Apart from a number of glutelins that were detected as targeted proteins in the GM line, the majority of the other changed proteins were involved in carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and stress responses. These results indicated that the altered proteins were not associated with plant allergens or toxicity.

  6. Characterisation of worldwide Helicobacter pylori strains reveals genetic conservation and essentiality of serine protease HtrA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Moodley, Yoshan; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pernitzsch, Sandy Ramona; Schmidt, Vanessa; Traverso, Francisco Rivas; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Rad, Roland; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Bow, Ho; Torres, Javier; Gerhard, Markus; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2015-01-01

    Summary HtrA proteases and chaperones exhibit important roles in periplasmic protein quality control and stress responses. The genetic inactivation of htrA has been described for many bacterial pathogens. However, in some cases such as the gastric pathogen H elicobacter pylori, HtrA is secreted where it cleaves the tumour‐suppressor E‐cadherin interfering with gastric disease development, but the generation of htrA mutants is still lacking. Here, we show that the htrA gene locus is highly conserved in worldwide strains. HtrA presence was confirmed in 992 H . pylori isolates in gastric biopsy material from infected patients. Differential RNA‐sequencing (dRNA‐seq) indicated that htrA is encoded in an operon with two subsequent genes, HP1020 and HP1021. Genetic mutagenesis and complementation studies revealed that HP1020 and HP1021, but not htrA, can be mutated. In addition, we demonstrate that suppression of HtrA proteolytic activity with a newly developed inhibitor is sufficient to effectively kill H . pylori, but not other bacteria. We show that H elicobacter  htrA is an essential bifunctional gene with crucial intracellular and extracellular functions. Thus, we describe here the first microbe in which htrA is an indispensable gene, a situation unique in the bacterial kingdom. HtrA can therefore be considered a promising new target for anti‐bacterial therapy. PMID:26568477

  7. Characterisation of worldwide Helicobacter pylori strains reveals genetic conservation and essentiality of serine protease HtrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Moodley, Yoshan; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pernitzsch, Sandy Ramona; Schmidt, Vanessa; Traverso, Francisco Rivas; Schmidt, Thomas P; Rad, Roland; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Bow, Ho; Torres, Javier; Gerhard, Markus; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja; Backert, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    HtrA proteases and chaperones exhibit important roles in periplasmic protein quality control and stress responses. The genetic inactivation of htrA has been described for many bacterial pathogens. However, in some cases such as the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, HtrA is secreted where it cleaves the tumour-suppressor E-cadherin interfering with gastric disease development, but the generation of htrA mutants is still lacking. Here, we show that the htrA gene locus is highly conserved in worldwide strains. HtrA presence was confirmed in 992 H. pylori isolates in gastric biopsy material from infected patients. Differential RNA-sequencing (dRNA-seq) indicated that htrA is encoded in an operon with two subsequent genes, HP1020 and HP1021. Genetic mutagenesis and complementation studies revealed that HP1020 and HP1021, but not htrA, can be mutated. In addition, we demonstrate that suppression of HtrA proteolytic activity with a newly developed inhibitor is sufficient to effectively kill H. pylori, but not other bacteria. We show that Helicobacter htrA is an essential bifunctional gene with crucial intracellular and extracellular functions. Thus, we describe here the first microbe in which htrA is an indispensable gene, a situation unique in the bacterial kingdom. HtrA can therefore be considered a promising new target for anti-bacterial therapy. PMID:26568477

  8. The Genetic Architecture of Flowering Time and Photoperiod Sensitivity in Maize as Revealed by QTL Review and Meta Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Xu; Tingzhao Rong; Yaxi Liu; Jian Liu; Moju Cao; Jing Wang; Hai Lan; Yunbi Xu; Yanli Lu; Guangtang Pan

    2012-01-01

    The control of flowering is not only important for reproduction,but also plays a key role in the processes of domestication and adaptation.To reveal the genetic architecture for flowering time and photoperiod sensitivity,a comprehensive evaluation of the relevant literature was performed and followed by meta analysis.A total of 25 synthetic consensus quantitative trait loci (QTL) and four hot-spot genomic regions were identified for photoperiod sensitivity including 11 genes related to photoperiod response or flower morphogenesis and development.Besides,a comparative analysis of the QTL for flowering time and photoperiod sensitivity highlighted the regions containing shared and unique QTL for the two traits.Candidate genes associated with maize flowering were identified through integrated analysis of the homologous genes for flowering time in plants and the consensus QTL regions for photoperiod sensitivity in maize (Zea mays L.).Our results suggest that the combination of literature review,meta-analysis and homologous blast is an efficient approach to identify new candidate genes and create a global view of the genetic architecture for maize photoperiodic flowering.Sequences of candidate genes can be used to develop molecular markers for various models of marker-assisted selection,such as marker-assisted recurrent selection and genomic selection that can contribute significantly to crop environmental adaptation.

  9. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  10. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside

  11. Chemical and genetic diversity of Zataria multiflora Boiss. accessions growing wild in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadian, Javad; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein; Azizi, Ali; Ranjbar, Hamid; Friedt, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Zataria multiflora Boiss. is an aromatic shrub belonging to the Lamiaceae family. Its aerial parts are used in the traditional medicine and in the pharmaceutical and food industries. The terpenoid and genetic profiles of 18 accessions of Z. multiflora, collected in different locations in Iran, have been analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS or by AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) analyses, respectively. Altogether, 56 compounds were identified in the essential oils, with the major constituents being thymol (6.0-54.9%), carvacrol (0.7-50.6%), linalool (1.2-46.8%), and p-cymene (1.6-14.8%). On the basis of the essential-oil composition, the 18 accessions were divided into four groups. The first group was characterized by a high content of carvacrol, thymol, and linalool, the second group was dominated by carvacrol, thymol, and p-cymene, the third group was characterized by a high concentration of thymol and a low content of carvacrol and p-cymene, and the forth group contained linalool and carvacrol as the main components. The AFLP results revealed that the average genetic similarity (GS) between the accessions was 0.61, ranging from 0.40 to 0.77. The UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean) cluster analysis divided all accessions into five groups at a similarity level of 0.60. The two clusters generated, the first based on the essential-oil compositions and the second on the AFLP data, showed a different pattern of relationships among the accessions. The knowledge of the Z. multiflora chemotype diversity, illustrated in this study, will allow an improvement of the homogeneity of the plant material for the production of different types of essential oils, depending on the demands of the pharmaceutical and food industries for specific uses. PMID:21259428

  12. ALMA reveals a chemically evolved submillimeter galaxy at z=4.76

    CERN Document Server

    Nagao, Tohru; De Breuck, Carlos; Caselli, Paola; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Saigo, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    The chemical properties of high-z galaxies provide important information to constrain galaxy evolutionary scenarios. However, widely-used metallicity diagnostics based on rest-frame optical emission lines are not usable for heavily dust-enshrouded galaxies (such as Sub-Millimeter Galaxies; SMGs), especially at z>3. Here we focus on the flux ratio of the far-infrared fine-structure emission lines [NII]205um and [CII]158um to assess the metallicity of high-z SMGs. Through ALMA cycle 0 observations, we have detected the [NII]205um emission in a strongly [CII]-emitting SMG, LESS J033229.4-275619 at z=4.76. The velocity-integrated [NII]/[CII] flux ratio is 0.043 +/- 0.008. This is the first measurement of the [NII]/[CII] flux ratio in high-z galaxies, and the inferred flux ratio is similar to the ratio observed in the nearby universe (~0.02-0.07). The velocity-integrated flux ratio and photoionization models suggest that the metallicity in this SMG is consistent with solar, implying the chemical evolution has prog...

  13. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    Full Text Available Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15 of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest.

  14. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The specific aims listed in the original application will essentially be pursued as indicated. The major goal of the grant is to characterize a human homologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad9 checkpoint control, radioresistance and chemoresistance gene, which is called HRAD9. The purpose is to gain information about the gene, including its structure and function, such that it can potentially be developed as a human genetic marker indicative of hypersensitivity to the deleterious effects associated with exposure to radiations or certain chemicals. The specific aims are divided into two major sections. The first section includes experiments designed to characterize the HRAD9 gene at the molecular level. Specifically, the genomic version of the gene will be isolated and its DNA sequence determined, in vitro mutagenesis will be used to assess structure/function relationships, and expression in cells and tissues will be examined. The second major set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer. For this aim, human HRAD9 mutants will be constructed and characterized. In addition, the status of HRAD9 in cancer cells and tissues will be assessed.'

  15. Genome-wide association analyses reveal complex genetic architecture underlying natural variation for flowering time in canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, H; Raman, R; Coombes, N; Song, J; Prangnell, R; Bandaranayake, C; Tahira, R; Sundaramoorthi, V; Killian, A; Meng, J; Dennis, E S; Balasubramanian, S

    2016-06-01

    Optimum flowering time is the key to maximize canola production in order to meet global demand of vegetable oil, biodiesel and canola-meal. We reveal extensive variation in flowering time across diverse genotypes of canola under field, glasshouse and controlled environmental conditions. We conduct a genome-wide association study and identify 69 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with flowering time, which are repeatedly detected across experiments. Several associated SNPs occur in clusters across the canola genome; seven of them were detected within 20 Kb regions of a priori candidate genes; FLOWERING LOCUS T, FRUITFUL, FLOWERING LOCUS C, CONSTANS, FRIGIDA, PHYTOCHROME B and an additional five SNPs were localized within 14 Kb of a previously identified quantitative trait loci for flowering time. Expression analyses showed that among FLC paralogs, BnFLC.A2 accounts for ~23% of natural variation in diverse accessions. Genome-wide association analysis for FLC expression levels mapped not only BnFLC.C2 but also other loci that contribute to variation in FLC expression. In addition to revealing the complex genetic architecture of flowering time variation, we demonstrate that the identified SNPs can be modelled to predict flowering time in diverse canola germplasm accurately and hence are suitable for genomic selection of adaptative traits in canola improvement programmes. PMID:26428711

  16. Degenerate in vitro genetic selection reveals mutations that diminish alfalfa mosaic virus RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-08-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3'-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5' hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3'-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3' RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3' hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  17. Correlating chemical sensitivity and basal gene expression reveals mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Matthew G.; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Cheah, Jaime H.; Adams, Drew J.; Price, Edmund V.; Gill, Shubhroz; Javaid, Sarah; Coletti, Matthew E.; Jones, Victor L.; Bodycombe, Nicole E.; Soule, Christian K.; Alexander, Benjamin; Li, Ava; Montgomery, Philip; Kotz, Joanne D.; Hon, C. Suk-Yee; Munoz, Benito; Liefeld, Ted; Dančík, Vlado; Haber, Daniel A.; Clish, Clary B.; Bittker, Joshua A.; Palmer, Michelle; Wagner, Bridget K.; Clemons, Paul A.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cellular gene expression in response to small-molecule or genetic perturbations have yielded signatures that can connect unknown mechanisms of action (MoA) to ones previously established. We hypothesized that differential basal gene expression could be correlated with patterns of small-molecule sensitivity across many cell lines to illuminate the actions of compounds whose MoA are unknown. To test this idea, we correlated the sensitivity patterns of 481 compounds with ~19,000 basal transcript levels across 823 different human cancer cell lines and identified selective outlier transcripts. This process yielded many novel mechanistic insights, including the identification of activation mechanisms, cellular transporters, and direct protein targets. We found that ML239, originally identified in a phenotypic screen for selective cytotoxicity in breast cancer stem-like cells, most likely acts through activation of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2). These data and analytical tools are available to the research community through the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal. PMID:26656090

  18. Strong genetic admixture in the Altai at the Middle Bronze Age revealed by uniparental and ancestry informative markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollard, Clémence; Keyser, Christine; Giscard, Pierre-Henri; Tsagaan, Turbat; Bayarkhuu, Noost; Bemmann, Jan; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    The Altai Mountains have been a long-term boundary zone between the Eurasian Steppe populations and South and East Asian populations. To disentangle some of the historical population movements in this area, 14 ancient human specimens excavated in the westernmost part of the Mongolian Altai were studied. Thirteen of them were dated from the Middle to the End of the Bronze Age and one of them to the Eneolithic period. The environmental conditions encountered in this region led to the good preservation of DNA in the human remains. Therefore, a multi-markers approach was adopted for the genetic analysis of identity, ancestry and phenotype markers. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed that the ancient Altaians studied carried both Western (H, U, T) and Eastern (A, C, D) Eurasian lineages. In the same way, the patrilineal gene pool revealed the presence of different haplogroups (Q1a2a1-L54, R1a1a1b2-Z93 and C), probably marking different origins for the male paternal lineages. To go further in the search of the origin of these ancient specimens, phenotypical characters (i.e. hair and eye color) were determined. For this purpose, we adapted the HIrisPlex assay recently described to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. In addition, some ancestry informative markers were analyzed with this assay. The results revealed mixed phenotypes among this group confirming the probable admixed ancestry of the studied Altaian population at the Middle Bronze Age. The good results obtained from ancient DNA samples suggest that this approach might be relevant for forensic casework too. PMID:25016250

  19. Kinetics of methane fermentation yield in biogas reactors: Genetic variation and association with chemical composition in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the most competitive crop for methane production in Germany. Methane fermentation yield per unit of dry matter (MFY) is a determinant of methane yield, but little information is available on this trait. Our objectives were to investigate the kinetics of MFY during fermentation of maize, estimate quantitative-genetic parameters for different traits related to MFY and examine the relationship of MFY with chemical composition and silage quality. Whole-plant material of 16 inbreds and their 32 testcrosses was analyzed for MFY over 35 days of fermentation using a discontinuous laboratory assay. Data were also generated on chemical composition and in vitro digestible organic matter (IVDOM). Significant genotypic variances and high heritabilities were observed for MFY at early fermentation stages (up to 5 days) probably due to different concentrations of easily degradable chemical components. However, genotypic variances and heritability of MFY reduced as fermentation progressed, because of complete or partial degradation of all chemical components. Further, there were strong correlations of MFY with chemical components at early fermentation stages but not at later stages. Therefore, MFY at later stages, which is closer to potential MFY, does not seem to be amenable to selection. High heritability of IVDOM and its strong correlation with MFY in testcrosses indicated its possible use for preliminary or indirect selection. Keeping in view the magnitude of genetic variance that was low for MFY and high for dry matter yield (DMY), the other component of methane yield, more emphasis on breeding for DMY seems appropriate. -- Highlights: ► We investigated methane fermentation yield (MFY) of diverse germplasm of maize. ► The kinetics of MFY and its correlations with chemical composition were examined. ► Genetic variance and heritability for MFY decreased with fermentation time. ► Complete fermentation (35 d) reduced correlations of MFY with chemical

  20. Genetic characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from North America revealed widespread and high prevalence of the fourth clonal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Velmurugan, G.V.; Ragendran, C.; Yabsley, M.J.; Thomas, N.J.; Beckmen, K.B.; Sinnett, D.; Ruid, D.; Hart, J.; Fair, P.A.; McFee, W.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Kwok, O.C.H.; Ferreira, L.R.; Choudhary, S.; Faria, E.B.; Zhou, H.; Felix, T.A.; Su, C.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study wild animals, from the USA were examined for T. gondii infection. Tissues of naturally exposed animals were bioassayed in mice for isolation of viable parasites. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 31 animals including, to our knowledge for the first time, from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), five gray wolves (Canis lupus), a woodrat (Neotoma micropus), and five Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). Additionally, 66 T. gondii isolates obtained previously, but not genetically characterised, were revived in mice. Toxoplasma gondii DNA isolated from these 97 samples (31+66) was characterised using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico). A total of 95 isolates were successfully genotyped. In addition to clonal Types II, and III, 12 different genotypes were found. These genotype data were combined with 74 T. gondii isolates previously characterised from wildlife from North America and a composite data set of 169 isolates comprised 22 genotypes, including clonal Types II, III and 20 atypical genotypes. Phylogenetic network analysis showed limited diversity with dominance of a recently designated fourth clonal type (Type 12) in North America, followed by the Type II and III lineages. These three major lineages together accounted for 85% of strains in North America. The Type 12 lineage includes previously identified Type A and X strains from sea otters. This study revealed that the Type 12 lineage accounts for 46.7% (79/169) of isolates and is dominant in wildlife of North America. No clonal Type I strain was identified among these wildlife isolates. These results suggest that T. gondii strains in wildlife from North America have limited diversity, with the occurrence of only a few major clonal types.

  1. Species delimitation in lemurs: multiple genetic loci reveal low levels of species diversity in the genus Cheirogaleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoloarison Rodin M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species are viewed as the fundamental unit in most subdisciplines of biology. To conservationists this unit represents the currency for global biodiversity assessments. Even though Madagascar belongs to one of the top eight biodiversity hotspots of the world, the taxonomy of its charismatic lemuriform primates is not stable. Within the last 25 years, the number of described lemur species has more than doubled, with many newly described species identified among the nocturnal and small-bodied cheirogaleids. Here, we characterize the diversity of the dwarf lemurs (genus Cheirogaleus and assess the status of the seven described species, based on phylogenetic and population genetic analysis of mtDNA (cytb + cox2 and three nuclear markers (adora3, fiba and vWF. Results This study identified three distinct evolutionary lineages within the genus Cheirogaleus. Population genetic cluster analyses revealed a further layer of population divergence with six distinct genotypic clusters. Conclusion Based on the general metapopulation lineage concept and multiple concordant data sets, we identify three exclusive groups of dwarf lemur populations that correspond to three of the seven named species: C. major, C. medius and C. crossleyi. These three species were found to be genealogically exclusive in both mtDNA and nDNA loci and are morphologically distinguishable. The molecular and morphometric data indicate that C. adipicaudatus and C. ravus are synonymous with C. medius and C. major, respectively. Cheirogaleus sibreei falls into the C. medius mtDNA clade, but in morphological analyses the membership is not clearly resolved. We do not have sufficient data to assess the status of C. minusculus. Although additional patterns of population differentiation are evident, there are no clear subdivisions that would warrant additional specific status. We propose that ecological and more geographic data should be collected to confirm these results.

  2. Phylogenetic Reassessment of Antarctic Tetillidae (Demospongiae, Tetractinellida) Reveals New Genera and Genetic Similarity among Morphologically Distinct Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carella, Mirco; Agell, Gemma; Cárdenas, Paco; Uriz, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Species of Tetillidae are distributed worldwide. However, some genera are unresolved and only a few genera and species of this family have been described from the Antarctic. The incorporation of 25 new COI and 18S sequences of Antarctic Tetillidae to those used recently for assessing the genera phylogeny, has allowed us to improve the resolution of some poorly resolved nodes and to confirm the monophyly of previously identified clades. Classical genera such as Craniella recovered their traditional diagnosis by moving the Antarctic Tetilla from Craniella, where they were placed in the previous family phylogeny, to Antarctotetilla gen. nov. The morphological re-examination of specimens used in the previous phylogeny and their comparison to the type material revealed misidentifications. The proposed monotypic new genus Levantinella had uncertain phylogenetic relationships depending on the gene partition used. Two more clades would require the inclusion of additional species to be formally established as new genera. The parsimony tree based on morphological characters and the secondary structure of the 18S (V4 region) almost completely matched the COI M1-M6 and the COI+18S concatenated phylogenies. Morphological synapomorphies have been identified for the genera proposed. New 15 28S (D3-D5) and 11 COI I3-M11 partitions were exclusively sequenced for the Antarctic species subset. Remarkably, species within the Antarctic genera Cinachyra (C. barbata and C. antarctica) and Antarctotetilla (A. leptoderma, A. grandis, and A. sagitta), which are clearly distinguishable morphologically, were not genetically differentiated with any of the markers assayed. Thus, as it has been reported for other Antarctic sponges, both the mitochondrial and nuclear partitions used did not differentiate species that were well characterized morphologically. Antarctic Tetillidae offers a rare example of genetically cryptic (with the traditional markers used for sponges), morphologically distinct

  3. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Drechmeria coniospora Reveals Core and Specific Genetic Requirements for Fungal Endoparasitism of Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Nishant; Arguel, Marie-Jeanne; Polanowska, Jolanta; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Raffaele, Sylvain; Barbry, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Drechmeria coniospora is an obligate fungal pathogen that infects nematodes via the adhesion of specialized spores to the host cuticle. D. coniospora is frequently found associated with Caenorhabditis elegans in environmental samples. It is used in the study of the nematode’s response to fungal infection. Full understanding of this bi-partite interaction requires knowledge of the pathogen’s genome, analysis of its gene expression program and a capacity for genetic engineering. The acquisition of all three is reported here. A phylogenetic analysis placed D. coniospora close to the truffle parasite Tolypocladium ophioglossoides, and Hirsutella minnesotensis, another nematophagous fungus. Ascomycete nematopathogenicity is polyphyletic; D. coniospora represents a branch that has not been molecularly characterized. A detailed in silico functional analysis, comparing D. coniospora to 11 fungal species, revealed genes and gene families potentially involved in virulence and showed it to be a highly specialized pathogen. A targeted comparison with nematophagous fungi highlighted D. coniospora-specific genes and a core set of genes associated with nematode parasitism. A comparative gene expression analysis of samples from fungal spores and mycelia, and infected C. elegans, gave a molecular view of the different stages of the D. coniospora lifecycle. Transformation of D. coniospora allowed targeted gene knock-out and the production of fungus that expresses fluorescent reporter genes. It also permitted the initial characterisation of a potential fungal counter-defensive strategy, involving interference with a host antimicrobial mechanism. This high-quality annotated genome for D. coniospora gives insights into the evolution and virulence of nematode-destroying fungi. Coupled with genetic transformation, it opens the way for molecular dissection of D. coniospora physiology, and will allow both sides of the interaction between D. coniospora and C. elegans, as well as the

  4. Transcriptome Profiling and Genetic Study Reveal Amplified Carboxylesterase Genes Implicated in Temephos Resistance, in the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Grigoraki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of Aedes albopictus, a major vector for viral diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya, has been largely reliant on the use of the larvicide temephos for many decades. This insecticide remains a primary control tool for several countries and it is a potential reliable reserve, for emergency epidemics or new invasion cases, in regions such as Europe which have banned its use. Resistance to temephos has been detected in some regions, but the mechanism responsible for the trait has not been investigated.Temephos resistance was identified in an Aedes albopictus population isolated from Greece, and subsequently selected in the laboratory for a few generations. Biochemical assays suggested the association of elevated carboxylesterases (CCE, but not target site resistance (altered AChE, with this phenotype. Illumina transcriptomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of three transcripts encoding CCE genes in the temephos resistant strain. CCEae3a and CCEae6a showed the most striking up-regulation (27- and 12-folds respectively, compared to the reference susceptible strain; these genes have been previously shown to be involved in temephos resistance also in Ae. aegypti. Gene amplification was associated with elevated transcription levels of both CCEae6a and CCEae3a genes. Genetic crosses confirmed the genetic link between CCEae6a and CCEae3a amplification and temephos resistance, by demonstrating a strong association between survival to temephos exposure and gene copy numbers in the F2 generation. Other transcripts, encoding cytochrome P450s, UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs, cuticle and lipid biosynthesis proteins, were upregulated in resistant mosquitoes, indicating that the co-evolution of multiple mechanisms might contribute to resistance.The identification of specific genes associated with insecticide resistance in Ae. albopictus for the first time is an important pre-requirement for insecticide resistance management. The genomic

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Drechmeria coniospora Reveals Core and Specific Genetic Requirements for Fungal Endoparasitism of Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrigand, Kevin; He, Le D; Thakur, Nishant; Arguel, Marie-Jeanne; Polanowska, Jolanta; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Raffaele, Sylvain; Barbry, Pascal; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2016-05-01

    Drechmeria coniospora is an obligate fungal pathogen that infects nematodes via the adhesion of specialized spores to the host cuticle. D. coniospora is frequently found associated with Caenorhabditis elegans in environmental samples. It is used in the study of the nematode's response to fungal infection. Full understanding of this bi-partite interaction requires knowledge of the pathogen's genome, analysis of its gene expression program and a capacity for genetic engineering. The acquisition of all three is reported here. A phylogenetic analysis placed D. coniospora close to the truffle parasite Tolypocladium ophioglossoides, and Hirsutella minnesotensis, another nematophagous fungus. Ascomycete nematopathogenicity is polyphyletic; D. coniospora represents a branch that has not been molecularly characterized. A detailed in silico functional analysis, comparing D. coniospora to 11 fungal species, revealed genes and gene families potentially involved in virulence and showed it to be a highly specialized pathogen. A targeted comparison with nematophagous fungi highlighted D. coniospora-specific genes and a core set of genes associated with nematode parasitism. A comparative gene expression analysis of samples from fungal spores and mycelia, and infected C. elegans, gave a molecular view of the different stages of the D. coniospora lifecycle. Transformation of D. coniospora allowed targeted gene knock-out and the production of fungus that expresses fluorescent reporter genes. It also permitted the initial characterisation of a potential fungal counter-defensive strategy, involving interference with a host antimicrobial mechanism. This high-quality annotated genome for D. coniospora gives insights into the evolution and virulence of nematode-destroying fungi. Coupled with genetic transformation, it opens the way for molecular dissection of D. coniospora physiology, and will allow both sides of the interaction between D. coniospora and C. elegans, as well as the

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Drechmeria coniospora Reveals Core and Specific Genetic Requirements for Fungal Endoparasitism of Nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lebrigand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drechmeria coniospora is an obligate fungal pathogen that infects nematodes via the adhesion of specialized spores to the host cuticle. D. coniospora is frequently found associated with Caenorhabditis elegans in environmental samples. It is used in the study of the nematode's response to fungal infection. Full understanding of this bi-partite interaction requires knowledge of the pathogen's genome, analysis of its gene expression program and a capacity for genetic engineering. The acquisition of all three is reported here. A phylogenetic analysis placed D. coniospora close to the truffle parasite Tolypocladium ophioglossoides, and Hirsutella minnesotensis, another nematophagous fungus. Ascomycete nematopathogenicity is polyphyletic; D. coniospora represents a branch that has not been molecularly characterized. A detailed in silico functional analysis, comparing D. coniospora to 11 fungal species, revealed genes and gene families potentially involved in virulence and showed it to be a highly specialized pathogen. A targeted comparison with nematophagous fungi highlighted D. coniospora-specific genes and a core set of genes associated with nematode parasitism. A comparative gene expression analysis of samples from fungal spores and mycelia, and infected C. elegans, gave a molecular view of the different stages of the D. coniospora lifecycle. Transformation of D. coniospora allowed targeted gene knock-out and the production of fungus that expresses fluorescent reporter genes. It also permitted the initial characterisation of a potential fungal counter-defensive strategy, involving interference with a host antimicrobial mechanism. This high-quality annotated genome for D. coniospora gives insights into the evolution and virulence of nematode-destroying fungi. Coupled with genetic transformation, it opens the way for molecular dissection of D. coniospora physiology, and will allow both sides of the interaction between D. coniospora and C. elegans, as

  7. Extended rigidity percolation and chemical thresholds in Ge Te Pb glasses as revealed by MDSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheerudeen Saheb, P.; Sharmila, B. H.; Asokan, S.; Appaji Gowda, K.

    2004-03-01

    Thermal analysis of Ge 20Te 80- xPb x (2≤ x≤8) glasses has been undertaken using modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). The compositional dependence of thermal parameters is investigated. The crystallization temperatures ( Tc) estimated from the total heat flow show detectable changes at compositions x=4, 6.5 and 7.5. Further, the heat capacity change at the glass transition temperature, measured from the reversible heat flow curve (Δ CpR), is found to exhibit a maximum and an inflexion at compositions x=4 and 6.5 and minimum at x=7.5, respectively. Also, the relaxation enthalpy, estimated from the area under the non-reversing heat flow curve (Δ HNR), exhibits similar features at the said compositions. From the observed MDSC results, it has been proposed that the compositions x=4 and x=6.5 denote to the onset and completion of rigidity percolation and x=7.5 corresponds to the chemical threshold of the system.

  8. Chemical Heterogeneity on Mercury's Surface Revealed by the MESSENGER X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weider, Shoshana Z.; Nittler, Larry R.; Starr, Richard D.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Byrne, Paul K.; Denevi, Brett W.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the analysis of 205 spatially resolved measurements of the surfacecomposition of Mercury from MESSENGERs X-Ray Spectrometer. The surfacefootprints of these measurements are categorized according to geological terrain. Northernsmooth plains deposits and the plains interior to the Caloris basin differ compositionallyfrom older terrain on Mercury. The older terrain generally has higher MgSi, SSi, andCaSi ratios, and a lower AlSi ratio than the smooth plains. Mercurys surface mineralogyis likely dominated by high-Mg mafic minerals (e.g., enstatite), plagioclase feldspar, andlesser amounts of Ca, Mg, andor Fe sulfides (e.g., oldhamite). The compositionaldifference between the volcanic smooth plains and the older terrain reflects differentabundances of these minerals and points to the crystallization of the smooth plains from amore chemically evolved magma source. High-degree partial melts of enstatite chondritematerial provide a generally good compositional and mineralogical match for much ofthe surface of Mercury. An exception is Fe, for which the low surface abundance onMercury is still higher than that of melts from enstatite chondrites and may indicate anexogenous contribution from meteoroid impacts.

  9. Revealing halogen bonding interactions with anomeric systems: an ab initio quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2015-02-01

    A computational study has been performed using MP2 and CCSD(T) methods on a series of O⋯X (X=Br, Cl and I) halogen bonds to evaluate the strength and characteristic of such highly directional noncovalent interactions. The study has been carried out on a series of dimeric complexes formed between interhalogen compounds (such as BrF, BrCl and BrI) and oxygen containing electron donor molecule. The existence and consequences of the anomeric effect of the electron donor molecule has also been investigated through an exploration of halogen bonding interactions in this halogen bonded complexes. The ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been employed to study both the nature and directionality of the halogen molecules toward the sp(3) oxygen atom in anomeric systems. The presence of anomeric nO→σ*CN interaction involves a dominant role for the availability of the axial and equatorial lone pairs of donor O atom to participate with interhalogen compounds in the halogen-bonded complexes. The energy difference between the axial and equatorial conformers with interhalogen compounds reaches up to 4.60 kJ/mol, which however depends upon the interacting halogen atoms and its attaching atoms. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the total halogen bond interaction energies are mainly contributed by the attractive electrostatic and dispersion components. The role of substituents attached with the halogen atoms has also been evaluated in this study. With the increase of halogen atom size and the positive nature of σ-hole, the halogen atom interacted more with the electron donor atom and the electrostatic contribution to the total interaction energy enhances appreciably. Further, noncovalent interaction (NCI) studies have been carried out to locate the noncovalent halogen bonding interactions in real space. PMID:25522359

  10. Phylogenetic inferences reveal a large extent of novel biodiversity in chemically rich tropical marine cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engene, Niclas; Gunasekera, Sarath P; Gerwick, William H; Paul, Valerie J

    2013-03-01

    Benthic marine cyanobacteria are known for their prolific biosynthetic capacities to produce structurally diverse secondary metabolites with biomedical application and their ability to form cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms. In an effort to provide taxonomic clarity to better guide future natural product drug discovery investigations and harmful algal bloom monitoring, this study investigated the taxonomy of tropical and subtropical natural product-producing marine cyanobacteria on the basis of their evolutionary relatedness. Our phylogenetic inferences of marine cyanobacterial strains responsible for over 100 bioactive secondary metabolites revealed an uneven taxonomic distribution, with a few groups being responsible for the vast majority of these molecules. Our data also suggest a high degree of novel biodiversity among natural product-producing strains that was previously overlooked by traditional morphology-based taxonomic approaches. This unrecognized biodiversity is primarily due to a lack of proper classification systems since the taxonomy of tropical and subtropical, benthic marine cyanobacteria has only recently been analyzed by phylogenetic methods. This evolutionary study provides a framework for a more robust classification system to better understand the taxonomy of tropical and subtropical marine cyanobacteria and the distribution of natural products in marine cyanobacteria. PMID:23315747

  11. Population genetics of Phytophthora infestans in Denmark reveals dominantly clonal populations and specific alleles linked to metalaxyl-M resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Melanie Sarah; Nielsen, B.J.; Schmidt, S.G.; Bødker, L.; Kjøller, Rasmus; Rosendahl, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Control of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans relies heavily on chemicals. The fungicide metalaxyl-M (Mefenoxam) has played an important role in controlling the disease, but insensitivity to the fungicide in certain isolates is now of major concern. A genetic basis for resista...

  12. A Chemical Biology Approach to Reveal Sirt6-targeted Histone H3 Sites in Nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wesley Wei; Zeng, Yu; Wu, Bo; Deiters, Alexander; Liu, Wenshe R

    2016-07-15

    As a member of a highly conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylases, Sirt6 is a key regulator of mammalian genome stability, metabolism, and life span. Previous studies indicated that Sirt6 is hardwired to remove histone acetylation at H3K9 and H3K56. However, how Sirt6 recognizes its nucleosome substrates has been elusive due to the difficulty of accessing homogeneous acetyl-nucleosomes and the low activity of Sirt6 toward peptide substrates. Based on the fact that Sirt6 has an enhanced activity to remove long chain fatty acylation from lysine, we developed an approach to recombinantly synthesize histone H3 with a fatty acylated lysine, N(ε)-(7-octenoyl)-lysine (OcK), installed at a number of lysine sites and used these acyl-H3 proteins to assemble acyl-nucleosomes as active Sirt6 substrates. A chemical biology approach that visualizes OcK in nucleosomes and therefore allows direct sensitization of Sirt6 activities on its acyl-nucleosome substrates was also formulated. By combining these two approaches, we showed that Sirt6 actively removes acylation from H3K9, H3K18, and H3K27; has relatively low activities toward H3K4 and K3K23; but sluggishly removes acylation at H3K14, H3K36, H3K56, and H3K79. Overexpressing Sirt6 in 293T cells led to downregulated acetylation at H3K18 and K3K27, confirming these two novel Sirt6-targeted nucleosome lysine sites in cells. Given that downregulation of H3K18 acetylation is correlated with a poor prognosis of several cancer types and H3K27 acetylation antagonizes repressive gene regulation by di- and trimethylation at H3K27, our current study implies that Sirt6 may serve as a target for cancer intervention and regulatory pathway investigation in cells. PMID:27152839

  13. Chemical Complexity in the Shocked Outflow L1157 Revealed by CARMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; McGuire, Brett A.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, the complex organic molecules which are the building blocks of life, have been found in meteoritic samples and, most recently, in samples from Comet Wild-2. Yet, no amino acids have been detected in the gas-phase in the interstellar medium, which seeds and enriches these meteorites and comets. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, has been shown to form in the laboratory through the reaction of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) with acetic acid (CH3COOH), a known interstellar molecule. This has prompted a move to search for NH2OH as a proxy of identifying regions where subsequent searches for glycine may prove the most fruitful.A search for NH2OH was conducted in seven diverse, molecule-rich sources and resulted in non-detections for all seven (Pulliam, et al. 2012). Theoretical work suggested the temperature of the sources was perhaps too low for NH2OH to thermally-desorb into the gas phase. Searches in shocked molecular regions, however, may overcome this barrier, as complex molecules are non-thermally liberated into the gas-phase by these shocks.Here, we present results from a targeted search toward the prototypical shocked outflow L1157. L1157-B0, -B1, and -B2 are shocked regions within the outflow from the infrared source L1157-mm. Using observations from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), we have mapped a variety of molecular tracers in the region and conducted an interferometric search for NH2OH with typical spatial resolutions of ~3'. We find that the prototypical complex molecule methanol (CH3OH) peaks in B2, the newer shock. We compare this with the distributions of HCN and HCO+ and discuss the implications for chemical evolution within the region. HCN, used as a density tracer, also peaks in B2 while HCO+ is shown as diffuse throughout B0. We also present the first maps of isocyanic acid (HNCO) in L1157. HNCO is found to peak in B2, cospatial with CH3OH and HCN. Finally, we report a non-detection of three NH2OH transitions

  14. Evolutionary study of leporid CD4 reveals a hotspot of genetic variability within the D2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patricia; Abrantes, Joana; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Keppler, Oliver T; Esteves, Pedro J

    2016-07-01

    CD4 is the major receptor on T helper cells involved in the uptake of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) into their host cells. Evolutionary studies of CD4 in primates revealed signatures of positive selection in the D1 domain that interacts with primate exogenous lentivirus gp120 proteins. Here, we studied the evolution of CD4 in lagomorphs by comparing sequences obtained for the genera Oryctolagus, Sylvilagus, Lepus, and Ochotona. Our results reveal an overall higher divergence in lagomorphs compared to primates with highest divergence in the D2 domain. A detailed analysis of a small fragment of 33 nucleotides coding for amino acids 169 to 179 in the D2 domain showed dramatic amino acid alterations with a dN/dS value of 3.2 for lagomorphs, suggesting that CD4 is under strong positive selection in this particular region. Within each leporid genus, no significant amino acid changes were observed for the D2 domain which indicates that the genetic differentiation occurred in the ancestor of each genus before the species radiation. The rabbit endogenous lentivirus type K (RELIK) found in leporids shares high structural similarity with HIV which suggests a possible interaction between RELIK and CD4. The presence of RELIK in the studied leporids, the high structural similarity to modern-day exogenous lentiviruses and the absence of exogenous lentiviruses in leporids, allows us to hypothesize that this endogenous retrovirus, that was most probably exogenous in the past, drove the divergent evolution of leporid CD4. PMID:26979977

  15. Genetic Analyses Reveal Functions for MAP2K3 and MAP2K6 in Mouse Testis Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Nick; Siggers, Pam; Carré, Gwenn-Aël; Wells, Sara; Greenfield, Andy

    2016-05-01

    Testis determination in mammals is initiated by expression of SRY in somatic cells of the embryonic gonad. Genetic analyses in the mouse have revealed a requirement for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in testis determination: targeted loss of the kinases MAP3K4 and p38 MAPK causes complete XY embryonic gonadal sex reversal. These kinases occupy positions at the top and bottom level, respectively, in the canonical three-tier MAPK-signaling cascade: MAP3K, MAP2K, MAPK. To date, no role in sex determination has been attributed to a MAP2K, although such a function is predicted to exist. Here, we report roles for the kinases MAP2K3 and MAP2K6 in testis determination. C57BL/6J (B6) embryos lacking MAP2K3 exhibited no significant abnormalities of testis development, whilst those lacking MAP2K6 exhibited a minor delay in testis determination. Compound mutants lacking three out of four functional alleles at the two loci also exhibited delayed testis determination and transient ovotestis formation as a consequence, suggestive of partially redundant roles for these kinases in testis determination. Early lethality of double-knockout embryos precludes analysis of sexual development. To reveal their roles in testis determination more clearly, we generated Map2k mutant B6 embryos using a weaker Sry allele (Sry(AKR)). Loss of Map2k3 on this highly sensitized background exacerbates ovotestis development, whilst loss of Map2k6 results in complete XY gonadal sex reversal associated with reduction of Sry expression at 11.25 days postcoitum. Our data suggest that MAP2K6 functions in mouse testis determination, via positive effects on Sry, and also indicate a minor role for MAP2K3. PMID:27009039

  16. The Chemical and Genetic Characteristics of Szechuan Pepper (Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum) Cultivars and Their Suitable Habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Li; Liu, Yue; Xie, Caixiang; Li, Xiwen; Yu, Yadong; Ye, Meng; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Szechuan peppers, famous for their unique sensation and flavor, are widely used as a food additive and traditional herbal medicine. Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum are both commonly recognized as Szechuan peppers, but they have different tastes and effects. The chemical components, genetic characteristics, and suitable habitat of six cultivars were analyzed in this study. The results indicated that Z. armatum contained a larger proportion of volatile oil, whereas Z. bungeanum produced a ...

  17. The chemical and genetic characteristics of Szechuan pepper (Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum) cultivars and their suitable habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Li eXiang; Yue eLiu; Caixiang eXie; Xiwen eLi; Yadong eYu; Meng eYe; Shilin eChen

    2016-01-01

    Szechuan peppers, famous for their unique sensation and flavor, are widely used as a food additive and traditional herbal medicine. Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum are both commonly recognized as Szechuan peppers, but they have different tastes and effects. The chemical components, genetic characteristics, and suitable habitat of six cultivars were analyzed in this study. The results indicated that Z. armatum contained a larger proportion of volatile oil, whereas Z. bungeanum produced a ...

  18. Chemical-genetic disruption of clathrin function spares adaptor complex 3–dependent endosome vesicle biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Grossniklaus, Emily J.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Peden, Andrew A.; Faundez, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A role for clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle biogenesis has been inferred from biochemical interactions and colocalization between this adaptor and clathrin. The functionality of these molecular associations, however, is controversial. We comprehensively explore the role of clathrin in AP-3–dependent vesicle budding, using rapid chemical-genetic perturbation of clathrin function with a clathrin light chain–FKBP chimera oligomerizable by the drug AP20187. We find that AP-3 interacts and coloc...

  19. Genetic analysis of the isolated Faroe Islands reveals SORCS3 as a potential multiple sclerosis risk gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Stefanie; Stenager, Egon; Binzer, Michael; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Hillert, Jan; Imrell, Kerstin

    genetically homogenous population of the isolated Faroe Islands. METHODS: Twenty-nine Faroese MS cases and 28 controls were genotyped with the HumanOmniExpressExome-chip. The individuals make up 1596 pair-combinations in which we searched for identical-by-descent shared segments using the PLINK-program....... RESULTS: A segment spanning 63 SNPs with excess case-case-pair sharing was identified (0.00173 < p > 0.00212). A haplotype consisting of 42 of the 63 identified SNPs which spanned the entire the Sortilin-related vacuolar protein sorting 10 domain containing receptor 3 (SORCS3) gene had a carrier frequency...... of 0.34 in cases but was not present in any controls (p = 0.0008). CONCLUSION: This study revealed an oversharing in case-case-pairs of a segment spanning 63 SNPs and the entire SORCS3. While not previously associated with MS, SORCS3 appears to be important in neuronal plasticity through its binding...

  20. Transcriptomes reveal the genetic mechanisms underlying ionic regulatory adaptations to salt in the crab-eating frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yong; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhong, Li; Hong, Mei-Ling; Chen, Hong-Man; Murphy, Robert W; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Che, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The crab-eating frog, Fejervarya cancrivora, is the only frog that lives near seas. It tolerates increased environmental concentrations of sodium, chloride and potassium partly by raising ion and urea levels in its blood plasma. The molecular mechanism of the adaptation remains rarely documented. Herein, we analyze transcriptomes of the crab-eating frog and its closely related saline-intolerant species, F. limnocharis, to explore the molecular basis of adaptations to such extreme environmental conditions. Analyses reveal the potential genetic mechanism underlying the adaptation to salinity for the crab-eating frog. Genes in categories associated with ion transport appear to have evolved rapidly in F. cancrivora. Both positively selected and differentially expressed genes exhibit enrichment in the GO category regulation of renal sodium excretion. In this category, the positively selected sites of ANPEP and AVPR2 encode CD13 and V2 receptors, respectively; they fall precisely on conserved domains. More differentially expressed rapidly evolved genes occur in the kidney of F. cancrivora than in F. limnocharis. Four genes involved in the regulation of body fluid levels show signs of positive selection and increased expression. Significant up-regulation occurs in several genes of F. cancrivora associated with renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption pathways, which relate to osmotic regulation. PMID:26619819

  1. Genetic Diversity of Pinus nigra Arn. Populations in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco Revealed By Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama Ahrazem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eight Pinus nigra Arn. populations from Southern Spain and Northern Morocco were examined using inter-simple sequence repeat markers to characterize the genetic variability amongst populations. Pair-wise population genetic distance ranged from 0.031 to 0.283, with a mean of 0.150 between populations. The highest inter-population average distance was between PaCU from Cuenca and YeCA from Cazorla, while the lowest distance was between TaMO from Morocco and MA Sierra Mágina populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and Nei’s genetic diversity analyses revealed higher genetic variation within the same population than among different populations. Genetic differentiation (Gst was 0.233. Cuenca showed the highest Nei’s genetic diversity followed by the Moroccan region, Sierra Mágina, and Cazorla region. However, clustering of populations was not in accordance with their geographical locations. Principal component analysis showed the presence of two major groups—Group 1 contained all populations from Cuenca while Group 2 contained populations from Cazorla, Sierra Mágina and Morocco—while Bayesian analysis revealed the presence of three clusters. The low genetic diversity observed in PaCU and YeCA is probably a consequence of inappropriate management since no estimation of genetic variability was performed before the silvicultural treatments. Data indicates that the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR method is sufficiently informative and powerful to assess genetic variability among populations of P. nigra.

  2. Genetic structure and diversity in New World screwworm populations from Uruguay revealed by microsatellite markers: Implications for control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The New World screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, is one of the most important parasitic insect pests that causes invasive myiasis in warm-blooded vertebrates and is responsible for important economic losses to livestock rearing throughout the neotropics. Because of the substantial economic losses caused by this pest, an international effort has eradicated the NWS from endemic areas of North and Central America and is preventing invasions into screwworm-free areas. There have been speculations and conflicting reports, however, about the existence of non-interbreeding populations and their possible effects on the control programme. It is crucial to identify such populations and to characterise the genetic variability and structure of target populations in order to maximize the effectiveness of the eradication programme. To investigate the genetic variability and population structure across the current geographic distribution of the NWS, we focus on microsatellites markers, which due to their high polymorphism are ideal for addressing such questions. The recent isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers for C. hominivorax now allows the investigation of the genetic variability and population structure of this pest in Uruguay. Five microsatellite markers previously isolated were used in this study to characterise C. hominivorax samples from five distinct geographic locations in Uruguay. All five loci investigated were polymorphic, revealing a high degree of polymorphism across the five sampling locations. For the five microsatellite loci analysed, the expected heterozygosity varied from 0.33 to 0.84 and the observed heterozygosities varied from 0.19 to 0.79. The number of alleles detected per locus was high, varying from 7 to 11. Significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was recorded for four sampling localities. In all cases, departures from H-W expectations were due to an excess of homozygotes. Among the

  3. Genetic structure and relationships within and between cultivated and wild sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) in Kenya as revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutegi, E; Sagnard, F; Semagn, K; Deu, M; Muraya, M; Kanyenji, B; de Villiers, S; Kiambi, D; Herselman, L; Labuschagne, M

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the extent and partitioning of diversity within and among crop landraces and their wild/weedy relatives constitutes the first step in conserving and unlocking their genetic potential. This study aimed to characterize the genetic structure and relationships within and between cultivated and wild sorghum at country scale in Kenya, and to elucidate some of the underlying evolutionary mechanisms. We analyzed at total of 439 individuals comprising 329 cultivated and 110 wild sorghums using 24 microsatellite markers. We observed a total of 295 alleles across all loci and individuals, with 257 different alleles being detected in the cultivated sorghum gene pool and 238 alleles in the wild sorghum gene pool. We found that the wild sorghum gene pool harbored significantly more genetic diversity than its domesticated counterpart, a reflection that domestication of sorghum was accompanied by a genetic bottleneck. Overall, our study found close genetic proximity between cultivated sorghum and its wild progenitor, with the extent of crop-wild divergence varying among cultivation regions. The observed genetic proximity may have arisen primarily due to historical and/or contemporary gene flow between the two congeners, with differences in farmers' practices explaining inter-regional gene flow differences. This suggests that deployment of transgenic sorghum in Kenya may lead to escape of transgenes into wild-weedy sorghum relatives. In both cultivated and wild sorghum, genetic diversity was found to be structured more along geographical level than agro-climatic level. This indicated that gene flow and genetic drift contributed to shaping the contemporary genetic structure in the two congeners. Spatial autocorrelation analysis revealed a strong spatial genetic structure in both cultivated and wild sorghums at the country scale, which could be explained by medium- to long-distance seed movement. PMID:21153801

  4. Spatial and temporal genetic structure of the planktonic Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha) in European seas as revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.T.C.A. Peijnenburg; C.Y. Fauvelot; J.A.J. Breeuwer; S.B.J. Menken

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the spatial and temporal scales at which planktonic organisms are genetically structured. A previous study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the holoplanktonic chaetognath Sagitta setosa revealed strong phylogeographic structuring suggesting that Northeast (NE) Atlantic,

  5. De novo genetic variation revealed in somatic sectors of single Arabidopsis plants [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/kw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne T Hopkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern over the tremendous loss of genetic diversity among many of our most important crops has prompted major efforts to preserve seed stocks derived from cultivated species and their wild relatives. Arabidopsis thaliana propagates mainly by self-fertilizing, and therefore, like many crop plants, theoretically has a limited potential for producing genetically diverse offspring. Despite this, inbreeding has persisted in Arabidopsis for over a million years suggesting that some underlying adaptive mechanism buffers the deleterious consequences of this reproductive strategy. Using presence-absence molecular markers we demonstrate that single Arabidopsis plants can have multiple genotypes. Sequence analyses reveal single nucleotide changes, loss of sequences and, surprisingly, acquisition of unique genomic insertions. Estimates based on quantitative analyses suggest that these genetically discordant sectors are very small but can have a complex genetic makeup. In ruling out more trivial explanations for these data, our findings raise the possibility that intrinsic drivers of genetic variation are responsible for the targeted sequence changes we detect. Given the evolutionary advantage afforded to populations with greater genetic diversity, we hypothesize that organisms that primarily self-fertilize or propagate clonally counteract the genetic cost of such reproductive strategies by leveraging a cryptic reserve of extra-genomic information.

  6. De novo genetic variation revealed in somatic sectors of single Arabidopsis plants [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1ii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne T Hopkins

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Concern over the tremendous loss of genetic diversity among many of our most important crops has prompted major efforts to preserve seed stocks derived from cultivated species and their wild relatives. Arabidopsis thaliana propagates mainly by self-fertilizing, and therefore, like many crop plants, theoretically has a limited potential for producing genetically diverse offspring. Despite this, inbreeding has persisted in Arabidopsis for over a million years suggesting that some underlying adaptive mechanism buffers the deleterious consequences of this reproductive strategy. Using presence-absence molecular markers we demonstrate that single Arabidopsis plants can have multiple genotypes. Sequence analyses reveal single nucleotide changes, loss of sequences and, surprisingly, acquisition of unique genomic insertions. Estimates based on quantitative analyses suggest that these genetically discordant sectors are very small but can have a complex genetic makeup. In ruling out more trivial explanations for these data, our findings raise the possibility that intrinsic drivers of genetic variation are responsible for the targeted sequence changes we detect. Given the evolutionary advantage afforded to populations with greater genetic diversity, we hypothesize that organisms that primarily self-fertilize or propagate clonally counteract the genetic cost of such reproductive strategies by leveraging a cryptic reserve of extra-genomic information.

  7. Some chemical influence on genetic effects of ionizing radiation and biodosimetry problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation sensitivity is a quantitative character from genetic point of view and the distribution of this character values in populations is characterized by a binomial curve. So, 50% of the population have the mean values of radiosensitivity (x ± 0.67σ), 95% of individuals have radiosensitivity values equal to x ± 1.96σ and 5% of the population have this characters ranged from x ± 1.96σ to x ± 3σ, with division into the supersensitive fraction (2.5%) and the superresistant one (2.5%). Radiosensitivity as well as other quantitative characters is caused by the interaction of some pairs of polymeric genes determining a lot of physiological and biochemical organism features. Thus, irradiation in the same dose can induce different level of mutations or other biological effects in different humans. Besides, radiosensitivity depends to a great degree upon environmental factors. For instance, a level of radiosensitivity depends on physical activity, nervous and psychological state, hormonal balance etc. A diet can change an individual radioresistance - food rich in vitamins, microelements, adaptogens and so on favors the increase in individual radioresistance. Many food stuffs contain radioprotectors or antimutagens. So, tea, coffee, cocoa, chocolate, mushrooms and other products have melanin, which is a very effective radioprotector not only against acute irradiation, but even against chronic one according to out data. On the contrary some substances in our food such as residual amounts of fertilizers or herbicides can be mutagenic or increase mutagenic action of radiation. In the last case we observed synergetic or antagonistic effects. Radioadaptive response is one of the most significant factors which can be responsible for uncorrected radiation dose evaluation by biodosimetry methods. This phenomenon decreases effects of ionizing radiation approximately twice. Adaptive reaction can be induced by low radiation dose as well

  8. Induction of novel genetic recombinants through chemical mutagenesis of microspores in Indian Mustard B. juncea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microspore embryogenesis and DH production protocol developed in our lab [In Vitro Cellular and Development Biology - Plant. 2005, 41: 266-273] was used for microspores isolation and their chemical mutagenesis to widen the genetic base of three widely cultivated B. juncea species, Pusa Bold, Varuna and Bio- 902. The regenerated three to four leaf growth stage plantlets were diploidized, hardened and transplanted to develop doubled haploid plants. The microspores of genotype BIO-902 treated with either ENU/EMS did not produce any embryos while the control produced 85.4 ± 10.9 embryos/ Petri dish. Treatment with 5.0 μM ENU/EMS resulted in maximum embryo induction from the other two genotypes, Pusa Bold and Varuna. Irrespective of the concentration used, EMS mutated microspores produced embryos with higher frequency (239) as compared to those treated with ENU (106). The control embryos exhibited 85 to 90% germination against the mutant microspore derived embryos (16.7 to 31.5%). Overall lower concentrations of EMS (1.0 to 2.5 μM) compared to that of ENU (2.5 to 5.0 μM) promoted higher frequency of positive mutants with promising yield potential. Both EMS and ENU generated considerable variability for agro morphological and biochemical traits; appressed pod phenotype, number of pods, leaf size, total glucosinolate content and FA profile. Desirable phenotypes with reduced glucosinolate ( 100 μM) per g oil free meal were recovered from 2.5 to 5.0 μM EMS mutagenesis. Mutants with 45% oleic acid (against 40-45% erucic and 15-20% oleic in controls) were obtained in mutagenized plants from EMS (2.5 μM) and ENU (5.0 μM ). Useful variability was identified in mutant plants for their disease response to the most devastating fungal diseases Albugo candida (DI 0.6-2.0) and Alternaria brassicae (DI 1.3- 2.6) under artificial inoculation. (author)

  9. Chemical and genetic characterization of Phlomis species and wild hybrids in Crete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Luciana; Stefanakis, Michalis K; Kokkini, Stella; Katerinopoulos, Haralambos E; Pirintsos, Stergios A

    2016-02-01

    The genus Phlomis is represented in the island of Crete (Greece, Eastern Mediterranean) by three species Phlomis cretica C. Presl., Phlomis fruticosa L., the island endemic Phlomis lanata Willd. and three hybrids Phlomis x cytherea Rech.f. (P. cretica x P. fruticosa), Phlomis x commixta Rech.f. (P. cretica x P. lanata) and Phlomis x sieberi Vierh. (P. fruticosa x P. lanata). This work describes (a) the profile of hybrids and parental species concerning their volatile compounds, (b) the suitability of ribosomal nuclear (ITS region), chloroplast (trnH-psbA), and AFLP markers to identify hybrids and (c) their competence to characterize the different chemotypes of both hybrids and their parental species. The cluster analysis and PCA constructed from chemical data (volatile oils) suggest that there are three groups of taxa. Group IA includes P. cretica and P. fruticosa, group IB includes P. x cytherea, whereas group II consists of P. x commixta, P. x sieberi and P. lanata. Volatile compounds detected only in the hybrids P. x sieberi and P. x commixta correspond to the 3% of the total compounds, value that is much higher in P. x cytherea (21%). Neighbor-joining, statistical parsimony analysis and the observations drawn from ribotypes spectrum of ITS markers divided Phlomis species in two groups, P. lanata and the complex P. cretica/P. fruticosa. In contrast to the ITS region, the plastid DNA marker follows a geographically related pattern. Neighbor-Net, PCA and Bayesian assignment analysis performed for AFLP markers separated the genotypes into three groups corresponding to populations of P. cretica, P. fruticosa, and P. lanata, respectively, while populations of P. x commixta, P. x cytherea, and P. x sieberi presented admixed ancestry. Most of the P. x cytherea samples were identified as F1 hybrids by Bayesian assignment test, while those of P. x commixta and P. x sieberi were identified as F2 hybrids. Overall, high chemical differentiation is revealed in one of the

  10. Genetic k-Means Clustering Approach for Mapping Human Vulnerability to Chemical Hazards in the Industrialized City: A Case Study of Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zeng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing human vulnerability to chemical hazards in the industrialized city is a matter of great urgency. Vulnerability mapping is an alternative approach for providing vulnerability-reducing interventions in a region. This study presents a method for mapping human vulnerability to chemical hazards by using clustering analysis for effective vulnerability reduction. Taking the city of Shanghai as the study area, we measure human exposure to chemical hazards by using the proximity model with additionally considering the toxicity of hazardous substances, and capture the sensitivity and coping capacity with corresponding indicators. We perform an improved k-means clustering approach on the basis of genetic algorithm by using a 500 m × 500 m geographical grid as basic spatial unit. The sum of squared errors and silhouette coefficient are combined to measure the quality of clustering and to determine the optimal clustering number. Clustering result reveals a set of six typical human vulnerability patterns that show distinct vulnerability dimension combinations. The vulnerability mapping of the study area reflects cluster-specific vulnerability characteristics and their spatial distribution. Finally, we suggest specific points that can provide new insights in rationally allocating the limited funds for the vulnerability reduction of each cluster.

  11. COE loss-of-function analysis reveals a genetic program underlying maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system in planarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martis W Cowles

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the COE family of transcription factors are required for central nervous system (CNS development. However, the function of COE in the post-embryonic CNS remains largely unknown. An excellent model for investigating gene function in the adult CNS is the freshwater planarian. This animal is capable of regenerating neurons from an adult pluripotent stem cell population and regaining normal function. We previously showed that planarian coe is expressed in differentiating and mature neurons and that its function is required for proper CNS regeneration. Here, we show that coe is essential to maintain nervous system architecture and patterning in intact (uninjured planarians. We took advantage of the robust phenotype in intact animals to investigate the genetic programs coe regulates in the CNS. We compared the transcriptional profiles of control and coe RNAi planarians using RNA sequencing and identified approximately 900 differentially expressed genes in coe knockdown animals, including 397 downregulated genes that were enriched for nervous system functional annotations. Next, we validated a subset of the downregulated transcripts by analyzing their expression in coe-deficient planarians and testing if the mRNAs could be detected in coe+ cells. These experiments revealed novel candidate targets of coe in the CNS such as ion channel, neuropeptide, and neurotransmitter genes. Finally, to determine if loss of any of the validated transcripts underscores the coe knockdown phenotype, we knocked down their expression by RNAi and uncovered a set of coe-regulated genes implicated in CNS regeneration and patterning, including orthologs of sodium channel alpha-subunit and pou4. Our study broadens the knowledge of gene expression programs regulated by COE that are required for maintenance of neural subtypes and nervous system architecture in adult animals.

  12. COE loss-of-function analysis reveals a genetic program underlying maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, Martis W; Omuro, Kerilyn C; Stanley, Brianna N; Quintanilla, Carlo G; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2014-10-01

    Members of the COE family of transcription factors are required for central nervous system (CNS) development. However, the function of COE in the post-embryonic CNS remains largely unknown. An excellent model for investigating gene function in the adult CNS is the freshwater planarian. This animal is capable of regenerating neurons from an adult pluripotent stem cell population and regaining normal function. We previously showed that planarian coe is expressed in differentiating and mature neurons and that its function is required for proper CNS regeneration. Here, we show that coe is essential to maintain nervous system architecture and patterning in intact (uninjured) planarians. We took advantage of the robust phenotype in intact animals to investigate the genetic programs coe regulates in the CNS. We compared the transcriptional profiles of control and coe RNAi planarians using RNA sequencing and identified approximately 900 differentially expressed genes in coe knockdown animals, including 397 downregulated genes that were enriched for nervous system functional annotations. Next, we validated a subset of the downregulated transcripts by analyzing their expression in coe-deficient planarians and testing if the mRNAs could be detected in coe+ cells. These experiments revealed novel candidate targets of coe in the CNS such as ion channel, neuropeptide, and neurotransmitter genes. Finally, to determine if loss of any of the validated transcripts underscores the coe knockdown phenotype, we knocked down their expression by RNAi and uncovered a set of coe-regulated genes implicated in CNS regeneration and patterning, including orthologs of sodium channel alpha-subunit and pou4. Our study broadens the knowledge of gene expression programs regulated by COE that are required for maintenance of neural subtypes and nervous system architecture in adult animals. PMID:25356635

  13. New analysis of a rat feeding study with a genetically modified maize reveals signs of hepatorenal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Cellier, Dominique; de Vendomois, Joël Spiroux

    2007-05-01

    Health risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) cultivated for food or feed is under debate throughout the world, and very little data have been published on mid- or long-term toxicological studies with mammals. One of these studies performed under the responsibility of Monsanto Company with a transgenic corn MON863 has been subjected to questions from regulatory reviewers in Europe, where it was finally approved in 2005. This necessitated a new assessment of kidney pathological findings, and the results remained controversial. An Appeal Court action in Germany (Münster) allowed public access in June 2005 to all the crude data from this 90-day rat-feeding study. We independently re-analyzed these data. Appropriate statistics were added, such as a multivariate analysis of the growth curves, and for biochemical parameters comparisons between GMO-treated rats and the controls fed with an equivalent normal diet, and separately with six reference diets with different compositions. We observed that after the consumption of MON863, rats showed slight but dose-related significant variations in growth for both sexes, resulting in 3.3% decrease in weight for males and 3.7% increase for females. Chemistry measurements reveal signs of hepatorenal toxicity, marked also by differential sensitivities in males and females. Triglycerides increased by 24-40% in females (either at week 14, dose 11% or at week 5, dose 33%, respectively); urine phosphorus and sodium excretions diminished in males by 31-35% (week 14, dose 33%) for the most important results significantly linked to the treatment in comparison to seven diets tested. Longer experiments are essential in order to indicate the real nature and extent of the possible pathology; with the present data it cannot be concluded that GM corn MON863 is a safe product. PMID:17356802

  14. Genetic visualization with an improved GCaMP calcium indicator reveals spatiotemporal activation of the spinal motor neurons in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Akira; Ohkura, Masamichi; Kotani, Tomoya; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi

    2011-03-29

    Animal behaviors are generated by well-coordinated activation of neural circuits. In zebrafish, embryos start to show spontaneous muscle contractions at 17 to 19 h postfertilization. To visualize how motor circuits in the spinal cord are activated during this behavior, we developed GCaMP-HS (GCaMP-hyper sensitive), an improved version of the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP, and created transgenic zebrafish carrying the GCaMP-HS gene downstream of the Gal4-recognition sequence, UAS (upstream activation sequence). Then we performed a gene-trap screen and identified the SAIGFF213A transgenic fish that expressed Gal4FF, a modified version of Gal4, in a subset of spinal neurons including the caudal primary (CaP) motor neurons. We conducted calcium imaging using the SAIGFF213A; UAS:GCaMP-HS double transgenic embryos during the spontaneous contractions. We demonstrated periodic and synchronized activation of a set of ipsilateral motor neurons located on the right and left trunk in accordance with actual muscle movements. The synchronized activation of contralateral motor neurons occurred alternately with a regular interval. Furthermore, a detailed analysis revealed rostral-to-caudal propagation of activation of the ipsilateral motor neuron, which is similar to but much slower than the rostrocaudal delay observed during swimming in later stages. Our study thus demonstrated coordinated activities of the motor neurons during the first behavior in a vertebrate. We propose the GCaMP technology combined with the Gal4FF-UAS system is a powerful tool to study functional neural circuits in zebrafish. PMID:21383146

  15. Multilocus Sequence Typing Reveals Relevant Genetic Variation and Different Evolutionary Dynamics among Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Scortichini

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Forty-five Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis (Xaj strains originating from Juglans regia cultivation in different countries were molecularly typed by means of MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST, using acnB, gapA, gyrB and rpoD gene fragments. A total of 2.5 kilobases was used to infer the phylogenetic relationship among the strains and possible recombination events. Haplotype diversity, linkage disequilibrium analysis, selection tests, gene flow estimates and codon adaptation index were also assessed. The dendrograms built by maximum likelihood with concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed two major and two minor phylotypes. The same haplotype was found in strains originating from different continents, and different haplotypes were found in strains isolated in the same year from the same location. A recombination breakpoint was detected within the rpoD gene fragment. At the pathovar level, the Xaj populations studied here are clonal and under neutral selection. However, four Xaj strains isolated from walnut fruits with apical necrosis are under diversifying selection, suggesting a possible new adaptation. Gene flow estimates do not support the hypothesis of geographic isolation of the strains, even though the genetic diversity between the strains increases as the geographic distance between them increases. A triplet deletion, causing the absence of valine, was found in the rpoD fragment of all 45 Xaj strains when compared with X. axonopodis pv. citri strain 306. The codon adaptation index was high in all four genes studied, indicating a relevant metabolic activity.

  16. Anisotropy of chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite C2F revealed with angle-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okotrub, Alexander V; Yudanov, Nikolay F; Asanov, Igor P; Vyalikh, Denis V; Bulusheva, Lyubov G

    2013-01-22

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite characterized by a low misorientation of crystallites is fluorinated using a gaseous mixture of BrF(3) with Br(2) at room temperature. The golden-colored product, easily delaminating into micrometer-size transparent flakes, is an intercalation compound where Br(2) molecules are hosted between fluorinated graphene layers of approximate C(2)F composition. To unravel the chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite, we apply angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and quantum-chemical modeling. The strong angular dependence of the CK and FK edge NEXAFS spectra on the incident radiation indicates that room-temperature-produced graphite fluoride is a highly anisotropic material, where half of the carbon atoms are covalently bonded with fluorine, while the rest of the carbon atoms preserve π electrons. Comparison of the experimental CK edge spectrum with theoretical spectra plotted for C(2)F models reveals that fluorine atoms are more likely to form chains. This conclusion agrees with the atomic force microscopy observation of a chain-like pattern on the surface of graphite fluoride layers. PMID:23214423

  17. Spatial genetic analyses reveal cryptic population structure and migration patterns in a continuously harvested grey wolf (Canis lupus population in north-eastern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Hindrikson

    Full Text Available Spatial genetics is a relatively new field in wildlife and conservation biology that is becoming an essential tool for unravelling the complexities of animal population processes, and for designing effective strategies for conservation and management. Conceptual and methodological developments in this field are therefore critical. Here we present two novel methodological approaches that further the analytical possibilities of STRUCTURE and DResD. Using these approaches we analyse structure and migrations in a grey wolf (Canislupus population in north-eastern Europe. We genotyped 16 microsatellite loci in 166 individuals sampled from the wolf population in Estonia and Latvia that has been under strong and continuous hunting pressure for decades. Our analysis demonstrated that this relatively small wolf population is represented by four genetic groups. We also used a novel methodological approach that uses linear interpolation to statistically test the spatial separation of genetic groups. The new method, which is capable of using program STRUCTURE output, can be applied widely in population genetics to reveal both core areas and areas of low significance for genetic groups. We also used a recently developed spatially explicit individual-based method DResD, and applied it for the first time to microsatellite data, revealing a migration corridor and barriers, and several contact zones.

  18. An optimized chemical kinetic mechanism for HCCI combustion of PRFs using multi-zone model and genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new chemical kinetic mechanism for PRFs HCCI combustion is developed. • New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. • Engine-related combustion and performance parameters are predicted accurately. • Engine unburned HC and CO emissions are predicted by the model properly. - Abstract: Development of comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanisms is required for HCCI combustion and emissions prediction to be used in engine development. The main purpose of this study is development of a new chemical kinetic mechanism for primary reference fuels (PRFs) HCCI combustion, which can be applied to combustion models to predict in-cylinder pressure and exhaust CO and UHC emissions, accurately. Hence, a multi-zone model is developed for HCCI engine simulation. Two semi-detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms those are suitable for premixed combustion are used for n-heptane and iso-octane HCCI combustion simulation. The iso-octane mechanism contains 84 species and 484 reactions and the n-heptane mechanism contains 57 species and 296 reactions. A simple interaction between iso-octane and n-heptane is considered in new mechanism. The multi-zone model is validated using experimental data for pure n-heptane and iso-octane. A new mechanism is prepared by combination of these two mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane blended fuel, which includes 101 species and 594 reactions. New mechanism optimization is performed using genetic algorithm and multi-zone model. Mechanism contains low temperature heat release region, which decreases with increasing octane number. The results showed that the optimized chemical kinetic mechanism is capable of predicting engine-related combustion and performance parameters. Also after implementing the optimized mechanism, engine unburned HC and CO emissions predicted by the model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data

  19. Genetic Differentiation between Natural and Hatchery Stocks of Japanese Scallop (Mizuhopecten yessoensis as Revealed by AFLP Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan-Jiang Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Japanese scallop (Mizuhopecten yessoensis is a cold-tolerant bivalve that was introduced to China for aquaculture in 1982. In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP markers were used to investigate levels of genetic diversity within M. yessoensis cultured stocks and compare them with wild populations. Six pairs of primer combinations generated 368 loci among 332 individuals, in four cultured and three wild populations. High polymorphism at AFLP markers was found within both cultured and wild M. yessoensis populations. The percentage of polymorphic loci ranged from 61.04% to 72.08%, while the mean heterozygosity ranged from 0.2116 to 0.2596. Compared with wild populations, the four hatchery populations showed significant genetic changes, such as lower expected heterozygosity and percentage of polymorphic loci, and smaller frequency of private alleles, all indicative of a reduction in genetic diversity. Some genetic structures were associated with the geographical distribution of samples; with all samples from Dalian and Japan being closely related, while the population from Russia fell into a distinct clade in the phylogenetic analysis. The genetic information derived from this study indicated that intentional or accidental release of selected Japanese scallops into natural sea areas might result in disturbance of local gene pools and loss of genetic variability. We recommend monitoring the genetic variability of selected hatchery populations to enhance conservation of natural Japanese scallop resources.

  20. [Genetic variability and differentiation of three Russian populations of yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis as revealed by nuclear markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrisanfova, G G; Kharchevnikov, D A; Popov, I O; Zinov'eva, S V; Semenova, S K

    2008-05-01

    Genetic variability of yellow potato cyst nematode G. rostochiensis from three Russian populations (Karelia, Vladimir oblast, and Moscow oblast) was investigated using two types of nuclear markers. Using RAPD markers identified with the help of six random primers (P-29, OPA-10, OPT-14, OPA-11, OPB-11, and OPH-20), it was possible to distinguish Karelian population from the group consisting of the populations from two adjacent regions (Moscow oblast and Vladimir oblast). Based on the combined matrix, containing 294 RAPD fragments, dendrogram of genetic differences was constructed, and the indices of genetic divergence and partition (P, H, and G(st)), as well as the gene flow indices N(m) between the nematode samples examined, were calculated. The dendrogram structure, genetic diversity indices, and variations of genetic distances between single individuals in each population from Karelia and Central Russia pointed to genetic isolation and higher genetic diversity of the nematodes from Karelia. Based on polymorphism of rDNA first intergenic spacer ITS1, attribution of all populations examined to the species G. rostochiensis was proved. Small variations of the ITS1 sequence in different geographic populations of nematodes from different regions of the species world range did not allow isolation of separate groups within the species. Possible factors (including interregional transportations of seed potato) affecting nematode population structure in Russia are discussed. PMID:18672794

  1. Microsatellite Analysis of Museum Specimens Reveals Historical Differences in Genetic Diversity between Declining and More Stable Bombus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Maebe

    Full Text Available Worldwide most pollinators, e.g. bumblebees, are undergoing global declines. Loss of genetic diversity can play an essential role in these observed declines. In this paper, we investigated the level of genetic diversity of seven declining Bombus species and four more stable species with the use of microsatellite loci. Hereto we genotyped a unique collection of museum specimens. Specimens were collected between 1918 and 1926, in 6 provinces of the Netherlands which allowed us to make interspecific comparisons of genetic diversity. For the stable species B. pascuorum, we also selected populations from two additional time periods: 1949-1955 and 1975-1990. The genetic diversity and population structure in B. pascuorum remained constant over the three time periods. However, populations of declining bumblebee species showed a significantly lower genetic diversity than co-occurring stable species before their major declines. This historical difference indicates that the repeatedly observed reduced genetic diversity in recent populations of declining bumblebee species is not caused solely by the decline itself. The historically low genetic diversity in the declined species may be due to the fact that these species were already rare, making them more vulnerable to the major drivers of bumblebee decline.

  2. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Benítez-Galeano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36 in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1 the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2 the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program.

  3. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Galeano, María José; Rubio, Leticia; Bertalmío, Ana; Maeso, Diego; Rivas, Fernando; Colina, Rodney

    2015-07-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23). Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36) in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD) and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1) the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2) the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program. PMID:26205407

  4. Heterogeneous genetic structure in a Fagus crenata population in an old-growth beech forest revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuka, Y; Tomaru, N; Nisimura, N; Tsumura, Y; Yamamoto, S

    2004-05-01

    The within-population genetic structure of Fagus crenata in a 4-ha plot (200 x 200 m) of an old-growth beech forest was analysed using microsatellite markers. To assess the genetic structure, Moran's I spatial autocorrelation coefficient was calculated. Correlograms of Moran's I showed significant positive values less than 0.100 for short-distance classes, indicating weak genetic structure. The genetic structure within the population is created by limited seed dispersal, and is probably weakened by overlapping seed shadow, secondary seed dispersal, extensive pollen flow and the thinning process. Genetic structure was detected in a western subplot of 50 x 200 m with immature soils and almost no dwarf bamboos (Sasa spp.), where small and intermediate-sized individuals were distributed in aggregations with high density because of successful regeneration. By contrast, genetic structure was not found in an eastern subplot of the same size with mature soils and Sasa cover, where successful regeneration was prevented, and the density of the small and intermediate-sized individuals was low. Moreover, genetic structure of individuals in a small-size class (diameter at breast height /= 12 cm). The apparent genetic structure detected in the 4-ha plot was therefore probably the result of the structure in the western portion of the plot and in small and intermediate-sized individuals that successfully regenerated under the favourable environment. The heterogeneity in genetic structure presumably reflects variation in the density that should be affected by differences in regeneration dynamics associated with heterogeneity in environmental conditions. PMID:15078459

  5. Microsatellites reveal a strong subdivision of genetic structure in Chinese populations of the mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jing-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two colour forms of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch coexist in China: a red (carmine form, which is considered to be native and a green form which is considered to be invasive. The population genetic diversity and population genetic structure of this organism were unclear in China, and there is a controversy over whether they constitute distinct species. To address these issues, we genotyped a total of 1,055 individuals from 18 red populations and 7 green populations in China using eight microsatellite loci. Results We identified 109 alleles. We found a highly significant genetic differentiation among the 25 populations (global FST = 0.506, global FST {ENA} = 0.473 and a low genetic diversity in each population. In addition, genetic diversity of the red form mites was found to be higher than the green form. Pearson correlations between statistics of variation (AR and HE and geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude showed that the genetic diversity of the red form was correlated with latitude. Using Bayesian clustering, we divided the Chinese mite populations into five clades which were well congruent with their geographic distributions. Conclusions Spider mites possess low levels of genetic diversity, limit gene flow between populations and significant and IBD (isolation by distance effect. These factors in turn contribute to the strong subdivision of genetic structure. In addition, population genetic structure results don't support the separation of the two forms of spider mite into two species. The morphological differences between the two forms of mites may be a result of epigenetic effects.

  6. Genetic analysis across differential spatial scales reveals multiple dispersal mechanisms for the invasive hydrozoan Cordylophora in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding patterns of post-establishment spread by invasive species is critically important for the design of effective management strategies and the development of appropriate theoretical models predicting spatial expansion of introduced populations. Here we explore genetic ...

  7. Ancient DNA from South-East Europe Reveals Different Events during Early and Middle Neolithic Influencing the European Genetic Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervella, Montserrat; Rotea, Mihai; Izagirre, Neskuts; Constantinescu, Mihai; Alonso, Santos; Ioana, Mihai; Lazăr, Cătălin; Ridiche, Florin; Soficaru, Andrei Dorian; Netea, Mihai G; de-la-Rua, Concepcion

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the process of Neolithization for the genetic make-up of European populations has been hotly debated, with shifting hypotheses from a demic diffusion (DD) to a cultural diffusion (CD) model. In this regard, ancient DNA data from the Balkan Peninsula, which is an important source of information to assess the process of Neolithization in Europe, is however missing. In the present study we show genetic information on ancient populations of the South-East of Europe. We assessed mtDNA from ten sites from the current territory of Romania, spanning a time-period from the Early Neolithic to the Late Bronze Age. mtDNA data from Early Neolithic farmers of the Starčevo Criş culture in Romania (Cârcea, Gura Baciului and Negrileşti sites), confirm their genetic relationship with those of the LBK culture (Linienbandkeramik Kultur) in Central Europe, and they show little genetic continuity with modern European populations. On the other hand, populations of the Middle-Late Neolithic (Boian, Zau and Gumelniţa cultures), supposedly a second wave of Neolithic migration from Anatolia, had a much stronger effect on the genetic heritage of the European populations. In contrast, we find a smaller contribution of Late Bronze Age migrations to the genetic composition of Europeans. Based on these findings, we propose that permeation of mtDNA lineages from a second wave of Middle-Late Neolithic migration from North-West Anatolia into the Balkan Peninsula and Central Europe represent an important contribution to the genetic shift between Early and Late Neolithic populations in Europe, and consequently to the genetic make-up of modern European populations. PMID:26053041

  8. Genetic diversity analysis reveals that geographical environment plays a more important role than rice cultivar in Villosiclava virens population selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Mei-Gang; Lin, Xian-Song; Liu, Hui-Jiang; Peng, You-Liang; Lin, Yang; Huang, Jun-Bin; Luo, Chao-Xi

    2014-05-01

    Rice false smut caused by Villosiclava virens is an economically important disease of grains worldwide. The genetic diversity of 153 isolates from six fields located in Wuhan (WH), Yichang Wangjia (YCW), Yichang Yaohe (YCY), Huanggang (HG), Yangxin (YX), and Jingzhou (JZ) in Hubei province of China were phylogenetically analyzed to evaluate the influence of environments and rice cultivars on the V. virens populations. Isolates (43) from Wuhan were from two rice cultivars, Wanxian 98 and Huajing 952, while most of the other isolates from fields YCW, YCY, HG, YX, and JZ originated from different rice cultivars with different genetic backgrounds. Genetic diversity of isolates was analyzed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The isolates from the same cultivars in Wuhan tended to group together, indicating that the cultivars had an important impact on the fungal population. The 110 isolates from individual fields tended to cluster according to geographical origin. The values of Nei's gene diversity (H) and Shannon's information index (I) showed that the genetic diversity among isolates was higher between than within geographical populations. Furthermore, mean genetic distance between groups (0.006) was higher than mean genetic distance within groups (0.0048) according to MEGA 5.2. The pairwise population fixation index (FST) values also showed significant genetic differentiation between most populations. Higher genetic similarity of isolates from individual fields but different rice cultivars suggested that the geographical factor played a more important role in the selection of V. virens isolates than rice cultivars. This information could be used to improve the management strategy for rice false smut by adjusting the cultivation measures, such as controlling fertilizer, water, and planting density, in the rice field to change the microenvironment. PMID:24584249

  9. Mouse to human comparative genetics reveals a novel immunoglobulin E-controlling locus on Hsa8q12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gusareva, Elena; Havelková, Helena; Blažková, Hana; Kosařová, Marcela; Kučera, P.; Král, V.; Salyakina, D.; Mulller-Myhsok, b.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2009), s. 15-25. ISSN 0093-7711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/06/1745; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : atopy * specific IgE * genetic loci * mouse-human homology * Czech population * 8q12 Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.988, year: 2009

  10. Genetic relationships and evolution in Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, squash, gourd) as revealed by simple sequence repeat polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Li; Paris, Harry S.; Nee, Michael H.; Stift, Gertraud; Pachner, Martin; Vollmann, Johann; Lelley, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 104 accessions of Cucurbita pepo were assessed from polymorphisms in 134 SSR (microsatellite) and four SCAR loci, yielding a total of 418 alleles, distributed among all 20 linkage groups. Genetic distance values were calculated, a dendrogram constructed, and principal coordinate analyses conducted. The results showed 100 of the accessions as distributed among three clusters representing each of the recognized subspecies, pepo, texana, and fraterna. The remaining fo...

  11. Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees reveals healthier and broader communities when colonies are genetically diverse

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Heather R.; Daniela Rios; Walker-Sperling, Victoria E.; Guus Roeselers; Newton, Irene L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically ...

  12. Nuclear Genetic Diversity in Human Lice (Pediculus humanus) Reveals Continental Differences and High Inbreeding among Worldwide Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ascunce, Marina S.; Toups, Melissa A.; Gebreyes Kassu; Jackie Fane; Katlyn Scholl; Reed, David L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of parasites is important to both basic and applied evolutionary biology. Knowledge of the genetic structure of parasite populations is critical for our ability to predict how an infection can spread through a host population and for the design of effective control methods. However, very little is known about the genetic structure of most human parasites, including the human louse (Pediculus humanus). This species is composed of two ecotypes: the head louse (Pedicu...

  13. Genetic relationships between sympatric populations of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis, as revealed by rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula S Peruca; Vilas-Bôas, Gislayne T.; OMN Arantes

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial strain Bacillus cereus is closely related to Bacillus thuringiensis, although any genetic relationship between the two strains is still in debate. Using rep-PCR genomic fingerprinting, we established the genetic relationships between Brazilian sympatric populations of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis simultaneously collected from two geographically separate sites. We observed the formation of both B. thuringiensis and B. cereus clusters, as well as strains of B. cereus that are mo...

  14. Bucking the trend: genetic analysis reveals high diversity, large population size and low differentiation in a deep ocean cetacean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K F; Patel, S; Baker, C S; Constantine, R; Millar, C D

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of a population is essential to its conservation and management. We report the level of genetic diversity and determine the population structure of a cryptic deep ocean cetacean, the Gray's beaked whale (Mesoplodon grayi). We analysed 530 bp of mitochondrial control region and 12 microsatellite loci from 94 individuals stranded around New Zealand and Australia. The samples cover a large area of the species distribution (~6000 km) and were collected over a 22-year period. We show high genetic diversity (h=0.933-0.987, π=0.763-0.996% and Rs=4.22-4.37, He=0.624-0.675), and, in contrast to other cetaceans, we found a complete lack of genetic structure in both maternally and biparentally inherited markers. The oceanic habitats around New Zealand are diverse with extremely deep waters, seamounts and submarine canyons that are suitable for Gray's beaked whales and their prey. We propose that the abundance of this rich habitat has promoted genetic homogeneity in this species. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the lack of beaked whale sightings is the result of their low abundance, but this is in contrast to our estimates of female effective population size based on mitochondrial data. In conclusion, the high diversity and lack of genetic structure can be explained by a historically large population size, in combination with no known exploitation, few apparent behavioural barriers and abundant habitat. PMID:26626574

  15. Genome sequencing reveals a new lineage associated with lablab bean and genetic exchange between Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valente eAritua

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Common bacterial blight is a devastating seed-borne disease of common beans that also occurs on other legume species including lablab and Lima beans. We sequenced and analysed the genomes of 26 isolates of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans, the causative agents of this disease, collected over four decades and six continents. This revealed considerable genetic variation within both taxa, encompassing both single-nucleotide variants and differences in gene content, that could be exploited for tracking pathogen spread. The bacterial isolate from Lima bean fell within the previously described Genetic Lineage 1, along with the pathovar type isolate (NCPPB 3035. The isolates from lablab represent a new, previously unknown genetic lineage closely related to strains of X. axonopodis pv. glycines. Finally, we identified more than 100 genes that appear to have been recently acquired by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli from X. fuscans subsp. fuscans.

  16. Anabolic implant effects on visceral organ mass, chemical body composition, and estimated energetic efficiency in cloned (genetically identical) beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, J P; Johnson, D E; Gerken, C L; Morgan, J B; Tatum, J D

    1997-10-01

    Six sets of four genetically identical Brangus steers (n = 24; X BW 409 kg) were used to determine the effect of different anabolic implants on visceral organ mass, chemical body composition, estimated tissue deposition, and energetic efficiency. Steers within a clone set were randomly assigned to one of the following implant treatments: C, no implant; E, estrogenic; A, androgenic, or AE, androgenic + estrogenic. Steers were slaughtered 112 d after implanting; visceral organs were weighed and final body composition determined by mechanical grinding and chemical analysis of the empty body. Mass of the empty gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was reduced approximately 9% (P .10) the efficiency of ME utilization. In general, estrogenic implants decreased GIT, androgenic implants increased liver, and all implants increased hide mass. Steers implanted with an AE combination had additive effects on protein deposition compared with either implant alone. The NEg requirements for body gain are estimated to be reduced 19% by estrogenic or combination implants. PMID:9331863

  17. Phylogeography of postglacial range expansion in Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae) reveals no evidence of bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity, or isolation by distance in the leading-edge populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Xu, Bing; Zhang, Da-Yong; Bai, Wei-Ning

    2016-09-01

    The past studies of postglacial recolonization patterns in high latitude regions have revealed a significant role of dispersal capacity in shaping the genetic diversity and population structure of temperate trees. However, most of these studies have focused on species with long-distance dispersal followed by exponential population growth and were therefore unable to reveal the patterns in the case of a gradual expansion. Here we studied the impacts of postglacial range expansions on the distribution of genetic diversity in the Manchurian walnut (Juglans mandshurica), a common tree of East Asian cool-temperate deciduous forests that apparently lacks long-distance seed dispersal ability. The genetic diversity and structure of 19 natural walnut populations in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula were examined using 17 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Potential habitats under current and past climatic conditions were predicted using the ecological niche modelling (ENM) method. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed three groups, which were inferred to have diverged through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles in multiple refugia during the Quaternary Period. ENM estimated a southward range shift at the LGM, but high suitability scores still occurred in the western parts of the Changbai Mountains (Northeast China), the Korean peninsula and the exposed seafloor of the Yellow Sea. In contrast to most other cool-temperate trees co-occurring in the same region, the Manchurian walnut did not show any evidence of a population bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity or isolation by distance during the postglacial expansion. Our study clearly indicates that current northern populations originated from one glacial lineage and recolonization via a gradually advancing front due to the lack of a long-distance seed dispersal mechanism led to no latitudinal decrease in genetic diversity. PMID:27346642

  18. The early chemical enrichment histories of two Sculptor group dwarf galaxies as revealed by RR lyrae variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified a sample of RRL candidates in both dTrans galaxies (219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005). The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of ([Fe/H])ESO294 = –1.77 ± 0.03 and ([Fe/H])ESO410 = –1.64 ± 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the shapes of the RRL MDFs are well described by pre-enrichment models. This suggests two possible channels for the early chemical evolution for these Sculptor group dTrans galaxies: (1) the ancient stellar populations of our target dwarf galaxies might have formed from the star forming gas which was already enriched through 'prompt initial enrichment' or an 'initial nucleosynthetic spike' from the very first massive stars, or (2) this pre-enrichment state might have been achieved by the end products from more evolved systems of their nearest neighbor, NGC 55. We also study the environmental effects of the formation and evolution of our target dTrans galaxies by comparing their properties with those of 79 volume limited (D ☉ < 2 Mpc) dwarf galaxy samples in terms of the luminosity-metallicity relation and the H I gas content. The presence of these RRL stars strongly supports the idea that although the Sculptor Group galaxies have a considerably

  19. The Early Chemical Enrichment Histories of Two Sculptor Group Dwarf Galaxies as Revealed by RR Lyrae Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soung-Chul; Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel; Sarajedini, Ata; Kim, Sang Chul; Kyeong, Jaemann

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified a sample of RRL candidates in both dTrans galaxies (219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005). The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of lang[Fe/H]rangESO294 = -1.77 ± 0.03 and lang[Fe/H]rangESO410 = -1.64 ± 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the shapes of the RRL MDFs are well described by pre-enrichment models. This suggests two possible channels for the early chemical evolution for these Sculptor group dTrans galaxies: (1) the ancient stellar populations of our target dwarf galaxies might have formed from the star forming gas which was already enriched through "prompt initial enrichment" or an "initial nucleosynthetic spike" from the very first massive stars, or (2) this pre-enrichment state might have been achieved by the end products from more evolved systems of their nearest neighbor, NGC 55. We also study the environmental effects of the formation and evolution of our target dTrans galaxies by comparing their properties with those of 79 volume limited (D ⊙ giant host galaxies, loosely bound and very low local density), they share a common epoch of early star formation with the dwarf satellite galaxies in the Local Group.

  20. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2–PPARγ. ► HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. ► HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. ► PPARγ reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. ► Runx2/PPARγ target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPARγ and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPARγ/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPARγ target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal a role for HDACs in orchestrating osteo-differentiation of hASCs at transcriptional level, and might provide new insights into the modulation of h

  1. Genetic Association Analysis of ATP Binding Cassette Protein Family Reveals a Novel Association of ABCB1 Genetic Variants with Epilepsy Risk, but Not with Drug-Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to vari...

  2. Genetic variation in Labeo fimbriatus (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) populations as revealed by partial cytochrome b sequences of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Subrat Kumar; Bej, Dillip; Das, Sofia Priyadarsani; Sahoo, Lakshman; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Pratap Chandra; Das, Paramananda

    2016-05-01

    Labeo fimbriatus, a medium sized carp is assessed as a commercially important aquaculture species in Indian subcontinent. In the present study, the genetic diversity and population structure of four Indian riverine populations of L. fimbriatus have been evaluated using partial cytochrome b sequences of mitochondrial DNA. Sequencing and analysis of this gene from 108 individuals defined 7 distinct haplotypes. Haplotype diversity (Hd) and nucleotide diversity (π) ranged from 0.067 to 0.405 and 0.00023 to 0.03231, respectively. The Mahanadi population had the highest π level. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 47.36% of genetic variation contained within population and 53.76% of genetic variation among groups. Pairwise FST analysis indicated that there was little or no genetic differentiation among populations (-0.0018 to 04572) from different geographical regions except Mahanadi population. The Mahanadi population can be considered as a separate stock from rest three riverine populations. Accordingly, the genetic information generated from this study can be implemented while taking decision in formulating base population for the sustainable selective breeding programs of this species. PMID:25329277

  3. Analysis of Microsatellite DNA Markers Reveals no Genetic Differentiation between Wild and Hatchery Populations of Pacific Threadfin in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Pan, Jinzeng Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pacific threadfin, Polydactylus sexfilis, is popular fish in recreational fishing, as well as aquaculture in Hawaii. Its natural population has been continuously declining in the past several decades. Microsatellite DNA markers are useful DNA-based tool for monitoring Pacific threadfin populations. In this study, fifteen Microsatellite (MS DNA markers were identified from a partial genomic Pacific threadfin DNA library enriched in CA repeats, and six highly-polymorphic microsatellite loci were employed to analyze genetic similarity and differences between the wild population and hatchery population in Oahu Island. A total of 37 alleles were detected at the six MS loci in the two populations. Statistical analysis of fixation index (FST and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA showed no genetic differentiation between the wild and hatchery populations (FST=0.001, CI95%= -0.01-0.021. Both high genetic diversity (Ho=0.664-0.674 and He=0.710-0.715 and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in the wild and hatchery populations. Results of genetic bottleneck analysis indicated that the hatchery was founded with sufficient numbers of brooders as inbreeding coefficient is very low (FIS=0.052-0.072 in both wild and hatchery populations. Further studies are needed for comprehensive determinations of genetic varieties of primary founder broodstocks and successive offspring of the hatchery and wild populations with increased number of Pacific threadfin sample collections.

  4. Genetic variability of wild cherry (Prunus avium L. seed stands in Slovenia as revealed by nuclear microsatellite loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristjan Jarni

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers were used to describe the genetic variability of four seed stands of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.. One hundred and thirty one individuals were genotyped at ten nuclear microsatellite loci. Total genetic diversity was high (H(E = 0.704, while differences between stands were small but significant (F(ST = 0.053, G'(ST = 0.234. There was a significant amount of clonal reproduction in one stand, with only 11 genotypes identified among 36 trees. One stand showed a significant excess (F(IS = -0.044 of heterozygosity, and one showed a deficit (F(IS = 0.044. Our results demonstrate the importance of taking into account the biological and genetic characteristics of species in forest management, especially when determining a new seed stand. The small genetic differences found between seed stands indicate that a large number of stands are not required. However, they should be carefully selected and should possess adequate genetic variability to ensure low relatedness between seed trees.

  5. Genetic differentiation of Octopus minor (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) off the northern coast of China as revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J M; Sun, G H; Zheng, X D; Ren, L H; Wang, W J; Li, G R; Sun, B C

    2015-01-01

    Octopus minor (Sasaki, 1920) is an economically important cephalopod that is found in the northern coastal waters of China. In this study, we investigated genetic differentiation in fishery populations using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). A total of 150 individuals were collected from five locations: Dalian (DL), Yan-tai (YT), Qingdao (QD), Lianyungang (LY), and Zhoushan (ZS), and 243 reproducible bands were amplified using five AFLP primer combinations. The percentage of polymorphic bands ranged from 53.33 to 76.08%. Nei's genetic identity ranged from 0.9139 to 0.9713, and the genetic distance ranged from 0.0291 to 0.0900. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, based on the genetic distance. The DL and YT populations originated from one clade, while the QD, LY, and ZS populations originated from another. The results indicate that the O. minor stock consisted of two genetic populations with an overall significantly analogous FST value (0.1088, P < 0.05). Most of the variance was within populations. These findings will be important for more sustainable octopus fisheries, so that this marine resource can be conserved for its long-term utilization. PMID:26634529

  6. AFLP marker analysis revealing genetic structure of the tree Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth. Brenan (Leguminosae-Mimosoideae in the southern Brazilian Tropical Rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Bérgamo de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapiptadenia rigida is a tropical early secondary succession tree characteristic of the Tropical Atlantic Rainforest. This species is of great ecological importance in the recovery of degraded areas. In this study we investigated the variability and population genetic structure of eight populations of P. rigida. Five AFLP primer combinations were used in a sample of 159 individuals representing these eight populations, rendering a total of 126 polymorphic fragments. The averages of percentage of polymorphic loci, gene diversity, and Shannon index were 60.45%, 0.217, and 0.322, respectively. A significant correlation between the population genetic variability and the population sizes was observed. The genetic variability within populations (72.20% was higher than between these (22.80%. No perfect correlation was observed between geographic and genetic distances, which might be explained by differences in deforestation intensities that occurred in these areas. A dendrogram constructed by the UPGMA method revealed the formation of two clusters, these also confirmed by Bayesian analysis for the number of K cluster. These results show that it is necessary to develop urgent management strategies for the conservation of certain populations of P. rigida, while other populations still preserve reasonably high levels of genetic variability.

  7. Genetic diversification in the East Himalayas as revealed by comparative phylogeography of the black-throated bushtit and Elliot’s laughing thrush

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing QUAN; Yanhua QU; Fumin LEI

    2015-01-01

    The Southwest Mountainous region of the eastern Himalayas is a hotspot with extraordinarily high biodiversity and endemism, but the processes that have driven this unique diversity are largely unknown. We evaluated processes that have con-tributed to the current observed high genetic diversity in this region by integrating comparative phylogeography with ecological niche modeling in a study of two representative birds of the Southwest Mountains: the black-throated bushtitAegithalos concin-nus and the Elliot’s laughing thrushGarrulax elliotii. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic lineages, which are roughly congruent with the north, south and east eco-subregion division of the Southwest Mountains. This strong geo-graphical structure in these two species suggests that lineage diversification has proceededin situ between the eco-subregions of the Southwest Mountains. During Pleistocene glaciations, the two species responded differently to climatic fluctuations.A.con-cinnus maintained rather stable habitats, mostly evergreen forests, during glacial cycles and thus kept a stable population size and further accumulated genetic diversity. In contrast,G. elliotii, which is mostly active in shrublands, has shifted its suitable habitats with glacial cycles. This species dispersed to low elevation areas during glacial periods, which provided multiple opportunities for gene admixture. The admixture causes the mixing of previously isolated genetic lineages and thus obscures the pattern of ge-netic variation [Current Zoology 61 (5): 935–942, 2015].

  8. Genetic differences among several species of Tricladida from the relict Lake Ohrid as revealed by enzyme electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sywula, Tadeusz; Krstanovski, Zdravko; Tasevska, Orhideja; Sell, Jerzy; Kretowicz, Tomasz

    2003-01-01

    Six endemic and two widely distributed species living in Lake Ohrid were studied. In general, these hermaphroditic animals displayed no signs of departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Genetic variation in all but one of the endemic species was of the same extent as that in geographically wide ranging invertebrates. On the other hand, the Lake Ohrid population of the common European species Dendrocoelum lacteum was monomorphic at all loci examined. D. sanctinaumi, one of the endemic species, exhibited a clear genetic subdivision into spring and littoral subpopulations. The genetic differentiation of Crenobia alpina alpina and C. a. montenigrina proved commensurable to that of well separated species from other genera. The data suggest that the separation of particular lineages in the set of Lake Ohrid endemics was widely dispersed over time. PMID:14686654

  9. Genetic differences among North African Berber and Arab-speaking populations revealed by Y-STR diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibar, Maria; Esteban, Esther; Harich, Nourdin; Kandil, Mostafa; Fernández-Santander, Ana

    2011-03-01

    Y-chromosome STR polymorphisms are inherited in a haploid state which makes them a powerful tool for easy tracing of paternal lineage and for use in human population evolutionary studies. North-African Y chromosomal diversity has traditionally been studied in order to find genetic and geographic associations as well as to test how natural and cultural barriers have affected the degree of genetic flow not only within North Africa but also in a wider Mediterranean context. The degree of Berber/Arab genetic differentiation in the Moroccan population has been tested for a complete set of forensic markers as sixteen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) (DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and GATA H4.1). The results suggest considerable population heterogeneity in North Africa. PMID:20854231

  10. Genetic control of environmental variation of two quantitative traits of Drosophila melanogaster revealed by whole-genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter; de los Campos, Gustavo; Morgante, Fabio;

    2015-01-01

    SR but not in SL. The number of studies of environmental variation, particularly in humans, is limited. The availability of full sequence information and modern computationally intensive statistical methods provides opportunities for rigorous analyses of environmental variability.......Genetic studies usually focus on quantifying and understanding the existence of genetic control on expected phenotypic outcomes. However, there is compelling evidence suggesting the existence of genetic control at the level of environmental variability, with some genotypes exhibiting more stable...... and others more volatile performance. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for environmental variability not only informs medical questions but is relevant in evolution and in agricultural science. In this work fully sequenced inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed to study the...

  11. Nuclear genetic diversity in human lice (Pediculus humanus) reveals continental differences and high inbreeding among worldwide populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascunce, Marina S; Toups, Melissa A; Kassu, Gebreyes; Fane, Jackie; Scholl, Katlyn; Reed, David L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of parasites is important to both basic and applied evolutionary biology. Knowledge of the genetic structure of parasite populations is critical for our ability to predict how an infection can spread through a host population and for the design of effective control methods. However, very little is known about the genetic structure of most human parasites, including the human louse (Pediculus humanus). This species is composed of two ecotypes: the head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer), and the clothing (body) louse (Pediculus humanus humanus Linnaeus). Hundreds of millions of head louse infestations affect children every year, and this number is on the rise, in part because of increased resistance to insecticides. Clothing lice affect mostly homeless and refugee-camp populations and although they are less prevalent than head lice, the medical consequences are more severe because they vector deadly bacterial pathogens. In this study we present the first assessment of the genetic structure of human louse populations by analyzing the nuclear genetic variation at 15 newly developed microsatellite loci in 93 human lice from 11 sites in four world regions. Both ecotypes showed heterozygote deficits relative to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and high inbreeding values, an expected pattern given their parasitic life history. Bayesian clustering analyses assigned lice to four distinct genetic clusters that were geographically structured. The low levels of gene flow among louse populations suggested that the evolution of insecticide resistance in lice would most likely be affected by local selection pressures, underscoring the importance of tailoring control strategies to population-specific genetic makeup and evolutionary history. Our panel of microsatellite markers provides powerful data to investigate not only ecological and evolutionary processes in lice, but also those in their human hosts because of the long-term coevolutionary

  12. Nuclear genetic diversity in human lice (Pediculus humanus reveals continental differences and high inbreeding among worldwide populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina S Ascunce

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of parasites is important to both basic and applied evolutionary biology. Knowledge of the genetic structure of parasite populations is critical for our ability to predict how an infection can spread through a host population and for the design of effective control methods. However, very little is known about the genetic structure of most human parasites, including the human louse (Pediculus humanus. This species is composed of two ecotypes: the head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer, and the clothing (body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus Linnaeus. Hundreds of millions of head louse infestations affect children every year, and this number is on the rise, in part because of increased resistance to insecticides. Clothing lice affect mostly homeless and refugee-camp populations and although they are less prevalent than head lice, the medical consequences are more severe because they vector deadly bacterial pathogens. In this study we present the first assessment of the genetic structure of human louse populations by analyzing the nuclear genetic variation at 15 newly developed microsatellite loci in 93 human lice from 11 sites in four world regions. Both ecotypes showed heterozygote deficits relative to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and high inbreeding values, an expected pattern given their parasitic life history. Bayesian clustering analyses assigned lice to four distinct genetic clusters that were geographically structured. The low levels of gene flow among louse populations suggested that the evolution of insecticide resistance in lice would most likely be affected by local selection pressures, underscoring the importance of tailoring control strategies to population-specific genetic makeup and evolutionary history. Our panel of microsatellite markers provides powerful data to investigate not only ecological and evolutionary processes in lice, but also those in their human hosts because of the long

  13. Ancient DNA reveals genetic stability despite demographic decline: 3,000 years of population history in the endemic Hawaiian petrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Andreanna J; Wiley, Anne E; James, Helen F; Ostrom, Peggy H; Stafford, Thomas W; Fleischer, Robert C

    2012-12-01

    In the Hawaiian Islands, human colonization, which began approximately 1,200 to 800 years ago, marks the beginning of a period in which nearly 75% of the endemic avifauna became extinct and the population size and range of many additional species declined. It remains unclear why some species persisted whereas others did not. The endemic Hawaiian petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) has escaped extinction, but colonies on two islands have been extirpated and populations on remaining islands have contracted. We obtained mitochondrial DNA sequences from 100 subfossil bones, 28 museum specimens, and 289 modern samples to investigate patterns of gene flow and temporal changes in the genetic diversity of this endangered species over the last 3,000 years, as Polynesians and then Europeans colonized the Hawaiian Islands. Genetic differentiation was found to be high between both modern and ancient petrel populations. However, gene flow was substantial between the extirpated colonies on Oahu and Molokai and modern birds from the island of Lanai. No significant reductions in genetic diversity occurred over this period, despite fears in the mid-1900s that this species may have been extinct. Simulations show that even a decline to a stable effective population size of 100 individuals would result in the loss of only 5% of the expected heterozygosity. Simulations also show that high levels of genetic diversity may be retained due to the long generation time of this species. Such decoupling between population size and genetic diversity in long-lived species can have important conservation implications. It appears that a pattern of dispersal from declining colonies, in addition to long generation time, may have allowed the Hawaiian petrel to escape a severe genetic bottleneck, and the associated extinction vortex, and persist despite a large population decline after human colonization. PMID:22844071

  14. Genetic variability of Wild Cherry (Prunus avium L.) seed stands in Slovenia as revealed by nuclear microsatellite loci

    OpenAIRE

    Kristjan Jarni; Bart De Cuyper; Robert Brus

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to describe the genetic variability of four seed stands of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.). One hundred and thirty one individuals were genotyped at ten nuclear microsatellite loci. Total genetic diversity was high (H(E) = 0.704), while differences between stands were small but significant (F(ST) = 0.053, G'(ST) = 0.234). There was a significant amount of clonal reproduction in one stand, with only 11 genotypes identified among 36 trees. One stand showed a signi...

  15. Genome-wide Association and Longitudinal Analyses Reveal Genetic Loci Linking Pubertal Height Growth, Pubertal Timing, and Childhood Adiposity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cousminer, Diana L; Berry, Diane J; Timpson, Nicholas J;

    2013-01-01

    adverse cardiometabolic health. The only gene so far associated with pubertal height growth, LIN28B, pleiotropically influences childhood growth, puberty, and cancer progression, pointing to shared underlying mechanisms.To discover genetic loci influencing pubertal height and growth and place them in......The pubertal height growth spurt is a distinctive feature of childhood growth reflecting both the central onset of puberty and local growth factors. While little is known about the underlying genetics, growth variability during puberty correlates with adult risks for hormone-dependent cancer and...

  16. Chemical Variation in a Dominant Tree Species: Population Divergence, Selection and Genetic Stability across Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Julianne M O'Reilly-Wapstra; Miller, Alison M.; Hamilton, Matthew G.; Dean Williams; Naomi Glancy-Dean; Potts, Brad M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding among and within population genetic variation of ecologically important plant traits provides insight into the potential evolutionary processes affecting those traits. The strength and consistency of selection driving variability in traits would be affected by plasticity in differences among genotypes across environments (G×E). We investigated population divergence, selection and environmental plasticity of foliar plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) in a dominant tree species, Eu...

  17. Comparison of Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry and Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Genetic Analysis of Lignocellulose Chemical Composition in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxing Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of wood chemical composition is often limited by the cost and throughput of direct analytical methods. The speed and low cost of Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR overcomes many of these limitations, but it is an indirect method relying on calibration models that are typically developed and validated with small sample sets. In this study, we used >1500 young greenhouse grown trees from a clonally propagated single Populus family, grown at low and high nitrogen, and compared FT-NIR calibration sample sizes of 150, 250, 500 and 750 on calibration and prediction model statistics, and heritability estimates developed with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (pyMBMS wood chemical composition. As calibration sample size increased from 150 to 750, predictive model statistics improved slightly. Overall, stronger calibration and prediction statistics were obtained with lignin, S-lignin, S/G ratio, and m/z 144 (an ion from cellulose, than with C5 and C6 carbohydrates, and m/z 114 (an ion from xylan. Although small differences in model statistics were observed between the 250 and 500 sample calibration sets, when predicted values were used for calculating genetic control, the 500 sample set gave substantially more similar results to those obtained with the pyMBMS data. With the 500 sample calibration models, genetic correlations obtained with FT-NIR and pyMBMS methods were similar. Quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis with pyMBMS and FT-NIR predictions identified only three common loci for lignin traits. FT-NIR identified four QTLs that were not found with pyMBMS data, and these QTLs were for the less well predicted carbohydrate traits.

  18. Genetic and systems level analysis of Drosophila sticky/citron kinase and dFmr1 mutants reveals common regulation of genetic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnescu Daniela C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, the genes sticky and dFmr1 have both been shown to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and chromatin structure. These genes also genetically interact with Argonaute family microRNA regulators. Furthermore, in mammalian systems, both genes have been implicated in neuronal development. Given these genetic and functional similarities, we tested Drosophila sticky and dFmr1 for a genetic interaction and measured whole genome expression in both mutants to assess similarities in gene regulation. Results We found that sticky mutations can dominantly suppress a dFmr1 gain-of-function phenotype in the developing eye, while phenotypes produced by RNAi knock-down of sticky were enhanced by dFmr1 RNAi and a dFmr1 loss-of-function mutation. We also identified a large number of transcripts that were misexpressed in both mutants suggesting that sticky and dFmr1 gene products similarly regulate gene expression. By integrating gene expression data with a protein-protein interaction network, we found that mutations in sticky and dFmr1 resulted in misexpression of common gene networks, and consequently predicted additional specific phenotypes previously not known to be associated with either gene. Further phenotypic analyses validated these predictions. Conclusion These findings establish a functional link between two previously unrelated genes. Microarray analysis indicates that sticky and dFmr1 are both required for regulation of many developmental genes in a variety of cell types. The diversity of transcripts regulated by these two genes suggests a clear cause of the pleiotropy that sticky and dFmr1 mutants display and provides many novel, testable hypotheses about the functions of these genes. As both of these genes are implicated in the development and function of the mammalian brain, these results have relevance to human health as well as to understanding more general biological processes.

  19. Genome Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus ST291, a Double Locus Variant of ST398, Reveals a Distinct Genetic Lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Stegger; Maliha Aziz; Tomasz Chroboczek; Lance B Price; Troels Ronco; Kristoffer Kiil; Skov, Robert L.; Frederic Laurent; Andersen, Paal S.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ST291 has been reported as a homologue recombinant double locus variant of the livestock associated S. aureus ST398. However, whole genome sequencing show that ST291 is a unique genetic lineage with highly variable content within its accessory genome compared to both human and livestock associated genome sequenced CC398s.

  20. DNA fingerprinting and anastomosis grouping reveal similar genetic diversity in Rhizoctonia species infecting turfgrasses in the transition zone of USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia blight (sensu lato) is a common and serious disease of many turfgrass species. The most widespread causal agent, R. solani, consists of several genetically different subpopulations. Though hyphal anastomosis reactions have been used to group Rhizoctonia species, they are time consuming a...

  1. Comparative linkage meta-analysis reveals regionally-distinct, disparate genetic architectures: application to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady Tang

    Full Text Available New high-throughput, population-based methods and next-generation sequencing capabilities hold great promise in the quest for common and rare variant discovery and in the search for "missing heritability." However, the optimal analytic strategies for approaching such data are still actively debated, representing the latest rate-limiting step in genetic progress. Since it is likely a majority of common variants of modest effect have been identified through the application of tagSNP-based microarray platforms (i.e., GWAS, alternative approaches robust to detection of low-frequency (1-5% MAF and rare (<1% variants are of great importance. Of direct relevance, we have available an accumulated wealth of linkage data collected through traditional genetic methods over several decades, the full value of which has not been exhausted. To that end, we compare results from two different linkage meta-analysis methods--GSMA and MSP--applied to the same set of 13 bipolar disorder and 16 schizophrenia GWLS datasets. Interestingly, we find that the two methods implicate distinct, largely non-overlapping, genomic regions. Furthermore, based on the statistical methods themselves and our contextualization of these results within the larger genetic literatures, our findings suggest, for each disorder, distinct genetic architectures may reside within disparate genomic regions. Thus, comparative linkage meta-analysis (CLMA may be used to optimize low-frequency and rare variant discovery in the modern genomic era.

  2. AFLP analysis reveals infraspecific phylogenetic relationships and population genetic structure of two species of Aconitum in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Mitka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of two Aconitum species endemic to the Carpathian Mountains and Sudetes was studied. A reticulate evolution between them was earlier postulated as an effect of secondary contact. The genetic diversity at the individual and taxonomic levels was examined across the entire geographical ranges of the taxa in 11 populations based on 247 AFLP markers found in 112 individuals in the Sudetes and Western Carpathians. The overall genetic differentiation was greater within the Sudetic A. plicatum (FST = 0.139, P < 0.001 than within the Carpathian A. firmum (FST = 0.062, P < 0.001, presumably due to the long-lasting geographic isolation between the Giant Mts and Praděd (Sudetes populations of the species. Interestingly, relatively distant and presently isolated populations of A. plicatum and A. f. subsp. maninense share a part of their genomes. It could be an effect of their common evolutionary history, including past and present reticulations. The introgression among infraspecific taxa of Aconitum is common, probably as a result of seed dispersal within a distance of ca. 20 km (Mantel’s r = 0.36, P = 0.01. Aconitum f. subsp. maninense had the highest genetic diversity indices: Nei’s h and rarefied FAr, and divergence index DW (P ≤ 0.05, pointing to its presumably ancient age and long-term isolation.

  3. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from North America revealed widespread and high prevalence of the fourth clonal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study, wild animals, including dolphins from the USA were examined for T. gondii infection. Tissues of naturally exposed animals were bioassayed in mice for isolation of viable parasites. Viable T. ...

  4. Genetic structure in cultivated and wild carrots (¤Daucus carota¤ L.) revealed by AFLP analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, S.I.; Bagger Jørgensen, Rikke

    2000-01-01

    Genetic variation within and among five Danish populations of wild carrot and five cultivated varieties was investigated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Ten AFLP primer combinations produced 116 polymorphic bands. Based on the marker data an UPGMA-cluster analysis and principal...... markers specific to the cultivated carrot makes it possible to detect introgression from cultivated to wild types....

  5. Genome analysis of Staphylococcus aureus ST291, a double locus variant of ST398, reveals a distinct genetic lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Stegger

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus ST291 has been reported as a homologue recombinant double locus variant of the livestock associated S. aureus ST398. However, whole genome sequencing show that ST291 is a unique genetic lineage with highly variable content within its accessory genome compared to both human and livestock associated genome sequenced CC398s.

  6. Population Genetics of the São Tomé Caecilian (Gymnophiona: Dermophiidae: Schistometopum thomense) Reveals Strong Geographic Structuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelting, Ricka E.; Measey, G. John; Drewes, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Islands provide exciting opportunities for exploring ecological and evolutionary mechanisms. The oceanic island of São Tomé in the Gulf of Guinea exhibits high diversity of fauna including the endemic caecilian amphibian, Schistometopum thomense. Variation in pigmentation, morphology and size of this taxon over its c. 45 km island range is extreme, motivating a number of taxonomic, ecological, and evolutionary hypotheses to explain the observed diversity. We conducted a population genetic study of S. thomense using partial sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes (ND4 and 16S), together with morphological examination, to address competing hypotheses of taxonomic or clinal variation. Using Bayesian phylogenetic analysis and Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variance, we found evidence of four geographic clades, whose range and approximated age (c. 253 Kya – 27 Kya) are consistent with the spread and age of recent volcanic flows. These clades explained 90% of variation in ND4 (φCT = 0.892), and diverged by 4.3% minimum pairwise distance at the deepest node. Most notably, using Mismatch Distributions and Mantel Tests, we identified a zone of population admixture that dissected the island. In the northern clade, we found evidence of recent population expansion (Fu's Fs = −13.08 and Tajima's D = −1.80) and limited dispersal (Mantel correlation coefficient = 0.36, p = 0.01). Color assignment to clades was not absolute. Paired with multinomial regression of chromatic data, our analyses suggested that the genetic groups and a latitudinal gradient together describe variation in color of S. thomense. We propose that volcanism and limited dispersal ability are the likely proximal causes of the observed genetic structure. This is the first population genetic study of any caecilian and demonstrates that these animals have deep genetic divisions over very small areas in accordance with previous speculations of low dispersal abilities. PMID:25171066

  7. Interspecific crossing and genetic mapping reveal intrinsic genomic incompatibility between two Senecio species that form a hybrid zone on Mount Etna, Sicily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, A C; Hiscock, S J; Abbott, R J

    2014-09-01

    Studies of hybridizing species can reveal much about the genetic basis and maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow. Here we report a genetic segregation and linkage analysis conducted on F2 progeny of a reciprocal cross between Senecio aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius that form a hybrid zone on Mount Etna, Sicily, aimed at determining the genetic basis of intrinsic hybrid barriers between them. Significant transmission ratio distortion (TRD) was detected at 34 (∼27%) of 127 marker loci located in nine distinct clusters across seven of the ten linkage groups detected, indicating genomic incompatibility between the species. TRD at these loci could not be attributed entirely to post-zygotic selective loss of F2 individuals that failed to germinate or flower (16.7%). At four loci tests indicated that pre-zygotic events, such as meiotic drive in F1 parents or gametophytic selection, contributed to TRD. Additional tests revealed that cytonuclear incompatibility contributed to TRD at five loci, Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) incompatibilities involving epistatic interactions between loci contributed to TRD at four loci, and underdominance (heterozygote disadvantage) was a possible cause of TRD at one locus. Major chromosomal rearrangements were probably not a cause of interspecific incompatibility at the scale that could be examined with current map marker density. Intrinsic genomic incompatibility between S. aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius revealed by TRD across multiple genomic regions in early-generation hybrids is likely to impact the genetic structure of the natural hybrid zone on Mount Etna by limiting introgression and promoting divergence across the genome. PMID:24595365

  8. Comparative analyses of genetic risk prediction methods reveal extreme diversity of genetic predisposition to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) among ethnic populations of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ankita Chatterjee; Analabha Basu; Abhijit Chowdhury; Kausik Das; Neeta Sarkar-Roy; Partha P. Majumder; Priyadarshi Basu

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a distinct pathologic condition characterized by a disease spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to steato-hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Prevalence of NAFLD varies in different ethnic groups, ranging from 12% in Chinese to 45% in Hispanics. Among Indian populations, the diversity in prevalence is high, ranging from 9% in rural populations to 32% in urban populations, with geographic differences as well. Here, we wished to find out if this difference is reflected in their genetic makeup. To date, several candidate genes and a few genomewide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out, and many associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and NAFLD have been observed. In this study, the risk allele frequencies (RAFs) of NAFLD-associated SNPs in 20 Indian ethnic populations (376 individuals) were analysed. We used two different measures for calculating genetic risk scores and compared their performance. The correlation of additive risk scores of NAFLD for three Hapmap populations with their weighted mean prevalence was found to be high (2 = 0.93). Later we used this method to compare NAFLD risk among ethnic Indian populations. Based on our observation, the Indian caste populations have high risk scores compared to Caucasians, who are often used as surrogate and similar to Indian caste population in disease gene association studies, and is significantly higher than the Indian tribal populations.

  9. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target

    OpenAIRE

    Fedeles, Bogdan I.; Zhu, Angela Y.; Young, Kellie S.; Hillier, Shawn M.; Proffitt, Kyle D.; Essigmann, John M.; Croy, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action...

  10. Epigenetic and genetic factors in the cellular response to radiations and DNA-damaging chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA-damaging agents are widely used as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease states. Many such agents are considered to produce detrimental side effects. Thus, it is important to evaluate both therapeutic efficacy and potential risk. DNA-damaging agents can be so evaluated by comparison to agents whose therapeutic benefit and potential hazards are better known. We propose a framework for such comparison, demonstrating that a simple transformation of cytotoxicity-dose response patterns permits a facile comparison of variation between cells exposed to a single DNA-damaging agent or to different cytotoxic agents. Further, by transforming data from experiments which compare responses of 2 cell populations to an effects ratio, different patterns for the changes in cytotoxicity produced by epigenetic and genetic factors were compared. Using these transformations, we found that there is a wide variation (a factor of 4) between laboratories for a single agent (UVC) and only a slightly larger variation (factor of 6) between normal cell response for different types of DNA-damaging agents (x-ray, UVC, alkylating agents, crosslinking agents). Epigenetic factors such as repair and recovery appear to be a factor only at higher dose levels. Comparison in the cytotoxic effect of a spectrum of DNA-damaging agents in xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia cells indicates significantly different patterns, implying that the effect, and perhaps the nature, of these genetic conditions are quite different

  11. A Hybrid Improved Genetic Algorithm and Its Application in Dynamic Optimization Problems of Chemical Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Fan; DU Wenli; QI Rongbin; QIAN Feng; ZHONG Weimin

    2013-01-01

    The solutions of dynamic optimization problems are usually very difficult due to their highly nonlinear and multidimensional nature.Genetic algorithm(GA)has been proved to be a feasible method when the gradient is difficult to calculate.Its advantage is that the control profiles at all time stages are optimized simultaneously,but its convergence is very slow in the later period of evolution and it is easily trapped in the local optimum.In this study,a hybrid improved genetic algorithm(HIGA)for solving dynamic optimization problems is proposed to overcome these defects.Simplex method(SM)is used to perform the local search in the neighborhood of the optimal solution.By using SM,the ideal searching direction of global optimal solution could be found as soon as possible and the convergence speed of the algorithm is improved.The hybrid algorithm presents some improvements,such as protecting the best individual,accepting immigrations,as well as employing adaptive crossover and Gaussian mutation operators.The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by solving several dynamic optimization problems.At last,HIGA is applied to the optimal production of secreted protein in a fed batch reactor and the optimal feed-rate found by HIGA is effective and relatively stable.

  12. Genetic structure and diversity of a collection of Brassica rapa subsp. rapa L. revealed by simple sequence repeat markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Soengas Fernández, María del Pilar; Cartea González, María Elena; Francisco Candeira, Marta; Lema Márquez, Margarita; Velasco Pazos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Brassica rapa subsp. rapa L. includes three different crops: turnips (roots), turnip greens (leaves) and turnip tops (inflorescences). A collection of B. rapa subsp. rapa from north-western Spain is currently kept at 'Mision Biologica de Galicia' (a research centre of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Spain). This collection has been characterized based on morphological and agronomical traits. A better understanding of the genetic diversity present in the collection ...

  13. First evidence of hybridization between golden jackal (Canis aureus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as revealed by genetic markers

    OpenAIRE

    Galov, Ana; Fabbri, Elena; Caniglia, Romolo; Arbanasić, Haidi; Lapalombella, Silvana; Florijančić, Tihomir; Bošković, Ivica; Galaverni, Marco; Randi, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent in nature and numerous cases of hybridization between wild canids and domestic dogs have been recorded. However, hybrids between golden jackals (Canis aureus) and other canids have not been described before. In this study, we combined the use of biparental (15 autosomal microsatellites and three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci) and uniparental (mtDNA control region and a Y-linked Zfy intron) genetic markers to assess the admixed o...

  14. ARTIFICIAL SELECTION ON RELATIVE BRAIN SIZE REVEALS A POSITIVE GENETIC CORRELATION BETWEEN BRAIN SIZE AND PROACTIVE PERSONALITY IN THE GUPPY

    OpenAIRE

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Lievens, Eva J.P.; Dahlbom, Josefin; Bundsen, Andreas; Semenova, Svetlana; Sundvik, Maria; Maklakov, Alexei A.; Winberg, Svante; Panula, Pertti; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-01-01

    Animal personalities range from individuals that are shy, cautious, and easily stressed (a "reactive" personality type) to individuals that are bold, innovative, and quick to learn novel tasks, but also prone to routine formation (a "proactive" personality type). Although personality differences should have important consequences for fitness, their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated how genetic variation in brain size affects personality. We put selection li...

  15. Genetic Diversity in Cellular Slime Molds: Allozyme Electrophoresis and a Monoclonal Antibody Reveal Cryptic Species among Dictyostelium discoideum Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Briscoe, David A.; Gooley, Andrew A.; Bernstein, R.L.; McKay, George M.; Williams, Keith L.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular slime molds have been classified on the basis of a small number of descriptive criteria such as fruiting body color and morphology, and, in heterothallic species, by assignment to compatible mating groups. However, some isolates which are morphologically classified as conspecific do not fall into a simple mating-type classification; for example some are asexual or homothallic. An increasing interest in inter-strain genetic variation in studies of development and simple behavior has l...

  16. Evolution of genes related to temperature adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster as revealed by QTL and population genetics analyses

    OpenAIRE

    WILCHES, RICARDO

    2014-01-01

    The fixation of beneficial variants leaves genomic footprints characterized by a reduction of genetic variation at linked neutral sites and strong, localized allele frequency differentiation among subpopulations. In contrast, for phenotypic evolution the effect of adaptation on the genes controlling the trait is little understood. Theoretical work on polygenic selection suggests that fixations of beneficial alleles (causing selective sweeps) are less likely than small-to-moderate allele frequ...

  17. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Foulongne-Oriol; Manuela Rocha de Brito; Delphine Cabannes; Aurélien Clément; Cathy Spataro; Magalie Moinard; Eustáquio Souza Dias; Philippe Callac; Jean-Michel Savoie

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed t...

  18. Genetic visualization with an improved GCaMP calcium indicator reveals spatiotemporal activation of the spinal motor neurons in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, Akira; Ohkura, Masamichi; Kotani, Tomoya; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Nakai, Junichi; Kawakami, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Animal behaviors are generated by well-coordinated activation of neural circuits. In zebrafish, embryos start to show spontaneous muscle contractions at 17 to 19 h postfertilization. To visualize how motor circuits in the spinal cord are activated during this behavior, we developed GCaMP-HS (GCaMP-hyper sensitive), an improved version of the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP, and created transgenic zebrafish carrying the GCaMP-HS gene downstream of the Gal4-recognition sequence, UAS...

  19. Genetic Variation among Isolates of Sarcocystis neurona, the Agent of Protozoal Myeloencephalitis, as Revealed by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Elsheikha, H.M.; Schott, H. C.; Mansfield, L. S.

    2006-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes serious neurological disease in horses and other vertebrates in the Americas. Based on epidemiological data, this parasite has recently emerged. Here, the genetic diversity of Sarcocystis neurona was evaluated using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. Fifteen S. neurona taxa from different regions collected over the last 10 years were used; six isolates were from clinically diseased horses, eight isolates were from wild-caught opossums (Didelph...

  20. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif; Almstrup, Kristian; Petri, Andreas; Barrett, Amy; Travers, Mary; Rayner, Nigel W; Mägi, Reedik; Pettersson, Fredrik H; Broxholme, John; Neville, Matt J; Wills, Quin F; Cheeseman, Jane; Allen, Maxine; Holmes, Chris C; Spector, Tim D; Fleckner, Jan; McCarthy, Mark I; Karpe, Fredrik; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Zondervan, Krina T

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue, ...... interactions influence complex traits such as MetS, integrated analysis of genotypes and coexpression networks across multiple tissues relevant to clinical traits is an efficient strategy to identify novel associations....

  1. Syntenic relationships between cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and melon (C. melo L.) chromosomes as revealed by comparative genetic mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Staub Jack E; Zalapa Juan; Garcia-Mas Jordi; Li Yuhong; Yang Luming; Cuevas Hugo E; Li Dawei; Luan Feishi; Reddy Umesh; He Xiaoming; Gong Zhenhui; Weng Yiqun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. (2n = 2 × = 14) and melon, C. melo L. (2n = 2 × = 24) are two important vegetable species in the genus Cucumis (family Cucurbitaceae). Both species have an Asian origin that diverged approximately nine million years ago. Cucumber is believed to have evolved from melon through chromosome fusion, but the details of this process are largely unknown. In this study, comparative genetic mapping between cucumber and melon was conducted to examine synt...

  2. Genetic randomization reveals functional relationships among morphologic and tissue-quality traits that contribute to bone strength and fragility

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Karl J; Hu, Bin; Tommasini, Steven M.; Courtland, Hayden-William; Price, Christopher; Terranova, Carl J.; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2007-01-01

    We examined femora from adult AXB/BXA recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains to identify skeletal traits that are functionally related and to determine how functional interactions among these traits contribute to genetic variability in whole-bone stiffness, strength, and toughness. Randomization of A/J and C57BL/6J genomic regions resulted in each adult male and female RI strain building mechanically functional femora by assembling unique sets of morphologic and tissue-quality traits. A correl...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup Analysis Reveals no Association between the Common Genetic Lineages and Prostate Cancer in the Korean Population

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Wook; Yoo, Tag-Keun; Shin, Dong-Jik; Rho, Hyun-Wook; Jin, Han-Jun; Kim, Eun-Tak; Bae, Yoon-Sun

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation has recently been suggested to have an association with various cancers, including prostate cancer risk, in human populations. Since mtDNA is haploid and lacks recombination, specific mutations in the mtDNA genome associated with human diseases arise and remain in particular genetic backgrounds referred to as haplogroups. To assess the possible contribution of mtDNA haplogroup-specific mutations to the occurrence of prostate cancer, we have therefore perfor...

  4. Distinction and relatedness – Taxonomic and genetic studies reveal a new species group of goatfishes (Upeneus; Mullidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Uiblein, Franz; Gouws, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic and genetic differentiation among goatfish species of the genus Upeneus which had been formerly included in the so-called ‘vittatus group’ were examined using a comprehensive alpha-taxonomic and barcoding approach. Four of the five species of this group, U. indicus, U. suahelicus, U. supravittatus and U. vittatus, occur in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO), while U. parvus occurs in the Western Atlantic. An updated diagnosis of the WIO species, followed by detailed inter- and intraspe...

  5. Spatial and temporal genetic structure of the planktonic Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha) in European seas as revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peijnenburg, K T C A; Fauvelot, C; Breeuwer, J A J; Menken, S B J

    2006-10-01

    Little is known about the spatial and temporal scales at which planktonic organisms are genetically structured. A previous study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the holoplanktonic chaetognath Sagitta setosa revealed strong phylogeographic structuring suggesting that Northeast (NE) Atlantic, Mediterranean and Black Sea populations are genetically disjunct. The present study used a higher sampling intensity and a combination of mitochondrial and four microsatellite markers to reveal population structuring between and within basins. Between basins, both marker sets indicated significant differentiation confirming earlier results that gene flow is probably absent between the respective S. setosa populations. At the within-basin scale, we found no evidence of spatial or temporal structuring within the NE Atlantic. In the Mediterranean basin, both marker sets indicated significant structuring, but only the mtDNA data indicated a sharp genetic division between Adriatic and all other Mediterranean populations. Data were inconclusive about population structuring in the Black Sea. The levels of differentiation indicated by the two marker sets differed substantially, with far less pronounced structure detected by microsatellite than mtDNA data. This study also uncovered the presence of highly divergent mitochondrial lineages that were discordant with morphology, geography and nuclear DNA. We thus propose the hypothesis that highly divergent mitochondrial lineages may be present within interbreeding S. setosa populations. PMID:16968273

  6. Population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations reveals the genetic basis of body size variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Turner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Body size is a classic quantitative trait with evolutionarily significant variation within many species. Locating the alleles responsible for this variation would help understand the maintenance of variation in body size in particular, as well as quantitative traits in general. However, successful genome-wide association of genotype and phenotype may require very large sample sizes if alleles have low population frequencies or modest effects. As a complementary approach, we propose that population-based resequencing of experimentally evolved populations allows for considerable power to map functional variation. Here, we use this technique to investigate the genetic basis of natural variation in body size in Drosophila melanogaster. Significant differentiation of hundreds of loci in replicate selection populations supports the hypothesis that the genetic basis of body size variation is very polygenic in D. melanogaster. Significantly differentiated variants are limited to single genes at some loci, allowing precise hypotheses to be formed regarding causal polymorphisms, while other significant regions are large and contain many genes. By using significantly associated polymorphisms as a priori candidates in follow-up studies, these data are expected to provide considerable power to determine the genetic basis of natural variation in body size.

  7. Patriline Differences Reveal Genetic Influence on Forewing Size and Shape in a Yellowjacket Wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Vespula flavopilosa Jacobson, 1978.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Perrard

    Full Text Available The wing venation is frequently used as a morphological marker to distinguish biological groups among insects. With geometric morphometrics, minute shape differences can be detected between closely related species or populations, making this technique useful for taxonomy. However, the direct influence of genetic differences on wing morphology has not been explored within colonies of social insects. Here, we show that the father's genotype has a direct effect on wing morphology in colonies of social wasps. Using geometric morphometrics on the venation pattern, we found significant differences in wing size and shape between patrilines of yellowjackets, taking allometry and measurement error into account. The genetic influence on wing size accounted for a small part of the overall size variation, but venation shape was highly structured by the differences between patrilines. Overall, our results showed a strong genetic influence on wing morphology likely acting at multiple levels of venation pattern development. This confirmed the pertinence of this marker for taxonomic purposes and suggests this phenotype as a potentially useful marker for phylogenies. This also raises doubts about the strength of selective pressures on this phenotype, which highlights the need to understand better the role of wing venation shape in insect flight.

  8. Genome-wide association reveals genetic basis for the propensity to migrate in wild populations of rainbow and steelhead trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Benjamin C; Campbell, Nathan R; Holecek, Dean E; Narum, Shawn R

    2013-06-01

    Little is known of the genetic basis of migration despite the ecological benefits migratory species provide to their communities and their rapid global decline due to anthropogenic disturbances in recent years. Using next-generation sequencing of restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) tags, we genotyped thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two wild populations of migratory steelhead and resident rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from the Pacific Northwest of the United States. One population maintains a connection to the sea, whereas the other population has been sequestered from its access to the ocean for more than 50 years by a hydropower dam. Here we performed a genome-wide association study to identify 504 RAD SNP markers from several genetic regions that were associated with the propensity to migrate both within and between the populations. Our results corroborate those in previous quantitative trait loci studies and provide evidence for additional loci associated with this complex migratory life history. Our results suggest a complex multi-genic basis with several loci of small effect distributed throughout the genome contributing to migration in this species. We also determined that despite being sequestered for decades, the landlocked population continues to harbour genetic variation associated with a migratory life history and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of genotyping-by-sequencing and how RAD-tag SNP data can be readily compared between studies to investigate migration within this species. PMID:23106605

  9. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus. The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  10. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship among Tunisian cactus species (Opuntia) as revealed by random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendhifi Zarroug, M; Baraket, G; Zourgui, L; Souid, S; Salhi Hannachi, A

    2015-01-01

    Opuntia ficus indica is one of the most economically important species in the Cactaceae family. Increased interest in this crop stems from its potential contribution to agricultural diversification, application in the exploitation of marginal lands, and utility as additional income sources for farmers. In Tunisia, O. ficus indica has been affected by drastic genetic erosion resulting from biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, it is imperative to identify and preserve this germplasm. In this study, we focused on the use of random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms to assess genetic diversity among 25 representatives of Tunisian Opuntia species maintained in the collection of the National Institute of Agronomic Research of Tunisia. Seventy-two DNA markers were screened to discriminate accessions using 16 successful primer combinations. The high percentage of polymorphic band (100%), the resolving power value (5.68), the polymorphic information content (0.94), and the marker index (7.2) demonstrated the efficiency of the primers tested. Therefore, appropriate cluster analysis used in this study illustrated a divergence among the cultivars studied and exhibited continuous variation that occurred independently of geographic origin. O. ficus indica accessions did not cluster separately from the other cactus pear species, indicating that their current taxonomical classifications are not well aligned with their genetic variability or locality of origin. PMID:25730081

  11. High genetic diversity in gametophyte clones of Undaria pinnatifida from Vladivostok, Dalian and Qingdao revealed using microsatellite analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tifeng; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Feng; Xu, Na; Zhao, Xiaobo; Gao, Suqin

    2012-03-01

    Breeding practice for Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar requires the screening of a large number of offspring from gametophyte crossings to obtain an elite variety for large-scale cultivation. To better understand the genetic relationships of different gametophyte cultures isolated from different sources, 20 microsatellite loci were screened and 53 gametophyte clone cultures analyzed for U. pinnatifida isolated from wild sporophytes in Vladivostok, Russia and from cultivated sporophytes from Dalian and Qingdao, China. One locus was abandoned because of poor amplification. At the sex-linked locus of Up-AC-2A8, 3 alleles were detected in 25 female gametophyte clones, with sizes ranging from 307 to 316 bp. At other loci, 3 to 7 alleles were detected with an average of 4.5 alleles per locus. The average number of alleles at each locus was 1.3 and 3.7 for Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones, respectively. The average gene diversity for Russian, Chinese, and for the combined total of gametophyte clones was 0.1, 0.4, and 0.5, respectively. Russian gametophyte clones had unique alleles at 7 out of the 19 loci. In cluster analysis, Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones were separated into two different groups according to genetic distance. Overall, high genetic diversity was detected in gametophyte clones isolated from the two countries. These gametophyte cultures were believed to be appropriate parental materials for conducting breeding programs in the future.

  12. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  13. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Foulongne-Oriol

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG, and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus. The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure of Eleutheronema rhadinum in the East and South China Seas revealed in mitochondrial COI sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinxu; Xu, Dongdong; Lou, Bao; Zhang, Tao; Xin, Jian; Guo, Yaoshi; Ma, Shilei

    2013-11-01

    Eleutheronema rhadinum is a potential commercial fisheries species and is subject to intense exploitation in China. Knowledge on the population structure of E. rhadinum in Chinese coastal waters, which is important for sustainable exploitation and proper resource management, is lacking. In the present study, the genetic diversity and population structure of E. rhadinum were evaluated using a 564-base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. A total of 76 specimens were collected from three localities around the East (Qidong and Zhoushan) and South China Seas (Zhuhai). Among these individuals, nine polymorphic sites were detected and 11 distinct haplotypes were defined. High levels of haplotype diversity ( h =0.759±0.035) and low levels of nucleotide diversity ( π= 0.001 98±0.003 26) were observed in these populations. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 96.72% of the genetic variation occurred within the populations, whereas 3.28% occurred among populations. No significant genealogical branches or clusters were recognized on the neighbor-joining tree. Intra-group variation among populations was significant ( φ st=0.032 85, P<0.01). These results suggest that E. rhadinum populations in the East and South China Seas have developed divergent genetic structures. Tests of neutral evolution and mismatch distribution suggest that E. rhadinum may have experienced a population expansion. The present study provides basic information for the conservation and sustainable exploitation of this species.

  15. High genetic differentiation of Aegla longirostri (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura) populations in southern Brazil revealed by multi-loci microsatellite analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomei-Santos, M L; Roratto, P A; Santos, S

    2011-01-01

    Species with a broad distribution rarely have the same genetic make-up throughout their entire range. In some cases, they may constitute a cryptic complex consisting of a few species, each with a narrow distribution, instead of a single-, widely distributed species. These differences can have profound impacts for biodiversity conservation planning. The genetic differentiation of four populations of Aegla longirostri, a freshwater crab found in two geographically isolated basins in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, was investigated by analyzing pentanucleotide multi-loci microsatellites in a heteroduplex assay. Although no morphological differences were evident, we found significant genetic differentiation among the four populations, based on F(ST) values and clustering analysis. This high level of differentiation may be indicative of cryptic species in these populations. If this hypothesis is correct, then the species occurring in the Ibicuí-Mirim River, at the southern limit of the Atlantic Rain Forest, would be under threat, considering its very restricted distribution. PMID:22179994

  16. Genetic and reproductive characterisation of seasonal flowering morphs of Gentianella bohemica revealed strong reproductive isolation and possible single origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenk, K; Göd, F; Kriechbaum, M; Kropf, M

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic polymorphism represents the most obvious type of intraspecific diversity raising scientific interest in its evolution and maintenance. We studied the regional endemic Gentianella bohemica, which exhibits an early- and a late-flowering morph. Genetic variation and structuring were investigated in relation to potential pollination and mating system differences, to verify hypotheses of evolutionary integrity, origin, and reproductive isolation of both flowering morphs. We identified the rarer early-flowering morph as an independent genetic entity, being more selfing, likely stronger pollinator-limited and reproductively isolated. All analysed populations showed strong among population differentiation and low overall genetic diversity due to habitat fragmentation and reduced population sizes. These results indicate likely inbreeding, but we also found evidence for possible outbreeding depression in the late-flowering morph. Both G. bohemica morphs are characteristic of traditionally used, nutrient-poor grasslands, but they represent independent conservation units and need temporally adapted management. We, therefore, also briefly discuss our results in the general context of conservation activities in relation to intraspecific polymorphisms and strongly argue for their formal and consequent consideration. PMID:26031436

  17. Genetic relationship and population structure of three Indian local chicken populations as revealed by mtDNA D-loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, P K; Das, B; Sahoo, L; Senapati, S; Nayak, G D

    2016-07-01

    The genetic information obtained from the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region has paramount importance in understanding the evolution of closely related individuals, and designing proper breeding or conservation plans. The present study was conducted using partial D-loop sequences of three local poultry populations from Odisha, India. The partial D-loop sequences were found to be highly polymorphic having 164 polymorphic sites with 89 singletons and 75 parsimony informative sites. Furthermore, 25 insertion and deletion sites were observed. High genetic diversity was observed within three local chicken populations. Highest genetic difference was observed between Gujuri and Kalua population (0.2230) followed by Gujuri and Hansli (0.199) and Kalua with Hansli (0.166). The pairwise mismatch distribution showed that all populations are of constant size over time. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the said three populations were close to the referred population of China, Sri Lanka, Indonesia and Japan than Aseel and Kadaknath (Indian native breeds). PMID:26162050

  18. Phylogeography of the Pacific Blueline Surgeonfish, Acanthurus nigroris, Reveals High Genetic Connectivity and a Cryptic Endemic Species in the Hawaiian Archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. DiBattista

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding genetic connectivity is fundamental to the design of marine protected areas in the service of ecosystem-scale management. Here we evaluate such trends for a Pacific surgeonfish (Acanthurus nigroris; N=544 at two spatial scales: (1 within the Hawaiian archipelago, and (2 across the entire species range from the central to southwest Pacific. The mtDNA cytochrome b data reveal genetic divergence (d=0.041 between Hawaii and the rest of the Pacific range indicating a cryptic species pair, with one taxon endemic to Hawaii. Johnston Atoll, 1400 km SW of Hawaii, also has the Hawaiian species but is distinct from most Hawaiian locations in population genetic comparisons, indicating the limits of gene flow for this widespread reef species. No consistent population genetic differences were observed among Hawaiian sites or among the other Pacific island sites. We also detected a modest bias in gene flow from the southeast towards the northwest islands of the Hawaiian Archipelago, indicating that the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument may be a recipient, rather than a source of propagules to replenish reef resources.

  19. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) revealing chemical variation during biofilm formation: from initial attachment to mature biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Yuanqing; Tong ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has recently been proved to be a promising technique for characterizing the chemical composition of the biofilm matrix. In the present study, to fully understand the chemical variations during biofilm formation, SERS based on silver colloidal nanoparticles was applied to evaluate the chemical components in the matrix of biofilm at different growth phases, including initial attached bacteria, colonies, and mature biofilm. Meanwhile, atomic force microsc...

  1. Genetic variability, differentiation, and founder effect in golden jackals (Canis aureus) from Serbia as revealed by mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachos, Frank E; Cirovic, Dusko; Kirschning, Julia; Otto, Marthe; Hartl, Günther B; Petersen, Britt; Honnen, Ann-Christin

    2009-04-01

    We analyzed 121 golden jackals (Canis aureus) from six sample sites in Serbia with regard to genetic variability and differentiation as revealed by mitochondrial control region sequences and eight nuclear microsatellite loci. There was no variation at all in the mtDNA sequences, and nuclear variability was very low (average observed and expected heterozygosity of 0.29 and 0.34, respectively). This is in line with the considerable recent range expansion of this species in the Balkans and indicates a strong founder effect in the recently established Serbian population. We did not find evidence of differentiation between the northeastern jackals and those from the plain of Srem or those in between. F-statistics and Bayesian Structure analyses, however, were indicative of a low degree of overall differentiation in the Serbian population. A vagrant Austrian jackal that was also analyzed was genetically indistinguishable from its Serbian conspecifics. PMID:19169806

  2. Genetic clustering of recent classical swine fever virus isolates from Karnataka, India revealed the emergence of subtype 2.2 replacing subtype 1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaraj, D B; Patil, S S; Rathnamma, D; Hemadri, D; Isloor, S; Geetha, S; Manjunathareddy, G B; Gajendragad, M R; Rahman, H

    2015-09-01

    The phylogenetic analysis of 11 CSFV isolates from Karnataka, India obtained during the year 2012-13 was undertaken to obtain the most reliable genetic typing of the CSFV isolates based on E2, NS5B and 5'UTR genomic regions. The study indicated that all the 11 CSFV isolates belonged to subgroup 2.2. The most reliable classification was obtained with sequence data from the NS5B region which separated all the isolates based on the history of outbreak and geographic origin. Analysis of full length E2 amino acid sequences revealed different genetic makeup of Indian 2.2 isolates compared to 2.2 isolates from different countries. The group 2.2 viruses are gradually spreading as confirmed by frequent detection/ isolation of group 2.2 viruses in the recent years and replacing the subgroup 1.1 viruses, which were hitherto predominantly involved in CSF outbreaks in India. PMID:26396984

  3. Morphological and genetic analyses reveal a cryptic species complex in the echinoid Echinocardium cordatum and rule out a stabilizing selection explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, E; David, B; Choné, T; Laurin, B; Féral, J P; Chenuil, A

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary analyses revealed the presence of at least five mitochondrial clades within the widespread sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Spatangoida). In this study, we analyzed the genetic (two mitochondrial and two nuclear sequence loci) and morphological characteristics (20 indices) from worldwide samples of this taxon to establish the species limits, morphological diversity and differentiation. Co-occurring spatangoid species were also analyzed with mitochondrial DNA. The nuclear sequences confirm that mitochondrial lineages correspond to true genetic entities and reveal that two clades (named A and B1) hybridize in their sympatry area, although a more closely related pair of clades (B1 and B2), whose distributions widely overlap, does not display hybridization. The morphology of all E. cordatum clade pairs was significantly differentiated, but no morphological diagnostic character was evidenced. By contrast, other spatangoid species pairs that diverged more recently than the E. cordatum clades display clear diagnostic characters. Morphological diversity thus appears responsible for the absence of diagnostic characters, ruling out stabilizing selection, a classical explanation for cryptic species. Alternative classical explanations are (i) environmental plasticity or (ii) a high diversity of genes determining morphology, maintained by varying environmental conditions. We suggest a new hypothesis that the observed morphological diversity is selectively neutral and reflects high effective population sizes in the E. cordatum complex. It is supported by the higher abundance of this taxon compared with other taxa, a trend for the genetic and morphological diversity to be correlated in Europe, and the higher genetic and morphological diversities found in clades of E cordatum (except B1) than in other spatangoid samples in Europe. However, the Pacific clades do not confirm these trends. PMID:26265259

  4. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid Ali Khan; Nafees Bacha; Bashir Ahmad; Ghosia Lutfullah; Umar Farooq; Russell John Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites. Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions. The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques, for example, homologous and heterologous expressions. This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites;also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  5. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid; Ali; Khan; Nafees; Bacha; Bashir; Ahmad; Ghosia; Lutfullah; Umar; Farooq; Russell; John; Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites.Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions.The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques,for example,homologous and heterologous expressions.This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites:also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  6. Genetic differentiation revealed by selective loci of drought-responding EST-SSRs between upland and lowland rice in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xia

    Full Text Available Upland and lowland rice (Oryza sativa L. represent two of the most important rice ecotypes adapted to ago-ecosystems with contrasting soil-water conditions. Upland rice, domesticated in the water-limited environment, contains valuable drought-resistant characters that can be used in water-saving breeding. Knowledge about the divergence between upland and lowland rice will provide valuable cues for the evolution of drought-resistance in rice. Genetic differentiation between upland and lowland rice was explored by 47 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs located in drought responding expressed sequence tags (ESTs among 377 rice landraces. The morphological traits of drought-resistance were evaluated in the field experiments. Different outlier loci were detected in the japonica and indica subspecies, respectively. Considerable genetic differentiation between upland and lowland rice on these outlier loci was estimated in japonica (Fst = 0.258 and indica (Fst = 0.127. Furthermore, populations of the upland and lowland ecotypes were clustered separately on these outlier loci. A significant correlation between genetic distance matrices and the dissimilarity matrices of drought-resistant traits was determined, indicating a certain relationship between the upland-lowland rice differentiation and the drought-resistance. Divergent selections occur between upland and lowland rice on the drought-resistance as the Qsts of some drought-resistant traits are significantly higher than the neutral Fst. In addition, the upland- and lowland-preferable alleles responded differently among ecotypes or allelic types under osmotic stress. This shows the evolutionary signature of drought resistance at the gene expression level. The findings of this study can strengthen our understanding of the evolution of drought-resistance in rice with significant implications in the improvement of rice drought-resistance.

  7. De novo assembly and characterization of the carrot transcriptome reveals novel genes, new markers, and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvienko Marta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among next generation sequence technologies, platforms such as Illumina and SOLiD produce short reads but with higher coverage and lower cost per sequenced nucleotide than 454 or Sanger. A challenge now is to develop efficient strategies to use short-read length platforms for de novo assembly and marker development. The scope of this study was to develop a de novo assembly of carrot ESTs from multiple genotypes using the Illumina platform, and to identify polymorphisms. Results A de novo assembly of transcriptome sequence from four genetic backgrounds produced 58,751 contigs and singletons. Over 50% of these assembled sequences were annotated allowing detection of transposable elements and new carrot anthocyanin genes. Presence of multiple genetic backgrounds in our assembly allowed the identification of 114 computationally polymorphic SSRs, and 20,058 SNPs at a depth of coverage of 20× or more. Polymorphisms were predominantly between inbred lines except for the cultivated x wild RIL pool which had high intra-sample polymorphism. About 90% and 88% of tested SSR and SNP primers amplified a product, of which 70% and 46%, respectively, were of the expected size. Out of verified SSR and SNP markers 84% and 82% were polymorphic. About 25% of SNPs genotyped were polymorphic in two diverse mapping populations. Conclusions This study confirmed the potential of short read platforms for de novo EST assembly and identification of genetic polymorphisms in carrot. In addition we produced the first large-scale transcriptome of carrot, a species lacking genomic resources.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals hidden genetic diversity in captive populations of the threatened American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, Paul; Ibáñez, Carolina; Viloria-Lagares, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Identification of units within species worthy of separate management consideration is an important area within conservation. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) surveys can potentially contribute to this by identifying phylogenetic and population structure below the species level. The American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) is broadly distributed throughout the Neotropics. Its numbers have been reduced severely with the species threatened throughout much of its distribution. In Colombia, the release of individuals from commercial captive populations has emerged as a possible conservation strategy that could contribute to species recovery. However, no studies have addressed levels of genetic differentiation or diversity within C. acutus in Colombia, thus complicating conservation and management decisions. Here, sequence variation was studied in mtDNA cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase I gene sequences in three Colombian captive populations of C. acutus. Two distinct lineages were identified: C. acutus-I, corresponding to haplotypes from Colombia and closely related Central American haplotypes; and C. acutus-II, corresponding to all remaining haplotypes from Colombia. Comparison with findings from other studies indicates the presence of a single "northern" lineage (corresponding to C. acutus-I) distributed from North America (southern Florida), through Central America and into northern South America. The absence of C. acutus-II haplotypes from North and Central America indicates that the C. acutus-II lineage probably represents a separate South American lineage. There appears to be sufficient divergence between lineages to suggest that they could represent two distinct evolutionary units. We suggest that this differentiation needs to be recognized for conservation purposes because it clearly contributes to the overall genetic diversity of the species. All Colombian captive populations included in this study contained a mixture of representatives of both lineages. As such

  9. Exome capture sequencing of adenoma reveals genetic alterations in multiple cellular pathways at the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donger Zhou

    Full Text Available Most of colorectal adenocarcinomas are believed to arise from adenomas, which are premalignant lesions. Sequencing the whole exome of the adenoma will help identifying molecular biomarkers that can predict the occurrence of adenocarcinoma more precisely and help understanding the molecular pathways underlying the initial stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. We performed the exome capture sequencing of the normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient and sequenced the identified mutations in additional 73 adenomas and 288 adenocarcinomas. Somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs were identified in both the adenoma and adenocarcinoma by comparing with the normal control from the same patient. We identified 12 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenoma and 42 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenocarcinoma. Most of these mutations including OR6X1, SLC15A3, KRTHB4, RBFOX1, LAMA3, CDH20, BIRC6, NMBR, GLCCI1, EFR3A, and FTHL17 were newly reported in colorectal adenomas. Functional annotation of these mutated genes showed that multiple cellular pathways including Wnt, cell adhesion and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis pathways were altered genetically in the adenoma and that the genetic alterations in the same pathways persist in the adenocarcinoma. CDH20 and LAMA3 were mutated in the adenoma while NRXN3 and COL4A6 were mutated in the adenocarcinoma from the same patient, suggesting for the first time that genetic alterations in the cell adhesion pathway occur as early as in the adenoma. Thus, the comparison of genomic mutations between adenoma and adenocarcinoma provides us a new insight into the molecular events governing the early step of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  10. Exome capture sequencing of adenoma reveals genetic alterations in multiple cellular pathways at the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donger; Yang, Liu; Zheng, Liangtao; Ge, Weiting; Li, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Xueda; Gao, Zhibo; Xu, Jinghong; Huang, Yanqin; Hu, Hanguang; Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Mingming; Yang, Huanming; Zheng, Lei; Zheng, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Most of colorectal adenocarcinomas are believed to arise from adenomas, which are premalignant lesions. Sequencing the whole exome of the adenoma will help identifying molecular biomarkers that can predict the occurrence of adenocarcinoma more precisely and help understanding the molecular pathways underlying the initial stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. We performed the exome capture sequencing of the normal mucosa, adenoma and adenocarcinoma tissues from the same patient and sequenced the identified mutations in additional 73 adenomas and 288 adenocarcinomas. Somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were identified in both the adenoma and adenocarcinoma by comparing with the normal control from the same patient. We identified 12 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenoma and 42 nonsynonymous somatic SNVs in the adenocarcinoma. Most of these mutations including OR6X1, SLC15A3, KRTHB4, RBFOX1, LAMA3, CDH20, BIRC6, NMBR, GLCCI1, EFR3A, and FTHL17 were newly reported in colorectal adenomas. Functional annotation of these mutated genes showed that multiple cellular pathways including Wnt, cell adhesion and ubiquitin mediated proteolysis pathways were altered genetically in the adenoma and that the genetic alterations in the same pathways persist in the adenocarcinoma. CDH20 and LAMA3 were mutated in the adenoma while NRXN3 and COL4A6 were mutated in the adenocarcinoma from the same patient, suggesting for the first time that genetic alterations in the cell adhesion pathway occur as early as in the adenoma. Thus, the comparison of genomic mutations between adenoma and adenocarcinoma provides us a new insight into the molecular events governing the early step of colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:23301059

  11. Environmental Mapping of Paracoccidioides spp. in Brazil Reveals New Clues into Genetic Diversity, Biogeography and Wild Host Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Thales Domingos; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Teixeira, Marcus de Melo; Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are the etiological agents of Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), and are easily isolated from human patients. However, due to human migration and a long latency period, clinical isolates do not reflect the spatial distribution of these pathogens. Molecular detection of P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii from soil, as well as their isolation from wild animals such as armadillos, are important for monitoring their environmental and geographical distribution. This study aimed to detect and, for the first time, evaluate the genetic diversity of P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii for Paracoccidioidomycosis in endemic and non-endemic areas of the environment, by using Nested PCR and in situ hybridization techniques. Methods/Principal Findings Aerosol (n = 16) and soil (n = 34) samples from armadillo burrows, as well as armadillos (n = 7) were collected in endemic and non-endemic areas of PCM in the Southeastern, Midwestern and Northern regions of Brazil. Both P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii were detected in soil (67.5%) and aerosols (81%) by PCR of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region (60%), and also by in situ hybridization (83%). Fungal isolation from armadillo tissues was not possible. Sequences from both species of P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii were detected in all regions. In addition, we identified genetic Paracoccidioides variants in soil and aerosol samples which have never been reported before in clinical or armadillo samples, suggesting greater genetic variability in the environment than in vertebrate hosts. Conclusions/Significance Data may reflect the actual occurrence of Paracoccidioides species in their saprobic habitat, despite their absence/non-detection in seven armadillos evaluated in regions with high prevalence of PCM infection by P. lutzii. These results may indicate a possible ecological difference between P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii concerning their wild hosts. PMID:27045486

  12. Segmental Polarity in Drosophila Melanogaster: Genetic Dissection of Fused in a Suppressor of Fused Background Reveals Interaction with Costal-2

    OpenAIRE

    Preat, T.; Therond, P.; Limbourg-Bouchon, B; Pham, A; H. Tricoire; Busson, D.; Lamour-Isnard, C.

    1993-01-01

    fused (fu) is a segment polarity gene that encodes a putative serine/threonine kinase. A complete suppressor of the embryonic and adult phenotypes of fu mutants, Suppressor of fused (Su(fu)), was previously described. The amorphic Su(fu) mutation is viable and displays no phenotype by itself. We have used this suppressor as a tool to perform a genetic dissection of the fu gene. Analysis of the interaction between Su(fu) and 33 fu alleles shows that they belong to three different classes. Defe...

  13. Evolution of Escherichia coli to 42 °C and Subsequent Genetic Engineering Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms and Novel Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Pedersen, Margit; LaCroix, Ryan A.;

    2014-01-01

    conditions allowed selection based on exponential-phase growth rate, yielding strains that uniformly converged toward a similar phenotype along distinct genetic paths. Adapted strains possessed as few as 6 and as many as 55 mutations, and of the 144 genes that mutated in total, 14 arose independently across...... general feature of ALE experiments. The widespread evolved expression shifts were enabled by a comparatively scant number of regulatory mutations, providing a net fitness benefit but causing suboptimal expression levels for certain genes, such as those governing flagellar formation, which then became...

  14. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  15. Chemical Genetics of Rapamycin-Insensitive TORC2 in S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph I. Kliegman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches for identifying synergistic targets use cell culture models to see if the combined effect of clinically available drugs is better than predicted by their individual efficacy. New techniques are needed to systematically and rationally identify targets and pathways that may be synergistic targets. Here, we created a tool to screen and identify molecular targets that may synergize with new inhibitors of target of rapamycin (TOR, a conserved protein that is a major integrator of cell proliferation signals in the nutrient-signaling pathway. Although clinical results from TOR complex 1 (TORC1-specific inhibition using rapamycin analogs have been disappointing, trials using inhibitors that also target TORC2 have been promising. To understand this increased therapeutic efficacy and to discover secondary targets for combination therapy, we engineered Tor2 in S. cerevisiae to accept an orthogonal inhibitor. We used this tool to create a chemical epistasis miniarray profile (ChE-MAP by measuring interactions between the chemically inhibited Tor2 kinase and a diverse library of deletion mutants. The ChE-MAP identified known TOR components and distinguished between TORC1- and TORC2-dependent functions. The results showed a TORC2-specific interaction with the pentose phosphate pathway, a previously unappreciated TORC2 function that suggests a role for the complex in balancing the high energy demand required for ribosome biogenesis.

  16. Genetic diversity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarti, Diny; Susilo, Agung W; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Ji, Kun; Motilal, Lambert A; Mischke, Sue; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia is the third largest cocoa-producing country in the world. Knowledge of genetic diversity and parentage of farmer selections is important for effective selection and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers' fields. We assessed genetic diversity and parentage of 53 farmer selections of cacao in Sulawesi, Indonesia, using 152 international clones as references. Cluster analysis, based on 15 microsatellite markers, showed that these Sulawesi farmer selections are mainly comprised of hybrids derived from Trinitario and two Upper Amazon Forastero groups. Bayesian assignment and likelihood-based parentage analysis further demonstrated that only a small number of germplasm groups, dominantly Trinitario and Parinari, contributed to these farmer selections, in spite of diverse parental clones having been used in the breeding program and seed gardens in Indonesia since the 1950s. The narrow parentage predicts a less durable host resistance to cacao diseases. Limited access of the farmers to diverse planting materials or the strong preference for large pods and large bean size by local farmers, may have affected the selection outcome. Diverse sources of resistance, harbored in different cacao germplasm groups, need to be effectively incorporated to broaden the on-farm diversity and ensure sustainable cacao production in Sulawesi. PMID:26719747

  17. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tia DiTommaso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP. A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1, while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1. The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  18. Differing courses of genetic evolution of Bradyrhizobium inoculants as revealed by long-term molecular tracing in Acacia mangium plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrineau, M M; Le Roux, C; Galiana, A; Faye, A; Duponnois, R; Goh, D; Prin, Y; Béna, G

    2014-09-01

    Introducing nitrogen-fixing bacteria as an inoculum in association with legume crops is a common practice in agriculture. However, the question of the evolution of these introduced microorganisms remains crucial, both in terms of microbial ecology and agronomy. We explored this question by analyzing the genetic and symbiotic evolution of two Bradyrhizobium strains inoculated on Acacia mangium in Malaysia and Senegal 15 and 5 years, respectively, after their introduction. Based on typing of several loci, we showed that these two strains, although closely related and originally sampled in Australia, evolved differently. One strain was recovered in soil with the same five loci as the original isolate, whereas the symbiotic cluster of the other strain was detected with no trace of the three housekeeping genes of the original inoculum. Moreover, the nitrogen fixation efficiency was variable among these isolates (either recombinant or not), with significantly high, low, or similar efficiencies compared to the two original strains and no significant difference between recombinant and nonrecombinant isolates. These data suggested that 15 years after their introduction, nitrogen-fixing bacteria remain in the soil but that closely related inoculant strains may not evolve in the same way, either genetically or symbiotically. In a context of increasing agronomical use of microbial inoculants (for biological control, nitrogen fixation, or plant growth promotion), this result feeds the debate on the consequences associated with such practices. PMID:25002434

  19. Increased sampling reveals novel lineages of Entamoeba: consequences of genetic diversity and host specificity for taxonomy and molecular detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensvold, C Rune; Lebbad, Marianne; Victory, Emma L; Verweij, Jaco J; Tannich, Egbert; Alfellani, Mohammed; Legarraga, Paulette; Clark, C Graham

    2011-07-01

    To expand the representation for phylogenetic analysis, ten additional complete Entamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained from humans, non-human primates, cattle and a tortoise. For some novel sequences no corresponding morphological data were available, and we suggest that these organisms should be referred to as ribosomal lineages (RL) rather than being assigned species names at present. To investigate genetic diversity and host specificity of selected Entamoeba species, a total of 91 new partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained, including 49 from Entamoeba coli, 18 from Entamoeba polecki, and 17 from Entamoeba hartmanni. We propose a new nomenclature for significant variants within established Entamoeba species. Based on current data we propose that the uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoeba infecting humans is called Entamoeba polecki and divided into four subtypes (ST1-ST4) and that Entamoeba coli is divided into two subtypes (ST1-ST2). New hosts for several species were detected and, while host specificity and genetic diversity of several species remain to be clarified, it is clear that previous reliance on cultivated material has given us a misleading and incomplete picture of variation within the genus Entamoeba. PMID:21295520

  20. Genetic interactions reveal that specific defects of chloroplast translation are associated with the suppression of var2-mediated leaf variegation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiayan; Zheng, Mengdi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Ruijuan; An, Lijun; Rodermel, Steve R; Yu, Fei

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development. PMID:23721655

  1. Genetic relationships and evolution in Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, squash, gourd) as revealed by simple sequence repeat polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Paris, Harry S; Nee, Michael H; Stift, Gertraud; Pachner, Martin; Vollmann, Johann; Lelley, Tamas

    2012-03-01

    Genetic relationships among 104 accessions of Cucurbita pepo were assessed from polymorphisms in 134 SSR (microsatellite) and four SCAR loci, yielding a total of 418 alleles, distributed among all 20 linkage groups. Genetic distance values were calculated, a dendrogram constructed, and principal coordinate analyses conducted. The results showed 100 of the accessions as distributed among three clusters representing each of the recognized subspecies, pepo, texana, and fraterna. The remaining four accessions, all having very small, round, striped fruits, assumed central positions between the two cultivated subspecies, pepo and texana, suggesting that they are relicts of undescribed wild ancestors of the two domesticated subspecies. In both, subsp. texana and subsp. pepo, accessions belonging to the same cultivar-group (fruit shape) associated with one another. Within subsp. pepo, accessions grown for their seeds or that are generalists, used for both seed and fruit consumption, assumed central positions. Specialized accessions, grown exclusively for consumption of their young fruits, or their mature fruit flesh, or seed oil extraction, tended to assume outlying positions, and the different specializations radiated outward from the center in different directions. Accessions of the longest-fruited cultivar-group, Cocozelle, radiated bidirectionally, indicating independent selection events for long fruits in subsp. pepo probably driven by a common desire to consume the young fruits. Among the accessions tested, there was no evidence for crossing between subspecies after domestication. PMID:22101929

  2. Genetic variation in the Solanaceae fruit bearing species lulo and tree tomato revealed by Conserved Ortholog (COSII markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Enciso-Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lulo or naranjilla (Solanum quitoense Lam. and the tree tomato or tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav. Sendt. are both Andean tropical fruit species with high nutritional value and the potential for becoming premium products in local and export markets. Herein, we present a report on the genetic characterization of 62 accessions of lulos (n = 32 and tree tomatoes (n = 30 through the use of PCR-based markers developed from single-copy conserved orthologous genes (COSII in other Solanaceae (Asterid species. We successfully PCR amplified a set of these markers for lulos (34 out of 46 initially tested and tree tomatoes (26 out of 41 for molecular studies. Six polymorphic COSII markers were found in lulo with a total of 47 alleles and five polymorphic markers in tree tomato with a total of 39 alleles in the two populations. Further genetic analyses indicated a high population structure (with F ST > 0.90, which may be a result of low migration between populations, adaptation to various niches and the number of markers evaluated. We propose COSII markers as sound tools for molecular studies, conservation and the breeding of these two fruit species.

  3. Nuclear markers reveal unexpected genetic variation and a Congolese-Nilotic origin of the Lake Victoria cichlid species flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehausen, Ole; Koetsier, Egbert; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Chapman, Lauren J; Chapman, Colin A; Knight, Mairi E; Turner, George F; van Alphen, Jacques J M; Bills, Roger

    2003-01-22

    Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial (mt) DNA have indicated that the cichlid species flock of the Lake Victoria region is derived from a single ancestral species found in East African rivers, closely related to the ancestor of the Lake Malawi cichlid species flock. The Lake Victoria flock contains ten times less mtDNA variation than the Lake Malawi radiation, consistent with current estimates of the ages of the lakes. We present results of a phylogenetic investigation using nuclear (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers and a wider coverage of riverine haplochromines. We demonstrate that the Lake Victoria-Edward flock is derived from the morphologically and ecologically diverse cichlid genus Thoracochromis from the Congo and Nile, rather than from the phenotypically conservative East African Astatotilapia. This implies that the ability to express much of the morphological diversity found in the species flock may by far pre-date the origin of the flock. Our data indicate that the nuclear diversity of the Lake Victoria-Edward species flock is similar to that of the Lake Malawi flock, indicating that the genetic diversity is considerably older than the 15 000 years that have passed since the lake began to refill. Most of this variation is manifested in trans-species polymorphisms, indicating very recent cladogenesis from a genetically very diverse founder stock. Our data do not confirm strict monophyly of either of the species flocks, but raise the possibility that these flocks have arisen from hybrid swarms. PMID:12590750

  4. Targeted high-throughput growth hormone 1 gene sequencing reveals high within-breed genetic diversity in South African goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, K T; Mdladla, K; Dzomba, E F; Muchadeyi, F C

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the genetic diversity in the growth hormone 1 gene (GH1) within and between South African goat breeds. Polymerase chain reaction-targeted gene amplification together with Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to generate the full length (2.54 kb) of the growth hormone 1 gene and screen for SNPs in the South African Boer (SAB) (n = 17), Tankwa (n = 15) and South African village (n = 35) goat populations. A range of 27-58 SNPs per population were observed. Mutations resulting in amino acid changes were observed at exons 2 and 5. Higher within-breed diversity of 97.37% was observed within the population category consisting of SA village ecotypes and the Tankwa goats. Highest pairwise FST values ranging from 0.148 to 0.356 were observed between the SAB and both the South African village and Tankwa feral goat populations. Phylogenetic analysis indicated nine genetic clusters, which reflected close relationships between the South African populations and the other international breeds with the exception of the Italian Sarda breeds. Results imply greater potential for within-population selection programs, particularly with SA village goats. PMID:26919178

  5. Genetic Interactions Reveal that Specific Defects of Chloroplast Translation are Associated with the Suppression of var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiayan Liu; Mengdi Zheng; Rui Wang; Ruijuan Wang; Lijun An; Steve R. Rodermel; Fei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development.

  6. Evaluation of the botanical origin of black cohosh products by genetic and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Kumeta, Yukie; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing sales of black cohosh (the dried rhizome and root of Cimicifuga racemosa L.) in the world herbal market, these products have continuous adulteration issues. The botanical authenticity of the black cohosh products is the first important step for ensuring their quality, safety and efficacy. In this study, we genetically identified the botanical sources of 10 black cohosh products and 5 Cimicifuga Rhizome crude drugs of Japanese Pharmacopoeia grade, and analyzed the metabolic profiling of 25 black cohosh products using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Consequently, we found that C. dahurica and possibly C. foetida are misused as sources of the black cohosh products and in some cases, the extracts of black cohosh were adulterated with the plant materials of C. dahurica. We demonstrated that these three species can be distinguished by three marker compounds in a specific mass range. These results must be helpful in establishing regulations for the safe use of the black cohosh products. PMID:24583864

  7. Synthetic chemical inducers and genetic decoupling enable orthogonal control of the rhaBAD promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Ciarán L; Liu, Zilei; Yoshihara, Akihide;

    2016-01-01

    External control of gene expression is crucial in synthetic biology and biotechnology research and applications, and is commonly achieved using inducible promoter systems. The E. coli rhamnose-inducible rhaBAD promoter has properties superior to more commonly-used inducible expression systems, but......BAD expression system revealed several promising inducers. These were characterised further to determine the strength, kinetics and concentration-dependence of induction; whether the inducer was used as a carbon source by E. coli; and the modality (distribution) of induction among populations of cells. L...

  8. An Improved Hybrid Genetic Algorithm for Chemical Plant Layout Optimization with Novel Non-overlapping and Toxic Gas Dispersion Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; WANG Zhenyu; ZHU Qunxiong

    2013-01-01

    New approaches for facility distribution in chemical plants are proposed including an improved non-overlapping constraint based on projection relationships of facilities and a novel toxic gas dispersion constraint.In consideration of the large number of variables in the plant layout model,our new method can significantly reduce the number of variables with their own projection relationships.Also,as toxic gas dispersion is a usual incident in a chemical plant,a simple approach to describe the gas leakage is proposed,which can clearly represent the constraints of potential emission source and sitting facilities.For solving the plant layout model,an improved genetic algorithm (GA) based on infeasible solution fix technique is proposed,which improves the globe search ability of GA.The case study and experiment show that a better layout plan can be obtained with our method,and the safety factors such as gas dispersion and minimum distances can be well handled in the solution.

  9. Changing blue fluorescent protein to green fluorescent protein using chemical RNA editing as a novel strategy in genetic restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Luyen T; Nguyen, Thanh T K; Alam, Shafiul; Sakamoto, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    Using the transition from cytosine of BFP (blue fluorescent protein) gene to uridine of GFP (green fluorescent protein) gene at position 199 as a model, we successfully controlled photochemical RNA editing to effect site-directed deamination of cytidine (C) to uridine (U). Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing 5'-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine ((CV) U) were used for reversible photoligation, and single-stranded 100-nt BFP DNA and in vitro-transcribed full-length BFP mRNA were the targets. Photo-cross-linking with the responsive ODNs was performed using UV (366 nm) irradiation, which was followed by heat treatment, and the cross-linked nucleotide was cleaved through photosplitting (UV, 312 nm). The products were analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and fluorescence measurements. Western blotting and fluorescence-analysis results revealed that in vitro-translated proteins were synthesized from mRNAs after site-directed RNA editing. We detected substantial amounts of the target-base-substituted fragment using RFLP and observed highly reproducible spectra of the transition-GFP signal using fluorescence spectroscopy, which indicated protein stability. ODNc restored approximately 10% of the C-to-U transition. Thus, we successfully used non-enzymatic site-directed deamination for genetic restoration in vitro. In the near future, in vivo studies that include cultured cells and model animals will be conducted to treat genetic disorders. PMID:26031895

  10. A genetic screen reveals Arabidopsis stomatal and/or apoplastic defenses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqing Zeng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of plants often begins with colonization of the plant surface, followed by entry into the plant through wounds and natural openings (such as stomata, multiplication in the intercellular space (apoplast of the infected tissues, and dissemination of bacteria to other plants. Historically, most studies assess bacterial infection based on final outcomes of disease and/or pathogen growth using whole infected tissues; few studies have genetically distinguished the contribution of different host cell types in response to an infection. The phytotoxin coronatine (COR is produced by several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. COR-deficient mutants of P. s. tomato (Pst DC3000 are severely compromised in virulence, especially when inoculated onto the plant surface. We report here a genetic screen to identify Arabidopsis mutants that could rescue the virulence of COR-deficient mutant bacteria. Among the susceptible to coronatine-deficient Pst DC3000 (scord mutants were two that were defective in stomatal closure response, two that were defective in apoplast defense, and four that were defective in both stomatal and apoplast defense. Isolation of these three classes of mutants suggests that stomatal and apoplastic defenses are integrated in plants, but are genetically separable, and that COR is important for Pst DC3000 to overcome both stomatal guard cell- and apoplastic mesophyll cell-based defenses. Of the six mutants defective in bacterium-triggered stomatal closure, three are defective in salicylic acid (SA-induced stomatal closure, but exhibit normal stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid (ABA, and scord7 is compromised in both SA- and ABA-induced stomatal closure. We have cloned SCORD3, which is required for salicylic acid (SA biosynthesis, and SCORD5, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein, AtGCN20/AtABCF3, predicted to be involved in stress-associated protein translation control. Identification of SCORD5 begins to

  11. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup analysis reveals no association between the common genetic lineages and prostate cancer in the Korean population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Kim

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variation has recently been suggested to have an association with various cancers, including prostate cancer risk, in human populations. Since mtDNA is haploid and lacks recombination, specific mutations in the mtDNA genome associated with human diseases arise and remain in particular genetic backgrounds referred to as haplogroups. To assess the possible contribution of mtDNA haplogroup-specific mutations to the occurrence of prostate cancer, we have therefore performed a population-based study of a prostate cancer cases and corresponding controls from the Korean population. No statistically significant difference in the distribution of mtDNA haplogroup frequencies was observed between the case and control groups of Koreans. Thus, our data imply that specific mtDNA mutations/lineages did not appear to have a significant effect on a predisposition to prostate cancer in the Korean population, although larger sample sizes are necessary to validate our results.

  12. The genetic origins of biosynthesis and light-responsive control of the chemical UV screen of land plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most land plants possess the capacity to protect themselves from UV light, and do so by producing pigments that absorb efficiently in the UV-A and UV-B regions of the spectrum while allowing transmission of nearly all photosynthetically useful wavelengths. These UV-absorbing pigments are mainly phenylpropanoids and flavonoids. This chapter summarizes current understanding of the mechanism of UV protection in higher land plants, evaluates the information available from lower land plants and their green-algal relatives, and then considers the possible evolutionary origins of this use of chemical filters for selectively screening UV light from solar radiation. It is proposed that photo control over the biosynthesis of UV-absorbing phenylpropanoids and flavonoids may have evolved in concert with the evolution of the high biosynthetic activity necessary for UV protection. The toxicity of phenylpropanoids and flavonoids has been postulated to have been a barrier to the evolution of an effective chemical UV screen, and that some means for sequestering these compounds and/or for controlling their synthesis probably evolved prior to, or in concert with, the evolution of high rates of biosynthesis. The original photoreceptor and signal transduction system is speculated to have been based on photo isomerization of a phenylpropanoid ester and a pre-existing product feedback mechanism for controlling phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Understanding the original mechanism for photo control of the chemical UV screen of land plants could be valuable for understanding the adaptability of extant land plants to rising levels of solar UV-B radiation and may suggest genetic strategies for engineering improved UV tolerance in crop plants. (author)

  13. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeesh Balan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy; and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004. This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004 and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05 cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency

  14. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency for MTLE

  15. Genetic Association Analysis of ATP Binding Cassette Protein Family Reveals a Novel Association of ABCB1 Genetic Variants with Epilepsy Risk, but Not with Drug-Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with

  16. A complex recombination pattern in the genome of allotetraploid Brassica napus as revealed by a high-density genetic map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqin Cai

    Full Text Available Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC, the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC. A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and simple sequence repeat (SSR markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus.

  17. Syntenic relationships among legumes revealed using a gene-based genetic linkage map of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Melody; Mamidi, Sujan; Lee, Rian; Chikara, Shireen; Rossi, Monica; Papa, Roberto; McClean, Phillip

    2010-10-01

    Molecular linkage maps are an important tool for gene discovery and cloning, crop improvement, further genetic studies, studies on diversity and evolutionary history, and cross-species comparisons. Linkage maps differ in both the type of marker and type of population used. In this study, gene-based markers were used for mapping in a recombinant inbred (RI) population of Phaseolus vulgaris L. P. vulgaris, common dry bean, is an important food source, economic product, and model organism for the legumes. Gene-based markers were developed that corresponded to genes controlling mutant phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, genes undergoing selection during domestication in maize, and genes that function in a biochemical pathway in A. thaliana. Sequence information, including introns and 3' UTR, was generated for over 550 genes in the two genotypes of P. vulgaris. Over 1,800 single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels were found, 300 of which were screened in the RI population. The resulting LOD 2.0 map is 1,545 cM in length and consists of 275 gene-based and previously mapped core markers. An additional 153 markers that mapped at LOD <1.0 were placed in genetic bins. By screening the parents of other mapping populations, it was determined that the markers were useful for other common Mesoamerican × Andean mapping populations. The location of the mapped genes relative to their homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana (At), Medicago truncatula (Mt), and Lotus japonicus (Lj) were determine by using a tblastx analysis with the current psedouchromosome builds for each of the species. While only short blocks of synteny were observed with At, large-scale macrosyntenic blocks were observed with Mt and Lj. By using Mt and Lj as bridging species, the syntenic relationship between the common bean and peanut was inferred. PMID:20607211

  18. Genome-wide mutagenesis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals novel genetic determinants and regulation mechanisms of biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyun Li

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac causes citrus canker disease, a major threat to citrus production worldwide. Accumulating evidence suggests that the formation of biofilms on citrus leaves plays an important role in the epiphytic survival of this pathogen prior to the development of canker disease. However, the process of Xac biofilm formation is poorly understood. Here, we report a genome-scale study of Xac biofilm formation in which we identified 92 genes, including 33 novel genes involved in biofilm formation and 7 previously characterized genes, colR, fhaB, fliC, galU, gumD, wxacO, and rbfC, known to be important for Xac biofilm formation. In addition, 52 other genes with defined or putative functions in biofilm formation were identified, even though they had not previously reported been to be associated with biofilm formation. The 92 genes were isolated from 292 biofilm-defective mutants following a screen of a transposon insertion library containing 22,000 Xac strain 306 mutants. Further analyses indicated that 16 of the novel genes are involved in the production of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS and/or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 7 genes are involved in signaling and regulatory pathways, and 5 genes have unknown roles in biofilm formation. Furthermore, two novel genes, XAC0482, encoding a haloacid dehalogenase-like phosphatase, and XAC0494 (designated as rbfS, encoding a two-component sensor protein, were confirmed to be biofilm-related genes through complementation assays. Our data demonstrate that the formation of mature biofilm requires EPS, LPS, both flagellum-dependent and flagellum-independent cell motility, secreted proteins and extracellular DNA. Additionally, multiple signaling pathways are involved in Xac biofilm formation. This work is the first report on a genome-wide scale of the genetic processes of biofilm formation in plant pathogenic bacteria. The report provides significant new information about the genetic

  19. Population genetics of two key mosquito vectors of Rift Valley Fever virus reveals new insights into the changing disease outbreak patterns in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Tchouassi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF outbreaks in Kenya have increased in frequency and range to include northeastern Kenya where viruses are increasingly being isolated from known (Aedes mcintoshi and newly-associated (Ae. ochraceus vectors. The factors contributing to these changing outbreak patterns are unclear and the population genetic structure of key vectors and/or specific virus-vector associations, in particular, are under-studied. By conducting mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analyses on >220 Kenyan specimens of Ae. mcintoshi and Ae. ochraceus, we uncovered high levels of vector complexity which may partly explain the disease outbreak pattern. Results indicate that Ae. mcintoshi consists of a species complex with one of the member species being unique to the newly-established RVF outbreak-prone northeastern region of Kenya, whereas Ae. ochraceus is a homogeneous population that appears to be undergoing expansion. Characterization of specimens from a RVF-prone site in Senegal, where Ae. ochraceus is a primary vector, revealed direct genetic links between the two Ae. ochraceus populations from both countries. Our data strongly suggest that unlike Ae. mcintoshi, Ae. ochraceus appears to be a relatively recent, single 'introduction' into Kenya. These results, together with increasing isolations from this vector, indicate that Ae. ochraceus will likely be of greater epidemiological importance in future RVF outbreaks in Kenya. Furthermore, the overall vector complexity calls into question the feasibility of mosquito population control approaches reliant on genetic modification.

  20. Development, cross-species/genera transferability of novel EST-SSR markers and their utility in revealing population structure and genetic diversity in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram K; Jena, Satya N; Khan, Suhail; Yadav, Sonia; Banarjee, Nandita; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Bhardwaj, Vasudha; Dattamajumder, Sanjay K; Kapur, Raman; Solomon, Sushil; Swapna, M; Srivastava, Sangeeta; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2013-07-25

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) with complex polyploid genome requires a large number of informative DNA markers for various applications in genetics and breeding. Despite the great advances in genomic technology, it is observed in several crop species, especially in sugarcane, the availability of molecular tools such as microsatellite markers are limited. Now-a-days EST-SSR markers are preferred to genomic SSR (gSSR) as they represent only the functional part of the genome, which can be easily associated with desired trait. The present study was taken up with a new set of 351 EST-SSRs developed from the 4085 non redundant EST sequences of two Indian sugarcane cultivars. Among these EST-SSRs, TNR containing motifs were predominant with a frequency of 51.6%. Thirty percent EST-SSRs showed homology with annotated protein. A high frequency of SSRs was found in the 5'UTR and in the ORF (about 27%) and a low frequency was observed in the 3'UTR (about 8%). Two hundred twenty-seven EST-SSRs were evaluated, in sugarcane, allied genera of sugarcane and cereals, and 134 of these have revealed polymorphism with a range of PIC value 0.12 to 0.99. The cross transferability rate ranged from 87.0% to 93.4% in Saccharum complex, 80.0% to 87.0% in allied genera, and 76.0% to 80.0% in cereals. Cloning and sequencing of EST-SSR size variant amplicons revealed that the variation in the number of repeat-units was the main source of EST-SSR fragment polymorphism. When 124 sugarcane accessions were analyzed for population structure using model-based approach, seven genetically distinct groups or admixtures thereof were observed in sugarcane. Results of principal coordinate analysis or UPGMA to evaluate genetic relationships delineated also the 124 accessions into seven groups. Thus, a high level of polymorphism adequate genetic diversity and population structure assayed with the EST-SSR markers not only suggested their utility in various applications in genetics and genomics in

  1. Development, cross-species/genera transferability of novel EST-SSR markers and their utility in revealing population structure and genetic diversity in sugarcane

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Ram K.

    2013-07-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid) with complex polyploid genome requires a large number of informative DNA markers for various applications in genetics and breeding. Despite the great advances in genomic technology, it is observed in several crop species, especially in sugarcane, the availability of molecular tools such as microsatellite markers are limited. Now-a-days EST-SSR markers are preferred to genomic SSR (gSSR) as they represent only the functional part of the genome, which can be easily associated with desired trait. The present study was taken up with a new set of 351 EST-SSRs developed from the 4085 non redundant EST sequences of two Indian sugarcane cultivars. Among these EST-SSRs, TNR containing motifs were predominant with a frequency of 51.6%. Thirty percent EST-SSRs showed homology with annotated protein. A high frequency of SSRs was found in the 5\\'UTR and in the ORF (about 27%) and a low frequency was observed in the 3\\'UTR (about 8%). Two hundred twenty-seven EST-SSRs were evaluated, in sugarcane, allied genera of sugarcane and cereals, and 134 of these have revealed polymorphism with a range of PIC value 0.12 to 0.99. The cross transferability rate ranged from 87.0% to 93.4% in Saccharum complex, 80.0% to 87.0% in allied genera, and 76.0% to 80.0% in cereals. Cloning and sequencing of EST-SSR size variant amplicons revealed that the variation in the number of repeat-units was the main source of EST-SSR fragment polymorphism. When 124 sugarcane accessions were analyzed for population structure using model-based approach, seven genetically distinct groups or admixtures thereof were observed in sugarcane. Results of principal coordinate analysis or UPGMA to evaluate genetic relationships delineated also the 124 accessions into seven groups. Thus, a high level of polymorphism adequate genetic diversity and population structure assayed with the EST-SSR markers not only suggested their utility in various applications in genetics and genomics in

  2. Genetic toxicity studies of organic chemicals found as contaminants in spacecraft cabin atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Joseph, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed during spaceflight to organic chemical contaminants in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Toxic exposures may cause lesions in the cellular DNA which are subsequently expressed as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE). Analysis of SCE is a sensitive short term assay techinque to detect and quantitate exposures to DNA damaging (mutagenic) substances. The increase in SCE incidence over baseline (control) levels is generally proportional to the concentration of the mutagen and to the duration of exposure. The BHK-21 baby hamster kidney cell line was the in vitro test system used. Test organics were added to the culture media for 18 hrs, in concentrations ranging from one to 20 ppm. Acetaldehyde and carbon disulfide were chosen for this study since they have occurred as atmospheric contaminants in many of the STS flights, and have been reported to have toxic and mutagenic effects in various test systems. Glutaraldehyde was chosen because few data are available on the mutagenicity of this common fixative, which is carried on STS flights for use in biological experiments. Acetaldehyde was a very strong inducer of SCE at concentrations of 2 ppm and above. Glutaraldehyde and carbon disulfide failed to induce SCE.

  3. The Rules of Aggression: How Genetic, Chemical and Spatial Factors Affect Intercolony Fights in a Dominant Species, the Mediterranean Acrobat Ant Crematogaster scutellaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Frizzi

    Full Text Available Nest-mate recognition plays a key role in the biology of ants. Although individuals coming from a foreign nest are, in most cases, promptly rejected, the degree of aggressiveness towards non nest-mates may be highly variable among species and relies on genetic, chemical and environmental factors. We analyzed intraspecific relationships among neighboring colonies of the dominant Mediterranean acrobat ant Crematogaster scutellaris integrating genetic, chemical and behavioral analyses. Colony structure, parental relationships between nests, cuticular hydrocarbons profiles (CHCs and aggressive behavior against non nest-mates were studied in 34 nests located in olive tree trunks. Bayesian clustering analysis of allelic variation at nine species-specific microsatellite DNA markers pooled nests into 14 distinct clusters, each representing a single colony, confirming a polydomous arrangement of nests in this species. A marked genetic separation among colonies was also detected, probably due to long distance dispersion of queens and males during nuptial flights. CHCs profiles varied significantly among colonies and between nests of the same colony. No relationship between CHCs profiles and genetic distances was detected. The level of aggressiveness between colonies was inversely related to chemical and spatial distance, suggesting a 'nasty neighbor' effect. Our findings also suggest that CHCs profiles in C. scutellaris may be linked to external environmental factors rather than genetic relationships.

  4. The Rules of Aggression: How Genetic, Chemical and Spatial Factors Affect Intercolony Fights in a Dominant Species, the Mediterranean Acrobat Ant Crematogaster scutellaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzi, Filippo; Ciofi, Claudio; Dapporto, Leonardo; Natali, Chiara; Chelazzi, Guido; Turillazzi, Stefano; Santini, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Nest-mate recognition plays a key role in the biology of ants. Although individuals coming from a foreign nest are, in most cases, promptly rejected, the degree of aggressiveness towards non nest-mates may be highly variable among species and relies on genetic, chemical and environmental factors. We analyzed intraspecific relationships among neighboring colonies of the dominant Mediterranean acrobat ant Crematogaster scutellaris integrating genetic, chemical and behavioral analyses. Colony structure, parental relationships between nests, cuticular hydrocarbons profiles (CHCs) and aggressive behavior against non nest-mates were studied in 34 nests located in olive tree trunks. Bayesian clustering analysis of allelic variation at nine species-specific microsatellite DNA markers pooled nests into 14 distinct clusters, each representing a single colony, confirming a polydomous arrangement of nests in this species. A marked genetic separation among colonies was also detected, probably due to long distance dispersion of queens and males during nuptial flights. CHCs profiles varied significantly among colonies and between nests of the same colony. No relationship between CHCs profiles and genetic distances was detected. The level of aggressiveness between colonies was inversely related to chemical and spatial distance, suggesting a 'nasty neighbor' effect. Our findings also suggest that CHCs profiles in C. scutellaris may be linked to external environmental factors rather than genetic relationships. PMID:26445245

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Variation Reveals a Sharp Genetic Break within the Distribution of the Blue Land Crab Cardisoma guanhumi in the Western Central Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosimere Xavier Amaral

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The blue land crab Cardisoma guanhumi is widely distributed throughout tropical and subtropical estuarine regions in the Western Central Atlantic (WCA. Patterns of population genetic structure and historical demographics of the species were assessed by mtDNA control region sequence analysis to examine the connectivity among five populations (n = 97 within the region for future conservation strategies and decision-making of fishery management. A total of 234 polymorphic nucleotides were revealed within the sequence region, which have defined 93 distinct haplotypes. No dominant mtDNA haplotypes were found but instead a distribution of a few low-frequency recurrent haplotypes with a large number of singletons. A NJ-tree and a median-joining haplotype network revealed two distinct clusters, corresponding to individuals from estuaries located along the Caribbean Sea and Brazilian waters, respectively. AMOVA and FST statistics supported the hypothesis that two main geographic regions exists. Phylogeographical discontinuity was further demonstrated by the Bayesian assignment analysis and a significant pattern of isolation-by-distance. Additionally, tests of neutral evolution and analysis of mismatch distribution indicate a complex demographic history in the WCA, which corresponds to bottleneck and subsequent population growth. Overall, a sharp genetic break between Caribbean and Brazilian populations raised concerns over the conservation status of the blue land crab.

  6. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroni, Paola [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Brini, Anna Teresa [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Arrigoni, Elena [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Girolamo, Laura de [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Niada, Stefania [Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Chirurgiche ed Odontoiatriche, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina, E-mail: a.desiderio@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  7. An in silico Approach Reveals Associations between Genetic and Epigenetic Factors within Regulatory Elements in B Cells from Primary Sjögren's Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsta, Orsia D; Le Dantec, Christelle; Charras, Amandine; Brooks, Wesley H; Arleevskaya, Marina I; Bordron, Anne; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics have highlighted several regions and candidate genes associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS), a systemic autoimmune epithelitis that combines exocrine gland dysfunctions, and focal lymphocytic infiltrations. In addition to genetic factors, it is now clear that epigenetic deregulations are present during SS and restricted to specific cell type subsets, such as lymphocytes and salivary gland epithelial cells. In this study, 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with 43 SS gene risk factors were selected from publicly available and peer reviewed literature for further in silico analysis. SS risk variant location was tested revealing a broad distribution in coding sequences (5.6%), intronic sequences (55.6%), upstream/downstream genic regions (30.5%), and intergenic regions (8.3%). Moreover, a significant enrichment of regulatory motifs (promoter, enhancer, insulator, DNAse peak, and expression quantitative trait loci) characterizes SS risk variants (94.4%). Next, screening SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r (2) ≥ 0.8 in Caucasians) revealed 645 new variants including 5 SNPs with missense mutations, and indicated an enrichment of transcriptionally active motifs according to the cell type (B cells > monocytes > T cells ≫ A549). Finally, we looked at SS risk variants for histone markers in B cells (GM12878), monocytes (CD14(+)) and epithelial cells (A548). Active histone markers were associated with SS risk variants at both promoters and enhancers in B cells, and within enhancers in monocytes. In conclusion and based on the obtained in silico results that need further confirmation, associations were observed between SS genetic risk factors and epigenetic factors and these associations predominate in B cells, such as those observed at the FAM167A-BLK locus. PMID:26379672

  8. The genome of an Encephalitozoon cuniculi type III strain reveals insights into the genetic diversity and mode of reproduction of a ubiquitous vertebrate pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, A; Moteshareie, H; Sak, B; Selman, M; Naor, A; Eyahpaise, M-È; Farinelli, L; Golshani, A; Kvac, M; Corradi, N

    2016-05-01

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a model microsporidian species with a mononucleate nucleus and a genome that has been extensively studied. To date, analyses of genome diversity have revealed the existence of four genotypes in E. cuniculi (EcI, II, III and IV). Genome sequences are available for EcI, II and III, and are all very divergent, possibly diploid and genetically homogeneous. The mechanisms that cause low genetic diversity in E. cuniculi (for example, selfing, inbreeding or a combination of both), as well as the degree of genetic variation in their natural populations, have been hard to assess because genome data have been so far gathered from laboratory-propagated strains. In this study, we aim to tackle this issue by analyzing the complete genome sequence of a natural strain of E. cuniculi isolated in 2013 from a steppe lemming. The strain belongs to the EcIII genotype and has been designated EcIII-L. The EcIII-L genome sequence harbors genomic features intermediate to known genomes of II and III lab strains, and we provide primers that differentiate the three E. cuniculi genotypes using a single PCR. Surprisingly, the EcIII-L genome is also highly homogeneous, harbors signatures of heterozygosity and also one strain-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that introduces a stop codon in a key meiosis gene, Spo11. Functional analyses using a heterologous system demonstrate that this SNP leads to a deficient meiosis in a model fungus. This indicates that EcIII-L meiotic machinery may be presently broken. Overall, our findings reveal previously unsuspected genome diversity in E. cuniculi, some of which appears to affect genes of primary importance for the biology of this pathogen. PMID:26837273

  9. An in silico approach reveals associations between genetic and epigenetic factors within regulatory elements in B cells from primary Sjögren’s syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsia D. Konsta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genetics have highlighted several regions and candidate genes associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS, a systemic autoimmune epithelitis that combines exocrine gland dysfunctions, and focal lymphocytic infiltrations. In addition to genetic factors, it is now clear that epigenetic deregulations are present during SS and restricted to specific cell type subsets such as lymphocytes and salivary gland epithelial cells. In this study, 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with 43 SS gene risk factors were selected from publicly available and peer reviewed literature for further in silico analysis. SS risk variant location was tested revealing a broad distribution in coding sequences (5.6%, intronic sequences (55.6%, upstream/downstream genic regions (30.5%, and intergenic regions (8.3%. Moreover, a significant enrichment of regulatory motifs (promoter, enhancer, insulator, DNAse peak and eQTL characterizes SS risk variants (94.4%. Next, screening SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 ≥ 0.8 in Caucasians revealed 645 new variants including 5 SNPs with missense mutations, and indicated an enrichment of transcriptionally active motifs according to the cell type (B cells > monocytes > T cells >> A549. Finally, we looked at SS risk variants for histone markers in B cells (GM12878, monocytes (CD14+ and epithelial cells (A548. Active histone markers were associated with SS risk variants at both promoters and enhancers in B cells, and within enhancers in monocytes. In conclusion and based on the obtained in silico results, that need further confirmation, associations were observed between SS genetic risk factors and epigenetic factors and these associations predominate in B cells such as those observed at the FAM167A-BLK locus.

  10. Gamete production patterns, ploidy, and population genetics reveal evolutionary significant units in hybrid water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruvost, Nicolas B M; Hoffmann, Alexandra; Reyer, Heinz-Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    The European water frog Pelophylax esculentus is a natural hybrid between P. lessonae (genotype LL) and P. ridibundus (RR). It reproduces through hybridogenesis, eliminating one parental genome from its germline and producing gametes containing the genome of the other parental species. According to previous studies, this elimination and transmission pattern is very diverse. In mixed populations, where only diploid hybrids (LR) live in sympatry and mate with one or both parental species, the excluded genome varies among regions, and the remaining genome is transmitted clonally to haploid gametes. In all-hybrid populations consisting of diploid (LR) and triploid (LLR and/or LRR) frogs, diploid individuals also produce gametes clonally (1n in males, 2n in females), whereas triploids eliminate the genome they have in single copy and produce haploid gametes containing the recombined other genome. However, here, too, regional differences seem to exist, and some triploids have been reported to produce diploid gametes. In order to systematically study such regional and genotype differences in gamete production, their potential origin, and their consequences for the breeding system, we sampled frogs from five populations in three European countries, performed crossing experiments, and investigated the genetic variation through microsatellite analysis. For four populations, one in Poland, two in Germany, and one in Slovakia, our results confirmed the elimination and transmission pattern described above. In one Slovakian population, however, we found a totally different pattern. Here, triploid males (LLR) produce sperm with a clonally transmitted diploid LL genome, rather than a haploid recombined L genome, and LR females clonally produce haploid R eggs, rather than diploid LR eggs. These differences among the populations in gamete production go along with differences in genomotype composition, breeding system (i.e., the way triploids are produced), and genetic variation

  11. Resolving the infection process reveals striking differences in the contribution of environment, genetics and phylogeny to host-parasite interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laforsch Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection processes consist of a sequence of steps, each critical for the interaction between host and parasite. Studies of host-parasite interactions rarely take into account the fact that different steps might be influenced by different factors and might, therefore, make different contributions to shaping coevolution. We designed a new method using the Daphnia magna - Pasteuria ramosa system, one of the rare examples where coevolution has been documented, in order to resolve the steps of the infection and analyse the factors that influence each of them. Results Using the transparent Daphnia hosts and fluorescently-labelled spores of the bacterium P. ramosa, we identified a sequence of infection steps: encounter between parasite and host; activation of parasite dormant spores; attachment of spores to the host; and parasite proliferation inside the host. The chances of encounter had been shown to depend on host genotype and environment. We tested the role of genetic and environmental factors in the newly described activation and attachment steps. Hosts of different genotypes, gender and species were all able to activate endospores of all parasite clones tested in different environments; suggesting that the activation cue is phylogenetically conserved. We next established that parasite attachment occurs onto the host oesophagus independently of host species, gender and environmental conditions. In contrast to spore activation, attachment depended strongly on the combination of host and parasite genotypes. Conclusions Our results show that different steps are influenced by different factors. Host-type-independent spore activation suggests that this step can be ruled out as a major factor in Daphnia-Pasteuria coevolution. On the other hand, we show that the attachment step is crucial for the pronounced genetic specificities of this system. We suggest that this one step can explain host population structure and could be a key

  12. First evidence of hybridization between golden jackal (Canis aureus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as revealed by genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galov, Ana; Fabbri, Elena; Caniglia, Romolo; Arbanasić, Haidi; Lapalombella, Silvana; Florijančić, Tihomir; Bošković, Ivica; Galaverni, Marco; Randi, Ettore

    2015-12-01

    Interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent in nature and numerous cases of hybridization between wild canids and domestic dogs have been recorded. However, hybrids between golden jackals (Canis aureus) and other canids have not been described before. In this study, we combined the use of biparental (15 autosomal microsatellites and three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci) and uniparental (mtDNA control region and a Y-linked Zfy intron) genetic markers to assess the admixed origin of three wild-living canids showing anomalous phenotypic traits. Results indicated that these canids were hybrids between golden jackals and domestic dogs. One of them was a backcross to jackal and another one was a backcross to dog, confirming that golden jackal-domestic dog hybrids are fertile. The uniparental markers showed that the direction of hybridization, namely females of the wild species hybridizing with male domestic dogs, was common to most cases of canid hybridization. A melanistic 3bp-deletion at the K locus (β-defensin CDB103 gene), that was absent in reference golden jackal samples, but was found in a backcross to jackal with anomalous black coat, suggested its introgression from dogs via hybridization. Moreover, we demonstrated that MHC sequences, although rarely used as markers of hybridization, can be also suitable for the identification of hybrids, as long as haplotypes are exclusive for the parental species. PMID:27019731

  13. First evidence of hybridization between golden jackal (Canis aureus) and domestic dog (Canis familiaris) as revealed by genetic markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Elena; Caniglia, Romolo; Arbanasić, Haidi; Lapalombella, Silvana; Florijančić, Tihomir; Bošković, Ivica; Galaverni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent in nature and numerous cases of hybridization between wild canids and domestic dogs have been recorded. However, hybrids between golden jackals (Canis aureus) and other canids have not been described before. In this study, we combined the use of biparental (15 autosomal microsatellites and three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci) and uniparental (mtDNA control region and a Y-linked Zfy intron) genetic markers to assess the admixed origin of three wild-living canids showing anomalous phenotypic traits. Results indicated that these canids were hybrids between golden jackals and domestic dogs. One of them was a backcross to jackal and another one was a backcross to dog, confirming that golden jackal–domestic dog hybrids are fertile. The uniparental markers showed that the direction of hybridization, namely females of the wild species hybridizing with male domestic dogs, was common to most cases of canid hybridization. A melanistic 3bp-deletion at the K locus (β-defensin CDB103 gene), that was absent in reference golden jackal samples, but was found in a backcross to jackal with anomalous black coat, suggested its introgression from dogs via hybridization. Moreover, we demonstrated that MHC sequences, although rarely used as markers of hybridization, can be also suitable for the identification of hybrids, as long as haplotypes are exclusive for the parental species. PMID:27019731

  14. Genetic diversity in potato field populations of Thanatephorus cucumeris AG-3, revealed by ITS polymorphism and RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justesen, Annemarie Fejer; Yohalem, David; Bay, Anne; Nicolaisen, Mogens

    2003-11-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to survey genetic variability in relation to agronomic and regional factors among 60 isolates of Thanatephorus cucumeris (anamorph Rhizoctonia solani) collected from lesions on potato stems or sclerotia of potato tubers. Based on comparative sequence analysis it was shown that all isolates belonged to anastomosis group 3 subgroup Potato Type (AG-3 PT). ITS1 sequence polymorphisms were found within 45 of the 60 isolates showing that different types of the ITS-region are present in individual isolates. Cloning and sequence analysis of the ITS1 region from three selected isolates with sequence polymorphism showed that two different ITS1-types were present in each isolate. RAPD analysis identified 51 RAPD-phenotypes among the 60 investigated isolates indicating a high level of diversity within the subgroup AG-3 PT. Putative clonal isolates with identical RAPD- and ITS1-types were identified within fields, and in one case the same phenotype was found in two different fields separated by several hundred kilometers. Population subdivision analysis based on phenotypic as well as genotypic diversities showed differentiation among populations from different fields when isolates were sampled from tubers, indicating restricted gene flow among soil populations. Low differentiation was seen among field populations sampled from stems, indicating that gene flow is taking place. The population structure was not influenced by the previous crop in the rotation nor by the two cultivars 'Sava' and 'Bintje'. PMID:15000234

  15. Expression profiling of a genetic animal model of depression reveals novel molecular pathways underlying depressive-like behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Blaveri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Flinders model is a validated genetic rat model of depression that exhibits a number of behavioural, neurochemical and pharmacological features consistent with those observed in human depression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have used genome-wide microarray expression profiling of the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex of Flinders Depression Sensitive (FSL and control Flinders Depression Resistant (FRL lines to understand molecular basis for the differences between the two lines. We profiled two independent cohorts of Flinders animals derived from the same colony six months apart, each cohort statistically powered to allow independent as well as combined analysis. Using this approach, we were able to validate using real-time-PCR a core set of gene expression differences that showed statistical significance in each of the temporally distinct cohorts, representing consistently maintained features of the model. Small but statistically significant increases were confirmed for cholinergic (chrm2, chrna7 and serotonergic receptors (Htr1a, Htr2a in FSL rats consistent with known neurochemical changes in the model. Much larger gene changes were validated in a number of novel genes as exemplified by TMEM176A, which showed 35-fold enrichment in the cortex and 30-fold enrichment in hippocampus of FRL animals relative to FSL. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide significant insights into the molecular differences underlying the Flinders model, and have potential relevance to broader depression research.

  16. Analysis of genetics and chemical contents relation compared to commonly used Cissus quadrangularis L. and barcode markers of some Thailand Cissus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudmoon, Runglawan; Chaveerach, Arunrat; Tanee, Tawatchai

    2016-01-01

    Several Cissus species are commonly used as traditional and modified medicines, and their chemical constituents are major point for precise usage. However, C. quadrangularis is the only species for which the usages and the chemical composition have been reported. These data should be investigated for other species in the genus. Eight species namely C. assamica, C. carnosa, C. elongata, C. hastata, C. javana, C. pteroclada, C. quadrangular is and C. repens were evaluated for genetic relationships and chemical composition. Constructed dendrogram shows high-powered efficiency of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) data used which can clearly identify different and identical species. Genetic similarity (S) value of the identical species is 0.86, whereas for different species the value can vary from 0.53 to 0.75. Four highly related species (S=0.64-0.72), C. assamica, C. carnosa, C. hastata and C. repens were selected to undergo chemical study by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the methanol crude extract. Only one compound, β-sitosterol, found in the four species is identical to the compound reported from C. quadrangular is, where there were five identical chemicals found in the selected species. Species-specific barcode with rbcL region was constructed. Nucleotide variation was evaluated indicating genetic distance value of 0.025 to 0.072. PMID:26826840

  17. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  18. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy reveals a convergence of the chemical composition in methanogenic archaea from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Paloma; Hermelink, Antje; Lasch, Peter; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; König, Nicole; Burckhardt, Oliver; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea are widespread anaerobic microorganisms responsible for the production of biogenic methane. Several new species of psychrotolerant methanogenic archaea were recently isolated from a permafrost-affected soil in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia), showing an exceptional resistance against desiccation, osmotic stress, low temperatures, starvation, UV and ionizing radiation when compared to methanogens from non-permafrost environments. To gain a deeper insight into the differences observed in their resistance, we described the chemical composition of methanogenic strains from permafrost and non-permafrost environments using confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM). CRM is a powerful tool for microbial identification and provides fingerprint-like information about the chemical composition of the cells. Our results show that the chemical composition of methanogens from permafrost-affected soils presents a high homology and is remarkably different from strains inhabiting non-permafrost environments. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the studied strains based on the functional gene mcrA to prove the different evolutionary relationship of the permafrost strains. We conclude that the permafrost methanogenic strains show a convergent chemical composition regardless of their genotype. This fact is likely to be the consequence of a complex adaptive process to the Siberian permafrost environment and might be the reason underlying their resistant nature. PMID:26499486

  19. Genome-wide sequencing reveals two major sub-lineages in the genetically monomorphic pathogen xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasukira, Arthur; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Aritua, Valente; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm) is the causal agent of banana Xanthomonas wilt (BXW). This disease has devastated economies based on banana and plantain crops (Musa species) in East Africa. Here we use genome-wide sequencing to discover a set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among East African isolates of Xcm. These SNPs have potential as molecular markers for phylogeographic studies of the epidemiology and spread of the pathogen. Our analysis reveals two major sub-lineages of the pathogen, suggesting that the current outbreaks of BXW on Musa species in the region may have more than one introductory event, perhaps from Ethiopia. Also, based on comparisons of genome-wide sequence data from multiple isolates of Xcm and multiple strains of X. vasicola pathovar vasculorum, we identify genes specific to Xcm that could be used to specifically detect Xcm by PCR-based methods. PMID:24704974

  20. The Chemical and Genetic Characteristics of Szechuan Pepper (Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum) Cultivars and Their Suitable Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Liu, Yue; Xie, Caixiang; Li, Xiwen; Yu, Yadong; Ye, Meng; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Szechuan peppers, famous for their unique sensation and flavor, are widely used as a food additive and traditional herbal medicine. Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum are both commonly recognized as Szechuan peppers, but they have different tastes and effects. The chemical components, genetic characteristics, and suitable habitat of six cultivars were analyzed in this study. The results indicated that Z. armatum contained a larger proportion of volatile oil, whereas Z. bungeanum produced a more non-volatile ether extraction. The average content of volatile oil and non-volatile ether extract of Z. armatum were 11.84 and 11.63%, respectively, and the average content of volatile oil and non-volatile ether extract of Z. bungeanum were 6.46 and 14.23%, respectively. Combined with an internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequence characters and chemical PCA results, six cultivars were classified into their own groups, for the two species in particular. The temperature in January and July were the most significant ecological factors influencing the contents of the Z. armatum volatile oil. However, annual precipitation, temperature in January and relevant humidity had a significant positive correlation with the content of non-volatile ether extract in Z. bungeanum. Thus, the most suitable areas for producing Z. bungeanum cultivars ranged from the Hengduan Mountains to the Ta-pa Mountains, and the regions suitable for Z. armatum cultivars were found to be in the Sichuan Basin and Dalou-Wu mountains. The predicted suitable habitat could be used as a preliminary test area for Szechuan pepper cultivar production. PMID:27148298

  1. Genetic introgression and hybridization in Antillean freshwater turtles (Trachemys) revealed by coalescent analyses of mitochondrial and cloned nuclear markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, James F; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Dijk, Peter Paul van; Wilson, Byron S; Marte, Cristian; Schettino, Lourdes Rodriguez; Brian Simison, W

    2013-04-01

    for the prehistoric translocation of T. stejnegeri between Puerto Rico and Hispaniola, as well as the more recent genetic pollution of native species by an invasive pet turtle native to the USA (T. scripta elegans). Finally, we test the impact of introgressed alleles using the multispecies coalescent in a Bayesian framework and show that studies that do not phase heterozygote sequences of hybrid individuals may recover the correct species tree, but overall support for clades that include hybrid individuals may be reduced. PMID:23353072

  2. Hsf1 activation inhibits rapamycin resistance and TOR signaling in yeast revealed by combined proteomic and genetic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sricharan Bandhakavi

    Full Text Available TOR kinases integrate environmental and nutritional signals to regulate cell growth in eukaryotic organisms. Here, we describe results from a study combining quantitative proteomics and comparative expression analysis in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae, to gain insights into TOR function and regulation. We profiled protein abundance changes under conditions of TOR inhibition by rapamycin treatment, and compared this data to existing expression information for corresponding gene products measured under a variety of conditions in yeast. Among proteins showing abundance changes upon rapamycin treatment, almost 90% of them demonstrated homodirectional (i.e., in similar direction transcriptomic changes under conditions of heat/oxidative stress. Because the known downstream responses regulated by Tor1/2 did not fully explain the extent of overlap between these two conditions, we tested for novel connections between the major regulators of heat/oxidative stress response and the TOR pathway. Specifically, we hypothesized that activation of regulator(s of heat/oxidative stress responses phenocopied TOR inhibition and sought to identify these putative TOR inhibitor(s. Among the stress regulators tested, we found that cells (hsf1-R206S, F256S and ssa1-3 ssa2-2 constitutively activated for heat shock transcription factor 1, Hsf1, inhibited rapamycin resistance. Further analysis of the hsf1-R206S, F256S allele revealed that these cells also displayed multiple phenotypes consistent with reduced TOR signaling. Among the multiple Hsf1 targets elevated in hsf1-R206S, F256S cells, deletion of PIR3 and YRO2 suppressed the TOR-regulated phenotypes. In contrast to our observations in cells activated for Hsf1, constitutive activation of other regulators of heat/oxidative stress responses, such as Msn2/4 and Hyr1, did not inhibit TOR signaling. Thus, we propose that activated Hsf1 inhibits rapamycin resistance and TOR signaling via elevated expression of specific

  3. Genetic relatedness of genus Oryza from Eastern Himalayan region as revealed by chloroplast matK gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Zodinpuii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationship was studied in wild and cultivated ric