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Sample records for chemical genetic approach

  1. Cellular biosensing: chemical and genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya

    2006-05-24

    Biosensors have been developed to determine the concentration of specific compounds in situ. They are already widely employed as a practical technology in the clinical and healthcare fields. Recently, another concept of biosensing has been receiving attention: biosensing for the evaluation of molecular potency. The development of this novel concept has been supported by the development of related technologies, as such as molecular design, molecular biology (genetic engineering) and cellular/tissular engineering. This review is addresses this new concept of biosensing and its application to the evaluation of the potency of chemicals in biological systems, in the field of cellular/tissular engineering. Cellular biosensing may provide information on both pharmaceutical and chemical safety, and on drug efficacy in vitro as a screening tool.

  2. Chemical genetics approaches for selective intervention in epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runcie, Andrew C; Chan, Kwok-Ho; Zengerle, Michael; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-08-01

    Chemical genetics is the use of biologically active small molecules (chemical probes) to investigate the functions of gene products, through the modulation of protein activity. Recent years have seen significant progress in the application of chemical genetics to study epigenetics, following the development of new chemical probes, a growing appreciation of the role of epigenetics in disease and a recognition of the need and utility of high-quality, cell-active chemical probes. In this review, we single out the bromodomain reader domains as a prime example of both the success, and challenges facing chemical genetics. The difficulty in generating single-target selectivity has long been a thorn in the side of chemical genetics, however, recent developments in advanced forms of chemical genetics promise to bypass this, and other, limitations. The 'bump-and-hole' approach has now been used to probe - for the first time - the BET bromodomain subfamily with single-target selectivity and may be applicable to other epigenetic domains. Meanwhile, PROTAC compounds have been shown to be significantly more efficacious than standard domain inhibitors, and have the potential to enhance target selectivity.

  3. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line; Drijfhout, Falko; Kronauer, Daniel;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14...... populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We evaluate the relative informative power of the three methodological approaches and estimate both the number...... of independent introduction events from a yet unknown native range somewhere in the Black Sea area, and the invasive potential of the existing introduced populations. RESULTS: Three clusters of genetically similar populations were detected, and all but one population had a similar chemical profile. Aggression...

  4. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: Integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Boomsma Jacobus J; Kronauer Daniel JC; Drijfhout Falko P; Ugelvig Line V; Pedersen Jes S; Cremer Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14 populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We eva...

  5. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: Integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14 populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We evaluate the relative informative power of the three methodological approaches and estimate both the number of independent introduction events from a yet unknown native range somewhere in the Black Sea area, and the invasive potential of the existing introduced populations. Results Three clusters of genetically similar populations were detected, and all but one population had a similar chemical profile. Aggression between populations could be predicted from their genetic and chemical distance, and two major clusters of non-aggressive groups of populations were found. However, populations of L. neglectus did not separate into clear supercolonial associations, as is typical for other invasive ants. Conclusion The three methodological approaches gave consistent and complementary results. All joint evidence supports the inference that the 14 introduced populations of L. neglectus in Europe likely arose from only very few independent introductions from the native range, and that new infestations were typically started through introductions from other invasive populations. This indicates that existing introduced populations have a very high invasive potential when the ants are inadvertently spread by human transport.

  6. A chemical genetics approach for specific differentiation of stem cells to somatic cells: a new promising therapeutical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachinidis, Agapios; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Seelig, Bianca; Berkessel, Albrecht; Hescheler, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy of severe degenerative diseases such as diabetes, myocardial infarction and Parkinson's disease through transplantation of somatic cells generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells is currently receiving considerable attention for the therapeutic applications. ES cells harvested from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the early embryo, can proliferate indefinitely in vitro while retaining the ability to differentiate into all somatic cells thereby providing an unlimited renewable source of somatic cells. In this context, identifying soluble factors, in particular chemically synthesized small molecules, and signal cascades involved in specific differentiation processes toward a defined tissue specific cell type are crucial for optimizing the generation of somatic cells in vitro for therapeutic approaches. However, experimental models are required allowing rapid and "easy-to-handle" parallel screening of chemical libraries to achieve this goal. Recently, the forward chemical genetic screening strategy has been postulated to screen small molecules in cellular systems for a specific desired phenotypic effect. The current review is focused on the progress of ES cell research in the context of the chemical genetics to identify small molecules promoting specific differentiation of ES cells to desired cell phenotype. Chemical genetics in the context of the cell ES-based cell replacement therapy remains a challenge for the near future for several scientific fields including chemistry, molecular biology, medicinal physics and robotic technologies.

  7. Chemical genetics and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sumitra; Zhang, Liyun; Mumm, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration involves interactions between multiple signaling pathways acting in a spatially and temporally complex manner. As signaling pathways are highly conserved, understanding how regeneration is controlled in animal models exhibiting robust regenerative capacities should aid efforts to stimulate repair in humans. One way to discover molecular regulators of regeneration is to alter gene/protein function and quantify effect(s) on the regenerative process: dedifferentiation/reprograming, stem/progenitor proliferation, migration/remodeling, progenitor cell differentiation and resolution. A powerful approach for applying this strategy to regenerative biology is chemical genetics, the use of small-molecule modulators of specific targets or signaling pathways. Here, we review advances that have been made using chemical genetics for hypothesis-focused and discovery-driven studies aimed at furthering understanding of how regeneration is controlled.

  8. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangjo [Bioinformatics Lab, Healthcare Group, SK Telecom, 9-1, Sunae-dong, Pundang-gu, Sungnam-si, Kyunggi-do 463-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minho [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyeshik [Department of Biological Science, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Miyoung [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corp., 8-11 Munpyeongseo-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Youn-Sig [Department of Applied Biology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hye-jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongsup [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Ook [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Inha University Hospital, 7-206 Sinheung-dong, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  9. Evaluating the impact of a fluoropolymer plant on a river macrobenthic community by a combined chemical, ecological and genetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Marianna; Marziali, Laura; Stefani, Fabrizio; Valsecchi, Sara; Bettinetti, Roberta; Mazzoni, Michela; Rosignoli, Federica; Polesello, Stefano

    2015-12-15

    Effect-based monitoring is a recommended approach suggested in European Guidelines to assess the response of ecosystem affected by a pollution source, considering the effects at community, population, individual but also at suborganism level. A combined chemical, ecological and genetic approach was applied in order to assess the impact of a fluoropolymer plant on the macrobenthic community of the Northern Italian river Bormida (Piedmont region). The macrobenthic community living downstream of the industrial discharge was chronically exposed to a mixture of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), with perfluorooctanoic acid as the main compound, at concentrations up to several μgL(-1). Ecological assessment proved that the downstream community was not substantially different from that living upstream of the pollution source. The impact on community is not quantifiable with the traditional monitoring methods used for ecological classification under European regulation because macrobenthic communities showed only slight differences in their structure. In order to highlight effects on genetic variability of the native population, a subcellular analysis by using the AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) genetic technique was applied to genotype of individuals of a selected species (Hydropsyche modesta, Trichoptera) collected in the two sampling sites. Percentage of variation between the two populations was 6.8%, a threshold compatible with a genetic drift induced in the downstream population. The genetic study carried out in field identified a significant divergence between exposed and non-exposed populations, but at present it is not possible to associate this divergence to a specific effect induced by PFAS.

  10. Meeting report of the EC/US workshop on genetic risk assessment: "human genetic risks from exposure to chemicals, focusing on the feasibility of a parallelogram approach".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, M D; Nolan, C

    1994-05-01

    This workshop was the concept of Professor Frits Sobels who passed away on the 6th of July 1993. The underlying idea of the Sobels' parallelogram approach is that an estimate (corrected by DNA-adduct dosimetry) of the genetic damage in human germ cells can be obtained by measuring a common endpoint in human and mouse somatic cells (such as gene mutation in lymphocytes) and in germ cells of mice, the desired target tissue inaccessible in humans. The main objective of the workshop was to identify the methodology, data requirements and mechanistic research to understand the human health impact of germ-cell mutagens. 4 chemicals were selected for review at the meeting: ethylene oxide, 1,3-butadiene, acrylamide and cyclophosphamide. The first 3 are important industrial chemicals with substantial use worldwide and, therefore, considerable potential human exposure. The 4th, cyclophosphamide, is a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This first EC/US workshop on risk assessment was highly focused on the feasibility of the parallelogram concept to estimate potential germ-cell effects in humans. It represented an evaluation of current knowledge and the identification of future research needs for a more precise assessment of human genetic risks from exposure to mutagenic chemicals.

  11. Chemical genetic approach identifies microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 1 as a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumova, Petranka; Reyniers, Lauran; Meyer, Marc; Lobbestael, Evy; Stauffer, Daniela; Gerrits, Bertran; Muller, Lionel; Hoving, Sjouke; Kaupmann, Klemens; Voshol, Johannes; Fabbro, Doriano; Bauer, Andreas; Rovelli, Giorgio; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant forms of Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 is a modular, multidomain protein containing 2 enzymatic domains, including a kinase domain, as well as several protein-protein interaction domains, pointing to a role in cellular signaling. Although enormous efforts have been made, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms of LRRK2 are still not completely known. In this study, we used a chemical genetics approach to identify LRRK2 substrates from mouse brain. This approach allows the identification of substrates of 1 particular kinase in a complex cellular environment. Several of the identified peptides are involved in the regulation of microtubule (MT) dynamics, including microtubule-associating protein (MAP)/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 1 (MARK1). MARK1 is a serine/threonine kinase known to phosphorylate MT-binding proteins such as Tau, MAP2, and MAP4 at KXGS motifs leading to MT destabilization. In vitro kinase assays and metabolic-labeling experiments in living cells confirmed MARK1 as an LRRK2 substrate. Moreover, we also showed that LRRK2 and MARK1 are interacting in eukaryotic cells. Our findings contribute to the identification of physiologic LRRK2 substrates and point to a potential mechanism explaining the reported effects of LRRK2 on neurite morphology.

  12. Improving the accuracy of low level quantum chemical calculation for absorption energies: the genetic algorithm and neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ting; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Shan-Shan; Li, Hui; Sun, Shi-Ling; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-07-07

    The combination of genetic algorithm and back-propagation neural network correction approaches (GABP) has successfully improved the calculation accuracy of absorption energies. In this paper, the absorption energies of 160 organic molecules are corrected to test this method. Firstly, the GABP1 is introduced to determine the quantitative relationship between the experimental results and calculations obtained by using quantum chemical methods. After GABP1 correction, the root-mean-square (RMS) deviations of the calculated absorption energies reduce from 0.32, 0.95 and 0.46 eV to 0.14, 0.19 and 0.18 eV for B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO methods, respectively. The corrected results of B3LYP/6-31G(d)-GABP1 are in good agreement with experimental results. Then, the GABP2 is introduced to determine the quantitative relationship between the results of B3LYP/6-31G(d)-GABP1 method and calculations of the low accuracy methods (B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO). After GABP2 correction, the RMS deviations of the calculated absorption energies reduce to 0.20 and 0.19 eV for B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO methods, respectively. The results show that the RMS deviations after GABP1 and GABP2 correction are similar for B3LYP/STO-3G and ZINDO methods. Thus, the B3LYP/6-31G(d)-GABP1 is a better method to predict absorption energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results where the experimental results are unknown or uncertain by experimental method. This method may be used for predicting absorption energies of larger organic molecules that are unavailable by experimental methods and by high-accuracy theoretical methods with larger basis sets. The performance of this method was demonstrated by application to the absorption energy of the aldehyde carbazole precursor.

  13. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eDebolt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBI have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A (CESA proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity.

  14. Genetic k-Means Clustering Approach for Mapping Human Vulnerability to Chemical Hazards in the Industrialized City: A Case Study of Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zeng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing human vulnerability to chemical hazards in the industrialized city is a matter of great urgency. Vulnerability mapping is an alternative approach for providing vulnerability-reducing interventions in a region. This study presents a method for mapping human vulnerability to chemical hazards by using clustering analysis for effective vulnerability reduction. Taking the city of Shanghai as the study area, we measure human exposure to chemical hazards by using the proximity model with additionally considering the toxicity of hazardous substances, and capture the sensitivity and coping capacity with corresponding indicators. We perform an improved k-means clustering approach on the basis of genetic algorithm by using a 500 m × 500 m geographical grid as basic spatial unit. The sum of squared errors and silhouette coefficient are combined to measure the quality of clustering and to determine the optimal clustering number. Clustering result reveals a set of six typical human vulnerability patterns that show distinct vulnerability dimension combinations. The vulnerability mapping of the study area reflects cluster-specific vulnerability characteristics and their spatial distribution. Finally, we suggest specific points that can provide new insights in rationally allocating the limited funds for the vulnerability reduction of each cluster.

  15. Suggested Involvement of PP1/PP2A Activity and De Novo Gene Expression in Anhydrobiotic Survival in a Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini, by Chemical Genetic Approach.

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    Koyuki Kondo

    Full Text Available Upon desiccation, some tardigrades enter an ametabolic dehydrated state called anhydrobiosis and can survive a desiccated environment in this state. For successful transition to anhydrobiosis, some anhydrobiotic tardigrades require pre-incubation under high humidity conditions, a process called preconditioning, prior to exposure to severe desiccation. Although tardigrades are thought to prepare for transition to anhydrobiosis during preconditioning, the molecular mechanisms governing such processes remain unknown. In this study, we used chemical genetic approaches to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of anhydrobiosis in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. We first demonstrated that inhibition of transcription or translation drastically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that de novo gene expression is required for successful transition to anhydrobiosis in this tardigrade. We then screened 81 chemicals and identified 5 chemicals that significantly impaired anhydrobiotic survival after severe desiccation, in contrast to little or no effect on survival after high humidity exposure only. In particular, cantharidic acid, a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase (PP 1 and PP2A, exhibited the most profound inhibitory effects. Another PP1/PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, also significantly and specifically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that PP1/PP2A activity plays an important role for anhydrobiosis in this species. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the required activities of signaling molecules for desiccation tolerance in tardigrades. The identified inhibitory chemicals could provide novel clues to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis in tardigrades.

  16. Suggested Involvement of PP1/PP2A Activity and De Novo Gene Expression in Anhydrobiotic Survival in a Tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini, by Chemical Genetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Koyuki; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Upon desiccation, some tardigrades enter an ametabolic dehydrated state called anhydrobiosis and can survive a desiccated environment in this state. For successful transition to anhydrobiosis, some anhydrobiotic tardigrades require pre-incubation under high humidity conditions, a process called preconditioning, prior to exposure to severe desiccation. Although tardigrades are thought to prepare for transition to anhydrobiosis during preconditioning, the molecular mechanisms governing such processes remain unknown. In this study, we used chemical genetic approaches to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of anhydrobiosis in the anhydrobiotic tardigrade, Hypsibius dujardini. We first demonstrated that inhibition of transcription or translation drastically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that de novo gene expression is required for successful transition to anhydrobiosis in this tardigrade. We then screened 81 chemicals and identified 5 chemicals that significantly impaired anhydrobiotic survival after severe desiccation, in contrast to little or no effect on survival after high humidity exposure only. In particular, cantharidic acid, a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase (PP) 1 and PP2A, exhibited the most profound inhibitory effects. Another PP1/PP2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, also significantly and specifically impaired anhydrobiotic survival, suggesting that PP1/PP2A activity plays an important role for anhydrobiosis in this species. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the required activities of signaling molecules for desiccation tolerance in tardigrades. The identified inhibitory chemicals could provide novel clues to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis in tardigrades.

  17. Structural and spectroscopic studies of water-alkaline earth ion micro clusters: an alternate approach using genetic algorithm in conjunction with quantum chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly Neogi, S.; Chaudhury, P.

    2014-08-01

    We present an approach of using a stochastic optimization technique namely genetic algorithm in association with quantum chemical methods to first elucidate structure and then infrared spectroscopy and thermochemistry of water-alkaline earth metal ion clusters. We show that an initial determination of structure using stochastic techniques and following it up with quantum chemical calculation can lead to much faster convergence to high quality structures for these systems. Infrared spectroscopic, thermochemical calculations and natural population analysis based charges on the central metal ions are done to further ascertain the correctness of the structures using our technique. We have done a comparative study with a pure density functional theory calculation and have shown that even for very poor starting guess geometries genetic algorithm in conjunction with density functional theory indeed converges to global structure while pure density functional theory can encounter problems in certain situations to arrive at global geometry. We have also discussed usefulness of Unimodal Normal distribution crossover for handling situation with real coded variables.

  18. A genetic engineering approach to genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, J S; Kazakov, V

    2001-01-01

    We present an extension to the standard genetic algorithm (GA), which is based on concepts of genetic engineering. The motivation is to discover useful and harmful genetic materials and then execute an evolutionary process in such a way that the population becomes increasingly composed of useful genetic material and increasingly free of the harmful genetic material. Compared to the standard GA, it provides some computational advantages as well as a tool for automatic generation of hierarchical genetic representations specifically tailored to suit certain classes of problems.

  19. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Reverse Genetic Approaches in Zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Huang; Zuoyan Zhu; Shuo Lin; Bo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a well-established vertebrate animal model.A comprehensive collection of reverse genetics tools has been developed for studying gene function in this useful organism.Morpholino is the most widely used reagent to knock down target gene expression post-transcriptionally.For a long time,targeted genome modification has been heavily relied on large-scale traditional forward genetic screens,such as ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis derived TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes)strategy and pseudo-typed retrovirus mediated insertional mutagenesis.Recently,engineered endonucleases,including ZFNs (zinc finger nucleases) and TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases),provide new and efficient strategies to directly generate sitespecific indel mutations by inducing double strand breaks in target genes.Here we summarize the major reverse genetic approaches for loss-of-function studies used and emerging in zebrafish,including strategies based on genome-wide mutagenesis and methods for sitespecific gene targeting.Future directions and expectations will also be discussed.

  1. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis as a Tool for Chemical Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lenci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical genetics is an approach for identifying small molecules with the ability to induce a biological phenotype or to interact with a particular gene product, and it is an emerging tool for lead generation in drug discovery. Accordingly, there is a need for efficient and versatile synthetic processes capable of generating complex and diverse molecular libraries, and Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS of small molecules is the concept of choice to give access to new chemotypes with high chemical diversity. In this review, the combination of chemical genetics and diversity-oriented synthesis to identify new chemotypes as hit compounds in chemical biology and drug discovery is reported, giving an overview of basic concepts and selected case studies.

  2. Rapid Identification of Chemical Genetic Interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, David; Nelson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mode of action of bioactive chemicals is of interest to a broad range of academic, pharmaceutical, and industrial scientists. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or budding yeast, is a model eukaryote for which a complete collection of ~6,000 gene deletion mutants and hypomorphic essential gene mutants are commercially available. These collections of mutants can be used to systematically detect chemical-gene interactions, i.e. genes necessary to tolerate a chemical. This information, in turn, reports on the likely mode of action of the compound. Here we describe a protocol for the rapid identification of chemical-genetic interactions in budding yeast. We demonstrate the method using the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has a well-defined mechanism of action. Our results show that the nuclear TRAMP RNA exosome and DNA repair enzymes are needed for proliferation in the presence of 5-FU, which is consistent with previous microarray based bar-coding chemical genetic approaches and the knowledge that 5-FU adversely affects both RNA and DNA metabolism. The required validation protocols of these high-throughput screens are also described. PMID:25867090

  3. Genome-wide genetic screening with chemically mutagenized haploid embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Forment, Josep V.; Herzog, Mareike; Coates, Julia; Konopka, Tomasz; Gapp, Bianca V.; Nijman, Sebastian M.; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas M.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. In model organisms, classical genetic screening via random mutagenesis provides key insights into the molecular bases of genetic interactions, helping to define synthetic lethality, synthetic viability and drug-resistance mechanisms. The limited genetic tractability of diploid mammalian cells, however, precludes this approach. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of classical genetic screening in mammalian systems by using haploid cells, chemical mut...

  4. Engineering and Functional Analysis of Mitotic Kinases Through Chemical Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew J K; Jallepalli, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, multiple protein kinases transform the cytoskeleton and chromosomes into new and highly dynamic structures that mediate the faithful transmission of genetic information and cell division. However, the large number and strong conservation of mammalian kinases in general pose significant obstacles to interrogating them with small molecules, due to the difficulty in identifying and validating those which are truly selective. To overcome this problem, a steric complementation strategy has been developed, in which a bulky "gatekeeper" residue within the active site of the kinase of interest is replaced with a smaller amino acid, such as glycine or alanine. The enlarged catalytic pocket can then be targeted in an allele-specific manner with bulky purine analogs. This strategy provides a general framework for dissecting kinase function with high selectivity, rapid kinetics, and reversibility. In this chapter we discuss the principles and techniques needed to implement this chemical genetic approach in mammalian cells.

  5. [Incest--forensic genetic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents intimate relationships between biologically and legally close relatives, complicated in the social, culture and religion perspective. (art. 201 of the Penal Code), but it chiefly addresses problems associated with giving opinion on the fatherhood towards the incestuous child. The report calls for a broader interest in this issue from expert witnesses in forensic genetics, as well as encourages them to publish examples taken from their own professional experience that may unquestionably be helpful to other practitioners in this field and above all will lead to extending educational methods related to widely understood DNA analysis in giving an opinion on arguable fatherhood.

  6. The calculus a genetic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Toeplitz, Otto

    2007-01-01

    When first published posthumously in 1963, this book presented a radically different approach to the teaching of calculus.  In sharp contrast to the methods of his time, Otto Toeplitz did not teach calculus as a static system of techniques and facts to be memorized. Instead, he drew on his knowledge of the history of mathematics and presented calculus as an organic evolution of ideas beginning with the discoveries of Greek scholars, such as Archimedes, Pythagoras, and Euclid, and developing through the centuries in the work of Kepler, Galileo, Fermat, Newton, and Leibniz. Through this unique a

  7. Chemical Genetics — A Versatile Method to Combine Science and Higher Level Teaching in Molecular Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Sandrock

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation is a key event in many cellular processes like cell cycle, transformation of environmental signals to transcriptional activation or polar growth. The chemical genetics approach can be used to analyse the effect of highly specific inhibition in vivo and is a promising method to screen for kinase targets. We have used this approach to study the role of the germinal centre kinase Don3 during the cell division in the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis. Due to the easy determination of the don3 phenotype we have chosen this approach for a genetic course for M.Sc. students and for IMPRS (International Max-Planck research school students. According to the principle of “problem-based learning” the aim of this two-week course is to transfer knowledge about the broad spectrum of kinases to the students and that the students acquire the ability to design their own analog-sensitive kinase of interest. In addition to these training goals, we benefit from these annual courses the synthesis of basic constructs for genetic modification of several kinases in our model system U. maydis.

  8. Genetic Algorithm Approaches for Actuator Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, William A.

    2000-01-01

    This research investigated genetic algorithm approaches for smart actuator placement to provide aircraft maneuverability without requiring hinged flaps or other control surfaces. The effort supported goals of the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization focus efforts in NASA's Aircraft au program. This work helped to properly identify various aspects of the genetic algorithm operators and parameters that allow for placement of discrete control actuators/effectors. An improved problem definition, including better definition of the objective function and constraints, resulted from this research effort. The work conducted for this research used a geometrically simple wing model; however, an increasing number of potential actuator placement locations were incorporated to illustrate the ability of the GA to determine promising actuator placement arrangements. This effort's major result is a useful genetic algorithm-based approach to assist in the discrete actuator/effector placement problem.

  9. New Approaches to Establish Genetic Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M.; George, Alfred L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular medicine has evolved rapidly in the era of genomics with many diseases having primary genetic origins becoming the subject of intense investigation. The resulting avalanche of information on the molecular causes of these disorders has prompted a revolution in our understanding of disease mechanisms and provided new avenues for diagnoses. At the heart of this revolution is the need to correctly classify genetic variants discovered during the course of research or reported from clinical genetic testing. This review will address current concepts related to establishing the cause and effect relationship between genomic variants and heart diseases. A survey of general approaches used for functional annotation of variants will also be presented. PMID:25864169

  10. Reverse Genetics Approaches to Control Arenavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Several arenavirus cause hemorrhagic fever disease in humans and pose a significant public health problem in their endemic regions. To date, no licensed vaccines are available to combat human arenavirus infections, and anti-arenaviral drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. The development of arenavirus reverse genetics approaches provides investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the investigation of the arenavirus molecular and cell biology. The use of cell-based minigenome systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in arenavirus replication and transcription and the identification of novel anti-arenaviral drug targets without requiring the use of live forms of arenaviruses. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious arenaviruses entirely from cloned cDNAs containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis, as well as to facilitate screens to identify anti-arenaviral drugs and development of novel live-attenuated arenavirus vaccines. Recently, reverse genetics have also allowed the generation of tri-segmented arenaviruses expressing foreign genes, facilitating virus detection and opening the possibility of implementing live-attenuated arenavirus-based vaccine vector approaches. Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious, reporter-expressing, arenaviruses has provided a new experimental method to study some aspects of the biology of highly pathogenic arenaviruses without the requirement of high-security biocontainment required to study HF-causing arenaviruses. In this chapter we summarize the current knowledge on arenavirus reverse genetics and the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques for the development of arenavirus vaccines and vaccine vectors.

  11. Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors in Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Ronald N.; Moore, David D.; Willson, Timothy M.; Guy, R. Kip

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) sponsored a workshop, “Chemical Approaches to Nuclear Receptors and Metabolism,” in April 2009 to explore how chemical and molecular biology and physiology can be exploited to further our understanding of nuclear receptor structure, function, and role in disease. Signaling cascades involving nuclear receptors are more complex and interrelated than once thought. Nuclear receptors continue to be attractive targets for drug discovery. The overall goal of this workshop was to identify gaps in our understanding of the complexity of ligand activities and begin to address them by (i) increasing the collaboration of investigators from different disciplines, (ii) developing a better understanding of chemical modulation of nuclear receptor action, and (iii) identifying opportunities and roadblocks in the path of translating basic research to discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:19654413

  12. Engineering electrical properties of graphene: chemical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Yuna; Novoselov, Konstantin; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-12-01

    To ensure the high performance of graphene-based devices, it is necessary to engineer the electrical properties of graphene with enhanced conductivity, controlled work function, opened or closed bandgaps, etc. This can be performed by various non-covalent chemical approaches, including molecular adsorption, substrate-induced doping, polymerization on graphene, deposition of metallic thin films or nanoparticles, etc. In addition, covalent approaches such as the substitution of carbon atoms with boron or nitrogen and the functionalization with hydrogen or fluorine are useful to tune the bandgaps more efficiently, with better uniformity and stability. In this review, representative examples of chemically engineered graphene and its device applications will be reviewed, and remaining challenges will be discussed.

  13. Chemical Genetics of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyu Zu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical genetic studies on acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs, rate-limiting enzymes in long chain fatty acid biosynthesis, have greatly advanced the understanding of their biochemistry and molecular biology and promoted the use of ACCs as targets for herbicides in agriculture and for development of drugs for diabetes, obesity and cancers. In mammals, ACCs have both biotin carboxylase (BC and carboxyltransferase (CT activity, catalyzing carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. Several classes of small chemicals modulate ACC activity, including cellular metabolites, natural compounds, and chemically synthesized products. This article reviews chemical genetic studies of ACCs and the use of ACCs for targeted therapy of cancers.

  14. Genetic Algorithm Approaches to Prebiobiotic Chemistry Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohn, Jason; Colombano, Silvano

    1997-01-01

    We model an artificial chemistry comprised of interacting polymers by specifying two initial conditions: a distribution of polymers and a fixed set of reversible catalytic reactions. A genetic algorithm is used to find a set of reactions that exhibit a desired dynamical behavior. Such a technique is useful because it allows an investigator to determine whether a specific pattern of dynamics can be produced, and if it can, the reaction network found can be then analyzed. We present our results in the context of studying simplified chemical dynamics in theorized protocells - hypothesized precursors of the first living organisms. Our results show that given a small sample of plausible protocell reaction dynamics, catalytic reaction sets can be found. We present cases where this is not possible and also analyze the evolved reaction sets.

  15. Genetic and chemical diversity of high mucilaginous plants of Sida complex by ISSR markers and chemical fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thul, Sanjog T; Srivastava, Ankit K; Singh, Subhash C; Shanker, Karuna

    2011-09-01

    A method was developed based on multiple approaches wherein DNA and chemical analysis was carried out toward differentiation of important species of Sida complex that is being used for commercial preparation. Isolated DNA samples were successfully performed through PCR amplification using ISSR markers and degree of genetic diversity among the different species of Sida is compared with that of chemical diversity. For genetic fingerprint investigation, selected 10 ISSR primers generating reproducible banding patterns were used. Among the total of 63 amplicons, 62 were recorded as polymorphic, genetic similarity index deduced from ISSR profiles ranged from 12 to 51%. Based on similarity index, S. acuta and S. rhombifolia found to be most similar (51%). High number of species-specific bands played pivotal role to delineate species at genetic level. Investigation based on HPTLC fingerprints analysis revealed 23 bands representing to characteristic chemicals and similarity index ranged from 73 to 91%. Prominent distinguishable bands were observed only in S. acuta, while S. cordifolia and S. rhombifolia shared most bands making them difficult to identify on chemical fingerprint basis. This report summarizes the genotypic and chemotypic diversity and the use of profiles for authentication of species of Sida complex.

  16. Chemical characteristics and volatile profile of genetically modified peanut cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ee Chin; Dunford, Nurhan T; Chenault, Kelly

    2008-10-01

    Genetic engineering has been used to modify peanut cultivars for improving agronomic performance and pest resistance. Food products developed through genetic engineering have to be assessed for their safety before approval for human consumption. Preservation of desirable chemical, flavor and aroma attributes of the peanut cultivars during the genetic modifications is critical for acceptance of genetically modified peanuts (GMP) by the food industry. Hence, the main objective of this study is to examine chemical characteristics and volatile profile of GMP. The genetically modified peanut cultivars, 188, 540 and 654 were obtained from the USDA-ARS in Stillwater, Oklahoma. The peanut variety Okrun was examined as a control. The volatile analysis was performed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) equipped with an olfactory detector. The peanut samples were also analyzed for their moisture, ash, protein, sugar and oil compositions. Experimental results showed that the variations in nutritional composition of peanut lines examined in this study were within the values reported for existing cultivars. There were minor differences in volatile profile among the samples. The implication of this study is significant, since it shows that peanut cultivars with greater pest and fungal resistance were successfully developed without major changes in their chemical characteristics.

  17. We see the light: chemical-genetic protein regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Steven A; Zeituni, Erin M

    2012-03-23

    The challenge of studying complex protein networks in whole animals has driven the development of new methods for manipulating protein function with spatial and temporal precision. A novel combination of chemical and genetic protein regulation (Rodriguez and Wolfgang, in this issue of Chemistry & Biology) achieves levels of control that will revolutionize the study of protein function.

  18. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Linneberg, Allan; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch;

    2010-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterised by adverse effects due to exposure to low levels of chemical substances. Various genes, especially genes of importance to the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, have been associated with MCS, but findings are inconsistent. The purpose of this ...... examined are of less importance to MCS than previously reported or that gene-environment interactions or significant degrees of genetic heterogeneity in MCS underlie inconsistent findings in the literature....... of this study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding...... compared in post hoc analyses with all individuals from the population sample (p=0.02). Genetic variants in paraoxonase 1 and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase were not associated with MSC or with self-reported chemical sensitivity in the population sample. Our results suggest that variants in the genes...

  19. Chemical approaches to studying stem cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenlin Li; Kai Jiang; Wanguo Wei; Yan Shi; Sheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells,including both pluripotent stem cells and multipotent somatic stem cells,hold great potential for interrogating the mechanisms of tissue development,homeostasis and pathology,and for treating numerous devastating diseases.Establishment of in vitro platforms to faithfully maintain and precisely manipulate stem cell fates is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology,and to translate stem cells into regenerative medicine.Chemical approaches have recently provided a number of small molecules that can be used to control cell selfrenewal,lineage differentiation,reprogramming and regeneration.These chemical modulators have been proven to be versatile tools for probing stem cell biology and manipulating cell fates toward desired outcomes.Ultimately,this strategy is promising to be a new frontier for drug development aimed at endogenous stem cell modulation.

  20. A novel mating approach for genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Severino F; Mengshoel, Ole J; Pinter, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Genetic algorithms typically use crossover, which relies on mating a set of selected parents. As part of crossover, random mating is often carried out. A novel approach to parent mating is presented in this work. Our novel approach can be applied in combination with a traditional similarity-based criterion to measure distance between individuals or with a fitness-based criterion. We introduce a parameter called the mating index that allows different mating strategies to be developed within a uniform framework: an exploitative strategy called best-first, an explorative strategy called best-last, and an adaptive strategy called self-adaptive. Self-adaptive mating is defined in the context of the novel algorithm, and aims to achieve a balance between exploitation and exploration in a domain-independent manner. The present work formally defines the novel mating approach, analyzes its behavior, and conducts an extensive experimental study to quantitatively determine its benefits. In the domain of real function optimization, the experiments show that, as the degree of multimodality of the function at hand grows, increasing the mating index improves performance. In the case of the self-adaptive mating strategy, the experiments give strong results for several case studies.

  1. Approaches to measuring entanglement in chemical magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiersch, M; Guerreschi, G G; Clausen, J; Briegel, H J

    2014-01-01

    Chemical magnetometers are radical pair systems such as solutions of pyrene and N,N-dimethylaniline (Py-DMA) that show magnetic field effects in their spin dynamics and their fluorescence. We investigate the existence and decay of quantum entanglement in free geminate Py-DMA radical pairs and discuss how entanglement can be assessed in these systems. We provide an entanglement witness and propose possible observables for experimentally estimating entanglement in radical pair systems with isotropic hyperfine couplings. As an application, we analyze how the field dependence of the entanglement lifetime in Py-DMA could in principle be used for magnetometry and illustrate the propagation of measurement errors in this approach.

  2. Genetic engineering and chemical conjugation of potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karin L; Uhde-Holzem, Kerstin; Fischer, Rainer; Commandeur, Ulrich; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the genetic engineering and chemical modification of potato virus X (PVX) for the presentation of various peptides, proteins, and fluorescent dyes, or other chemical modifiers. Three different ways of genetic engineering are described and by these means, peptides are successfully expressed not only when the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A sequence or a flexible glycine-serine linker is included, but also when the peptide is fused directly to the PVX coat protein. When larger proteins or unfavorable peptide sequences are presented, a partial fusion via the FMDV 2A sequence is preferable. When these PVX chimeras retain the ability to assemble into viral particles and are thus able to infect plants systemically, they can be utilized to inoculate susceptible plants for isolation of sufficient amounts of virus particles for subsequent chemical modification. Chemical modification is required for the display of nonbiological ligands such as fluorophores, polymers, and small drug compounds. We present three methods of chemical bioconjugation. For direct conjugation of small chemical modifiers to solvent exposed lysines, N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry can be applied. Bio-orthogonal reactions such as copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition or hydrazone ligation are alternatives to achieve more efficient conjugation (e.g., when working with high molecular weight or insoluble ligands). Furthermore, hydrazone ligation offers an attractive route for the introduction of pH-cleavable cargos (e.g., therapeutic molecules).

  3. Chemical characterization and genetic relationships among Ocimum basilicum L. cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Zlatko; Carović-Stanko, Klaudija; Politeo, Olivera; Strikić, Frane; Kolak, Ivan; Milos, Mladen; Satovic, Zlatko

    2011-11-01

    Twenty-seven Ocimum basilicum cultivars were subjected to a chemical characterization of essential oil components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and a genetic characterization using the amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technique. Since the same 27 accessions had previously been classified into six morphotypes, these analyses allowed us to make detailed comparisons of chemistry, genetics, and morphology. The chemical composition and morphology of the studied cultivars appeared to have a strong genetic component. The AFLP analysis revealed a distinction between the green and purple morphotypes. The green morphotypes predominantly utilized the terpene biosynthetic pathway, while most purple morphotypes primarily utilized the phenylpropene biosynthetic pathway. The GC/MS analysis led to identification of 87 volatiles. Among the 27 cultivars, five chemotypes were identified. A detailed characterization of the essential oil constituents indicated the existence of both specific combinations of compounds and 'private' compounds with the potential to be used in many aspects of human life. The established relationship between a genetic profile, chemical composition, and morphology represents an important step in future breeding programs and in the cultivation of this species.

  4. An Integrated Approach to Crop Genetic Improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin A. J. Parry; Malcolm J. Hawkesford

    2012-01-01

    The balance between the supply and demand of the major food crops is fragile,fueling concerns for long-term global food security.The rising population,increasing wealth and a proliferation of nonfood uses (e.g.bioenergy) has led to growing demands on agriculture,while increased production is limited by greater urbanization,and the degradation of land.Furthermore,global climate change with increasing temperatures and lower,more erratic rainfall is projected to decrease agricultural yields.There is a predicted need to increase food production by at least 70% by 2050 and therefore an urgent need to develop novel and integrated approaches,incorporating high-throughput phenotyping that will both increase production per unit area and simultaneously improve the resource use efficiency of crops.Yield potential,yield stability,nutrient and water use are all complex multigenic traits and while there is genetic variability,their complexity makes such traits difficult to breed for directly.Nevertheless molecular plant breeding has the potential to deliver substantial improvements,once the component traits and the genes underlying these traits have been identified.In addition,interactions between the individual traits must also be taken into account,a demand that is difficult to fulfill with traditional screening approaches.Identified traits will be incorporated into new cultivars using conventional or biotechnological tools.In order to better understand the relationship between genotype,component traits,and environment over time,a multidisciplinary approach must be adopted to both understand the underlying processes and identify candidate genes,QTLs and traits that can be used to develop improved crops.

  5. Fuzzy Inspired Hybrid Genetic Approach to Optimize Travelling Salesman Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the category of algorithm Problems are basically exponential problems. These problems are basically exponential problems and take time to find the solution. In the present work we are optimising one of the common NP complete problem called Travelling Salesman Problem. In our work we have defined a genetic approach by combining fuzzy approach along with genetics. In this work we have implemented the modified DPX crossover to improve genetic approach. The work is implemented in MATLAB environment and obtained results shows the define approach has optimized the existing genetic algorithm results

  6. Genetic Approaches to Develop Salt Tolerant Germplasm

    KAUST Repository

    Tester, Mark A.

    2015-08-19

    Forty percent of the world\\'s food is produced under irrigation, and this is directly threatened by over-exploitation and changes in the global environment. One way to address this threat is to develop systems for increasing our ability to use lower quality water, in particular saline water. Low cost partial desalination of brackish water, use of saline water for cooling and increases in the salinity tolerance of crops can all contribute to the development of this new agricultural system. In this talk, the focus will be on the use of forward genetic approaches for discovery of genes related to salinity tolerance in barley and tomatoes. Rather than studying salinity tolerance as a trait in itself, we dissect salinity tolerance into a series of components that are hypothesised to contribute to overall salinity tolerance (following the paradigm of Munns & Tester, 2008). For example, one significant component of tolerance of most crop plants to moderate soil salinity is due to the ability to maintain low concentrations of Na+ in the leaves, and much analysis of this aspect has been done (e.g. Roy et al., 2013, 2014). A major site for the control of shoot Na+ accumulation is at the plasma membrane of the mature stele of the root. Alleles of HKT, a major gene underlying this transport process have been characterized and, in work led by Dr Rana Munns (CSIRO), have now been introgressed into commercial durum wheat and led to significantly increased yields in saline field conditions (Munns et al., 2012). The genotyping of mapping populations is now highly efficient. However, the ability to quantitatively phenotype these populations is now commonly limiting forward progress in plant science. The increasing power of digital imaging and computational technologies offers the opportunity to relieve this phenotyping bottleneck. The Plant Accelerator is a 4500m2 growth facility that provides non-destructive phenotyping of large populations of plants (http

  7. Assessment of genetic and chemical variability in Thymus caramanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadian, Javad; Bigdeloo, Mahdi; Nazeri, Vahideh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-05-01

    Thymus caramanicus is an endemic species grown in Iran with interesting pharmacological and biological properties. In the present work, essential oil compositions and inter-simple sequences repeat (ISSR) markers were used to estimate the relationships among and within seven populations of T. caramanicus, belonging to three provinces in Iran. The studied individuals were distinguished on the basis of ISSR markers and constituents of essential oil. A total of 127 band positions were produced by 12 ISSR primers, of which 105 were found polymorphic with 82.68% polymorphism. Genetic similarity values among individuals ranged between 0.15 and 0.82 which was indicative of a high level of genetic variation. On the basis of their genetic similarities, ISSR analysis allowed to group the samples into two main clusters. One of these included populations originated from Kerman and Isfahan provinces, and the other cluster consists of populations from Semnan province. Chemical compounds of essential oils were found variable in the various individuals and all samples were principally composed of phenolic constituents (carvacrol and/or thymol). As a consequence, the plants were classified into two major chemotypes including carvacrol and thymol/carvacrol. A relationship between genetic and chemical variability and geographic distribution has been observed in studied populations of T. caramanicus.

  8. Quantitative Chemical-Genetic Interaction Map Connects Gene Alterations to Drug Responses | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Cancer Discovery report, CTD2 researchers at the University of California in San Francisco developed a new quantitative chemical-genetic interaction mapping approach to evaluate drug sensitivity or resistance in isogenic cell lines. Performing a high-throughput screen with isogenic cell lines allowed the researchers to explore the impact of a panel of emerging and established drugs on cells overexpressing a single cancer-associated gene in isolation.

  9. A cellular genetics approach identifies gene-drug interactions and pinpoints drug toxicity pathway nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Takeo Suzuki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to toxicity testing have incorporated high-throughput screening across a broad-range of in vitro assays to identify potential key events in response to chemical or drug treatment. To date, these approaches have primarily utilized repurposed drug discovery assays. In this study, we describe an approach that combines in vitro screening with genetic approaches for the experimental identification of genes and pathways involved in chemical or drug toxicity. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from 32 genetically-characterized inbred mouse strains were treated in concentration-response format with 65 compounds, including pharmaceutical drugs, environmental chemicals, and compounds with known modes-of-action. Integrated cellular responses were measured at 24 and 72 hours using high-content imaging and included cell loss, membrane permeability, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis. Genetic association analysis of cross-strain differences in the cellular responses resulted in a collection of candidate loci potentially underlying the variable strain response to each chemical. As a demonstration of the approach, one candidate gene involved in rotenone sensitivity, Cybb, was experimentally validated in vitro and in vivo. Pathway analysis on the combined list of candidate loci across all chemicals identified a number of over-connected nodes that may serve as core regulatory points in toxicity pathways.

  10. Whole genome approaches to quantitative genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Peter M

    2009-06-01

    Apart from parent-offspring pairs and clones, relative pairs vary in the proportion of the genome that they share identical by descent. In the past, quantitative geneticists have used the expected value of sharing genes by descent to estimate genetic parameters and predict breeding values. With the possibility to genotype individuals for many markers across the genome it is now possible to empirically estimate the actual relationship between relatives. We review some of the theory underlying the variation in genetic identity, show applications to estimating genetic variance for height in humans and discuss other applications.

  11. Chemical Genetic Dissection of Brassinosteroid-Ethylene Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua M.Gendron; Asif Haque; Nathan Gendron; Timothy Chang; Tadao Asami; Zhi-Yong Wang

    2008-01-01

    We undertook a chemical genetics screen to identify chemical inhibitors of brassinosteroid (BR) action.From a chemical library of 10,000 small molecules,one compound was found to inhibit hypocotyl length and activate the expression of a BR-repressed reporter gene (CPD::GUS) in Arabidopsis,and it was named brassinopride (BRP).These effects of BRP could be reversed by co-treatment with brassinolide,suggesting that BRP either directly or indirectly inhibits BR biosynthesis.Interestingly,the compound causes exaggerated apical hooks,similar to that caused by ethylene treatment.The BRP-induced apical hook phenotype can be blocked by a chemical inhibitor of ethylene perception or an ethylene-insensitive mutant,suggesting that,in addition to inhibiting BR,BRP activates ethylene response.Analysis of BRP analogs provided clues about structural features important for its effects on two separate targets in the BR and ethylene pathways.Analyses of the responses of various BR and ethylene mutants to BRP,ethylene,and BR treatments revealed modes of cross-talk between ethylene and BR in dark-grown seedlings.Our results suggest that active downstream BR signaling,but not BR synthesis or a BR gradient,is required for ethylene-induced apical hook formation.The BRP-related compounds can be useful tools for manipulating plant growth and studying hormone interactions.

  12. Simulation Approach for Timing Analysis of Genetic Logic Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Constructing genetic logic circuits is an application of synthetic biology in which parts of the DNA of a living cell are engineered to perform a dedicated Boolean function triggered by an appropriate concentration of certain proteins or by different genetic components. These logic circuits work in a manner similar to electronic logic circuits, but they are much more stochastic and hence much harder to characterize. In this article, we introduce an approach to analyze the threshold value and timing of genetic logic circuits. We show how this approach can be used to analyze the timing behavior of single and cascaded genetic logic circuits. We further analyze the timing sensitivity of circuits by varying the degradation rates and concentrations. Our approach can be used not only to characterize the timing behavior but also to analyze the timing constraints of cascaded genetic logic circuits, a capability that we believe will be important for design automation in synthetic biology.

  13. Genetic diversity and chemical polymorphism of some Thymus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustaiee, Ali Reza; Yavari, Alireza; Nazeri, Vahideh; Shokrpour, Majid; Sefidkon, Fatemeh; Rasouli, Musa

    2013-06-01

    To ascertain whether there are chemical and genetic relationships among some Thymus species and also to determine correlation between these two sets of data, the essential-oil composition and genetic variability of six populations of Thymus including: T. daenensis ČELAK. (two populations), T. fallax FISCH. & C.A.MEY., T. fedtschenkoi RONNIGER, T. migricus KLOKOV & DES.-SHOST., and T. vulgaris L. were analyzed by GC and GC/MS, and also by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Thus, 27 individuals were analyzed using 16 RAPD primers, which generated 264 polymorphic scorable bands and volatiles isolated by distillation extraction were subjected to GC and GC/MS analyses. The yields of oils ranged from 2.1 to 3.8% (v/w), and 34 components were identified, amounting to a total percentage of 97.8-99.9%. RAPD Markers allowed a perfect distinction between the different species based on their distinctive genetic background. However, they did not show identical clustering with the volatile-oil profiles.

  14. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  15. Cellular and genetic approaches to myocardial regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyn, John van

    2008-01-01

    Injection of (stem) cells into the damaged heart has a positive effect on cardiac function. In this thesis two strategies for improving myocardial regeneration over classical cell therapy were investigated. The first is to induce cardiomyogenic differentiation by genetically engineering cells to ex

  16. Protein engineering approaches to chemical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Zeng, An-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Protein engineering for the improvement of properties of biocatalysts and for the generation of novel metabolic pathways plays more and more important roles in chemical biotechnology aiming at the production of chemicals from biomass. Although widely used in single-enzyme catalysis process, protein engineering is only being increasingly explored in recent years to achieve more complex in vitro and in vivo biocatalytic processes. This review focuses on major contributions of protein engineering to chemical biotechnology in the field of multi-enzymatic cascade catalysis and metabolic engineering. Especially, we discuss and highlight recent strategies for combining pathway design and protein engineering for the production of novel products.

  17. Cell reprogramming: a new chemical approach to stem cell biology and tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasia, L; Piccoli, M; Garatti, A; Conforti, E; Scaringi, R; Bergante, S; Castelvecchio, S; Venerando, B; Menicanti, L; Tettamanti, G

    2011-02-01

    Generation of pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult fibroblasts starts a "new era" in stem cell biology, as it overcomes several key issues associated with previous approaches, including the ethical concerns associated with human embryonic stem cells. However, as the genetic approach for cell reprogramming has already shown potential safety issues, a chemical approach may be a safer and easier alternative. Moreover, a chemical approach could be advantageous not only for the de-differentiation phase, but also for inducing reprogrammed cells into the desired cell type with higher efficiency than current methodologies. Finally, a chemical approach may be envisioned to activate resident adult stem cells to proliferate and regenerate damaged tissues in situ, without the need for exogenous cell injections.

  18. Stego-audio Using Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Santhi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of digital multimedia applications, the secure data transmission becomes the main issue in data communication system. So the multimedia data hiding techniques have been developed to ensure the secured data transfer. Steganography is an art of hiding a secret message within an image/audio/video file in such a way that the secret message cannot be perceived by hacker/intruder. In this study, we use RSA encryption algorithm to encrypt the message and Genetic Algorithm (GA to encode the message in the audio file. This study presents a method to access the negative audio bytes and includes the negative audio bytes in the message encoding and position embedding process. This increases the capacity of encoding message in the audio file. The use of GA operators in Genetic Algorithm reduces the noise distortions.

  19. Genetic & epigenetic approach to human obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajender Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is an important clinical and public health challenge, epitomized by excess adipose tissue accumulation resulting from an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure. It is a forerunner for a variety of other diseases such as type-2-diabetes (T2D, cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, stroke, hyperlipidaemia and can be fatal leading to premature death. Obesity is highly heritable and arises from the interplay of multiple genes and environmental factors. Recent advancements in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have shown important steps towards identifying genetic risks and identification of genetic markers for lifestyle diseases, especially for a metabolic disorder like obesity. According to the 12 th u0 pdate of Human Obesity Gene Map there are 253 quantity trait loci (QTL for obesity related phenotypes from 61 genome wide scan studies. Contribution of genetic propensity of individual ethnic and racial variations in obesity is an active area of research. Further, understanding its complexity as to how these variations could influence ones susceptibility to become or remain obese will lead us to a greater understanding of how obesity occurs and hopefully, how to prevent and treat this condition. In this review, various strategies adapted for such an analysis based on the recent advances in genome wide and functional variations in human obesity are discussed.

  20. Genetic & epigenetic approach to human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K Rajender; Lal, Nirupama; Giridharan, N V

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is an important clinical and public health challenge, epitomized by excess adipose tissue accumulation resulting from an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure. It is a forerunner for a variety of other diseases such as type-2-diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, stroke, hyperlipidaemia and can be fatal leading to premature death. Obesity is highly heritable and arises from the interplay of multiple genes and environmental factors. Recent advancements in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown important steps towards identifying genetic risks and identification of genetic markers for lifestyle diseases, especially for a metabolic disorder like obesity. According to the 12th Update of Human Obesity Gene Map there are 253 quantity trait loci (QTL) for obesity related phenotypes from 61 genome wide scan studies. Contribution of genetic propensity of individual ethnic and racial variations in obesity is an active area of research. Further, understanding its complexity as to how these variations could influence ones susceptibility to become or remain obese will lead us to a greater understanding of how obesity occurs and hopefully, how to prevent and treat this condition. In this review, various strategies adapted for such an analysis based on the recent advances in genome wide and functional variations in human obesity are discussed.

  1. A chemical approach to understanding oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterkin, James A.; Becerra-Toledo, Andres E.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.; Marks, Laurence D.

    2012-02-01

    Chemical bonding has often been ignored in favor of physics based energetic considerations in attempts to understand the structure, stability, and reactivity of oxide surfaces. Herein, we analyze the chemical bonding in published structures of the SrTiO3, MgO, and NiO surfaces using bond valence sum (BVS) analysis. These simple chemical bonding theories compare favorably with far more complex quantum mechanical calculations in assessing surface structure stability. Further, the coordination and bonding of surface structures explains the observed stability in a readily comprehensible manner. Finally, we demonstrate how simple chemical bonding models accurately predict the adsorption of foreign species onto surfaces, and how such models can be used to predict changes in surface structures.

  2. Engaging nurses in genetics: the strategic approach of the NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Maggie; Tonkin, Emma; Burke, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    The UK government announced the establishment of an NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre in its Genetics White Paper. The Centre aims to lead and coordinate developments to enhance genetics literacy of health professionals. The nursing program takes a strategic approach based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior, using the UK nursing genetics competences as the platform for development. The program team uses innovative approaches to raise awareness of the relevance of genetics, working collaboratively with policy stakeholders, as key agents of change in promoting competence. Providing practical help in preparing learning and teaching resources lends further encouragement. Evaluation of the program is dependent on gathering baseline data, and the program has been informed by an education needs analysis. The challenges faced are substantial and necessitate international collaboration where expertise and resources can be shared to produce a global system of influence to facilitate the engagement of non-genetic nurses.

  3. Genetic approaches to the molecular/neuronal mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akira; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2005-09-01

    Learning and memory is an essential component of human intelligence. To understand its underlying molecular and neuronal mechanisms is currently an extensive focus in the field of cognitive neuroscience. We have employed advanced mouse genetic approaches to analyze the molecular and neuronal bases for learning and memory, and our results showed that brain region-specific genetic manipulations (including transgenic and knockout), inducible/reversible knockout, genetic/chemical kinase inactivation, and neuronal-based genetic approach are very powerful tools for studying the involvements of various molecules or neuronal substrates in the processes of learning and memory. Studies using these techniques may eventually lead to the understanding of how new information is acquired and how learned information is memorized in the brain.

  4. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Martins

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  5. Cyanobactins from Cyanobacteria: Current Genetic and Chemical State of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-11-13

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be one of the most promising sources of new, natural products. Apart from non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides, ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are one of the leading groups of bioactive compounds produced by cyanobacteria. Among these, cyanobactins have sparked attention due to their interesting bioactivities and for their potential to be prospective candidates in the development of drugs. It is assumed that the primary source of cyanobactins is cyanobacteria, although these compounds have also been isolated from marine animals such as ascidians, sponges and mollusks. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge of cyanobactins, recognized as being produced by cyanobacteria, and to emphasize their genetic clusters and chemical structures as well as their bioactivities, ecological roles and biotechnological potential.

  6. Chemical and instrumental approaches to cheese analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Anand; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Overcoming the complexity of cheese matrix to reliably analyze cheese composition, flavor, and ripening changes has been a challenge. Several sample isolation or fractionation methods, chemical and enzymatic assays, and instrumental methods have been developed over the decades. While some of the methods are well established standard methods, some still need to be researched and improved. This chapter reviews the chemical and instrumental methods available to determine cheese composition and monitor biochemical events (e.g., glycolysis, lipolysis, and proteolysis) during cheese ripening that lead to the formation of cheese flavor. Chemical and enzymatic methods available for analysis of cheese composition (fat, protein, lactose, salt, nitrogen content, moisture, etc.) are presented. Electrophoretic, chromatographic, and spectroscopic techniques are also reviewed in the light of their application to monitor cheese ripening and flavor compounds. Novel instrumental methods based on Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy that are currently being researched and applied to cheese analysis are introduced.

  7. Cognitive Radio — Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Y. B.

    2005-03-01

    Cognitive Radio (CR) is relatively a new technology, which intelligently detects a particular segment of the radio spectrum currently in use and selects unused spectrum quickly without interfering the transmission of authorized users. Cognitive Radios can learn about current use of spectrum in their operating area, make intelligent decisions, and react to immediate changes in the use of spectrum by other authorized users. The goal of CR technology is to relieve radio spectrum overcrowding, which actually translates to a lack of access to full radio spectrum utilization. Due to this adaptive behavior, the CR can easily avoid the interference of signals in a crowded radio frequency spectrum. In this research, we discuss the possible application of genetic algorithms (GA) to create a CR that can respond intelligently in changing and unanticipated circumstances and in the presence of hostile jammers and interferers. Genetic algorithms are problem solving techniques based on evolution and natural selection. GA models adapt Charles Darwin's evolutionary theory for analysis of data and interchanging design elements in hundreds of thousands of different combinations. Only the best-performing combinations are permitted to survive, and those combinations "reproduce" further, progressively yielding better and better results.

  8. Probability Simulation Optimization Approach Using Orthogonal Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yinling; XING Lining; YAN Shiliang

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve the complex optimization problem dealing with uncertain phenomenon effectively, this paper presents a probability simulation optimization approach using orthogonal genetic algorithm. This approach synthesizes the computer simulation technology, orthogonal genetic algorithm and statistical test method faultlessly, which can solve complex optimization problem effectively. In this paper, the author gives the correlative conception of probability simulation optimization and describes the probability simulation optimization approach using orthogonal genetic algorithm in detail. Theoretically speaking, it has a strong rationality and maneuverability that can apply probability method in solving the complex optimization problems with uncertain phenomenon. In demonstration, the optimization performance of this method is better than other traditional methods. Simulation result suggests that the approach referred to this paper is feasible, correct and valid.

  9. Genetic Programming Approach for Predicting Surface Subsidence Induced by Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The surface subsidence induced by mining is a complex problem, which is related with many complex and uncertain factors.Genetic programming (GP) has a good ability to deal with complex and nonlinear problems, therefore genetic programming approach is proposed to predict mining induced surface subsidence in this article.First genetic programming technique is introduced, second, surface subsidence genetic programming model is set up by selecting its main affective factors and training relating to practical engineering data, and finally, predictions are made by the testing of data, whose results show that the relative error is approximately less than 10%, which can meet the engineering needs, and therefore, this proposed approach is valid and applicable in predicting mining induced surface subsidence.The model offers a novel method to predict surface subsidence in mining.

  10. Reverse genetics approaches to combat pathogenic arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Juan C

    2008-12-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans, and evidence indicates that the worldwide-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a neglected human pathogen of clinical significance. Moreover, arenaviruses pose a biodefense threat. No licensed anti-arenavirus vaccines are available, and current anti-arenavirus therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin, which is only partially effective and is associated with anemia and other side effects. Therefore, it is important to develop effective vaccines and better antiviral drugs to combat the dual threats of naturally occurring and intentionally introduced arenavirus infections. The development of arenavirus reverse genetic systems is allowing investigators to conduct a detailed molecular characterization of the viral cis-acting signals and trans-acting factors that control each of the steps of the arenavirus life cycle, including RNA synthesis, packaging and budding. Knowledge derived from these studies is uncovering potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention, as well as facilitating the establishment of assays to identify and characterize candidate antiviral drugs capable of interfering with specific steps of the virus life cycle. Likewise, the ability to generate predetermined specific mutations within the arenavirus genome and analyze their phenotypic expression would significantly contribute to the elucidation of arenavirus-host interactions, including the basis of their ability to cause severe HF. This, in turn, could lead to the development of novel, potent and safe arenavirus vaccines.

  11. Broadening Our Portfolio in the Genetic Improvement of Maize Chemical Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Weiwei; Brotman, Yariv; Willmitzer, Lothar; Yan, Jianbing; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-08-01

    The adoption of recombinant inbred line and introgression line populations, as well as the study of association mapping panels, has greatly accelerated our ability to identify the genes underlying plant phenotypic variance. In tandem, the development of metabolomics approaches has greatly enhanced our ability to comprehensively define cellular chemical composition. As a consequence, breeding for chemical composition is being extended beyond our traditional targets of oil and protein to include components such as essential amino acids, vitamins, and antioxidant secondary metabolites with considerable purported consequences for human health. Here, we review the above-mentioned developments paying particular attention to the genetic architecture of metabolic traits as well as updating the perspective for utilizing metabolomics in maize improvement.

  12. Approaching Chemical Accuracy with Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Petruzielo, F R; Umrigar, C J

    2012-01-01

    A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreement between diffusion Monte Carlo and experiment, reducing the mean absolute deviation to 2.1 kcal/mol. Moving beyond a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction, diffusion Monte Carlo with a small complete active space Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction results in near chemical accuracy. In this case, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies is 1.2 kcal/mol. It is shown from calculations on systems containing phosphorus that the accuracy can be further improved by employing a larger active space.

  13. Genetic and genomic approaches to understanding macrophage identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher K

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and functions of diverse macrophage phenotypes in health and disease. Recent studies using genetic and genomic approaches suggest a relatively simple model of collaborative and hierarchical interactions between lineage-determining and signal-dependent transcription factors that enable selection and activation of transcriptional enhancers that specify macrophage identity and function. In addition, we have found that it is possible to use natural genetic variation as a powerful tool for advancing our understanding of how the macrophage deciphers the information encoded by the genome to attain specific phenotypes in a context-dependent manner. Here, I will describe our recent efforts to extend genetic and genomic approaches to investigate the roles of distinct tissue environments in determining the phenotypes of different resident populations of macrophages.

  14. Understanding the Science-Learning Environment: A Genetically Sensitive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that environmental influences on school science performance increase in importance from primary to secondary school. Here we assess for the first time the relationship between the science-learning environment and science performance using a genetically sensitive approach to investigate the aetiology of this link. 3000…

  15. Review: domestic animal forensic genetics - biological evidence, genetic markers, analytical approaches and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthaswamy, S

    2015-10-01

    This review highlights the importance of domestic animal genetic evidence sources, genetic testing, markers and analytical approaches as well as the challenges this field is facing in view of the de facto 'gold standard' human DNA identification. Because of the genetic similarity between humans and domestic animals, genetic analysis of domestic animal hair, saliva, urine, blood and other biological material has generated vital investigative leads that have been admitted into a variety of court proceedings, including criminal and civil litigation. Information on validated short tandem repeat, single nucleotide polymorphism and mitochondrial DNA markers and public access to genetic databases for forensic DNA analysis is becoming readily available. Although the fundamental aspects of animal forensic genetic testing may be reliable and acceptable, animal forensic testing still lacks the standardized testing protocols that human genetic profiling requires, probably because of the absence of monetary support from government agencies and the difficulty in promoting cooperation among competing laboratories. Moreover, there is a lack in consensus about how to best present the results and expert opinion to comply with court standards and bear judicial scrutiny. This has been the single most persistent challenge ever since the earliest use of domestic animal forensic genetic testing in a criminal case in the mid-1990s. Crime laboratory accreditation ensures that genetic test results have the courts' confidence. Because accreditation requires significant commitments of effort, time and resources, the vast majority of animal forensic genetic laboratories are not accredited nor are their analysts certified forensic examiners. The relevance of domestic animal forensic genetics in the criminal justice system is undeniable. However, further improvements are needed in a wide range of supporting resources, including standardized quality assurance and control protocols for sample

  16. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, Thomas J.;

    2016-01-01

    could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information in a qualitative AA comparison. Starting from existing hazard AAs, a series of four chemical...... Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher exposure potential, which......-product application scenarios were examined to test the concept, to understand the effort required, and to determine the value of exposure data in AA decision-making. The group has developed a classification approach for ingredient and product parameters to support comparisons between alternatives as well...

  17. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  18. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor Nogales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines.

  19. OPTIMIZING LOCALIZATION ROUTE USING PARTICLE SWARM-A GENETIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lakshmanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most key problems in wireless sensor networks is finding optimal algorithms for sending packets from source node to destination node. Several algorithms exist in literature, since some are in vital role other may not. Since WSN focus on low power consumption during packet transmission and receiving, finally we adopt by merging swarm particle based algorithm with genetic approach. Initially we order the nodes based on their energy criterion and then focusing towards node path; this can be done using Proactive route algorithm for finding optimal path between Source-Destination (S-D nodes. Fast processing and pre traversal can be done using selective flooding approach and results are in genetic. We have improved our results with high accuracy and optimality in rendering routes.

  20. A decision analytic approach to exposure-based chemical prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Mitchell

    Full Text Available The manufacture of novel synthetic chemicals has increased in volume and variety, but often the environmental and health risks are not fully understood in terms of toxicity and, in particular, exposure. While efforts to assess risks have generally been effective when sufficient data are available, the hazard and exposure data necessary to assess risks adequately are unavailable for the vast majority of chemicals in commerce. The US Environmental Protection Agency has initiated the ExpoCast Program to develop tools for rapid chemical evaluation based on potential for exposure. In this context, a model is presented in which chemicals are evaluated based on inherent chemical properties and behaviorally-based usage characteristics over the chemical's life cycle. These criteria are assessed and integrated within a decision analytic framework, facilitating rapid assessment and prioritization for future targeted testing and systems modeling. A case study outlines the prioritization process using 51 chemicals. The results show a preliminary relative ranking of chemicals based on exposure potential. The strength of this approach is the ability to integrate relevant statistical and mechanistic data with expert judgment, allowing for an initial tier assessment that can further inform targeted testing and risk management strategies.

  1. A genetic algorithm approach to routine gamma spectra analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlevaro, C M [Instituto de FIsica de LIquidos y Sistemas Biologicos, Calle 59 No 789, B1900BTE La Plata (Argentina); Wilkinson, M V [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Avda. del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP Buenos Aires (Argentina); Barrios, L A [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Avda. del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-01-15

    In this work we present an alternative method for performing routine gamma spectra analysis based on genetic algorithm techniques. The main idea is to search for patterns of single nuclide spectra obtained by simulation in a sample spectrum targeted for analysis. We show how this approach is applied to the analysis of simulated and real target spectra, and also to the study of interference resolution.

  2. DNA enrichment approaches to identify unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulandhu, Alfred J; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Dobnik, David; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana; Kok, Esther J

    2016-07-01

    With the increased global production of different genetically modified (GM) plant varieties, chances increase that unauthorized GM organisms (UGMOs) may enter the food chain. At the same time, the detection of UGMOs is a challenging task because of the limited sequence information that will generally be available. PCR-based methods are available to detect and quantify known UGMOs in specific cases. If this approach is not feasible, DNA enrichment of the unknown adjacent sequences of known GMO elements is one way to detect the presence of UGMOs in a food or feed product. These enrichment approaches are also known as chromosome walking or gene walking (GW). In recent years, enrichment approaches have been coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis and implemented in, amongst others, the medical and microbiological fields. The present review will provide an overview of these approaches and an evaluation of their applicability in the identification of UGMOs in complex food or feed samples.

  3. Integrating exposure into chemical alternatives assessment using a qualitative approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggs, Bill; Arnold, Scott; Burns, T. E.

    2016-01-01

    Most alternatives assessments (AA) published to date are largely hazard-based rankings, and as such may not represent a fully informed consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of possible alternatives. With an assessment goal of identifying an alternative chemical that is more sustainable...... Sustainable Chemical Alternatives Technical Committee, which consists of scientists from academia, industry, government, and NGOs, has developed a qualitative comparative exposure approach. Conducting such a comparison can screen for alternatives that are expected to have a higher human or environmental...... exposure potential, which could trigger a higher-tiered, more quantitative exposure assessment on the alternatives being considered, minimizing the likelihood of regrettable substitution. This talk will demonstrate an approach for including chemical- and product-related exposure information...

  4. Human exposure assessment: Approaches for chemicals (REACH) and biocides (BPD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van; Gerritsen-Ebben, R.

    2008-01-01

    The approaches that are indicated in the various guidance documents for the assessment of human exposure for chemicals and biocides are summarised. This reflects the TNsG (Technical notes for Guidance) version 2: human exposure assessment for biocidal products (1) under the BPD (Biocidal Products Di

  5. [Current methods in genetic analysis : an approach for genetics-based preventive medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hans-Georg; Rost, Imma

    2015-02-01

    Modern genetic analysis methods such as DNA arrays (gene chips) or high-throughput DNA sequencing of the next generation (Next Generation Sequencing, NGS) have once again accelerated the pace of innovation that has been powered by genome research over the past 10 years of the "post-genomic era". The present paper introduces array and NGS methods as two important innovation driving methods and provides examples for their application in large-scale scientific projects. However, a broad application of these very powerful technologies for genetic screening for the purpose of disease prevention is currently not yet in sight. The complexity of the interaction of genes, gene products and the environment has so far exceeded all expectations, suggesting that reliable statements about the medical relevance of common genetic variants can presently only be made in a few areas such as pharmacogenetics and oncology. We also discuss ethical issues raised by genetic population screening. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief outline of the development of methods in molecular genetics to the now dominant modern technologies and present their applications in research, in the diagnosis of rare diseases, and in terms of screening approaches.

  6. An Airborne Conflict Resolution Approach Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondoloni, Stephane; Conway, Sheila

    2001-01-01

    An airborne conflict resolution approach is presented that is capable of providing flight plans forecast to be conflict-free with both area and traffic hazards. This approach is capable of meeting constraints on the flight plan such as required times of arrival (RTA) at a fix. The conflict resolution algorithm is based upon a genetic algorithm, and can thus seek conflict-free flight plans meeting broader flight planning objectives such as minimum time, fuel or total cost. The method has been applied to conflicts occurring 6 to 25 minutes in the future in climb, cruise and descent phases of flight. The conflict resolution approach separates the detection, trajectory generation and flight rules function from the resolution algorithm. The method is capable of supporting pilot-constructed resolutions, cooperative and non-cooperative maneuvers, and also providing conflict resolution on trajectories forecast by an onboard FMC.

  7. Genetic Evolutionary Approach for Cutting Forces Prediction in Hard Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylan, Fatih; Kayacan, Cengiz

    2011-11-01

    Hard milling is a very common used machining procedure in the last years. Therefore the prediction of cutting forces is important. The paper deals with this prediction using genetic evolutionary programming (GEP) approach to set mathematical expression for out cutting forces. In this study, face milling was performed using DIN1.2842 (90MnCrV8) cold work tool steel, with a hardness of 61 HRC. Experimental parameters were selected using stability measurements and simulations. In the hard milling experiments, cutting force data in a total of three axes were collected. Feed direction (Fx) and tangential direction (Fy) cutting forces generated using genetic evolutionary programming were modelled. Cutting speed and feed rate values were treated as inputs in the models, and average cutting force values as output. Mathematical expressions were created to predict average Fxand Fy forces that can be generated in hard material milling.

  8. A computational approach to chemical etiologies of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audouze, Karine Marie Laure; Brunak, Søren; Grandjean, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Computational meta-analysis can link environmental chemicals to genes and proteins involved in human diseases, thereby elucidating possible etiologies and pathogeneses of non-communicable diseases. We used an integrated computational systems biology approach to examine possible pathogenetic...... linkages in type 2 diabetes (T2D) through genome-wide associations, disease similarities, and published empirical evidence. Ten environmental chemicals were found to be potentially linked to T2D, the highest scores were observed for arsenic, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, hexachlorobenzene...

  9. A Comprehensive Approach for Pectin Chemical and Functional Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Sousa, António Felipe Gomes Teixeira

    In this work, a comprehensive approach for the chemical and functional analysis of pectin was used in order to relate the different extraction conditions used to the polymer structure and the final functional (mainly gelling) properties. A wide range of methods were utilized including chemical...... and chromatographic characterization methods (HPAEC and HPSEC), rheological measurements of elasticity, and biological epitopes detection using carbohydrate microarrays. The end product of this study is expected to contribute to the knowledge of pectin polymeric conformation and structure-function properties as well...

  10. An analytical approach to the implementation of genetically modified crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, K.; Rasmussen, B.

    2000-01-01

    Public scepticism towards genetically modified (GM) crops is increasing. To address this, the risks and benefits of GM crops must be examined across scientific disciplines, and be discussed with the authorities, the agricultural industry and the consumers. In a feasibility study we have...... systematically analysed the challenges of the development and marketing of GM crops in Europe. A life-cycle inventory was used together with established technology foresight techniques in an interdisciplinary and empirical framework. The approach taken in this study established a dialogue between stakeholders...... and provided a framework for discussions about the future direction of GM crops....

  11. A reverse genetics approach to study feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Gergely; Spies, Danica; Bank-Wolf, Barbara; Thiel, Volker; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal immunopathological disease caused by feline coronaviruses (FCoVs). Here, we describe a reverse genetics approach to study FIP by assessing the pathogenicity of recombinant type I and type II and chimeric type I/type II FCoVs. All recombinant FCoVs established productive infection in cats, and recombinant type II FCoV (strain 79-1146) induced FIP. Virus sequence analyses from FIP-diseased cats revealed that the 3c gene stop codon of strain 79-1146 has changed to restore a full-length open reading frame (ORF).

  12. Quantum Chemical Approach to Estimating the Thermodynamics of Metabolic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism. PMID:25387603

  13. Quantum chemical approach to estimating the thermodynamics of metabolic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinich, Adrian; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Dunn, Ian; Sanchez-Lengeling, Benjamin; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Noor, Elad; Even, Arren Bar; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-11-12

    Thermodynamics plays an increasingly important role in modeling and engineering metabolism. We present the first nonempirical computational method for estimating standard Gibbs reaction energies of metabolic reactions based on quantum chemistry, which can help fill in the gaps in the existing thermodynamic data. When applied to a test set of reactions from core metabolism, the quantum chemical approach is comparable in accuracy to group contribution methods for isomerization and group transfer reactions and for reactions not including multiply charged anions. The errors in standard Gibbs reaction energy estimates are correlated with the charges of the participating molecules. The quantum chemical approach is amenable to systematic improvements and holds potential for providing thermodynamic data for all of metabolism.

  14. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. Howard B. Lieberman

    2001-05-11

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage.

  15. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Discovering Fuzzy Censored Classification Rules (Fccrs: A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Bala

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Classification Rules (CRs are often discovered in the form of ‘If-Then’ Production Rules (PRs. PRs, beinghigh level symbolic rules, are comprehensible and easy to implement. However, they are not capable ofdealing with cognitive uncertainties like vagueness and ambiguity imperative to real word decision makingsituations. Fuzzy Classification Rules (FCRs based on fuzzy logic provide a framework for a flexiblehuman like reasoning involving linguistic variables. Moreover, a classification system consisting of simple‘If-Then’ rules is not competent in handling exceptional circumstances. In this paper, we propose aGenetic Algorithm approach to discover Fuzzy Censored Classification Rules (FCCRs. A FCCR is aFuzzy Classification Rule (FCRs augmented with censors. Here, censors are exceptional conditions inwhich the behaviour of a rule gets modified. The proposed algorithm works in two phases. In the firstphase, the Genetic Algorithm discovers Fuzzy Classification Rules. Subsequently, these FuzzyClassification Rules are mutated to produce FCCRs in the second phase. The appropriate encodingscheme, fitness function and genetic operators are designed for the discovery of FCCRs. The proposedapproach for discovering FCCRs is then illustrated on a synthetic dataset.

  17. Controlling Risk Exposure in Periodic Environments: A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Emeterio

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the performance of different agent's investment strategies in an investment scenario with periodic returns and different types and levels of noise. We consider an investment model, where an agent decides the percentage of budget to risk at each time step. Afterwards, agent's investment is evaluated in the market via a return on investment (RoI), which we assume is a stochastic process with unknown periodicities and different levels of noise. To control the risk exposure, we investigate approaches based on: technical analysis (Moving Least Squares, MLS), and evolutionary computation (Genetic Algorithms, GA). In our comparison, we also consider two reference strategies for zero-knowledge and complete-knowledge behaviors, respectively. In our approach, the performance of a strategy corresponds to the average budget that can be obtained with this strategy over a certain number of time steps. To this end, we perform some computer experiments, where for each strategy the budget obtained af...

  18. A genetic algorithm approach to recognition and data mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punch, W.F.; Goodman, E.D.; Min, Pei [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    We review here our use of genetic algorithm (GA) and genetic programming (GP) techniques to perform {open_quotes}data mining,{close_quotes} the discovery of particular/important data within large datasets, by finding optimal data classifications using known examples. Our first experiments concentrated on the use of a K-nearest neighbor algorithm in combination with a GA. The GA selected weights for each feature so as to optimize knn classification based on a linear combination of features. This combined GA-knn approach was successfully applied to both generated and real-world data. We later extended this work by substituting a GP for the GA. The GP-knn could not only optimize data classification via linear combinations of features but also determine functional relationships among the features. This allowed for improved performance and new information on important relationships among features. We review the effectiveness of the overall approach on examples from biology and compare the effectiveness of the GA and GP.

  19. Chemically Defined Medium and Caenorhabditis elegans: A Powerful Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, N. J.; Kozak, E.; Conley, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    C. elegans has been established as a powerful genetic system. Growth in a chemically defined medium (C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)) now allows standardization and systematic manipulation of the nutrients that animals receive. Liquid cultivation allows automated culturing and experimentation and should be of me in large-scale growth and screening of animals. Here we present our initial results from developing culture systems with CeMM. We find that CeMM is versatile and culturing is simple. CeMM can be used in a solid or liquid state, it can be stored unused for at least a year, unattended actively growing cultures may be maintained longer than with standard techniques, and standard C. elegans protocols work well with animals grown in defined medium. We also find that there are caveats of using defined medium. Animals in defined medium grow more slowly than on standard medium, appear to display adaptation to the defined medium, and display altered growth rates as they change defined medium composition. As was suggested with the introduction of C. elegans as a potential genetic system, use of defined medium with C. elegans should prove a powerful tool.

  20. Chemical-genetic profile analysis of five inhibitory compounds in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamgir Md

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical-genetic profiling of inhibitory compounds can lead to identification of their modes of action. These profiles can help elucidate the complex interactions between small bioactive compounds and the cell machinery, and explain putative gene function(s. Results Colony size reduction was used to investigate the chemical-genetic profile of cycloheximide, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, paromomycin, streptomycin and neomycin in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These compounds target the process of protein biosynthesis. More than 70,000 strains were analyzed from the array of gene deletion mutant yeast strains. As expected, the overall profiles of the tested compounds were similar, with deletions for genes involved in protein biosynthesis being the major category followed by metabolism. This implies that novel genes involved in protein biosynthesis could be identified from these profiles. Further investigations were carried out to assess the activity of three profiled genes in the process of protein biosynthesis using relative fitness of double mutants and other genetic assays. Conclusion Chemical-genetic profiles provide insight into the molecular mechanism(s of the examined compounds by elucidating their potential primary and secondary cellular target sites. Our follow-up investigations into the activity of three profiled genes in the process of protein biosynthesis provided further evidence concerning the usefulness of chemical-genetic analyses for annotating gene functions. We termed these genes TAE2, TAE3 and TAE4 for translation associated elements 2-4.

  1. Approaches to Chemical and Biochemical Information and Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privman, Vladimir

    2012-02-01

    We outline models and approaches for error control required to prevent buildup of noise when ``gates'' and other ``network elements'' based on (bio)chemical reaction processes are utilized to realize stable, scalable networks for information and signal processing. We also survey challenges and possible future research. [4pt] [1] Control of Noise in Chemical and Biochemical Information Processing, V. Privman, Israel J. Chem. 51, 118-131 (2010).[0pt] [2] Biochemical Filter with Sigmoidal Response: Increasing the Complexity of Biomolecular Logic, V. Privman, J. Halamek, M. A. Arugula, D. Melnikov, V. Bocharova and E. Katz, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 14103-14109 (2010).[0pt] [3] Towards Biosensing Strategies Based on Biochemical Logic Systems, E. Katz, V. Privman and J. Wang, in: Proc. Conf. ICQNM 2010 (IEEE Comp. Soc. Conf. Publ. Serv., Los Alamitos, California, 2010), pages 1-9.

  2. Design and optimization of pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI using a multiobjective genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimaru, Eriko S; Randtke, Edward A; Pagel, Mark D; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI experimental parameters and RF saturation pulse shapes were optimized using a multiobjective genetic algorithm. The optimization was carried out for RF saturation duty cycles of 50% and 90%, and results were compared to continuous wave saturation and Gaussian waveform. In both simulation and phantom experiments, continuous wave saturation performed the best, followed by parameters and shapes optimized by the genetic algorithm and then followed by Gaussian waveform. We have successfully demonstrated that the genetic algorithm is able to optimize pulse CEST parameters and that the results are translatable to clinical scanners.

  3. Identifying genetic risk variants for coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolemia: an extreme genetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versmissen, Jorie; Oosterveer, Daniëlla M; Yazdanpanah, Mojgan; Dehghan, Abbas; Hólm, Hilma; Erdman, Jeanette; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Schunkert, Heribert; Huijgen, Roeland; Vongpromek, Ranitha; Uitterlinden, André G; Defesche, Joep C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mulder, Monique; Dadd, Tony; Karlsson, Hróbjartur D; Ordovas, Jose; Kindt, Iris; Jarman, Amelia; Hofman, Albert; van Vark-van der Zee, Leonie; Blommesteijn-Touw, Adriana C; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Liem, Anho H; van der Ouderaa, Frans J; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano; Averna, Maurizio; Langslet, Gisle; Ose, Leiv; Ros, Emilio; Almagro, Fátima; de Leeuw, Peter W; Civeira, Fernando; Masana, Luis; Pintó, Xavier; Simoons, Maarten L; Schinkel, Arend FL; Green, Martin R; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Johnson, Keith J; Schaefer, Arne; Neil, Andrew; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Humphries, Steve E; Kastelein, John JP; Sijbrands, Eric JG

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a disorder characterized by coronary heart disease (CHD) at young age. We aimed to apply an extreme sampling method to enhance the statistical power to identify novel genetic risk variants for CHD in individuals with FH. We selected cases and controls with an extreme contrast in CHD risk from 17 000 FH patients from the Netherlands, whose functional LDLR mutation was unequivocally established. The genome-wide association (GWA) study was performed on 249 very young FH cases with CHD and 217 old FH controls without CHD (above 65 years for males and 70 years of age for females) using the Illumina HumanHap550K chip. In the next stage, two independent samples (one from the Netherlands and one from Italy, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom) of FH patients were used as replication samples. In the initial GWA analysis, we identified 29 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with suggestive associations with premature CHD (P<1 × 10−4). We examined the association of these SNPs with CHD risk in the replication samples. After Bonferroni correction, none of the SNPs either replicated or reached genome-wide significance after combining the discovery and replication samples. Therefore, we conclude that the genetics of CHD risk in FH is complex and even applying an ‘extreme genetics' approach we did not identify new genetic risk variants. Most likely, this method is not as effective in leveraging effect size as anticipated, and may, therefore, not lead to significant gains in statistical power. PMID:24916650

  4. Reverse Pathway Genetic Approach Identifies Epistasis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traglia, Michela; Tsang, Kathryn; Bearden, Carrie E.; Rauen, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    Although gene-gene interaction, or epistasis, plays a large role in complex traits in model organisms, genome-wide by genome-wide searches for two-way interaction have limited power in human studies. We thus used knowledge of a biological pathway in order to identify a contribution of epistasis to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in humans, a reverse-pathway genetic approach. Based on previous observation of increased ASD symptoms in Mendelian disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway (RASopathies), we showed that common SNPs in RASopathy genes show enrichment for association signal in GWAS (P = 0.02). We then screened genome-wide for interactors with RASopathy gene SNPs and showed strong enrichment in ASD-affected individuals (P < 2.2 x 10−16), with a number of pairwise interactions meeting genome-wide criteria for significance. Finally, we utilized quantitative measures of ASD symptoms in RASopathy-affected individuals to perform modifier mapping via GWAS. One top region overlapped between these independent approaches, and we showed dysregulation of a gene in this region, GPR141, in a RASopathy neural cell line. We thus used orthogonal approaches to provide strong evidence for a contribution of epistasis to ASDs, confirm a role for the Ras/MAPK pathway in idiopathic ASDs, and to identify a convergent candidate gene that may interact with the Ras/MAPK pathway. PMID:28076348

  5. Estimating Sampling Selection Bias in Human Genetics: A Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide; Taglioli, Luca; De Iasio, Sergio; Gueresi, Paola; Alfani, Guido; Nelli, Sergio; Rossi, Paolo; Paoli, Giorgio; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    This research is the first empirical attempt to calculate the various components of the hidden bias associated with the sampling strategies routinely-used in human genetics, with special reference to surname-based strategies. We reconstructed surname distributions of 26 Italian communities with different demographic features across the last six centuries (years 1447–2001). The degree of overlapping between "reference founding core" distributions and the distributions obtained from sampling the present day communities by probabilistic and selective methods was quantified under different conditions and models. When taking into account only one individual per surname (low kinship model), the average discrepancy was 59.5%, with a peak of 84% by random sampling. When multiple individuals per surname were considered (high kinship model), the discrepancy decreased by 8–30% at the cost of a larger variance. Criteria aimed at maximizing locally-spread patrilineages and long-term residency appeared to be affected by recent gene flows much more than expected. Selection of the more frequent family names following low kinship criteria proved to be a suitable approach only for historically stable communities. In any other case true random sampling, despite its high variance, did not return more biased estimates than other selective methods. Our results indicate that the sampling of individuals bearing historically documented surnames (founders' method) should be applied, especially when studying the male-specific genome, to prevent an over-stratification of ancient and recent genetic components that heavily biases inferences and statistics. PMID:26452043

  6. A genetic epidemiology approach to cyber-security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Santiago; Kott, Alexander; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-07-16

    While much attention has been paid to the vulnerability of computer networks to node and link failure, there is limited systematic understanding of the factors that determine the likelihood that a node (computer) is compromised. We therefore collect threat log data in a university network to study the patterns of threat activity for individual hosts. We relate this information to the properties of each host as observed through network-wide scans, establishing associations between the network services a host is running and the kinds of threats to which it is susceptible. We propose a methodology to associate services to threats inspired by the tools used in genetics to identify statistical associations between mutations and diseases. The proposed approach allows us to determine probabilities of infection directly from observation, offering an automated high-throughput strategy to develop comprehensive metrics for cyber-security.

  7. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  8. A Full Bayesian Approach for Boolean Genetic Network Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shengtong; Wong, Raymond K. W.; Lee, Thomas C. M.; Shen, Linghao; Li, Shuo-Yen R.; Fan, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    Boolean networks are a simple but efficient model for describing gene regulatory systems. A number of algorithms have been proposed to infer Boolean networks. However, these methods do not take full consideration of the effects of noise and model uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a full Bayesian approach to infer Boolean genetic networks. Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms are used to obtain the posterior samples of both the network structure and the related parameters. In addition to regular link addition and removal moves, which can guarantee the irreducibility of the Markov chain for traversing the whole network space, carefully constructed mixture proposals are used to improve the Markov chain Monte Carlo convergence. Both simulations and a real application on cell-cycle data show that our method is more powerful than existing methods for the inference of both the topology and logic relations of the Boolean network from observed data. PMID:25551820

  9. A full bayesian approach for boolean genetic network inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtong Han

    Full Text Available Boolean networks are a simple but efficient model for describing gene regulatory systems. A number of algorithms have been proposed to infer Boolean networks. However, these methods do not take full consideration of the effects of noise and model uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a full Bayesian approach to infer Boolean genetic networks. Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms are used to obtain the posterior samples of both the network structure and the related parameters. In addition to regular link addition and removal moves, which can guarantee the irreducibility of the Markov chain for traversing the whole network space, carefully constructed mixture proposals are used to improve the Markov chain Monte Carlo convergence. Both simulations and a real application on cell-cycle data show that our method is more powerful than existing methods for the inference of both the topology and logic relations of the Boolean network from observed data.

  10. Marine derived polysaccharides for biomedical applications: chemical modification approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ayala, Giovanna Gomez; Malinconico, Mario; Laurienzo, Paola

    2008-09-03

    Polysaccharide-based biomaterials are an emerging class in several biomedical fields such as tissue regeneration, particularly for cartilage, drug delivery devices and gelentrapment systems for the immobilization of cells. Important properties of the polysaccharides include controllable biological activity, biodegradability, and their ability to form hydrogels. Most of the polysaccharides used derive from natural sources; particularly, alginate and chitin, two polysaccharides which have an extensive history of use in medicine, pharmacy and basic sciences, and can be easily extracted from marine plants (algae kelp) and crab shells, respectively. The recent rediscovery of poly-saccharidebased materials is also attributable to new synthetic routes for their chemical modification, with the aim of promoting new biological activities and/or to modify the final properties of the biomaterials for specific purposes. These synthetic strategies also involve the combination of polysaccharides with other polymers. A review of the more recent research in the field of chemical modification of alginate, chitin and its derivative chitosan is presented. Moreover, we report as case studies the results of our recent work concerning various different approaches and applications of polysaccharide-based biomaterials, such as the realization of novel composites based on calcium sulphate blended with alginate and with a chemically modified chitosan, the synthesis of novel alginate-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers and the development of a family of materials based on alginate and acrylic polymers of potential interest as drug delivery systems.

  11. Marine Derived Polysaccharides for Biomedical Applications: Chemical Modification Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Laurienzo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide-based biomaterials are an emerging class in several biomedical fields such as tissue regeneration, particularly for cartilage, drug delivery devices and gelentrapment systems for the immobilization of cells. Important properties of the polysaccharides include controllable biological activity, biodegradability, and their ability to form hydrogels. Most of the polysaccharides used derive from natural sources; particularly, alginate and chitin, two polysaccharides which have an extensive history of use in medicine, pharmacy and basic sciences, and can be easily extracted from marine plants (algae kelp and crab shells, respectively. The recent rediscovery of poly-saccharidebased materials is also attributable to new synthetic routes for their chemical modification, with the aim of promoting new biological activities and/or to modify the final properties of the biomaterials for specific purposes. These synthetic strategies also involve the combination of polysaccharides with other polymers. A review of the more recent research in the field of chemical modification of alginate, chitin and its derivative chitosan is presented. Moreover, we report as case studies the results of our recent work concerning various different approaches and applications of polysaccharide-based biomaterials, such as the realization of novel composites based on calcium sulphate blended with alginate and with a chemically modified chitosan, the synthesis of novel alginate-poly(ethylene glycol copolymers and the development of a family of materials based on alginate and acrylic polymers of potential interest as drug delivery systems.

  12. AMAZON RAINFOREST COSMETICS: CHEMICAL APPROACH FOR QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Funasaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The market for natural cosmetics featuring ingredients derived from Amazon natural resources is growing worldwide. However, there is neither enough scientific basis nor quality control of these ingredients. This paper is an account of the chemical constituents and their biological activities of fourteen Amazonian species used in cosmetic industry, including açaí (Euterpe oleracea, andiroba (Carapa guianensis, bacuri (Platonia insignis, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, buriti (Mauritia vinifera or M. flexuosa, cumaru (Dipteryx odorata, cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum, guarana (Paullinia cupana, mulateiro (Calycophyllum spruceanum, murumuru (Astrocaryum murumuru, patawa (Oenocarpus bataua or Jessenia bataua, pracaxi (Pentaclethra macroloba, rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora, and ucuuba (Virola sebifera. Based on the reviewed articles, we selected chemical markers for the quality control purpose and evaluated analytical methods. Even though chromatographic and spectroscopic methods are major analytical techniques in the studies of these species, molecular approaches will also be important as used in food and medicine traceability. Only a little phytochemical study is available about most of the Amazonian species and some species such as açaí and andiroba have many reports on chemical constituents, but studies on biological activities of isolated compounds and sampling with geographical variation are limited.

  13. Rapidity-dependent chemical potentials in a statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Biedroń, Bartłomiej

    2008-04-01

    We present a single-freeze-out model with thermal and geometric parameters dependent on the position within the fireball and use it to describe the rapidity distribution and transverse-momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons measured at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_NN}=200\\,\\, GeV by BRAHMS. THERMINATOR is used to perform the necessary simulation, which includes all resonance decays. The result of the fit to the data is the expected growth of the baryon and strange chemical potentials with the spatial rapidity αpar. The value of the baryon chemical potential at αpar ~ 3 is about 200 MeV, i.e. it lies in the range of the highest SPS energies. The chosen geometry of the fireball has a decreasing transverse size as the magnitude of αpar is increased, which also corresponds to decreasing transverse flow. The strange chemical potential obtained from the fit to the K+/K- ratio is such that the local strangeness density in the fireball is compatible with zero. The resulting rapidity distribution of net protons are described qualitatively within the statistical approach. As a result of our study, the knowledge of the 'topography' of the fireball is acquired, allowing for other analyses and predictions. Research supported by the Polish Ministry of Education and Science, grants N202 034 32/0918 and 2 P03B 02828.

  14. Next-generation sequencing approaches in genetic rodent model systems to study functional effects of human genetic variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, V.; Cuppen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing improve existing techniques and enable new approaches in genetics and functional genomics, bringing about unprecedented coverage, resolution and sensitivity. Enhanced toolsets can facilitate the untangling of connections between genomic variation, environmental facto

  15. Next-generation sequencing approaches in genetic rodent model systems to study functional effects of human genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Rapid advances in DNA sequencing improve existing techniques and enable new approaches in genetics and functional genomics, bringing about unprecedented coverage, resolution and sensitivity. Enhanced toolsets can facilitate the untangling of connections between genomic variation, environmental facto

  16. Genetics in psychosomatic medicine : research designs and statistical approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Snieder, Harold; Dong, Yanbin; de Geus, Eco

    2007-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that genetic factors influence many of the behaviors and disease endpoints of interest to psychosomatic medicine researchers. There has been increasing interest in incorporating genetic variation markers into psychosomatic research. In this Statistical Corner article

  17. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  18. Chemical genetic induction of meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Moreno, Angel; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Hidalgo, Elena; Ayté, José

    2012-04-15

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, meiosis is inhibited by the protein kinase Pat1, which phosphorylates and inactivates Mei2, an RNA binding protein essential for the initiation of meiosis. When diploid cells are deprived of nutrients, they initiate a cascade of events leading to the inactivation of Pat1 and entry into meiosis. Strains carrying the temperature-sensitive pat1-114 allele are forced to enter into meiosis when shifted to the non-permissive temperature, independently of the ploidity of the cell. This system has been extensively used, since it is possible to achieve a highly synchronous meiosis, which is a must for any molecular or microscopic approach that aims to decipher the mechanisms governing meiosis. Here, we have designed a new system to obtain a similarly synchronous meiosis, but independently of temperature shifts. Thus, by introducing a mutation in the ATP pocket of Pat1, we have generated a protein kinase that, in the presence of small specific inhibitors, can be inactivated. This results in forced entry into meiosis without the need of a temperature shift, minimizing the introduction of heat shock or any other stress responses along the meiotic waves of transcription.

  19. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Decou, Raphaël; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  20. A quantum informational approach for dissecting chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Duperrouzel, Corinne; Boguslawski, Katharina; Barcza, Gergerly; Legeza, Örs; Ayers, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    We present a conceptionally different approach to dissect bond-formation processes in metal-driven catalysis using concepts from quantum information theory. Our method uses the entanglement and correlation among molecular orbitals to analyze changes in electronic structure that accompany chemical processes. As a proof-of-principle example, the evolution of nickel-ethene bond-formation is dissected which allows us to monitor the interplay of back-bonding and $\\pi$-donation along the reaction coordinate. Furthermore, the reaction pathway of nickel-ethene complexation is analyzed using quantum chemistry methods revealing the presence of a transition state. Our study supports the crucial role of metal-to-ligand back-donation in the bond-forming process of nickel-ethene.

  1. Chemical Abstracts Service approach to management of large data bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffenberger, M A; Wigington, R L

    1975-02-01

    When information handling is "the business," as it is at Chemical Abstract Service (CAS), the total organization must be involved in information management. Since 1967, when, as a result of long-range planning efforts, CAS adopted a "data-base approach" to management of both the processing system and the distribution of information files, CAS has been grappling with the problems of managing large collections of information in computer-based systems. This paper describes what has been done at CAS in the management of large files and what we see as necessary, as a result of our experience, to improve and complete the information management system that is the foundation of our production processes.

  2. Bioactives from fruit processing wastes: Green approaches to valuable chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jhumur; Singh, Ramkrishna; Vijayaraghavan, R; MacFarlane, Douglas; Patti, Antonio F; Arora, Amit

    2017-06-15

    Fruit processing industries contribute more than 0.5billion tonnes of waste worldwide. The global availability of this feedstock and its untapped potential has encouraged researchers to perform detailed studies on value-addition potential of fruit processing waste (FPW). Compared to general food or other biomass derived waste, FPW are found to be selective and concentrated in nature. The peels, pomace and seed fractions of FPW could potentially be a good feedstock for recovery of bioactive compounds such as pectin, lipids, flavonoids, dietary fibres etc. A novel bio-refinery approach would aim to produce a wider range of valuable chemicals from FPW. The wastes from majority of the extraction processes may further be used as renewable sources for production of biofuels. The literature on value addition to fruit derived waste is diverse. This paper presents a review of fruit waste derived bioactives. The financial challenges encountered in existing methods are also discussed.

  3. Chemical reaction network approaches to Biochemical Systems Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arceo, Carlene Perpetua P; Jose, Editha C; Marin-Sanguino, Alberto; Mendoza, Eduardo R

    2015-11-01

    This paper provides a framework to represent a Biochemical Systems Theory (BST) model (in either GMA or S-system form) as a chemical reaction network with power law kinetics. Using this representation, some basic properties and the application of recent results of Chemical Reaction Network Theory regarding steady states of such systems are shown. In particular, Injectivity Theory, including network concordance [36] and the Jacobian Determinant Criterion [43], a "Lifting Theorem" for steady states [26] and the comprehensive results of Müller and Regensburger [31] on complex balanced equilibria are discussed. A partial extension of a recent Emulation Theorem of Cardelli for mass action systems [3] is derived for a subclass of power law kinetic systems. However, it is also shown that the GMA and S-system models of human purine metabolism [10] do not display the reactant-determined kinetics assumed by Müller and Regensburger and hence only a subset of BST models can be handled with their approach. Moreover, since the reaction networks underlying many BST models are not weakly reversible, results for non-complex balanced equilibria are also needed.

  4. Genetic programming approach to evaluate complexity of texture images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Gianluigi; Corchs, Silvia; Gasparini, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    We adopt genetic programming (GP) to define a measure that can predict complexity perception of texture images. We perform psychophysical experiments on three different datasets to collect data on the perceived complexity. The subjective data are used for training, validation, and test of the proposed measure. These data are also used to evaluate several possible candidate measures of texture complexity related to both low level and high level image features. We select four of them (namely roughness, number of regions, chroma variance, and memorability) to be combined in a GP framework. This approach allows a nonlinear combination of the measures and could give hints on how the related image features interact in complexity perception. The proposed complexity measure M exhibits Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.890 on the training set, 0.728 on the validation set, and 0.724 on the test set. M outperforms each of all the single measures considered. From the statistical analysis of different GP candidate solutions, we found that the roughness measure evaluated on the gray level image is the most dominant one, followed by the memorability, the number of regions, and finally the chroma variance.

  5. Genetic braid optimization: A heuristic approach to compute quasiparticle braids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ross B.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2013-02-01

    In topologically protected quantum computation, quantum gates can be carried out by adiabatically braiding two-dimensional quasiparticles, reminiscent of entangled world lines. Bonesteel [Phys. Rev. Lett.10.1103/PhysRevLett.95.140503 95, 140503 (2005)], as well as Leijnse and Flensberg [Phys. Rev. B10.1103/PhysRevB.86.104511 86, 104511 (2012)], recently provided schemes for computing quantum gates from quasiparticle braids. Mathematically, the problem of executing a gate becomes that of finding a product of the generators (matrices) in that set that approximates the gate best, up to an error. To date, efficient methods to compute these gates only strive to optimize for accuracy. We explore the possibility of using a generic approach applicable to a variety of braiding problems based on evolutionary (genetic) algorithms. The method efficiently finds optimal braids while allowing the user to optimize for the relative utilities of accuracy and/or length. Furthermore, when optimizing for error only, the method can quickly produce efficient braids.

  6. An unbiased systems genetics approach to mapping genetic loci modulating susceptibility to severe streptococcal sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourtan F Abdeltawab

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Striking individual differences in severity of group A streptococcal (GAS sepsis have been noted, even among patients infected with the same bacterial strain. We had provided evidence that HLA class II allelic variation contributes significantly to differences in systemic disease severity by modulating host responses to streptococcal superantigens. Inasmuch as the bacteria produce additional virulence factors that participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease, we sought to identify additional gene networks modulating GAS sepsis. Accordingly, we applied a systems genetics approach using a panel of advanced recombinant inbred mice. By analyzing disease phenotypes in the context of mice genotypes we identified a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL on Chromosome 2 between 22 and 34 Mb that strongly predicts disease severity, accounting for 25%-30% of variance. This QTL harbors several polymorphic genes known to regulate immune responses to bacterial infections. We evaluated candidate genes within this QTL using multiple parameters that included linkage, gene ontology, variation in gene expression, cocitation networks, and biological relevance, and identified interleukin1 alpha and prostaglandin E synthases pathways as key networks involved in modulating GAS sepsis severity. The association of GAS sepsis with multiple pathways underscores the complexity of traits modulating GAS sepsis and provides a powerful approach for analyzing interactive traits affecting outcomes of other infectious diseases.

  7. Forward Genetic Approaches for Elucidation of Novel Regulators of Lyme Arthritis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K.C. Bramwell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients experiencing natural infection with Borrelia burgdorferi display a spectrum of associated symptoms and severity, strongly implicating the impact of genetically determined host factors in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Herein, we provide a summary of the host genetic factors that have been demonstrated to influence the severity and chronicity of Lyme arthritis symptoms, and a review of the resources available, current progress, and added value of a forward genetic approach for identification of novel genetic regulators.

  8. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L., E-mail: sarah.burgess@alum.mit.edu [American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 2009–10 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  9. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease:A clinical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie A Chaix; Gregor Andelfinger; Paul Khairy

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease(CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient followup. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel.

  10. The Multiplexed Chemical Kinetic Photoionization Mass Spectrometer: A New Approach To Isomer-resolved Chemical Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, David L.; Zou, Peng; Johnsen, Howard; Hayden, Carl C.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Knyazev, Vadim D.; North, Simon W.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-08-28

    We have developed a multiplexed time- and photon-energy?resolved photoionizationmass spectrometer for the study of the kinetics and isomeric product branching of gasphase, neutral chemical reactions. The instrument utilizes a side-sampled flow tubereactor, continuously tunable synchrotron radiation for photoionization, a multi-massdouble-focusing mass spectrometer with 100percent duty cycle, and a time- and positionsensitive detector for single ion counting. This approach enables multiplexed, universal detection of molecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition to measurement of rate coefficients as a function of temperature and pressure, different structural isomers can be distinguished based on their photoionization efficiency curves, providing a more detailed probe of reaction mechanisms. The multiplexed 3-dimensional data structure (intensity as a function of molecular mass, reaction time, and photoionization energy) provides insights that might not be available in serial acquisition, as well as additional constraints on data interpretation.

  11. [A novel approach to techniques in genetic testing for cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Jun-ichi

    2014-04-01

    In molecular targeted drug therapy, genetic screening is carried out to identify the existence of target genes that are specifically expressed in cancer cells. Conventional methods for detecting the mutation of genes in cancer cells through the use of purified DNA is time consuming, especially in the case of the enzymatic treatment of pathological specimens, and it is difficult to finish all these protocols on the same day. Also, depending on the condition of the patients, it may be difficult to perform surgery or biopsy, and pathological specimens are not always obtainable. Thus, sometimes genetic screening using purified DNA and the enzymatic treatment of pathological specimens cannot be performed. We have successfully solved these problems using i-densy, a genetic analysis device, and two different methods of genetic testing for cancer. The first is a method which, without extracting DNA, uses simply pretreated pathological specimens for genetic screening. Using deparaffinized specimens that have only been heat-treated for a short period of time, we were able to obtain the exact same results as if we had extracted DNA. The second is the highly specific genetic screening technique, the MBP-QP method. Using this method, we were able to confirm the detection of genetic mutation from the DNA of blood plasma. It is now possible to screen for the mutation of genes in cancer cells using just a blood sample from patients without using tissue or cells, which also has little burden on the patient.

  12. [The discussion of the infiltrative model of chemical knowledge stepping into genetics teaching in agricultural institute or university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Luo, Pei-Gao

    2010-05-01

    Chemistry is an important group of basic courses, while genetics is one of the important major-basic courses in curriculum of many majors in agricultural institutes or universities. In order to establish the linkage between the major course and the basic course, the ability of application of the chemical knowledge previously learned in understanding genetic knowledge in genetics teaching is worthy of discussion for genetics teachers. In this paper, the authors advocate to apply some chemical knowledge previously learned to understand genetic knowledge in genetics teaching with infiltrative model, which could help students learn and understand genetic knowledge more deeply. Analysis of the intrinsic logistic relationship among the knowledge of different courses and construction of the integral knowledge network are useful for students to improve their analytic, comprehensive and logistic abilities. By this way, we could explore a new teaching model to develop the talents with new ideas and comprehensive competence in agricultural fields.

  13. AI AND SAR APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING CHEMICAL CARCINOGENICITY: SURVEY AND STATUS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide variety of artificial intelligence (AI) and structure-activity relationship (SAR approaches have been applied to tackling the general problem of predicting rodent chemical carcinogenicity. Given the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms relative to this endpoin...

  14. Potential International Approaches to Ownership/Control of Human Genetic Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    In its governance activities for genetic resources, the international community has adopted various approaches to their ownership, including: free access; common heritage of mankind; intellectual property rights; and state sovereign rights. They have also created systems which combine elements of these approaches. While governance of plant and animal genetic resources is well-established internationally, there has not yet been a clear approach selected for human genetic resources. Based on assessment of the goals which international governance of human genetic resources ought to serve, and the implications for how they will be accessed and utilised, it is argued that common heritage of mankind will be the most appropriate approach to adopt to their ownership/control. It does this with the aim of stimulating discussion in this area and providing a starting point for deeper consideration of how a common heritage of mankind, or similar, regime for human genetic resources would function and be implemented.

  15. Integrating demographic and genetic approaches in plant conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; Luijten, S.H.; den Nijs, J.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    We summarize the problems that populations of formerly common plants may encounter when habitat fragmentation isolates them and reduces population size. Genetic erosion, inbreeding depression, Allee-effects on reproductive success, catastrophes and environmental stochasticity are illustrated with st

  16. Mobile transporter path planning using a genetic algorithm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1988-01-01

    The use of an optimization technique known as a genetic algorithm for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the Space Station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Specific elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research. However, trajectory planning problems are common in space systems and the genetic algorithm provides an attractive alternative to the classical techniques used to solve these problems.

  17. Combining Single (Mixed) Metric Approach and Genetic Algorithm for QoS Routing Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡世余; 谢剑英

    2004-01-01

    A hybrid algorithm for the delay constrained least cost path problem is proposed through combination of single (mixed) metric approach and genetic algorithm. Compared with the known genetic algorithm for the same problem, the new algorithm adopts integral coding scheme and new genetic operator, which reduces the search space and improves the efficiency of genetic operation. Meanwhile, the single (mixed) approach accelerates the convergence speed. Simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm can find near-optimal even optimal solutions within moderate numbers of generations.

  18. Introduction to Focus Issue: Quantitative Approaches to Genetic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Collins, James J.; Glass, Leon

    2013-06-01

    All cells of living organisms contain similar genetic instructions encoded in the organism's DNA. In any particular cell, the control of the expression of each different gene is regulated, in part, by binding of molecular complexes to specific regions of the DNA. The molecular complexes are composed of protein molecules, called transcription factors, combined with various other molecules such as hormones and drugs. Since transcription factors are coded by genes, cellular function is partially determined by genetic networks. Recent research is making large strides to understand both the structure and the function of these networks. Further, the emerging discipline of synthetic biology is engineering novel gene circuits with specific dynamic properties to advance both basic science and potential practical applications. Although there is not yet a universally accepted mathematical framework for studying the properties of genetic networks, the strong analogies between the activation and inhibition of gene expression and electric circuits suggest frameworks based on logical switching circuits. This focus issue provides a selection of papers reflecting current research directions in the quantitative analysis of genetic networks. The work extends from molecular models for the binding of proteins, to realistic detailed models of cellular metabolism. Between these extremes are simplified models in which genetic dynamics are modeled using classical methods of systems engineering, Boolean switching networks, differential equations that are continuous analogues of Boolean switching networks, and differential equations in which control is based on power law functions. The mathematical techniques are applied to study: (i) naturally occurring gene networks in living organisms including: cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma genitalium, fruit flies, immune cells in mammals; (ii) synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli and yeast; and (iii) electronic circuits modeling genetic networks

  19. Chemical variation in a dominant tree species: population divergence, selection and genetic stability across environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne M O'Reilly-Wapstra

    Full Text Available Understanding among and within population genetic variation of ecologically important plant traits provides insight into the potential evolutionary processes affecting those traits. The strength and consistency of selection driving variability in traits would be affected by plasticity in differences among genotypes across environments (G×E. We investigated population divergence, selection and environmental plasticity of foliar plant secondary metabolites (PSMs in a dominant tree species, Eucalyptus globulus. Using two common garden trials we examined variation in PSMs at multiple genetic scales; among 12 populations covering the full geographic range of the species and among up to 60 families within populations. Significant genetic variation in the expression of many PSMs resides both among and within populations of E. globulus with moderate (e.g., sideroxylonal A h(2op = 0.24 to high (e.g., macrocarpal G h(2op = 0.48 narrow sense heritabilities and high coefficients of additive genetic variation estimated for some compounds. A comparison of Qst and Fst estimates suggest that variability in some of these traits may be due to selection. Importantly, there was no genetic by environment interaction in the expression of any of the quantitative chemical traits despite often significant site effects. These results provide evidence that natural selection has contributed to population divergence in PSMs in E. globulus, and identifies the formylated phloroglucinol compounds (particularly sideroxylonal and a dominant oil, 1,8-cineole, as candidates for traits whose genetic architecture has been shaped by divergent selection. Additionally, as the genetic differences in these PSMs that influence community phenotypes is stable across environments, the role of plant genotype in structuring communities is strengthened and these genotypic differences may be relatively stable under global environmental changes.

  20. Optimization of a Reduced Chemical Kinetic Model for HCCI Engine Simulations by Micro-Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A reduced chemical kinetic model (44 species and 72 reactions) for the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion of n-heptane was optimized to improve its autoignition predictions under different engine operating conditions. The seven kinetic parameters of the optimized model were determined by using the combination of a micro-genetic algorithm optimization methodology and the SENKIN program of CHEMKIN chemical kinetics software package. The optimization was performed within the range of equivalence ratios 0.2-1.2, initial temperature 310-375 K and initial pressure 0.1-0.3 MPa. The engine simulations show that the optimized model agrees better with the detailed chemical kinetic model (544 species and 2 446 reactions) than the original model does.

  1. Bioethical – Theological and Legal approach in genetic testing of adult persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Katsimigas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Thorough genetic testing gives possibility's diagnosis of genetic diseases or identity individuals, who genetic predisposed for disease outbreak Aims: To present/identify the ethical and religious issues, which arise from the application of genetic testing in humans. Furthermore, the principles from the European and Greek legislation regarding genetic testing will be discussed. Materials & Methods: A literature review based on both review and research literature, conducted during the period of (1993-2010, derived from MEDLINE, SCOPUS and ΙΑΤΡΟΤΕΚ databases using as key words: Bioethics, genetic testing, bioethics, access, genetic information, orthodox ethics, Legislation. Results: Genetic testing for disease prevention is of primary importance. The main ethical concerns however, are related to the dissemination/ disclosure and use of this information from insurance companies, healthcare authorities, scientists, forensic departments/services and employers. Similarly, the orthodox religion accepts the use of genetic testing for the prevention and treatment of diseases as long as there is no break of confidentiality. Finally, considering the legal issues, it is apparent that genetic information is regarded as personal information and as such it is protected from the national (Greek and international law. Conclusions: It is necessary to ensure that the public authorities protect the rights of their citizens regarding genetic testing and all insurance companies, employers, schools etc. should not be allowed to have access to genetic information. Such an approach will ensure that social discrimination, obstructions or other inequalities between people on the basis of genetic information is avoided.

  2. A propensity score approach to correction for bias due to population stratification using genetic and non-genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita

    2009-12-01

    Confounding due to population stratification (PS) arises when differences in both allele and disease frequencies exist in a population of mixed racial/ethnic subpopulations. Genomic control, structured association, principal components analysis (PCA), and multidimensional scaling (MDS) approaches have been proposed to address this bias using genetic markers. However, confounding due to PS can also be due to non-genetic factors. Propensity scores are widely used to address confounding in observational studies but have not been adapted to deal with PS in genetic association studies. We propose a genomic propensity score (GPS) approach to correct for bias due to PS that considers both genetic and non-genetic factors. We compare the GPS method with PCA and MDS using simulation studies. Our results show that GPS can adequately adjust and consistently correct for bias due to PS. Under no/mild, moderate, and severe PS, GPS yielded estimated with bias close to 0 (mean=-0.0044, standard error=0.0087). Under moderate or severe PS, the GPS method consistently outperforms the PCA method in terms of bias, coverage probability (CP), and type I error. Under moderate PS, the GPS method consistently outperforms the MDS method in terms of CP. PCA maintains relatively high power compared to both MDS and GPS methods under the simulated situations. GPS and MDS are comparable in terms of statistical properties such as bias, type I error, and power. The GPS method provides a novel and robust tool for obtaining less-biased estimates of genetic associations that can consider both genetic and non-genetic factors.

  3. [Molecular genetic bases of adaptation processes and approaches to their analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenkova, E A

    2013-01-01

    Great interest in studying the molecular genetic bases of the adaptation processes is explained by their importance in understanding evolutionary changes, in the development ofintraspecific and interspecific genetic diversity, and in the creation of approaches and programs for maintaining and restoring the population. The article examines the sources and conditions for generating adaptive genetic variability and contribution of neutral and adaptive genetic variability to the population structure of the species; methods for identifying the adaptive genetic variability on the genome level are also described. Considerable attention is paid to the potential of new technologies of genome analysis, including next-generation sequencing and some accompanying methods. In conclusion, the important role of the joint use of genomics and proteomics approaches in understanding the molecular genetic bases of adaptation is emphasized.

  4. A genetic algorithm approach in interface and surface structure optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part a global optimization method is developed for the interface and surface structures optimization. Two prototype systems are chosen to be studied. One is Si[001] symmetric tilted grain boundaries and the other is Ag/Au induced Si(111) surface. It is found that Genetic Algorithm is very efficient in finding lowest energy structures in both cases. Not only existing structures in the experiments can be reproduced, but also many new structures can be predicted using Genetic Algorithm. Thus it is shown that Genetic Algorithm is a extremely powerful tool for the material structures predictions. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the explanation of an experimental observation of thermal radiation from three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal structures. The experimental results seems astounding and confusing, yet the theoretical models in the paper revealed the physics insight behind the phenomena and can well reproduced the experimental results.

  5. Genetic and chemical knockdown: a complementary strategy for evaluating an anti-infective target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran V

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vasanthi Ramachandran,1,* Ragini Singh,2,* Xiaoyu Yang,1 Ragadeepthi Tunduguru,1 Subrat Mohapatra,2 Swati Khandelwal,2 Sanjana Patel,2 Santanu Datta21AstraZeneca India R&D, Bangalore, India; 2Cellworks India, Bangalore, India *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The equity of a drug target is principally evaluated by its genetic vulnerability with tools ranging from antisense- and microRNA-driven knockdowns to induced expression of the target protein. In order to upgrade the process of antibacterial target identification and discern its most effective type of inhibition, an in silico toolbox that evaluates its genetic and chemical vulnerability leading either to stasis or cidal outcome was constructed and validated. By precise simulation and careful experimentation using enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase and its specific inhibitor glyphosate, it was shown that genetic knockdown is distinct from chemical knockdown. It was also observed that depending on the particular mechanism of inhibition, viz competitive, uncompetitive, and noncompetitive, the antimicrobial potency of an inhibitor could be orders of magnitude different. Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to glyphosate and the lack of it in Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be predicted by the in silico platform. Finally, as predicted and simulated in the in silico platform, the translation of growth inhibition to a cidal effect was able to be demonstrated experimentally by altering the carbon source from sorbitol to glucose.Keywords: knockdown, inhibition, in silico, vulnerability

  6. Horizontal symmetry in the algebraic approach of genetic code

    CERN Document Server

    Godina-Nava, J J

    2013-01-01

    Using concepts of physics of elementary particles concerning the breaking of symmetry and grannd unified theory we propose to study with the algebraic approximation the degeneracy finded in the genetic code with the incorporation of a horizontal symmetry used in gauge theories to fit the contents of the multiplets of the genetic code. It is used the algebraic approch of Hornos et. al. \\cite{main,PRL71,PRE,MPLB}. We propose an example for the incorporation of horizontal symmetry to study mixtures of elements of the multiplets.

  7. Horizontal symmetry in the algebraic approach of genetic code

    OpenAIRE

    Godina-Nava, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Using concepts of physics of elementary particles concerning the breaking of symmetry and grannd unified theory we propose to study with the algebraic approximation the degeneracy finded in the genetic code with the incorporation of a horizontal symmetry used in gauge theories to fit the contents of the multiplets of the genetic code. It is used the algebraic approch of Hornos et. al. \\cite{main,PRL71,PRE,MPLB}. We propose an example for the incorporation of horizontal symmetry to study mixtu...

  8. An Improved Hybrid Genetic Algorithm for Chemical Plant Layout Optimization with Novel Non-overlapping and Toxic Gas Dispersion Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; WANG Zhenyu; ZHU Qunxiong

    2013-01-01

    New approaches for facility distribution in chemical plants are proposed including an improved non-overlapping constraint based on projection relationships of facilities and a novel toxic gas dispersion constraint.In consideration of the large number of variables in the plant layout model,our new method can significantly reduce the number of variables with their own projection relationships.Also,as toxic gas dispersion is a usual incident in a chemical plant,a simple approach to describe the gas leakage is proposed,which can clearly represent the constraints of potential emission source and sitting facilities.For solving the plant layout model,an improved genetic algorithm (GA) based on infeasible solution fix technique is proposed,which improves the globe search ability of GA.The case study and experiment show that a better layout plan can be obtained with our method,and the safety factors such as gas dispersion and minimum distances can be well handled in the solution.

  9. Congenital hydrocephalus in clinical practice : A genetic diagnostic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Krapels, P. C.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; van Lint, F. H. M.; Willekes, C.; Weber, J. W.; Gavilanes, A. W. D.; Macville, M. V. E.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Engelen, J. J. M.; Bakker, J.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. The etiology is very heterogeneous. Little is known about the genetic causes of congenital hydrocephalus. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with primary congenital hydrocephalus referred to the Department of Cli

  10. DNA enrichment approaches to identify unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arulandhu, Alfred J.; Dijk, van Jeroen P.; Dobnik, David; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana; Kok, Esther J.

    2016-01-01

    With the increased global production of different genetically modified (GM) plant varieties, chances increase that unauthorized GM organisms (UGMOs) may enter the food chain. At the same time, the detection of UGMOs is a challenging task because of the limited sequence information that will gener

  11. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers fo

  12. A Fuzzy Genetic Algorithm Approach to an Adaptive Information Retrieval Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Bautista, Maria J.; Vila, Maria-Amparo; Larsen, Henrik Legind

    1999-01-01

    Presents an approach to a Genetic Information Retrieval Agent Filter (GIRAF) that filters and ranks documents retrieved from the Internet according to users' preferences by using a Genetic Algorithm and fuzzy set theory to handle the imprecision of users' preferences and users' evaluation of the retrieved documents. (Author/LRW)

  13. Food Control and a Citizen Science Approach for Improving Teaching of Genetics in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Y. J.; Muñoz-Colmenero, A. M.; Dopico, E.; Miralles, L.; Garcia-Vazquez, E.

    2016-01-01

    A Citizen Science approach was implemented in the laboratory practices of Genetics at the University of Oviedo, related with the engaging topic of Food Control. Real samples of food products consumed by students at home ("students as samplers") were employed as teaching material in three different courses of Genetics during the academic…

  14. Chemical and genetic relationships among sage ( Salvia officinalis L.) cultivars and Judean sage ( Salvia judaica Boiss.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böszörményi, Andrea; Héthelyi, Eva; Farkas, Agnes; Horváth, Györgyi; Papp, Nóra; Lemberkovics, Eva; Szoke, Eva

    2009-06-10

    The essential oil composition and genetic variability of common sage ( Salvia officinalis L.) and its three ornamental cultivars ('Purpurascens', 'Tricolor', and 'Kew Gold') as well as Judean sage ( Salvia judaica Boiss.) were analyzed by GC-FID, GC-MS, and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Common sage and its cultivars contained the same volatile compounds; only the ratio of compounds differed. The main compounds were the sesquiterpene alpha-humulene and the monoterpenes beta-pinene, eucalyptol, and camphor. Judean sage contained mainly the sesquiterpenes beta-cubebene and ledol. All of the samples exhibited characteristic RAPD patterns that allowed their identification. Cluster analyses based on oil composition and RAPD markers corresponded very well to each other, suggesting that there is a strong relationship between the chemical profile and the genetic variability.

  15. A molecular-genetic approach to studying source-sink interactions in Arabidopsis thalian. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, S. I.

    2000-06-01

    This is a final report describing the results of the research funded by the DOE Energy Biosciences Program grant entitled ''A Molecular-Genetic Approach to Studying Source-Sink Interactions in Arabidiopsis thaliana''.

  16. A systems genetics approach provides a bridge from discovered genetic variants to biological pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Nakaoka

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have yielded novel genetic loci underlying common diseases. We propose a systems genetics approach to utilize these discoveries for better understanding of the genetic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Current evidence of genetic associations with RA was sought through PubMed and the NHGRI GWAS catalog. The associations of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1 alleles were confirmed in 1,287 cases and 1,500 controls of Japanese subjects. Among these, HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight SNPs showed significant associations and all but one of the variants had the same direction of effect as identified in the previous studies, indicating that the genetic risk factors underlying RA are shared across populations. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC for the genetic risk score based on the selected variants was 68.4%. For seropositive RA patients only, the AUC improved to 70.9%, indicating good but suboptimal predictive ability. A simulation study shows that more than 200 additional loci with similar effect size as recent GWAS findings or 20 rare variants with intermediate effects are needed to achieve AUC = 80.0%. We performed the random walk with restart (RWR algorithm to prioritize genes for future mapping studies. The performance of the algorithm was confirmed by leave-one-out cross-validation. The RWR algorithm pointed to ZAP70 in the first rank, in which mutation causes RA-like autoimmune arthritis in mice. By applying the hierarchical clustering method to a subnetwork comprising RA-associated genes and top-ranked genes by the RWR, we found three functional modules relevant to RA etiology: "leukocyte activation and differentiation", "pattern-recognition receptor signaling pathway", and "chemokines and their receptors".These results suggest that the systems genetics approach is useful to find directions of future mapping strategies to illuminate

  17. Screening of herbal extracts influencing hematopoiesis and their chemical genetic effects in embryonic zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajaretinam Rajesh Kannan; Samuel Gnana Prakash Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To screen the herbal extracts influencing the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in zebrafish embryos and their chemical genetic effects. Methods: The herbals used in this study had been widely applicable in Siddha medicines in South India. Herbal extracts were treated in zebrafish embryos at 4 d post fertilization and the extracts inducing the HSC were enumerated in hemocytometer. The biocompatibility and the organogenesis of the screened extracts were assessed in the zebrafish embryos for their chemical genetic effects. The LC50 values were calculated with their parallel control. The blood cells were enumerated. Results: The level of RBC was found increased in the Bergera koenigii (B. koenigii) at 15 μg/mL (P<0.05), Mimosa pudica (M. pudica) at 20 μg/mL (P<0.05) and Solanum trilobatum (S. trilobatum) at 25 μg/mL (P<0.05) and decreased RBC level was found in Phyllanthus niruri (P. niruri) at 30 μg/mL (P<0.05). The WBC count was found increased in S. trilobatum at 20 μg/mL (P<0.05) and Annona muricata (Annona muricata) at 15 μg/mL (P<0.05) and the Vitis quadrangularis (V. quadrangularis) at 20 μg/mL (P<0.05) decreased the WBC level. There were no notable effects in heart beats and the chemical genetic effects were observed at higher concentration of the extract resulting in Pericardial bulging, trunk tail flexure with heart edema, fin fold deformities etc. Conclusions: This in vivo based screening of Hematopoiesis is an inexpensive assay to screen herbal compounds and found that S. trilobatum extract influenced embryonic HSC in zebrafish, which could be a therapeutic for blood related disorders.

  18. Gradient Bundle Analysis: A Full Topological Approach to Chemical Bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The "chemical bond" is a central concept in molecular sciences, but there is no consensus as to what a bond actually is. Therefore, a variety of bonding models have been developed, each defining the structure of molecules in a different manner with the goal of explaining and predicting chemical properties. This thesis describes the initial development of gradient bundle analysis (GBA), a chemical bonding model that creates a high resolution picture of chemical interactions within the charge density framework. GBA is based on concepts from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), but uses a more complete picture of the topology and geometry of the electron charge density to understand and predict bonding interactions. Gradient bundles are defined as volumes bounded by zero-flux surfaces (ZFSs) in the gradient of the charge density with well-defined energies. The structure of gradient bundles provides an avenue for detecting the locations of valence electrons, which correspond to reactive regions in a ...

  19. Degradation of endocrine disrupting chemicals by genetic transformants with two lignin degrading enzymes in Phlebia tremellosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Hyunwoo; Lee, Sungsuk; Ryu, Sunhwa; Choi, Hyoung T

    2011-10-01

    A white rot fungus Phlebia tremellosa produced lignin degrading enzymes, which showed degrading activity against various recalcitrant compounds. However, manganese peroxidase (MnP) activity, one of lignin degrading enzymes, was very low in this fungus under various culture conditions. An expression vector that carried both the laccase and MnP genes was constructed using laccase genomic DNA of P. tremellosa and MnP cDNA from Polyporus brumalis. P. tremellosa was genetically transformed using the expression vector to obtain fungal transformants showing increased laccase and MnP activity. Many transformants showed highly increased laccase and MnP activity at the same time in liquid medium, and three of them were used to degrade endocrine disrupting chemicals. The transformant not only degraded bisphenol A and nonylphenol more rapidly but also removed the estrogenic activities of the chemicals faster than the wild type strain.

  20. Genetic Approach to Elucidation of Sasang Constitutional Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Bu-Yeo Kim; Seongwon Cha; Hee-Jeong Jin; Sangkyun Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Sasang Constitutional Medicine (SCM) offers a medical principle that classifies humans into four constitution groups and guides their treatment with constitution-matched medical assistance. The principle of this traditional medicine, although requires significant scientific support, appears to suggest a genetic influence on constitution type. The relative frequency of constitution types in a population, for instance, has remained relatively constant since Jema Lee first described them from hi...

  1. Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm Approach to Determine Pulse Sequences in NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Ajoy, Ashok

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new class of genetic algorithm that computationally determines efficient pulse sequences to implement a quantum gate U in a three-qubit system. The method is shown to be quite general, and the same algorithm can be used to derive efficient sequences for a variety of target matrices. We demonstrate this by implementing the inversion-on-equality gate efficiently when the spin-spin coupling constants $J_{12}=J_{23}=J$ and $J_{13}=0$. We also propose new pulse sequences to implement the Parity gate and Fanout gate, which are about 50% more efficient than the previous best efforts. Moreover, these sequences are shown to require significantly less RF power for their implementation. The proposed algorithm introduces several new features in the conventional genetic algorithm framework. We use matrices instead of linear chains, and the columns of these matrices have a well defined hierarchy. The algorithm is a genetic algorithm coupled to a fast local optimizer, and is hence a hybrid GA. It shows fast con...

  2. Food control and a citizen science approach for improving teaching of Genetics in universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Y J; Muñoz-Colmenero, A M; Dopico, E; Miralles, L; Garcia-Vazquez, E

    2016-09-10

    A Citizen Science approach was implemented in the laboratory practices of Genetics at the University of Oviedo, related with the engaging topic of Food Control. Real samples of food products consumed by students at home (students as samplers) were employed as teaching material in three different courses of Genetics during the academic year 2014-2015: Experimental Methods in Food Production (MBTA) (Master level), and Applied Molecular Biology (BMA) and Conservation Genetics and Breeding (COMGE) (Bachelor/Degree level). Molecular genetics based on PCR amplification of DNA markers was employed for species identification of 22 seafood products in COMGE and MBTA, and for detection of genetically modified (GM) maize from nine products in BMA. In total six seafood products incorrectly labeled (27%), and two undeclared GM maize (22%) were found. A post-Laboratory survey was applied for assessing the efficacy of the approach for improving motivation in the Laboratory Practices of Genetics. Results confirmed that students that worked on their own samples from local markets were significantly more motivated and better evaluated their Genetic laboratory practices than control students (χ(2)  = 12.11 p = 0.033). Our results suggest that citizen science approaches could not be only useful for improving teaching of Genetics in universities but also to incorporate students and citizens as active agents in food control. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(5):450-462, 2016.

  3. A Genetic-Algorithms-Based Approach for Programming Linear and Quadratic Optimization Problems with Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a genetic-algorithms-based approach as an all-purpose problem-solving method for operation programming problems under uncertainty. The proposed method was applied for management of a municipal solid waste treatment system. Compared to the traditional interactive binary analysis, this approach has fewer limitations and is able to reduce the complexity in solving the inexact linear programming problems and inexact quadratic programming problems. The implementation of this approach was performed using the Genetic Algorithm Solver of MATLAB (trademark of MathWorks. The paper explains the genetic-algorithms-based method and presents details on the computation procedures for each type of inexact operation programming problems. A comparison of the results generated by the proposed method based on genetic algorithms with those produced by the traditional interactive binary analysis method is also presented.

  4. Versatile RHDV virus-like particles: incorporation of antigens by genetic modification and chemical conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacey, Matthew; Wilson, Sarah; Baird, Margaret A; Ward, Vernon K

    2007-12-01

    Virus-like particles have proved to be excellent molecular scaffolds, yet the individual characteristics and immune responses generated against each VLP requires the development of a wide range of capsids for use as vaccines, molecular delivery vessels, and nanoscale templates. Here we describe the development of Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV)-like particles as a rapidly versatile molecular workbench, overcoming limitations imposed by established genetic antigen incorporation procedures with chimeric VLP. Production of the RHDV capsid protein in a baculovirus system led to the self-assembly of VLP which were recovered at over 99% purity and manipulated both genetically and chemically. Fusion of small peptide sequences to RHDV VLP was well tolerated, forming chimeric capsids that enhanced the presentation of foreign peptide to hybridoma T helper cells 700-fold. Rapid and simple conjugation techniques employing the hetero-bifunctional chemical linker sulfo-SMCC enabled both small peptides and whole proteins to be conjugated to the surface of RHDV VLP, overcoming limitations imposed on VLP formation and yield experienced with chimeric VLP. Administration of VLP/ovalbumin conjugate provoked high titre ovalbumin-specific antibody in mice, demonstrating the immune stimulatory properties of the capsid were conferred to conjugated foreign antigen. VLP facilitated delivery of conjugated antigen to dendritic cells, eliciting proliferative responses in naïve TCR transgenic T helper cells that were at least 10-fold greater than ovalbumin antigen delivered alone.

  5. Computational approaches to the chemical conversion of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Daojian; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Apra, Edoardo; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2013-06-01

    The conversion of CO2 into fuels and chemicals is viewed as an attractive route for controlling the atmospheric concentration of this greenhouse gas and recycling it, but its industrial application is limited by the low selectivity and activity of the current catalysts. Theoretical modeling, in particular density-functional theory (DFT) simulations, provides a powerful and effective tool to discover chemical reaction mechanisms and design new catalysts for the chemical conversion of CO2, overcoming the repetitious and time/labor consuming trial-and-error experimental processes. In this article we give a comprehensive survey of recent advances on mechanism determination by DFT calculations for the catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 into CO, CH4, CH3OH, and HCOOH, and CO2 methanation, as well as the photo- and electrochemical reduction of CO2. DFT-guided design procedures of new catalytic systems are also reviewed, and challenges and perspectives in this field are outlined.

  6. The practice of genetic counselling: a Ccmparative approach to understanding genetic counselling in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suli, S.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an empirical account of the application of genetic counselling in China based on interviews, clinical observation and literature research during a field study from September 2008 to February 2009, carried out mainly in China and partly in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom. Makin

  7. Linkage intensity learning approach with genetic algorithm for causality diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng-liang; CHEN Juan-juan

    2007-01-01

    The causality diagram theory, which adopts graphical expression of knowledge and direct intensity of causality, overcomes some shortages in belief network and has evolved into a mixed causality diagram methodology for discrete and continuous variable. But to give linkage intensity of causality diagram is difficult, particularly in many working conditions in which sampling data are limited or noisy. The classic learning algorithm is hard to be adopted. We used genetic algorithm to learn linkage intensity from limited data. The simulation results demonstrate that this algorithm is more suitable than the classic algorithm in the condition of sample shortage such as space shuttle's fault diagnoisis.

  8. Classical mechanics approach applied to analysis of genetic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylchenkova, Anastasiia; Mraz, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Moskon, Miha

    2016-04-05

    Biological oscillators present a fundamental part of several regulatory mechanisms that control the response of various biological systems. Several analytical approaches for their analysis have been reported recently. They are, however, limited to only specific oscillator topologies and/or to giving only qualitative answers, i.e., is the dynamics of an oscillator given the parameter space oscillatory or not. Here we present a general analytical approach that can be applied to the analysis of biological oscillators. It relies on the projection of biological systems to classical mechanics systems. The approach is able to provide us with relatively accurate results in the meaning of type of behaviour system reflects (i.e. oscillatory or not) and periods of potential oscillations without the necessity to conduct expensive numerical simulations. We demonstrate and verify the proposed approach on three different implementations of amplified negative feedback oscillator.

  9. Genetic and chemical modifiers of a CUG toxicity model in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Garcia-Lopez

    Full Text Available Non-coding CUG repeat expansions interfere with the activity of human Muscleblind-like (MBNL proteins contributing to myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1. To understand this toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism we developed a Drosophila model expressing 60 pure and 480 interrupted CUG repeats in the context of a non-translatable RNA. These flies reproduced aspects of the DM1 pathology, most notably nuclear accumulation of CUG transcripts, muscle degeneration, splicing misregulation, and diminished Muscleblind function in vivo. Reduced Muscleblind activity was evident from the sensitivity of CUG-induced phenotypes to a decrease in muscleblind genetic dosage and rescue by MBNL1 expression, and further supported by the co-localization of Muscleblind and CUG repeat RNA in ribonuclear foci. Targeted expression of CUG repeats to the developing eye and brain mushroom bodies was toxic leading to rough eyes and semilethality, respectively. These phenotypes were utilized to identify genetic and chemical modifiers of the CUG-induced toxicity. 15 genetic modifiers of the rough eye phenotype were isolated. These genes identify putative cellular processes unknown to be altered by CUG repeat RNA, and they include mRNA export factor Aly, apoptosis inhibitor Thread, chromatin remodelling factor Nurf-38, and extracellular matrix structural component Viking. Ten chemical compounds suppressed the semilethal phenotype. These compounds significantly improved viability of CUG expressing flies and included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (ketoprofen, muscarinic, cholinergic and histamine receptor inhibitors (orphenadrine, and drugs that can affect sodium and calcium metabolism such as clenbuterol and spironolactone. These findings provide new insights into the DM1 phenotype, and suggest novel candidates for DM1 treatments.

  10. Introduction: integrating genetic and cultural evolutionary approaches to language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; McElligott, Alan G; Adger, David

    2011-04-01

    The papers in this special issue of Human Biology address recent research in the field of language evolution, both the genetic evolution of the language faculty and the cultural evolution of specific languages. While both of these areas have received increasing interest in recent years, there is also a need to integrate these somewhat separate efforts and explore the relevant gene-culture coevolutionary interactions. Here we summarize the individual contributions, set them in the context of the wider literature, and identify outstanding future research questions. The first set of papers concerns the comparative study of nonhuman communication in primates and birds from both a behavioral and neurobiological perspective, revealing evidence for several common language-related traits in various nonhuman species and providing clues as to the evolutionary origin and function of the human language faculty. The second set of papers discusses the consequences of viewing language as a culturally evolving system in its own right, including claims that this removes the need for strong genetic biases for language acquisition, and that phylogenetic evolutionary methods can be used to reconstruct language histories. We conclude by highlighting outstanding areas for future research, including identifying the precise selection pressures that gave rise to the language faculty in ancestral hominin species, and determining the strength, domain specificity, and origin of the cultural transmission biases that shape languages as they pass along successive generations of language learners.

  11. A chemical-biological similarity-based grouping of complex substances as a prototype approach for evaluating chemical alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Fabian A; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Chappell, Grace A; Wright, Fred A; Reif, David M; Braisted, John; Gerhold, David L; Yeakley, Joanne M; Shepard, Peter; Seligmann, Bruce; Roy, Tim; Boogaard, Peter J; Ketelslegers, Hans B; Rohde, Arlean M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-08-21

    Comparative assessment of potential human health impacts is a critical step in evaluating both chemical alternatives and existing products on the market. Most alternatives assessments are conducted on a chemical-by-chemical basis and it is seldom acknowledged that humans are exposed to complex products, not individual substances. Indeed, substances of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products, and Biological materials (UVCBs) are ubiquitous in commerce yet they present a major challenge for registration and health assessments. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and computational approach to categorize UVCBs according to global similarities in their bioactivity using a suite of in vitro models. We used petroleum substances, an important group of UVCBs which are grouped for regulatory approval and read-across primarily on physico-chemical properties and the manufacturing process, and only partially based on toxicity data, as a case study. We exposed induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes to DMSO-soluble extracts of 21 petroleum substances from five product groups. Concentration-response data from high-content imaging in cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, as well as targeted high-throughput transcriptomic analysis of the hepatocytes, revealed distinct groups of petroleum substances. Data integration showed that bioactivity profiling affords clustering of petroleum substances in a manner similar to the manufacturing process-based categories. Moreover, we observed a high degree of correlation between bioactivity profiles and physico-chemical properties, as well as improved groupings when chemical and biological data were combined. Altogether, we demonstrate how novel in vitro screening approaches can be effectively utilized in combination with physico-chemical characteristics to group complex substances and enable read-across. This approach allows for rapid and scientifically-informed evaluation of health impacts of

  12. Hazard identification of chemicals: A more efficient approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Woutersen, R.A.; Vliet, P.W. van

    2006-01-01

    The OECD (organisation for economic co-operation and development) guidelines for hazard identification of chemicals have proved their worth in practice and are of great significance for designing adequate and relevant toxicity studies. However, assessment procedures are too time-consuming and too ex

  13. AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF SORGHUM USING TISSUE CULTURE-BASED AND POLLEN-MEDIATED APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    Elkonin L.A.; O.N. Nosova; J.V. Italianskaya

    2012-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a powerful tool for genetic improvement of arable crops. Genetic engineering approaches are especially important for modification of starch and protein contents, vitamin and micronutrient concentration, improvement of nutritive value of protein fractions, and increase tolerance to environmental stresses. Application of transgenic technologies for genetic improvement of sorghum, a highly productive heat tolerant and drought resistant crop, is extremely important since...

  14. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  15. The Sociopolitical Importance of Genetic, Phenomenological Approaches to Science Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzul, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses Wolff-Michael Roth's theoretical framework for a phenomenological, genetic approach to science teaching and learning based on the work of Edmund Husserl. This approach advocates the inclusion of student lifeworlds in science education and underlines the importance of thinking about subjectivity in both science and science…

  16. The role of genetic and chemical variation of Pinus sylvestris seedlings in influencing slug herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Iason, Glenn R; Thoss, Vera

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated the genetic and chemical basis of resistance of Pinus sylvestris seedlings to herbivory by a generalist mollusc, Arion ater. Using feeding trials with captive animals, we examined selective herbivory by A. ater of young P. sylvestris seedlings of different genotypes and correlated preferences with seedling monoterpene levels. We also investigated the feeding responses of A. ater to artificial diets laced with two monoterpenes, Delta(3)-carene and alpha-pinene. Logistic regression indicated that two factors were the best predictors of whether seedlings in the trial would be consumed. Individual slug variation (replicates) was the most significant factor in the model; however, alpha-pinene concentration (also representing beta-pinene, Delta(3)-carene and total monoterpenes due to multicollinearity) of needles was also a significant factor. While A. ater did not select seedlings on the basis of family, seedlings not eaten were significantly higher in levels of alpha-pinene compared to seedlings that were consumed. We also demonstrated significant genetic variation in alpha-pinene concentration of seedlings between different families of P. sylvestris. Nitrogen and three morphological seedling characteristics (stem length, needle length and stem diameter) also showed significant genetic variation between P. sylvestris families. Artificial diets laced with high (5 mg g(-1) dry matter) quantities of either Delta(3)-carene or alpha-pinene, were eaten significantly less than control diets with no added monoterpenes, supporting the results of the seedling feeding trial. This study demonstrates that A. ater selectively feed on P. sylvestris seedlings and that this selection is based, in part, on the monoterpene concentration of seedlings. These results, coupled with significant genetic variation in alpha-pinene concentration of seedlings and evidence that slug herbivory is detrimental to P. sylvestris fitness, are discussed as possible evidence for A

  17. A genetic approach to understanding asthma and lung function development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a common heritable disease of the airways with recurrent episodes of symptoms and reversible airflow obstruction that has increased dramatically in prevalence. The disease is highly heterogeneous with varying age at onset and clinical presentation and most likely represents several...... different subtypes of disease associated with distinct clinical features, divergent underlying molecular mechanisms, and individual treatment responses. Information obtained from genetic studies may be an important way of understanding underlying disease subtypes. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have......, related traits and objective measures in order to disentangle the underlying pathophysiological disease mechanisms for the subtypes of disease. Several genes and loci have been found to be associated with adult lung function in GWAS, but it is currently unknown at what time in life these genes exert...

  18. Data Mining Using Neural–Genetic Approach: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvez Rahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the advance age of technology, there is an increasing availability of digital documents in various languages in various fields. Data mining is gaining popularity in field of knowledge discovery. Data mining is the knowledge discovery process by which we can analyze the large amounts of data from various data repositories and summarizing it into information useful to us. Due to its importance of extracting information/ knowledge from the large data repositories, data mining has become an essential part of human life in various fields. Data mining has a very wide area of applications, and these applications have enriched the human life in various fields including scientific, medical, business, education etc. Here in this paper we will discuss the emphasis of Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm in the field of data mining.

  19. Graphical approach to evaluate genetic estimates of calf survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesser, H N; Shanks, R D; Berger, P J; Healey, M H

    2009-05-01

    Genetic variation and resemblance among relatives are fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Our purpose was to identify bulls with a bimodal pattern of inheritance in the quest for new discoveries about the inheritance of calf survival. A bimodal pattern of inheritance for calf survival was identified in sons of Holstein bulls. A bimodal pattern of inheritance indicates 2 groups of sons resulting from an allele effect, a grandsire effect, or some other common factor. Different combinations (AA, Aa, aa) of 2 alleles at a locus cause varying phenotypes to be expressed. Bulls that are heterozygous for loci affecting reproductive performance may have a bimodal pattern of inheritance if the difference in effect of the 2 alleles is large. If the bimodal pattern is caused by an allele effect, then molecular markers can be identified for use in marker-assisted selection breeding programs. Data on predicted transmitting ability for perinatal survival for the first parity of 8,678 sons of 599 sires were collected from 1984 through 1997 from the National Association of Animal Breeders calving ease database, which included 7 Midwestern states. Sixteen bulls were identified with a potential bimodal pattern of inheritance because they had 2 distinct groups of sons. The 2 groups of sons were separated by calculating the coefficient of variation for each possible combination of sons; the combination that gave the smallest coefficient of variation difference between the 2 groups was considered the correct distribution of the sons into those groups. Bulls with a bimodal distribution were analyzed to determine the distribution of the grandsons among the maternal grandsires (MGS) of the 2 groups of the bimodal distribution. The bimodal distribution may be a result of heterozygous sires or MGS that are homozygous for low or high survival. If the bimodal distribution is caused by a MGS effect, then marker-assisted selection can still be used by evaluating the MGS instead of the sires.

  20. [Mendelian randomisation - a genetic approach to an epidemiological method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensrud, Mats Julius

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic information is becoming more easily available, and rapid progress is being made in developing methods of illuminating issues of interest. Mendelian randomisation makes it possible to study causes of disease using observational data. The name refers to the random distribution of gene variants in meiosis. The methodology makes use of genes that influence a risk factor for a disease, without influencing the disease itself. In this review article I explain the principles behind Mendelian randomisation and present the areas of application for this methodology.MATERIAL AND METHOD Methodology articles describing Mendelian randomisation were reviewed. The articles were found through a search in PubMed with the combination «mendelian randomization» OR «mendelian randomisation», and a search in McMaster Plus with the combination «mendelian randomization». A total of 15 methodology articles were read in full text. Methodology articles were supplemented by clinical studies found in the PubMed search.RESULTS In contrast to traditional observational studies, Mendelian randomisation studies are not affected by two important sources of error: conventional confounding variables and reverse causation. Mendelian randomisation is therefore a promising tool for studying causality. Mendelian randomisation studies have already provided valuable knowledge on the risk factors for a wide range of diseases. It is nevertheless important to be aware of the limitations of the methodology. As a result of the rapid developments in genetics research, Mendelian randomisation will probably be widely used in future years.INTERPRETATION If Mendelian randomisation studies are conducted correctly, they may help to reveal both modifiable and non-modifiable causes of disease.

  1. Induction of Neural Progenitor-Like Cells from Human Fibroblasts via a Genetic Material-Free Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Mirakhori

    Full Text Available A number of studies generated induced neural progenitor cells (iNPCs from human fibroblasts by viral delivering defined transcription factors. However, the potential risks associated with gene delivery systems have limited their clinical use. We propose it would be safer to induce neural progenitor-like cells from human adult fibroblasts via a direct non-genetic alternative approach.Here, we have reported that seven rounds of TAT-SOX2 protein transduction in a defined chemical cocktail under a 3D sphere culture gradually morphed fibroblasts into neuroepithelial-like colonies. We were able to expand these cells for up to 20 passages. These cells could give rise to cells that expressed neurons and glia cell markers both in vitro and in vivo.These results show that our approach is beneficial for the genetic material-free generation of iNPCs from human fibroblasts where small chemical molecules can provide a valuable, viable strategy to boost and improve induction in a 3D sphere culture.

  2. Chemical genetics suggests a critical role for lysyl oxidase in zebrafish notochord morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Bartlett, Stephen J; Gansner, John M; Wilson, Duncan; He, Ling; Gitlin, Jonathan D; Kelsh, Robert N; Dowden, James

    2007-01-01

    As a result of a chemical genetic screen for modulators of metalloprotease activity, we report that 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide induces a conspicuous undulating notochord defect in zebrafish embryos, a phenocopy of the leviathan mutant. The location of the chemically-induced wavy notochord correlated with the timing of application, thus defining a narrow chemical sensitivity window during segmentation stages. Microscopic observations revealed that notochord undulations appeared during the phase of notochord cell vacuolation and notochord elongation. Notochord cells become swollen as well as disorganized, while electron microscopy revealed disrupted organization of collagen fibrils in the surrounding sheath. We demonstrate by assay in zebrafish extracts that 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide inhibits lysyl oxidase. Thus, we provide insight into notochord morphogenesis and reveal novel compounds for lysyl oxidase inhibition. Taken together, these data underline the utility of small molecules for elucidating the dynamic mechanisms of early morphogenesis and provide a potential explanation for the recently established role of copper in zebrafish notochord formation.

  3. Chemical Approaches to Studying Labile Amino Acid Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmelstein, Alan M; Moreno, Javier; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is the archetypal posttranslational modification of proteins. While phosphorylation of these residues has become standard textbook knowledge, phosphorylation of other amino acid side chains is underappreciated and minimally characterized by comparison. This disparity is rooted in the relative instability of these chemically distinct amino acid side chain moieties, namely phosphoramidates, acyl phosphates, thiophosphates, and phosphoanhydrides. In the case of the O-phosphorylated amino acids, synthetic constructs were critical to assessing their stability and developing tools for their study. As the chemical biology community has become more aware of these alternative phosphorylation sites, methodology has been developed for the synthesis of well-characterized standards and close mimics of these phosphorylated amino acids as well. In this article, we review the synthetic chemistry that is a prerequisite to progress in this field.

  4. The underlying mechanisms of genetic innovation and speciation in the family Corynebacteriaceae: A phylogenomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Jiang, Zhao; Yang, Ling-Ling; Huang, Ying

    2017-02-01

    The pangenome of a bacterial species population is formed by genetic reduction and genetic expansion over the long course of evolution. Gene loss is a pervasive source of genetic reduction, and (exogenous and endogenous) gene gain is the main driver of genetic expansion. To understand the genetic innovation and speciation of the family Corynebacteriaceae, which cause a wide range of serious infections in humans and animals, we analyzed the pangenome of this family, and reconstructed its phylogeny using a phylogenomics approach. Genetic variations have occurred throughout the whole evolutionary history of the Corynebacteriaceae. Gene loss has been the primary force causing genetic changes, not only in terms of the number of protein families affected, but also because of its continuity on the time series. The variation in metabolism caused by these genetic changes mainly occurred for membrane transporters, two-component systems, and metabolism related to amino acids and carbohydrates. Interestingly, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) not only caused changes related to pathogenicity, but also triggered the acquisition of antimicrobial resistance. The Darwinian theory of evolution did not adequately explain the effects of dispersive HGT and/or gene loss in the evolution of the Corynebacteriaceae. These findings provide new insight into the evolution and speciation of Corynebacteriaceae and advance our understanding of the genetic innovation in microbial populations.

  5. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: a parallel multilevel genetic program approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Michael A; Coker, David F

    2011-07-28

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent.

  6. Chemical named entities recognition: a review on approaches and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Eltyeb, Safaa; Salim, Naomie

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in the flow rate of published digital information in all disciplines has resulted in a pressing need for techniques that can simplify the use of this information. The chemistry literature is very rich with information about chemical entities. Extracting molecules and their related properties and activities from the scientific literature to “text mine” these extracted data and determine contextual relationships helps research scientists, particularly those in drug developmen...

  7. Three-Tier Approach to Chemical Spill Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    D. Chandler, Lt.Col., USAF, BSC USAF Medical Center/ SGB , Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433-5300 Major chemical spills create special problems in protec...lower levels. The SPEGL is set at a level to protect this tion of both public and worker health. The current standard of sensitive subpopulation...large, predicted, toxic hazard car- including sensitive subpopulatio-,s. The Occupational Safety ridors creating evacuation problems and additional

  8. Genetic Approaches to Appearance and Ancestry : Improving Forensic DNA Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Chaitanya (Lakshmi)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTraditionally, routine forensic casework is based on comparative grounds. DNA profiles obtained from crime-scenes are compared with those of potential suspects or DNA profiles deposited in forensic DNA databases. The principal limitation of such comparative approach is that trace donors

  9. Genetic and metabolomic approaches for coronary heart disease risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, Anika Antoinette Maria

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is currently based on traditional risk factors (TRFs) like age, sex, lipid levels, blood pressure. Here we investigated, using the CAREMA cohort, whether this prediction can potentially be improved by applying a metabolomics approach and by includi

  10. A Domain-Independent Window Approach to Multiclass Object Detection Using Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjie Zhang

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a domain-independent approach to the use of genetic programming for object detection problems in which the locations of small objects of multiple classes in large images must be found. The evolved program is scanned over the large images to locate the objects of interest. The paper develops three terminal sets based on domain-independent pixel statistics and considers two different function sets. The fitness function is based on the detection rate and the false alarm rate. We have tested the method on three object detection problems of increasing difficulty. This work not only extends genetic programming to multiclass-object detection problems, but also shows how to use a single evolved genetic program for both object classification and localisation. The object classification map developed in this approach can be used as a general classification strategy in genetic programming for multiple-class classification problems.

  11. A Detailed look of Audio Steganography Techniques using LSB and Genetic Algorithm Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gunjan Nehru; Puja Dhar

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the study of various techniques of audio steganography using different algorithmis like genetic algorithm approach and LSB approach. We have tried some approaches that helps in audio steganography. As we know it is the art and science of writing hidden messages in such a way that no one, apart from the sender and intended recipient, suspects the existence of the message, a form of security through obscurity. In steganography, the message used to hide secret message is called hos...

  12. Search for genetic virulence markers in viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) using a reverse genetics approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Anders; Biacchesi, S.; Bremont, M.

    2011-01-01

    VHSV is a negative strand RNA virus causing serious disease in farmed rainbow trout. Although VHSV has been eradicated by stamping out procedures in several fresh water bodies, recently including all streams in Denmark, the wildlife marine reservoir still represents a threat against rainbow trout...... farming. Particularly in Scandinavia, outbreaks of VHS in sea reared rainbow trout have demonstrated that although marine variants of VHSV are considered to be avirulent to rainbow trout, the virus is potentially able to adapt to this host and cause disease. Limited knowledge about the genetic background...

  13. A Genetic Algorithms Based Approach for Group Multicast Routing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Sanna Randaccio

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Whereas multicast transmission in one-to-many communications allows the operator to drastically save network resources, it also makes the routing of the traffic flows more complex then in unicast transmissions. A huge amount of possible trees have to be considered and analyzed to find the appropriate routing paths. To address this problem, we propose the use of the genetic algorithms (GA, which considerably reduce the number of solutions to be evaluated. A heuristic procedure is first used to discern a set of possible trees for each multicast session in isolation. Then, the GA are applied to find the appropriate combination of the trees to comply with the bandwidth needs of the group of multicast sessions simultaneously. The goodness of each solution is assessed by means of an expression that weights both network bandwidth allocation and one-way delay. The resulting cost function is guided by few parameters that can be easily tuned during traffic engineering operations; an appropriate setting of these parameters allows the operator to configure the desired balance between network resource utilization and provided quality of service. Simulations have been performed to compare the proposed algorithm with alternative solutions in terms of bandwidth utilization and transmission delay.

  14. Hybrid genetic algorithm approach for selective harmonic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahidah, Mohamed S.A. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100, Jalan Multimedia-Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Agelidis, Vassilios G. [School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Rao, Machavaram V. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama-Melaka (Malaysia)

    2008-02-15

    The paper presents an optimal solution for a selective harmonic elimination pulse width modulated (SHE-PWM) technique suitable for a high power inverter used in constant frequency utility applications. The main challenge of solving the associated non-linear equations, which are transcendental in nature and, therefore, have multiple solutions, is the convergence, and therefore, an initial point selected considerably close to the exact solution is required. The paper discusses an efficient hybrid real coded genetic algorithm (HRCGA) that reduces significantly the computational burden, resulting in fast convergence. An objective function describing a measure of the effectiveness of eliminating selected orders of harmonics while controlling the fundamental, namely a weighted total harmonic distortion (WTHD) is derived, and a comparison of different operating points is reported. It is observed that the method was able to find the optimal solution for a modulation index that is higher than unity. The theoretical considerations reported in this paper are verified through simulation and experimentally on a low power laboratory prototype. (author)

  15. Diagnostic/genetic sreening - approach for genetic diagnoses and prevention of cleft lip and/or palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Nagato; Kato, Tomoki; Hayakawa, Toko; Imura, Hideto

    2013-01-01

    The treatment, research and volunteer work for cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) has been led for over 30 years by our team. Within this period, more than 4,000 cases of CL/P were treated and at the same time, and approximately 400 papers were published as the first or partner researcher in Nature Genetics, New England Journal of Medicine and others. In addition, with $20 million that was donated from companies and laypeople, and the grant from the Japanese government, CL/P centres in many countries and in Japan, the oral and craniofacial congenital anomaly gene bank in our CL/P centre was established by our leadership. In the bank there are genes from approximately more than 8,000 cases. The genes were mapped with Professor Jeffery Murray of Iowa University in the United States, the findings about genetic syndromes such as Van der Woude Syndrome and basal cell nevus syndrome were applied in clinical settings. The genetic counselling section that specialises in the oral and maxillofacial field was established by our effort for the first time in Japan. In this review, our clinical experience and approach for genetic diagnoses and prevention of cleft lip and/or palate will be discussed.

  16. Harmonization of risk management approaches: radiation and chemical exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Div., Mumbai (India)

    2006-07-01

    Assessment of occupational and public risk from the environmental pollutants like chemicals, radiation, etc demands that the effects be considered not only from each individual pollutant, but from the combination of all the pollutants. An integrated risk assessment system needs to be in place to have an overall risk perspective for the benefit of policy makers and decision takers to try to achieve risk reduction in totality. The basis for risk-based radiation dose limits is derived from epidemiological studies, which provide a rich source of data largely unavailable to chemical risk assessors. In addition, use of the principle of optimization as expressed in the ALARA concept has resulted in a safety culture, which is much more than just complying with stipulated limits. The conservative hypothesis of no-threshold dose-effect relation (ICRP) is universally assumed. The end-points and the severity of different classes of pollutants and even different pollutants in a same class vary over a wide range. Hence, it is difficult to arrive at a quantitative value for the net detriment that weighs the various types of end-points and various classes of pollutants. Once the risk due to other pollutants is quantified by some acceptable methodology, it can be expressed in terms of the Risk Equivalent Radiation Dose (R.E.R.D.) for easy comparison with options involving radiation exposure. This paper is an effort to use to quantify and present the risk due to exposure to chemicals and radiation in a common scale for the purpose of easy comparison to facilitate decision taking. (authors)

  17. Modeling Warfare in Social Animals: A "Chemical" Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarlasci, Alisa; Martelloni, Gianluca; Frizzi, Filippo; Santini, Giacomo; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present here a general method for modelling the dynamics of battles among social animals. The proposed method exploits the procedures widely used to model chemical reactions, but still uncommon in behavioural studies. We applied this methodology to the interpretation of experimental observations of battles between two species of ants (Lasius neglectus and Lasius paralienus), but this scheme may have a wider applicability and can be extended to other species as well. We performed two types of experiment labelled as interaction and mortality. The interaction experiments are designed to obtain information on the combat dynamics and lasted one hour. The mortality ones provide information on the casualty rates of the two species and lasted five hours. We modelled the interactions among ants using a chemical model which considers the single ant individuals and fighting groups analogously to atoms and molecules. The mean-field behaviour of the model is described by a set of non-linear differential equations. We also performed stochastic simulations of the corresponding agent-based model by means of the Gillespie event-driven integration scheme. By fitting the stochastic trajectories with the deterministic model, we obtained the probability distribution of the reaction parameters. The main result that we obtained is a dominance phase diagram, that gives the average trajectory of a generic battle, for an arbitrary number of opponents. This phase diagram was validated with some extra experiments. With respect to other war models (e.g., Lanchester's ones), our chemical model considers all phases of the battle and not only casualties. This allows a more detailed description of the battle (with a larger number of parameters), allowing the development of more sophisticated models (e.g., spatial ones), with the goal of distinguishing collective effects from the strategic ones. PMID:25369269

  18. Probabilistic Approach to Risk Analysis of Chemical Spills at Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magda Bogalecka; Krzysztof Kolowrocki

    2006-01-01

    Risk analysis of chemical spills at sea and their consequences for sea environment are discussed. Mutual interactions between the process of the sea accident initiating events, the process of the sea environment threats, and the process of the sea environment degradation are investigated. To describe these three particular processes, the separate semi-Markov models are built. Furthermore, these models are jointed into one general model of these processes interactions.Moreover, some comments on the method for statistical identification of the considered models are proposed.

  19. Frontiers and Approaches to Chemical Synthesis of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of existing approaches to the synthesis of oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODN) are discussed focusing on large-scale methods. The liquid phase and solid supported synthesis and the synthesis on soluble polymers are discussed. Different problems concerning the methods and implementation of the ODN synthesis are outlined depending on goals of using target oligomers.

  20. [Approach to depressogenic genes from genetic analyses of animal models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    Human depression or mood disorder is defined as a complex disease, making positional cloning of susceptibility genes a formidable task. We have undertaken genetic analyses of three different animal models for depression, comparing our results with advanced database resources. We first performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on two mouse models of "despair", namely, the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and detected multiple chromosomal loci that control immobility time in these tests. Since one QTL detected on mouse chromosome 11 harbors the GABA A receptor subunit genes, we tested these genes for association in human mood disorder patients. We obtained significant associations of the alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit genes with the disease, particularly in females. This result was striking, because we had previously detected an epistatic interaction between mouse chromosomes 11 and X that regulates immobility time in these animals. Next, we performed genome-wide expression analyses using a rat model of depression, learned helplessness (LH). We found that in the frontal cortex of LH rats, a disease implicated region, the LIM kinase 1 gene (Limk 1) showed greatest alteration, in this case down-regulation. By combining data from the QTL analysis of FST/TST and DNA microarray analysis of mouse frontal cortex, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein 1 (Cap 1) as another candidate gene for depression susceptibility. Both Limk 1 and Cap 1 are key players in the modulation of actin G-F conversion. In summary, our current study using animal models suggests disturbances of GABAergic neurotransmission and actin turnover as potential pathophysiologies for mood disorder.

  1. [Modern evolutional developmental biology: mechanical and molecular genetic or phenotypic approaches?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'eva, É I

    2010-01-01

    Heightened interest in the evolutionary problems of developmental biology in the 1980s was due to the success of molecular genetics and disappointment in the synthetic theory of evolution, where the chapters of embryology and developmental biology seem to have been left out. Modern evo-devo, which turned out to be antipodean to the methodology of the synthetic theory of evolution, propagandized in the development of evolutionary problems only the mechanical and molecular genetic approach to the evolution of ontogenesis, based on cellular and intercellular interactions. The phonotypical approach to the evaluation of evolutionary occurrences in ontogenesis, which aids in the joining of the genetic and epigenetic levels of research, the theory of natural selection, the nomogenetic conception, and the problem of the wholeness of the organism in onto- and phylogenesis may be against this. The phenotypic approach to ontogenesis is methodologically the most perspective for evolutionary developmental biology.

  2. Genetic algorithm based image binarization approach and its quantitative evaluation via pooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huijun; Liu, Ya; Liu, Maofu

    2015-12-01

    The binarized image is very critical to image visual feature extraction, especially shape feature, and the image binarization approaches have been attracted more attentions in the past decades. In this paper, the genetic algorithm is applied to optimizing the binarization threshold of the strip steel defect image. In order to evaluate our genetic algorithm based image binarization approach in terms of quantity, we propose the novel pooling based evaluation metric, motivated by information retrieval community, to avoid the lack of ground-truth binary image. Experimental results show that our genetic algorithm based binarization approach is effective and efficiency in the strip steel defect images and our quantitative evaluation metric on image binarization via pooling is also feasible and practical.

  3. Genetic and chemical diversity in seeds of cactus mandacaru (Cereus sp. from two edaphoclimatic regions contrasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maycon R.R. Bevilaqua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical, physiological and genetic differences in seeds of cactus of the Cereus genus (mandacaru cultivated in the Northeast (Picos, State of Piauí and Southern (Maringá, State of Paraná regions of Brazil. Over a period of eight days, temperatures of 25°C and 30°C were equally efficient for the germination of all the seeds. Oleic acid (C18:1 was the most common fatty acid found in the seeds collected in the Southern (41% and Northeast (45.5% regions. The analysis of lipases indicated that seeds from Maringá have high mean observed and expected heterozygosities and that seeds from Picos have a higher number of alleles per loci. Therefore, the seeds of mandacaru from the semiarid region of Northeast as well as the seeds from the South (the two contrasting regions of Brazil are promising with regards to the preservation of the biodiversity in the genome of mandacaru. The low genetic identity between mandacaru seeds from Maringá and Picos at Lipase-5 locus analysis (I = 0.77 suggests that the mandacaru plants from Maringá and Picos may correspond to two species: C. peruvianus and C. jamacaru, respectively.

  4. Chemical genetics reveals an RGS/G-protein role in the action of a compound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fitzgerald

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here on a chemical genetic screen designed to address the mechanism of action of a small molecule. Small molecules that were active in models of urinary incontinence were tested on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the resulting phenotypes were used as readouts in a genetic screen to identify possible molecular targets. The mutations giving resistance to compound were found to affect members of the RGS protein/G-protein complex. Studies in mammalian systems confirmed that the small molecules inhibit muscarinic G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR signaling involving G-alphaq (G-protein alpha subunit. Our studies suggest that the small molecules act at the level of the RGS/G-alphaq signaling complex, and define new mutations in both RGS and G-alphaq, including a unique hypo-adapation allele of G-alphaq. These findings suggest that therapeutics targeted to downstream components of GPCR signaling may be effective for treatment of diseases involving inappropriate receptor activation.

  5. Genetic and chemical diversity in seeds of cactus mandacaru (Cereus sp.) from two edaphoclimatic regions contrasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilaqua, Maycon R R; Santana Filho, Arquimedes P; Mangolin, Claudete A; Oliveira, Arildo J B; Machado, Maria De Fátima P S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical, physiological and genetic differences in seeds of cactus of the Cereus genus (mandacaru) cultivated in the Northeast (Picos, State of Piauí) and Southern (Maringá, State of Paraná) regions of Brazil. Over a period of eight days, temperatures of 25°C and 30°C were equally efficient for the germination of all the seeds. Oleic acid (C18:1) was the most common fatty acid found in the seeds collected in the Southern (41%) and Northeast (45.5%) regions. The analysis of lipases indicated that seeds from Maringá have high mean observed and expected heterozygosities and that seeds from Picos have a higher number of alleles per loci. Therefore, the seeds of mandacaru from the semiarid region of Northeast as well as the seeds from the South (the two contrasting regions of Brazil) are promising with regards to the preservation of the biodiversity in the genome of mandacaru. The low genetic identity between mandacaru seeds from Maringá and Picos at Lipase-5 locus analysis (I = 0.77) suggests that the mandacaru plants from Maringá and Picos may correspond to two species: C. peruvianus and C. jamacaru, respectively.

  6. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  7. Evaluating uncertainties in an integrated approach for chemical risk assessment under REACH: more certain decisions?

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeire, T.G.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concentrates on uncertainty and variability in the risk assessment methodology for industrial chemicals as applied within the current regulatory framework for industrial chemicals in Europe, REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals). The methodological approaches discussed address the risk assessment for both humans and the environment. The aim of this thesis is to investigate in what way the scientific process of risk assessment can improve deci...

  8. Predicting allergic contact dermatitis: a hierarchical structure activity relationship (SAR) approach to chemical classification using topological and quantum chemical descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Subhash C.; Mills, Denise; Hawkins, Douglas M.

    2008-06-01

    A hierarchical classification study was carried out based on a set of 70 chemicals—35 which produce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and 35 which do not. This approach was implemented using a regular ridge regression computer code, followed by conversion of regression output to binary data values. The hierarchical descriptor classes used in the modeling include topostructural (TS), topochemical (TC), and quantum chemical (QC), all of which are based solely on chemical structure. The concordance, sensitivity, and specificity are reported. The model based on the TC descriptors was found to be the best, while the TS model was extremely poor.

  9. Strongly Interacting Matter at Finite Chemical Potential: Hybrid Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, C. P.

    2013-06-01

    Search for a proper and realistic equation of state (EOS) for strongly interacting matter used in the study of the QCD phase diagram still appears as a challenging problem. Recently, we constructed a hybrid model description for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) as well as hadron gas (HG) phases where we used an excluded volume model for HG and a thermodynamically consistent quasiparticle model for the QGP phase. The hybrid model suitably describes the recent lattice results of various thermodynamical as well as transport properties of the QCD matter at zero baryon chemical potential (μB). In this paper, we extend our investigations further in obtaining the properties of QCD matter at finite value of μB and compare our results with the most recent results of lattice QCD calculation.

  10. Chronic anal fissure: new approaches to chemical sphincterotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad hassan Emami

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    • An anal fissure is a split in the mucosa extending from the anal verge towards the dentate line. It currently affects 10% of patients attending proctology clinics. Recent studies have highlighted the role of increased internal anal sphincter pressure and decreased anodermal blood flow in the pathogenesis of chronic anal fissures. Acute fissures usually heal with conservative management. Fissures lasting greater than two months with features of chronicity, are unlikely to heal with conservative management. Lateral internal sphincterotomy has been the treatment of choice for chronic anal fissures. Because of the disability associated with surgery for healing anal fissure and the risk of incontinence, medical alternatives for surgery have been sought. Among different chemical agents, Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN has been shown to be the first line treatment for chronic anal fissure but the transient sphincteric relaxation effect of pharmacologic agents such as GTN, makes them less effective than surgery. Although we have different forms of GTN products, they do not show a long acting effect on relaxing and enhancing the perfusion of anal sphincter, because they are soon metabolized. Most difficulties with current usage of drugs are due to poor compliance of patients. It can be taken into consideration that new formulation and novel combination of GTN with other treatments, in slow releasing forms may lead to acceptable strategies in the management of chronic anal fissure. As authors’ experience in this field, other clinical trials on the drug combination and slow releasing formulations are warranted to generate new data on the subject.
    • Key word: chronic anal fissure, review, chemical sphincterotomy 

  11. Maximizing lifetime of wireless sensor networks using genetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagh, Sanjeev; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    The wireless sensor networks are designed to install the smart network applications or network for emergency solutions, where human interaction is not possible. The nodes in wireless sensor networks have to self organize as per the users requirements through monitoring environments. As the sensor...... nodes are deployed in an inaccessible location for particular mission, it is difficult to exchange or recharge the nodes battery. Hence the important issues to design the sensor network for maximum time duration of network and also for low power operation of the nodes. The proposal is to select...... the cluster head intelligently using auction data of node i.e. its local battery power, topology strength and external battery support. The network lifetime is the centre focus of the research paper which explores intelligently selection of cluster head using auction based approach. The multi...

  12. A chemical genetic screen uncovers a small molecule enhancer of the N-acylethanolamine degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Faure, Lionel; Chapman, Kent D.; Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2017-01-01

    N-Acylethanolamines (NAEs) are a group of fatty acid amides that play signaling roles in diverse physiological processes in eukaryotes. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) degrades NAE into ethanolamine and free fatty acid to terminate its signaling function. In animals, chemical inhibitors of FAAH have been used for therapeutic treatment of pain and as tools to probe deeper into biochemical properties of FAAH. In a chemical genetic screen for small molecules that dampened the inhibitory effect of N-lauroylethanolamine (NAE 12:0) on Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth, we identified 6-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-2,4(3 H,6 H)-dione (or MDPD). MDPD alleviated the growth inhibitory effects of NAE 12:0, in part by enhancing the enzymatic activity of Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH). In vitro, biochemical assays showed that MDPD enhanced the apparent Vmax of AtFAAH but did not alter the affinity of AtFAAH for its NAE substrates. Structural analogs of MDPD did not affect AtFAAH activity or dampen the inhibitory effect of NAE 12:0 on seedling growth indicating that MDPD is a specific synthetic chemical activator of AtFAAH. Collectively, our study demonstrates the feasibility of using an unbiased chemical genetic approach to identify new pharmacological tools for manipulating FAAH- and NAE-mediated physiological processes in plants. PMID:28112243

  13. Dual-transduction-mode sensing approach for chemical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang (Frank); Swensen, James S.

    2012-11-01

    Smart devices such as electronic nose have been developed for application in many fields like national security, defense, environmental regulation, health care, pipeline monitoring and food analysis. Despite a large array of individual sensors, these devices still lack the ability to identify a target at a very low concentration out of a mixture of odors, limited by a single type of transduction as the sensing response to distinguish one odor from another. Here, we propose a new sensor architecture empowering each individual sensor with multi-dimensional transduction signals. The resolving power of our proposed electronic nose is thereby multiplied by a set of different and independent variables which synergistically will provide a unique combined fingerprint for each analyte. We demonstrate this concept using a Light Emitting Organic Field-Effect Transistor (LEOFET). Sensing response has been observed on both electrical and optical output signals from a green LEOFET upon exposure to an explosive taggant, with optical signal exhibiting much higher sensitivity. This new sensor architecture opens a field of devices for smart detection of chemical and biological targets.

  14. Tactical approach to maneuvering within the chemical contamination labyrinth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, T.W. [Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the need and accepts the responsibility for understanding the reality and mitigating the consequence of the complex chemical contamination legacy it inherited as well as controlling, reducing, and eliminating extant emissions and effluents. The key to maneuvering through this complicated and multifaceted labyrinth of concerns, from which a meaningful, high quality, and cost-effective restoration/mitigation machine is then set in motions, is the ability to perform accurate, factual, and explicit health and environmental/ecological risk assessments. Likewise, the common denominator for carrying out this essential task is to have access to comprehensive and reliable data of known quality with which to perform those analyses. DOE is committed to identifying the data universe; to technically scrutinize and ensure the quality of that data; to develop efficient and cost-effective means to maximize the handling, utilization, and sharing of that universe; and to undertake those assessments. DOE views this as an effort that can only be accomplished through a merging of the technical excellence that exists within federal and state agencies, academia, and industry. The task at hand is so large that only by integrating that intelligence base can we hope to accomplish the goals of establishing meaningful standards, developing functional and effective solutions, and providing quality guidance at a national scale.

  15. Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal Distinct Components of Impulsive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Wall, Melanie M; Wang, Shuai; Magalong, Valerie M; Ahmari, Susanne E; Balsam, Peter D; Blanco, Carlos; Hen, René

    2017-01-18

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype found in many psychiatric disorders including substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two behavioral features often considered in impulsive behavior are behavioral inhibition (impulsive action) and delayed gratification (impulsive choice). However, the extent to which these behavioral constructs represent distinct facets of behavior with discrete biological bases is unclear. To test the hypothesis that impulsive action and impulsive choice represent statistically independent behavioral constructs in mice, we collected behavioral measures of impulsivity in a single cohort of mice using well-validated operant behavioral paradigms. Mice with manipulation of serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) expression were included as a model of disordered impulsivity. A factor analysis was used to characterize correlations between the measures of impulsivity and to identify covariates. Using two approaches, we dissociated impulsive action from impulsive choice. First, the absence of 5-HT1BRs caused increased impulsive action, but not impulsive choice. Second, based on an exploratory factor analysis, a two-factor model described the data well, with measures of impulsive action and choice separating into two independent factors. A multiple-indicator multiple-causes analysis showed that 5-HT1BR expression and sex were significant covariates of impulsivity. Males displayed increased impulsivity in both dimensions, whereas 5-HT1BR expression was a predictor of increased impulsive action only. These data support the conclusion that impulsive action and impulsive choice are distinct behavioral phenotypes with dissociable biological influences that can be modeled in mice. Our work may help inform better classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disorders, which present with disordered impulsivity.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 18 January 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2016.277.

  16. Improving the accuracy of density-functional theory calculation: the genetic algorithm and neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Shi, LiLi; Zhang, Min; Su, Zhongmin; Wang, XiuJun; Hu, LiHong; Chen, GuanHua

    2007-04-14

    The combination of genetic algorithm and neural network approach (GANN) has been developed to improve the calculation accuracy of density functional theory. As a demonstration, this combined quantum mechanical calculation and GANN correction approach has been applied to evaluate the optical absorption energies of 150 organic molecules. The neural network approach reduces the root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the calculated absorption energies of 150 organic molecules from 0.47 to 0.22 eV for the TDDFTB3LYP6-31G(d) calculation, and the newly developed GANN correction approach reduces the rms deviation to 0.16 eV.

  17. Non-Genetic Engineering Approaches for Isolating and Generating Novel Yeasts for Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, P. J.; Bellon, J. R.; Schmidt, S. A.; Varela, C.; Pretorius, I. S.

    Generating novel yeast strains for industrial applications should be quite straightforward; after all, research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Baker's Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has paved the way for many advances in the modern biological sciences. We probably know more about this humble eukaryote than any other, and it is the most tractable of organisms for manipulation using modern genetic engineering approaches. In many countries, however, there are restrictions on the use of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs), particularly in foods and beverages, and the level of consumer acceptance of GMOs is, at best, variable. Thus, many researchers working with industrial yeasts use genetic engineering techniques primarily as research tools, and strain development continues to rely on non-GM technologies. This chapter explores the non-GM tools and strategies available to such researchers.

  18. Solving an aggregate production planning problem by using multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripon Kumar Chakrabortty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In hierarchical production planning system, Aggregate Production Planning (APP falls between the broad decisions of long-range planning and the highly specific and detailed short-range planning decisions. This study develops an interactive Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA approach for solving the multi-product, multi-period aggregate production planning (APP with forecasted demand, related operating costs, and capacity. The proposed approach attempts to minimize total costs with reference to inventory levels, labor levels, overtime, subcontracting and backordering levels, and labor, machine and warehouse capacity. Here several genetic algorithm parameters are considered for solving NP-hard problem (APP problem and their relative comparisons are focused to choose the most auspicious combination for solving multiple objective problems. An industrial case demonstrates the feasibility of applying the proposed approach to real APP decision problems. Consequently, the proposed MOGA approach yields an efficient APP compromise solution for large-scale problems.

  19. On Generating Optimal Signal Probabilities for Random Tests: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Srinivas

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic Algorithms are robust search and optimization techniques. A Genetic Algorithm based approach for determining the optimal input distributions for generating random test vectors is proposed in the paper. A cost function based on the COP testability measure for determining the efficacy of the input distributions is discussed. A brief overview of Genetic Algorithms (GAs and the specific details of our implementation are described. Experimental results based on ISCAS-85 benchmark circuits are presented. The performance of our GAbased approach is compared with previous results. While the GA generates more efficient input distributions than the previous methods which are based on gradient descent search, the overheads of the GA in computing the input distributions are larger.

  20. At the brink of supercoloniality: genetic, behavioral and chemical assessments of population structure of the desert ant Cataglyphis niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya eSaar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The nesting habits of ants play an important role in structuring ant populations. They vary from monodomy, a colony occupies a single nest, via polydomy, a colony occupies multiple adjacent nests, to supercoloniality, a colony spans over large territories comprising dozen to thousands nests without having any boundaries. The population structure of the desert ant Cataglyphis niger, previously considered to form supercolonies, was studied using genetic, chemical and behavioral tools in plots of 50x50 meters at two distinct populations. At the Palmahim site, the plot comprised 15 nests that according to the genetic analysis constituted three colonies. Likewise at the Rishon Leziyyon site 14 nests constituted 5 genetic colonies. In both sites, both chemical analysis and the behavioral (aggression tests confirmed the colony genetic architecture. The behavioral tests also revealed that aggression between colonies within a population was higher than that exhibited between colonies of different populations, suggesting the occurrence of the nasty neighbor phenomenon. In contrast to supercolony structure previously reported in another population of this species, the presently studied populations were composed of polydomous colonies. However, both the genetic and chemical data revealed that the inter-colonial differences between sites were larger than those within site, suggesting some within-site population viscosity. Thus, C. niger exhibits flexible nesting characteristics, from polydomy to supercoloniality, and can be considered at the brink of supercoloniality. We attribute the differences in population structure among sites to the intensity of intraspecific competition.

  1. Approaches for the Identification of Genetic Modifiers of Nutrient Dependent Phenotypes: Examples from Folate

    OpenAIRE

    MacFarlane, Amanda J.; Ian eZinck

    2014-01-01

    By combining the sciences of nutrition, bioinformatics, genomics, population genetics, and epidemiology, nutrigenomics is improving our understanding of how diet and nutrient intake can interact with or modify gene expression and disease risk. In this review, we explore various approaches to examine gene–nutrient interactions and the modifying role of nutrient consumption, as they relate to nutrient status and disease risk in human populations. Two common approaches include the use of SNPs in...

  2. An Alternative Educational Approach for an Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory Course in Industrial and Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Andres; Sanchez-Barba, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We describe an alternative educational approach for an inorganic chemistry laboratory module named "Experimentation in Chemistry", which is included in Industrial Engineering and Chemical Engineering courses. The main aims of the new approach were to reduce the high levels of failure and dropout on the module and to make the content match the…

  3. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Genetic and Chemical Activators ofPeroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARalpha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive survey of chemical, diet and genetic perturbations that activate PPARalpha in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful to identify the factors that may contribute to PPARalpha-dependent liver tumors. A gene signature dependent on PPARalpha ac...

  4. Integrating Genetic, Psychopharmacological and Neuroimaging Studies: A Converging Methods Approach to Understanding the Neurobiology of ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durston, Sarah; Konrad, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how combining multiple approaches can inform us about the neurobiology of ADHD. Converging evidence from genetic, psychopharmacological and functional neuroimaging studies has implicated dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuitry in ADHD. However, while the observation of converging evidence from multiple vantage points…

  5. A Genetic Algorithm Approach for Group Formation in Collaborative Learning Considering Multiple Student Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Julian; Ovalle, Demetrio A.; Vicari, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Considering that group formation is one of the key processes in collaborative learning, the aim of this paper is to propose a method based on a genetic algorithm approach for achieving inter-homogeneous and intra-heterogeneous groups. The main feature of such a method is that it allows for the consideration of as many student characteristics as…

  6. Application of a single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approach to pharmacokinetic model building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Eric A; Sale, Mark E; Pollock, Bruce G; Belani, Chandra P; Egorin, Merrill J; Ivy, Percy S; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Manuck, Stephen B; Marder, Stephen R; Muldoon, Matthew F; Scher, Howard I; Solit, David B; Bies, Robert R

    2012-08-01

    A limitation in traditional stepwise population pharmacokinetic model building is the difficulty in handling interactions between model components. To address this issue, a method was previously introduced which couples NONMEM parameter estimation and model fitness evaluation to a single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm for global optimization of the model structure. In this study, the generalizability of this approach for pharmacokinetic model building is evaluated by comparing (1) correct and spurious covariate relationships in a simulated dataset resulting from automated stepwise covariate modeling, Lasso methods, and single-objective hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to covariate identification and (2) information criteria values, model structures, convergence, and model parameter values resulting from manual stepwise versus single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to model building for seven compounds. Both manual stepwise and single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm approaches to model building were applied, blinded to the results of the other approach, for selection of the compartment structure as well as inclusion and model form of inter-individual and inter-occasion variability, residual error, and covariates from a common set of model options. For the simulated dataset, stepwise covariate modeling identified three of four true covariates and two spurious covariates; Lasso identified two of four true and 0 spurious covariates; and the single-objective, hybrid genetic algorithm identified three of four true covariates and one spurious covariate. For the clinical datasets, the Akaike information criterion was a median of 22.3 points lower (range of 470.5 point decrease to 0.1 point decrease) for the best single-objective hybrid genetic-algorithm candidate model versus the final manual stepwise model: the Akaike information criterion was lower by greater than 10 points for four compounds and differed by less than 10 points for three

  7. Back-propagation network improved by conjugate gradient based on genetic algorithm in QSAR study on endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Since the complexity and structural diversity of man-made compounds are considered,quantitative structure-activity relationships(QSARs)-based fast screening approaches are urgently needed for the assessment of the potential risk of endocrine disrupting chemicals(EDCs).The artificial neural networks(ANN)are capable of recognizing highly nonlinear relationships,so it will have a bright application prospect in building high-quality QSAR models.As a popular supervised training algorithm in ANN,back-propagation(BP)converges slowly and immerses in vibration frequently.In this paper,a research strategy that BP neural network was improved by conjugate gradient(CG)algorithm with a variable selection method based on genetic algorithm was applied to investigate the QSAR of EDCs.This resulted in a robust and highly predictive ANN model with R2 of 0.845 for the training set,q2 pred of 0.81 and root-mean-square error(RMSE) of 0.688 for the test set.The result shows that our method can provide a feasible and practical tool for the rapid screening of the estrogen activity of organic compounds.

  8. Global-scale analyses of chemical ecology and population genetics in the invasive Argentine ant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, M; Van Wilgenburg, E; Tsutsui, N D

    2009-03-01

    Ants are some of the most abundant and ecologically successful terrestrial organisms, and invasive ants rank among the most damaging invasive species. The Argentine ant is a particularly well-studied invader, in part because of the extreme social structure of introduced populations, known as unicoloniality. Unicolonial ants form geographically vast supercolonies, within which territorial behaviour and intraspecific aggression are absent. Because the extreme social structure of introduced populations arises from the widespread acceptance of conspecifics, understanding how this colonymate recognition occurs is key to explaining their success as invaders. Here, we present analyses of Argentine ant recognition cues (cuticular hydrocarbons) and population genetic characteristics from 25 sites across four continents and the Hawaiian Islands. By examining both hydrocarbon profiles and microsatellite genotypes in the same individual ants, we show that native and introduced populations differ in several respects. Both individual workers and groups of nestmates in the introduced range possess less diverse chemical profiles than ants in the native range. As previous studies have reported, we also find that introduced populations possess much lower levels of genetic diversity than populations in the native range. Interestingly, the largest supercolonies on several continents are strikingly similar to each other, suggesting that they arose from a shared introduction pathway. This high similarity suggests that these geographically far-flung ants may still recognize and accept each other as colonymates, thus representing distant nodes of a single, widely distributed supercolony. These findings shed light on the behaviour and sociality of these unicolonial invaders, and pose new questions about the history and origins of introduced populations.

  9. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  10. Fat versus Thin Threading Approach on GPUs: Application to Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Klingbeil, Guido

    2012-02-01

    We explore two different threading approaches on a graphics processing unit (GPU) exploiting two different characteristics of the current GPU architecture. The fat thread approach tries to minimize data access time by relying on shared memory and registers potentially sacrificing parallelism. The thin thread approach maximizes parallelism and tries to hide access latencies. We apply these two approaches to the parallel stochastic simulation of chemical reaction systems using the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA) by Gillespie [14]. In these cases, the proposed thin thread approach shows comparable performance while eliminating the limitation of the reaction system\\'s size. © 2006 IEEE.

  11. Comparison of modeling approaches to prioritize chemicals based on estimates of exposure and exposure potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jade; Arnot, Jon A.; Jolliet, Olivier; Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Isukapalli, Sastry; Dasgupta, Surajit; Pandian, Muhilan; Wambaugh, John; Egeghy, Peter; Cohen Hubal, Elaine A.; Vallero, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    While only limited data are available to characterize the potential toxicity of over 8 million commercially available chemical substances, there is even less information available on the exposure and use-scenarios that are required to link potential toxicity to human and ecological health outcomes. Recent improvements and advances such as high throughput data gathering, high performance computational capabilities, and predictive chemical inherency methodology make this an opportune time to develop an exposure-based prioritization approach that can systematically utilize and link the asymmetrical bodies of knowledge for hazard and exposure. In response to the US EPA’s need to develop novel approaches and tools for rapidly prioritizing chemicals, a “Challenge” was issued to several exposure model developers to aid the understanding of current systems in a broader sense and to assist the US EPA’s effort to develop an approach comparable to other international efforts. A common set of chemicals were prioritized under each current approach. The results are presented herein along with a comparative analysis of the rankings of the chemicals based on metrics of exposure potential or actual exposure estimates. The analysis illustrates the similarities and differences across the domains of information incorporated in each modeling approach. The overall findings indicate a need to reconcile exposures from diffuse, indirect sources (far-field) with exposures from directly, applied chemicals in consumer products or resulting from the presence of a chemical in a microenvironment like a home or vehicle. Additionally, the exposure scenario, including the mode of entry into the environment (i.e. through air, water or sediment) appears to be an important determinant of the level of agreement between modeling approaches. PMID:23707726

  12. Chemical proteomics approaches for identifying the cellular targets of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M H; Sieber, S A

    2016-05-01

    Covering: 2010 up to 2016Deconvoluting the mode of action of natural products and drugs remains one of the biggest challenges in chemistry and biology today. Chemical proteomics is a growing area of chemical biology that seeks to design small molecule probes to understand protein function. In the context of natural products, chemical proteomics can be used to identify the protein binding partners or targets of small molecules in live cells. Here, we highlight recent examples of chemical probes based on natural products and their application for target identification. The review focuses on probes that can be covalently linked to their target proteins (either via intrinsic chemical reactivity or via the introduction of photocrosslinkers), and can be applied "in situ" - in living systems rather than cell lysates. We also focus here on strategies that employ a click reaction, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), to allow minimal functionalisation of natural product scaffolds with an alkyne or azide tag. We also discuss 'competitive mode' approaches that screen for natural products that compete with a well-characterised chemical probe for binding to a particular set of protein targets. Fuelled by advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and bioinformatics, many modern strategies are now embracing quantitative proteomics to help define the true interacting partners of probes, and we highlight the opportunities this rapidly evolving technology provides in chemical proteomics. Finally, some of the limitations and challenges of chemical proteomics approaches are discussed.

  13. A fuzzy genetic approach for network reconfiguration to enhance voltage stability in radial distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, N.C. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Prasad, K. [Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2006-11-15

    This paper presents a fuzzy genetic approach for reconfiguration of radial distribution systems (RDS) so as to maximize the voltage stability of the network for a specific set of loads. The network reconfiguration involves a mechanism for selection of the best set of branches to be opened, one from each loop, such that the reconfigured RDS possesses desired performance characteristics. This discrete solution space is better handled by the proposed scheme, which maximizes a suitable optimizing function (computed using two different approaches). In the first approach, this function is chosen as the average of a voltage stability index of all the buses in the RDS, while in the second approach, the complete RDS is reduced to a two bus equivalent system and the optimizing function is the voltage stability index of this reduced two bus system. The fuzzy genetic algorithm uses a suitable coding and decoding scheme for maintaining the radial nature of the network at every stage of genetic evolution, and it also uses a fuzzy rule based mutation controller for efficient search of the solution space. This method, tested on 69 bus and 33 bus RDSs, shows promising results for the both approaches. It is also observed that the network losses are reduced when the voltage stability is enhanced by the network reconfiguration. (author)

  14. [Recent progress in gene mapping through high-throughput sequencing technology and forward genetic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cairui; Zou, Changsong; Song, Guoli

    2015-08-01

    Traditional gene mapping using forward genetic approaches is conducted primarily through construction of a genetic linkage map, the process of which is tedious and time-consuming, and often results in low accuracy of mapping and large mapping intervals. With the rapid development of high-throughput sequencing technology and decreasing cost of sequencing, a variety of simple and quick methods of gene mapping through sequencing have been developed, including direct sequencing of the mutant genome, sequencing of selective mutant DNA pooling, genetic map construction through sequencing of individuals in population, as well as sequencing of transcriptome and partial genome. These methods can be used to identify mutations at the nucleotide level and has been applied in complex genetic background. Recent reports have shown that sequencing mapping could be even done without the reference of genome sequence, hybridization, and genetic linkage information, which made it possible to perform forward genetic study in many non-model species. In this review, we summarized these new technologies and their application in gene mapping.

  15. NeuroChip: a microfluidic electrophysiological device for genetic and chemical biology screening of Caenorhabditis elegans adult and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunxiao; Dillon, James; Kearn, James; Murray, Caitriona; O'Connor, Vincent; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Morgan, Hywel

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and chemical biology screens of C. elegans have been of enormous benefit in providing fundamental insight into neural function and neuroactive drugs. Recently the exploitation of microfluidic devices has added greater power to this experimental approach providing more discrete and higher throughput phenotypic analysis of neural systems. Here we make a significant addition to this repertoire through the design of a semi-automated microfluidic device, NeuroChip, which has been optimised for selecting worms based on the electrophysiological features of the pharyngeal neural network. We demonstrate this device has the capability to sort mutant from wild-type worms based on high definition extracellular electrophysiological recordings. NeuroChip resolves discrete differences in excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory components of the neural network from individual animals. Worms may be fed into the device consecutively from a reservoir and recovered unharmed. It combines microfluidics with integrated electrode recording for sequential trapping, restraining, recording, releasing and recovering of C. elegans. Thus mutant worms may be selected, recovered and propagated enabling mutagenesis screens based on an electrophysiological phenotype. Drugs may be rapidly applied during the recording thus permitting compound screening. For toxicology, this analysis can provide a precise description of sub-lethal effects on neural function. The chamber has been modified to accommodate L2 larval stages showing applicability for small size nematodes including parasitic species which otherwise are not tractable to this experimental approach. We also combine NeuroChip with optogenetics for targeted interrogation of the function of the neural circuit. NeuroChip thus adds a new tool for exploitation of C. elegans and has applications in neurogenetics, drug discovery and neurotoxicology.

  16. NeuroChip: a microfluidic electrophysiological device for genetic and chemical biology screening of Caenorhabditis elegans adult and larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Hu

    Full Text Available Genetic and chemical biology screens of C. elegans have been of enormous benefit in providing fundamental insight into neural function and neuroactive drugs. Recently the exploitation of microfluidic devices has added greater power to this experimental approach providing more discrete and higher throughput phenotypic analysis of neural systems. Here we make a significant addition to this repertoire through the design of a semi-automated microfluidic device, NeuroChip, which has been optimised for selecting worms based on the electrophysiological features of the pharyngeal neural network. We demonstrate this device has the capability to sort mutant from wild-type worms based on high definition extracellular electrophysiological recordings. NeuroChip resolves discrete differences in excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory components of the neural network from individual animals. Worms may be fed into the device consecutively from a reservoir and recovered unharmed. It combines microfluidics with integrated electrode recording for sequential trapping, restraining, recording, releasing and recovering of C. elegans. Thus mutant worms may be selected, recovered and propagated enabling mutagenesis screens based on an electrophysiological phenotype. Drugs may be rapidly applied during the recording thus permitting compound screening. For toxicology, this analysis can provide a precise description of sub-lethal effects on neural function. The chamber has been modified to accommodate L2 larval stages showing applicability for small size nematodes including parasitic species which otherwise are not tractable to this experimental approach. We also combine NeuroChip with optogenetics for targeted interrogation of the function of the neural circuit. NeuroChip thus adds a new tool for exploitation of C. elegans and has applications in neurogenetics, drug discovery and neurotoxicology.

  17. A Genetic Algorithm and Fuzzy Logic Approach for Video Shot Boundary Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thounaojam, Dalton Meitei; Khelchandra, Thongam; Manglem Singh, Kh; Roy, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a shot boundary detection approach using Genetic Algorithm and Fuzzy Logic. In this, the membership functions of the fuzzy system are calculated using Genetic Algorithm by taking preobserved actual values for shot boundaries. The classification of the types of shot transitions is done by the fuzzy system. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the shot boundary detection increases with the increase in iterations or generations of the GA optimization process. The proposed system is compared to latest techniques and yields better result in terms of F1score parameter.

  18. A Genetic Algorithm and Fuzzy Logic Approach for Video Shot Boundary Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalton Meitei Thounaojam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a shot boundary detection approach using Genetic Algorithm and Fuzzy Logic. In this, the membership functions of the fuzzy system are calculated using Genetic Algorithm by taking preobserved actual values for shot boundaries. The classification of the types of shot transitions is done by the fuzzy system. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the shot boundary detection increases with the increase in iterations or generations of the GA optimization process. The proposed system is compared to latest techniques and yields better result in terms of F1score parameter.

  19. A new approach for the combined chemical and mineral classification of the inorganic matter in coal. 2. Potential applications of the classification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislav V. Vassilev; Christina G. Vassileva; David Baxter; Lars K. Andersen [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Central Laboratory of Mineralogy and Crystallography

    2009-02-15

    Part 1 of the present work introduced and evaluated a new approach for the combined chemical and mineral classification of the inorganic matter in coal. The benefit of these classification systems is the use of significant correlations and actual element associations, and well-defined and genetically described mineral classes and species in coal. Potential applications of the chemically and mineralogically categorized coal types and subtypes are discussed in the present part 2. The data show that various technological problems, environmental risks and health concerns of coal use are related directly or indirectly to specific mineral and chemical coal types and subtypes. Furthermore, a concept of 'self-cleaning fuels' also is introduced and developed herein based on mineral coal types. The application of these chemical and mineral classification systems and concept is proposed to both the scientific and industrial community. 54 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Study of lattice QCD at finite chemical potential using canonical ensemble approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bornyakov, V G; Goy, V A; Molochkov, A V; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nikolaev, A A; Zakharov, V I

    2016-01-01

    New approach to computation of canonical partition functions in $N_f=2$ lattice QCD is presented. We compare results obtained by new method with results obtained by known method of hopping parameter expansion. We observe agreement between two methods indicating validity of the new method. We use results for the number density obtained in the confining and deconfining phases at imaginary chemical potential to determine the phase transition line at real chemical potential.

  1. Chemical Genetics of Rapamycin-Insensitive TORC2 in S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph I. Kliegman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches for identifying synergistic targets use cell culture models to see if the combined effect of clinically available drugs is better than predicted by their individual efficacy. New techniques are needed to systematically and rationally identify targets and pathways that may be synergistic targets. Here, we created a tool to screen and identify molecular targets that may synergize with new inhibitors of target of rapamycin (TOR, a conserved protein that is a major integrator of cell proliferation signals in the nutrient-signaling pathway. Although clinical results from TOR complex 1 (TORC1-specific inhibition using rapamycin analogs have been disappointing, trials using inhibitors that also target TORC2 have been promising. To understand this increased therapeutic efficacy and to discover secondary targets for combination therapy, we engineered Tor2 in S. cerevisiae to accept an orthogonal inhibitor. We used this tool to create a chemical epistasis miniarray profile (ChE-MAP by measuring interactions between the chemically inhibited Tor2 kinase and a diverse library of deletion mutants. The ChE-MAP identified known TOR components and distinguished between TORC1- and TORC2-dependent functions. The results showed a TORC2-specific interaction with the pentose phosphate pathway, a previously unappreciated TORC2 function that suggests a role for the complex in balancing the high energy demand required for ribosome biogenesis.

  2. Design of tailor-made chemical blend using a decomposition-based computer-aided approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza; Gernaey, Krist; Manan, Z.A.;

    2011-01-01

    Computer aided techniques form an efficient approach to solve chemical product design problems such as the design of blended liquid products (chemical blending). In chemical blending, one tries to find the best candidate, which satisfies the product targets defined in terms of desired product...... the desired product attributes. Alternatively, rigorous modeling could also be used in this final step. In other words, the candidates are quickly generated and screened until a small number is left for final selection and evaluation by experiments and/or rigorous modeling. This paper presents a design...... methodology for blended liquid products that identifies a set of feasible chemical blends. The blend design problem is formulated as a Mixed Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) model where the objective is to find the optimal blended gasoline or diesel product subject to types of chemicals...

  3. A systems engineering approach to manage the complexity in sustainable chemical product-process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    This paper provides a perspective on model-data based solution approaches for chemical product-process design, which consists of finding the identity of the candidate chemical product, designing the process that can sustainably manufacture it and verifying the performance of the product during...... application. The chemical product tree is potentially very large and a wide range of options exist for selecting the product to make, the raw material to use as well as the processing route to employ. It is shown that systematic computer-aided methods and tools integrated within a model-data based design...

  4. Environmental Pollution, Toxicity Profile and Treatment Approaches for Tannery Wastewater and Its Chemical Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Gaurav; Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    Leather industries are key contributors in the economy of many developing countries, but unfortunately they are facing serious challenges from the public and governments due to the associated environmental pollution. There is a public outcry against the industry due to the discharge of potentially toxic wastewater having alkaline pH, dark brown colour, unpleasant odour, high biological and chemical oxygen demand, total dissolved solids and a mixture of organic and inorganic pollutants. Various environment protection agencies have prioritized several chemicals as hazardous and restricted their use in leather processing however; many of these chemicals are used and discharged in wastewater. Therefore, it is imperative to adequately treat/detoxify the tannery wastewater for environmental safety. This paper provides a detail review on the environmental pollution and toxicity profile of tannery wastewater and chemicals. Furthermore, the status and advances in the existing treatment approaches used for the treatment and/or detoxification of tannery wastewater at both laboratory and pilot/industrial scale have been reviewed. In addition, the emerging treatment approaches alone or in combination with biological treatment approaches have also been considered. Moreover, the limitations of existing and emerging treatment approaches have been summarized and potential areas for further investigations have been discussed. In addition, the clean technologies for waste minimization, control and management are also discussed. Finally, the international legislation scenario on discharge limits for tannery wastewater and chemicals has also been discussed country wise with discharge standards for pollution prevention due to tannery wastewater.

  5. A nearest neighbour approach by genetic distance to the assignment of individual trees to geographic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degen, Bernd; Blanc-Jolivet, Céline; Stierand, Katrin; Gillet, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    During the past decade, the use of DNA for forensic applications has been extensively implemented for plant and animal species, as well as in humans. Tracing back the geographical origin of an individual usually requires genetic assignment analysis. These approaches are based on reference samples that are grouped into populations or other aggregates and intend to identify the most likely group of origin. Often this grouping does not have a biological but rather a historical or political justification, such as "country of origin". In this paper, we present a new nearest neighbour approach to individual assignment or classification within a given but potentially imperfect grouping of reference samples. This method, which is based on the genetic distance between individuals, functions better in many cases than commonly used methods. We demonstrate the operation of our assignment method using two data sets. One set is simulated for a large number of trees distributed in a 120km by 120km landscape with individual genotypes at 150 SNPs, and the other set comprises experimental data of 1221 individuals of the African tropical tree species Entandrophragma cylindricum (Sapelli) genotyped at 61 SNPs. Judging by the level of correct self-assignment, our approach outperformed the commonly used frequency and Bayesian approaches by 15% for the simulated data set and by 5-7% for the Sapelli data set. Our new approach is less sensitive to overlapping sources of genetic differentiation, such as genetic differences among closely-related species, phylogeographic lineages and isolation by distance, and thus operates better even for suboptimal grouping of individuals.

  6. Landscape genetic approaches to guide native plant restoration in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F.; Havrilla, Caroline A.; DeFalco, Lesley; Esque, Todd; Custer, Nathan; Wood, Troy E.

    2016-01-01

    Restoring dryland ecosystems is a global challenge due to synergistic drivers of disturbance coupled with unpredictable environmental conditions. Dryland plant species have evolved complex life-history strategies to cope with fluctuating resources and climatic extremes. Although rarely quantified, local adaptation is likely widespread among these species and potentially influences restoration outcomes. The common practice of reintroducing propagules to restore dryland ecosystems, often across large spatial scales, compels evaluation of adaptive divergence within these species. Such evaluations are critical to understanding the consequences of large-scale manipulation of gene flow and to predicting success of restoration efforts. However, genetic information for species of interest can be difficult and expensive to obtain through traditional common garden experiments. Recent advances in landscape genetics offer marker-based approaches for identifying environmental drivers of adaptive genetic variability in non-model species, but tools are still needed to link these approaches with practical aspects of ecological restoration. Here, we combine spatially-explicit landscape genetics models with flexible visualization tools to demonstrate how cost-effective evaluations of adaptive genetic divergence can facilitate implementation of different seed sourcing strategies in ecological restoration. We apply these methods to Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers genotyped in two Mojave Desert shrub species of high restoration importance: the long-lived, wind-pollinated gymnosperm Ephedra nevadensis, and the short-lived, insect-pollinated angiosperm Sphaeralcea ambigua. Mean annual temperature was identified as an important driver of adaptive genetic divergence for both species. Ephedra showed stronger adaptive divergence with respect to precipitation variability, while temperature variability and precipitation averages explained a larger fraction of adaptive

  7. Landscape genetic approaches to guide native plant restoration in the Mojave Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F; Havrilla, Caroline A; DeFalco, Lesley A; Esque, Todd C; Custer, Nathan A; Wood, Troy E

    2017-03-01

    Restoring dryland ecosystems is a global challenge due to synergistic drivers of disturbance coupled with unpredictable environmental conditions. Dryland plant species have evolved complex life-history strategies to cope with fluctuating resources and climatic extremes. Although rarely quantified, local adaptation is likely widespread among these species and potentially influences restoration outcomes. The common practice of reintroducing propagules to restore dryland ecosystems, often across large spatial scales, compels evaluation of adaptive divergence within these species. Such evaluations are critical to understanding the consequences of large-scale manipulation of gene flow and to predicting success of restoration efforts. However, genetic information for species of interest can be difficult and expensive to obtain through traditional common garden experiments. Recent advances in landscape genetics offer marker-based approaches for identifying environmental drivers of adaptive genetic variability in non-model species, but tools are still needed to link these approaches with practical aspects of ecological restoration. Here, we combine spatially explicit landscape genetics models with flexible visualization tools to demonstrate how cost-effective evaluations of adaptive genetic divergence can facilitate implementation of different seed sourcing strategies in ecological restoration. We apply these methods to Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers genotyped in two Mojave Desert shrub species of high restoration importance: the long-lived, wind-pollinated gymnosperm Ephedra nevadensis, and the short-lived, insect-pollinated angiosperm Sphaeralcea ambigua. Mean annual temperature was identified as an important driver of adaptive genetic divergence for both species. Ephedra showed stronger adaptive divergence with respect to precipitation variability, while temperature variability and precipitation averages explained a larger fraction of adaptive

  8. Deciphering genetic diversity and inheritance of tomato fruit weight and composition through a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Laura; Xu, Jiaxin; Biais, Benoît; Maucourt, Mickaël; Ballias, Patricia; Bernillon, Stéphane; Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel; Desgroux, Aurore; Faurobert, Mireille; Bouchet, Jean-Paul; Gibon, Yves; Moing, Annick; Causse, Mathilde

    2013-12-01

    Integrative systems biology proposes new approaches to decipher the variation of phenotypic traits. In an effort to link the genetic variation and the physiological and molecular bases of fruit composition, the proteome (424 protein spots), metabolome (26 compounds), enzymatic profile (26 enzymes), and phenotypes of eight tomato accessions, covering the genetic diversity of the species, and four of their F1 hybrids, were characterized at two fruit developmental stages (cell expansion and orange-red). The contents of metabolites varied among the genetic backgrounds, while enzyme profiles were less variable, particularly at the cell expansion stage. Frequent genotype by stage interactions suggested that the trends observed for one accession at a physiological level may change in another accession. In agreement with this, the inheritance modes varied between crosses and stages. Although additivity was predominant, 40% of the traits were non-additively inherited. Relationships among traits revealed associations between different levels of expression and provided information on several key proteins. Notably, the role of frucktokinase, invertase, and cysteine synthase in the variation of metabolites was highlighted. Several stress-related proteins also appeared related to fruit weight differences. These key proteins might be targets for improving metabolite contents of the fruit. This systems biology approach provides better understanding of networks controlling the genetic variation of tomato fruit composition. In addition, the wide data sets generated provide an ideal framework to develop innovative integrated hypothesis and will be highly valuable for the research community.

  9. A pooling-based approach to mapping genetic variants associated with DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplow, Irene M; MacIsaac, Julia L; Mah, Sarah M; McEwen, Lisa M; Kobor, Michael S; Fraser, Hunter B

    2015-06-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a key role in gene regulation. Previous studies have investigated its genetic basis by mapping genetic variants that are associated with DNA methylation at specific sites, but these have been limited to microarrays that cover map of DNA methylation. Compared to methods that do not account for ASM, our approach increases statistical power to detect associations while sharply reducing cost, effort, and experimental variability. As a proof of concept, we generated deep sequencing data from a pool of 60 human cell lines; we evaluated almost twice as many CpGs as the largest microarray studies and identified more than 2000 genetic variants associated with DNA methylation. We found that these variants are highly enriched for associations with chromatin accessibility and CTCF binding but are less likely to be associated with traits indirectly linked to DNA, such as gene expression and disease phenotypes. In summary, our approach allows genome-wide mapping of genetic variants associated with DNA methylation in any tissue of any species, without the need for individual-level genotype or methylation data.

  10. Genetic parameters for carcass traits and body weight using a Bayesian approach in the Canchim cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, S L C; Mokry, F B; Espasandín, A C; Dias, M A D; Baena, M M; de A Regitano, L C

    2016-06-10

    Correlation between genetic parameters and factors such as backfat thickness (BFT), rib eye area (REA), and body weight (BW) were estimated for Canchim beef cattle raised in natural pastures of Brazil. Data from 1648 animals were analyzed using multi-trait (BFT, REA, and BW) animal models by the Bayesian approach. This model included the effects of contemporary group, age, and individual heterozygosity as covariates. In addition, direct additive genetic and random residual effects were also analyzed. Heritability estimated for BFT (0.16), REA (0.50), and BW (0.44) indicated their potential for genetic improvements and response to selection processes. Furthermore, genetic correlations between BW and the remaining traits were high (P > 0.50), suggesting that selection for BW could improve REA and BFT. On the other hand, genetic correlation between BFT and REA was low (P = 0.39 ± 0.17), and included considerable variations, suggesting that these traits can be jointly included as selection criteria without influencing each other. We found that REA and BFT responded to the selection processes, as measured by ultrasound. Therefore, selection for yearling weight results in changes in REA and BFT.

  11. New Genetic Approaches to AD: Lessons from APOE-TOMM40 Phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Michael W; Crenshaw, Donna; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Burns, Daniel K; Roses, Allen D

    2016-05-01

    Clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease are now focusing on the earliest stages of the disease with the goal of delaying dementia onset. There is great utility in using genetic variants to identify individuals at high age-dependent risk when the goal is to begin treatment before the development of any cognitive symptoms. Genetic variants identified through large-scale genome-wide association studies have not substantially improved the accuracy provided by APOE genotype to identify people at high risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We describe novel approaches, focused on molecular phylogenetics, to finding genetic variants that predict age at LOAD onset with sufficient accuracy and precision to be useful. We highlight the discovery of a polymorphism in TOMM40 that, in addition to APOE, may improve risk prediction and review how TOMM40 genetic variants may impact the develop of LOAD independently from APOE. The analysis methods described in this review may be useful for other genetically complex human diseases.

  12. Regional Genetic Structure and Environmental Variables Influence our Conservation Approach for Feather Heads (Ptilotus macrocephalus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Collin W; James, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Continued alterations to the Australian environment compromise the long-term viability of many plant species. We investigate the population genetics of Ptilotus macrocephalus, a perennial herb that occurs in 2 nationally endangered communities on the Victorian Volcanic Plain Bioregion (VVP), Australia, to answer key questions regarding regional differentiation and to guide conservation strategies. We evaluate genetic structure and diversity within and among 17 P. macrocephalus populations from 3 regions of southeastern Australia using 17 microsatellite markers developed de novo. Genetic structure was present in P. macrocephalus between the 3 regions but not at the population level. Environmental factors, namely temperature and precipitation, significantly explained differentiation between the North region and the other 2 regions indicating isolation by environment. Within regions, genetic structure currently shows a high level of gene flow and genetic variation. Our results suggest that within-region gene flow does not reflect current habitat fragmentation in southeastern Australia whereas temperature and precipitation are likely to be responsible for the differentiation detected among regions. Climate change may severely impact P. macrocephalus on the VVP and test its evolutionary resilience. We suggest taking a proactive conservation approach to improve long-term viability by sourcing material for restoration to assist gene flow to the VVP region to promote an increased adaptive capacity.

  13. Infant development in family context: Call for a genetically informed approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie H. Parade

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We call for a genetically informed approach in the examination of infant social and emotional development in family context. We recommend that scholars conceptualize family functioning as occurring on three unique levels: the parent-child dyad, the inter-parental dyad, and whole family functioning. Although advances in the area of understanding genetic variation in infants as a potential moderator of the influence of parent-child dyadic functioning have been made over the past decade, it is time to widen this inquiry to consider genetic variation in infants as a potential moderator of the influence of inter-parental dyadic and whole family functioning as well. A critical review of the literature also calls for additional examination of genetic variation in infants as a moderator of positive contextual influences, the integration of unique temperament variables with studies of infant genotype, consideration of the role of the gene-environment correlation, and epigenetic effects. Furthermore, we call for the application of genetically-informed research methods to these questions. Expanding knowledge in this area has the potential to refine treatment and prevention efforts aimed at promoting infant social and emotional development.

  14. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kogelman, Lisette; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about...... the transcriptome, and may reveal novel genes affecting complex diseases. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic variation (expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL] mapping) has identified causal variants that affect complex diseases. We integrated transcriptomic data from adipose tissue and genomic data from...... a porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. METHODS: Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential...

  15. Discovering Pair-Wise Genetic Interactions: An Information Theory-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignac, Tomasz M.; Skupin, Alexander; Sakhanenko, Nikita A.; Galas, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic variation, including that which underlies health and disease in humans, results in part from multiple interactions among both genetic variation and environmental factors. While diseases or phenotypes caused by single gene variants can be identified by established association methods and family-based approaches, complex phenotypic traits resulting from multi-gene interactions remain very difficult to characterize. Here we describe a new method based on information theory, and demonstrate how it improves on previous approaches to identifying genetic interactions, including both synthetic and modifier kinds of interactions. We apply our measure, called interaction distance, to previously analyzed data sets of yeast sporulation efficiency, lipid related mouse data and several human disease models to characterize the method. We show how the interaction distance can reveal novel gene interaction candidates in experimental and simulated data sets, and outperforms other measures in several circumstances. The method also allows us to optimize case/control sample composition for clinical studies. PMID:24670935

  16. Genetic and Chemical Profiling of Gymnema sylvestre Accessions from Central India: Its Implication for Quality Control and Therapeutic Potential of Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashutosh Kumar; Dhawan, Sunita Singh; Singh, Seema; Bharati, Kumar Avinash; Jyotsana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gymnema sylvestre, a vulnerable plant species, is mentioned in Indian Pharmacopeia as an antidiabetic drug Objective: Study of genetic and chemical diversity and its implications in accessions of G. sylvestre Materials and Methods: Fourteen accessions of G. sylvestre collected from Central India and assessment of their genetic and chemical diversity were carried out using ISSR (inter simple sequence repeat) and HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) fingerprinting methods Results: Among the screened 40 ISSR primers, 15 were found polymorphic and collectively produced nine unique accession-specific bands. The maximum and minimum numbers of amplicones were noted for ISSR-15 and ISSR-11, respectively. The ISSR -11 and ISSR-13 revealed 100% polymorphism. HPLC chromatograms showed that accessions possess the secondary metabolites of mid-polarity with considerable variability. Unknown peaks with retention time 2.63, 3.41, 23.83, 24.50, and 44.67 were found universal type. Comparative hierarchical clustering analysis based on foresaid fingerprints indicates that both techniques have equal potential to discriminate accessions according to percentage gymnemic acid in their leaf tissue. Second approach was noted more efficiently for separation of accessions according to their agro-climatic/collection site Conclusion: Highly polymorphic ISSRs could be utilized as molecular probes for further selection of high gymnemic acid yielding accessions. Observed accession specific bands may be used as a descriptor for plant accessions protection and converted into sequence tagged sites markers. Identified five universal type peaks could be helpful in identification of G. sylvestre-based various herbal preparations. SUMMARY Nine accession specific unique bandsFive marker peaks for G. sylvestre.Suitability of genetic and chemical fingerprinting Abbreviations used: HPLC: High Performance Liquid Chromatography, ISSR: Inter Simple Sequence Repeats, CTAB: Cetyl

  17. Microbial and genetic ecology of tropical Vertisols under intensive chemical farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Jaya; Aparna, K; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Trimurtulu, N; Rao, D L N; Lal, Rup

    2015-01-01

    There are continued concerns on unscientific usage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, particularly in many developing countries leading to adverse consequences for soil biological quality and agricultural sustainability. In farmers' fields in tropical Vertisols of peninsular India, "high" fertilizer and pesticide usage at about 2.3 times the recommended rates in black gram (Vigna mungo) did not have a deleterious effect on the abundance of culturable microorganisms, associative nitrogen fixers, nitrifiers, and 16S rRNA gene diversity compared to normal rates. However, "very high" application at about five times the fertilizers and 1.5 times pesticides in chilies (Capsicum annuum) adversely affected the populations of fungi, actinomycetes, and ammonifiers, along with a drastic change in the eubacterial community profile and diversity over normal rates. Actinobacteria were dominant in black gram normal (BG1) (47%), black gram high (BG2) (36%), and chili normal (CH1) (30%) and were least in chili very high (CH2) (14%). Geodermatophilus formed 20% of Actinobacteria in BG1 but disappeared in BG2, CH1, and CH2. Asticcacaulis dominated at "very high" input site (CH2). Diversity of nitrogen fixers was completely altered; Dechloromonas and Anaeromyxobacter were absent in BG1 but proliferated well in BG2. There was reduction in rhizobial nifH sequences in BG2 by 46%. Phylogenetic differences characterized by UniFrac and principal coordinate analysis showed that BG2 and CH2 clustered together depicting a common pattern of genetic shift, while BG1 and CH1 fell at different axis. Overall, there were adverse consequences of "very high" fertilizer and pesticide usage on soil microbial diversity and function in tropical Vertisols.

  18. An integrated approach to structural design of buildings using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, M.Y.; Mathews, J.D. [Univ. of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an evolutionary approach to the integration of design activities, in the area of structural design of buildings, using Genetic Algorithms (GA). Integration process is viewed in two contexts: (i) Integration across the design activities within a particular discipline, and (ii) Integration across of the disciplines involved in the design. Particular advantages of the integration of design activities during the conceptual stage of the design process are highlighted.

  19. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  20. Approaches for the identification of genetic modifiers of nutrient dependent phenotypes: Examples from folate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Macfarlane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available By combining the sciences of nutrition, bioinformatics, genomics, population genetics and epidemiology, nutrigenomics is improving our understanding of how diet and nutrient intake can interact with or modify gene expression and disease risk. In this review, we explore various approaches to examine gene-nutrient interactions and the modifying role of nutrient consumption, as they relate to nutrient status and disease risk in human populations. Two common approaches include the use of SNPs in candidate genes to identify their association with nutritional status or disease outcomes, or genome wide association studies to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with a given phenotype. Here, we examine the results of various gene-nutrient interaction studies, the association of genetic polymorphisms with disease expression and the identification of nutritional factors that modify gene-dependent disease phenotypes. We have focussed on specific examples from investigations of the interactions of folate and B-vitamin consumption and polymorphisms in the genes of B vitamin dependent enzymes and their association with disease risk, followed by an examination of the strengths and limitations of the methods employed. We also present suggestions for future studies, including an approach from an on-going large scale study, to examine the interaction of nutrient intake and genotypic variation and their impact on nutritional status.

  1. Developmental psychopathology in an era of molecular genetics and neuroimaging: A developmental neurogenetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Luke W

    2015-05-01

    The emerging field of neurogenetics seeks to model the complex pathways from gene to brain to behavior. This field has focused on imaging genetics techniques that examine how variability in common genetic polymorphisms predict differences in brain structure and function. These studies are informed by other complimentary techniques (e.g., animal models and multimodal imaging) and have recently begun to incorporate the environment through examination of Imaging Gene × Environment interactions. Though neurogenetics has the potential to inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology, there has been little integration between principles of neurogenetics and developmental psychopathology. The paper describes a neurogenetics and Imaging Gene × Environment approach and how these approaches have been usefully applied to the study of psychopathology. Six tenets of developmental psychopathology (the structure of phenotypes, the importance of exploring mechanisms, the conditional nature of risk, the complexity of multilevel pathways, the role of development, and the importance of who is studied) are identified, and how these principles can further neurogenetics applications to understanding the development of psychopathology is discussed. A major issue of this piece is how neurogenetics and current imaging and molecular genetics approaches can be incorporated into developmental psychopathology perspectives with a goal of providing models for better understanding pathways from among genes, environments, the brain, and behavior.

  2. Pharmacologically regulated induction of silent mutations (PRISM): combined pharmacological and genetic approaches for learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Paul W; Ohno, Masuo; Takahashi, Eiki; Chen, Adele R; Costa, Rui M; Kushner, Steven A; Silva, Alcino J

    2003-04-01

    Mouse transgenic and knock-out approaches have made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the molecular and cellular bases of learning and memory. These approaches have successfully identified a large number of molecules with either a central or modulatory role in learning and memory. However, there are limitations associated with first-generation mutant mice, which include, for example, the lack of temporal control over the mutation. Recent technical developments have started to address some of these shortcomings. Here, the authors review a newly developed inducible approach that takes advantage of synergistic interactions between subthreshold genetic and pharmacological manipulations. This approach is easily set up and can be used to study the functional interactions between molecules in signaling pathways.

  3. Tailor-made Design of Chemical Blends using Decomposition-based Computer-aided Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yunus, Nor Alafiza; Manan, Zainuddin Abd.; Gernaey, Krist;

    of desired properties of the product as design constraints. The blend design problem is solved using a decomposition approach, which eliminates infeasible and/or redundant candidates gradually. The decomposition method reduces the search space in a systematic way. This general blend design problem......Computer aided technique is an efficient approach to solve chemical product design problems such as design of blended liquid products (chemical blending). In chemical blending, one tries to find the best candidate, which satisfies the product targets defined in terms of desired product attributes...... the desired product attributes. Alternatively, rigorous modelling could also be used in this final step. In other words, the candidates are quickly generated and screened until a small number is left for final selection and evaluation by experiment and/or rigorous modelling. This paper presents a design...

  4. A wet-chemical approach to perovskite and fluorite-type nanoceramics: synthesis and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Sjoerd Antonius

    2015-01-01

    In thesis the low-temperature, wet-chemical approach to various functional inorganic oxide materials is described. The main focus of this research is to control the material’s synthesis from liquid precursor to metal oxide powder or thin film; while understanding its formation mechanism. In addition

  5. Microwave-irradiation-assisted hybrid chemical approach for titanium dioxide nanoparticle synthesis: microbial and cytotoxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Rajendran, Bhavapriya; Avadhani, Ganesh S; Ramalingam, Chidambaram; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. It is used for protection against UV exposure due to its light-scattering properties and high refractive index. Though TNPs are increasingly used, the synthesis of TNPs is tedious and time consuming; therefore, in the present study, microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach was used for TNP synthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that TNPs can be synthesized only in 2.5 h; however, the commonly used chemical approach using muffle furnace takes 5 h. The activity of TNP depends on the synthetic protocol; therefore, the present study also determined the effect of microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach synthetic protocol on microbial and cytotoxicity. The results showed that TNP has the best antibacterial activity in decreasing order from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The IC50 values of TNP for HCT116 and A549 were found to be 6.43 and 6.04 ppm, respectively. Cell death was also confirmed from trypan blue exclusion assay and membrane integrity loss was observed. Therefore, the study determines that the microwave-assisted hybrid chemical approach is time-saving; hence, this technique can be upgraded from lab scale to industrial scale via pilot plant scale. Moreover, it is necessary to find the mechanism of action at the molecular level to establish the reason for greater bacterial and cytotoxicological toxicity. Graphical abstract A graphical representation of TNP synthesis.

  6. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  7. Improving Students' Chemical Literacy Levels on Thermochemical and Thermodynamics Concepts through a Context-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Geban, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delve into the effect of context-based approach (CBA) over traditional instruction (TI) on students' chemical literacy level related to thermochemical and thermodynamics concepts. Four eleventh-grade classes with 118 students in total taught by two teachers from a public high school in 2012 fall semester were enrolled…

  8. Chemical treatment of the intra-canal dentin surface: a new approach to modify dentin hydrophobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar GAITAN-FONSECA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the hydrophobicity of dentin surfaces that were modified through chemical silanization with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS. Material and Methods An in vitro experimental study was performed using 40 human permanent incisors that were divided into the following two groups: non-silanized and silanized. The specimens were pretreated and chemically modified with OTS. After the chemical modification, the dentin hydrophobicity was examined using a water contact angle measurement (WCA. The effectiveness of the modification of hydrophobicity was verified by the fluid permeability test (FPT. Results and Conclusions Statistically significant differences were found in the values of WCA and FPT between the two groups. After silanization, the hydrophobic intraradicular dentin surface exhibited in vitro properties that limit fluid penetration into the sealed root canal. This chemical treatment is a new approach for improving the sealing of the root canal system.

  9. Small molecule screening in zebrafish: an in vivo approach to identifying new chemical tools and drug leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patton E Elizabeth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the past two decades, zebrafish genetic screens have identified a wealth of mutations that have been essential to the understanding of development and disease biology. More recently, chemical screens in zebrafish have identified small molecules that can modulate specific developmental and behavioural processes. Zebrafish are a unique vertebrate system in which to study chemical genetic systems, identify drug leads, and explore new applications for known drugs. Here, we discuss some of the advantages of using zebrafish in chemical biology, and describe some important and creative examples of small molecule screening, drug discovery and target identification.

  10. An ICA with reference approach in identification of genetic variation and associated brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu eLiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To address the statistical challenges associated with genome-wide association studies, we present an independent component analysis (ICA with reference approach to target a specific genetic variation and associated brain networks. First, a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are empirically chosen to reflect a feature of interest and these SNPs are used as a reference when applying ICA to a full genomic SNP array. After extracting the genetic component maximally representing the characteristics of the reference, we test its association with brain networks in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. The method was evaluated on both real and simulated datasets. Simulation demonstrates that ICA with reference can extract a specific genetic factor, even when the variance accounted for by such a factor is so small that a regular ICA fails. Our real data application from 48 schizophrenia patients and 40 healthy controls include 300K SNPs and fMRI images in an auditory oddball task. Using SNPs with allelic frequency difference in two groups as a reference, we extracted a genetic component that maximally differentiates patients from controls (p<4×10-17, and discovered a brain functional network that was significantly associated with this genetic component (p<1×10-4. The regions in the functional network mainly locate in the thalamus, anterior and posterior cingulate gyri. The contributing SNPs in the genetic factor mainly fall into two clusters centered at chromosome 7q21 and chromosome 5q35. The findings from the schizophrenia application are in concordance with previous knowledge about brain regions and gene function. All together, the results suggest that the ICA with reference can be particularly useful to explore the whole genome to find a specific factor of interest and further study its effect on brain.

  11. Comparative genetic approaches to the evolution of human brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    With advances in genomic technologies, the amount of genetic data available to scientists today is vast. Genomes are now available or planned for 14 different primate species and complete resequencing of numerous human individuals from numerous populations is underway. Moreover, high-throughput deep sequencing is quickly making whole genome efforts within the reach of single laboratories allowing for unprecedented studies. Comparative genetic approaches to the identification of the underlying basis of human brain, behavior, and cognitive ability are moving to the forefront. Two approaches predominate: inter-species divergence comparisons and intra-species polymorphism studies. These methodological differences are useful for different time scales of evolution and necessarily focus on different evolutionary events in the history of primate and hominin evolution. Inter-species divergence is more useful in studying large scale primate, or hominoid, evolution whereas intra-species polymorphism can be more illuminating of recent hominin evolution. These differences in methodological utility also extend to studies of differing genetic substrates; current divergence studies focus primarily on protein evolution whereas polymorphism studies are substrate ambivalent. Some of the issues inherent in these studies can be ameliorated by current sequencing capabilities whereas others remain intractable. New avenues are also being opened that allow for the incorporation of novel substrates and approaches. In the post-genomic era, the study of human evolution, specifically as it relates to the brain, is becoming more complete focusing increasingly on the totality of the system and better conceptualizing the entirety of the genetic changes that have lead to the human phenotype today.

  12. Comparison of the 'chemical' and 'structural' approaches to the optimization of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Tatarinova

    Full Text Available Noncanonically structured DNA aptamers to thrombin were examined. Two different approaches were used to improve stability, binding affinity and biological activity of a known thrombin-binding aptamer. These approaches are chemical modification and the addition of a duplex module to the aptamer core structure. Several chemically modified aptamers and the duplex-bearing ones were all studied under the same conditions by a set of widely known and some relatively new methods. A number of the thrombin-binding aptamer analogs have demonstrated improved characteristics. Most importantly, the study allowed us to compare directly the two approaches to aptamer optimization and to analyze their relative advantages and disadvantages as well as their potential in drug design and fundamental studies.

  13. The application of genetics approaches to the study of exceptional longevity in humans: potential and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrario Anna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The average life-span of the population of industrialized countries has improved enormously over the last decades. Despite evidence pointing to the role of food intake in modulating life-span, exceptional longevity is still considered primarily an inheritable trait, as pointed out by the description of families with centenarian clusters and by the elevated relative probability of siblings of centenarians to become centenarians themselves. However, rather than being two separate concepts, the genetic origin of exceptional longevity and the more recently observed environment-driven increase in the average age of the population could possibly be explained by the same genetic variants and environmentally modulated mechanisms (caloric restriction, specific nutrients. In support of this hypothesis, polymorphisms selected for in the centenarian population as a consequence of demographic pressure have been found to modulate cellular signals controlled also by caloric restriction. Here, we give an overview of the recent findings in the field of the genetics of human exceptional longevity, of how some of the identified polymorphisms modulate signals also influenced by food intake and caloric restriction, of what in our view have been the limitations of the approaches used over the past years to study genetics (sib-pair-, candidate gene association-, and genome-wide association-studies, and briefly of the limitations and the potential of the new, high-throughput, next-generation sequencing techniques applied to exceptional longevity.

  14. Gene networks associated with conditional fear in mice identified using a systems genetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskin Eleazar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our understanding of the genetic basis of learning and memory remains shrouded in mystery. To explore the genetic networks governing the biology of conditional fear, we used a systems genetics approach to analyze a hybrid mouse diversity panel (HMDP with high mapping resolution. Results A total of 27 behavioral quantitative trait loci were mapped with a false discovery rate of 5%. By integrating fear phenotypes, transcript profiling data from hippocampus and striatum and also genotype information, two gene co-expression networks correlated with context-dependent immobility were identified. We prioritized the key markers and genes in these pathways using intramodular connectivity measures and structural equation modeling. Highly connected genes in the context fear modules included Psmd6, Ube2a and Usp33, suggesting an important role for ubiquitination in learning and memory. In addition, we surveyed the architecture of brain transcript regulation and demonstrated preservation of gene co-expression modules in hippocampus and striatum, while also highlighting important differences. Rps15a, Kif3a, Stard7, 6330503K22RIK, and Plvap were among the individual genes whose transcript abundance were strongly associated with fear phenotypes. Conclusion Application of our multi-faceted mapping strategy permits an increasingly detailed characterization of the genetic networks underlying behavior.

  15. A Detailed look of Audio Steganography Techniques using LSB and Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Nehru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the study of various techniques of audio steganography using different algorithmis like genetic algorithm approach and LSB approach. We have tried some approaches that helps in audio steganography. As we know it is the art and science of writing hidden messages in such a way that no one, apart from the sender and intended recipient, suspects the existence of the message, a form of security through obscurity. In steganography, the message used to hide secret message is called host message or cover message. Once the contents of the host message or cover message are modified, the resultant message is known as stego message. In other words, stego message is combination of host message and secret message. Audio steganography requires a text or audio secret message to be embedded within a cover audio message. Due to availability of redundancy, the cover audio message before steganography, stego message after steganography remains same. for information hiding.

  16. Societies drifting apart? Behavioural, genetic and chemical differentiation between supercolonies in the yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Drescher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In populations of most social insects, gene flow is maintained through mating between reproductive individuals from different colonies in periodic nuptial flights followed by dispersal of the fertilized foundresses. Some ant species, however, form large polygynous supercolonies, in which mating takes place within the maternal nest (intranidal mating and fertilized queens disperse within or along the boundary of the supercolony, leading to supercolony growth (colony budding. As a consequence, gene flow is largely confined within supercolonies. Over time, such supercolonies may diverge genetically and, thus, also in recognition cues (cuticular hydrocarbons, CHC's by a combination of genetic drift and accumulation of colony-specific, neutral mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested this hypothesis for six supercolonies of the invasive ant Anoplolepis gracilipes in north-east Borneo. Within supercolonies, workers from different nests tolerated each other, were closely related and showed highly similar CHC profiles. Between supercolonies, aggression ranged from tolerance to mortal encounters and was negatively correlated with relatedness and CHC profile similarity. Supercolonies were genetically and chemically distinct, with mutually aggressive supercolony pairs sharing only 33.1%±17.5% (mean ± SD of their alleles across six microsatellite loci and 73.8%±11.6% of the compounds in their CHC profile. Moreover, the proportion of alleles that differed between supercolony pairs was positively correlated to the proportion of qualitatively different CHC compounds. These qualitatively differing CHC compounds were found across various substance classes including alkanes, alkenes and mono-, di- and trimethyl-branched alkanes. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that positive feedback between genetic, chemical and behavioural traits may further enhance supercolony differentiation through genetic drift and neutral evolution, and may drive

  17. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  18. At risk, or not at risk: Epidemiological approaches for assessing psychiatric (genetic) risk factors in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breetvelt, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis “At risk, or not at risk” describes several approaches - cross-sectional, prospective, phenotype mining and forward genetics - for assessing psychiatric (genetic) risk factors in a general population study. The aims were 1) to investigate how routine and follow-up data from populationbas

  19. Branch-pipe-routing approach for ships using improved genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Haiteng; Niu, Wentie

    2016-09-01

    Branch-pipe routing plays fundamental and critical roles in ship-pipe design. The branch-pipe-routing problem is a complex combinatorial optimization problem and is thus difficult to solve when depending only on human experts. A modified genetic-algorithm-based approach is proposed in this paper to solve this problem. The simplified layout space is first divided into threedimensional (3D) grids to build its mathematical model. Branch pipes in layout space are regarded as a combination of several two-point pipes, and the pipe route between two connection points is generated using an improved maze algorithm. The coding of branch pipes is then defined, and the genetic operators are devised, especially the complete crossover strategy that greatly accelerates the convergence speed. Finally, simulation tests demonstrate the performance of proposed method.

  20. A genetic approach for the identification of exosporium assembly determinants of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreng, Krista A.; Thompson, Brian M.; Stewart, George C.

    2013-01-01

    The exosporium is the outermost layer of spores of the zoonotic pathogen Bacillus anthracis. The composition of the exosporium and its functions are only partly understood. Because this outer spore layer is refractive to traditional biochemical analysis, a genetic approach is needed in order to define the proteins which comprise this important spore layer and its assembly pathway. We have created a novel genetic screening system for the identification and isolation of mutants with defects in exosporium assembly during B. anthracis spore maturation. The system is based on the targeting sequence of the BclA exosporium nap layer glycoprotein and a fluorescent reporter. By utilizing this screening system and gene inactivation with Tn916, several novel putative exosporium-associated determinants were identified. A sampling of the mutants obtained was further characterized, confirming their exosporium defect and validating the utility of this screen to identify novel spore determinants in the genome of this pathogen. PMID:23411372

  1. Evaluation of a non-targeted "Omic"' approach in the safety assessment of genetically modified plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kok, E. J.; Knuthsen, Pia;

    2006-01-01

    Genetically modified plants must be approved before release in the European Union, and the approval is generally based upon a comparison of various characteristics between the transgenic plant and a conventional counterpart. As a case study, focusing on safety assessment of genetically modified...... plants, we here report the development and characterisation of six independently transformed Arabidopsis thaliana lines modified in the flavonoid biosynthesis. Analyses of integration events and comparative analysis for characterisation of the intended effects were performed by PCR, quantitative Real......, no unintended effects were identified. However, we found that the majority of genes showing differential expression were identified as stress-related genes and that environmental conditions had a large impact on the expression of several genes, proteins, and metabolites. We suggest that the microarray approach...

  2. Identifying genetic signatures of selection in a non-model species, alpine gentian (Gentiana nivalis L.), using a landscape genetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothwell, H.; Bisbing, S.; Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard;

    2013-01-01

    loci, we compared outlier locus detection methods with a recently-developed landscape genetic approach. We analyzed 157 loci from samples of the alpine herb Gentiana nivalis collected across the European Alps. Principle coordinates of neighbor matrices (PCNM), eigenvectors that quantify multi...... variables identified eight more potentially adaptive loci than models run without spatial variables. 3) When compared to outlier detection methods, the landscape genetic approach detected four of the same loci plus 11 additional loci. 4) Temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation were the three major......-scale spatial variation present in a data set, were incorporated into a landscape genetic approach relating AFLP frequencies with 23 environmental variables. Four major findings emerged. 1) Fifteen loci were significantly correlated with at least one predictor variable (R adj 2 > 0.5). 2) Models including PCNM...

  3. An Inverse Analysis Approach to the Characterization of Chemical Transport in Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Matthew P.; Stevenson, Shawn M.; Pearl, Thomas P.; Mantooth, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX. PMID:25226346

  4. Universal Electrochemical/Chemical Simulator Based on an Exponentially Expanding Grid Network Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG,Zhao-Xiang(邓兆祥); LIN,Xiang-Qin(林祥钦); TONG,Zhong-Hua(童中华)

    2004-01-01

    A universal simulator capable of simulating virtually any user-defined electrochemical/chemical problems in one-dimensional diffusion geometry was developed based on an exponentially expanding grid modification of the existing network approach. Some generalized reaction-diffusion governing equations of an arbitrary electrochemical/chemical process were derived, and program controlled automatic generation of the corresponding PSPICE netlist file was realized. On the basis of the above techniques, a universal simulator package was realized, which is capable of dealing with arbitrarily complex electrochemical/chemical problems with one-dimensional diffusion geometry such as planar diffusion, spherical diffusion, cylindrical diffusion and rotational disk diffusion-convection processes. The building of such a simulator is easy and thus it would be very convenient to have it updated for simulations of newly raised electrochemical problems.

  5. Chemical potential dependence of particle ratios within a unified thermal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, I.; Nanda, H.; Uddin, S.

    2016-06-01

    A unified statistical thermal freeze-out model (USTFM) is used to study the chemical potential dependence of identified particle ratios at mid-rapidity in heavy-ion collisions. We successfully reproduce the experimental data ranging from SPS energies to LHC energies, suggesting the statistical nature of the particle production in these collisions and hence the validity of our approach. The behavior of the freeze-out temperature is studied with respect to chemical potential. The freeze-out temperature is found to be universal at the RHIC and LHC and is close to the QCD predicted phase transition temperature, suggesting that the chemical freeze-out occurs soon after the hadronization takes place.

  6. Genetic mutations associated with chemical resistance in the cytochrome P450 genes of invasive and native Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populations in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Li Qiu; Li Liu; Xiao-Xi Li; Vartika Mathur; Zhen-Qiang Qin; Shun-Xiang Ren

    2009-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a species complex, and its two most damaging biotypes B and Q are globally distributed pests. Despite increasing biological and economic impacts, little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that favor their competfion with native populations. Here, we investigated the genetic mutations in the P450 gene of the invasive B, Q biotypes and the native Cv population. Four mutations associated with chemical resistance, Pro-Leu, Ala-Ser, Ser-Phe and Trp-Leu, were found in the cytochrome P450 CYP6C and CYP9F genes of the B and Q biotypes. Bioassay results also revealed that both the B and Q biotypes have about 12-47 times more resistance to acephate, betacypermethrin, methomyl, and 5-7 times more resistance to imidacloprid insecticide than Cv population. Our results provide a molecular approach for better understanding and monitoring the pesticide resistances of invasive and native B. tabaci populations in China.

  7. Enhancing sewage sludge dewaterability by bioleaching approach with comparison to other physical and chemical conditioning methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenwu Liu; Jun Zhou; Dianzhan Wang; Lixiang Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The sewage sludge conditioning process is critical to improve the sludge dewaterability prior to mechanical dewatering.Traditionally,sludge is conditioned by physical or chemical approaches,mostly with the addition of inorganic or organic chemicals.Here we report that bioleaching,an efficient and economical microbial method for the removal of sludge-borne heavy metals,also plays a significant role in enhancing sludge dewaterability.The effects of bioleaching and physical or chemical approaches on sludge dewaterability were compared.The conditioning result of bioleaching by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans on sludge dewatering was investigated and compared with the effects of hydrothermal(121 ℃ for 2 hr),microwave(1050 W for 50 sec),ultrasonic (250 W for 2 min),and chemical conditioning(24% ferric chloride and 68% calcium oxide; dry basis).The results show that the specific resistance to filtration(SRF)or capillary suction time(CST)of sludge is decreased by 93.1% or 74.1%,respectively,after fresh sludge is conditioned by bioleaching,which is similar to chemical conditioning treatment with ferric chloride and calcium oxide but much more effective than other conditioning approaches including hydrothermal,microwave,and ultrasonic conditioning.Furthermore,after sludge dewatering,bioleached sludge filtrate contains the lowest concentrations of chroma(18 times),COD(542 mg/L),total N(TN,300 mg/L),NH4+-N(208 mg/L),and total P(TP,2 mg/L)while the hydrothermal process resulted in the highest concentration of chroma(660 times),COD(18,155 mg/L),TN(472 mg/L),NH4+-N(381 mg/L),and TP(191 mg/L)among these selected conditioning methods.Moreover,unlike chemical conditioning,sludge bioleaching does not result in a significant reduction of organic matter,TN,and TP in the resulting dewatered sludge cake.Therefore,considering sludge dewaterability and the chemical properties of sludge filtrate and resulting dewatered sludge cakes,bioleaching has

  8. An Informatics Approach to Evaluating Combined Chemical Exposures from Consumer Products: A Case Study of Asthma-Associated Chemicals and Potential Endocrine Disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Henry A.; Blake, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous or sequential exposure to multiple environmental stressors can affect chemical toxicity. Cumulative risk assessments consider multiple stressors but it is impractical to test every chemical combination to which people are exposed. New methods are needed to prioritize chemical combinations based on their prevalence and possible health impacts. Objectives: We introduce an informatics approach that uses publicly available data to identify chemicals that co-occur in consumer products, which account for a significant proportion of overall chemical load. Methods: Fifty-five asthma-associated and endocrine disrupting chemicals (target chemicals) were selected. A database of 38,975 distinct consumer products and 32,231 distinct ingredient names was created from online sources, and PubChem and the Unified Medical Language System were used to resolve synonymous ingredient names. Synonymous ingredient names are different names for the same chemical (e.g., vitamin E and tocopherol). Results: Nearly one-third of the products (11,688 products, 30%) contained ≥ 1 target chemical and 5,229 products (13%) contained > 1. Of the 55 target chemicals, 31 (56%) appear in ≥ 1 product and 19 (35%) appear under more than one name. The most frequent three-way chemical combination (2-phenoxyethanol, methyl paraben, and ethyl paraben) appears in 1,059 products. Further work is needed to assess combined chemical exposures related to the use of multiple products. Conclusions: The informatics approach increased the number of products considered in a traditional analysis by two orders of magnitude, but missing/incomplete product labels can limit the effectiveness of this approach. Such an approach must resolve synonymy to ensure that chemicals of interest are not missed. Commonly occurring chemical combinations can be used to prioritize cumulative toxicology risk assessments. Citation: Gabb HA, Blake C. 2016. An informatics approach to evaluating combined chemical

  9. A multiobjective optimization approach for combating Aedes aegypti using chemical and biological alternated step-size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Weverton O; Wanner, Elizabeth F; Cardoso, Rodrigo T N

    2015-11-01

    Dengue epidemics, one of the most important viral disease worldwide, can be prevented by combating the transmission vector Aedes aegypti. In support of this aim, this article proposes to analyze the Dengue vector control problem in a multiobjective optimization approach, in which the intention is to minimize both social and economic costs, using a dynamic mathematical model representing the mosquitoes' population. It consists in finding optimal alternated step-size control policies combining chemical (via application of insecticides) and biological control (via insertion of sterile males produced by irradiation). All the optimal policies consists in apply insecticides just at the beginning of the season and, then, keep the mosquitoes in an acceptable level spreading into environment a few amount of sterile males. The optimization model analysis is driven by the use of genetic algorithms. Finally, it performs a statistic test showing that the multiobjective approach is effective in achieving the same effect of variations in the cost parameters. Then, using the proposed methodology, it is possible to find, in a single run, given a decision maker, the optimal number of days and the respective amounts in which each control strategy must be applied, according to the tradeoff between using more insecticide with less transmission mosquitoes or more sterile males with more transmission mosquitoes.

  10. An Approach to Assembly Sequence Plannning Based on Hierarchical Strategy and Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Xinwen; Ding Han; Xiong Youlun

    2001-01-01

    Using group and subassembly cluster methods, the hierarchical structure of a product is.generated automatically, which largely reduces the complexity of planning. Based on genetic algofithn the optimal of assembly sequence of each stracture level can be obtained by sequence-bysequence search. As a result, a better assembly sequence of the product can be generated by combining the assembly sequences of all hierarchical structures, which provides more parallelism and flexibility for assembly operations. An industrial example is solved by this new approach.

  11. Genetic algorithm-fuzzy based dynamic motion planning approach for a mobile robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Presents the mobile robots dynamic motion planning problem with a task to find an obstacle-free route that requires minimum travel time from the start point to the destination point in a changing environment, due to the obstacle's moving. An Genetic Algorithm fuzzy(GA-Fuzzy)based optimal approach proposed to find any obstacle-free path and the GA used to select the optimal one, points ont that using this learned knowledge off line, a mobile robot can navigate to its goal point when it faces new scenario on-line. Concludes with the opti mal rule base given and the simulation results showing its effectiveness.

  12. A local chemical potential approach within the variable charge method formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsener, A.; Politano, O.; Derlet, P. M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2008-03-01

    A new and computationally efficient implementation of the variable charge method of Streitz and Mintmire (1994 Phys. Rev. B 50 11996) is presented. In particular a local chemical potential approach that optimizes the charge on only those atoms expected to be ionic is developed. By doing so, the charge fluctuation problem experienced in regions far from any oxygen is solved, leading to a linear minimization problem of the electrostatic energy. In the dilute oxygen limit, such an approach can lead to at least an order of magnitude saving in computation.

  13. Correlation between the Chemical and Genetic Relationships among Thymus saturejoides Genotypes Cultured under in vitro and in vivo Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Aicha; Udupa, Sripada M; Iraqi, Driss; Meksem, Khalid; Hmamouchi, Mohamed; ElMeskaoui, Abdelmalek

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo essential oil (EO) composition and genetic variability in six micropropagated genotypes of Thymus saturejoides Coss., a Mediterranean medicinal and aromatic plant, were analyzed by GC/MS and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Yield and composition of the EO varied between genotypes. Cluster analysis based on RAPD data and EO grouped the six genotypes in three groups in both culture conditions, thus showing considerable intraspecific genetic and chemical variations. Applying the Mantel test, the result showed a significant correlation between the two proximity matrices RAPD and EO obtained from in vitro genotypes, whereas this correlation was not observed when using the EO obtained from the in vivo genotypes.

  14. An automatic modeling system of the reaction mechanisms for chemical vapor deposition processes using real-coded genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kinpara, Hiroki; Ema, Yoshinori

    2011-09-01

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we have developed an automatic system to model reaction mechanisms in the CVD processes by analyzing the experimental results, which are cross-sectional shapes of the deposited films on substrates with micrometer- or nanometer-sized trenches. We designed the inference engine to model the reaction mechanism in the system by the use of real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs). We studied the dependence of the system performance on two methods using simple genetic algorithms (SGAs) and the RCGAs; the one involves the conventional GA operators and the other involves the blend crossover operator (BLX-alpha). Although we demonstrated that the systems using both the methods could successfully model the reaction mechanisms, the RCGAs showed the better performance with respect to the accuracy and the calculation cost for identifying the models.

  15. Chemical Biology Approaches to Genome Editing: Understanding, Controlling, and Delivering Programmable Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Johnny H; Davis, Kevin M; Liu, David R

    2016-01-21

    Programmable DNA nucleases have provided scientists with the unprecedented ability to probe, regulate, and manipulate the human genome. Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 system (CRISPR-Cas9) represent a powerful array of tools that can bind to and cleave a specified DNA sequence. In their canonical forms, these nucleases induce double-strand breaks at a DNA locus of interest that can trigger cellular DNA repair processes that disrupt or replace genes. The fusion of these programmable nucleases with a variety of other protein domains has led to a rapidly growing suite of tools for activating, repressing, visualizing, and modifying loci of interest. Maximizing the usefulness and therapeutic relevance of these tools, however, requires precisely controlling their activity and specificity to minimize potentially toxic side effects arising from off-target activities. This need has motivated the application of chemical biology principles and methods to genome-editing proteins, including the engineering of variants of these proteins with improved or altered specificities, and the development of genetic, chemical, optical, and protein delivery methods that control the activity of these agents in cells. Advancing the capabilities, safety, effectiveness, and therapeutic relevance of genome-engineering proteins will continue to rely on chemical biology strategies that manipulate their activity, specificity, and localization.

  16. The theological and legal approach of prenatal and preimplantation genetic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Katsimigas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The investigation of the theological and legal questions derived from the application of prenatal and preimplantation genetic control on human embryos. Moreover, the review of the European and Greek legislation with regard to the prenatal and preimplantation control. Material and Method: A literature review based on both review and research literature, conducted during the period of 1984-2009, derived from MEDLINE, SCOPUS and ΙΑΤΡΟΤΕΚ databases using as key words Prenatal diagnosis , Bioethics, Orthodox ethics, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, Legislation. Results: The orthodox theology adopts a negative view for the abortion of fetus, which it is considered murder in any stage of growth. The legal approach brought two basic questions a the securing of consent from the examined individual and b the constitutional protection of fetus' life. Conclusions: The orthodox theology, through their teaching places the moral criteria for facing the moral questions derived from the application of prenatal and preimplantation genetic control on human embryos. Also, the Greek citizens need to be informed for all the diagnostic examinations on embryos that should be provided by all public health organizations.

  17. Approach to the genetics of alcoholism: a review based on pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnke, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a common disorder with a heterogenous etiology. The results of family, twin and adoption studies on alcoholism are reviewed. These studies have revealed a heritability of alcoholism of over 50%. After evaluating the results, it was epidemiologically stated that alcoholism is heterogenous complex disorder with a multiple genetic background. Modern molecular genetic techniques allow examining specific genes involved in the pathophysiology of complex diseases such as alcoholism. Strategies for gene identification are introduced to the reader, including family-based and association studies. The susceptibility genes that are in the focus of this article have been chosen because they are known to encode for underlying mechanisms that are linked to the pathophysiology of alcoholism or that are important for the pharmacotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of alcohol dependence. Postulated candidate genes of the metabolism of alcohol and of the involved neurotransmitter systems are introduced. Genetic studies on alcoholism examining the metabolism of alcohol and the dopaminergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, opioid, cholinergic and serotonergic neurotransmitter systems as well as the neuropeptide Y are presented. The results are critically discussed followed by a discussion of possible consequences.

  18. New Approaches for Crop Genetic Adaptation to the Abiotic Stresses Predicted with Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Redden

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extreme climatic variation is predicted with climate change this century. In many cropping regions, the crop environment will tend to be warmer with more irregular rainfall and spikes in stress levels will be more severe. The challenge is not only to raise agricultural production for an expanding population, but to achieve this under more adverse environmental conditions. It is now possible to systematically explore the genetic variation in historic local landraces by using GPS locators and world climate maps to describe the natural selection for local adaptation, and to identify candidate germplasm for tolerances to extreme stresses. The physiological and biochemical components of these expressions can be genomically investigated with candidate gene approaches and next generation sequencing. Wild relatives of crops have largely untapped genetic variation for abiotic and biotic stress tolerances, and could greatly expand the available domesticated gene pools to assist crops to survive in the predicted extremes of climate change, a survivalomics strategy. Genomic strategies can assist in the introgression of these valuable traits into the domesticated crop gene pools, where they can be better evaluated for crop improvement. The challenge is to increase agricultural productivity despite climate change. This calls for the integration of many disciplines from eco-geographical analyses of genetic resources to new advances in genomics, agronomy and farm management, underpinned by an understanding of how crop adaptation to climate is affected by genotype × environment interaction.

  19. Extension of the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach to incorporate chemicals classified as reactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Robert J; Api, Anne Marie; Roberts, David W; Lalko, Jon F

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of chemicals for their skin sensitising potential is an essential step in ensuring the safety of ingredients in consumer products. Similar to the Threshold of Toxicological Concern, the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) has been demonstrated to provide effective risk assessments for skin sensitisation in cases where human exposure is low. The DST was originally developed based on a Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) dataset and applied to chemicals that were not considered to be directly reactive to skin proteins, and unlikely to initiate the first mechanistic steps leading to the induction of sensitisation. Here we have extended the DST concept to protein reactive chemicals. A probabilistic assessment of the original DST dataset was conducted and a threshold of 64 μg/cm(2) was derived. In our accompanying publication, a set of structural chemistry based rules was developed to proactively identify highly reactive and potentially highly potent materials which should be excluded from the DST approach. The DST and rule set were benchmarked against a test set of chemicals with LLNA/human data. It is concluded that by combining the reactive DST with knowledge of chemistry a threshold can be established below which there is no appreciable risk of sensitisation for protein-reactive chemicals.

  20. Mining chemical reactions using neighborhood behavior and condensed graphs of reactions approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Aurélie; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Solov'ev, Vitaly; Varnek, Alexandre

    2012-09-24

    This work addresses the problem of similarity search and classification of chemical reactions using Neighborhood Behavior (NB) and Condensed Graphs of Reaction (CGR) approaches. The CGR formalism represents chemical reactions as a classical molecular graph with dynamic bonds, enabling descriptor calculations on this graph. Different types of the ISIDA fragment descriptors generated for CGRs in combination with two metrics--Tanimoto and Euclidean--were considered as chemical spaces, to serve for reaction dissimilarity scoring. The NB method has been used to select an optimal combination of descriptors which distinguish different types of chemical reactions in a database containing 8544 reactions of 9 classes. Relevance of NB analysis has been validated in generic (multiclass) similarity search and in clustering with Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). NB-compliant sets of descriptors were shown to display enhanced mapping propensities, allowing the construction of better Self-Organizing Maps and similarity searches (NB and classical similarity search criteria--AUC ROC--correlate at a level of 0.7). The analysis of the SOM clusters proved chemically meaningful CGR substructures representing specific reaction signatures.

  1. Tracing Technological Development Trajectories: A Genetic Knowledge Persistence-Based Main Path Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunseok; Magee, Christopher L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new method to identify main paths in a technological domain using patent citations. Previous approaches for using main path analysis have greatly improved our understanding of actual technological trajectories but nonetheless have some limitations. They have high potential to miss some dominant patents from the identified main paths; nonetheless, the high network complexity of their main paths makes qualitative tracing of trajectories problematic. The proposed method searches backward and forward paths from the high-persistence patents which are identified based on a standard genetic knowledge persistence algorithm. We tested the new method by applying it to the desalination and the solar photovoltaic domains and compared the results to output from the same domains using a prior method. The empirical results show that the proposed method can dramatically reduce network complexity without missing any dominantly important patents. The main paths identified by our approach for two test cases are almost 10x less complex than the main paths identified by the existing approach. The proposed approach identifies all dominantly important patents on the main paths, but the main paths identified by the existing approach miss about 20% of dominantly important patents.

  2. A genetic algorithm-based approach to flexible flow-line scheduling with variable lot sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I; Sikora, R; Shaw, M J

    1997-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been used widely for such combinatorial optimization problems as the traveling salesman problem (TSP), the quadratic assignment problem (QAP), and job shop scheduling. In all of these problems there is usually a well defined representation which GA's use to solve the problem. We present a novel approach for solving two related problems-lot sizing and sequencing-concurrently using GAs. The essence of our approach lies in the concept of using a unified representation for the information about both the lot sizes and the sequence and enabling GAs to evolve the chromosome by replacing primitive genes with good building blocks. In addition, a simulated annealing procedure is incorporated to further improve the performance. We evaluate the performance of applying the above approach to flexible flow line scheduling with variable lot sizes for an actual manufacturing facility, comparing it to such alternative approaches as pair wise exchange improvement, tabu search, and simulated annealing procedures. The results show the efficacy of this approach for flexible flow line scheduling.

  3. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  4. Synthetic biology approaches in cancer immunotherapy, genetic network engineering, and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Cho, Jang Hwan; Weinberg, Benjamin H; Wong, Nicole M; Wong, Wilson W

    2016-04-18

    Investigations into cells and their contents have provided evolving insight into the emergence of complex biological behaviors. Capitalizing on this knowledge, synthetic biology seeks to manipulate the cellular machinery towards novel purposes, extending discoveries from basic science to new applications. While these developments have demonstrated the potential of building with biological parts, the complexity of cells can pose numerous challenges. In this review, we will highlight the broad and vital role that the synthetic biology approach has played in applying fundamental biological discoveries in receptors, genetic circuits, and genome-editing systems towards translation in the fields of immunotherapy, biosensors, disease models and gene therapy. These examples are evidence of the strength of synthetic approaches, while also illustrating considerations that must be addressed when developing systems around living cells.

  5. An Approach to Derive Parametric L-System Using Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Humera; Zakaria, M. Nordin; Hassan, Mohd. Fadzil; Sulaiman, Suziah

    In computer graphics, L-System is widely used to model artificial plants structures and fractals. The Genetic Algorithm (GA) is the most popular form of Evolutionary Algorithms. This paper examines a method for automatic plant modeling which is based on an integration of GA and Parametric L-System using appropriate fitness function. The approach is specifically based on the implementation of two layered GA to derive the rewriting rules of Parametric L-System. The higher level of GA deals with the evolution of symbols and lower level deals with the evolution of numerical parameters. Initial results derived from the approach are very promising, which shows that complicated branching structures can be easily derived by the multilayered architecture of GA.

  6. Genetic Algorithm Based PID Controller Tuning Approach for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jayachitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithm (GA based PID (proportional integral derivative controller has been proposed for tuning optimized PID parameters in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR process using a weighted combination of objective functions, namely, integral square error (ISE, integral absolute error (IAE, and integrated time absolute error (ITAE. Optimization of PID controller parameters is the key goal in chemical and biochemical industries. PID controllers have narrowed down the operating range of processes with dynamic nonlinearity. In our proposed work, globally optimized PID parameters tend to operate the CSTR process in its entire operating range to overcome the limitations of the linear PID controller. The simulation study reveals that the GA based PID controller tuned with fixed PID parameters provides satisfactory performance in terms of set point tracking and disturbance rejection.

  7. University of California San Francisco (UCSF-1): Chemical-Genetic Interaction Mapping Strategy | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at University of California San Francisco (UCSF-1) developed a chemical-genetic interaction mapping strategy to uncover the impact of cancer gene expression on responses to a panel of emerging therapeutics. To study the impact of aberrant gene activity in isolation, they developed an isogenic model of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) using the hormone receptor negative MCF10A non-tumorigenic cell line derived from healthy breast tissue which is diploid and largely devoid of somatic alterations.

  8. Intrusion detection: a novel approach that combines boosting genetic fuzzy classifier and data mining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyer, Tansel; Alhajj, Reda; Barker, Ken

    2005-03-01

    This paper proposes an intelligent intrusion detection system (IDS) which is an integrated approach that employs fuzziness and two of the well-known data mining techniques: namely classification and association rule mining. By using these two techniques, we adopted the idea of using an iterative rule learning that extracts out rules from the data set. Our final intention is to predict different behaviors in networked computers. To achieve this, we propose to use a fuzzy rule based genetic classifier. Our approach has two main stages. First, fuzzy association rule mining is applied and a large number of candidate rules are generated for each class. Then the rules pass through pre-screening mechanism in order to reduce the fuzzy rule search space. Candidate rules obtained after pre-screening are used in genetic fuzzy classifier to generate rules for the specified classes. Classes are defined as Normal, PRB-probe, DOS-denial of service, U2R-user to root and R2L- remote to local. Second, an iterative rule learning mechanism is employed for each class to find its fuzzy rules required to classify data each time a fuzzy rule is extracted and included in the system. A Boosting mechanism evaluates the weight of each data item in order to help the rule extraction mechanism focus more on data having relatively higher weight. Finally, extracted fuzzy rules having the corresponding weight values are aggregated on class basis to find the vote of each class label for each data item.

  9. Process planning optimization on turning machine tool using a hybrid genetic algorithm with local search approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Su

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A turning machine tool is a kind of new type of machine tool that is equipped with more than one spindle and turret. The distinctive simultaneous and parallel processing abilities of turning machine tool increase the complexity of process planning. The operations would not only be sequenced and satisfy precedence constraints, but also should be scheduled with multiple objectives such as minimizing machining cost, maximizing utilization of turning machine tool, and so on. To solve this problem, a hybrid genetic algorithm was proposed to generate optimal process plans based on a mixed 0-1 integer programming model. An operation precedence graph is used to represent precedence constraints and help generate a feasible initial population of hybrid genetic algorithm. Encoding strategy based on data structure was developed to represent process plans digitally in order to form the solution space. In addition, a local search approach for optimizing the assignments of available turrets would be added to incorporate scheduling with process planning. A real-world case is used to prove that the proposed approach could avoid infeasible solutions and effectively generate a global optimal process plan.

  10. A Parallel Approach To Optimum Actuator Selection With a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent discoveries in smart technologies have created a variety of aerodynamic actuators which have great potential to enable entirely new approaches to aerospace vehicle flight control. For a revolutionary concept such as a seamless aircraft with no moving control surfaces, there is a large set of candidate locations for placing actuators, resulting in a substantially larger number of combinations to examine in order to find an optimum placement satisfying the mission requirements. The placement of actuators on a wing determines the control effectiveness of the airplane. One approach to placement Maximizes the moments about the pitch, roll, and yaw axes, while minimizing the coupling. Genetic algorithms have been instrumental in achieving good solutions to discrete optimization problems, such as the actuator placement problem. As a proof of concept, a genetic has been developed to find the minimum number of actuators required to provide uncoupled pitch, roll, and yaw control for a simplified, untapered, unswept wing model. To find the optimum placement by searching all possible combinations would require 1,100 hours. Formulating the problem and as a multi-objective problem and modifying it to take advantage of the parallel processing capabilities of a multi-processor computer, reduces the optimization time to 22 hours.

  11. A Novel Approach for Discovery Quantitative Fuzzy Multi-Level Association Rules Mining Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad M. Darwish

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative multilevel association rules mining is a central field to realize motivating associations among data components with multiple levels abstractions. The problem of expanding procedures to handle quantitative data has been attracting the attention of many researchers. The algorithms regularly discretize the attribute fields into sharp intervals, and then implement uncomplicated algorithms established for Boolean attributes. Fuzzy association rules mining approaches are intended to defeat such shortcomings based on the fuzzy set theory. Furthermore, most of the current algorithms in the direction of this topic are based on very tiring search methods to govern the ideal support and confidence thresholds that agonize from risky computational cost in searching association rules. To accelerate quantitative multilevel association rules searching and escape the extreme computation, in this paper, we propose a new genetic-based method with significant innovation to determine threshold values for frequent item sets. In this approach, a sophisticated coding method is settled, and the qualified confidence is employed as the fitness function. With the genetic algorithm, a comprehensive search can be achieved and system automation is applied, because our model does not need the user-specified threshold of minimum support. Experiment results indicate that the recommended algorithm can powerfully generate non-redundant fuzzy multilevel association rules.

  12. [Research progress in chemical communication among insect-resistant genetically modified plants, insect pests and natural enemies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Song; Li, Yun-He; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Semiochemicals released by plants or insects play an important role in the communication among plants, phytophagous insects and their natural enemies. They thus form a chemical information network which regulates intra- and inter-specific behaviors and sustains the composition and structure of plant and insect communities. The application of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops may affect the chemical communication within and among the tritrophic levels, and thus cause disturbances to the biotic community structure and the stability of the farmland ecosystem. This has raised concerns about the environmental safety of IRGM crops and triggered research worldwide. In the current article we provided a brief summary of the chemical communication among plants, herbivores and natural enemies; analyzed the potential of IRGM crops to affect the chemical communication between plants and arthropods and the related mechanisms; and discussed the current research progress and the future prospects in this field. We hope that this will promote the research in this field by Chinese scientists and increase our understanding of the potential effects of growing of IRGM crops on the arthropod community structure.

  13. Rat reverse genetics : generation and characterization of chemically induced rat mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of animal models has been crucial for studying the function of genetic elements in the human genome. Embryonic stem (ES) cell-based homologous recombination (HR) has proven a very efficient technique for gene manipulation. However, this technique is not (yet) available for all model organism

  14. A New Spectral Shape-Based Record Selection Approach Using Np and Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edén Bojórquez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to improve code-based real records selection criteria, an approach inspired in a parameter proxy of spectral shape, named Np, is analyzed. The procedure is based on several objectives aimed to minimize the record-to-record variability of the ground motions selected for seismic structural assessment. In order to select the best ground motion set of records to be used as an input for nonlinear dynamic analysis, an optimization approach is applied using genetic algorithms focuse on finding the set of records more compatible with a target spectrum and target Np values. The results of the new Np-based approach suggest that the real accelerograms obtained with this procedure, reduce the scatter of the response spectra as compared with the traditional approach; furthermore, the mean spectrum of the set of records is very similar to the target seismic design spectrum in the range of interest periods, and at the same time, similar Np values are obtained for the selected records and the target spectrum.

  15. Identification of previously unrecognized antiestrogenic chemicals using a novel virtual screening approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching Y; Ai, Ni; Arora, Sonia; Erenrich, Eric; Nagarajan, Karthigeyan; Zauhar, Randy; Young, Douglas; Welsh, William J

    2006-12-01

    The physiological roles of estrogen in sexual differentiation and development, female and male reproductive processes, and bone health are complex and diverse. Numerous natural and synthetic chemical compounds, commonly known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), have been shown to alter the physiological effects of estrogen in humans and wildlife. As such, these EDCs may cause unanticipated and even undesirable effects. Large-scale in vitro and in vivo screening of chemicals to assess their estrogenic activity would demand a prodigious investment of time, labor, and money and would require animal testing on an unprecedented scale. Approaches in silico are increasingly recognized as playing a vital role in screening and prioritizing chemicals to extend limited resources available for experimental testing. Here, we evaluated a multistep procedure that is suitable for in silico (virtual) screening of large chemical databases to identify compounds exhibiting estrogenic activity. This procedure incorporates Shape Signatures, a novel computational tool that rapidly compares molecules on the basis of similarity in shape, polarity, and other bio-relevant properties. Using 4-hydroxy tamoxifen (4-OH TAM) and diethylstilbestrol (DES) as input queries, we employed this scheme to search a sample database of approximately 200,000 commercially available organic chemicals for matches (hits). Of the eight compounds identified computationally as potentially (anti)estrogenic, biological evaluation confirmed two as heretofore unknown estrogen antagonists. Subsequent radioligand binding assays confirmed that two of these three compounds exhibit antiestrogenic activities comparable to 4-OH TAM. Molecular modeling studies of these ligands docked inside the binding pocket of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) elucidated key ligand-receptor interactions that corroborate these experimental findings. The present study demonstrates the utility of our computational scheme for this and

  16. Examining the family-centred approach to genetic testing and counselling among UK Pakistanis: a community perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, A; Small, N; Ahmad, W I U; Atkin, K; Corry, P; Benson, J; Morton, R; Modell, B

    2013-01-01

    WHO advice suggests a family-centred approach for managing the elevated risk of recessively inherited disorders in consanguineous communities, whilst emerging policy recommends community engagement as an integral component of genetic service development. This paper explores the feasibility of the family-centred approach in the UK Pakistani origin community. The study took place within a context of debate in the media, professional and lay circles about cousin marriage causing disability in children. Using qualitative methods, a total of six single-sex focus group discussions (n = 50) were conducted in three UK cities with a high settlement of people of Pakistani origin. Tape-recorded transcripts were analysed using framework analysis. Kinship networks within Pakistani origin communities are being sustained and marriage between close blood relatives continues to take place alongside other marriage options. Study participants were critical of what was perceived as a prevalent notion that cousin marriage causes disability in children. They were willing to discuss cousin marriage and disability, share genetic information and engage with genetic issues. A desire for accurate information and a public informed about genetic issues was articulated whilst ineffective communication of genetic risk information undermined professionals in their support role. This study suggests a community that is embracing change, one in which kinship networks are still active and genetic information exchange is taking place. At the community level, these are conditions supportive of the family-centred approach to genetic testing and counselling.

  17. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  18. A novel approach: chemical relational databases, and the role of the ISSCAN database on assessing chemical carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Romualdo; Bossa, Cecilia; Richard, Ann M; Yang, Chihae

    2008-01-01

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity databases are crucial resources for toxicologists and regulators involved in chemicals risk assessment. Until recently, existing public toxicity databases have been constructed primarily as "look-up-tables" of existing data, and most often did not contain chemical structures. Concepts and technologies originated from the structure-activity relationships science have provided powerful tools to create new types of databases, where the effective linkage of chemical toxicity with chemical structure can facilitate and greatly enhance data gathering and hypothesis generation, by permitting: a) exploration across both chemical and biological domains; and b) structure-searchability through the data. This paper reviews the main public databases, together with the progress in the field of chemical relational databases, and presents the ISSCAN database on experimental chemical carcinogens.

  19. Pre-emptive resource-constrained multimode project scheduling using genetic algorithm: A dynamic forward approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidin Delgoshaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The issue resource over-allocating is a big concern for project engineers in the process of scheduling project activities. Resource over-allocating drawback is frequently seen after scheduling of a project in practice which causes a schedule to be useless. Modifying an over-allocated schedule is very complicated and needs a lot of efforts and time. In this paper, a new and fast tracking method is proposed to schedule large scale projects which can help project engineers to schedule the project rapidly and with more confidence. Design/methodology/approach: In this article, a forward approach for maximizing net present value (NPV in multi-mode resource constrained project scheduling problem while assuming discounted positive cash flows (MRCPSP-DCF is proposed. The progress payment method is used and all resources are considered as pre-emptible. The proposed approach maximizes NPV using unscheduled resources through resource calendar in forward mode. For this purpose, a Genetic Algorithm is applied to solve. Findings: The findings show that the proposed method is an effective way to maximize NPV in MRCPSP-DCF problems while activity splitting is allowed. The proposed algorithm is very fast and can schedule experimental cases with 1000 variables and 100 resources in few seconds. The results are then compared with branch and bound method and simulated annealing algorithm and it is found the proposed genetic algorithm can provide results with better quality. Then algorithm is then applied for scheduling a hospital in practice. Originality/value: The method can be used alone or as a macro in Microsoft Office Project® Software to schedule MRCPSP-DCF problems or to modify resource over-allocated activities after scheduling a project. This can help project engineers to schedule project activities rapidly with more accuracy in practice.

  20. Sensitivity of chemical reaction networks: a structural approach. 1. Examples and the carbon metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold

    2015-02-21

    In biological cells, chemical reaction pathways lead to complex network systems like metabolic networks. One experimental approach to the dynamics of such systems examines their "sensitivity": each enzyme mediating a reaction in the system is increased/decreased or knocked out separately, and the responses in the concentrations of chemicals or their fluxes are observed. In this study, we present a mathematical method, named structural sensitivity analysis, to determine the sensitivity of reaction systems from information on the network alone. We investigate how the sensitivity responses of chemicals in a reaction network depend on the structure of the network, and on the position of the perturbed reaction in the network. We establish and prove some general rules which relate the sensitivity response to the structure of the underlying network. We describe a hierarchical pattern in the flux response which is governed by branchings in the network. We apply our method to several hypothetical and real life chemical reaction networks, including the metabolic network of the Escherichia coli TCA cycle.

  1. Chemical entity recognition in patents by combining dictionary-based and statistical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondi, Saber A; Pons, Ewoud; Afzal, Zubair; van Haagen, Herman; Becker, Benedikt F H; Hettne, Kristina M; van Mulligen, Erik M; Kors, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development of a chemical entity recognition system and its application in the CHEMDNER-patent track of BioCreative 2015. This community challenge includes a Chemical Entity Mention in Patents (CEMP) recognition task and a Chemical Passage Detection (CPD) classification task. We addressed both tasks by an ensemble system that combines a dictionary-based approach with a statistical one. For this purpose the performance of several lexical resources was assessed using Peregrine, our open-source indexing engine. We combined our dictionary-based results on the patent corpus with the results of tmChem, a chemical recognizer using a conditional random field classifier. To improve the performance of tmChem, we utilized three additional features, viz. part-of-speech tags, lemmas and word-vector clusters. When evaluated on the training data, our final system obtained an F-score of 85.21% for the CEMP task, and an accuracy of 91.53% for the CPD task. On the test set, the best system ranked sixth among 21 teams for CEMP with an F-score of 86.82%, and second among nine teams for CPD with an accuracy of 94.23%. The differences in performance between the best ensemble system and the statistical system separately were small.Database URL: http://biosemantics.org/chemdner-patents.

  2. Novel approaches to improving the chemical safety of the meat chain towards toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E; Ratel, J; Bouhlel, J; Planche, C; Meurillon, M

    2015-11-01

    In addition to microbiological issues, meat chemical safety is a growing concern for the public authorities, chain stakeholders and consumers. Meat may be contaminated by various chemical toxicants originating from the environment, treatments of agricultural production or food processing. Generally found at trace levels in meat, these toxicants may harm human health during chronic exposure. This paper overviews the key issues to be considered to ensure better control of their occurrence in meat and assessment of the related health risk. We first describe potential contaminants of meat products. Strategies to move towards a more efficient and systematic control of meat chemical safety are then presented in a second part, with a focus on emerging approaches based on toxicogenomics. The third part presents mitigation strategies to limit the impact of process-induced toxicants in meat. Finally, the last part introduces methodological advances to refine chemical risk assessment related to the occurrence of toxicants in meat by quantifying the influence of digestion on the fraction of food contaminants that may be assimilated by the human body.

  3. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  4. A chemical-genetic strategy reveals distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1 kinase in neuronal polarization and synapse formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokat Kevan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons assemble into a functional network through a sequence of developmental processes including neuronal polarization and synapse formation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the serine/threonine SAD-1 kinase is essential for proper neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. To determine if SAD-1 activity regulates the establishment or maintenance of these neuronal structures, we examined its temporal requirements using a chemical-genetic method that allows for selective and reversible inactivation of its kinase activity in vivo. Results We generated a PP1 analog-sensitive variant of SAD-1. Through temporal inhibition of SAD-1 kinase activity we show that its activity is required for the establishment of both neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. However, while SAD-1 activity is needed strictly when neurons are polarizing, the temporal requirement for SAD-1 is less stringent in synaptic organization, which can also be re-established during maintenance. Conclusion This study reports the first temporal analysis of a neural kinase activity using the chemical-genetic system. It reveals that neuronal polarity and synaptic organization have distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1.

  5. Synthetic dual-input mammalian genetic circuits enable tunable and stringent transcription control by chemical and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Du, Zengmin; Liu, Renmei; Yang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Programmable transcription factors can enable precise control of gene expression triggered by a chemical inducer or light. To obtain versatile transgene system with combined benefits of a chemical inducer and light inducer, we created various chimeric promoters through the assembly of different copies of the tet operator and Gal4 operator module, which simultaneously responded to a tetracycline-responsive transcription factor and a light-switchable transactivator. The activities of these chimeric promoters can be regulated by tetracycline and blue light synergistically or antagonistically. Further studies of the antagonistic genetic circuit exhibited high spatiotemporal resolution and extremely low leaky expression, which therefore could be used to spatially and stringently control the expression of highly toxic protein Diphtheria toxin A for light regulated gene therapy. When transferring plasmids engineered for the gene switch-driven expression of a firefly luciferase (Fluc) into mice, the Fluc expression levels of the treated animals directly correlated with the tetracycline and light input program. We suggest that dual-input genetic circuits using TET and light that serve as triggers to achieve expression profiles may enable the design of robust therapeutic gene circuits for gene- and cell-based therapies.

  6. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  7. A generalized quantum chemical approach for elastic and inelastic electron transports in molecular electronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    A generalized quantum chemical approach for electron transport in molecular devices is developed. It allows one to treat devices where the metal electrodes and the molecule are either chemically or physically bonded on equal footing. An extension to include the vibration motions of the molecule has also been implemented which has produced the inelastic electron-tunneling spectroscopy of molecular electronics devices with unprecedented accuracy. Important information about the structure of the molecule and of metal-molecule contacts that are not accessible in the experiment are revealed. The calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of different molecular devices, including benzene-1,4-dithiolate, octanemonothiolate [H(CH2)8S], and octanedithiolate [S(CH2)8S] bonded to gold electrodes, are in very good agreement with experimental measurements.

  8. Comparison of Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry and Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Genetic Analysis of Lignocellulose Chemical Composition in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxing Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of wood chemical composition is often limited by the cost and throughput of direct analytical methods. The speed and low cost of Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR overcomes many of these limitations, but it is an indirect method relying on calibration models that are typically developed and validated with small sample sets. In this study, we used >1500 young greenhouse grown trees from a clonally propagated single Populus family, grown at low and high nitrogen, and compared FT-NIR calibration sample sizes of 150, 250, 500 and 750 on calibration and prediction model statistics, and heritability estimates developed with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (pyMBMS wood chemical composition. As calibration sample size increased from 150 to 750, predictive model statistics improved slightly. Overall, stronger calibration and prediction statistics were obtained with lignin, S-lignin, S/G ratio, and m/z 144 (an ion from cellulose, than with C5 and C6 carbohydrates, and m/z 114 (an ion from xylan. Although small differences in model statistics were observed between the 250 and 500 sample calibration sets, when predicted values were used for calculating genetic control, the 500 sample set gave substantially more similar results to those obtained with the pyMBMS data. With the 500 sample calibration models, genetic correlations obtained with FT-NIR and pyMBMS methods were similar. Quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis with pyMBMS and FT-NIR predictions identified only three common loci for lignin traits. FT-NIR identified four QTLs that were not found with pyMBMS data, and these QTLs were for the less well predicted carbohydrate traits.

  9. INTRACELLULAR CHEMICAL MEASUREMENTS:A GENERALIZED APPROACH WITH HIGH-SPATIAL RESOLUTION USING FUNCTIONALIZED NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T

    2007-03-05

    We are developing an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. We present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. We developed and used SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy to characterize heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters. These heterogeneities have historically provided inconsistent response to pH, leading a poor sensitivity of {approx}1 pH unit. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance. We have also developed a rapid scanning technique to obtain pH information using confocal microscopic imaging. Together with the development of hollow gold nanoshells with collaborators, this project enables future cell-based studies of pH using SERS. This research will be continued as a collaboration with the Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST) at UC Davis Medical Center.

  10. Quantitative genetics approaches to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology; a perspective from research on the evolution of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Paul L; Xie, Lingtian; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative genetic approaches are often used to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology. This paper focuses on the evolution of resistance to environmental contaminants-an important evolutionary process in ecotoxicology. Three approaches are commonly employed to study the evolution of resistance: (1) Assessing whether a contaminant-exposed population has an increased resistance relative to a control population, using either spatial or temporal comparisons. (2) Estimating a population's heritability of resistance. (3) Investigating responses in a laboratory selection experiment. All three approaches provide valuable information on the potential for contaminants to affect a population's evolutionary trajectory via natural selection. However, all three approaches have inherent limitations, including difficulty in separating the various genetic and environmental variance components, responses being dependent on specific population and testing conditions, and inability to fully capture natural conditions in the laboratory. In order to maximize insights into the long-term consequences of adaptation, it is important to not just look at resistance itself, but also at the fitness consequences and at correlated responses in characteristics other than resistance. The rapid development of molecular genetics has yielded alternatives to the "black box" approach of quantitative genetics, but the presence of different limitations and strengths in the two fields means that they should be viewed as complementary rather than exchangeable. Quantitative genetics is benefiting from the incorporation of molecular tools and remains an important field for studying evolutionary toxicology.

  11. Parallel tagged next-generation sequencing on pooled samples - a new approach for population genetics in ecology and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodna, Monika; Grueber, Catherine E; Gemmell, Neil J

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) on pooled samples has already been broadly applied in human medical diagnostics and plant and animal breeding. However, thus far it has been only sparingly employed in ecology and conservation, where it may serve as a useful diagnostic tool for rapid assessment of species genetic diversity and structure at the population level. Here we undertake a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy, practicality and limitations of parallel tagged amplicon NGS on pooled population samples for estimating species population diversity and structure. We obtained 16S and Cyt b data from 20 populations of Leiopelma hochstetteri, a frog species of conservation concern in New Zealand, using two approaches - parallel tagged NGS on pooled population samples and individual Sanger sequenced samples. Data from each approach were then used to estimate two standard population genetic parameters, nucleotide diversity (π) and population differentiation (FST), that enable population genetic inference in a species conservation context. We found a positive correlation between our two approaches for population genetic estimates, showing that the pooled population NGS approach is a reliable, rapid and appropriate method for population genetic inference in an ecological and conservation context. Our experimental design also allowed us to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of the pooled population NGS approach and outline some guidelines and suggestions that might be considered when planning future projects.

  12. Students' learning approaches and their understanding of some chemical concepts in eighth-grade science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Christine Hui Li

    The purpose of this study was to (a) investigate the relationship between students' learning approaches and their conceptual understanding of some chemical concepts, (b) describe the qualitative differences between a deep and surface learning approach to learning science, and (c) identify the kinds of cognitive and metacognitive strategies that students use as they construct their conceptual knowledge. One hundred and two eighth grade students were given the Learning Approach Questionnaire to measure their orientation to learn using a deep or surface approach. They also completed a Chemistry Questionnaire both before and after the teaching of a chemistry unit which lasted nine weeks. Six target students from one class were selected for more in-depth study. They represented learners using a deep or surface learning approach, and were identified by the Learning Approach Questionnaire and their teacher's evaluation. They worked in groups during hands-on laboratory activities and were audiotaped or videotaped. The students were also interviewed individually both before and after instruction of the chemistry unit about their responses on the Chemistry Questionnaire and their thoughts and actions during the laboratory activities. The correlation between the students' scores on the "meaningful orientation" scale of the Learning Approach Questionnaire and their gain scores from the pre-test to post-test on the Chemistry Questionnaire was.06, suggesting no relationship between the students' learning approach and their conceptual change. Several reasons were given to explain this finding. Analysis of the target students' discourse and actions during the group activities and their interview responses revealed differences between the deep and surface learning approaches regarding generative thinking, nature of explanations, asking questions, metacognitive activity, and approach to tasks. Strategies associated with a deep learning approach included generating mental images and

  13. Modeling the binding affinity of structurally diverse industrial chemicals to carbon using the artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Rai, Premanjali; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    Binding affinity of chemical to carbon is an important characteristic as it finds vast industrial applications. Experimental determination of the adsorption capacity of diverse chemicals onto carbon is both time and resource intensive, and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. In this study, artificial intelligence (AI)-based ten different qualitative and quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models (MLPN, RBFN, PNN/GRNN, CCN, SVM, GEP, GMDH, SDT, DTF, DTB) were established for the prediction of the adsorption capacity of structurally diverse chemicals to activated carbon following the OECD guidelines. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear dependence in the data were evaluated using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation procedures performed employing a wide series of statistical checks. In complete dataset, the qualitative models rendered classification accuracies between 97.04 and 99.93%, while the quantitative models yielded correlation (R(2)) values of 0.877-0.977 between the measured and the predicted endpoint values. The quantitative prediction accuracies for the higher molecular weight (MW) compounds (class 4) were relatively better than those for the low MW compounds. Both in the qualitative and quantitative models, the Polarizability was the most influential descriptor. Structural alerts responsible for the extreme adsorption behavior of the compounds were identified. Higher number of carbon and presence of higher halogens in a molecule rendered higher binding affinity. Proposed QSPR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. A relatively better performance of the ensemble learning models (DTF, DTB) may be attributed to the strengths of the bagging and boosting algorithms which enhance the predictive accuracies. The

  14. A Modified Genetic Algorithm for Product Family Optimization with Platform Specified by Information Theoretical Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chun-bao; WANG Li-ya

    2008-01-01

    Many existing product family design methods assume a given platform, However, it is not an in-tuitive task to select the platform and unique variable within a product family. Meanwhile, most approachesare single-platform methods, in which design variables are either shared across all product variants or not atall. While in multiple-platform design, platform variables can have special value with regard to a subset ofproduct variants within the product family, and offer opportunities for superior overall design. An informationtheoretical approach incorporating fuzzy clustering and Shannon's entropy was proposed for platform variablesselection in multiple-platform product family. A 2-level chromosome genetic algorithm (2LCGA) was proposedand developed for optimizing the corresponding product family in a single stage, simultaneously determiningthe optimal settings for the product platform and unique variables. The single-stage approach can yield im-provements in the overall performance of the product family compared with two-stage approaches, in which thefirst stage involves determining the best settings for the platform and values of unique variables are found foreach product in the second stage. An example of design of a family of universal motors was used to verify theproposed method.

  15. An Interval-Valued Approach to Business Process Simulation Based on Genetic Algorithms and the BPMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario G.C.A. Cimino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulating organizational processes characterized by interacting human activities, resources, business rules and constraints, is a challenging task, because of the inherent uncertainty, inaccuracy, variability and dynamicity. With regard to this problem, currently available business process simulation (BPS methods and tools are unable to efficiently capture the process behavior along its lifecycle. In this paper, a novel approach of BPS is presented. To build and manage simulation models according to the proposed approach, a simulation system is designed, developed and tested on pilot scenarios, as well as on real-world processes. The proposed approach exploits interval-valued data to represent model parameters, in place of conventional single-valued or probability-valued parameters. Indeed, an interval-valued parameter is comprehensive; it is the easiest to understand and express and the simplest to process, among multi-valued representations. In order to compute the interval-valued output of the system, a genetic algorithm is used. The resulting process model allows forming mappings at different levels of detail and, therefore, at different model resolutions. The system has been developed as an extension of a publicly available simulation engine, based on the Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN standard.

  16. Pharmaceutical proteins in plants. A strategic genetic engineering approach for the production of tuberculosis antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, Roger; Denise, Hubert; Vivares, Christian; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Vitale, Sandro; Pedrazzini, Emmanuela; Ma, Julian; Dix, Phil; Gray, John; Pezzotti, Mario; Conrad, Udo; Robinson, David

    2008-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a re-emerging disease that is considered a major human health priority as well as an important disease of livestock. TB is also a zoonosis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis, the human and bovine causative agents, respectively, are very closely related. Protection against TB is essentially achieved through vaccination with the Bacille Calmetle-Guerin (BCG) strain of M. bovis. Protection is, however, incomplete, and novel improved vaccines are currently under investigation. Production of protective antigens in transgenic plants, or "pharming," is a promising emerging approach, and a zoonosis-like TB is a good model for investigating the potential of this approach. Pharma-Planta, a European Commission-funded project and consortium, was set up to address this topic, within which a component is aimed at assessing the production efficacy and stability of the TB antigens in different compartments of the plant cell. This article is meant to introduce this promising approach for veterinary medicine by describing the ongoing project and its specific genetic engineering strategy.

  17. Gene editing and genetic engineering approaches for advanced probiotics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ruby; Kumar, Vishal; Baweja, Mehak; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2017-01-10

    The applications of probiotics are significant and thus resulted in need of genome analysis of probiotic strains. Various omics methods and systems biology approaches enables us to understand and optimize the metabolic processes. These techniques have increased the researcher's attention towards gut microbiome and provided a new source for the revelation of uncharacterized biosynthetic pathways which enables novel metabolic engineering approaches. In recent years, the broad and quantitative analysis of modified strains relies on systems biology tools such as in silico design which are commonly used methods for improving strain performance. The genetic manipulation of probiotic microorganisms is crucial for defining their role in intestinal microbiota and exploring their beneficial properties. This review describes an overview of gene editing and system biology approaches, highlighting the advent of omics methods which allows the study of new routes for studying probiotic bacteria. We have also summarized gene editing tools like TALEN, ZFNs and CRISPR-Cas that edits or cleave the specific target DNA. Furthermore, in this review an overview of proposed design of advanced customized probiotic is also hypothesized to improvise the probiotics.

  18. A HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM-NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH FOR PRICING CORES AND REMANUFACTURED CORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Seidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT:Sustainability has become a major issue in most economies, causing many leading companies to focus on product recovery and reverse logistics. Remanufacturing is an industrial process that makes used products reusable. One of the important aspects in both reverse logistics and remanufacturing is the pricing of returned and remanufactured products (called cores. In this paper, we focus on pricing the cores and remanufactured cores. First we present a mathematical model for this purpose. Since this model does not satisfy our requirements, we propose a simulation optimisation approach. This approach consists of a hybrid genetic algorithm based on a neural network employed as the fitness function. We use automata learning theory to obtain the learning rate required for training the neural network. Numerical results demonstrate that the optimal value of the acquisition price of cores and price of remanufactured cores is obtained by this approach.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Volhoubaarheid het ‘n belangrike saak geword in die meeste ekonomieë, wat verskeie maatskappye genoop het om produkherwinning en omgekeerde logistiek te onder oë te neem. Hervervaardiging is ‘n industriële proses wat gebruikte produkte weer bruikbaar maak. Een van die belangrike aspekte in beide omgekeerde logistiek en hervervaardiging is die prysbepaling van herwinne en hervervaardigde produkte. Hierdie artikel fokus op die prysbepalingsaspekte by wyse van ‘n wiskundige model.

  19. A density functional theory-based chemical potential equalisation approach to molecular polarizability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Wadehra; Swapan K Ghosh

    2005-09-01

    The electron density changes in molecular systems in the presence of external electric fields are modeled for simplicity in terms of the induced charges and dipole moments at the individual atomic sites. A chemical potential equalisation scheme is proposed for the calculation of these quantities and hence the dipole polarizability within the framework of density functional theory based linear response theory. The resulting polarizability is expressed in terms of the contributions from individual atoms in the molecule. A few illustrative numerical calculations are shown to predict the molecular polarizabilities in good agreement with available results. The usefulness of the approach to the calculation of intermolecular interaction needed for computer simulation is highlighted.

  20. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associat...

  1. Pediatric Cancer Genetics Research and an Evolving Preventive Ethics Approach for Return of Results after Death of the Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollon, Sarah; Bergstrom, Katie; McCullough, Laurence B; McGuire, Amy L; Gutierrez, Stephanie; Kerstein, Robin; Parsons, D Williams; Plon, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    The return of genetic research results after death in the pediatric setting comes with unique complexities. Researchers must determine which results and through which processes results are returned. This paper discusses the experience over 15 years in pediatric cancer genetics research of returning research results after the death of a child and proposes a preventive ethics approach to protocol development in order to improve the quality of return of results in pediatric genomic settings.

  2. Pollen Sterility—A Promising Approach to Gene Confinement and Breeding for Genetically Modified Bioenergy Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert P. Kausch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced genetic and biotechnology tools will be required to realize the full potential of food and bioenergy crops. Given current regulatory concerns, many transgenic traits might never be deregulated for commercial release without a robust gene confinement strategy in place. The potential for transgene flow from genetically modified (GM crops is widely known. Pollen-mediated transfer is a major component of gene flow in flowering plants and therefore a potential avenue for the escape of transgenes from GM crops. One approach for preventing and/or mitigating transgene flow is the production of trait linked pollen sterility. To evaluate the feasibility of generating pollen sterility lines for gene confinement and breeding purposes we tested the utility of a promoter (Zm13Pro from a maize pollen-specific gene (Zm13 for driving expression of the reporter gene GUS and the cytotoxic gene barnase in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare as a monocot proxy for bioenergy grasses. This study demonstrates that the Zm13 promoter can drive pollen-specific expression in stably transformed rice and may be useful for gametophytic transgene confinement and breeding strategies by pollen sterility in food and bioenergy crops.

  3. Reproductive outcome of male carriers of chromosomal abnormalities: multidisciplinary approach for genetic counseling and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, K M; Wu, B; Wang, H B; Tian, R H

    2016-12-02

    Chromosomal abnormality is the most common genetic cause of infertility. Infertility, as a psychological problem, has received an increasing amount of attention. Psychological interventions have been shown to have beneficial effects on infertile patients with chromosomal abnormalities. The present study explored reproductive outcome of male carriers of chromosomal abnormalities, who accepted genetic counseling and psychological support. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes and G-banding. The detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities was 10.3% in pre-pregnancy counseled males, with polymorphisms being most common, followed by 47,XXY and balanced translocation. Follow-up of 170 carriers with normozoospermia, after 3 years, showed that 94.7% of the cases resulted in live births. In the carriers of polymorphisms, balanced translocation, inv(9), Robertsonian translocation, inversion, and 47,XYY, live birth rates were 96.8, 85.7, 100, 83.3, 75, and 100%, respectively. Follow-up of 54 carriers with oligozoospermia or azoospermia, after 3 years, showed that 14.8% of the cases resulted in live births. In the carriers of 47,XXY with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia, 80 or 5.9% of the cases resulted in live births, respectively. Therefore, timely psychological support would be beneficial and multidisciplinary approach should be preferentially considered for the management of individuals with chromosomal abnormalities.

  4. Molecular approach to genetic and epigenetic pathogenesisof early-onset colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequent cancertype and the incidence of this disease is increasinggradually per year in individuals younger than 50 yearsold. The current knowledge is that early-onset CRC(EOCRC) cases are heterogeneous population thatincludes both hereditary and sporadic forms of theCRC. Although EOCRC cases have some distinguishingclinical and pathological features than elder age CRC,the molecular mechanism underlying the EOCRC ispoorly clarified. Given the significance of CRC in theworld of medicine, the present review will focus on therecent knowledge in the molecular basis of genetic andepigenetic mechanism of the hereditary forms of EOCRC,which includes Lynch syndrome, Familial CRC type X,Familial adenomatous polyposis, MutYH-associatedpolyposis, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-JeghersSyndrome and sporadic forms of EOCRC. Recent findingsabout molecular genetics and epigenetic basis of EOCRCgave rise to new alternative therapy protocols. Althoughexact diagnosis of these cases still remains complicated,the present review paves way for better predictions andcontributes to more accurate diagnostic and therapeuticstrategies into clinical approach.

  5. Unambiguous molecular detections with multiple genetic approach for the complicated chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lung-Huang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS causes a developmental disorder during the embryonic stage, usually because of hemizygous deletions. The clinical pictures of patients with 22q11DS vary because of polymorphisms: on average, approximately 93% of affected individuals have a de novo deletion of 22q11, and the rest have inherited the same deletion from a parent. Methods using multiple genetic markers are thus important for the accurate detection of these microdeletions. Methods We studied 12 babies suspected to carry 22q11DS and 18 age-matched healthy controls from unrelated Taiwanese families. We determined genomic variance using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Changes in genomic copy number were significantly associated with clinical manifestations for the classical criteria of 22q11DS using MPLA and qPCR (p Conclusion Both MLPA and qPCR could produce a clearly defined range of deleted genomic DNA, whereas there must be a deleted genome that is not distinguishable using MLPA. These data demonstrate that such multiple genetic approaches are necessary for the unambiguous molecular detection of these types of complicated genomic syndromes.

  6. DYNAMIC RELOCATION OF PLANT/WAREHOUSE FACILITIES:A FAST COMPACT GENETIC ALGORITHM APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shugang; Wu Zhiming; Pang Xiaohong

    2004-01-01

    The problem of dynamic relocation and phase-out of combined manufacturing plant and warehousing facilities in the supply chain are concerned.A multiple time/multiple objective model is proposed to maximize total profit during the time horizon, minimize total access time from the plant/warehouse facilities to its suppliers and customers and maximize aggregated local incentives during the time horizon.The relocation problem keeps the feature of NP-hard and with the traditional method the optimal result cannot be got easily.So a compact genetic algorithm (CGA) is introduced to solve the problem.In order to accelerate the convergence speed of the CGA, the least square approach is introduced and a fast compact genetic algorithm (fCGA) is proposed.Finally, simulation results with the fCGA are compared with the CGA and classical integer programming (IP).The results show that the fCGA proposed is of high efficiency for Pareto optimality problem.

  7. A bayesian approach to inferring the genetic population structure of sugarcane accessions from INTA (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Pocovi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. accessions from INTA germplasm bank (Argentina will be of great importance for germplasm collection and breeding improvement as it will identify diverse parental combinations to create segregating progenies with maximum genetic variability for further selection. A Bayesian approach, ordination methods (PCoA, Principal Coordinate Analysis and clustering analysis (UPGMA, Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean were applied to this purpose. Sixty three INTA sugarcane hybrids were genotyped for 107 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR and 136 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP loci. Given the low probability values found with AFLP for individual assignment (4.7%, microsatellites seemed to perform better (54% for STRUCTURE analysis that revealed the germplasm to exist in five optimum groups with partly corresponding to their origin. However clusters shown high degree of admixture, F ST values confirmed the existence of differences among groups. Dissimilarity coefficients ranged from 0.079 to 0.651. PCoA separated sugarcane in groups that did not agree with those identified by STRUCTURE. The clustering including all genotypes neither showed resemblance to populations find by STRUCTURE, but clustering performed considering only individuals displaying a proportional membership > 0.6 in their primary population obtained with STRUCTURE showed close similarities. The Bayesian method indubitably brought more information on cultivar origins than classical PCoA and hierarchical clustering method.

  8. Nonlinear Electrical Circuit Oscillator Control Based on Backstepping Method: A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Khoeiniha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated study of dynamics of nonlinear electrical circuit by means of modern nonlinear techniques and the control of a class of chaotic system by using backstepping method based on Lyapunov function. The behavior of such nonlinear system when they are under the influence of external sinusoidal disturbances with unknown amplitudes has been considered. The objective is to analyze the performance of this system at different amplitudes of disturbances. We illustrate the proposed approach for controlling duffing oscillator problem to stabilize this system at the equilibrium point. Also Genetic Algorithm method (GA for computing the parameters of controller has been used. GA can be successfully applied to achieve a better controller. Simulation results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Optimization of Electrical System for Offshore Wind Farms via a Genetic Algorithm Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Menghua

    , and the LTC limitation of transformers, the power generation limits and the voltage operation range are considered as the constraints. The optimization method combined with probabilistic analysis is used to obtain the capacity of a given wind farm site. The OES-OWF is approached by Genetic Algorithm (GA...... to very different costs, system reliability, power quality, and power losses etc. Therefore, the optimization of electrical system design for offshore wind farms becomes more and more necessary. There are two tasks in this project: 1) the first one is to construct an algorithm for finding the capacity......). This platform is based on a knowledge database, and composed of several functional modules such as cost calculation, reliability evaluation, losses calculation, AC-DC integrated load flow algorithm etc. All these modules are based on a spreadsheet database which provides an interface for users to input...

  10. Genetic treatment of a molecular disorder: gene therapy approaches to sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, Megan D; Orkin, Stuart H; Bauer, Daniel E

    2016-02-18

    Effective medical management for sickle cell disease (SCD) remains elusive. As a prevalent and severe monogenic disorder, SCD has been long considered a logical candidate for gene therapy. Significant progress has been made in moving toward this goal. These efforts have provided substantial insight into the natural regulation of the globin genes and illuminated challenges for genetic manipulation of the hematopoietic system. The initial γ-retroviral vectors, next-generation lentiviral vectors, and novel genome engineering and gene regulation approaches each share the goal of preventing erythrocyte sickling. After years of preclinical studies, several clinical trials for SCD gene therapies are now open. This review focuses on progress made toward achieving gene therapy, the current state of the field, consideration of factors that may determine clinical success, and prospects for future development.

  11. An Evolutionary Approach to Drug-Design Using a Novel Neighbourhood Based Genetic Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arnab; Chowdhury, Arkabandhu; Konar, Amit

    2012-01-01

    The present work provides a new approach to evolve ligand structures which represent possible drug to be docked to the active site of the target protein. The structure is represented as a tree where each non-empty node represents a functional group. It is assumed that the active site configuration of the target protein is known with position of the essential residues. In this paper the interaction energy of the ligands with the protein target is minimized. Moreover, the size of the tree is difficult to obtain and it will be different for different active sites. To overcome the difficulty, a variable tree size configuration is used for designing ligands. The optimization is done using a novel Neighbourhood Based Genetic Algorithm (NBGA) which uses dynamic neighbourhood topology. To get variable tree size, a variable-length version of the above algorithm is devised. To judge the merit of the algorithm, it is initially applied on the well known Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP).

  12. A NAÏVE APPROACH TO SPEED UP PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION PROBLEM USING A MULTIOBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixauli-Soler, J. Samuel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GAs are appropriate when investors have the objective of obtaining mean‑variance (VaR efficient frontier as minimising VaR leads to non‑convex and non‑differential risk‑return optimisation problems. However GAs are a time‑consuming optimisation technique. In this paper, we propose to use a naïve approach consisting of using samples split by quartile of risk to obtain complete efficient frontiers in a reasonable computation time. Our results show that using reduced problems which only consider a quartile of the assets allow us to explore the efficient frontier for a large range of risk values. In particular, the third quartile allows us to obtain efficient frontiers from the 1.8% to 2.5% level of VaR quickly, while that of the first quartile of assets is from 1% to 1.3% level of VaR.

  13. NOVEL APPROACH FOR ROBOT PATH PLANNING BASED ON NUMERICAL ARTIFICIAL POTENTIAL FIELD AND GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Weizhong; ZHAO Jie; GAO Yongsheng; CAI Hegao

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach for collision-free path planning of a multiple degree-of-freedom (DOF)articulated robot in a complex environment is proposed. Firstly, based on visual neighbor point (VNP), a numerical artificial potential field is constructed in Cartesian space, which provides the heuristic information, effective distance to the goal and the motion direction for the motion of the robot joints. Secondly, a genetic algorithm, combined with the heuristic rules, is used in joint space to determine a series of contiguous configurations piecewise fiom initial configuration until the goal configuration is attained. A simulation shows that the method can not only handle issues on path planning of the articulated robots in environment with complex obstacles, but also improve the efficiency and quality of path planning.

  14. A new modified-rate approach for gas-grain chemical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T

    2008-01-01

    Understanding grain-surface processes is crucial to interpreting the chemistry of the ISM. However, accurate surface chemistry models are computationally expensive and are difficult to integrate with gas-phase simulations. A new modified-rate method for solving grain-surface chemical systems is presented. Its purpose is accurately to model highly complex systems that can otherwise only be treated using the sometimes inadequate rate-equation approach. In contrast to previous rate-modification techniques, the functional form of the surface production rates was modified, and not simply the rate coefficient. This form is appropriate to the extreme "small-grain" limit, and can be verified using an analytical master-equation approach. Various further modifications were made to this basic form, to account for competition between processes, to improve estimates of surface occupation probabilities, and to allow a switch-over to the normal rate equations where these are applicable. The new method was tested against sys...

  15. Modeling of Scale-Dependent Bacterial Growth by Chemical Kinetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydee Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied the so-called chemical kinetics approach to complex bacterial growth patterns that were dependent on the liquid-surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V of the bacterial cultures. The kinetic modeling was based on current experimental knowledge in terms of autocatalytic bacterial growth, its inhibition by the metabolite CO2, and the relief of inhibition through the physical escape of the inhibitor. The model quantitatively reproduces kinetic data of SA/V-dependent bacterial growth and can discriminate between differences in the growth dynamics of enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli  JM83, and Salmonella typhimurium on one hand and Vibrio cholerae on the other hand. Furthermore, the data fitting procedures allowed predictions about the velocities of the involved key processes and the potential behavior in an open-flow bacterial chemostat, revealing an oscillatory approach to the stationary states.

  16. Fragment quantum chemical approach to geometry optimization and vibrational spectrum calculation of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2016-01-21

    Geometry optimization and vibrational spectra (infrared and Raman spectra) calculations of proteins are carried out by a quantum chemical approach using the EE-GMFCC (electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method (J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 7149). The first and second derivatives of the EE-GMFCC energy are derived and employed in geometry optimization and vibrational frequency calculations for several test systems, including a polypeptide ((GLY)6), an α-helix (AKA), a β-sheet (Trpzip2) and ubiquitin (76 residues with 1231 atoms). Comparison of the present results with those obtained from full system QM (quantum mechanical) calculations shows that the EE-GMFCC approach can give accurate molecular geometries, vibrational frequencies and vibrational intensities. The EE-GMFCC method is also employed to simulate the amide I vibration of proteins, which has been widely used for the analysis of peptide and protein structures, and the results are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. Chemical Genetic Screens for TDP-43 Modifiers and ALS Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Jean-Pierre Julien Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: p.drapeau@umontreal.ca 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7... Ash PE, Zhang YJ, Roberts CM, Saldi T, Hutter H, et al. (2010) Neurotoxic effects of TDP-43 overexpression in C. elegans. Hum Mol Genet. 30. Zhang T...elegans. PloS One 7, e31321. Vaccaro, A., Tauffenberger, A., Ash , P.E., Carlomagno, Y., Petrucelli, L., Parker, J.A., 2012b. TDP-1/TDP-43 regulates

  18. On the Predictability of Risk Box Approach by Genetic Programming Method for Bankruptcy Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bahiraie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Theoretical based data representation is an important tool for model selection and interpretations in bankruptcy analysis since the numerical representation are much less transparent. Some methodological problems concerning financial ratios such as non-proportionality, non-asymetricity, non-scalicity are solved in this study and we presented a complementary technique for empirical analysis of financial ratios and bankruptcy risk. Approach: This study presented new geometric technique for empirical analysis of bankruptcy risk using financial ratios. Within this framework, we proposed the use of a new ratio representation which named Risk Box measure (RB. We demonstrated the application of this geometric approach for variable representation, data visualization and financial ratios at different stages of corporate bankruptcy prediction models based on financial balance sheet ratios. These stages were the selection of variables (predictors, accuracy of each estimation model and the representation of each model for transformed and common ratios. Results: We provided evidence of extent to which changes in values of this index were associated with changes in each axis values and how this may alter our economic interpretation of changes in the patterns and direction of risk components. Results of Genetic Programming (GP models were compared as different classification models and results showed the classifiers outperform by modified ratios. Conclusion/Recommendations: In this study, a new dimension to risk measurement and data representation with the advent of the Share Risk method (SR was proposed. Genetic programming method is substantially superior to the traditional methods such as MDA or Logistic method. It was strongly suggested the use of SR methodology for ratio analysis, which provided a conceptual and complimentary methodological solution to many problems associated with the use of ratios. Respectively, GP will provide

  19. Chemical and genetic characterization of bacteriocins: antimicrobial peptides for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Abigail B; Worobo, Randy W

    2014-01-15

    Antimicrobial peptides are produced across all domains of life. Among these diverse compounds, those produced by bacteria have been most successfully applied as agents of biocontrol in food and agriculture. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized, proteinaceous compounds that inhibit the growth of closely related bacteria. Even within the subcategory of bacteriocins, the peptides vary significantly in terms of the gene cluster responsible for expression, and chemical and structural composition. The polycistronic gene cluster generally includes a structural gene and various combinations of immunity, secretion, and regulatory genes and modifying enzymes. Chemical variation can exist in amino acid identity, chain length, secondary and tertiary structural features, as well as specificity of active sites. This diversity posits bacteriocins as potential antimicrobial agents with a range of functions and applications. Those produced by food-grade bacteria and applied in normally occurring concentrations can be used as GRAS-status food additives. However, successful application requires thorough characterization.

  20. Comparison of chemical and thermal protein denaturation by combination of computational and experimental approaches. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Christiansen, Alexander; Samiotakis, Antonios; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation methods have been widely used to investigate folding processes of proteins in vitro. However, a molecular understanding of the relationship between these two perturbation methods is lacking. Here, we combined computational and experimental approaches to investigate denaturing effects on three structurally different proteins. We derived a linear relationship between thermal denaturation at temperature Tb and chemical denaturation at another temperature Tu using the stability change of a protein (ΔG). For this, we related the dependence of ΔG on temperature, in the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, to that of ΔG on urea concentration in the linear extrapolation method, assuming that there is a temperature pair from the urea (Tu) and the aqueous (Tb) ensembles that produces the same protein structures. We tested this relationship on apoazurin, cytochrome c, and apoflavodoxin using coarse-grained molecular simulations. We found a linear correlation between the temperature for a particular structural ensemble in the absence of urea, Tb, and the temperature of the same structural ensemble at a specific urea concentration, Tu. The in silico results agreed with in vitro far-UV circular dichroism data on apoazurin and cytochrome c. We conclude that chemical and thermal unfolding processes correlate in terms of thermodynamics and structural ensembles at most conditions; however, deviations were found at high concentrations of denaturant.

  1. Interaction of Ionizing Radiation, Genetically Active Chemicals, and Radiofrequency Radiation in Human and Rodent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Martin L. Meltz, Ph.D. Patricia K. Holahan , Ph.D. Steven T. Smith, Ph.D. James J. Kerbacher, Ph.D. Victor Ciaravino, Ph.D. Department of Radiology PO...Chemicals, and Radiofrequency Radiation in Human and Rodent Cells 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Meltz. Martin L.; Holahan Patricia K.; Smith Steven Kerbacher...Potentiation of SCE Induction and Cell Killing by Adriamycin in CHO Cells (Ciaravino and Holahan , in preparation), showed that Adriamycin exposure at 410C

  2. A genetic algorithm approach for assessing soil liquefaction potential based on reliability method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Bagheripour; I Shooshpasha; M Afzalirad

    2012-02-01

    Deterministic approaches are unable to account for the variations in soil’s strength properties, earthquake loads, as well as source of errors in evaluations of liquefaction potential in sandy soils which make them questionable against other reliability concepts. Furthermore, deterministic approaches are incapable of precisely relating the probability of liquefaction and the factor of safety (FS). Therefore, the use of probabilistic approaches and especially, reliability analysis is considered since a complementary solution is needed to reach better engineering decisions. In this study, Advanced First-Order Second-Moment (AFOSM) technique associated with genetic algorithm (GA) and its corresponding sophisticated optimization techniques have been used to calculate the reliability index and the probability of liquefaction. The use of GA provides a reliable mechanism suitable for computer programming and fast convergence. A new relation is developed here, by which the liquefaction potential can be directly calculated based on the estimated probability of liquefaction (), cyclic stress ratio (CSR) and normalized standard penetration test (SPT) blow counts while containing a mean error of less than 10% from the observational data. The validity of the proposed concept is examined through comparison of the results obtained by the new relation and those predicted by other investigators. A further advantage of the proposed relation is that it relates and FS and hence it provides possibility of decision making based on the liquefaction risk and the use of deterministic approaches. This could be beneficial to geotechnical engineers who use the common methods of FS for evaluation of liquefaction. As an application, the city of Babolsar which is located on the southern coasts of Caspian Sea is investigated for liquefaction potential. The investigation is based primarily on in situ tests in which the results of SPT are analysed.

  3. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  4. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA: a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3gk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Wiley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases.

  5. GA(M)E-QSAR: a novel, fully automatic genetic-algorithm-(meta)-ensembles approach for binary classification in ligand-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Castillo, Yunierkis; Lazar, Cosmin; Taminau, Jonatan; Froeyen, Mathy; Cabrera-Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Nowé, Ann

    2012-09-24

    Computer-aided drug design has become an important component of the drug discovery process. Despite the advances in this field, there is not a unique modeling approach that can be successfully applied to solve the whole range of problems faced during QSAR modeling. Feature selection and ensemble modeling are active areas of research in ligand-based drug design. Here we introduce the GA(M)E-QSAR algorithm that combines the search and optimization capabilities of Genetic Algorithms with the simplicity of the Adaboost ensemble-based classification algorithm to solve binary classification problems. We also explore the usefulness of Meta-Ensembles trained with Adaboost and Voting schemes to further improve the accuracy, generalization, and robustness of the optimal Adaboost Single Ensemble derived from the Genetic Algorithm optimization. We evaluated the performance of our algorithm using five data sets from the literature and found that it is capable of yielding similar or better classification results to what has been reported for these data sets with a higher enrichment of active compounds relative to the whole actives subset when only the most active chemicals are considered. More important, we compared our methodology with state of the art feature selection and classification approaches and found that it can provide highly accurate, robust, and generalizable models. In the case of the Adaboost Ensembles derived from the Genetic Algorithm search, the final models are quite simple since they consist of a weighted sum of the output of single feature classifiers. Furthermore, the Adaboost scores can be used as ranking criterion to prioritize chemicals for synthesis and biological evaluation after virtual screening experiments.

  6. Principles for identification of High Potency Category Chemicals for which the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach should not be applied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David W; Api, Anne Marie; Safford, Robert J; Lalko, Jon F

    2015-08-01

    An essential step in ensuring the toxicological safety of chemicals used in consumer products is the evaluation of their skin sensitising potential. The sensitising potency, coupled with information on exposure levels, can be used in a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) to determine an acceptable level of a given chemical in a given product. Where consumer skin exposure is low, a risk assessment can be conducted using the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach, avoiding the need to determine potency experimentally. Since skin sensitisation involves chemical reaction with skin proteins, the first step in the DST approach is to assess, on the basis of the chemical structure, whether the chemical is expected to be reactive or not. Our accompanying publication describes the probabilistic derivation of a DST of 64 μg/cm(2) for chemicals assessed as reactive. This would protect against 95% of chemicals assessed as reactive, but the remaining 5% would include chemicals with very high potency. Here we discuss the chemical properties and structural features of high potency sensitisers, and derive an approach whereby they can be identified and consequently excluded from application of the DST.

  7. A Hybrid Improved Genetic Algorithm and Its Application in Dynamic Optimization Problems of Chemical Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Fan; DU Wenli; QI Rongbin; QIAN Feng; ZHONG Weimin

    2013-01-01

    The solutions of dynamic optimization problems are usually very difficult due to their highly nonlinear and multidimensional nature.Genetic algorithm(GA)has been proved to be a feasible method when the gradient is difficult to calculate.Its advantage is that the control profiles at all time stages are optimized simultaneously,but its convergence is very slow in the later period of evolution and it is easily trapped in the local optimum.In this study,a hybrid improved genetic algorithm(HIGA)for solving dynamic optimization problems is proposed to overcome these defects.Simplex method(SM)is used to perform the local search in the neighborhood of the optimal solution.By using SM,the ideal searching direction of global optimal solution could be found as soon as possible and the convergence speed of the algorithm is improved.The hybrid algorithm presents some improvements,such as protecting the best individual,accepting immigrations,as well as employing adaptive crossover and Gaussian mutation operators.The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by solving several dynamic optimization problems.At last,HIGA is applied to the optimal production of secreted protein in a fed batch reactor and the optimal feed-rate found by HIGA is effective and relatively stable.

  8. New Approaches for Collaborative Sharing of Chemical Model Data and Analysis Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, K; Oluwole, O; Pitz, W; Rahn, L A; Green, Jr., W H; Leahy, D; Pancerella, C; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J

    2005-01-19

    The urgent need for high-efficiency, low-emission energy utilization technologies for transportation, power generation, and manufacturing processes presents difficult challenges to the combustion research community. The required predictive understanding requires systematic knowledge across the full range of physical scales involved in combustion processes--from the properties and interactions of individual molecules to the dynamics and products of turbulent multi-phase reacting flows. Innovative experimental techniques and computational approaches are revolutionizing the rate at which chemical science research can produce the new information necessary to advance our combustion knowledge. But the increased volume and complexity of this information often makes it even more difficult to derive the systems-level knowledge we need. Combustion researchers have responded by forming interdisciplinary communities intent on sharing information and coordinating research priorities. Such efforts face many barriers, however, including lack of data accessibility and interoperability, missing metadata and pedigree information, efficient approaches for sharing data and analysis tools, and the challenges of working together across geography, disciplines, and a very diverse spectrum of applications and funding. This challenge is especially difficult for those developing, sharing and/or using detailed chemical models of combustion to treat the oxidation of practical fuels. This is a very complex problem, and the development of new chemistry models requires a series of steps that involve acquiring and keeping track of a large amount of data and its pedigree. Also, this data is developed using a diverse range of codes and experiments spanning ab initio chemistry codes, laboratory kinetics and flame experiments, all the way to reacting flow simulations on massively parallel computers. Each of these processes typically requires different data formats, and often the data and/or analysis

  9. An active film-coating approach to enhance chemical stability of a potent drug molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Divyakant; Rao, Venkatramana; Guo, Hang; Li, Danping; Stein, Daniel; Hu, Frank Y; Kiesnowski, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Peliglitazar, a PPAR α/γ agonist, was found to undergo acid as well as base catalyzed degradation. The acid catalyzed degradation led to the formation of benzylic alcohol and glycine carbamate and the base catalyzed degradation led to formation of p-hydroxyanisole and an amine degradant. In capsule formulations, the capsules with the lowest drug-loading exhibited maximum instability even at 25 °C/60% RH storage condition. Incorporation of pH-modifiers to maintain 'micro-environmental pH' acidic did not prevent the formation of the base-catalyzed degradants. Traditional dry granulated tablet formulation which is qualitatively similar to the capsule formulations showed the presence of acid-catalyzed degradants even without the presence of an acidifying agent. On the other hand, traditional wet granulated tablet formulation showed mainly base-catalyzed degradants. Stability problems of the tablet formulation were aggravated because the potent molecule required low tablet strengths which resulted in low drug to excipient ratio. To stabilize the molecule, an active film-coating approach was explored. In this approach, the drug was sprayed with the coating material onto non-active containing tablet cores. This approach of trapping the drug particles into the coating material provided tablets with satisfactory chemical stability. The stability enhancement observed in the active coating approach is attributed to the higher drug to excipient ratio in the film coat of non-reactive coating material compared to that in the traditional dry or wet granulated formulations.

  10. Identifying New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Prostate Cancer Using a Hybrid Network and Shortest Path Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fei; Zhou, You; Wang, Meng; Yang, Jing; Wu, Kai; Lu, Changhong; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the male prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Because prostate cancer cells may spread to other parts of the body and can influence human reproduction, understanding the mechanisms underlying this disease is critical for designing effective treatments. The identification of as many genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer as possible will enhance our understanding of this disease. In this study, we proposed a computational method to identify new candidate genes and chemicals based on currently known genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer by applying a shortest path approach in a hybrid network. The hybrid network was constructed according to information concerning chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions. Many of the obtained genes and chemicals are associated with prostate cancer. PMID:26504486

  11. A genetic predictive model for canine hip dysplasia: integration of Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) and candidate gene approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, Nerea; Segarra, Sergi; Artieda, Marta; Francino, Olga; Sánchez, Elisenda; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Casellas, Joaquim; Tejedor, Diego; Cerdeira, Joaquín; Martínez, Antonio; Velasco, Alfonso; Sánchez, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia is one of the most prevalent developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs worldwide. Unfortunately, the success of eradication programs against this disease based on radiographic diagnosis is low. Adding the use of diagnostic genetic tools to the current phenotype-based approach might be beneficial. The aim of this study was to develop a genetic prognostic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. To develop our DNA test, 775 Labrador Retrievers were recruited. For each dog, a blood sample and a ventrodorsal hip radiograph were taken. Dogs were divided into two groups according to their FCI hip score: control (A/B) and case (D/E). C dogs were not included in the sample. Genetic characterization combining a GWAS and a candidate gene strategy using SNPs allowed a case-control population association study. A mathematical model which included 7 SNPs was developed using logistic regression. The model showed a good accuracy (Area under the ROC curve = 0.85) and was validated in an independent population of 114 dogs. This prognostic genetic test represents a useful tool for choosing the most appropriate therapeutic approach once genetic predisposition to hip dysplasia is known. Therefore, it allows a more individualized management of the disease. It is also applicable during genetic selection processes, since breeders can benefit from the information given by this test as soon as a blood sample can be collected, and act accordingly. In the authors' opinion, a shift towards genomic screening might importantly contribute to reducing canine hip dysplasia in the future. In conclusion, based on genetic and radiographic information from Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia, we developed an accurate predictive genetic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. However, further research is warranted in order to evaluate the validity of this genetic test in other dog breeds.

  12. A genetic predictive model for canine hip dysplasia: integration of Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS and candidate gene approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Bartolomé

    Full Text Available Canine hip dysplasia is one of the most prevalent developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs worldwide. Unfortunately, the success of eradication programs against this disease based on radiographic diagnosis is low. Adding the use of diagnostic genetic tools to the current phenotype-based approach might be beneficial. The aim of this study was to develop a genetic prognostic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. To develop our DNA test, 775 Labrador Retrievers were recruited. For each dog, a blood sample and a ventrodorsal hip radiograph were taken. Dogs were divided into two groups according to their FCI hip score: control (A/B and case (D/E. C dogs were not included in the sample. Genetic characterization combining a GWAS and a candidate gene strategy using SNPs allowed a case-control population association study. A mathematical model which included 7 SNPs was developed using logistic regression. The model showed a good accuracy (Area under the ROC curve = 0.85 and was validated in an independent population of 114 dogs. This prognostic genetic test represents a useful tool for choosing the most appropriate therapeutic approach once genetic predisposition to hip dysplasia is known. Therefore, it allows a more individualized management of the disease. It is also applicable during genetic selection processes, since breeders can benefit from the information given by this test as soon as a blood sample can be collected, and act accordingly. In the authors' opinion, a shift towards genomic screening might importantly contribute to reducing canine hip dysplasia in the future. In conclusion, based on genetic and radiographic information from Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia, we developed an accurate predictive genetic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. However, further research is warranted in order to evaluate the validity of this genetic test in other dog breeds.

  13. Metabolomics-Inspired Insight into Developmental, Environmental and Genetic Aspects of Tomato Fruit Chemical Composition and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-09-01

    Tomato was one of the first plant species to be evaluated using metabolomics and remains one of the best characterized, with tomato fruit being both an important source of nutrition in the human diet and a valuable model system for the development of fleshy fruits. Additionally, given the broad habitat range of members of the tomato clade and the extensive use of exotic germplasm in tomato genetic research, it represents an excellent genetic model system for understanding both metabolism per se and the importance of various metabolites in conferring stress tolerance. This review summarizes technical approaches used to characterize the tomato metabolome to date and details insights into metabolic pathway structure and regulation that have been obtained via analysis of tissue samples taken under different developmental or environmental circumstance as well as following genetic perturbation. Particular attention is paid to compounds of importance for nutrition or the shelf-life of tomatoes. We propose furthermore how metabolomics information can be coupled to the burgeoning wealth of genome sequence data from the tomato clade to enhance further our understanding of (i) the shifts in metabolic regulation occurring during development and (ii) specialization of metabolism within the tomato clade as a consequence of either adaptive evolution or domestication.

  14. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds.

  15. Testing of chemicals for genetic activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; von Borstel, R.C.; von Halle, E.S.; Parry, J.M.; Siebert, D.; Zetterberg, G.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N.

    1984-01-01

    This review article with over 200 references summarizes the results of mutation screening tests with 492 chemicals using saccharomyces cerevisiae as the test organism. In addition, an extensive description of S. cerevisiae as a test organism is given. Yeast can be used to study genetic effects both in mitotic and in meiotic cells because it can be cultured as a stable haploid or a stable diploid. The most commonly used genetic endpoint has been mitotic recombination either as mitotic crossing-over or mitotic gene conversion. Data were available on tests with 492 chemicals, of which 249 were positive, as reported in 173 articles or reports. The genetic test/carcinogenicity accuracy was 0.74, based on the carcinogen listing established in the gene-tox program. The yeast tests supplement the bacterial tests for detecting agents that act via radical formation, antibacterial drugs, and other chemicals interfering with chromosome segregation and recombination processes.

  16. Evaluation of a LASSO regression approach on the unrelated samples of Genetic Analysis Workshop 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Elston, Robert C; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2011-11-29

    The Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data we used comprise 697 unrelated individuals genotyped at 24,487 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a mini-exome scan, using real sequence data for 3,205 genes annotated by the 1000 Genomes Project and simulated phenotypes. We studied 200 sets of simulated phenotypes of trait Q2. An important feature of this data set is that most SNPs are rare, with 87% of the SNPs having a minor allele frequency less than 0.05. For rare SNP detection, in this study we performed a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression and F tests at the gene level and calculated the generalized degrees of freedom to avoid any selection bias. For comparison, we also carried out linear regression and the collapsing method, which sums the rare SNPs, modified for a quantitative trait and with two different allele frequency thresholds. The aim of this paper is to evaluate these four approaches in this mini-exome data and compare their performance in terms of power and false positive rates. In most situations the LASSO approach is more powerful than linear regression and collapsing methods. We also note the difficulty in determining the optimal threshold for the collapsing method and the significant role that linkage disequilibrium plays in detecting rare causal SNPs. If a rare causal SNP is in strong linkage disequilibrium with a common marker in the same gene, power will be much improved.

  17. Image Retrieval Approach Based on Intuitive Fuzzy Set Combined with Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-yin; XU Wei-hua; HU Chang-zhen

    2009-01-01

    Aiming at shortcomings of traditional image retrieval systems,a new image retrieval approach based on color features of image combining intuitive fuzzy theory with genetic algorithm is proposed.Each image is segmented into a constant number of sub-images in vertical direction.Color features are extracted from every sub-image to get chromosome coding.It is considered that fuzzy membership and intuitive fuzzy hesitancy degree of every pixel's color in image are associated to all the color histogram bins.Certain feature,fuzzy feature and intuitive fuzzy feature of colors in an image,are used together to describe the content of image.Efficient combinations of sub-image are selected according to operation of selecting,crossing and variation.Retrieval resuits are obtained from image matching based on these color feature combinations of sub-images.Tests show that this approach can improve the accuracy of image retrieval in the case of not decreasing the speed of image retrieval.Its mean precision is above 80%.

  18. Assuring the safety of genetically modified (GM) foods: the importance of an holistic, integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Andrew

    2002-09-11

    Genes change continuously by natural mutation and recombination enabling man to select and breed crops having the most desirable traits such as yield or flavour. Genetic modification (GM) is a recent development which allows specific genes to be identified, isolated, copied and inserted into other plants with a high level of specificity. The food safety considerations for GM crops are basically the same as those arising from conventionally bred crops, very few of which have been subject to any testing yet are generally regarded as being safe to eat. In contrast a rigorous safety testing paradigm has been developed for GM crops, which utilises a systematic, stepwise and holistic approach. The resultant science based process, focuses on a classical evaluation of the toxic potential of the introduced novel trait and the wholesomeness of the transformed crop. In addition, detailed consideration is given to the history and safe use of the parent crop as well as that of the gene donor. The overall safety evaluation is conducted under the concept known as substantial equivalence which is enshrined in all international crop biotechnology guidelines. This provides the framework for a comparative approach to identify the similarities and differences between the GM product and its comparator which has a known history of safe use. By building a detailed profile on each step in the transformation process, from parent to new crop, and by thoroughly evaluating the significance from a safety perspective, of any differences that may be detected, a very comprehensive matrix of information is constructed which enables the conclusion as to whether the GM crop, derived food or feed is as safe as its traditional counterpart. Using this approach in the evaluation of more than 50 GM crops which have been approved worldwide, the conclusion has been that foods and feeds derived from genetically modified crops are as safe and nutritious as those derived from traditional crops. The lack of

  19. A Novel Approach: Chemical Relational Databases, and the Role of the ISSCAN Database on Assessing Chemical Carcinogenity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity databases are crucial resources for toxicologists and regulators involved in chemicals risk assessment. Until recently, existing public toxicity databases have been constructed primarily as "look-up-tables" of existing data, and most often did no...

  20. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid; Ali; Khan; Nafees; Bacha; Bashir; Ahmad; Ghosia; Lutfullah; Umar; Farooq; Russell; John; Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites.Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions.The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques,for example,homologous and heterologous expressions.This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites:also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  1. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid Ali Khan; Nafees Bacha; Bashir Ahmad; Ghosia Lutfullah; Umar Farooq; Russell John Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites. Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions. The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques, for example, homologous and heterologous expressions. This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites;also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  2. A candidate gene approach identifies an IL33 genetic variant as a novel genetic risk factor for GCA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márquez

    Full Text Available Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition.A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays.A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (P(MH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78-0.99 and recessive (P(MH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35-0.80 models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis.Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA.

  3. Applying new genetic approaches to improve quality of population assessment of green and loggerhead turtles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As the NOAA-Fisheries? National Sea Turtle Genetics Lab, the SWFSC Marine Turtle Genetics Program has the lead responsibility for generating, analyzing and...

  4. Enhancing the Capability of N-Dimension Self-Organizing Petrinet using Neuro-Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuj Darbari

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlight intelligent Urban Traffic control using Neuro-Genetic Petrinet. The combination of genetic algorithm provides dynamic change of weight for faster learning and converging of Neuro-Petrinet.

  5. Systematic documentation and analysis of human genetic variation in hemoglobinopathies using the microattribution approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Giardine (Belinda); J. Borg (Joseph); D.R. Higgs (Douglas); K.R. Peterson (Kenneth R.); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); D. Maglott (Donna); B.K. Singleton (Belinda K.); D.J. Anstee (David J.); A.N. Basak (Nazli); B.H. Clark (Bruce); F.C. Costa (Flavia C.); P. Faustino (Paula); H. Fedosyuk (Halyna); A.E. Felice (Alex); A. Francina (Alain); R. Galanello (Renzo); M.V.E. Gallivan (Monica V. E.); M. Georgitsi (Marianthi); R.J. Gibbons (Richard J.); P.C. Giordano (Piero Carlo); C.L. Harteveld (Cornelis); J.D. Hoyer (James D.); M. Jarvis (Martin); P. Joly (Philippe); E. Kanavakis (Emmanuel); P. Kollia (Panagoula); S. Menzel (Stephan); W.G. Miller (William); K. Moradkhani (Kamran); J. Old (John); A. Papachatzpoulou (Adamantia); M.N. Papadakis (Manoussos); P. Papadopoulos (Petros); S. Pavlovic (Sonja); L. Perseu (Lucia); M. Radmilovic (Milena); C. Riemer (Cathy); S. Satta (Stefania); I.A. Schrijver (Ingrid); M. Stojiljkovic (Maja); S.L. Thein; J. Traeger-Synodinos (Joanne); R. Tully (Ray); T. Wada (Takahito); J.S. Waye (John); C. Wiemann (Claudia); B. Zukic (Branka); D.H.K. Chui (David H. K.); H. Wajcman (Henri); R. Hardison (Ross); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a series of interrelated locus-specific databases to store all published and unpublished genetic variation related to hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia and implemented microattribution to encourage submission of unpublished observations of genetic variation to these public

  6. Reductions in genetic diversity of Schistosoma mansoni populations under chemotherapeutic pressure: the effect of sampling approach and parasite population definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Michael D; Churcher, Thomas S; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Norton, Alice J; Lwambo, Nicholas J S; Webster, Joanne P

    2013-11-01

    Detecting potential changes in genetic diversity in schistosome populations following chemotherapy with praziquantel (PZQ) is crucial if we are to fully understand the impact of such chemotherapy with respect to the potential emergence of resistance and/or other evolutionary outcomes of interventions. Doing so by implementing effective, and cost-efficient sampling protocols will help to optimise time and financial resources, particularly relevant to a disease such as schistosomiasis currently reliant on a single available drug. Here we explore the effect on measures of parasite genetic diversity of applying various field sampling approaches, both in terms of the number of (human) hosts sampled and the number of transmission stages (miracidia) sampled per host for a Schistosoma mansoni population in Tanzania pre- and post-treatment with PZQ. In addition, we explore population structuring within and between hosts by comparing the estimates of genetic diversity obtained assuming a 'component population' approach with those using an 'infrapopulation' approach. We found that increasing the number of hosts sampled, rather than the number of miracidia per host, gives more robust estimates of genetic diversity. We also found statistically significant population structuring (using Wright's F-statistics) and significant differences in the measures of genetic diversity depending on the parasite population definition. The relative advantages, disadvantages and, hence, subsequent reliability of these metrics for parasites with complex life-cycles are discussed, both for the specific epidemiological and ecological scenario under study here and for their future application to other areas and schistosome species.

  7. A general approach for combining diverse rare variant association tests provides improved robustness across a wider range of genetic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Brian; Hainline, Allison; Arbet, Jaron; Grinde, Kelsey; Benitez, Alejandra; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    The widespread availability of genome sequencing data made possible by way of next-generation technologies has yielded a flood of different gene-based rare variant association tests. Most of these tests have been published because they have superior power for particular genetic architectures. However, for applied researchers it is challenging to know which test to choose in practice when little is known a priori about genetic architecture. Recently, tests have been proposed which combine two particular individual tests (one burden and one variance components) to minimize power loss while improving robustness to a wider range of genetic architectures. In our analysis we propose an expansion of these approaches, yielding a general method that works for combining any number of individual tests. We demonstrate that running multiple different tests on the same data set and using a Bonferroni correction for multiple testing is never better than combining tests using our general method. We also find that using a test statistic that is highly robust to the inclusion of non-causal variants (joint-infinity) together with a previously published combined test (sequence kernel adaptive test-optimal) provides improved robustness to a wide range of genetic architectures and should be considered for use in practice. Software for this approach is supplied. We support the increased use of combined tests in practice - as well as further exploration of novel combined testing approaches using the general framework provided here - to maximize robustness of rare variant testing strategies against a wide range of genetic architectures.

  8. Bioinformatics' approaches to detect genetic variation in whole genome sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, H.H.D.

    2010-01-01

    Current genetic marker repositories are not sufficient or even are completely lacking for most farm animals. However, genetic markers are essential for the development of a research tool facilitating discovery of genetic factors that contribute to resistance to disease and the overall welfare and pe

  9. A novel landscape genetic approach demonstrates the effects of human disturbance on the Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lopez, M J; Barelli, C; Rovero, F; Hodges, K; Roos, C; Peterman, W E; Ting, N

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive understanding of how human disturbance affects tropical forest ecosystems is critical for the mitigation of future losses in global biodiversity. Although many genetic studies of tropical forest fragmentation have been conducted to provide insight into this issue, relatively few have incorporated landscape data to explicitly test the effects of human disturbance on genetic differentiation among populations. In this study, we use a newly developed landscape genetic approach that relies on a genetic algorithm to simultaneously optimize resistance surfaces to investigate the effects of human disturbance in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, which is an important part of a universally recognized biodiversity hotspot. Our study species is the endangered Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum), which is endemic to the Udzungwa Mountains and a known indicator species that thrives in large and well-protected blocks of old growth forest. Population genetic analyses identified significant population structure among Udzungwa red colobus inhabiting different forest blocks, and Bayesian cluster analyses identified hierarchical structure. Our new method for creating composite landscape resistance models found that the combination of fire density on the landscape and distance to the nearest village best explains the genetic structure observed. These results demonstrate the effects that human activities are having in an area of high global conservation priority and suggest that this ecosystem is in a precarious state. Our study also illustrates the ability of our novel landscape genetic method to detect the impacts of relatively recent landscape features on a long-lived species.

  10. Extent of hydrogen coverage of Si(001) under chemical vapor deposition conditions from ab initio approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Phil; Tonner, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The extent of hydrogen coverage of the Si(001) c(4 × 2) surface in the presence of hydrogen gas has been studied with dispersion corrected density functional theory. Electronic energy contributions are well described using a hybrid functional. The temperature dependence of the coverage in thermodynamic equilibrium was studied computing the phonon spectrum in a supercell approach. As an approximation to these demanding computations, an interpolated phonon approach was found to give comparable accuracy. The simpler ab initio thermodynamic approach is not accurate enough for the system studied, even if corrections by the Einstein model for surface vibrations are considered. The on-set of H2 desorption from the fully hydrogenated surface is predicted to occur at temperatures around 750 K. Strong changes in hydrogen coverage are found between 1000 and 1200 K in good agreement with previous reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy experiments. These findings allow a rational choice for the surface state in the computational treatment of chemical reactions under typical metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions on Si(001).

  11. Next Gen Pop Gen: implementing a high-throughput approach to population genetics in boarfish (Capros aper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Edward D; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Carlsson, Jens

    2016-12-01

    The recently developed approach for microsatellite genotyping by sequencing (GBS) using individual combinatorial barcoding was further improved and used to assess the genetic population structure of boarfish (Capros aper) across the species' range. Microsatellite loci were developed de novo and genotyped by next-generation sequencing. Genetic analyses of the samples indicated that boarfish can be subdivided into at least seven biological units (populations) across the species' range. Furthermore, the recent apparent increase in abundance in the northeast Atlantic is better explained by demographic changes within this area than by influx from southern or insular populations. This study clearly shows that the microsatellite GBS approach is a generic, cost-effective, rapid and powerful method suitable for full-scale population genetic studies-a crucial element for assessment, sustainable management and conservation of valuable biological resources.

  12. Genetic and chemical characterization of an EMS induced mutation in Cucumis melo CRTISO gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpaz, Navot; Burger, Yosi; Lavee, Tamar; Tzuri, Galil; Sherman, Amir; Melamed, Tal; Eshed, Ravit; Meir, Ayala; Portnoy, Vitaly; Bar, Einat; Shimoni-Shor, Einav; Feder, Ari; Saar, Yuval; Saar, Uzi; Baumkoler, Fabian; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Schaffer, Arthur A; Katzir, Nurit; Tadmor, Yaakov

    2013-11-15

    In order to broaden the available genetic variation of melon, we developed an ethyl methanesulfonate mutation library in an orange-flesh 'Charentais' type melon line that accumulates β-carotene. One mutagenized M2 family segregated for a novel recessive trait, a yellow-orange fruit flesh ('yofI'). HPLC analysis revealed that 'yofI' accumulates pro-lycopene (tetra-cis-lycopene) as its major fruit pigment. The altered carotenoid composition of 'yofI' is associated with a significant change of the fruit aroma since cleavage of β-carotene yields different apocarotenoids than the cleavage of pro-lycopene. Normally, pro-lycopene is further isomerized by CRTISO (carotenoid isomerase) to yield all-trans-lycopene, which is further cyclized to β-carotene in melon fruit. Cloning and sequencing of 'yofI' CRTISO identified two mRNA sequences which lead to truncated forms of CRTISO. Sequencing of the genomic CRTISO identified an A-T transversion in 'yofI' which leads to a premature STOP codon. The early carotenoid pathway genes were up regulated in yofI fruit causing accumulation of other intermediates such as phytoene and ζ-carotene. Total carotenoid levels are only slightly increased in the mutant. Mutants accumulating pro-lycopene have been reported in both tomato and watermelon fruits, however, this is the first report of a non-lycopene accumulating fruit showing this phenomenon.

  13. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  14. Particle production and chemical freezeout from the hybrid UrQMD approach at NICA energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser; Shalaby, Asmaa G; Hanafy, Mahmoud; Sorin, Alexander; Rogachevsky, Oleg; Scheinast, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The energy dependence of various particle ratios is calculated within the Ultra-Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics approach and compared with the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model and measurements from various experiments, including RHIC-BES, SPS and AGS. It is found that the UrQMD particle ratios agree well with the experimental results at the RHIC-BES energies. Thus, we have utilized UrQMD in simulating particle ratios at other beam energies down to 3 GeV, which will be accessed at NICA and FAIR future facilities. We observe that the particle ratios for crossover and first-order phase transition, implemented in the hybrid UrQMD v3.4, are nearly indistinguishable, especially at low energies (at large baryon chemical potentials or high density).

  15. An experimental design approach to the chemical characterisation of pectin polysaccharides extracted from Cucumis melo Inodorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Laura J; Morris, Gordon A

    2015-03-06

    Extracted pectins have been utilised in a number of applications in both the food and pharmaceutical industries where they are generally used as gelling agents, thickeners and stabilisers, although a number of pectins have been shown to be bioactive. These functional properties will depend upon extraction conditions. A statistical experimental design approach was used to study the effects of extraction conditions pH, time and temperature on pectins extracted from Cucumis melo Inodorus. The results show that the chemical composition is very sensitive to these conditions and that this has a great influence on for example the degree of branching. Higher temperatures, lower pHs and longer extraction times lead to a loss of the more acid labile arabinofuranose residues present on the pectin side chain. The fitting of regression equations relating yield and composition to extraction conditions can therefore lead to tailor-made pectins for specific properties and/or applications.

  16. Approaches to assessing the risk of chemical contamination of Urban Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, O. A.; Makarov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The existing approaches to studying the risk of chemical contamination of soils are analyzed. It is noted that the actual and critical loads of contaminants on the soil cover are often compared for estimating these risks. The insufficient use of economic tools and methods for assessing the risk of soil contamination is emphasized. The sanitary-hygienic standards are found out to be exceeded for lead, zinc, cadmium and copper content in soils in six localities, each of 6250 m2 in the area, situated in the industrial and transport zones of Podol'sk and Moscow. The values of actual and maximal permissible damage exerted by the heavy-metal contamination to the studied soils are calculated. The probable damage R and the degree of probable damage implementation (DPDI) are used as the indices of soil contamination risk.

  17. Particle production and chemical freezeout from the hybrid UrQMD approach at NICA energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasser Tawfik, Abdel [Modern University for Technology and Information (MTI), Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), Cairo (Egypt); World Laboratory for Cosmology and Particle Physics (WLCAPP), Cairo (Egypt); Abou-Salem, Loutfy I. [Benha University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Benha (Egypt); Shalaby, Asmaa G.; Hanafy, Mahmoud [World Laboratory for Cosmology and Particle Physics (WLCAPP), Cairo (Egypt); Benha University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Benha (Egypt); Sorin, Alexander [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubna International University, Dubna (Russian Federation); Rogachevsky, Oleg; Scheinast, Werner [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The energy dependence of various particle ratios is calculated within the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics approach and compared with the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model and measurements from various experiments, including RHIC-BES, SPS and AGS. It is found that the UrQMD particle ratios agree well with the experimental results at the RHIC-BES energies. Thus, we have utilized UrQMD in simulating particle ratios at other beam energies down to 3GeV, which will be accessed at NICA and FAIR future facilities. We observe that the particle ratios for crossover and first-order phase transition, implemented in the hybrid UrQMD v3.4, are nearly indistinguishable, especially at low energies (at large baryon chemical potentials or high density). (orig.)

  18. Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from consuming aquatic food resources from chemically contaminated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozonoff, D. (Boston Univ. School of Public Health, MA (United States)); Longnecker, M.P. (UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Epidemiologic approaches to assessing human cancer risk from contaminated waters must confront the problems of long latency and rarity of the end point (cancer). The latency problem makes determination of diet history more difficult, while the low frequency of cancer as an end point reduces the statistical power of the study. These factors are discussed in relation to the study designs most commonly employed in epidemiology. It is suggested that the use of biomarkers for persistent chemicals may be useful to mitigate the difficulty of determining exposure, while the use of more prevalent and timely end points, such as carcinogen-DNA adducts or oncogene proteins, may make the latency and rarity problems more tractable.

  19. Beyond the pseudo-time-dependent approach: chemical models of dense core precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Hassel, G E; Bergin, E A

    2010-01-01

    Context: Chemical models of dense cloud cores often utilize the so-called pseudo-time-dependent approximation, in which the physical conditions are held fixed and uniform as the chemistry occurs. In this approximation, the initial abundances chosen, which are totally atomic in nature except for molecular hydrogen, are artificial. A more detailed approach to the chemistry of dense cold cores should include the physical evolution during their early stages of formation. Aims: Our major goal is to investigate the initial synthesis of molecular ices and gas-phase molecules as cold molecular gas begins to form behind a shock in the diffuse interstellar medium. The abundances calculated as the conditions evolve can then be utilized as reasonable initial conditions for a theory of the chemistry of dense cores. Methods: Hydrodynamic shock-wave simulations of the early stages of cold core formation are used to determine the time-dependent physical conditions for a gas-grain chemical network. We follow the cold post-sho...

  20. An approach to enhance self-compensation capability in paper-based devices for chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Jie; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a simple design for increasing the tolerance of reagent dislocation on a paper-based platform using a combination of wax-treated paper and a vortex mixer. To date, massive budgetary funds are required in the biotechnological industry to develop new applications; a large part of that cost is attributable to the screening of specific chemical compounds. Here, we propose using a liquid-handling robot to automatically deposit selected reagents on a paper-based platform. We also present a preliminary concept approach for developing a reagent placing device with simple and inexpensive features. A defect of inaccuracy was observed between droplet location and test well location after viewing the performance of the liquid-handling robot on our paper-based platform. Because of dislocation error resulting from robotic reagent placement, we decided to apply an external, rotational force following droplet placement in order to compensate for the distance of reagent dislocation. Note, the largest distance of reagent dislocation was determined by examining the results of altering applied reagent volume, but not concentration, in volumes from 5 µL to 30 µL in a series of experiments. As a result of these experiments, we observed that dislocation was positively affected by an increase in applied volume. A colorimetric assay for nitrite detection was also performed to confirm the feasibility of this method. This work, we believe, can minimize the cost of chemical compound screening for the biotechnological industry.

  1. Metabolomic Approaches to Explore Chemical Diversity of Human Breast-Milk, Formula Milk and Bovine Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Linxi; Zhao, Aihua; Zhang, Yinan; Chen, Tianlu; Zeisel, Steven H; Jia, Wei; Cai, Wei

    2016-12-17

    Although many studies have been conducted on the components present in human breast milk (HM), research on the differences of chemical metabolites between HM, bovine milk (BM) and formula milk (FM) is limited. This study was to explore the chemical diversity of HM, BM and FM by metabolomic approaches. GC-TOFMS and UPLC-QTOFMS were applied to investigate the metabolic compositions in 30 HM samples, 20 FM samples and 20 BM samples. Metabolite profiling identified that most of the non-esterified fatty acids, which reflected the hydrolysis of triglycerides, were much more abundant in HM than those in FM and BM, except for palmitic acid and stearic acid. The levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates were much higher in FM and BM than those in HM. Each type of milk also showed its unique composition of free amino acids and free carbohydrates. In conclusion, higher levels of non-esterified saturated fatty acids with aliphatic tails <16 carbons, monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids and lower levels of TCA intermediates are characteristic of HM, as compared with FM and BM. The content of non-esterified fatty acids may reflect the hydrolysis of triglycerides in different milk types.

  2. Effectiveness of bone cleaning process using chemical and entomology approaches: time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Poh Soon; Khoo, Lay See; Mohd Hilmi, Saidin; Ahmad Hafizam, Hasmi; Mohd Shah, Mahmood; Nurliza, Abdullah; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal examination is an important aspect of forensic pathology practice, requiring effective bone cleaning with minimal artefact. This study was conducted to compare between chemical and entomology methods of bone cleaning. Ten subjects between 20 and 40 years old who underwent uncomplicated medico-legal autopsies at the Institute of Forensic Medicine Malaysia were randomly chosen for this descriptive cross sectional study. The sternum bone was divided into 4 parts, each part subjected to a different cleaning method, being two chemical approaches i.e. laundry detergent and a combination of 6% hydrogen peroxide and powder sodium bicarbonate and two entomology approaches using 2nd instar maggots of Chrysomyia rufifacies and Ophyra spinigera. A scoring system for grading the outcome of cleaning was used. The effectiveness of the methods was evaluated based on average weight reduction per day and median number of days to achieve the average score of less than 1.5 within 12 days of the bone cleaning process. Using maggots was the most time-effective and costeffective method, achieving an average weight reduction of 1.4 gm per day, a median of 11.3 days to achieve the desired score and an average cost of MYR 4.10 per case to reach the desired score within 12 days. This conclusion was supported by blind validation by forensic specialists achieving a 77.8% preference for maggots. Emission scanning electron microscopy evaluation also revealed that maggots especially Chrysomyia rufifacies preserved the original condition of the bones better allowing improved elucidation of bone injuries in future real cases.

  3. A new approach of cascade utilization of the chemical energy of fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Wei; JIN Hongguang; LIN Rumou

    2006-01-01

    The indirect release of chemical energy of fuel is investigated, and a new mechanism is proposed to identify the cascade utilization of chemical energy of fuel more clearly. Based on the concept of energy level, the internal phenomenon of the indirect chemical energy release is disclosed, and the equations of energy level describing the utilization of chemical energy and thermal energy during the indirect chemical energy release process are obtained. From theoretical analysis, we find that the superiority of the indirect chemical energy release of fuel comes from the cascade utilization of the fuel's chemical energy. Moreover, the cascade utilization of chemical energy is verified by the investigation of CRGT (chemically recuperated gas turbine). As a result, the thermal exergy obtained from the chemical energy release of fuel increases by 2 % -3 %. The results obtained here may help a deeper understanding of indirect chemical energy release of fuel and provide a theoretical basis for the synthesis of innovative energy systems.

  4. Biosafety risk assessment approaches for insect-resistant genetically modified crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaam Ullah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental risk assessment (ERA is imperative for commercial release of insect resistant, genetically modified crops (IR-GMCs.An insect specific, spider venom peptideω-HXTX-Hv1a (Hvt was successfully expressed in cotton plants. The cotton plants producing Hvt protein have demonstrated resistance against economically important insect pest species. The study was performed to assess the effects of Hvt producing cotton plants on Honey bees (Apis mellifera. Methods: Three approaches were used to evaluate the effects of Hvt protein on adults of honeybees; whole plant assays in flight cages, in vitro assays with pollen of Hvt-cotton, and assays with elevated levels of purified Hvt protein. Pollens of Bt cotton or purified Bt proteins were used as control. Results: The field experiments did not yield any meaningful data due to high rate of mortality in all treatments including the control. However, the laboratory experiments provided conclusive results in which Hvt, purified or in pollens, did not affect the survival or longevity of the bees compared to the control. During the course of study we were able to compare the quality, effectiveness and economics of different experiments. Conclusions: We conclude that Hvt either purified or produced in cotton plants do not affect the survival or longevity of honey bees. We are also of the view that starting at laboratory level assays not only gives meaningful data but also saves a lot of time and money that can be spent on other important questions regarding safety of a particular transgenic crop. Hence, a purpose-based, tiered approach could be the best choice for pre-release ERA of IR-GMCs.

  5. Feature Selection and Classification of Electroencephalographic Signals: An Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguzel, Turker Tekin; Ozekes, Serhat; Tan, Oguz; Gultekin, Selahattin

    2015-10-01

    Feature selection is an important step in many pattern recognition systems aiming to overcome the so-called curse of dimensionality. In this study, an optimized classification method was tested in 147 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The performance of the combination of a genetic algorithm (GA) and a back-propagation (BP) neural network (BPNN) was evaluated using 6-channel pre-rTMS electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns of theta and delta frequency bands. The GA was first used to eliminate the redundant and less discriminant features to maximize classification performance. The BPNN was then applied to test the performance of the feature subset. Finally, classification performance using the subset was evaluated using 6-fold cross-validation. Although the slow bands of the frontal electrodes are widely used to collect EEG data for patients with MDD and provide quite satisfactory classification results, the outcomes of the proposed approach indicate noticeably increased overall accuracy of 89.12% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.904 using the reduced feature set.

  6. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  7. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad R Irwin

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV, MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+ MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+ MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2. These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  8. Myxoma virus oncolytic efficiency can be enhanced through chemical or genetic disruption of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Chad R; Favis, Nicole A; Agopsowicz, Kate C; Hitt, Mary M; Evans, David H

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is one of many animal viruses that exhibit oncolytic properties in transformed human cells. Compared to orthopoxviruses like vaccinia (VACV), MYXV spreads inefficiently, which could compromise its use in treating tumors and their associated metastases. The VACV F11 protein promotes virus exit and rapid spread by inhibiting Rho signalling, which results in a disruption of cortical actin. We have previously shown that although MYXV lacks an F11 homolog, the F11L gene can be introduced into MYXV promoting the spread of this Leporipoxvirus in natural host cells. Here we show that the F11-encoding (F11L(+)) MYXV strain replicates to higher levels in a number of human cancer cells. We also show that F11L(+) MYXV induces better tumor control and prolonged survival of mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that this virus also spreads more efficiently from the site of growth in one injected tumor, to a second untreated tumor. While we focused mostly on the use of a modified MYXV we were able to show that the effects of F11 on MYXV growth in cancer cells could be mimicked through the use of pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated silencing of key regulators of cortical actin (RhoA, RhoC, mDia1, or LIMK2). These data suggest that it may be possible to increase the oncolytic efficacy of wild-type MYXV using chemical inhibitors of RhoA/C or their downstream targets. Furthermore, since all viruses must overcome barriers to exit posed by structures like cortical actin, these findings suggest that the oncolytic activity of other viruses may be enhanced through similar strategies.

  9. Genetic and chemical comparison of Boi (Sinomeni Caulis et Rhizoma) and Seifuto (Caulis Sinomenii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Tomoko; Matsumura, Ikue; Nakamura, Rie; Yamaji, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Kazunori; Takeda, Osami; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Takeda, Tadahiro

    2010-07-01

    Boi and its original plant Sinomenium acutum from Japan were compared with Seifuto and its botanical origins from China in terms of their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences and major chemical components. Boi, Seifuto, and their botanical origins overall showed seven variable sites in the ITS sequence and six genotypes. Japanese S. acutum and Boi had one nucleotide variation at position 593 to show two genotypes (J1 and J2) and their heterozygote (J3). Seifuto samples and their botanical origins, S. acutum and S. acutum var. cinereum from China, showed three genotypes (C1, C2, and C3), which did not agree with the botanical classification, indicating that they cannot be distinguished according to their ITS sequences. All Seifuto samples from Henan market showed the same ITS genotype (C1). The Japanese and Chinese genotypes differed in the nucleotide position 424, which can be used to distinguish the country of origin of these materials. In the HPLC analysis of six major components, sinomenine (1), magnoflorine (2), menisperine (3), 6-O-methyllaudanosoline glucoside (4), liriodendrin (5), and menisdaurin (6), all were detected in Boi, whereas five (all except for menisdaurin) were detected in Seifuto. The main component in the rhizome of Seifuto was sinomenine, whereas magnoflorine was the main component in the rhizome and the climbing stem of Boi. The content of sinomenine in Seifuto was almost twice that in Boi. Although the individual content of alkaloids 1-4 differed between Boi and Seifuto, the total contents of these alkaloids were comparable between them both in the climbing stem and rhizome.

  10. Efficient generation of recombinant influenza A viruses employing a new approach to overcome the genetic instability of HA segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mostafa

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAVs are the most relevant and continual source of severe infectious respiratory complications in humans and different animal species, especially poultry. Therefore, an efficient vaccination that elicits protective and neutralizing antibodies against the viral hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA is an important strategy to counter annual epidemics or occasional pandemics. With the help of plasmid-based reverse genetics technology, it is possible that IAV vaccine strains (IVVS are rapidly generated. However, the genetic instability of some cloned HA-cDNAs after transformation into competent bacteria represents a major obstacle. Herein, we report efficient cloning strategies of different genetically volatile HA segments (H5- and H9-subtypes employing either a newly constructed vector for reverse genetics (pMKPccdB or by the use of the Escherichia coli strain HB101. Both approaches represent improved and generalizable strategies to establish functional reverse genetics systems preventing genetic changes to the cloned (HA segments of IAV facilitating more efficient rescue of recombinant IAV for basic research and vaccine development.

  11. Minding the Genes: a Multidisciplinary Approach towards Genetic Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ashley; Rosman, Lindsey; Cahill, John; Ingles, Jodie; Murray, Brittney; Tichnell, Crystal; James, Cynthia A; Sears, Samuel F

    2016-09-30

    Genetic assessment for inherited cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasingly available, due in part to rapid innovations in genetic sequencing technologies. While genetic testing is aimed at reducing uncertainty, it also produces awareness of potential medical conditions and can leave patients feeling uncertain about their risk, especially if there are ambiguous results. This uncertainty can produce psychological distress for patients and their families undergoing the assessment process. Additionally, patients may experience psychological distress related to living with inherited CVD. In order to more effectively manage the psychosocial challenges related to genetic assessment for CVD, a multidisciplinary model expanded to include psychologists and other allied health professionals is outlined. A case study is provided to illustrate how psychological distress can manifest in a patient living with inherited CVD, as well as proposed psychological management of this patient. Finally, a guide for genetic counselors is provided to aid in identifying and managing common psychological reactions to genetic assessment for CVD.

  12. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  13. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wid...

  14. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    OpenAIRE

    Chang eShen; Jing eGao; Yu Jun Sheng; Jinfa eDou; Fusheng eZhou; Xiaodong eZheng; Randy eKo; Xianfa eTang; Caihong Hong Zhu; Xianyong Yong Yin; Liangdan Dan Sun; Yong eCui; Xue Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association stud...

  15. In silico prediction of toxicity of phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis by using genetic algorithm and decision tree-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasitabar, Fatemeh; Zare-Shahabadi, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals is an important issue in environmental protection; however, there is a huge lack of experimental data for a large number of end-points. The experimental determination of toxicity of chemicals involves high costs and time-consuming process. In silico tools such as quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models, which are constructed on the basis of computational molecular descriptors, can predict missing data for toxic end-points for existing or even not yet synthesized chemicals. Phenol derivatives are known to be aquatic pollutants. With this background, we aimed to develop an accurate and reliable QSTR model for the prediction of toxicity of 206 phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis. A multiple linear regression (MLR)-based QSTR was obtained using a powerful descriptor selection tool named Memorized_ACO algorithm. Statistical parameters of the model were 0.72 and 0.68 for Rtraining(2) and Rtest(2), respectively. To develop a high-quality QSTR model, classification and regression tree (CART) was employed. Two approaches were considered: (1) phenols were classified into different modes of action using CART and (2) the phenols in the training set were partitioned to several subsets by a tree in such a manner that in each subset, a high-quality MLR could be developed. For the first approach, the statistical parameters of the resultant QSTR model were improved to 0.83 and 0.75 for Rtraining(2) and Rtest(2), respectively. Genetic algorithm was employed in the second approach to obtain an optimal tree, and it was shown that the final QSTR model provided excellent prediction accuracy for the training and test sets (Rtraining(2) and Rtest(2) were 0.91 and 0.93, respectively). The mean absolute error for the test set was computed as 0.1615.

  16. Approaches in the risk assessment of genetically modified foods by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzakas, Theodoros H; Chryssochoidis, G; Argyropoulos, D

    2007-04-01

    Risk analysis has become important to assess conditions and take decisions on control procedures. In this context it is considered a prerequisite in the evaluation of GM food. Many consumers worldwide worry that food derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be unhealthy and hence regulations on GMO authorisations and labelling have become more stringent. Nowadays there is a higher demand for non-GM products and these products could be differentiated from GM products using the identity preservation system (IP) that could apply throughout the grain processing system. IP is the creation of a transparent communication system that encompasses HACCP, traceability and related systems in the supply chain. This process guarantees that certain characteristics of the lots of food (non-GM origin) are maintained "from farm to fork". This article examines the steps taken by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority to examine the presence of GMOs in foods. The whole integrated European legislation framework currently in place still needs to be implemented in Greece. Penalties should be enforced to those who import, process GMOs without special licence and do not label those products. Similar penalties should be enforced to those companies that issue false certificates beyond the liabilities taken by the food enterprises for farmers' compensation. We argue that Greece has no serious reasons to choose the use of GMOs due to the fact that the structural and pedologic characteristics of the Greek agriculture favour the biological and integrated cultivation more. Greece is not in favour of the politics behind coexistence of conventional and GM plants and objects to the use of GMOs in the food and the environment because the processor has a big burden in terms of money, time and will suffer a great deal in order to prove that their products are GMO free or that any contamination is adventitious or technically unavoidable. Moreover, Greece owns a large variety of genetic

  17. Inquiry guided learning in a chemical engineering core curriculum: General instructional approach and specific application to the fluid mechanics case

    OpenAIRE

    Atilhan, Mert; Eljack, Fadwa; Alfadala, Hassan; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud; Mahalec, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from a preliminary study of the effectiveness of using inquiry-guided learning instructional strategies both in chemical engineering classrooms and laboratories. For readers unfamiliar with the instructional strategy, the paper describes the general approach and then reports on results of its application for the fluid mechanics course taken by undergraduate students in the Chemical Engineering Department at Qatar University. Inquiry-guided activities were developed...

  18. Carbonado: Physical and chemical properties, a critical evaluation of proposed origins, and a revised genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Stephen E.

    2014-03-01

    Carbonado-diamond is the most controversial of all diamond types and is found only in Brazil, and the Central African Republic (Bangui). Neither an affinity to Earth's mantle, nor an origin in the crust can be unequivocally established. Carbonado-diamond is at least 3.8 Ga old, an age about 0.5 Ga older than the oldest diamonds yet reported in kimberlites and lamproites on Earth. Derived from Neo- to Mid-Proterozoic meta-conglomerates, the primary magmatic host rock has not been identified. Discovered in 1841, the material is polycrystalline, robust and coke-like, and is best described as a strongly bonded micro-diamond ceramic. It is characteristically porous, which precludes an origin at high pressures and high temperatures in Earth's deep interior, yet it is also typically patinated, with a glass-like surface that resembles melting. With exotic inclusions of highly reduced metals, carbides, and nitrides the origin of carbonado-diamond is made even more challenging. But the challenge is important because a new diamondiferous host rock may be involved, and the development of a new physical process for generating diamond is possibly assured. The combination of micro-crystals and random crystal orientation leads to extreme mechanical toughness, and a predicable super-hardness. The physical and chemical properties of carbonado are described with a view to the development of a mimetic strategy to synthesize carbonado and to duplicate its extreme toughness and super-hardness. Textural variations are described with an emphasis on melt-like surface features, not previously discussed in the literature, but having a very clear bearing on the history and genesis of carbonado. Selected physical properties are presented and the proposed origins, diverse in character and imaginatively novel, are critically reviewed. From our present knowledge of the dynamic Earth, all indications are that carbonado is unlikely to be of terrestrial origin. A revised model for the origin of

  19. Review of laboratory-based terrestrial bioaccumulation assessment approaches for organic chemicals: Current status and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Robert; Huggett, Duane; Brasfield, Sandra; Brown, Becky; Embry, Michelle; Fairbrother, Anne; Kivi, Michelle; Paumen, Miriam Leon; Prosser, Ryan; Salvito, Dan; Scroggins, Rick

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, interest has been renewed in approaches for the assessment of the bioaccumulation potential of chemicals, principally driven by the need to evaluate large numbers of chemicals as part of new chemical legislation, while reducing vertebrate test organism use called for in animal welfare legislation. This renewed interest has inspired research activities and advances in bioaccumulation science for neutral organic chemicals in aquatic environments. In January 2013, ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute convened experts to identify the state of the science and existing shortcomings in terrestrial bioaccumulation assessment of neutral organic chemicals. Potential modifications to existing laboratory methods were identified, including areas in which new laboratory approaches or test methods could be developed to address terrestrial bioaccumulation. The utility of "non-ecotoxicity" data (e.g., mammalian laboratory data) was also discussed. The highlights of the workshop discussions are presented along with potential modifications in laboratory approaches and new test guidelines that could be used for assessing the bioaccumulation of chemicals in terrestrial organisms.

  20. Transportable, Chemical Genetic Methodology for the Small Molecule-Mediated Inhibition of Heat Shock Factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher L; Dewal, Mahender B; Nekongo, Emmanuel E; Santiago, Sebasthian; Lu, Nancy B; Levine, Stuart S; Shoulders, Matthew D

    2016-01-15

    Proteostasis in the cytosol is governed by the heat shock response. The master regulator of the heat shock response, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and key chaperones whose levels are HSF1-regulated have emerged as high-profile targets for therapeutic applications ranging from protein misfolding-related disorders to cancer. Nonetheless, a generally applicable methodology to selectively and potently inhibit endogenous HSF1 in a small molecule-dependent manner in disease model systems remains elusive. Also problematic, the administration of even highly selective chaperone inhibitors often has the side effect of activating HSF1 and thereby inducing a compensatory heat shock response. Herein, we report a ligand-regulatable, dominant negative version of HSF1 that addresses these issues. Our approach, which required engineering a new dominant negative HSF1 variant, permits dosable inhibition of endogenous HSF1 with a selective small molecule in cell-based model systems of interest. The methodology allows us to uncouple the pleiotropic effects of chaperone inhibitors and environmental toxins from the concomitantly induced compensatory heat shock response. Integration of our method with techniques to activate HSF1 enables the creation of cell lines in which the cytosolic proteostasis network can be up- or down-regulated by orthogonal small molecules. Selective, small molecule-mediated inhibition of HSF1 has distinctive implications for the proteostasis of both chaperone-dependent globular proteins and aggregation-prone intrinsically disordered proteins. Altogether, this work provides critical methods for continued exploration of the biological roles of HSF1 and the therapeutic potential of heat shock response modulation.

  1. Effects of genetic mutations and chemical exposures on Caenorhabditis elegans feeding: evaluation of a novel, high-throughput screening assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy A Boyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Government agencies have defined a need to reduce, refine or replace current mammalian-based bioassays with testing methods that use alternative species. Invertebrate species, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, provide an attractive option because of their short life cycles, inexpensive maintenance, and high degree of evolutionary conservation with higher eukaryotes. The C. elegans pharynx is a favorable model for studying neuromuscular function, and the effects of chemicals on neuromuscular activity, i.e., feeding. Current feeding methodologies, however, are labor intensive and only semi-quantitative. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here a high-throughput assay is described that uses flow cytometry to measure C. elegans feeding by determining the size and intestinal fluorescence of hundreds of nematodes after exposure to fluorescent-labeled microspheres. This assay was validated by quantifying fluorescence in feeding-defective C. elegans (eat mutants, and by exposing wild-type nematodes to the neuroactive compounds, serotonin and arecoline. The eat mutations previously determined to cause slow pumping rates exhibited the lowest feeding levels with our assay. Concentration-dependent increases in feeding levels after serotonin exposures were dependent on food availability, while feeding levels decreased in arecoline-exposed nematodes regardless of the presence of food. The effects of the environmental contaminants, cadmium chloride and chlorpyrifos, on wild-type C. elegans feeding were then used to demonstrate an application of the feeding assay. Cadmium exposures above 200 microM led to a sharp drop in feeding levels. Feeding of chlorpyrifos-exposed nematodes decreased in a concentration-dependent fashion with an EC(50 of 2 microM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C. elegans fluorescence microsphere feeding assay is a rapid, reliable method for the assessment of neurotoxic effects of pharmaceutical drugs, industrial chemicals or

  2. The Chemical and Genetic Characteristics of Szechuan Pepper (Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum) Cultivars and Their Suitable Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Liu, Yue; Xie, Caixiang; Li, Xiwen; Yu, Yadong; Ye, Meng; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Szechuan peppers, famous for their unique sensation and flavor, are widely used as a food additive and traditional herbal medicine. Zanthoxylum bungeanum and Z. armatum are both commonly recognized as Szechuan peppers, but they have different tastes and effects. The chemical components, genetic characteristics, and suitable habitat of six cultivars were analyzed in this study. The results indicated that Z. armatum contained a larger proportion of volatile oil, whereas Z. bungeanum produced a more non-volatile ether extraction. The average content of volatile oil and non-volatile ether extract of Z. armatum were 11.84 and 11.63%, respectively, and the average content of volatile oil and non-volatile ether extract of Z. bungeanum were 6.46 and 14.23%, respectively. Combined with an internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequence characters and chemical PCA results, six cultivars were classified into their own groups, for the two species in particular. The temperature in January and July were the most significant ecological factors influencing the contents of the Z. armatum volatile oil. However, annual precipitation, temperature in January and relevant humidity had a significant positive correlation with the content of non-volatile ether extract in Z. bungeanum. Thus, the most suitable areas for producing Z. bungeanum cultivars ranged from the Hengduan Mountains to the Ta-pa Mountains, and the regions suitable for Z. armatum cultivars were found to be in the Sichuan Basin and Dalou-Wu mountains. The predicted suitable habitat could be used as a preliminary test area for Szechuan pepper cultivar production.

  3. The Ehrenfest force topology: a physically intuitive approach for analyzing chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Julio R; Jenkins, Samantha; Kirk, Steven R; Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W

    2013-11-07

    Modified ANO-RCC basis sets are used to determine twelve molecular graphs of the Ehrenfest force for H2, CH4, CH2O, CH3NO, C2H2, C2H4, C3H3NO, N4H4, H2O, (H2O)2, (H2O)4 and (H2O)6. The molecular graphs include all types of topological critical points and a mix of bonding types is chosen to include sigma-, π- and hydrogen-bonding. We then compare a wide range of point properties: charge density, trace of the Hessian, eigenvalues, ellipticity, stiffness, total local energy and the eigenvectors are calculated at the bond critical points (BCPs) and compared for the Ehrenfest, QTAIM and stress tensor schemes. QTAIM is found to be the only partitioning scheme that can differentiate between shared- and closed-shell chemical bond types. Only the results from the Ehrenfest force partitioning, however, are demonstrated to be physically intuitive. This is demonstrated for the water molecule, the water-dimer and the water clusters (H2O)4 and (H2O)6. In particular, both the stiffness and the trace of the Hessians of the appropriate quantities of the sigma-bond BCPs for the water clusters are found to depend on the quantum topology dimension of the molecular graph. The behavior of all the stress tensor point properties is found to be erratic. This is explained by the ambiguity in the theoretical definition of the stress tensor. As a complementary approach the Ehrenfest force provides a new indicator of the mixed chemical character of the hydrogen-bond BCP, which arises from the collinear donor sigma-bond donating a degree of covalent character to the hydrogen-bond. This indicator takes the form of the relative orientation of the shallowest direction of the Ehrenfest potential of the hydrogen-bond BCPs and the corresponding direction for the collinear sigma-bond BCP.

  4. Determination of contact maps in proteins: A combination of structural and chemical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: mc@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Gómez-Sicilia, Àngel [Instituto Cajal, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Av. Doctor Arce, 37, 28002 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), C/Faraday 9, 28049 Cantoblanco (Madrid) (Spain)

    2015-12-28

    Contact map selection is a crucial step in structure-based molecular dynamics modelling of proteins. The map can be determined in many different ways. We focus on the methods in which residues are represented as clusters of effective spheres. One contact map, denoted as overlap (OV), is based on the overlap of such spheres. Another contact map, named Contacts of Structural Units (CSU), involves the geometry in a different way and, in addition, brings chemical considerations into account. We develop a variant of the CSU approach in which we also incorporate Coulombic effects such as formation of the ionic bridges and destabilization of possible links through repulsion. In this way, the most essential and well defined contacts are identified. The resulting residue-residue contact map, dubbed repulsive CSU (rCSU), is more sound in its physico-chemical justification than CSU. It also provides a clear prescription for validity of an inter-residual contact: the number of attractive atomic contacts should be larger than the number of repulsive ones — a feature that is not present in CSU. However, both of these maps do not correlate well with the experimental data on protein stretching. Thus, we propose to use rCSU together with the OV map. We find that the combined map, denoted as OV+rCSU, performs better than OV. In most situations, OV and OV+rCSU yield comparable folding properties but for some proteins rCSU provides contacts which improve folding in a substantial way. We discuss the likely residue-specificity of the rCSU contacts. Finally, we make comparisons to the recently proposed shadow contact map, which is derived from different principles.

  5. Developing educational resources for population genetics in R: An open and collaborative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The R computing and statistical language community has developed a myriad of resources for conducting populations genetic analyses. However, resources for learning how to carry out population genetic analyses in R are scattered and often incomplete, which can make acquiring this skill unnecessarily ...

  6. Determinants of primary open-angle glaucoma : a genetic-epidemiologic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A.A. Hulsman

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn the first part of this thesis, potential environmental and genetic risk factors for POAG are examined in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study among subjects 55 years and older. In its second part, the population of a genetic isolate is investigated, using a

  7. Genetic and environmental influences on the longitudinal structure of neuroticism: a trait-state approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laceulle, Odilia M; Ormel, Johan; Aggen, Steven H; Neale, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we sought to elucidate both stable and changing factors in the longitudinal structure of neuroticism using a behavioral genetic twin design. We tested whether this structure is best accounted for by a trait-state, a trait-only, or a state-only model. In line with classic views on personality, our results revealed substantial trait and state components. The contributions of genetic and environmental influences on the trait component were nearly equal, whereas environmental influences on the state component were much stronger than genetic influences. Although the overall findings were similar for older and younger twins, genetic influences on the trait component were stronger than environmental influences in younger twins, whereas the opposite was found for older twins. The current findings help to elucidate how the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors contributes to both stability and change in neuroticism.

  8. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases.

  9. Genetic and molecular bases of yield-associated traits: a translational biology approach between rice and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluru, Ravi; Reynolds, Matthew P; Salse, Jerome

    2014-07-01

    Transferring the knowledge bases between related species may assist in enlarging the yield potential of crop plants. Being cereals, rice and wheat share a high level of gene conservation; however, they differ at metabolic levels as a part of the environmental adaptation resulting in different yield capacities. This review focuses on the current understanding of genetic and molecular regulation of yield-associated traits in both crop species, highlights the similarities and differences and presents the putative knowledge gaps. We focus on the traits associated with phenology, photosynthesis, and assimilate partitioning and lodging resistance; the most important drivers of yield potential. Currently, there are large knowledge gaps in the genetic and molecular control of such major biological processes that can be filled in a translational biology approach in transferring genomics and genetics informations between rice and wheat.

  10. A bio-cultural approach to the study of food choice: The contribution of taste genetics, population and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide S; Giuliani, Cristina; Antinucci, Marco; Morini, Gabriella; Garagnani, Paolo; Tofanelli, Sergio; Luiselli, Donata

    2017-03-31

    The study of food choice, one of the most complex human traits, requires an integrated approach that takes into account environmental, socio-cultural and biological diversity. We recruited 183 volunteers from four geo-linguistic groups and highly diversified in terms of both genetic background and food habits from whom we collected genotypes and phenotypes tightly linked to taste perception. We confirmed previous genetic associations, in particular with stevioside perception, and noted significant differences in food consumption: in particular, broccoli, mustard and beer consumption scores were significantly higher (Adjusted P = 0.02, Adjusted P groups. Licorice and Parmesan cheese showed lower consumption and liking scores in the Sri Lankan group (Adjusted P = 0.001 and Adjusted P contribution of genetics, population diversity and cultural aspects in taste perception and food consumption.

  11. Chewing the fat: genetic approaches to model dyslipidemia-induced diabetic neuropathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilford, B L; Wright, D E

    2013-10-01

    Emerging clinical evidence now suggests that dyslipidemia may be strongly linked with the development and progression of neuropathy in diabetic patients, and dyslipidemia is considered an important risk factor for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, because of important species differences, current animal models fall short of accurately replicating human diabetic dyslipidemia. Rodents resist expansion in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and typically maintain or increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), despite prolonged high-fat feeding. Here, we discuss the findings of Hinder et al., in which they utilized novel genetic experimental approaches to develop a diabetic mouse model with human-like dyslipidemia. The authors created a mouse with an apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout in conjunction with a leptin receptor mutation. A triple mutant mouse with both ApoE and apolipoprotein B48 knockout and leptin deficiency was also created in an effort to generate a model of diabetic dyslipidemia that better mimics the human condition. The long-term goal of these studies is to develop more faithful models to address how hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia may drive the development and progression of neuropathy. Hinder and colleagues were successful at creating a diabetic mouse model with severe hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and a significant increase in the total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio. This work was successful in establishing a model of diabetic dyslipidemia that more closely emulates the poor lipid profile observed in human diabetic patients with neuropathy. This commentary will also review current models used to study the effects of dyslipidemia on diabetic neuropathy and highlight a proposed mechanism for the role of dyslipidemia in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

  12. Genetic programming approach on evaporation losses and its effect on climate change for Vaipar Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S.Kasiviswanathan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is the major problem that every human being is facing over the world. The rise in fossil fuel usage increases the emission of `greenhouse' gases, particularly carbon dioxide continuously into the earth's atmosphere. This causes a rise in the amount of heat from the sun withheld in the earth's atmosphere that would normally radiated back into space. This increase in heat has led to the greenhouse effect, resulting in climate change and rise in temperature along with other climatological parameters directly affects evaporation losses. Accurate modelling and forecasting of these evaporation losses are important for preventing further effects due to climate change. Evaporation is purely non-linear and varying both spatially and temporally. This needs suitable data driven approach to model and should have the ability to take care of all these non-linear behaviour of the system. As such, though there are many empirical and analytical models suggested in the literature for the estimation of evaporation losses, such models should be used with care and caution. Further, difficulties arise in obtaining all the climatological data used in a given analytical or empirical model. Genetic programming (GP is one such technique applied where the non-linearity exist. GP has the flexible mathematical structure which is capable of identifying the non-linear relationship between input and output data sets. Thus, it is easy to construct 'local' models for estimating evaporation losses. The performance of GP model is compared with Thornthwaite method, and results from the study indicate that the GP model performed better than the Thornthwaite method. Forecasting of meteorological parameters such as temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity has been performed using Markovian chain series analysis subsequently it is used to estimate the future evaporation losses using developed GP model. Finally the effect of possible future climate change on

  13. A genetic approach for investigating vagal sensory roles in regulation of gastrointestinal function and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward Alan

    2006-06-30

    Sensory innervation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by the vagus nerve plays important roles in regulation of GI function and feeding behavior. This innervation is composed of a large number of sensory pathways, each arising from a different population of sensory receptors. Progress in understanding the functions of these pathways has been impeded by their close association with vagal efferent, sympathetic, and enteric systems, which makes it difficult to selectively label or manipulate them. We suggest that a genetic approach may overcome these barriers. To illustrate the potential value of this strategy, as well as to gain insights into its application, investigations of CNS pathways and peripheral tissues involved in energy balance that benefited from the use of gene manipulations are reviewed. Next, our studies examining the feasibility of using mutations of developmental genes for manipulating individual vagal afferent pathways are reviewed. These experiments characterized mechanoreceptor morphology, density and distribution, and feeding patterns in four viable mutant mouse strains. In each strain a single population of vagal mechanoreceptors innervating the muscle wall of the GI tract was altered, and was associated with selective effects on feeding patterns, thus supporting the feasibility of this strategy. However, two limitations of this approach must be addressed for it to achieve its full potential. First, mutation effects in tissues outside the GI tract can contribute to changes in GI function or feeding. Additionally, knockouts of developmental genes are often lethal, preventing analysis of mature innervation and ingestive behavior. To address these issues, we propose to develop conditional gene knockouts restricted to specific GI tract tissues. Two genes of interest are brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which are essential for vagal afferent development. Creating conditional knockouts of these genes requires

  14. Chemical Genetics Identify eIF2α Kinase Heme Regulated Inhibitor as Anti-Cancer Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Ozel, Duygu; Qiao, Yuan; Harbinski, Fred; Chen, Limo; Denoyelle, Séverine; He, Xiaoying; Zvereva, Nela; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Chorev, Michael; Halperin, Jose A.; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2013-01-01

    Translation initiation plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation and malignant transformation. Consistently, increasing the abundance of the eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAi translation initiation complex transforms normal cells and contributes to cancer initiation and the severity of some anemia. The chemical modifiers of the eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAi ternary complex are therefore invaluable tools for studying its role in the pathobiology of human disorders and for determining if this complex can be pharmacologically targeted for therapeutic purposes. Using a cell based assay, we identified N,N’-diarylureas as novel inhibitors of the ternary complex abundance. Direct functional-genetics and biochemical evidence demonstrated that the N,N’-diarylureas activate heme regulated inhibitor kinase, thereby phosphorylate eIF2α and reduce abundance of the ternary complex. Using tumor cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo as paradigms, we demonstrate that N,N’-diarylureas are potent and specific tools for studying the role eIF2·GTP·Met-tRNAi ternary complex in the pathobiology of human disorders. PMID:21765405

  15. The potential of computer-based quantitative structure activity approaches for predicting acute toxicity of chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvinavashe, E.

    2008-01-01

    Within the EU, the management of the risks of chemicals currently falls under a new legislation called Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH). Within the next 10 years, existing (eco)toxicological data gaps for the more than 100 000 chemicals on the European Inventory of E

  16. An approach to modeling coupled thermal-hydraulic-chemical processes in geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palguta, Jennifer; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Hickman, Stephen H.; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between hydrothermal fluids and rock alter mineralogy, leading to the formation of secondary minerals and potentially significant physical and chemical property changes. Reactive transport simulations are essential for evaluating the coupled processes controlling the geochemical, thermal and hydrological evolution of geothermal systems. The objective of this preliminary investigation is to successfully replicate observations from a series of hydrothermal laboratory experiments [Morrow et al., 2001] using the code TOUGHREACT. The laboratory experiments carried out by Morrow et al. [2001] measure permeability reduction in fractured and intact Westerly granite due to high-temperature fluid flow through core samples. Initial permeability and temperature values used in our simulations reflect these experimental conditions and range from 6.13 × 10−20 to 1.5 × 10−17 m2 and 150 to 300 °C, respectively. The primary mineralogy of the model rock is plagioclase (40 vol.%), K-feldspar (20 vol.%), quartz (30 vol.%), and biotite (10 vol.%). The simulations are constrained by the requirement that permeability, relative mineral abundances, and fluid chemistry agree with experimental observations. In the models, the granite core samples are represented as one-dimensional reaction domains. We find that the mineral abundances, solute concentrations, and permeability evolutions predicted by the models are consistent with those observed in the experiments carried out by Morrow et al. [2001] only if the mineral reactive surface areas decrease with increasing clay mineral abundance. This modeling approach suggests the importance of explicitly incorporating changing mineral surface areas into reactive transport models.

  17. Chemical and Enzymatic Approaches to Carbohydrate-Derived Spiroketals: Di-D-Fructose Dianhydrides (DFAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. García Fernández

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Di-D-fructose dianhydrides (DFAs comprise a unique family of stereoisomeric spiro-tricyclic disaccharides formed upon thermal and/or acidic activation of sucroseand/ or D-fructose-rich materials. The recent discovery of the presence of DFAs in food products and their remarkable nutritional features has attracted considerable interest from the food industry. DFAs behave as low-caloric sweeteners and have proven to exert beneficial prebiotic nutritional functions, favouring the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. In the era of functional foods, investigation of the beneficial properties of DFAs has become an important issue. However, the complexity of the DFA mixtures formed during caramelization or roasting of carbohydrates by traditional procedures (up to 14 diastereomeric spiroketal cores makes evaluation of their individual properties a difficult challenge. Great effort has gone into the development of efficient procedures to obtain DFAs in pure form at laboratory and industrial scale. This paper is devoted to review the recent advances in the stereoselective synthesis of DFAs by means of chemical and enzymatic approaches, their scope, limitations, and complementarities.

  18. Predicting dissolved oxygen concentration using kernel regression modeling approaches with nonlinear hydro-chemical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2014-05-01

    Kernel function-based regression models were constructed and applied to a nonlinear hydro-chemical dataset pertaining to surface water for predicting the dissolved oxygen levels. Initial features were selected using nonlinear approach. Nonlinearity in the data was tested using BDS statistics, which revealed the data with nonlinear structure. Kernel ridge regression, kernel principal component regression, kernel partial least squares regression, and support vector regression models were developed using the Gaussian kernel function and their generalization and predictive abilities were compared in terms of several statistical parameters. Model parameters were optimized using the cross-validation procedure. The proposed kernel regression methods successfully captured the nonlinear features of the original data by transforming it to a high dimensional feature space using the kernel function. Performance of all the kernel-based modeling methods used here were comparable both in terms of predictive and generalization abilities. Values of the performance criteria parameters suggested for the adequacy of the constructed models to fit the nonlinear data and their good predictive capabilities.

  19. Consequences of new approach of chemical stability tests of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena eJamrógiewicz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a great need of broaden look on stability tests of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs in comparison with current requirements contained in pharmacopoeia. By usage of many modern analytical methods the conception of monitoring the changes of APIs during initial stage of their exposure to harmful factors has been developed. New knowledge must be acquired in terms of identification of each degradation products, especially volatile ones. Further research as toxicology prediction during in silico studies of determined and identified degradation products is necessary. In silico methods are known as computational toxicology or computer-assisted technologies which are used for predicting toxicology of pharmaceutical substances such as impurities or degradation products. This is a specialized software and databases intended to calculate probability of genotoxicity or mutagenicity of these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. Applying of new analytical approach is proposed as the usage of PAT tools, XRD, HS-SPME GC-MS/MS, LC-MS/MS for stability testing. Described improvements should be taken into account in case of each drug existing already in the market as well as being implemented as new one.

  20. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A;

    2012-01-01

    pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associations with fasting insulin and glucose on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown loci...... associated with fasting insulin at P role for these loci...... in insulin resistance pathways. The discovery of these loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology....

  1. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V., E-mail: e.kustova@spbu.ru [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr. 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M., E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • State-to-state approach for coupled vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions. • Self-consistent model for rates of non-equilibrium reactions and energy transitions. • In viscous flows mass action law is violated. • Cross coupling between reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure in viscous flow. • Results allow implementing the state-to-state approach for viscous flow simulations. - Abstract: Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman–Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N{sub 2} flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  2. A review of approaches to the detection of genetic damage in the human fetus.

    OpenAIRE

    Everson, R B

    1987-01-01

    Studies in experimental animals suggest links between genetic damage to the fetus and the etiology of several disorders, including fetal loss, teratogenesis, and cancer. Methods for measuring genetic damage directly in the human fetus could provide epidemiologists and clinical researchers with powerful tools for investigating similar associations in humans. Current methods potentially available for such studies include assays for mutagenic substances in human body fluids and for measuring mod...

  3. A Promising Approach to Gene Confinement and Breeding for Genetically Modified Bioenergy Crops

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Advanced genetic and biotechnology tools will be required to realize the full potential of food and bioenergy crops. Given current regulatory concerns, many transgenic traits might never be deregulated for commercial release without a robust gene confinement strategy in place. The potential for transgene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops is widely known. Pollen-mediated transfer is a major component of gene flow in flowering plants and therefore a potential avenue for the escape of tr...

  4. A genetic-algorithm approach for assessing the liquefaction potential of sandy soils

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, G.; Akyol, E.

    2010-01-01

    The determination of liquefaction potential is required to take into account a large number of parameters, which creates a complex nonlinear structure of the liquefaction phenomenon. The conventional methods rely on simple statistical and empirical relations or charts. However, they cannot characterise these complexities. Genetic algorithms are suited to solve these types of problems. A genetic algorithm-based model has been developed to determine the liquefaction potential by confirming Cone...

  5. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo.

  6. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang eShen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association studies (GWASs. More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWASs. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, such as immunoregulatory function, melanocyte regulation and so on. A number of susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in vitiligo development.

  7. Retroviral Transduction of Helper T Cells as a Genetic Approach to Study Mechanisms Controlling their Differentiation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Garden, Oliver A.; Lang, Florian; Cobb, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Helper T cell development and function must be tightly regulated to induce an appropriate immune response that eliminates specific pathogens yet prevents autoimmunity. Many approaches involving different model organisms have been utilized to understand the mechanisms controlling helper T cell development and function. However, studies using mouse models have proven to be highly informative due to the availability of genetic, cellular, and biochemical systems. One genetic approach in mice used by many labs involves retroviral transduction of primary helper T cells. This is a powerful approach due to its relative ease, making it accessible to almost any laboratory with basic skills in molecular biology and immunology. Therefore, multiple genes in wild type or mutant forms can readily be tested for function in helper T cells to understand their importance and mechanisms of action. We have optimized this approach and describe here the protocols for production of high titer retroviruses, isolation of primary murine helper T cells, and their transduction by retroviruses and differentiation toward the different helper subsets. Finally, the use of this approach is described in uncovering mechanisms utilized by microRNAs (miRNAs) to regulate pathways controlling helper T cell development and function. PMID:27842353

  8. Chemical and engineering approaches to enable organic field-effect transistors for electronic skin applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Bettinger, Christopher J; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2012-03-20

    Skin is the body's largest organ and is responsible for the transduction of a vast amount of information. This conformable material simultaneously collects signals from external stimuli that translate into information such as pressure, pain, and temperature. The development of an electronic material, inspired by the complexity of this organ is a tremendous, unrealized engineering challenge. However, the advent of carbon-based electronics may offer a potential solution to this long-standing problem. In this Account, we describe the use of an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) architecture to transduce mechanical and chemical stimuli into electrical signals. In developing this mimic of human skin, we thought of the sensory elements of the OFET as analogous to the various layers and constituents of skin. In this fashion, each layer of the OFET can be optimized to carry out a specific recognition function. The separation of multimodal sensing among the components of the OFET may be considered a "divide and conquer" approach, where the electronic skin (e-skin) can take advantage of the optimized chemistry and materials properties of each layer. This design of a novel microstructured gate dielectric has led to unprecedented sensitivity for tactile pressure events. Typically, pressure-sensitive components within electronic configurations have suffered from a lack of sensitivity or long mechanical relaxation times often associated with elastomeric materials. Within our method, these components are directly compatible with OFETs and have achieved the highest reported sensitivity to date. Moreover, the tactile sensors operate on a time scale comparable with human skin, making them ideal candidates for integration as synthetic skin devices. The methodology is compatible with large-scale fabrication and employs simple, commercially available elastomers. The design of materials within the semiconductor layer has led to the incorporation of selectivity and sensitivity within

  9. Chemical reaction rates and non-equilibrium pressure of reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    Viscous gas flows with vibrational relaxation and chemical reactions in the state-to-state approach are analyzed. A modified Chapman-Enskog method is used for the determination of chemical reaction and vibrational transition rates and non-equilibrium pressure. Constitutive equations depend on the thermodynamic forces: velocity divergence and chemical reaction/transition affinity. As an application, N2 flow with vibrational relaxation across a shock wave is investigated. Two distinct processes occur behind the shock: for small values of the distance the affinity is large and vibrational relaxation is in its initial stage; for large distances the affinity is small and the chemical reaction is in its final stage. The affinity contributes more to the transition rate than the velocity divergence and the effect of these two contributions are more important for small distances from the shock front. For the non-equilibrium pressure, the term associated with the bulk viscosity increases by a small amount the hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  11. Chemical genetic inhibition of Mps1 in stable human cell lines reveals novel aspects of Mps1 function in mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tale Sliedrecht

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proper execution of chromosome segregation relies on tight control of attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. This is monitored by the mitotic checkpoint that allows chromosome segregation only when all chromosomes are stably attached. Proper functioning of the attachment and checkpoint processes is thus important to prevent chromosomal instability. Both processes rely on the mitotic kinase Mps1. PRINCIPAL FINDING: We present here two cell lines in which endogenous Mps1 has been stably replaced with a mutant kinase (Mps1-as that is specifically inhibited by bulky PP1 analogs. Mps1 inhibition in these cell lines is highly penetrant and reversible. Timed inhibition during bipolar spindle assembly shows that Mps1 is critical for attachment error-correction and confirms its role in Aurora B regulation. We furthermore show that Mps1 has multiple controls over mitotic checkpoint activity. Mps1 inhibition precludes Mad1 localization to unattached kinetochores but also accelerates mitosis. This acceleration correlates with absence of detectable mitotic checkpoint complex after Mps1 inhibition. Finally, we show that short-term inhibition of Mps1 catalytic activity is sufficient to kill cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mps1 is involved in the regulation of multiple key processes that ensure correct chromosome segregation and is a promising target for inhibition in anti-cancer strategies. We report here two cell lines that allow specific and highly penetrant inhibition of Mps1 in a reproducible manner through the use of chemical genetics. Using these cell lines we confirm previously suggested roles for Mps1 activity in mitosis, present evidence for novel functions and examine cell viability after short and prolonged Mps1 inhibition. These cell lines present the best cellular model system to date for investigations into Mps1 biology and the effects of penetrance and duration of Mps1 inhibition on cell viability.

  12. Characterization of pellicle inhibition in Gluconacetobacter xylinus 53582 by a small molecule, pellicin, identified by a chemical genetics screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice L Strap

    Full Text Available Pellicin ([2E]-3-phenyl-1-[2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,6-benzodioxocin-8-yl]prop-2-en-1-one was identified in a chemical genetics screen of 10,000 small molecules for its ability to completely abolish pellicle production in Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Cells grown in the presence of pellicin grew 1.5 times faster than untreated cells. Interestingly, growth in pellicin also caused G. xylinus cells to elongate. Measurement of cellulose synthesis in vitro showed that cellulose synthase activity was not directly inhibited by pellicin. Rather, when cellulose synthase activity was measured in cells that were pre-treated with the compound, the rate of cellulose synthesis increased eight-fold over that observed for untreated cells. This phenomenon was also apparent in the rapid production of cellulose when cells grown in the presence of pellicin were washed and transferred to media lacking the inhibitor. The rate at which cellulose was produced could not be accounted for by growth of the organism. Pellicin was not detected when intracellular contents were analyzed. Furthermore, it was found that pellicin exerts its effect extracellularly by interfering with the crystallization of pre-cellulosic tactoidal aggregates. This interference of the crystallization process resulted in enhanced production of cellulose II as evidenced by the ratio of acid insoluble to acid soluble product in in vitro assays and confirmed in vivo by scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The relative crystallinity index, RCI, of pellicle produced by untreated G. xylinus cultures was 70% while pellicin-grown cultures had RCI of 38%. Mercerized pellicle of untreated cells had RCI of 42%, which further confirms the mechanism of action of pellicin as an inhibitor of the cellulose I crystallization process. Pellicin is a useful tool for the study of cellulose biosynthesis in G. xylinus.

  13. Reverse and conventional chemical ecology approaches for the development of oviposition attractants for Culex mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter S Leal

    Full Text Available Synthetic mosquito oviposition attractants are sorely needed for surveillance and control programs for Culex species, which are major vectors of pathogens causing various human diseases, including filariasis, encephalitis, and West Nile encephalomyelitis. We employed novel and conventional chemical ecology approaches to identify potential attractants, which were demonstrated in field tests to be effective for monitoring populations of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus in human dwellings. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that an odorant-binding protein from this species, CquiOBP1, is expressed in trichoid sensilla on the antennae, including short, sharp-tipped trichoid sensilla type, which house an olfactory receptor neuron sensitive to a previously identified mosquito oviposition pheromone (MOP, 6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide. CquiOBP1 exists in monomeric and dimeric forms. Monomeric CquiOBP1 bound MOP in a pH-dependent manner, with a change in secondary structure apparently related to the loss of binding at low pH. The pheromone antipode showed higher affinity than the natural stereoisomer. By using both CquiOBP1 as a molecular target in binding assays and gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD, we identified nonanal, trimethylamine (TMA, and skatole as test compounds. Extensive field evaluations in Recife, Brazil, a region with high populations of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, showed that a combination of TMA (0.9 microg/l and nonanal (0.15 ng/microl is equivalent in attraction to the currently used infusion-based lure, and superior in that the offensive smell of infusions was eliminated in the newly developed synthetic mixture.

  14. Association between serotonin cumulative genetic score and the Behavioral Approach System (BAS): Moderation by early life environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Rahel; McGeary, John E; Beevers, Christopher G

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigates if genetic variation in the serotonergic system interacts with early adversity to predict changes in the Behavioral Approach System (BAS), a system that taps into reward processing. In a sample of community adults (N= 236) the influence of single serotonergic candidate polymorphisms on BAS was analyzed, we also examined the aggregate contribution of these genetic variants by creating a Cumulative Genetic Score (CGS). A CGS quantifies an individual's cumulative risk by aggregating the number of risk alleles across the candidate polymorphisms. After individual gene analysis, three candidate genes rs7305115 (TPH2), rs6311 (HTR2A), and rs6295 (HTR1A) were combined into the CGS. There were no significant interactions between individual candidate polymorphisms and childhood adversity, but the CGS interacted with childhood adversity to explain a significant amount of variance (11.6%) in the BAS. Findings suggest that genetic variations in the serotonergic system in combination with childhood adversity contribute to individual differences in reward sensitivity.

  15. An improved self-calibration approach based on adaptive genetic algorithm for position-based visual servo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding LIU; Xiongjun WU; Yanxi YANG

    2008-01-01

    An improved self-calibrating algorithm for visual servo based on adaptive genetic algorithm is proposed in this paper.Our approach introduces an extension of Mendonca-Cipolla and G.Chesi's self-calibration for the positionbased visual servo technique which exploits the singular value property of the essential matrix.Specifically,a suitable dynamic online cost function is generated according to the property of the three singular values.The visual servo process is carried out simultaneous to the dynamic self-calibration,and then the cost function is minirmzed using the adaptive genetic algorithm instead of the gradient descent method in G.Chesi's approach.Moreover,this method overcomes the limitation that the initial parameters must be selected close to the true value,which is not constant in many cases.It is not necessary to know exactly the camera intrinsic parameters when using our approach,instead,coarse coding bounds ot the five parameters are enough for the algorithm,which can be done once and for all off-line.Besides,this algorithm does not require knowledge of the 3D model of the object.Simulation experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate that the proposed approach provides a fast convergence speed and robustness against unpredictable perturbalaons of camera parameters,and it is an effective and efficient visual scrvo algorithm.

  16. AN APPROACH TO OPTIMIZE QOS ROUTING PROTOCOL USING GENETIC ALGORITHM IN MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Siwach

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Service support for Mobile Ad hoc Networks is an exigenttask due to dynamic topology and limited resource. To support QoS,the link state information such as delay, bandwidth, jitter, cost, errorrate and node energy in the network should be available andmanageable. QOS is one the basic requirement of a network andwhen we talk about the Mobile Network this is the highly constraintrequirement of a user. To improve the quality of service we usedifferent changes in MANET protocols, its parameter, routingalgorithm etc. The proposed work is to define a genetic based routingapproach to optimize the routing in MANETs. The genetic approachwill generate an optimized path on the basic of congestion over thenetwork. The result path will improve the data delivery over thenetwork. The focus of the paper is to study about MANET, QOS andtries to develop a network on which genetic algorithm is applied togenerate an optimized path.

  17. Genetic engineering of novel flower colors in floricultural plants: recent advances via transgenic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Since the first successful genetic engineering of flower color in petunia, several new techniques have been developed and applied to modify flower color not only in model plants but also in floricultural plants. A typical example is the commercial violet-flowered carnation "Moondust series" developed by Suntry Ltd. and Florigene Ltd. More recently, blue-flowered roses have been successfully produced and are expected to be commercially available in the near future. In recent years, successful modification of flower color by sophisticated regulation of flower-pigment metabolic pathways has become possible. In this chapter, we review recent advances in flower color modification by genetic engineering, especially focusing on the methodology. We have included our own recent results on successful production of flower-color-modified transgenic plants in a model plant, tobacco and an ornamental plant, gentian. Based on these results, genetic engineering of flower color for improvement of floricultural plants is discussed.

  18. Aptamers generated from cell-SELEX for molecular medicine: a chemical biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohong; Tan, Weihong

    2010-01-19

    Molecular medicine is an emerging field focused on understanding the molecular basis of diseases and translating this information into strategies for diagnosis and therapy. This approach could lead to personalized medical treatments. Currently, our ability to understand human diseases at the molecular level is limited by the lack of molecular tools to identify and characterize the distinct molecular features of the disease state, especially for diseases such as cancer. Among the new tools being developed by researchers including chemists, engineers, and other scientists is a new class of nucleic acid probes called aptamers, which are ssDNA/RNA molecules selected to target a wide range of molecules and even cells. In this Account, we will focus on the use of aptamers, generated from cell-based selections, as a novel molecular tool for cancer research. Cancers originate from mutations of human genes. These genetic alterations result in molecular changes to diseased cells, which, in turn, lead to changes in cell morphology and physiology. For decades, clinicians have diagnosed cancers primarily based on the morphology of tumor cells or tissues. However, this method does not always give an accurate diagnosis and does not allow clinicians to effectively assess the complex molecular alterations that are predictive of cancer progression. As genomics and proteomics do not yet allow a full access to this molecular knowledge, aptamer probes represent one effective and practical avenue toward this goal. One special feature of aptamers is that we can isolate them by selection against cancer cells without prior knowledge of the number and arrangement of proteins on the cellular surface. These probes can identify molecular differences between normal and tumor cells and can discriminate among tumor cells of different classifications, at different disease stages, or from different patients. This Account summarizes our recent efforts to develop aptamers through cell-SELEX for the

  19. Genetic evaluation of early egg production and maturation traits using two different approaches in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Khadiga, G; Mahmoud, B Y F; El-Full, E A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate a multi-trait selection program based on aggregated breeding values using an animal model Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) in Japanese quail. The estimated genetic gain was compared by both mixed model and least squares methods. Data of 1,682 female Japanese quails were collected through four consecutive generations to estimate genetic gain, depending on aggregated breeding values, for age at first egg (AFE), body weight at sexual maturity (BWSM), and days needed to produce the first ten eggs (DN10). Estimates of cumulative selection response were favorable for all the studied traits and significant for AFE (-3.03) and BWSM(10.38), but not significant for DN10(-0.15). Estimates of direct heritability were moderate for AFE (0.21) and BWSM(0.25) but low for DN10(0.08), while estimates of maternal heritability were moderate for AFE (0.19) but low for BWSM(0.04) and DN10(0.01). High (0.45 to 0.56) genetic and low (-0.01 to -0.18) phenotypic correlations were observed among the studied traits. Negative (-0.23 to -0.95) correlations between additive genetic and maternal genetic effects were observed for all traits. Genetic trends were -0.76 (P=0.031), 2.54 (P=0.037), and -0.06 (P=0.052) with calculated product-moment correlations between breeding values, estimated by BLUP and phenotypic selection methods, of 0.78 (P=0.002), 0.77 (P=0.004), and 0.61 (P=0.007) for AFE, BWSM, and DN10, respectively. Aggregated breeding value estimation based on animal model BLUP could be an effective method of constructing a selection program to achieve a favorable selection response in egg production traits in Japanese quail.

  20. Autism and genetics: Clinical approach and association study with two markers of HRAS gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herault, J.; Petit, E.; Cherpi, C. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Medicale, Tours (France)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    Twin studies and familial aggregation studies indicate that genetic factors could play a role in infantile autism. In an earlier study, we identified a possible positive association between autism and a c-Harvey-ras (HRAS) oncogene marker at the 3{prime} end of the coding region. In an attempt to confirm this finding, we studied a larger population, well-characterized clinically and genetically. We report a positive association between autism and two HRAS markers, the 3{prime} marker used in the initial study and an additional marker in exon 1. 46 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Bodies in skin: a philosophical and theological approach to genetic skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Angelika

    2010-03-01

    This contribution evolved from my work in a European network and is dedicated to the rare genetic skin diseases. To gain a deeper knowledge about the question, what it means to suffer from a genetic skin disease, I have discussed the concepts of skin in philosophical and theological anthropology. Presuming that ancient interpretations of skin diseases (moral and cultical impurity) are still relevant today, feminist Christian theology shows the ways of deconstructing stigmatizing paradigma by using the body as a hermeneutic category. Skin becomes the "open borderline" of the human being, pointing out both the social vulnerability and the transcendent capacity of the human person.

  2. An information-gain approach to detecting three-way epistatic interactions in genetic association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Ting; Chen, Yuanzhu; Kiralis, Jeff W;

    2013-01-01

    Background Epistasis has been historically used to describe the phenomenon that the effect of a given gene on a phenotype can be dependent on one or more other genes, and is an essential element for understanding the association between genetic and phenotypic variations. Quantifying epistasis....... In the tuberculosis data, we found a statistically significant pure three-way epistatic interaction effect that was stronger than any lower-order associations. Conclusion Our study provides a methodological basis for detecting and characterizing high-order gene-gene interactions in genetic association studies....

  3. Electromagnetic energy as a bridge between atomic and cellular levels in the genetics approach to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofani, Santi

    2015-01-01

    Literature on magnetic fields (MF) and gene expression, as well as on DNA damage, supports the hypothesis that electromagnetic energy may act at atomic level influencing genetic stability. According to quantum physics, MF act on the interconversion of singlet and triplet spin states, and therefore on genetic instability, activating oxidative processes connected to biological free radicals formation, particularly ROS. In the above frame, the results of in vitro and in vivo laboratory trials have been analyzed. The use of a static MF amplitude modulated by 50 Hz MF, with a time average total intensity of 5.5 mT, has been shown to influence tumor cell functions such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, p53 expression, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in animals, evidence that MF can be more effective than chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) in inhibiting metastatic spread and growth, having synergistic activity with chemotherapy (Cis-platin), and no observable side effects or toxicity in animals or in humans. The beneficial biological/clinical effects observed, without any adverse effects, have been confirmed by various authors and augur well for the potentiality of this new approach to treat genetically based diseases like cancer. Further studies are needed to develop a quantum physics approach to biology, allowing a stable bridge to be built between atomic and cellular levels, therefore developing quantum biology.

  4. A Computer Algebra Approach to Solving Chemical Equilibria in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalainoff, Melinda; Lachance, Russ; Riegner, Dawn; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report on a semester-long study of the incorporation into our general chemistry course, of advanced algebraic and computer algebra techniques for solving chemical equilibrium problems. The method presented here is an alternative to the commonly used concentration table method for describing chemical equilibria in general…

  5. A scalable machine-learning approach to recognize chemical names within large text databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wren Jonathan D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation The use or study of chemical compounds permeates almost every scientific field and in each of them, the amount of textual information is growing rapidly. There is a need to accurately identify chemical names within text for a number of informatics efforts such as database curation, report summarization, tagging of named entities and keywords, or the development/curation of reference databases. Results A first-order Markov Model (MM was evaluated for its ability to distinguish chemical names from words, yielding ~93% recall in recognizing chemical terms and ~99% precision in rejecting non-chemical terms on smaller test sets. However, because total false-positive events increase with the number of words analyzed, the scalability of name recognition was measured by processing 13.1 million MEDLINE records. The method yielded precision ranges from 54.7% to 100%, depending upon the cutoff score used, averaging 82.7% for approximately 1.05 million putative chemical terms extracted. Extracted chemical terms were analyzed to estimate the number of spelling variants per term, which correlated with the total number of times the chemical name appeared in MEDLINE. This variability in term construction was found to affect both information retrieval and term mapping when using PubMed and Ovid.

  6. Numerical Techniques for Chemical and Biological Engineers Using MATLAB A Simple Bifurcation Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Elnashaie, Said SEH; Affane, Chadia

    2007-01-01

    All reactive chemical and biological processes are highly nonlinear allowing for multiple steady states. This book addresses the bifurcation characteristics of chemical and biological processes as the general case and treats systems with a unique steady state as special cases. It includes a CD-ROM which contains nearly 100 MATLAB programs.

  7. Total synthesis approaches to natural product derivatives based on the combination of chemical synthesis and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschning, Andreas; Taft, Florian; Knobloch, Tobias

    2007-10-21

    Secondary metabolites are an extremely diverse and important group of natural products with industrial and biomedical implications. Advances in metabolic engineering of both native and heterologous secondary metabolite producing organisms have allowed the directed synthesis of desired novel products by exploiting their biosynthetic potentials. Metabolic engineering utilises knowledge of cellular metabolism to alter biosynthetic pathways. An important technique that combines chemical synthesis with metabolic engineering is mutasynthesis (mutational biosynthesis; MBS), which advanced from precursor-directed biosynthesis (PDB). Both techniques are based on the cellular uptake of modified biosynthetic intermediates and their incorporation into complex secondary metabolites. Mutasynthesis utilises genetically engineered organisms in conjunction with feeding of chemically modified intermediates. From a synthetic chemist's point of view the concept of mutasynthesis is highly attractive, as the method combines chemical expertise with Nature's synthetic machinery and thus can be exploited to rapidly create small libraries of secondary metabolites. However, in each case, the method has to be critically compared with semi- and total synthesis in terms of practicability and efficiency. Recent developments in metabolic engineering promise to further broaden the scope of outsourcing chemically demanding steps to biological systems.

  8. Poly(ADP-ribose)--a unique natural polymer structural features, biological role and approaches to the chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a natural polymer, taking part in numerous important cellular processes. Several enzymes are involved in biosynthesis and degradation of PAR. One of them, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is considered to be a perspective target for the design of new drugs, affecting PAR metabolism. The structure of PAR was established by enzymatic hydrolysis and further analysis of the products, but total chemical synthesis of PAR hasn't been described yet. Several approaches have been developed on the way to chemical synthesis of this unique biopolymer.

  9. Atomic modelling of crystal/complex fluid/crystal contacts—Part I. The genetic iterative multi-species (GIMS) approach and case of kaolinite/brine/kaolinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouanna, P.; Pèpe, G.; Dweik, J.; Gouze, P.

    2010-11-01

    Predicting the impact of underground engineering on the environment requires the knowledge of natural media at different scales. In particular, understanding basic phenomena controlling the properties of rocks in the presence of complex fluids necessitates a detailed atomic description of the solid/fluid/solid contacts, the subject of Part I of the present study. First, building the solid interspace between two different crystals in a non-periodic situation is achieved using the ab initio and molecular mechanics code GenMol TM. A description of the fluid confined within the interspace is then derived from the original genetic iterative multi-species (GIMS) algorithm implemented in the same code. This approach consists of equilibrating chemical potentials, cycle after cycle and species after species, between the confined fluid and the free natural fluid. An elementary iteration for a species k consists of different steps incrementing the number Nk of particles k, with other numbers Nk' remaining constant. At each step, an optimum fluid composition is obtained by a genetic process distributing the fluid particles on a grid by stochastic shots, followed in fine by a refining process. The effectiveness of the GIMS approach is demonstrated in the case study of a fluid confined between two (0 0 1) kaolinite faces, with apertures h varying between 4 and 10 Å, connected to a 9-species external solution [H 2O, Cl -, N a+, CO 2(aq), NaCl (aq), Ca 2+, Mg 2+, HCO3-, H 3O +] where concentrations are ranging from 55 to 10 -4 mol/L. The results show a drastic variation in the solute/solvent and cations/ions ratios in the confined fluid when aperture h is lowered to less than 1 nm. These results obtained with a very rapid convergence of the iterative algorithm combined with a very competitive genetic optimizer are validated with high precision on a free solution. This description of contacts between crystals is original and unattainable by standard crystal interface approaches

  10. Control of the sensitivity of CRLH interdigital microstrip balanced structures using a co-design genetic algorithm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siragusa, R.; Perret, E.; Nguyen, H. V.; Lemaître-Auger, P.; Tedjini, S.; Caloz, C.

    2011-06-01

    A fully automated tool for designing CRLH interdigital microstrip structures using a co-design synthesis computational approach is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. This approach uses an electromagnetic simulator in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to synthesize and optimize a balanced CRLH interdigital microstrip transmission line. The high sensitivity of a long balanced transmission line to fabrication tolerances is controlled by the use of a high precision 3D simulator. The 2.5D simulator used was found insufficient for a large number of unit cells. A 13 UC CRLH transmission line is designed with the proposed approach. The response sensitivity of the balanced transmission lines to the over/under-etching factor is highlighted by comparing the measurements of four lines with different factors. The effect of over/under-etching is significant for values larger than 10 μm.

  11. Novel genomic approaches unravel genetic architecture of complex traits in apple.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, S.; Garrick, D.J.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Whitworth, C.; Chagné, D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the genetic architecture of quantitative traits is important for developing genome-based crop improvement methods. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a powerful technique for mining novel functional variants. Using a family-based design involving 1,200 apple (Malus × d

  12. Biotechnological approaches for the genetic improvement of Jatropha curcas L.: A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2015-08-14

    Ever increasing demand for energy sources and reduction of non-renewable fossil fuel reserves have lead to exploration of alternative and renewable energy sources. Due to wide distribution, agronomic suitability, and desirable oil properties, J. curcas has been identified as a renewable and alternative energy source of biodiesel. Large scale commercial cultivation of this crop would not only be environmentally friendly and be worthwhile in carbon sequestration but also in decreasing the energy supply pressures. Wide adaptation across geographic regions, short gestation period compared to most tree species, rapid growth, hardiness, optimum plant size, and easy propagation in combination make this species suitable for large scale cultivation on barren lands. The limited information of the genetics and inheritance of desirable traits, unpredictable and low yields, the limited diversity and susceptibility to diseases and insects are however, key limitations in fruitful farming of J. curcas. In this review, an effort is made to project the current biotechnology and molecular biology tools employed in the direction of, evaluating the genetic diversity and phylogeny revelation of Jatropha spp., identification of genetic markers for desirable traits, development of efficient micropropagation and regeneration system, and genetic transformation methods for J. curcas. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Molecular and genetics approaches for investigation of phospholipase D role in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volotovsky I. D.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of publications ñoncerning the role of phospholipase D (PLD in regulation of metabolism in plant cells. Analysis of molecular and genetic studies suggest that PLD is an important component of various hormonal and stress signaling pathways

  14. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Eicher, John D.; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D.; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H.; Matteini, Amy M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Smith, Albert V.; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J.; Knopman, Davis S.; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Liewald, David C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Weir, David R.; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bennett, David A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Windham, Beverly G.; Newman, Ann B.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging. PMID:28077804

  15. Classification of Noisy Data: An Approach Based on Genetic Algorithms and Voronoi Tessellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Abdul Rauf; Schiøler, Henrik; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    on the portioning of information space; and (2) use of the genetic algorithm to solve combinatorial problems for classification. In particular, we will implement our methodology to solve complex classification problems and compare the performance of our classifier with other well-known methods (SVM, KNN, and ANN...

  16. Genetic characterization, species differentiation and detection of Fasciola spp. by molecular approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hai-Long

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver flukes belonging to the genus Fasciola are among the causes of foodborne diseases of parasitic etiology. These parasites cause significant public health problems and substantial economic losses to the livestock industry. Therefore, it is important to definitively characterize the Fasciola species. Current phenotypic techniques fail to reflect the full extent of the diversity of Fasciola spp. In this respect, the use of molecular techniques to identify and differentiate Fasciola spp. offer considerable advantages. The advent of a variety of molecular genetic techniques also provides a powerful method to elucidate many aspects of Fasciola biology, epidemiology, and genetics. However, the discriminatory power of these molecular methods varies, as does the speed and ease of performance and cost. There is a need for the development of new methods to identify the mechanisms underpinning the origin and maintenance of genetic variation within and among Fasciola populations. The increasing application of the current and new methods will yield a much improved understanding of Fasciola epidemiology and evolution as well as more effective means of parasite control. Herein, we provide an overview of the molecular techniques that are being used for the genetic characterization, detection and genotyping of Fasciola spp..

  17. A patient centred approach to care planning for patients with chronic genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair Kent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay proposes seven pre-requisites for the creation of effective programmes of care and support for patients living with the consequences of chronic genetic diseases. It then goes on to discuss the role of patient organisations and other stakeholders in bringing about the development and implementation of these.

  18. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Longitudinal Structure of Neuroticism A Trait-State Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laceulle, Odilia M.; Ormel, Johan; Aggen, Steven H.; Neale, Michael C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to elucidate both stable and changing factors in the longitudinal structure of neuroticism using a behavioral genetic twin design. We tested whether this structure is best accounted for by a trait-state, a trait-only, or a state-only model. In line with classic views on pers

  19. Microsatellite allele dose and configuration establishment (MADCE): an integrated approach for genetic studies in allopolyploids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van T.; Noordijk, Y.; Dubos, T.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Weg, van de W.E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic studies in allopolyploid plants are challenging because of the presence of similar sub-genomes, which leads to multiple alleles and complex segregation ratios. In this study, we describe a novel method for establishing the exact dose and configuration of microsatellite alleles fo

  20. Students' Understanding of Genetics Concepts: The Effect of Reasoning Ability and Learning Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Didem; Saglam, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Students tend to learn genetics by rote and may not realise the interrelationships in daily life. Because reasoning abilities are necessary to construct relationships between concepts and rote learning impedes the students' sound understanding, it was predicted that having high level of formal reasoning and adopting meaningful learning…

  1. A latent class approach to investigating demand for genetically modified banana in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikulwe, E.M.; Birol, E.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Falck-Zepeda, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores consumer acceptance and valuation of a genetically modified (GM) staple food crop in a developing country prior to its commercialization. We focus on the hypothetical introduction of a disease-resistant GM banana variety in Uganda, where bananas are among the most important stapl

  2. Students' Understanding of Genetics Concepts: The Effect of Reasoning Ability and Learning Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Didem; Saglam, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Students tend to learn genetics by rote and may not realise the interrelationships in daily life. Because reasoning abilities are necessary to construct relationships between concepts and rote learning impedes the students' sound understanding, it was predicted that having high level of formal reasoning and adopting meaningful learning orientation…

  3. Genetic, Genomic, and Breeding Approaches to Further Explore Kernel Composition Traits and Grain Yield in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Helena Sofia Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Maize ("Zea mays L.") is a model species well suited for the dissection of complex traits which are often of commercial value. The purpose of this research was to gain a deeper understanding of the genetic control of maize kernel composition traits starch, protein, and oil concentration, and also kernel weight and grain yield. Germplasm with…

  4. A Novel Approach to Managing Invasive Termite Species Using Genetically Engineered Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Journal of Parasitology 86 (6), pp. 1355–1359. Nickoloff, J. A. (1995) In: J.A. Nickoloff, Ed, Electroporation Protocols for Microorganisms, Methods in...Agricultural Center, Veterinary Science, 404 Life Sciences Building, Baton Rouge, LA Paratransgenesis is the genetic manipulation of a host’s symbiotic

  5. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium concepts in forest genetic modelling: population- and individually-based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.; Werf, van der D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The environment is changing and so are forests, in their functioning, in species composition, and in the species’ genetic composition. Many empirical and process-based models exist to support forest management. However, most of these models do not consider the impact of environmental changes and for

  6. Writing and Reading Skills as Assessed by Teachers in 7-Year Olds: A Behavioral Genetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Bonamy R.; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A behavioral genetic analysis of general writing ability was conducted using teacher assessments based on UK National Curriculum criteria for a sample of 3296 same-sex pairs of 7-year-old twins. Writing was highly heritable within the normal range (0.66) and at the low extreme (0.70). Environmental influences were almost all non-shared, with…

  7. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogelman, Lisette J. A.; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the tr

  8. Novel genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis; a haplotype-based candidate gene approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitte de Willige, Shirley

    2007-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) is a common disease, which occurs mostly in the deep veins of the leg. VT clusters within families and is a multicausal disease, in which both genetic and environmental factors interact in the onset of the disease. The aim of the study described in this thesis was to find new

  9. Workshop overview : Approaches to the assessment of the allergenic potential of food from genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladics, G.S.; Holsapple, M.P.; Astwood, J.D.; Kimber, I.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Helm, R.M.; Dong, W.

    2003-01-01

    There is a need to assess the safety of foods deriving from genetically modified (GM) crops, including the allergenic potential of novel gene products. Presently, there is no single in vitro or in vivo model that has been validated for the identification or characterization of potential food allerge

  10. A unified approach to the evolutionary consequences of genetic and nongenetic inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Troy; Bonduriansky, Russell

    2011-08-01

    Inheritance-the influence of ancestors on the phenotypes of their descendants-translates natural selection into evolutionary change. For the past century, inheritance has been conceptualized almost exclusively as the transmission of DNA sequence variation from parents to offspring in accordance with Mendelian rules, but advances in cell and developmental biology have now revealed a rich array of inheritance mechanisms. This empirical evidence calls for a unified conception of inheritance that combines genetic and nongenetic mechanisms and encompasses the known range of transgenerational effects, including the transmission of genetic and epigenetic variation, the transmission of plastic phenotypes (acquired traits), and the effects of parental environment and genotype on offspring phenotype. We propose a unified theoretical framework based on the Price equation that can be used to model evolution under an expanded inheritance concept that combines the effects of genetic and nongenetic inheritance. To illustrate the utility and generality of this framework, we show how it can be applied to a variety of scenarios, including nontransmissible environmental noise, maternal effects, indirect genetic effects, transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, RNA-mediated inheritance, and cultural inheritance.

  11. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci in plants - a novel statistical approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative variation is a feature of many important traits such as yield, quality and disease resistance in crop plants and farm animals, and diseases in humans. The genetic mapping, understanding and manipulation of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) are therefore of prime importance. Only by using g

  12. Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm Optimisation Approach for the Geometrical Design of an Active Noise Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jafferi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the geometrical design of active noise control (ANC in free- field propagation medium. The development and performance assessment uses genetic optimisation techniques to arrange system components so as to satisfy several performance requirements, such as physical extent of cancellation, controller design restriction and system stability. The ANC system design can be effectively addressed if it is considered as multi – objective optimisation problems. The multi-objective genetic algorithms (MOGAs are well suited to the design of an ANC system and the approach used for it is based on a multi - objective method, with which the physical extent of cancellation and relative stability assessment are dealt with simultaneously.

  13. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Coull, Brent; Suh, Helen; Wright, Robert; Baccarelli, Andrea; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing) modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011). To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing) to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction) = 0.04). Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction) = 0.12), CRP (p(interaction) = 0.02), and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08). This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  14. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Abele Bind

    Full Text Available Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1. Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011. To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction = 0.04. Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction = 0.12, CRP (p(interaction = 0.02, and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08. This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  15. A Modified Approach for Calculating Dressed Quark Propagator at Finite Chemical Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the rainbow approximation of Dyson-Schwinger equation and the assumption that the full inverse quark propagator at finite chemical potential is analytic in the neighborhood of μ = 0, it is proved that the dressed From the dressed quark propagator at finite chemical potential μ can be written as (g0-1)[μ]=iγ·(p~)A((p~2))+B((p~2))with (p~)μ=((p),p4+iμ).From the dressed quark propagator at finite chemical potential in Munczek model the bag constant of a baryon and the scalar quark condensate are evaluated. A comparison with previous results is given.

  16. Order batching in warehouses by minimizing total tardiness: a hybrid approach of weighted association rule mining and genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadnia, Amir Hossein; Taheri, Shahrooz; Ghadimi, Pezhman; Saman, Muhamad Zameri Mat; Wong, Kuan Yew

    2013-01-01

    One of the cost-intensive issues in managing warehouses is the order picking problem which deals with the retrieval of items from their storage locations in order to meet customer requests. Many solution approaches have been proposed in order to minimize traveling distance in the process of order picking. However, in practice, customer orders have to be completed by certain due dates in order to avoid tardiness which is neglected in most of the related scientific papers. Consequently, we proposed a novel solution approach in order to minimize tardiness which consists of four phases. First of all, weighted association rule mining has been used to calculate associations between orders with respect to their due date. Next, a batching model based on binary integer programming has been formulated to maximize the associations between orders within each batch. Subsequently, the order picking phase will come up which used a Genetic Algorithm integrated with the Traveling Salesman Problem in order to identify the most suitable travel path. Finally, the Genetic Algorithm has been applied for sequencing the constructed batches in order to minimize tardiness. Illustrative examples and comparisons are presented to demonstrate the proficiency and solution quality of the proposed approach.

  17. New Chemical Kinetics Approach for DSMC Applications to Nonequilibrium Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new chemical kinetics model and database will be developed for aerothermodynamic analyses on entry vehicles. Unique features of this model include (1) the ability...

  18. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustova, Elena V. [Department of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 Universitetskiy pr., 28, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-980 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-12-09

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N{sub 2} across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  19. Reacting gas mixtures in the state-to-state approach: The chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, Elena V.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work chemically reacting mixtures of viscous flows are analyzed within the framework of Boltzmann equation. By applying a modified Chapman-Enskog method to the system of Boltzmann equations general expressions for the rates of chemical reactions and vibrational energy transitions are determined as functions of two thermodynamic forces: the velocity divergence and the affinity. As an application chemically reacting mixtures of N2 across a shock wave are studied, where the first lowest vibrational states are taken into account. Here we consider only the contributions from the first four single quantum vibrational-translational energy transitions. It is shown that the contribution to the chemical reaction rate related to the affinity is much larger than that of the velocity divergence.

  20. The terrorist threat nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical - a medical approach; Menace terroriste nucleaire, radiologique, biologique, chimique - approche medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revel, M.C. de; Gourmelon, M.C.S.; Vidal, P.C.; Renaudeau, P.C.S

    2005-07-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the fear of a large scale nuclear, biological and/or chemical terrorism is taken again into consideration at the highest level of national policies of risk prevention. The advent of international terrorism implies a cooperation between the military defense and the civil defense. The nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical (NRBC) experts of the health service of army and of civil defense will have to work together in case of major terror attack. This book presents this cooperation between civil and military experts in the NRBC domain: risk analysis, national defense plans, crisis management, syndromes and treatments. The different aspects linked with the use of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons are analyzed by the best experts from French medical and research institutes. All topics of each NRBC domain are approached: historical, basic, diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive. (J.S.)