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Sample records for chemical factors controlling

  1. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Davison, Brian H; Standaert, Robert F; Davis, Mark F; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-01-09

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S), and p-hydroxyphenyl (H) subunits. It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular weight lignin polymers and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di-, and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p-electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages (β-β or β-5) react poorly and tend to "cap" the polymer. In general, β-5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  2. Chemical factors controlling actinide sorption in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.

    1979-01-01

    The solid geologic media and the aqueous phase are of equal importance for the retention of actinides in the environment. The composition of the water is largely determined by the mineralogical composition of the rock that it is in equilibrium with. The chemical form of the actinides and their sorption, are highly dependent on the composition of the water with respect to pH, redox potential, and concentration of anions like carbonate, phosphate, fluoride, and organic acids

  3. Mass transfer rate through liquid membranes: interfacial chemical reactions and diffusion as simultaneous permeability controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Chiarizia, R.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the permeability of a liquid membrane to metal cations have been derived taking into account aqueous diffusion, membrane diffusion, and interfacial chemical reactions as simultaneous permeability controlling factors. Diffusion and chemical reactions have been coupled by a simple model analogous to the one previously described by us to represent liquid-liquid extraction kinetics. The derived equations, which make use of experimentally determined interfacial reaction mechanisms, qualitatively fit unexplained literature data regarding Cu 2+ transfer through liquid membranes. Their use to predict and optimize membrane permeability in practical separation processes by setting the appropriate concentration of the membrane carrier [LIX 64 (General Mills), a commercial β-hydroxy-oxime] and the pH of the aqueous copper feed solution is briefly discussed. 4 figures

  4. Factors controlling physico-chemical characteristics in the coastal waters off Mangalore-A multivariate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Mesquita, A.; Pradhan, U.K.; Verlekar, X.N.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality parameters (temperature, pH, salinity, DO, BOD, suspended solids, nutrients, PHc, phenols, trace metals-Pb, Cd and Hg, chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and phaeopigments) and the sediment quality parameters (total phosphorous, total nitrogen, organic carbon and trace metals) were analysed from samples collected at 15 stations along 3 transects off Karnataka coast (Mangalore harbour in the south to Suratkal in the north), west coast of India during 2007. The analyses showed high ammonia off Suratkal, high nitrite (NO 2 -N) and nitrate (NO 3 -N) in the nearshore waters off Kulai and high nitrite (NO 2 -N) and ammonia (NH 3 -N) in the harbour area. Similarly, high petroleum hydrocarbon (PHc) values were observed near the harbour, while phenols remained high in the nearshore waters of Kulai and Suratkal. Significantly, high concentrations of cadmium and mercury with respect to the earlier studies were observed off Kulai and harbour regions, respectively. R-mode varimax factor analyses were applied separately to surface and bottom water data sets due to existing stratification in the water column caused by riverine inflow and to sediment data. This helped to understand the interrelationships between the variables and to identify probable source components for explaining the environmental status of the area. Six factors (each for surface and bottom waters) were found responsible for variance (86.9% in surface and 82.4% in bottom) in the coastal waters between Mangalore and Suratkal. In sediments, 4 factors explained 86.8% of the observed total variance. The variances indicated addition of nutrients and suspended solids to the coastal waters due to weathering and riverine transport and are categorized as natural sources. The observed contamination of coastal waters indicated anthropogenic inputs of Cd and phenol from industrial effluent sources at Kulai and Suratkal, ammonia from wastewater discharges off Kulai and harbour, PHc and Hg from boat traffic and harbour

  5. Control in the Chemical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses various control techniques used in chemical processes, including measuring devices, controller functions, control valves, and feedforward and feedback actions. Applications of control to a real chemical plant are exemplified. (CC)

  6. Patterns in the Physical, Chemical, and Biological Composition of Icelandic Lakes and the Dominant Factors Controlling Variability Across Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A.; Strock, K.; Edwards, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    Fourteen lakes were sampled in the southern and western area of Iceland in June of 2017. The southern systems, within the Eastern Volcanic Zone, have minimal soil development and active volcanoes that produce ash input to lakes. Lakes in the Western Volcanic Zone were more diverse and located in older bedrock with more extensively weathered soil. Physical variables (temperature, oxygen concentration, and water clarity), chemical variables (pH, conductivity, dissolved and total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, and dissolved organic carbon concentration), and biological variables (algal biomass) were compared across the lakes sampled in these geographic regions. There was a large range in lake characteristics, including five to eighteen times higher algal biomass in the southern systems that experience active ash input to lakes. The lakes located in the Eastern Volcanic Zone also had higher conductivity and lower pH, especially in systems receiving substantial geothermal input. These results were analyzed in the context of more extensive lake sampling efforts across Iceland (46 lakes) to determine defining characteristics of lakes in each region and to identify variables that drive heterogeneous patterns in physical, chemical, and biological lake features within each region. Coastal systems, characterized by high conductivity, and glacially-fed systems, characterized by high iron concentrations, were unique from lakes in all other regions. Clustering and principal component analyses revealed that lake type (plateau, valley, spring-fed, and direct-runoff) was not the primary factor explaining variability in lake chemistry outside of the coastal and glacial lake types. Instead, lakes differentiated along a gradient of iron concentration and total nitrogen concentration. The physical and chemical properties of subarctic lakes are especially susceptible to both natural and human-induced environmental impacts. However, relatively little is known about the

  7. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  8. Chemical and physical factors which control the substitution reactions of direct fission-produced iodine with gaseous methane and the methyl halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, M.; Church, L.B.

    1976-01-01

    The factors controlling the hydrogen and halogen substitution reactions resulting from direct fission-produced iodine isotopes (*I) with gaseous methane and methyl halides were investigated. The chemical reaction probabilities, corrected for any secondary decomposition, were compared as a function of various chemical and physical parameters. These include carbon-halogen bond strength, halogen electronegativity, volume and cross sectional area of the substituted and neighboring atoms. On the basis of this analysis, it is concluded that *I-for-X (where X = H, F, Cl, Br and I) substitution reactions are controlled by the cross sectional area of the X atom. The *I-for-H substitution probability is reduced in proportion to the volume of X, suggesting that steric interference is the dominant factor influencing the reaction probability. (orig.) [de

  9. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  10. Factors influencing choice of care-seeking for acute fever comparing private chemical shops with health centres and hospitals in Ghana: a study using case-control methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansah, Evelyn K; Gyapong, Margaret; Narh-Bana, Solomon; Bart-Plange, Constance; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2016-05-25

    Several public health interventions to improve management of patients with fever are largely focused on the public sector yet a high proportion of patients seek care outside the formal healthcare sector. Few studies have provided information on the determinants of utilization of the private sector as against formal public sector. Understanding the differences between those who attend public and private health institutions, and their pathway to care, has significant practical implications. The chemical shop is an important source of care for acute fever in Ghana. Case-control methodology was used to identify factors associated with seeking care for fever in the Dangme West District, Ghana. People presenting to health centres, or hospital outpatients, with a history or current fever were compared to counterparts from the same community with fever visiting a chemical shop. Of 600 patients, 150 each, were recruited from the district hospital and two health centres, respectively, and 300 controls from 51 chemical shops. Overall, 103 (17.2 %) patients tested slide positive for malaria. Specifically, 13.7 % (41/300) of chemical shop patients, 30.7 % (46/150) health centre and 10.7 % (16/150) hospital patients were slide positive. While it was the first option for care for 92.7 % (278/300) chemical shop patients, 42.7 % (64/150) of health centre patients first sought care from a chemical shop. More health centre patients (61.3 %; 92/150) presented with fever after more than 3 days than chemical shop patients (27.7 %; 83/300) [AOR = 0.19; p private drug retail sector is the first option for the majority of patients, including poorer patients, with fever in this setting. Most patients with fever arrive at chemical shops with less delay and fewer signs of severity than at public health facilities. Improving chemical shop skills is a good opportunity to diagnose, treat or refer people with fever early.

  11. Chemical control methods and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Manning; James. Miller

    2011-01-01

    After determining the best course of action for control of an invasive plant population, it is important to understand the variety of methods available to the integrated pest management professional. A variety of methods are now widely used in managing invasive plants in natural areas, including chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods. Once the preferred...

  12. Quantitative relations between chemical oxygen demand concentration and its influence factors in the sluice-controlled river reaches of Shaying River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Ming; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Congying

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the effects of dam and sluice construction on the water environment has attracted extensive attention from academia and governments alike. Because the operation of sluices greatly alters environmental factors such as water flow and sediment load, the water quality in sluice-controlled river reaches (SCRRs) undergoes complex changes compared with those in normal reaches. This work used river reaches near the Huaidian Sluice in Shaying River of China as a case study to analyse the effects of sluice operation on water quality evolution in SCRRs. The most influential factors affecting the rate of change in chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in SCRRs were identified through water quality monitoring experiments performed under various modes of sluice operation and by applying a statistical method 'partial correlation analysis'. Then, a hydrodynamic model incorporating sluice operation and a water quality transport and transform model incorporating the release of endogenous loads were developed. Using these two models, the processes of temporal and spatial change of COD concentrations in the SCRRs were simulated under various scenarios designed to represent the dominant factors of influence. Finally, the simulation results were used to develop empirical relationships between the rate of change in COD concentrations and the dominant factors of influence. The results reveal that three factors, i.e., water inflow concentration, gate opening size, and gate opening number, are the dominant factors of influence, and there are logarithmic relationships between the rate of change in COD concentration in the SCRRs and these factors.

  13. Optimal control for chemical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Upreti, Simant Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Optimal Control for Chemical Engineers gives a detailed treatment of optimal control theory that enables readers to formulate and solve optimal control problems. With a strong emphasis on problem solving, the book provides all the necessary mathematical analyses and derivations of important results, including multiplier theorems and Pontryagin's principle.The text begins by introducing various examples of optimal control, such as batch distillation and chemotherapy, and the basic concepts of optimal control, including functionals and differentials. It then analyzes the notion of optimality, de

  14. Chemical control of flowering time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionescu, Irina Alexandra; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Sánchez Pérez, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Flowering at the right time is of great importance; it secures seed production and therefore species survival and crop yield. In addition to the genetic network controlling flowering time, there are a number of much less studied metabolites and exogenously applied chemicals that may influence...... on the genetic aspects of flowering time regulation in annuals, but less so in perennials. An alternative to plant breeding approaches is to engineer flowering time chemically via the external application of flower-inducing compounds. This review discusses a variety of exogenously applied compounds used in fruit...

  15. How to control chemical hazards

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Improving protection against chemical hazards is one of the 2012 CERN safety objectives identified by the Director General. Identifying and drawing up a complete inventory of chemicals, and assessing the associated risks are important steps in this direction.   The HSE Unit has drawn up safety rules, guidelines and forms to help you to meet this objective. We would like to draw your attention to: • safety guidelines C-0-0-1 and C-1-0-2 (now also available in French), which deal with the identification of hazardous chemicals and the assessment of chemical risk; • safety guideline C-1-0-1, which deals with the storage of hazardous chemicals. All safety documents can be consulted at: cern.ch/regles-securite The HSE Unit will be happy to answer any questions you may have. Write to us at: safety-general@cern.ch The HSE Unit

  16. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  17. Chemical process control using Mat lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sin Chun; Kim, Raeh Yeon; Kim, Yang Su; Oh, Min; Yeo, Yeong Gu; Jung, Yeon Su

    2001-07-01

    This book is about chemical process control, which includes the basis of process control with conception, function, composition of system and summary, change of laplace and linearization, modeling of chemical process, transfer function and block diagram, the first dynamic property of process, the second dynamic property of process, the dynamic property of combined process, control structure of feedback on component of control system, the dynamic property of feedback control loop, stability of closed loop control structure, expression of process, modification and composition of controller, analysis of vibration response and adjustment controller using vibration response.

  18. Genetic susceptibility factors for multiple chemical sensitivity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-01-01

    of this study was to investigate genetic susceptibility factors for MCS and self-reported chemical sensitivity in a population sample. Ninety six MCS patients and 1,207 controls from a general population divided into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity were genotyped for variants in the genes encoding......Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterised by adverse effects due to exposure to low levels of chemical substances. Various genes, especially genes of importance to the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, have been associated with MCS, but findings are inconsistent. The purpose...... significant (OR=1.2, p=0.28). Fast arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 metaboliser status was associated with severity of chemical sensitivity only in the most severely affected group in the population sample (OR=3.1, p=0.04). The cholecystokinin 2 receptor allele with 21 CT repeats was associated with MCS when...

  19. ANALYTICAL SYNTHESIS OF CHEMICAL REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Labutin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the analytical synthesis of the synergetic control system of chemical reactor for the realization of a complex series-parallel exothermal reaction has been solved. The synthesis of control principles is performed using the analytical design method of aggregated regulators. Synthesized nonlinear control system solves the problem of stabilization of the concentration of target component at the exit of reactor and also enables one to automatically transfer to new production using the equipment.

  20. Chemical Data Reporting: Factors to Consider When Using the Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2012 Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) database provides non-confidential information on the manufacture, import, processing, and use of chemicals in commerce at national and regional levels. This fact sheet highlights factors to consider.

  1. Versatile Dual Photoresponsive System for Precise Control of Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Can; Bing, Wei; Wang, Faming; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-08-22

    A versatile method for photoregulation of chemical reactions was developed through a combination of near-infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) light sensitive materials. This regulatory effect was achieved through photoresponsive modulation of reaction temperature and pH values, two prominent factors influencing reaction kinetics. Photothermal nanomaterial graphene oxide (GO) and photobase reagent malachite green carbinol base (MGCB) were selected for temperature and pH regulation, respectively. Using nanocatalyst- and enzyme-mediated chemical reactions as model systems, we demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of this method. In addition, a photoresponsive, multifunctional "Band-aid"-like hydrogel platform was presented for programmable wound healing. Overall, this simple, efficient, and reversible system was found to be effective for controlling a wide variety of chemical reactions. Our work may provide a method for remote and sustainable control over chemical reactions for industrial and biomedical applications.

  2. Intelligent Controller Design for a Chemical Process

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Glan Devadhas G; Dr.Pushpakumar S.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical process control is a challenging problem due to the strong on*line non*linearity and extreme sensitivity to disturbances of the process. Ziegler – Nichols tuned PI and PID controllers are found to provide poor performances for higher*order and non–linear systems. This paper presents an application of one*step*ahead fuzzy as well as ANFIS (adaptive*network*based fuzzy inference system) tuning scheme for an Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor CSTR process. The controller is designed based ...

  3. WEED CONTROL EFFECTS ON SOIL CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Lima e Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The weed control procedures are known to affect the soil physical attributes and the nutrient amount taken up by weed roots. This work hypothesis is that weed control methods might also affect soil chemical attributes. Four experiments were carried out, three with maize (E-1, E-2 and E-3 and one with cotton (E-4, in randomized complete blocks design arranged in split-plots, with five replications. In E-1 experiment, the plots consisted of two weed control treatments: no-weed control and weed shovel-digging at 20 and 40 days after sowing; and the subplots consisted of six maize cultivars. In the three other experiments, the plots consisted of plant cultivars: four maize cultivars (E-2 and E-3 and four cotton cultivars (E-4. And, the subplots consisted of three weed control treatments: (1 no-weed control; (2 weed shovel-digging at 20 and 40 days after sowing; and (3 intercropping with cowpea (E-2 or Gliricidia sepium (Jacq. Walp. (E-3 and E-4. In all experiments, after harvest, eight soil samples were collected from each subplot (0-20 cm depth and composed in one sample. Soil chemical analysis results indicated that the weed control by shovel-digging or intercropping may increase or decrease some soil element concentrations and the alterations depend on the element and experiment considered. In E-2, the weed shovel-dug plots showed intermediate soil pH, lower S (sum of bases values and higher soil P concentrations than the other plots. In E-4, soil K and Na concentrations in plots without weed control did not differ from plots with intercropping, and in both, K and Na values were higher than in weed shovel-dug plots. Maize and cotton cultivars did not affect soil chemical characteristics.

  4. Programmable chemical controllers made from DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Dalchau, Neil; Srinivas, Niranjan; Phillips, Andrew; Cardelli, Luca; Soloveichik, David; Seelig, Georg

    2013-10-01

    Biological organisms use complex molecular networks to navigate their environment and regulate their internal state. The development of synthetic systems with similar capabilities could lead to applications such as smart therapeutics or fabrication methods based on self-organization. To achieve this, molecular control circuits need to be engineered to perform integrated sensing, computation and actuation. Here we report a DNA-based technology for implementing the computational core of such controllers. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks as a 'programming language' and our DNA architecture can, in principle, implement any behaviour that can be mathematically expressed as such. Unlike logic circuits, our formulation naturally allows complex signal processing of intrinsically analogue biological and chemical inputs. Controller components can be derived from biologically synthesized (plasmid) DNA, which reduces errors associated with chemically synthesized DNA. We implement several building-block reaction types and then combine them into a network that realizes, at the molecular level, an algorithm used in distributed control systems for achieving consensus between multiple agents.

  5. Does runoff or temperature control chemical weathering rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiriksdottir, Eydis Salome; Gislason, Sigurdur Reynir; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The rate chemical weathering is affected by both temperature and runoff. Separating out these two factors is challenging because runoff tends to increase with increasing temperature. → In this study, natural river water samples collected on basaltic catchments over a five year period are used together with experimentally derived dissolution rate model for basaltic glass to pull apart the effects of runoff and temperature. → This study shows that the rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff, but is dominated by runoff. - Abstract: The rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff. The relative role of these two factors in the rivers of NE Iceland is determined through the rigorous analysis of their water chemistry over a 5-a period. River catchments are taken to be analogous to laboratory flow reactors; like the fluid in flow reactors, the loss of each dissolved element in river water is the sum of that of the original rainwater plus that added from kinetically controlled dissolution and precipitation reactions. Consideration of the laboratory determined dissolution rate behaviour of basalts and measured water chemistry indicates that the maximum effect of changing temperature on chemical denudation in the NE Icelandic rivers was 5-25% of the total change, whereas that of runoff was 75-95%. The bulk of the increased denudation rates with runoff appear to stem from an increase in reactive surface area for chemical weathering of catchment solids.

  6. Chemical barriers for controlling groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical barriers are being explored as a low-cost means of controlling groundwater contamination. The barrier can intercept a contaminant plume and prevent migration by transferring contaminants from the groundwater to immobile solids. A chemical barrier can be emplaced in a landfill liner or in an aquifer cutoff wall or can be injected into a contaminant plume. Chemical barriers can be classified as either precipitation barriers or sorption barriers depending upon the dominant mode of contaminant extraction. In a precipitation barrier, contaminants are bound in the structures of newly formed phases; whereas, in a sorption barrier, contaminants attach to the surfaces of preexisting solids by adsorption or some other surface mechanism. Sorption of contaminants is pH dependent. A precipitation barrier can control the pH of the system, but alkaline groundwater may dominate the pH in a sorption barrier. A comparison is made of the characteristics of precipitation and sorption barriers. Experimental data on the extraction of uranium and molybdenum from simulated groundwater are used to demonstrate these concepts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  7. Factors controlling metal fuel lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Seidel, B.R.; Walters, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of metal fuel elements is determined by a fuel burnup at which a statistically predicted number of fuel breaches would occur, the number of breaches determined by the amount of free fission gas which a particular reactor design can tolerate. The reliability is therefore measured using experimentally determined breach statistics, or by modelling fuel element behavior and those factors which contribute to cladding breach. The factors are fuel/cladding mechanical and chemical interactions, fission gas pressure, fuel phase transformations involving volume changes, and fission product effects on cladding integrity. Experimental data for EBR-II fuel elements has shown that the primary, and perhaps the only significant factor affecting metal fuel reliability, is the pressure-induced stresses caused by fission gas release. Other metal fuel/cladding systems may perform similarly

  8. Chemical optimization algorithm for fuzzy controller design

    CERN Document Server

    Astudillo, Leslie; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    In this book, a novel optimization method inspired by a paradigm from nature is introduced. The chemical reactions are used as a paradigm to propose an optimization method that simulates these natural processes. The proposed algorithm is described in detail and then a set of typical complex benchmark functions is used to evaluate the performance of the algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed optimization algorithm can outperform other methods in a set of benchmark functions. This chemical reaction optimization paradigm is also applied to solve the tracking problem for the dynamic model of a unicycle mobile robot by integrating a kinematic and a torque controller based on fuzzy logic theory. Computer simulations are presented confirming that this optimization paradigm is able to outperform other optimization techniques applied to this particular robot application

  9. Computer Controlled Chemical Micro-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechtilde, Schaefer; Eduard, Stach; Adreas, Foitzik

    2006-01-01

    Chemical reactions or chemical equilibria can be influenced and controlled by several parameters. The ratio of two liquid ingredients, the so called reactants or educts, plays an important role in determining the end product and its yield. The reactants must be weighed and accordingly mixed with the conventional batch mode. If the reaction is done in a microreactor or in several parallel working micro-reactors, units for allotting the educts in appropriate quantities are required. In this report we present a novel micro-reactor that allows the constant monitoring of the chemical reaction via Raman spectroscopy. Such monitoring enables an appropriate feedback on the steering parameters for the PC controlled micro-pumps for the appropriate educt flow rate of both liquids to get optimised ratios of ingredients at an optimised total flow rate. The micro-reactors are the core pieces of the design and are easily removable and can therefore be changed at any time to adapt the requirements of the chemical reaction. One type of reactor consists of a stainless steel base containing small scale milled channels covered with anodically bonded Pyrex glass. Another type of reactor has a base of anisotropically etched silicon, and is also covered with anodically bonded Pyrex glass. The glass window allows visual observation of the initial phase interface of the two educts in the reaction channels by optical microscopy and does not affect, in contrast to infrared spectroscopy, the Raman spectroscopic signal for detection of the reaction kinetics. On the basis of a test reaction, we present non-invasive and spatially highly resolved in-situ reaction analysis using Raman spectroscopy measured along the reaction channel at different locations

  10. Physical and chemical factors affecting sludge consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W.; Blimkie, M.E.; Lavoie, P.A

    1997-09-01

    Chemical reactions between sludge components and precipitation reactions within the pores of the existing sludge are shown to contribute to the consolidation of sludge under steam generator operating conditions. Simulations of sludge representative of plants with a mixed iron/copper feedtrain suggest that as the conditions in the feedtrain become more oxidizing the sludge will become harder with a higher nickel ferrite content. The precipitation of feedwater impurities introduced by condenser leaks and of zinc silicate, which is produced in plants with brass condenser tubes and silica in the makeup water, contribute significantly to sludge consolidation. Sodium phosphate is also shown to be an agent of sludge consolidation. (author)

  11. Physico-chemical and biotic factors influencing microalgal seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physico-chemical and biotic factors influencing microalgal seed culture propagation for inoculation of a ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... used to inoculate an open raceway pond for large scale biomass production for biodiesel production.

  12. SALE, Quality Control of Analytical Chemical Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, W.J.; Gentillon, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program is a statistical analysis program written to analyze the data received from laboratories participating in the SALE quality control and evaluation program. The system is aimed at identifying and reducing analytical chemical measurement errors. Samples of well-characterized materials are distributed to laboratory participants at periodic intervals for determination of uranium or plutonium concentration and isotopic distributions. The results of these determinations are statistically evaluated and participants are informed of the accuracy and precision of their results. 2 - Method of solution: Various statistical techniques produce the SALE output. Assuming an unbalanced nested design, an analysis of variance is performed, resulting in a test of significance for time and analyst effects. A trend test is performed. Both within- laboratory and between-laboratory standard deviations are calculated. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Up to 1500 pieces of data for each nuclear material sampled by a maximum of 75 laboratories may be analyzed

  13. Chemicals for crop protection and pest control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Green, Maurice B; Hartley, Gilbert Spencer; West, Trustham Frederick

    1977-01-01

    .... For the most part, the conventional classification into insecticides, herbicides and fungicides has been followed and some more specialized chemicals are also classified according to their biological...

  14. Chemical weed control in Spinach (Spiniacia oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Modhej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Spinach (Spinacia oleracea is an annual plant of family Chenopodiaceae. It is cultivated in temperate and cold regions in Khouzestan in autumn and winter. Weeds are the main problems that limit the production of vegetables. Competition ability of spinach against weeds is very low and weeds cause the loss of quality and quantity in this plant. Weeds reduce germination and establishment and growth of spinach. Weed management in spinach should be done at the beginning of the season. Hand weeding is the best way to control weeds spinach, although due to the high cost it is not cost effective, but is steel common in large areas. Weed control spinach, using chemical methods, the number of weeds are kept below the threshold of economic damage. Materials and Methods The experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design with 15 treatments and three replications. Treatments included pre-plant application of EPTC at 5 and 6 lit ha-1, pre-plant application of Trifluralin at 2 lit ha-1, pre-plant and pre-emergence application of Pendimethalin at 3 lit ha-1, pre-emergence and post-emergence application of Meteribouzin at 300 g ha-1, pre-emergence and post-emergence application of Meteribouzin at 400 g ha-1, pre-emergence and post-emergence application of Imazethapyr at 0.7 lit ha-1, pre-emergence and post-emergence application of Imazethapyr at 1 lit ha-1, weedy and weed free checks. Each plot the size of 2.5 × 2 meters and 10 row cultivation with distances between rows of 15 cm and the distance between the plants 25 cm and the sowing depth was 3 cm. The herbicide treatments were applied to the back sprayer with Flat fan nozzle with volume of consumption of 240 lit ha-1 solution. The final harvest was about 50 days after emergence. Sampling of weeds 10 days before harvest was performed with using quadrate 0.5 ×0.5. Results Discussion Important broad-leaf and narrow leaf weeds observed in the field, included field bindweed

  15. Factors influencing chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    A short summary is given of our studies on the major factors that affect the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses. These factors include glass composition, solution composition, SA/V (ratio of glass surface area to the volume of solution), radiation, and colloidal formation. These investigations have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses and to accumulate.a data base for modeling the long-term durability of waste glass, which will be used in the risk assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This knowledge gained also enhances our ability to formulate optimal waste glass compositions

  16. Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan: 100 Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Y.M.

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is to identify the chemical spill control practices, procedures, and containment devices Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) employs to prevent a reportable quantity (RQ) of a hazardous substance (as defined in 40 CFR Part 302) from being released to the environment. The chemical systems and chemical storage facilities in the 100 Areas are described. This document traces the ultimate fate of accidental chemical spills at the 100 Areas. Also included in the document destinations, spill containment devices, and systems surveillance frequencies. 2 tabs.

  17. Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan: 100 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, Y.M.

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this Chemical Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is to identify the chemical spill control practices, procedures, and containment devices Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) employs to prevent a reportable quantity (RQ) of a hazardous substance (as defined in 40 CFR Part 302) from being released to the environment. The chemical systems and chemical storage facilities in the 100 Areas are described. This document traces the ultimate fate of accidental chemical spills at the 100 Areas. Also included in the document destinations, spill containment devices, and systems surveillance frequencies. 2 tabs

  18. Sensitivity of men and women to effect of chemical factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliyev, V.A.

    1985-05-01

    The activity of enzymes performing energy metabolism and electron transport in the respiratory chain and anabolism and catabolism processes in cells of the blood system of men and women petroleum processing workers is described and discussed. Enzymic activity was studied by cytochemical methods. Subjects included basic petroleum processing device operators (96 women and 74 men ranging in age from 19-30 years with work experience ranging from 4 months to 10 years). The control group included 133 persons of corresponding age-sex groups who were not involved in petroleum processing work. The cytoenzymic studies refuted the assumption that women workers are more sensitive than men workers to the effect of toxic substances. On the whole, the men in the study were found to be less resistant to the effect of chemical factors encountered in petroleum processing work. It was assumed that specific features of functioning of the female body (menstruation, pregnancy and birth), causing stress and reconstruction of homeostasis systems, promoted improvement of adaptational mechanisms in the process of evolution, which mechanisms were coded in the gene pool. It is speculated that sexual differences may cause differences in cell metabolism. 12 refs.

  19. Factors influencing recovery and restoration following a chemical incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Fernández, A; Wyke, S; Brooke, N; Duarte-Davidson, R

    2014-11-01

    Chemicals are an important part of our society. A wide range of chemicals are discharged into the environment every day from residential, commercial and industrial sources. Many of these discharges do not pose a threat to public health or the environment. However, global events have shown that chemical incidents or accidents can have severe consequences on human health, the environment and society. It is important that appropriate tools and technical guidance are available to ensure that a robust and efficient approach to developing a remediation strategy is adopted. The purpose of remediation is to protect human health from future exposure and to return the affected area back to normal as soon as possible. There are a range of recovery options (techniques or methods for remediation) that are applicable to a broad range of chemicals and incidents. Recovery options should be evaluated according to their appropriateness and efficacy for removing contaminants from the environment; however economic drivers and social and political considerations often influence decision makers on which remedial actions are implemented during the recovery phase of a chemical incident. To date, there is limited information in the literature on remediation strategies and recovery options that have been implemented following a chemical incident, or how successful they have been. Additional factors that can affect the approach taken for recovery are not well assessed or understood by decision makers involved in the remediation and restoration of the environment following a chemical incident. The identification of this gap has led to the development of the UK Recovery Handbook for Chemical Incidents to provide a framework for choosing an effective recovery strategy. A compendium of practical evidence-based recovery options (techniques or methods for remediation) for inhabited areas, food production systems and water environments has also been developed and is included in the chemical

  20. Synthetic biology expands chemical control of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Tyler J; Silver, Pamela A

    2015-10-01

    The tools of synthetic biology allow researchers to change the ways engineered organisms respond to chemical stimuli. Decades of basic biology research and new efforts in computational protein and RNA design have led to the development of small molecule sensors that can be used to alter organism function. These new functions leap beyond the natural propensities of the engineered organisms. They can range from simple fluorescence or growth reporting to pathogen killing, and can involve metabolic coordination among multiple cells or organisms. Herein, we discuss how synthetic biology alters microorganisms' responses to chemical stimuli resulting in the development of microbes as toxicity sensors, disease treatments, and chemical factories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physical and chemical trigger factors in environmental intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Anna-Sara; Palmquist, Eva; Nordin, Steven

    2018-04-01

    Individuals with environmental intolerance (EI) react to exposure from different environmental sources at levels tolerated by most people and that are below established toxicological and hazardous thresholds. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of attributing symptoms to chemical and physical sources in the environment among individuals with different forms of self-reported EI and in referents. Cross-sectional data from a population-based study, the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406), were used and individuals with self-reported EI to chemicals, buildings, electromagnetic fields and sounds as well as a group with multiple EIs were identified. The Environmental-Symptom Attribution Scale was used to quantify degree to which health symptoms are attributed to 40 specific environmental exposures and sources, with subscales referring to the four types of EI. All EI groups, except the group with building related intolerance (BRI), reported more symptoms from the expected sources compared to the referents. In addition, individuals with chemical and sound intolerance reported symptoms from building related trigger factors, and individuals with electromagnetic hypersensitivity reported symptoms from chemical trigger factors. The study suggests that individuals with BRI react to fewer and more specific trigger factors than do individuals with other EIs, and that it is important to ask about different sources since three of the EI groups attribute their symptoms to a wide variety of sources in addition to the sources to which their EI implicates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Study on chemical reactivity control of liquid sodium. Research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Nobuki; Yoshioka, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Liquid sodium has the excellent properties as coolant of the fast breeder reactor (FBR). On the other hand, it reacts high with water and oxygen. So an innovative technology to suppress the reactivity is desired. The purpose of this study is to control the chemical reactivity of liquid sodium by dispersing the nanometer-size metallic particles (we call them Nano-particles) into liquid sodium. We focus on the atomic interaction between Nano-particles and sodium atoms. And we try to apply it to suppress the chemical reactivity of liquid sodium. Liquid sodium dispersing Nano-particles is named 'Nano-fluid'. Research programs of this study are the Nano-particles production, the evaluation of reactivity suppression of liquid sodium and the feasibility study to FBR plant. In this paper, the research programs and status are described. The important factors for particle production were understood. In order to evaluate the chemical reactivity of Nano-fluid the research programs were planned. The feasibility of the application of Nano-fluid to the coolant of FBR plant was evaluated preliminarily from the viewpoint of design and operation. (author)

  3. The Control of Chemical and Biological Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Archibald S.; And Others

    This book is composed of four papers prepared to illuminate the problem areas which might arise if the policies of the 1925 Geneva Protocol and other measures to limit chemical and biological weapons are ratified by the United States Senate. The papers included are: Legal Aspects of the Geneva Protocol of 1925; The Use of Herbicides in War: A…

  4. The influence of chemical degradation during dietary exposures to fish on biomagnification factors and bioaccumulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnot, Jon A; Mackay, Donald

    2018-01-24

    The chemical dietary absorption efficiency (E D ) quantifies the amount of chemical absorbed by an organism relative to the amount of chemical an organism is exposed to following ingestion. In particular, E D can influence the extent of bioaccumulation and biomagnification for hydrophobic chemicals. A new E D model is developed to quantify chemical process rates in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The new model is calibrated with critically evaluated measured E D values (n = 250) for 80 hydrophobic persistent chemicals. The new E D model is subsequently used to estimate chemical reaction rate constants (k R ) assumed to occur in the lumen of the GIT from experimental dietary exposure tests (n = 255) for 165 chemicals. The new k R estimates are corroborated with k R estimates for the same chemicals from the same data derived previously by other methods. The roles of k R and the biotransformation rate constant (k B ) on biomagnification factors (BMFs) determined under laboratory test conditions and on BMFs and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) in the environment are examined with the new model. In this regard, differences in lab and field BMFs are highlighted. Recommendations to address uncertainty in E D and k R data are provided.

  5. Chemical controls on subsurface radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, K.J.; Killey, R.W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical and biochemical processes can affect the movement of contaminants in groundwater. Materials can be almost completely removed from circulation by processes such as precipitation and coprecipitation. Organic compounds or contaminants that are hazardous may be degraded or formed during groundwater transport. Studies at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL have focused on radionuclide transport, although other contaminants have been and are being investigated. This paper summarizes findings from research that extends back more than 30 years. Much of the work on reactive contaminant transport has centered on 90 Sr; other contaminants have also been considered, however, and features of their behaviour are also reviewed. (25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.)

  6. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the chemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  7. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-01-01

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method

  8. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I., E-mail: roxana.both@aut.utcluj.ro [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Implications and control of fuel-cladding chemical interaction for LMFBR fuel pin design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roake, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI) is typically incorporated into the design of an LMFBR fuel pin as a wastage allowance. Several interrelated factors are considered during the evolution of an LMFBR fuel pin design. Those which are indirectly affected by FCCI include: allowable pin power, fuel restructuring, fission gas migration and release from the fuel, fuel cracking, fuel swelling, in-reactor cladding creep, cladding swelling, and the cladding mechanical strain. Chemical activity of oxygen is the most readily controlled factor in FCCI. Two methods are being investigated: control of total oxygen inventory by limiting fuel O/M, and control of oxygen activity with buffer metals

  10. Implications and control of fuel-cladding chemical interaction for LMFBR fuel pin design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roake, W E [Westinghouse-Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1977-04-01

    Fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI) is typically incorporated into the design of an LMFBR fuel pin as a wastage allowance. Several interrelated factors are considered during the evolution of an LMFBR fuel pin design. Those which are indirectly affected by FCCI include: allowable pin power, fuel restructuring, fission gas migration and release from the fuel, fuel cracking, fuel swelling, in-reactor cladding creep, cladding swelling, and the cladding mechanical strain. Chemical activity of oxygen is the most readily controlled factor in FCCI. Two methods are being investigated: control of total oxygen inventory by limiting fuel O/M, and control of oxygen activity with buffer metals.

  11. Physical chemical quality control of the molybdenum technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, E.; Cruz, J.; Isaac, M.; Gamboa, R.; D'Alessandro, K.; Desdin, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative operational procedure imported molybdenum technetium generators have been made. Procedures for determination of chemical, radiochemical and radionuclidic purities that may be applied in Hospital's laboratories and in the quality control of generators production are developed

  12. NONLINEAR MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVA R. G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm for model predictive control is presented. The algorithm utilizes a simultaneous solution and optimization strategy to solve the model's differential equations. The equations are discretized by equidistant collocation, and along with the algebraic model equations are included as constraints in a nonlinear programming (NLP problem. This algorithm is compared with the algorithm that uses orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The equidistant collocation algorithm results in simpler equations, providing a decrease in computation time for the control moves. Simulation results are presented and show a satisfactory performance of this algorithm.

  13. Controlling the accuracy of chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suschny, O.; Danesi, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of the IAEA in quantitative analysis began in the early 1960's with radiochemical work connected with the environment. It than expanded to cover analysis (mostly by nuclear techniques) of samples for projects associated with human health, agriculture, hydrology and international safeguards. This article highlights the IAEA activities in the field of quality control in quantitative analysis

  14. Chemical sensors and gas sensors for process control in biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.E.

    1988-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the possibilities for chemical measurement of the progress of biotechnological processes which are offered by devices already developed for other demanding applications. It considers the potential use of ultrasonic instrumentation originally developed for the nuclear industry, gas measurement methods from the fields of environmental monitoring and combustion control, nuclear instruments developed for the oil, mining and chemical industries, robotic systems and advanced control techniques. (author)

  15. Ecologically sustainable chemical recommendations for agricultural pest control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Linda J; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2007-12-01

    Effective pest control remains an essential part of food production, and it is provided both by chemicals and by natural enemies within agricultural ecosystems. These methods of control are often in conflict because of the negative impact of chemicals on natural enemies. There are already well-established approaches such as those provided by the International Organization for Biological and Integrated Control-Pesticides and Beneficial Organisms for testing, collecting, and publishing information on responses of natural enemies to chemicals based on laboratory responses of specific organisms; however, these tests do not assess the cumulative impact of chemical inputs across an entire season or consider impacts on the complex communities of natural enemies that can provide effective pest control on a farm. Here, we explore the potential of different approaches for assessing the impact of chemicals on agricultural ecosystems and we propose a simple metric for sustainable chemical use on farms that minimizes overall impact on beneficial groups. We suggest ways in which the effectiveness of metrics can be extended to include persistence and habitat features. Such metrics can assist farmers in developing targets for sustainable chemical use as demonstrated in the viticultural industry.

  16. Factors influencing Australian agricultural workers' self-efficacy using chemicals in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Ian R

    2012-11-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore which factors can simultaneously influence the self-reported ability of agricultural employees to embrace chemical safety practices. Eight variables were considered in the study, including the employees' gender, age, duration of current employment status, and whether they were employed full-time or part-time. The self-efficacy measures of 169 participants were then estimated by measuring their self-rated ability to understand and perform different chemical safety practices. Models identifying employee self-efficacy pathways leading to worker readiness to engage in chemical safety were then tested using Partial Least Squares Path Analysis. Study results suggest that employees' self-efficacy to successfully engage in safe chemical practices in their workplace can be directly predicted by four variables, with additional indirect effects offered by one other variable, which cumulatively account for 41% of the variance of employees' chemical safety self-efficacy scores. The most significant predictor variables that directly influenced employees' self-efficacy in adopting chemical safety practices in the workplace were worker age, gender, years of employment, and concurrent confidence (self-efficacy) arising from prior experience using chemicals in the workplace. The variables of employees' prior knowledge and understanding about the use of administrative controls and personal protective equipment to protect workers from chemical exposure had no direct influence on self-efficacy to handle chemical emergencies. Employees' unfamiliarity with risk control strategies and reliance on material safety data sheets for information suggest that ongoing and targeted training are necessary if chemical safety issues are to be addressed.

  17. Chemical composition dependence of exposure buildup factors for some polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Tejbir [Department of Physics, S.D.D.I.E.T., Barwala, District Panchkula, Haryana 134 118 (India)], E-mail: tejbir.s@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Naresh [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 402 (India)], E-mail: naresh20dhiman@yahoo.com; Singh, Parjit S. [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)], E-mail: dr_parjit@hotmail.com

    2009-01-15

    Exposure buildup factors for some polymers such as poly-acrylo-nitrile (PAN), poly-methyl-acrylate (PMA), poly-vinyl-chloride (PVC), synthetic rubber (SR), tetra-fluro-ethylene (Teflon) have been computed using the G.P. fitting method in the energy range of 0.015-15.0 MeV, up to the penetration of 40 mean free paths (mfp). The variation of exposure buildup factors for all the selected polymers with incident photon energy at the fixed penetration depths has been studied, mainly emphasizing on chemical composition (equivalent atomic number) of the selected polymers. It has been observed that for the lower penetration depths (below 10 mfp), the exposure buildup factor decreases with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers at all the incident photon energies. However, at the penetration depth of 10 mfp and incident photon energy above 3 MeV, the exposure buildup factor becomes almost independent of the equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers. Further, above the fixed penetration depth of 15 mfp of the selected polymers and above the incident photon energy of 3 MeV, reversal in the trend has been observed, i.e., the exposure buildup factor increases with the increase in equivalent atomic number.

  18. Chemical composition dependence of exposure buildup factors for some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Parjit S.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure buildup factors for some polymers such as poly-acrylo-nitrile (PAN), poly-methyl-acrylate (PMA), poly-vinyl-chloride (PVC), synthetic rubber (SR), tetra-fluro-ethylene (Teflon) have been computed using the G.P. fitting method in the energy range of 0.015-15.0 MeV, up to the penetration of 40 mean free paths (mfp). The variation of exposure buildup factors for all the selected polymers with incident photon energy at the fixed penetration depths has been studied, mainly emphasizing on chemical composition (equivalent atomic number) of the selected polymers. It has been observed that for the lower penetration depths (below 10 mfp), the exposure buildup factor decreases with the increase in equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers at all the incident photon energies. However, at the penetration depth of 10 mfp and incident photon energy above 3 MeV, the exposure buildup factor becomes almost independent of the equivalent atomic number of the selected polymers. Further, above the fixed penetration depth of 15 mfp of the selected polymers and above the incident photon energy of 3 MeV, reversal in the trend has been observed, i.e., the exposure buildup factor increases with the increase in equivalent atomic number

  19. Chemical mechanisms in mercury emission control technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, E.S.; Laumb, J.D.; Benson, S.A.; Dunham, G.E.; Sharma, R.K.; Mibeck, B.A.; Miller, S.J.; Holmes, M.J.; Pavlish, J.H. [University of North Dakota, Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The emission of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-burning power plants is a major environmental concern. Control technologies utilizing activated carbon show promise and are currently under intense review. Oxidation and capture of elemental mercury on activated carbon was extensively investigated in a variety of flue gas atmospheres. Extensive parametric testing with individual and a variety of combinations and concentrations of reactive flue gas components and spectroscopic examination of the sulfur and chlorine forms present before and after breakthrough have led to an improved model to explain the kinetic and capacity results. The improved model delineates the independent Lewis acid oxidation site as well as a zig-zag carbene site on the carbon edge that performs as a Lewis base in reacting with both the oxidized mercury formed at the oxidation site and with the acidic flue gas components in competing reactions to form organochlorine, sulfinate, and sulfate ester moieties on the carbon edge.

  20. Chemical weed control in barley (hordeum vulgare)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.; Hassan, S.W.; Abid, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of two different pre-emergence herbicides i.e. Terbutryn (lgron-500FW) A, 1.01.25 kg a.t. ha/sup -1/ and Flurochloridone (Racer-25 CS) a 0.31, 0.37, 0.44, 0.50 and 0.56 Kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ on weeds and yield of barley wad studied under field conditions hb/sup -1/. All the herbicides significantly reduce the dry weight of weed Maximum reduction (70%) was observed in terbutryn a 1.0 Kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ Growth and yield parameters like number of spike lets per spike. Number of grams per spike. 1000-grain weight. Biological yield. Grain yield straw yield and harvest index showed significant response to various herbicides doses under study. Application of Flurochloridone (Racer-25 (CS) a 0.44 kg a.i. ha/sup -1/ and Terbutryn (lgran-500 FW) a 1.0 kg a.i). The data further revealed that in general all herbicide application treatments exhibited superior performance in respect of growth and yield over control. (author)

  1. Chemical and physical quality control of the HIPPURAN-131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin Zorilla, J.; Olive, E.; Isaac, M.; Cruz, J.

    1989-01-01

    Some physico-chemical methods for analytical control of Hippuran- 131 I are compared. The most convenient to applicate in hospitals and in more specialized quality control laboratories are recommended. The quality of Hippuran- 131 I produced by ISOTOP (USSR) is also evaluated. The product met the requirement of the International Pharmacopeia

  2. Temporal Control over Transient Chemical Systems using Structurally Diverse Chemical Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack L-Y; Maiti, Subhabrata; Fortunati, Ilaria; Ferrante, Camilla; Prins, Leonard J

    2017-08-25

    The next generation of adaptive, intelligent chemical systems will rely on a continuous supply of energy to maintain the functional state. Such systems will require chemical methodology that provides precise control over the energy dissipation process, and thus, the lifetime of the transiently activated function. This manuscript reports on the use of structurally diverse chemical fuels to control the lifetime of two different systems under dissipative conditions: transient signal generation and the transient formation of self-assembled aggregates. The energy stored in the fuels is dissipated at different rates by an enzyme, which installs a dependence of the lifetime of the active system on the chemical structure of the fuel. In the case of transient signal generation, it is shown that different chemical fuels can be used to generate a vast range of signal profiles, allowing temporal control over two orders of magnitude. Regarding self-assembly under dissipative conditions, the ability to control the lifetime using different fuels turns out to be particularly important as stable aggregates are formed only at well-defined surfactant/fuel ratios, meaning that temporal control cannot be achieved by simply changing the fuel concentration. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The statutory approach: the control of chemical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briens, F.

    1997-01-01

    The evaluation and management of risks linked with chemical products and in particular with petroleum products is now performed using all the available tools developed by the OECD or the European Union in order to harmonize the procedures between member states. This paper describes the statutory liabilities linked to the trade of chemical products of industrial use in the case of new and of existing chemical substances (classification, labelling, risk evaluation and reduction, physico-chemical properties, toxicological and eco-toxicological studies, neutralization, limitation of trade and use, import/export, protection of the ozone layer, etc..). It refers to the legal framework (orders, by-laws, decrees, guidelines..) defined by the OECD and the European Community and recalls the organization and administration of the competent authorities for the control of chemical products. (J.S.)

  4. Physical and chemical factors influencing radionuclide behaviour in arable soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauret, G.; Vidal, M.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Kruglov, S.V.; Cremers, A.; Wauters, J.; Valcke, E.; Ivanov, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides integrates plant physiological and soil chemical aspects. Therefore, it is necessary to study the factors affecting the equilibrium of the radionuclides between solid and soil solution phases. Desorption and adsorption studies were applied to the podsolic and peat soils considered in the ECP-2 project. In the desorption approach, both sequential extraction and 'infinite bath' techniques were used. In the adsorption approach, efforts were directed at predicting Cs and Sr-K D on the basis of soil properties and soil solution composition. Desorption approach predicts time-dynamics of transfer with time but it is un sufficient for comparatively predicting transfer. Adsorption studies informs about which are the key factors affecting radionuclide transfer. For Sr, availability depends on the CEC and on the concentration of the Ca + Mg in the soil solution. For Cs, availability is mainly dependent on the partitioning between FES -frayed edge sites-, which are highly specific and REC -regular exchange complex-, with low selectivity for Cs. Moreover, availability depends on the K and NH 4 , levels in the soil solution and fixation properties of the soil. Considering these factors, the calculation of the in situ K D values helps to predict the relative transfer of radionuclides. The calculation of the K D of the materials that could be used as countermeasures could permit the prediction of its suitability to decrease transfer and therefore to help in producing cleaner agricultural products

  5. Efficiency factor of a chemical nuclear reactor with gamma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguis T, C.

    1975-01-01

    A chemonuclear reactor is simulated in order to calculate the efficiency factor of molecular species in chemical reactions induced by gamma radiation, with the purpose to obtain information for its design and consider the electromagnetic energy as a possible solution to the present problem of energy. The research is based on a mathematical model of succesive Compton processes applied to spherical and cylindrical geometry and corroborated through the absorbed dose and the experimental date of the increase factor, for the radioisotopic sources Co-60 and Cs-137 relating the quantity of energy deposited into various cylinders with the G value, the relation radius/height of the reactor is optimized according to the molecular production. This is illustrated with the radiolysis of a solution of CH 3 OH/H 2 O which forms H 2 and with the obtainment of C 2 H 5 Br that represents and industrial process induced radioactively. The results show a greater energy deposition with Cs-137 but a larger production of H 2 /hr with Co-60, and besides we can find high production values of C 2 H 5 Br. The cylinder with more advantages is that whose relation R/H is of 0.5. It can be concluded that the final selection of the reactor should be made after a more intense study of the used isotope and the source activity. The efficiency factor of H 2 can be increased selecting the appropriate type and concentration of solute of the irradiated aqueous solutions

  6. Determining treatment frequency for controlling weeds on traffic islands using chemical and non-chemical weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Larsen, S.U.; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Many public authorities rely on the use of non-chemical weed control methods, due to stringent restrictions on herbicide use in urban areas. However, these methods usually require more repeated treatments than chemical weed management, resulting in increased costs of weed management. In order...... of treatments per year were required: glyphosate 2.5, hot water 3, flames 5, hot air/flames 5.5 and steam 5.5 treatments. The results demonstrate that the weed control should be adjusted to the prescribed quality for the traffic islands by regularly assessing the need for weed control. They also show...... to investigate the efficacy of four non-chemical weed control methods and glyphosate treatment, experiments were carried out on traffic islands in the growing seasons 2005 and 2006. Three trial sites were each divided into six treatment areas, which were either treated with glyphosate, flame, steam, hot air...

  7. Hierarchical optimal control of large-scale nonlinear chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein; Sadati, Nasser

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach is presented for optimal control of large-scale chemical processes. In this approach, the chemical process is decomposed into smaller sub-systems at the first level, and a coordinator at the second level, for which a two-level hierarchical control strategy is designed. For this purpose, each sub-system in the first level can be solved separately, by using any conventional optimization algorithm. In the second level, the solutions obtained from the first level are coordinated using a new gradient-type strategy, which is updated by the error of the coordination vector. The proposed algorithm is used to solve the optimal control problem of a complex nonlinear chemical stirred tank reactor (CSTR), where its solution is also compared with the ones obtained using the centralized approach. The simulation results show the efficiency and the capability of the proposed hierarchical approach, in finding the optimal solution, over the centralized method.

  8. Control of chemical dynamics by lasers: theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondorskiy, Alexey; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2010-06-03

    Theoretical ideas are proposed for laser control of chemical dynamics. There are the following three elementary processes in chemical dynamics: (i) motion of the wave packet on a single adiabatic potential energy surface, (ii) excitation/de-excitation or pump/dump of wave packet, and (iii) nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections of potential energy surfaces. A variety of chemical dynamics can be controlled, if we can control these three elementary processes as we desire. For (i) we have formulated the semiclassical guided optimal control theory, which can be applied to multidimensional real systems. The quadratic or periodic frequency chirping method can achieve process (ii) with high efficiency close to 100%. Concerning process (iii) mentioned above, the directed momentum method, in which a predetermined momentum vector is given to the initial wave packet, makes it possible to enhance the desired transitions at conical intersections. In addition to these three processes, the intriguing phenomenon of complete reflection in the nonadiabatic-tunneling-type of potential curve crossing can also be used to control a certain class of chemical dynamics. The basic ideas and theoretical formulations are provided for the above-mentioned processes. To demonstrate the effectiveness of these controlling methods, numerical examples are shown by taking the following processes: (a) vibrational photoisomerization of HCN, (b) selective and complete excitation of the fine structure levels of K and Cs atoms, (c) photoconversion of cyclohexadiene to hexatriene, and (d) photodissociation of OHCl to O + HCl.

  9. Dynamics and Control of Chemical Reactors-Selectively Surveyed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, S. B.; Jensen, N.

    1989-01-01

    The chemical reactor or bioreactor is physically at a central position in a process, and often with a decisive role on the overall technical and economical performance. Even though application of feedback control on reactors is gaining momentum and on-line optimization has been implemented....... For bioreactors the theory and practice of reactor design, dynamics and control have to be adapted to the peculiarities of the biological catalysts. Enzymes, the protein catalysts, are the simplest ones, which have many common features with chemical catalysts. The living cells are much more complex, these growing...... in industry, many reactor control problems are still left unsolved or only partly solved using open loop strategies where disturbance rejection and model inaccuracies have to be handled through manual reactor control and feedback control of raw material preprocessing and product purification operations...

  10. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  11. [Prospects in getting accordance between chemical analytic control means and medical technical requirements to safety system concerning chemical weapons destruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembovskiĭ, V R; Mogilenkova, L A; Savel'eva, E I

    2005-01-01

    The major unit monitoring chemical weapons destruction objects is a system of chemical analyticcontrol over the technologic process procedures and possibility of environment and workplace pollution withtoxicchemicals and their destruction products. At the same time, physical and chemical control means meet sanitary and hygienic requirements incompletely. To provide efficient control, internationally recognized approaches should be adapted to features of Russian system monitoring pollution of chemical weapons destruction objects with toxic chemicals.

  12. The Potential Of Cultural And Chemical Control Practices For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Potential Of Cultural And Chemical Control Practices For Enhancing ... and a significant (P < 0.05) increase in yield components of hands per bunch and finger ... Une étude de l\\'effet de la population de plantes, l\\'application des engrais, ...

  13. Methylene Diphosphonate Chemical and Biological control of MDP complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aungurarat, Angkanan; Ngamprayad, Tippanan

    2000-01-01

    Technetium-9 9m MDP easy prepared from MDP kits which different sources such as OAP (In house), SIGMA. The resulting Tc 9 9m -MDP preparations were controlled in chemical and biological tests to compare the different results in these cases: radiochemical purity, the quantity of starting material and biodistribution result

  14. MIMO Self-Tuning Control of Chemical Process Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallager, L.; Jørgensen, S. B.; Goldschmidt, L.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of selecting a feasible model structure for a MIMO self-tuning controller (MIMOSC) is addressed. The dependency of the necessary structure complexity in relation to the specific process operating point is investigated. Experimental results from a fixed-bed chemical reactor are used...

  15. Chemical control of blossom blight disease of sarpagandha caused ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Chemical control of blossom blight disease of sarpagandha caused by Colletotrichum capsici. R. S. Shukla, Abdul-Khaliq and M. Alam*. Department of Plant Pathology, Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial. Research, P. O. CIMAP, Lucknow–226 015, India.

  16. Effective chemical control of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) pests in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective chemical control of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) pests in mango orchards in northern Côte-d'Ivoire. OR N'depo, N Hala, A N'da Adopo, F Coulibaly, PK Kouassi, JF Vayssieres, M de Meyer ...

  17. Physical and Chemical Factors Affecting Contaminant Hydrology in Cold Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grant, Steven

    2000-01-01

    .... The chemical thermodynamics of geochemical solutions below 0 deg C is then reviewed. Particular attention is placed on the physical-chemical properties of ice and liquid water at subzero temperatures...

  18. Chemical Weed Control Increases Survival and Growth in Hardwood Plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayne G. Erdmann

    1967-01-01

    In a plantation of four hardwood species on a silt loam soil planted to 1-0 stock, 4 pounds of active atrazine or simazine controlled weeds effectively without injuring the trees. Chemical weed control was better on plowed and disked ground than on unprepared ground. Yellow-poplar and white ash grew faster on prepared ground. Black walnut and red oak did not respond...

  19. Chemical markers for the quality control of herbal medicines: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung Cheng Chuen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection of chemical markers is crucial for the quality control of herbal medicines, including authentication of genuine species, harvesting the best quality raw materials, evaluation of post-harvesting handling, assessment of intermediates and finished products, and detection of harmful or toxic ingredients. Ideal chemical markers should be the therapeutic components of herbal medicines. However, for most herbal medicines, the therapeutic components have not been fully elucidated or easily monitored. Bioactive, characteristic, main, synergistic, correlative, toxic and general components may be selected. This article reviews the effective use of chemical markers in the quality control of herbal medicines including the selection criteria considering the roles and physicochemical factors which may affect the effective use of chemical markers.

  20. Human factors challenges for advanced process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubler, W.F.; O'Hara, J..M.

    1996-01-01

    New human-system interface technologies provide opportunities for improving operator and plant performance. However, if these technologies are not properly implemented, they may introduce new challenges to performance and safety. This paper reports the results from a survey of human factors considerations that arise in the implementation of advanced human-system interface technologies in process control and other complex systems. General trends were identified for several areas based on a review of technical literature and a combination of interviews and site visits with process control organizations. Human factors considerations are discussed for two of these areas, automation and controls

  1. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Pollution control in oil, gas and chemical plants

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    This unique book covers the fundamental requirements for air, soil, noise and water pollution control in oil and gas refineries, chemical plants, oil terminals, petrochemical plants, and related facilities. Coverage includes design and operational considerations relevant to critical systems such as monitoring of water pollution control, equipment, and engineering techniques as well as engineering/technological methods related to soil, noise and air pollution control. This book also: ·         Covers a diverse list of pollution control strategies important to practitioners, ranging from waste water gathering systems and oil/suspended solids removal to chemical flocculation units, biological treatment, and sludge handling and treatment ·         Provides numerous step-by-step tutorials that orient both entry level and veteran engineers to the essentials of pollution control methods in petroleum and chemical industries ·         Includes a comprehensive glossary providing readers with...

  3. Incorporation of chemical kinetic models into process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herget, C.J.; Frazer, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An important consideration in chemical process control is to determine the precise rationing of reactant streams, particularly when a large time delay exists between the mixing of the reactants and the measurement of the product. In this paper, a method is described for incorporating chemical kinetic models into the control strategy in order to achieve optimum operating conditions. The system is first characterized by determining a reaction rate surface as a function of all input reactant concentrations over a feasible range. A nonlinear constrained optimization program is then used to determine the combination of reactants which produces the specified yield at minimum cost. This operating condition is then used to establish the nominal concentrations of the reactants. The actual operation is determined through a feedback control system employing a Smith predictor. The method is demonstrated on a laboratory bench scale enzyme reactor

  4. Economic model predictive control theory, formulations and chemical process applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Matthew; Christofides, Panagiotis D

    2017-01-01

    This book presents general methods for the design of economic model predictive control (EMPC) systems for broad classes of nonlinear systems that address key theoretical and practical considerations including recursive feasibility, closed-loop stability, closed-loop performance, and computational efficiency. Specifically, the book proposes: Lyapunov-based EMPC methods for nonlinear systems; two-tier EMPC architectures that are highly computationally efficient; and EMPC schemes handling explicitly uncertainty, time-varying cost functions, time-delays and multiple-time-scale dynamics. The proposed methods employ a variety of tools ranging from nonlinear systems analysis, through Lyapunov-based control techniques to nonlinear dynamic optimization. The applicability and performance of the proposed methods are demonstrated through a number of chemical process examples. The book presents state-of-the-art methods for the design of economic model predictive control systems for chemical processes. In addition to being...

  5. Towards benchmarking of multivariable controllers in chemical/biochemical industries: Plantwide control for ethylene glycol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Bialas, Dawid Jan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a simple yet realistic benchmark plant for evaluation and comparison of advanced multivariable control for chemical and biochemical processes. The benchmark plant is based on recycle-separator-recycle systems for ethylene glycol production and implemented in Matlab...... for education purposes (operator training, student education, etc) as well as scientific research into chemical process control where it enables rapid evaluation and comparison of advanced multivariable controllers as demonstrated in this study....

  6. Controlling organic chemical hazards in food manufacturing: a hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropkins, K; Beck, A J

    2002-08-01

    Hazard analysis by critical control points (HACCP) is a systematic approach to the identification, assessment and control of hazards. Effective HACCP requires the consideration of all hazards, i.e., chemical, microbiological and physical. However, to-date most 'in-place' HACCP procedures have tended to focus on the control of microbiological and physical food hazards. In general, the chemical component of HACCP procedures is either ignored or limited to applied chemicals, e.g., food additives and pesticides. In this paper we discuss the application of HACCP to a broader range of chemical hazards, using organic chemical contaminants as examples, and the problems that are likely to arise in the food manufacturing sector. Chemical HACCP procedures are likely to result in many of the advantages previously identified for microbiological HACCP procedures: more effective, efficient and economical than conventional end-point-testing methods. However, the high costs of analytical monitoring of chemical contaminants and a limited understanding of formulation and process optimisation as means of controlling chemical contamination of foods are likely to prevent chemical HACCP becoming as effective as microbiological HACCP.

  7. Chemical and ecological control methods for Epitrix spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. S. Cuthbertson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little information exists in regards to the control options available for potato flea beetles, Epitrix spp. This short review covers both chemical and ecological options currently available for control of Epitrix spp. Synthetic pyrethroids are the weapon of choice for the beetles. However, the impetus in integrated pest management is to do timely (early-season applications with something harsh which will give long-term protection at a time when there are not a lot of beneficials in the field. Finding the balance for control of Epitrix spp. is proving difficult.

  8. Nonlinear model predictive control for chemical looping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao; Lou, Xinsheng

    2017-08-22

    A control system for optimizing a chemical looping ("CL") plant includes a reduced order mathematical model ("ROM") that is designed by eliminating mathematical terms that have minimal effect on the outcome. A non-linear optimizer provides various inputs to the ROM and monitors the outputs to determine the optimum inputs that are then provided to the CL plant. An estimator estimates the values of various internal state variables of the CL plant. The system has one structure adapted to control a CL plant that only provides pressure measurements in the CL loops A and B, a second structure adapted to a CL plant that provides pressure measurements and solid levels in both loops A, and B, and a third structure adapted to control a CL plant that provides full information on internal state variables. A final structure provides a neural network NMPC controller to control operation of loops A and B.

  9. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav, E-mail: tsori@bgu.ac.il [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  10. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-21

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  11. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, James R.; Dodson, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  12. Integrated Process Design, Control and Analysis of Intensified Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil

    chemical processes; for example, intensified processes such as reactive distillation. Most importantly, it identifies and eliminates potentially promising design alternatives that may have controllability problems later. To date, a number of methodologies have been proposed and applied on various problems......, that the same principles that apply to a binary non-reactive compound system are valid also for a binary-element or a multi-element system. Therefore, it is advantageous to employ the element based method for multicomponent reaction-separation systems. It is shown that the same design-control principles...

  13. Subfemtosecond directional control of chemical processes in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaser, Ali S.; Litvinyuk, Igor V.

    2017-02-01

    Laser pulses with a waveform-controlled electric field and broken inversion symmetry establish the opportunity to achieve directional control of molecular processes on a subfemtosecond timescale. Several techniques could be used to break the inversion symmetry of an electric field. The most common ones include combining a fundamental laser frequency with its second harmonic or with higher -frequency pulses (or pulse trains) as well as using few-cycle pulses with known carrier-envelope phase (CEP). In the case of CEP, control over chemical transformations, typically occurring on a timescale of many femtoseconds, is driven by much faster sub-cycle processes of subfemtosecond to few-femtosecond duration. This is possible because electrons are much lighter than nuclei and fast electron motion is coupled to the much slower nuclear motion. The control originates from populating coherent superpositions of different electronic or vibrational states with relative phases that are dependent on the CEP or phase offset between components of a two-color pulse. In this paper, we review the recent progress made in the directional control over chemical processes, driven by intense few-cycle laser pulses a of waveform-tailored electric field, in different molecules.

  14. Chemical risk factors responsible for the formation of wedge-shaped lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-carious tooth substances loss pose a major health problem of a modern man. The literature often collectively describes all non-carious lesions and is therefore difficult to compare results obtained by different authors. Chemical factors are one of the predisposing factors responsible for the formation of wedge-shaped erosions. Aim: Examination of chemical risk factors as one of the predisposing causes responsible for the formation of wedge-shaped lesions. Method: We examined 62 patients with wedge-shaped erosions (mean age 45.52 ± 12.03 years, 58.1% of men and 60 patients without erosions in the control group (mean age 34.40 ± 9.28 years, 60% men . The entire examination was completed by using a questionnaire at the Dental Clinic of the University of Pristina - Kosovska Mitrovica. salivary pH was measured by the pH meter. Results: The results show that the wedge-shaped lesions often occur equally in both men and women. Considerably often it might appear in older people but can also occur in teenagers. Patients with wedge-shaped erosion have increased acidity of saliva, a heightened sense of acid in the mouth and consume a lot more carbonated drinks compared to patients without erosions. Conclusion: Wedge-shaped lesions are more common in people older than 40 years. Taking into account the results obtained in this study it can be concluded that the chemical risk factors truly fall within the predisposing factors that may be responsible for the creation of wedge-shaped erosions.

  15. AMAZON RAINFOREST COSMETICS: CHEMICAL APPROACH FOR QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Funasaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The market for natural cosmetics featuring ingredients derived from Amazon natural resources is growing worldwide. However, there is neither enough scientific basis nor quality control of these ingredients. This paper is an account of the chemical constituents and their biological activities of fourteen Amazonian species used in cosmetic industry, including açaí (Euterpe oleracea, andiroba (Carapa guianensis, bacuri (Platonia insignis, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, buriti (Mauritia vinifera or M. flexuosa, cumaru (Dipteryx odorata, cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum, guarana (Paullinia cupana, mulateiro (Calycophyllum spruceanum, murumuru (Astrocaryum murumuru, patawa (Oenocarpus bataua or Jessenia bataua, pracaxi (Pentaclethra macroloba, rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora, and ucuuba (Virola sebifera. Based on the reviewed articles, we selected chemical markers for the quality control purpose and evaluated analytical methods. Even though chromatographic and spectroscopic methods are major analytical techniques in the studies of these species, molecular approaches will also be important as used in food and medicine traceability. Only a little phytochemical study is available about most of the Amazonian species and some species such as açaí and andiroba have many reports on chemical constituents, but studies on biological activities of isolated compounds and sampling with geographical variation are limited.

  16. COLLABORATIVE TRIAL AND QUALITY CONTROL IN CHEMICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsito Narsito

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract                                                             This paper deals with some practical problems related to the quality of analytical chemical data usually met in practice. Special attention is given to the topic of quality control in analytical chemistry, since analytical data is one of the primary information from which some important scientifically based decision are to be made. The present paper starts with brief description on some fundamental aspects associated with quality of analytical data, such as sources of variation of analytical data, criteria for quality of analytical method, quality assurance in chemical analysis. The assessment of quality parameter for analytical method like the use of standard materials as well as standard methods is given. Concerning with the quality control of analytical data, the use of several techniques, such as control samples and control charts, in monitoring analytical data in quality control program are described qualitatively.  In the final part of this paper, some important remarks for the preparation of collaborative trials, including the evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of analytical method are also given Keywords: collaborative trials, quality control, analytical data Abstract                                                             This paper deals with some practical problems related to the quality of analytical chemical data usually met in practice. Special attention is given to the topic of quality control in analytical chemistry, since analytical data is one of the primary information from which some important scientifically based decision are to be made. The present paper starts with brief description on some fundamental aspects associated with quality of analytical data, such as sources of variation of analytical data, criteria for quality of

  17. Chemical factors of soil polution in Taganrog as population health risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Aydinov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our research goal was to perform a hygienic assessment of soil pollution with chemicals on areas aimed for housing and recreation zones in Taganrog, Rostov region. Due to the fact that surface layer of city soils is an open dynamic system which is tightly connected to atmosphere and hydrosphere we treated pollutants content in soils as indicators of territory anthropogenic transformation and technogenic load on population. We used atomic-adsorption spectrophotometry to detect heavy metals and highly efficient liquid chromatography to detect 3,4-benzpyrene content. The results comprise 660 examined soil samples taken from 19 monitoring points; they were examined to detect 7 pollutants content (lead, zinc, copper, nickel, cadmium, chromium, and mercury over 2008–2015; 144 samples were examined to detect 3,4-benzpyrene content over 2013–2015. We determined that priority pollutants among detected metals were zinc and lead; their content in city soils amounted up to 5.91 and 1.95 maximum permissible concentration. Complex indicator of city soils contamination varied from 1.61 to 2.02, long-term average annual value being 1.83. 3,4-benzpyrene was confirmed to be a substantial risk factor for population health as its concentrations exceeded maximum allowable values in 65.28 % of examined soil samples at average and maximum concentrations (2.45 and 38.05 MPC correspondingly. We recommend to include this chemical into systematic environmental quality monitoring. We detected regional peculiarities of soil pollution with chemicals on city territories aimed for housing, territories of pre-school children facilities, and recreation zones.

  18. An electrochemical study of natural and chemically controlled eumelanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ri Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Eumelanin is the most common form of the pigment melanin in the human body, with functions including antioxidant behavior, metal chelation, and free radical scavenging. This biopigment is of interest for biologically derived batteries and supercapacitors. In this work, we characterized the voltammetric properties of chemically controlled eumelanins produced from 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA building blocks, namely, DHI-melanin, DHICA-melanin, and natural eumelanin, extracted from the ink sac of cuttlefish, Sepia melanin. Eumelanin electrodes were studied for their cyclic voltammetric properties in acidic buffers including Na+, K+, NH4+, and Cu2+ ions.

  19. An electrochemical study of natural and chemically controlled eumelanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ri; Prontera, Carmela Tania; Di Mauro, Eduardo; Pezzella, Alessandro; Soavi, Francesca; Santato, Clara

    2017-12-01

    Eumelanin is the most common form of the pigment melanin in the human body, with functions including antioxidant behavior, metal chelation, and free radical scavenging. This biopigment is of interest for biologically derived batteries and supercapacitors. In this work, we characterized the voltammetric properties of chemically controlled eumelanins produced from 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) building blocks, namely, DHI-melanin, DHICA-melanin, and natural eumelanin, extracted from the ink sac of cuttlefish, Sepia melanin. Eumelanin electrodes were studied for their cyclic voltammetric properties in acidic buffers including Na+, K+, NH4+, and Cu2+ ions.

  20. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Wang, Ying; Kumar, Ananad; Wavrik, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs. This research project had three objectives. The first objective was to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective was to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective was to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs

  1. Risk factors for gallbladder cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kajal; Sreenivas, V; Velpandian, T; Kapil, Umesh; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Risk factors for gallbladder cancer (GBC) except gallstones are not well known. The objective was to study the risk factors for GBC. In a case-control study, 200 patients with GBC, 200 healthy controls and 200 gallstones patients as diseased controls were included prospectively. The risk factors studied were related to socioeconomic profile, life style, reproduction, diet and bile acids. On comparing GBC patients (mean age 51.7 years; 130 females) with healthy controls, risk factors were chemical exposure [odd ratios (OR): 7.0 (2.7-18.2); p < 0.001)], family history of gallstones [OR: 5.3 (1.5-18.9); p < 0.01)], tobacco [OR: 4.1 (1.8-9.7); p < 0.001)], fried foods [OR: 3.1 (1.7-5.6); p < 0.001], joint family [OR: 3.2 (1.7-6.2); p < 0.001], long interval between meals [OR: 1.4 (1.2-1.6); p < 0.001] and residence in Gangetic belt [OR: 3.3 (1.8-6.2); p < 0.001]. On comparing GBC cases with gallstone controls, risk factors were female gender [OR: 2.4 (1.3-4.3); p = 0.004], residence in Gangetic belt [OR: 2.3 (1.2-4.4); p = 0.012], fried foods [OR: 2.5 (1.4-4.4); p < 0.001], diabetes [OR: 2.7 (1.2-6.4); p = 0.02)], tobacco [OR 3.8 (1.7-8.1); p < 0.001)] and joint family [OR: 2.1 (1.2-3.4); p = 0.004]. The ratio of secondary to primary bile acids was significantly higher in GBC cases than gallstone controls (20.8 vs. 0.44). Fried foods, tobacco, chemical exposure, family history of gallstones, residence in Gangetic belt and secondary bile acids were significant risk factors for GBC. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  2. Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.; Jolley, R.L.; Gat, U.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1984-10-01

    This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly

  3. Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy; Russell, Marion; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-06-01

    Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations.

  4. Combined Noncyclic Scheduling and Advanced Control for Continuous Chemical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Petersen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel formulation for combined scheduling and control of multi-product, continuous chemical processes is introduced in which nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC and noncyclic continuous-time scheduling are efficiently combined. A decomposition into nonlinear programming (NLP dynamic optimization problems and mixed-integer linear programming (MILP problems, without iterative alternation, allows for computationally light solution. An iterative method is introduced to determine the number of production slots for a noncyclic schedule during a prediction horizon. A filter method is introduced to reduce the number of MILP problems required. The formulation’s closed-loop performance with both process disturbances and updated market conditions is demonstrated through multiple scenarios on a benchmark continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR application with fluctuations in market demand and price for multiple products. Economic performance surpasses cyclic scheduling in all scenarios presented. Computational performance is sufficiently light to enable online operation in a dual-loop feedback structure.

  5. Intelligent process control of fiber chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John Gregory

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a widely used process for the application of thin films. In this case, CVD is being used to apply a thin film interface coating to single crystal monofilament sapphire (Alsb2Osb3) fibers for use in Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC's). The hot-wall reactor operates at near atmospheric pressure which is maintained using a venturi pump system. Inert gas seals obviate the need for a sealed system. A liquid precursor delivery system has been implemented to provide precise stoichiometry control. Neural networks have been implemented to create real-time process description models trained using data generated based on a Navier-Stokes finite difference model of the process. Automation of the process to include full computer control and data logging capability is also presented. In situ sensors including a quadrupole mass spectrometer, thermocouples, laser scanner, and Raman spectrometer have been implemented to determine the gas phase reactants and coating quality. A fuzzy logic controller has been developed to regulate either the gas phase or the in situ temperature of the reactor using oxygen flow rate as an actuator. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of various samples are shown. A hierarchical control structure upon which the control structure is based is also presented.

  6. A non-chemical system for online weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-03-30

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%-91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide.

  7. Safety factor profile control in a tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Bribiesca Argomedo, Federico; Prieur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak uses Lyapunov techniques to address a challenging problem for which even the simplest physically relevant models are represented by nonlinear, time-dependent, partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because of the  spatiotemporal dynamics of transport phenomena (magnetic flux, heat, densities, etc.) in the anisotropic plasma medium. Robustness considerations are ubiquitous in the analysis and control design since direct measurements on the magnetic flux are impossible (its estimation relies on virtual sensors) and large uncertainties remain in the coupling between the plasma particles and the radio-frequency waves (distributed inputs). The Brief begins with a presentation of the reference dynamical model and continues by developing a Lyapunov function for the discretized system (in a polytopic linear-parameter-varying formulation). The limitations of this finite-dimensional approach motivate new developments in the infinite-dimensional framework. The t...

  8. Chemical and biological factors affecting bioavailability of contaminants in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezovich, J.P.

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses the influence that salinity has on the bioavailability of the two largest classes of contaminants, trace metals and organic compounds will be discussed. Although data on contaminant toxicity will be used to draw inferences about chemical availability, this discussion will focus on the properties that contaminants are likely to exhibit in waters of varying salinities. In addition, information on physiological changes that are affected by salinity will be used to illustrate how biological effects can alter the apparent availability of contaminants

  9. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp2 carbon atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-04-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp2 carbon structures.

  10. Can Chemical Mouthwash Agents Achieve Plaque/Gingivitis Control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Weijden, Fridus A; Van der Sluijs, Eveline; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Slot, Dagmar E

    2015-10-01

    Also note that structured abstracts are not allowed per journal style: What is the effect of a mouthwash containing various active chemical ingredients on plaque control and managing gingivitis in adults based on evidence gathered from existing systematic reviews? The summarized evidence suggests that mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine(CHX) and essential oils (EO) had a large effect supported by a strong body of evidence. Also there was strong evidence for a moderate effect of cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC). Evidence suggests that a CHX mouthwash is the first choice, the most reliable alternative is EO. No difference between CHX and EO with respect to gingivitis was observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of chemical, botanical and cultural managements of termites control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufera, Jiregna Tasisa; Fufa, Tena Gobena

    2014-01-15

    The study was conducted at Bojdi Dirmaji District, Wollega Zone (Western Ethiopia) using Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications. Eight different treatments of chemical, botanical and cultural control methods independently and in combinations were evaluated to identify the most effective method which is environmentally sustainable and economically feasible in controlling the termite problems. The data were collected over 12 weeks and analysis of variance showed significant difference among the treatments for all parameters. Maesa lanceolata 100 g alone showed lower percent damage between 2-8 weeks (33.3%), later on after 9-12 weeks it become non significant and the destructed mound was recovered. Mound treated with Diazinon 60% EC at the rate of 25 and 20 mL alone and Diazinon 60% EC combination with queen removal at rate of 15 and 10 mL showed significant control overall the treatment. From the results of the study the lower rate of Diazinon 60% EC (10 mL per mound) and queen removal could be better option to manage the termite problem and could be more sustainable and integrated manner in the study area.

  12. Chemical substances as risk factors of nephropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Marchewka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disease, does not fall into the group of diseases induced by toxic substances or environmental pollution, there is much evidence that some chemicals have considerable importance in its development. Exposure to substances with potential renal toxicity is especially dangerous for diabetics because it accelerates and intensifies diabetic nephropathy. This paper discusses the relationship between the xenobiotics and the development of diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy with particular emphasis on those substances that causes the greatest damage to the kidneys. These are cadmium, iron, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated organic compounds, nitrogen compounds, and contrast agents. In addition, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus induction or kidney damage by these xenobiotics are described.

  13. Relationship between soil chemical factors and grassland diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, F; Peeters, A; Tallowin, JRB; Bakker, JP; Bekker, RM; Fillat, F; Oomes, MJM

    Many studies carried out during these last few years have focused on the factors influencing plant diversity in species-rich grasslands. This is due to the fact that these ecosystems, among the most diversified in temperate climates, are extremely threatened; in some areas, they have almost

  14. Biological effects under combined action of radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenchenko, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    The paper considers the manifoild factors of environmental pollution effect upon living organisms and their possible response manifested in additivity, synergism and anthogonism. Consideration is also given to the possible practical measures for improving ecological situation and decreasing the risk of anthropogenesis negative after-effects

  15. Factors associated with chemical burns in Zhejiang province, China: An epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Rui M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-related burns are common among occupational injuries. Zhejiang Province is an industrial area with a high incidence of chemical burns. We aimed to survey epidemiological features of chemical burns in Zhejiang province to determine associated factors and acquire data for developing a strategy to prevent and treat chemical burns. Methods Questionnaires were developed, reviewed and validated by experts, and sent to 25 hospitals in Zhejiang province to prospectively collect data of 492 chemical burn patients admitted during one year from Sept. 1, 2008 to Aug. 31, 2009. Questions included victims' characteristics and general condition, injury location, causes of accident, causative chemicals, total body surface area burn, concomitant injuries, employee safety training, and awareness level of protective measures. Surveys were completed for each of burn patients by burn department personnel who interviewed the hospitalized patients. Results In this study, 417 victims (87.61% got chemical burn at work, of which 355 victims (74.58% worked in private or individual enterprises. Most frequent chemicals involved were hydrofluoric acid and sulfuric acid. Main causes of chemical injury accidents were inappropriate operation of equipment or handling of chemicals and absence of or failure to use effective individual protection. Conclusions Most chemical burns are preventable occupational injuries that can be attributed to inappropriate operation of equipment or handling of chemicals, lack of employee awareness about appropriate action and lack of effective protective equipment and training. Emphasis on safety education and protection for workers may help protect workers and prevent chemical burns.

  16. Size-controlled synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles through chemical and photo-chemical routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangeysh, Behzad

    The central objective of this work is developing convenient general procedures for controlling the formation and stabilization of nanoscale transition metal particles. Contemporary interest in developing alternative synthetic approaches for producing nanoparticles arises in large part from expanding applications of the nanomaterials in areas such as catalysis, electronics and medicine. This research focuses on advancing the existing nanoparticle synthetic routes by using a new class of polymer colloid materials as a chemical approach, and the laser irradiation of metal salt solution as a photo-chemical method to attain size and shape selectivity. Controlled synthesis of small metal nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 1 to 5nm is still a continuing challenge in nanomaterial synthesis. This research utilizes a new class of polymer colloid materials as nano-reactors and protective agents for controlling the formation of small transition metal nanoparticles. The polymer colloid particles were formed from cross-linking of dinegatively charged metal precursors with partially protonated poly dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDMAEMA). Incorporation of [PtCl6]2- species into the colloidal particles prior to the chemical reduction was effectively employed as a new strategy for synthesis of unusually small platinum nanoparticles with narrow size distributions (1.12 +/-0.25nm). To explore the generality of this approach, in a series of proof-of-concept studies, this method was successfully employed for the synthesis of small palladium (1.4 +/-0.2nm) and copper nanoparticles (1.5 +/-0.6nm). The polymer colloid materials developed in this research are pH responsive, and are designed to self-assemble and/or disassemble by varying the levels of protonation of the polymer chains. This unique feature was used to tune the size of palladium nanoparticles in a small range from 1nm to 5nm. The procedure presented in this work is a new convenient room temperature route for synthesis of

  17. Motivational Factors Contributing to Turkish High School Students' Achievement in Gases and Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Cansel; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of motivational factors to 10th grade students' achievement in gases and chemical reactions in chemistry. Three hundred fifty nine 10th grade students participated in the study. The Gases and Chemical Reactions Achievement Test and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were…

  18. Testing the control of mineral supply rates on chemical erosion in the Klamath Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, N.; Ferrier, K.

    2017-12-01

    The relationship between rates of chemical erosion and mineral supply is central to many problems in Earth science, including the role of tectonics in the global carbon cycle, nutrient supply to soils and streams via soil production, and lithologic controls on landscape evolution. We aim to test the relationship between mineral supply rates and chemical erosion in the forested uplands of the Klamath mountains, along a latitudinal transect of granodioritic plutons that spans an expected gradient in mineral supply rates associated with the geodynamic response to the migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction. We present 10Be-derived erosion rates and Zr-derived chemical depletion factors, as well as bulk soil and rock geochemistry on 10 ridgetops along the transect to test hypotheses about supply-limited and kinetically-limited chemical erosion. Previous studies in this area, comparing basin-averaged erosion rates and modeled uplift rates, suggest this region may be adjusted to an approximate steady state. Our preliminary results suggest that chemical erosion at these sites is influenced by both mineral supply rates and dissolution kinetics.

  19. Serum Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 as an Index of Chemical Hepato carcinogenesis in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelgawad, M.R.; Fekry, A.E.; Edrees, G.; Ali, M.A.; Ghareeb, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF β1) is an important mediator which controls liver cell proliferation and replication. The relation between TGF β1, Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and clinically thought hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats were investigated to clarify the clinical value of measuring peripheral serum TGF β1 and AFP in evaluation of HCC. Peripheral serum TGF β1 and AFP were measured during chemically induced hepato carcinogenesis. Male rats were given a genotoxic compound diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in drinking water for 149 days with control receiving drinking water only. Animals were killed at different times intervals 54, 86 and 149 days, serum TGF β1 levels were measured by, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and AFP levels were assayed by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). In DEN treated rats 54 days, there was mild portal tract inflammatory cellular infiltrate, serum TGF β1 and AFP levels were both significantly elevated above control (P>0.05 and P<0.001). At 86 days there were moderate inflammation (portal and peri portal), serum TGF β1 and AFP levels were significantly increased, (P<0.001). At 149 days typical HCC were present in ten of ten rats and serum TGF β1 and AFP were both significantly elevated compared with controls, (P<0.001). It can be concluded that serum TGF β1 and AFP levels are elevated during chemically induced HCC and have roles during the stages of process (initiation, promotion and progression); both serum TGF β1 and AFP levels can be used in parallel as a non invasive tumor markers for early diagnosis and prognosis of HCC

  20. Design and Control of Chemical Grouting : Volume 3 - Engineering Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Recent improvements in the engineering practice of chemical grouting have provided increased confidence in this method of ground modification. Designers can significantly improve the success of chemical grouting by defining their grouting program obj...

  1. Helium leak and chemical impurities control technology in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Sakaba, Nariaki

    2014-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has designed and developed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) hydrogen cogeneration system named gas turbine high-temperature reactor (GTHTR300C) as a commercial HTGR. Helium gas is used as the primary coolant in HTGR. Helium gas is easy to leak, and the primary helium leakage should be controlled tightly from the viewpoint of preventing the release of radioactive materials to the environment. Moreover from the viewpoint of preventing the oxidization of graphite and metallic material, the helium coolant chemistry should be controlled tightly. The primary helium leakage and the helium coolant chemistry during the operation is the major factor in the HTGR for commercialization of HTGR system. This paper shows the design concept and the obtained operational experience on the primary helium leakage control and primary helium impurity control in the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) of JAEA. Moreover, the future plan to obtain operational experience of these controls for commercialization of HTGR system is shown. (author)

  2. Factors controlling contrail cirrus optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft contrails develop into contrail cirrus by depositional growth and sedimentation of ice particles and horizontal spreading due to wind shear. Factors controlling this development include temperature, ice supersaturation, thickness of ice-supersaturated layers, and vertical gradients in the horizontal wind field. An analytical microphysical cloud model is presented and validated that captures these processes. Many individual contrail cirrus are simulated that develop differently owing to the variability in the controlling factors, resulting in large samples of cloud properties that are statistically analyzed. Contrail cirrus development is studied over the first four hours past formation, similar to the ages of line-shaped contrails that were tracked in satellite imagery on regional scales. On these time scales, contrail cirrus optical depth and microphysical variables exhibit a marked variability, expressed in terms of broad and skewed probability distribution functions. Simulated mean optical depths at a wavelength of 0.55 μm range from 0.05-0.5 and a substantial fraction 20-50% of contrail cirrus stay subvisible (optical depth <0.02, depending on meteorological conditions.

    A detailed analysis based on an observational case study over the continental USA suggests that previous satellite measurements of line-shaped persistent contrails have missed about 89%, 50%, and 11% of contrails with optical depths 0-0.05, 0.05-0.1, and 0.1-0.2, respectively, amounting to 65% of contrail coverage of all optical depths. When comparing observations with simulations and when estimating the contrail cirrus climate impact, not only mean values but also the variability in optical depth and microphysical properties need to be considered.

  3. A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Croft

    2007-06-01

    The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TA’s system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TA’s system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

  4. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; listed chemical. 598.309 Section 598.309 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical. The terms narcotic drug, controlled substance, and listed chemical have the meanings given those terms...

  5. Chemically Induced Degradation of the Oncogenic Transcription Factor BCL6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kerres

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor BCL6 is a known driver of oncogenesis in lymphoid malignancies, including diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Disruption of its interaction with transcriptional repressors interferes with the oncogenic effects of BCL6. We used a structure-based drug design to develop highly potent compounds that block this interaction. A subset of these inhibitors also causes rapid ubiquitylation and degradation of BCL6 in cells. These compounds display significantly stronger induction of expression of BCL6-repressed genes and anti-proliferative effects than compounds that merely inhibit co-repressor interactions. This work establishes the BTB domain as a highly druggable structure, paving the way for the use of other members of this protein family as drug targets. The magnitude of effects elicited by this class of BCL6-degrading compounds exceeds that of our equipotent non-degrading inhibitors, suggesting opportunities for the development of BCL6-based lymphoma therapeutics.

  6. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-01-01

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t 1/2 law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction

  7. Synthesis, chemical and biological quality control of radioiodinated peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.; Khalaj, A.; Beiki, D.; Motameidi, F.; Maloobi, M.; Karimian-dehghan, M.; Keshavarrzi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Iodinated compounds with I-131, 125 and 123 have been widely used for biochemical function studies. In conjunction with SPECT, [I-123] labelled proteins have various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine. Preparation of some radioiodinated peptides with tyrosine and/or lysine groups on their main chain molecules can be carried out with both direct and indirect methods, but lack of these groups in molecule cause the molecule dose not lend itself for direct radioiodination. In this study, human IgG and Formyl-Methyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine, FMLF, have been chosen as a model compounds for direct and indirect radioiodination respectively. Here, we will describe the labelling procedure of [I-125] IgG using chloramine-T as a suitable oxidant agent and [I-125 and I-131] FMLF by indirect method using ATE/SIB as a prosthetic group in multi-step reactions. The obtained results for chemical quality control of intermediate radioiodinated SIB by HPLC and two labelled IgG and FMLF will be also discussed. Biological results, biodistribution studies and SPECT scans on mice per-injected labelled FMLF show a low uptake of thyroid but a high at urine and bladder, perhaps because of low molecular weight of FMLF. In this case, it seems to be better to separate the reaction mixture of labelled FMLF by BPLC than Sephadex-G50 gel filtration. (Author)

  8. In-reactor performance of methods to control fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, E.T.; Gibby, R.L.; Wilson, C.N.; Lawrence, L.A.; Adamson, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    Inner surface corrosion of austenitic stainless steel cladding by oxygen and reactive fission product elements requires a 50 μm wastage allowance in current FBR reference oxide fuel pin design. Elimination or reduction of this wastage allowance could result in better reactor efficiency and economics through improvements in fuel pin performance and reliability. Reduction in cladding thickness and replacement of equivalent volume with fuel result in improved breeding capability. Of the factors affecting fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI), oxygen activity within the fuel pin can be most readily controlled and/or manipulated without degrading fuel pin performance or significantly increasing fuel fabrication costs. There are two major approaches to control oxygen activity within an oxide fuel pin: (1) control of total oxygen inventory and chemical activity (Δ anti GO 2 ) by use of low oxygen-to-metal ratio (O/M) fuel; and (2) incorporation of a material within the fuel pin to provide in-situ control of oxygen activity (Δ anti GO 2 ) and fixation of excess oxygen prior to, or in preference to reaction with the cladding. The paper describes irradiation tests which were conducted in EBR-II and GETR incorporating oxygen buffer/getter materials and very low O/M fuel to control oxygen activity in sealed fuel pins

  9. Factors controlling upper tropospheric relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling the distribution of relative humidity in the absence of clouds are examined, with special emphasis on relative humidity over ice (RHI under upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric conditions. Variations of temperature are the key determinant for the distribution of RHI, followed by variations of the water vapor mixing ratio. Multiple humidity modes, generated by mixing of different air masses, may contribute to the overall distribution of RHI, in particular below ice saturation. The fraction of air that is supersaturated with respect to ice is mainly determined by the distribution of temperature. The nucleation of ice in cirrus clouds determines the highest relative humdity that can be measured outside of cirrus clouds. While vertical air motion and ice microphysics determine the slope of the distributions of RHI, as shown in a separate study companion (Haag et al., 2003, clouds are not required to explain the main features of the distributions of RHI below the ice nucleation threshold. Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature; troposphere – composition and chemistry; general or miscellaneous

  10. Factors controlling upper tropospheric relative humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling the distribution of relative humidity in the absence of clouds are examined, with special emphasis on relative humidity over ice (RHI under upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric conditions. Variations of temperature are the key determinant for the distribution of RHI, followed by variations of the water vapor mixing ratio. Multiple humidity modes, generated by mixing of different air masses, may contribute to the overall distribution of RHI, in particular below ice saturation. The fraction of air that is supersaturated with respect to ice is mainly determined by the distribution of temperature. The nucleation of ice in cirrus clouds determines the highest relative humdity that can be measured outside of cirrus clouds. While vertical air motion and ice microphysics determine the slope of the distributions of RHI, as shown in a separate study companion (Haag et al., 2003, clouds are not required to explain the main features of the distributions of RHI below the ice nucleation threshold.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature; troposphere – composition and chemistry; general or miscellaneous

  11. Chemical control and design considerations for CANDU-PHW steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.R.; Churchill, B.R.

    1978-01-01

    Ontario Hydro presently operates eight nuclear power units with a total capacitiy of about 4000 MW(e) net. Operating experience has been with Monel-400 and with Inconel-600 tubed steam generators using sodium phosphate or all volatile control of the boiler steam and water system. With a heavy water Heat Transport System, steam generator tube integrity is an essential ingredient of economical power production. Only three steam generator tube failures have occurred so far in about 40 unit-years operation. None was attributable to corrosion. Factors in the good reliability are, careful engineering design, good quality control at all stages of tubing and steam generator manufacture and close chemical control. The continuing evolution of our steam generator design means that future requirements will be more stringent. (author)

  12. The significance of feedback control for chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet

    1992-01-01

    The conventional way of applying chemical sensors is in an open-loop configuration. A parameter of the chemical domain, such as a gas or ion concentration, is converted into a parameter of the mechanical or electrical domain, often with non-linear transfer characteristics. The paramagnetic oxygen

  13. Inventory Control: A Small Electronic Device for Studying Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, A. L.; Calvo-Aguilar, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Shows how the rate of reaction can be studied using a simple electronic device that overcomes the difficulty students encounter in solving the differential equations describing chemical equilibrium. The device, used in conjunction with an oscilloscope, supplies the voltages that represent the chemical variables that take part in the equilibrium.…

  14. Colon cancer controls versus population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaerlev, Linda; Lynge, Elsebeth; Sabroe, Svend

    2004-01-01

    are interchangeable with the experience for population controls. Patient controls may even be preferable from population controls under certain conditions. In this study we examine if colon cancer patients can serve as surrogates for proper population controls in case-control studies of occupational risk factors...... about occupational, medical and life style conditions. RESULTS: No statistical significant difference for educational level, medical history or smoking status was seen between the two control groups. There was evidence of a higher alcohol intake, less frequent work as a farmer and less exposure...... to pesticides among colon cancer controls. CONCLUSIONS: Use of colon cancer controls may provide valid exposure estimates in studies of many occupational risk factors for cancer, but not for studies on exposure related to farming....

  15. Femtosecond laser control of chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser control of chemical reactions is made possible through the use of pulse-shaping techniques coupled to a learning algorithm feedback loop – teaching the laser pulse to control the chemical reaction. This can result in controllable...

  16. Chemical Weed Control in Saffron (Crocus sativus Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid abbaspoor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Saffron is derived from the stigmas of the saffron (Crocus sativus L. It is the world’s most expensive spice and has been widely used in many countries. It is also increasingly used for medicinal purposes. Weed control in this perennial, small and low growing crop, needs a lot of labor work. Chemical approach is one of the most effective methods for weed control in saffron. Currently, some herbicide options are available for applications in saffron. For example, satisfactory broadleaved weed control would be achieved by post-emergence application of metribuzin and ioxynil after harvesting saffron flowers. Application of glyphosate and/or 2, 4-D / 2, 4-DB are used to clean up the beds prior to the new season’s flowering and growth of saffron in New Zealand. The selective weed control of weeds in saffron has not been widely reported elsewhere but some in Iran. The choice of herbicide(s depends on the kind of weeds present. In some literatures metribuzin showed promising results for weed control in saffron fields. It is selectively used for control of annual grasses and numerous broad-leaved weeds. The objective of this study was the evaluation of the efficacy of 15 herbicides with different mode of actions, selected on the basis of dominant weed flora and previous studies, on weeds grown in saffron fields. Materials and Methods A field study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of herbicides for weed control in saffron (Crocus sativus in Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center of Khorasan Razavi Province, Mashhad, in 2014-2015 growing season. The experiment was conducted in a completely randomized block design with three replications. Treatments were consisted of metsulfuron-methyl + sulfosulfuron (Total® at dose of 40 g ha-1, sulfosulfuron (Apirus® at dose of 26.6 g ha-1, oxadiazon (Ronestar® at dose of 2 l ha-1, oxyflurofen (Goal® at dose of 2 l ha-1, mesosulfuron + idosulfuron + diflufenican

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Chemical Defence Pathways in Plant Disease Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rook, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    on each topic. The chapter reviews the some of the scientific and technical challenges in metabolic engineering and the new possibilities emerging from recent technological developments. It concludes by discussing the outlook for bioengineered chemical defences as part of crop protection strategies, also...... with antimicrobial properties for use in crop protection. It presents an overview of the metabolic engineering efforts made in the area of plant chemical defence. For in-depth information on the characteristics of a specific class of chemical defence compounds, the reader is referred to the specialized reviews...

  18. Factors Affecting Exocellular Polysaccharide Production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Grown in a Chemically Defined Medium†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Sandrine; Furlan, Sylviane; Crepeau, Marie-Jeanne; Cerning, Jutta; Desmazeaud, Michel

    2000-01-01

    We developed a chemically defined medium (CDM) containing lactose or glucose as the carbon source that supports growth and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production of two strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. The factors found to affect EPS production in this medium were oxygen, pH, temperature, and medium constituents, such as orotic acid and the carbon source. EPS production was greatest during the stationary phase. Composition analysis of EPS isolated at different growth phases and produced under different fermentation conditions (varying carbon source or pH) revealed that the component sugars were the same. The EPS from strain L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CNRZ 1187 contained galactose and glucose, and that of strain L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CNRZ 416 contained galactose, glucose, and rhamnose. However, the relative proportions of the individual monosaccharides differed, suggesting that repeating unit structures can vary according to specific medium alterations. Under pH-controlled fermentation conditions, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains produced as much EPS in the CDM as in milk. Furthermore, the relative proportions of individual monosaccharides of EPS produced in pH-controlled CDM or in milk were very similar. The CDM we developed may be a useful model and an alternative to milk in studies of EPS production. PMID:10919802

  19. Determinants of job stress in chemical process industry: A factor analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Balagopal G; Praveensal, C J; Madhu, G

    2015-01-01

    Job stress is one of the active research domains in industrial safety research. The job stress can result in accidents and health related issues in workers in chemical process industries. Hence it is important to measure the level of job stress in workers so as to mitigate the same to avoid the worker's safety related problems in the industries. The objective of this study is to determine the job stress factors in the chemical process industry in Kerala state, India. This study also aims to propose a comprehensive model and an instrument framework for measuring job stress levels in the chemical process industries in Kerala, India. The data is collected through a questionnaire survey conducted in chemical process industries in Kerala. The collected data out of 1197 surveys is subjected to principal component and confirmatory factor analysis to develop the job stress factor structure. The factor analysis revealed 8 factors that influence the job stress in process industries. It is also found that the job stress in employees is most influenced by role ambiguity and the least by work environment. The study has developed an instrument framework towards measuring job stress utilizing exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

  20. Chemical and molecular factors in irritable bowel syndrome: current knowledge, challenges, and unanswered questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Oduyebo, Ibironke; Halawi, Houssam

    2016-11-01

    Several chemical and molecular factors in the intestine are reported to be altered and to have a potentially significant role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), particularly in IBS with diarrhea. These include bile acids; short-chain fatty acids; mucosal barrier proteins; mast cell products such as histamine, proteases, and tryptase; enteroendocrine cell products; and mucosal mRNAs, proteins, and microRNAs. This article reviews the current knowledge and unanswered questions in the pathobiology of the chemical and molecular factors in IBS. Evidence continues to point to significant roles in pathogenesis of these chemical and molecular mechanisms, which may therefore constitute potential targets for future research and therapy. However, it is still necessary to address the interaction between these factors in the gut and to appraise how they may influence hypervigilance in the central nervous system in patients with IBS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Estimation for Retention Factor of Isoflavones in Physico-Chemical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ki; Row, Kyung Ho

    2003-01-01

    The estimation of retention factors by correlation equations with physico-chmical properties maybe helpful in chromatographic work. The physico-chemical properties were water solubility (S), hydrophobicity (P), total energy (Et), connectivity index 1 (1χ), hydrophilic-lipophlic balance (x) and hydrophilic surface area (h) of isoflavones. The retention factors were experimentally measured by RP-HPLC. Especially, the empirical regulations of water solubility and hydrophobicity were expressed in a linear form. The equation between retention factors and various physico-chemical properties of isoflavones was suggested as k = a0 + a 1 log S + a2 log P Q + a3 (E t ) + a4 ( 1 χ) + a5 (x) + a6 (h), and the correlation coefficients estimated were relatively higher than 0.95. The empirical equations might be successfully used for a prediction of the various chromatographic characteristics of substances, with a similar chemical structure

  2. Interactions between toxic chemicals and natural environmental factors--a meta-analysis and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Ryszard; Bednarska, Agnieszka J; Kramarz, Paulina E; Loureiro, Susana; Scheil, Volker; Kudłek, Joanna; Holmstrup, Martin

    2010-08-15

    The paper addresses problems arising from effects of natural environmental factors on toxicity of pollutants to organisms. Most studies on interactions between toxicants and natural factors, including those completed in the EU project NoMiracle (Novel Methods for Integrated Risk Assessment of Cumulative Stressors in Europe) described herein, showed that effects of toxic chemicals on organisms can differ vastly depending purely on external conditions. We compiled data from 61 studies on effects of temperature, moisture and dissolved oxygen on toxicity of a range of chemicals representing pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, plant protection products of bacterial origin and trace metals. In 62.3% cases significant interactions (pnatural factors and chemicals were found, reaching 100% for the effect of dissolved oxygen on toxicity of waterborne chemicals. The meta-analysis of the 61 studies showed that the null hypothesis assuming no interactions between toxic chemicals and natural environmental factors should be rejected at p=2.7 x 10(-82) (truncated product method probability). In a few cases of more complex experimental designs, also second-order interactions were found, indicating that natural factors can modify interactions among chemicals. Such data emphasize the necessity of including information on natural factors and their variation in time and across geographic regions in ecological risk assessment. This can be done only if appropriate ecotoxicological test designs are used, in which test organisms are exposed to toxicants at a range of environmental conditions. We advocate designing such tests for the second-tier ecological risk assessment procedures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. In silico models for predicting vector control chemicals targeting Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillers, J.; Lagneau, C.; Lattes, A.; Garrigues, J.C.; Clémenté, M.M.; Yébakima, A.

    2014-01-01

    Human arboviral diseases have emerged or re-emerged in numerous countries worldwide due to a number of factors including the lack of progress in vaccine development, lack of drugs, insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, climate changes, societal behaviours, and economical constraints. Thus, Aedes aegypti is the main vector of the yellow fever and dengue fever flaviviruses and is also responsible for several recent outbreaks of the chikungunya alphavirus. As for the other mosquito species, the A. aegypti control relies heavily on the use of insecticides. However, because of increasing resistance to the different families of insecticides, reduction of Aedes populations is becoming increasingly difficult. Despite the unquestionable utility of insecticides in fighting mosquito populations, there are very few new insecticides developed and commercialized for vector control. This is because the high cost of the discovery of an insecticide is not counterbalanced by the ‘low profitability’ of the vector control market. Fortunately, the use of quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modelling allows the reduction of time and cost in the discovery of new chemical structures potentially active against mosquitoes. In this context, the goal of the present study was to review all the existing QSAR models on A. aegypti. The homology and pharmacophore models were also reviewed. Specific attention was paid to show the variety of targets investigated in Aedes in relation to the physiology and ecology of the mosquito as well as the diversity of the chemical structures which have been proposed, encompassing man-made and natural substances. PMID:25275884

  4. Physico-chemical quality control 131I-sodium 2-iodohippurate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, J.; Olive, E.; Issac, M.; Cruz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Some physico-chemical methods for analytical control 131 I-sodium 2-iodohippurate are compared. The most convenient to applicate in hospital and in more especialized quality control laboratories are recommended

  5. CHEMICAL CONTROL OF BEAN WEEVIL, ACANTHOSCELIDES OBTECTUS SAY IN STORAGE CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M PORCA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the positive results obtained by some pesticides applied against the bean weevil - Acanthoscelides obtectus Say, after a synthetic rewiew of the potential chemical methods which may be used in the chemical control of the insectes harmful to the stored bean seeds. The chemical control is realised treatments wits syntetic pyrethroid (permetrin, deltametrin and organophosphoric insecticides (malation, pirimifos metil, fenitrotion and chlrorpirifos-metil.

  6. Chemically triggered ejection of membrane tubules controlled by intermonolayer friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, J-B; Khalifat, N; Puff, N; Angelova, M I

    2009-01-09

    We report a chemically driven membrane shape instability that triggers the ejection of a tubule growing exponentially toward a chemical source. The instability is initiated by a dilation of the exposed monolayer, which is coupled to the membrane spontaneous curvature and slowed down by intermonolayer friction. Our experiments are performed by local delivery of a basic pH solution to a giant vesicle. Quantitative fits of the data give an intermonolayer friction coefficient b approximately 2x10;{9} J s/m;{4}. The exponential growth of the tubule may be explained by a Marangoni stress yielding a pulling force proportional to its length.

  7. 78 FR 64210 - Extension of Review Periods Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Certain Chemicals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Certain Chemicals and Microorganisms; Premanufacture... 325 and 324110), e.g., chemical manufacturing and petroleum refineries. The North American Industrial... Agency under section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), received by EPA on or before October 1...

  8. Compatible biological and chemical control systems for Rhizoctonia solani in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, van den P.H.J.F.; Luttikholt, A.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    A series of chemical and biological control agents were tested for compatibility with the Rhizoctonia-specific biocontrol fungus Verticillium biguttatum aimed at designing novel control strategies for black scurf (Rhizoctonia solani) and other tuber diseases in potato. The efficacy of chemicals,

  9. Factors influencing the profitability of optimizing control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broussaud, A.; Guyot, O.

    1999-01-01

    Optimizing control systems supplement conventional Distributed Control Systems and Programmable Logic Controllers. They continuously implement set points, which aim at maximizing the profitability of plant operation. They are becoming an integral part of modern mineral processing plants. This trend is justified by economic considerations, optimizing control being among the most cost-effective methods of improving metallurgical plant performance. The paper successively analyzes three sets of factors, which influence the profitability of optimizing control systems, and provides guidelines for analyzing the potential value of an optimizing control system at a given operation: external factors, such as economic factors and factors related to plant feed; features of the optimizing control system; and subsequent maintenance of the optimizing control system. It is shown that pay back times for optimization control projects are typically measured in days. The OCS software used by the authors for their applications is described briefly. (author)

  10. Maternal Chemical and Drug Intolerances: Potential Risk Factors for Autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbrun, Lynne P; Palmer, Raymond F; Jaen, Carlos R; Svoboda, Melissa D; Perkins, Jimmy; Miller, Claudia S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether chemically intolerant women are at greater risk for having a child with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We conducted a case-control study of chemical intolerance among mothers of children with ASD (n = 282) or ADHD (n = 258) and children without these disorders (n = 154). Mothers participated in an online survey consisting of a validated chemical intolerance screening instrument, the Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory (QEESI). Cases and controls were characterized by parental report of a professional diagnosis. We used a one-way, unbalanced analysis of variance to compare means across the 3 groups. Both mothers of children with ASD or ADHD had significantly higher mean chemical intolerance scores than did mothers of controls, and they were more likely to report adverse reactions to drugs. Chemically intolerant mothers were 3 times more likely (odds ratio, 3.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-6.02) to report having a child with autism or 2.3 times more likely (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-5.04) to report a child with ADHD. Relative to controls, these mothers report their children are more prone to allergies (P Family Medicine.

  11. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael W; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kerr, Richard A; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D; Kim, Kwang S; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-13

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  12. Factors controlling superelastic damping capacity of SMAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr; Pilch, Jan; Landa, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 5-6 (2009), 603-611 ISSN 1059-9495 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : shape memory alloys * superelastic damping * thermomechanical testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.592, year: 2009

  13. The influences of the physical-chemical factors on the free-volume relations in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, J.; Kristiak, J.; Kristiakova, K.; Sausa, O.; Bandzuch, P.

    1995-01-01

    The positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to the study of different physical-chemical factors on the free-volume microstructure of the model polymeric systems [amorphous 1,4-cis-poly(butadiene), amorphous a-tactic and semi-crystal iso-tactic poly(propylene), polycarbonate

  14. Two Experiments to Approach the Boltzmann Factor: Chemical Reaction and Viscous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Claudio; Battaglia, Onofrio R.; Guastella, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a pedagogical approach aimed at pointing out the role played by the Boltzmann factor in describing phenomena usually perceived as regulated by different mechanisms of functioning. Experimental results regarding some aspects of a chemical reaction and of the viscous flow of some liquids are analysed and described in terms…

  15. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  16. HUMAN FACTORS GUIDANCE FOR CONTROL ROOM EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OHARA, J.; BROWN, W.; STUBLER, W.; HIGGINS, J.; WACHTEL, J.; PERSENSKY, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    The Human-System Interface Design Review Guideline (NUREG-0700, Revision 1) was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide human factors guidance as a basis for the review of advanced human-system interface technologies. The guidance consists of three components: design review procedures, human factors engineering guidelines, and a software application to provide design review support called the ''Design Review Guideline.'' Since it was published in June 1996, Rev. 1 to NUREG-0700 has been used successfully by NRC staff, contractors and nuclear industry organizations, as well as by interested organizations outside the nuclear industry. The NRC has committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool in the face of emerging and rapidly changing technology. This paper addresses the current research to update of NUREG-0700 based on the substantial work that has taken place since the publication of Revision 1

  17. Factors Affecting Sustainable Animal Trypanosomosis Control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trypanosomiasis control in parts of Kaduna State within the sub- humid savannah ... livestock farmers in planning and implementation. Across ... help to ensure a better management of livestock in tsetse fly infested areas with minimal loses in .... market and administered by them. This drug ... Table 2 shows the analysis of.

  18. What factors control dimerization of coniferyl alcohol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl J. Houtman

    1999-01-01

    Data suggest that the dimerization of coniferyl alcohol is not under thermodynamic control. In this study, molecular dynamics calculations were used to estimate the effect of the solvent environment. In water, the coniferyl alcohol radicals were forced to associate by the formation of a solvent cage. In glycerol, the solvent cage effect appeared to be absent. These...

  19. Soft-Starting Power-Factor Motor Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    Three-phase power-factor controller with soft start is based on earlier version that does not control starting transients. Additional components serve to turn off "run" command signal and substitute gradual startup command signal during preset startup interval. Improved controller reduces large current surge that usually accompanies starting. Controller applies power smoothly, without causing motor vibrations.

  20. Chemical Controls of Ozone Dry Deposition to the Sea Surface Microlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, L.; Chance, R.; Tinel, L.; Saint, A.; Sherwen, T.; Loades, D.; Evans, M. J.; Boxhall, P.; Hamilton, J.; Stolle, C.; Wurl, O.; Ribas-Ribas, M.; Pereira, R.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic dry deposition of atmospheric ozone (O3) is both the largest and most uncertain O3 depositional sink, and is widely acknowledged to be controlled largely by chemical reactions in the sea surface microlayer (SML) involving iodide (I-) and dissolved organic material (DOM). These reactions not only determine how quickly O3 can be removed from the atmosphere, but also result in emissions of trace gases including volatile organic compounds and may constitute a source of secondary organic aerosols to the marine atmosphere. Iodide concentrations at the sea surface vary by approximately an order of magnitude spatially, leading to more than fivefold variation in ozone deposition velocities (and volatile iodine fluxes). Sea-surface temperature is a reasonable predictor of [I-], however two recent parameterisations for surface I- differ by a factor of two at low latitudes. The nature and reactivity of marine DOM to O3 is almost completely unknown, although studies have suggested approximately equivalent chemical control of I- and DOM on ozone deposition. Here we present substantial new measurements of oceanic I- in both bulk seawater and the overlying SML, and show improved estimates of the global sea surface iodide distribution. We also present analyses of water-soluble DOM isolated from the SML and bulk seawater, and corresponding laboratory studies of ozone uptake to bulk and SML seawater, with the aim of characterizing the reactivity of O3 towards marine DOM.

  1. Improvement of chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakovic-Ognjanovic, Vladana N.; Zivojinovic, Dragana Z.; Grgur, Branimir N.; Rajakovic, Ljubinka V.

    2011-01-01

    A more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle (WSC) of thermal power plants (TPP) is proposed in this paper. Minimization of corrosion effects by the production of ultra pure water and its strict control is the basis of all the investigated processes. The research involved the analysis of water samples in the WSC through key water quality parameters and by the most convenient analytical tools. The necessity for the stricter chemical control is demonstrated through a concrete example of the TPP Nikola Tesla, Serbia. After a thorough analysis of the chemical control system of the WSC, diagnostic and control parameters were chosen for continuous systematic measurements. Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as the ions which indicate the corrosion potential of the water and give insight into the proper production and maintenance of water within the WSC. Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica, were considered and related to their quantitative values. - Research highlights: → The more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plant Nikola Tesla, Serbia. → In chemical control the diagnostic and control parameters were optimized and introduced for the systematic measurements in the water-steam cycle. → Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as ions which indicate corrosion potential of water and give insight to proper function of production and maintenance of water within water-team cycle. → Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica are considered and related with their quantitative values.

  2. Human factors methods for nuclear control room design. Volume I. Human factors enhancement of existing nuclear control rooms. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Seidenstein, S.; Eckert, S.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1979-11-01

    Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary specialty concerned with influencing the design of equipment systems, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable operator performance. Human factors approaches were applied in the design of representative nuclear power plant control panels. First, methods for upgrading existing operational control panels were examined. Then, based on detailed human factors analyses of operator information and control requirements, designs of reactor, feedwater, and turbine-generator control panels were developed to improve the operator-control board interface, thereby reducing the potential for operator errors. In addition to examining present-generation concepts, human factors aspects of advanced systems and of hybrid combinations of advanced and conventional designs were investigated. Special attention was given to warning system designs. Also, a survey was conducted among control board designers to (1) develop an overview of design practices in the industry, and (2) establish appropriate measures leading to a more systematic concern for human factors in control board design

  3. The chemical monitoring and control during temporary turbine trip or reactor scram of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heng

    2012-01-01

    During normal operation, a malfunction of equipment or improper operation sometimes results in a turbine trip or reactor scram or even cold shutdown. Because present chemical control strategy and programs aimed at the situation of normal operation and planed refueling outage, no integrate emergency program of radiochemical and chemical control had been developed to focus on this urgent and unexpected situation. After many years of practice and experience feedback, chemists have created an emergency collaborative program of radiochemical and chemical control which aims at these unexpected situations such as unplanned unit down power, turbine trip, or reactor scram. The program defines different radiochemical and chemical control measures and steps during different status to monitor primary loop dose rate variation, fuel assembly integrity and water chemical excursion to prevent components from corrosion. (author)

  4. Toxic effects of the interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with chemicals or physical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Zhao, Jinshun

    2013-01-01

    Due to their chemical stability and nonallergic, nonirritant, and ultraviolet protective properties, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in industries such as electronics, optics, and material sciences, as well as architecture, medicine, and pharmacology. However, increasing concerns have been raised in regards to its ecotoxicity and toxicity on the aquatic environment as well as to humans. Although insights have been gained into the effects of TiO2 NPs on susceptible biological systems, there is still much ground to be covered, particularly in respect of our knowledge of the effects of the interaction of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. Studies suggest that interactions of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors may result in an increase in toxicity or adverse effects. This review highlights recent progress in the study of the interactive effects of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. PMID:23901269

  5. Control of Cellular Morphology by Mechanical Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoumine, Olivier

    1996-11-01

    This short review deals with the influence of mechanical factors on eucaryotic cell morphology and structure. We classify these factors into two types: i) external forces (e.g. gravitational forces or hemodynamic stresses), which when applied experimentally allow characterization of passive mechanical properties; and ii) internal forces, e.g. generated by molecular motors or polymerization processes. Perturbation of one or more of these forces induces significant changes in cell shape, cytoskeleton and pericellular matrix organization. We describe these phenomena in view of current models. Cette brève revue traite de l'influence des facteurs mécaniques sur la morphologie et la structure des cellules eucaryotes. Nous classifions ces facteurs en deux catégories : i) les forces externes (par exemple les forces de gravitation et les contraintes hèmodynamiques) qui, imposées in vitro, permettent de caractériser les propriétés mécaniques passives ; et ii) les forces internes, par exemple celles générées par les moteurs moléculaires ou les processus de polymérisation. La perturbation de l'une ou de l'autre de ces forces provoque des changements significatifs de la morphologie cellulaire ainsi que l'organisation du cytosquelette et de la matrice péricellulaire. Nous décrivons ces phénomènes en fonction de modèles existants.

  6. Biological effects of concomitant influence of radioactive and chemical factors. (Experimental research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshkov, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Remote consequences of concomitant influence of radioactive and chemical hazards substances, modeling the ecological situation at the territory of the Altaj region after the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk test site is studied on the mice. Negative effect of the concomitant impact of radioactive and hazardous chemical substances on the basic morpho-functional systems of animals is revealed; the reproduction function proved to be the most sensitive one. It is noted that the radiation factor constitutes the basis of all violations of bone marrow blood-producing function by concomitant influence

  7. Analysis of chemical factors affecting marine ecosystem around nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Yoon Dong; Chun, Ki Jeong; Kim, Jin Kyu; Jung, Kyeong Chai; Lee, Yeong Keun; Park, Hyo Kook

    1994-06-01

    The ecological data of the coastal area of Youngkwang nuclear power plant from 1987 to 1993 were comprehensively analyzed, and various physical and chemical properties of sea water and sediments were measured. Major factors affecting phytoplankton standing crops were suspended substances, nitrate, and silicate. The contents of iron, chromium, copper, and sulfur in sediments sampled from the discharge channel were slightly higher than those in the other areas. In order to qantify the chemical impacts on marine ecosystem, it is desirable that a systematic survey be made through the whole year cycle to assure the consistency and confidence of the related data. (Author)

  8. Cell cycle controls: potential targets for chemical carcinogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Afshari, C A; Barrett, J C

    1993-01-01

    The progression of the cell cycle is controlled by the action of both positive and negative growth regulators. The key players in this activity include a family of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, which are themselves regulated by other kinases and phosphatases. Maintenance of balanced cell cycle controls may be directly linked to genomic stability. Loss of the check-points involved in cell cycle control may result in unrepaired DNA damage during DNA synthesis or mitosis leading to genet...

  9. 77 FR 70188 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ...; Notice of Registration; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. By Notice dated July 17, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on July 26, 2012, 77 FR 43863, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N... has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a) and determined that the registration of Boehringer...

  10. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Safety and Emission Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensor technology is being developed for leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire safety applications. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Using these technologies, sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Factors Controlling Isoprene Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Damon, Megan R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of variability in the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured by the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States for 2005-2007. The data show that the inferred, regional-average isoprene emissions varied by about 22% during summer and are well correlated with temperature, which is known to influence emissions. Part of the correlation with temperature is likely associated with other causal factors that are temperature-dependent. We show that the variations in HCHO are convolved with the temperature dependence of surface ozone, which influences isoprene emissions, and the dependence of the HCHO column to mixed layer height as OMI's sensitivity to HCHO increases with altitude. Furthermore, we show that while there is an association of drought with the variation in HCHO, drought in the southeastern U.S. is convolved with temperature.

  12. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaatz, F.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Provencio, P.P.; Jackson, J.L

    2003-01-15

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/{mu}m and a field enhancement factor {beta}=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs.

  13. Diameter control and emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown using chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaatz, F.H.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Provencio, P.P.; Jackson, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via thermal chemical vapor deposition from a sputtered 4-nm-thick nickel catalyst film on a tungsten-coated silicon substrate. CNTs grow from a mixture of nitrogen and acetylene gases at temperatures ranging from 630 to 790 deg. C, resulting in CNT outer diameters of 5-350 nm. CNT diameters increase exponentially with temperature. These results define regimes for template growth fabricated in catalytically active anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with controlled pinhole sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. We measure a threshold electron emission field of 3 V/μm and a field enhancement factor β=5230 on randomly oriented 10-nm diameter CNTs

  14. The Synergistic Effect between Electrical and Chemical Factors in Plasma Gene/Molecule-Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasma and processes on cells promote plasma gene/molecule transfection. We have discovered a new plasma source using a microcapillary electrode which enables high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability simultaneously. However, the mechanism of the transfection by plasma was not clear. To clarify the transfection mechanisms by micro plasma, we focused on the effects of electrical (current, charge, field, etc.) and chemical (radicals, RONS, etc.) factors generated by the micro plasma and evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones. At first, the necessity of the electrical factors was estimated by the laser produced plasma (LPP). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cell was cultured on a 96-well plate or 12-well micro slide chamber. Plasmids pCX-EGFP in Tris-EDTA buffer was dropped on the cells and they were exposed to the capillary discharge plasma (CDP) or the LPP. In the case of the CDP, the plasma was generated between the tip of the capillary electrode and the cells so that both electrical and chemical factors were supplied to the cells. In this setup, about 20% of average transfection efficiency was obtained. In the case of the LPP, the plasma was generated apart from the cells so that electrical factors were not supplied to the cells. In this setup, no transfection was observed. These results show that the electrical factors are necessary for the plasma gene transfection. Next, the necessity of the chemical factors was estimated the effect of catalase to remove H2O2 in CDP. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.4 by scavenging H2O2 with catalase. However, only the solution of H2O2 caused no gene transfection in cells. These results shows that H2O2 is important species to cause gene/molecule transfection but still needs a synergistic effect with electrical or other chemical factors. This work was partly supported by

  15. Dealing With A Controllable Risk Factor Like Diet In The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a silent killer in Nigeria and many parts of the world. Certain factors increase the risk of CVD. While there are controllable factors that contribute and predispose to the development of CVD like diet, exercise, tobacco use, high blood pressure and obesity, there are uncontrollable factors like ...

  16. Risk factors for caries - control and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melida Hasanagić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate a prevalence of caries, filled permanentand extracted permanent teeth, as well as caries risk factors inschool children aged 7, 9 and 11.Methods. The survey included 800 children (296 children aged7; 254 children aged 9 and 250 children aged 11 from the MostarMunicipality, 400 of them living in both rural and urban areas.A dental mirror and standard light of dental chair were used forexamination. The DMF index (Dental Caries, Missing Teeth andFilled Teeth was determined, as well as failure in keeping teethhygiene, sugar intake with food, and incidence of oral cavity infection.Results. The dental state of permanent teeth in children aged 7and 9 has shown significant difference between the children fromrural and urban areas (p < 0,001. Out of 2,698 and 2,790 permanentteeth in children aged 11 from rural and urban areas, 1,086(40,25 % and 884 (31.68 % had caries, respectively (p < 0.01.The difference between these groups of children has been foundin relation to the index of oral hygiene too (p < 0.05.Conclusion. An identification of risk groups for getting caries wasvery important and could help health and social structures to maintaintheir programs in order to improve oral health.

  17. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation and decision making for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials, and energy....

  18. 78 FR 39337 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on May 31, 2013, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, 2820 N. Normandy Drive, Petersburg...

  19. 77 FR 43863 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on June 8, 2012, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals...

  20. 77 FR 43861 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on June 8, 2012, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive...

  1. 78 FR 39340 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. Pursuant to Sec. 1301.33(a), Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this is notice that on May 31, 2013, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals...

  2. Underlying Factors for Practicality of the Production Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arica, Emrah; Strandhagen, Jan Ola; Hvolby, Hans-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    and communication technology, coordination and feedback, human factors and decision making, and measurement are the identified factors to be taken into account. Industrial interviews with three case companies, that are participating to the research program called The Norwegian Manufacturing Future (SFI NORMAN......This paper gives indications to important factors that must be considered for effectiveness of the production control systems under uncertainty. Five key factors have been identified by the literature study. Production schedule generation and execution approach under uncertainty, information...

  3. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials and energy. The implemented control strategy combines a biologically-inspired method with optimal control concepts for finding more sustainable operating trajectories. The sustainability assessment of process operating points is carried out by using the U.S. EPA’s Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for the ENvironmental Sustainability of Chemistries with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator (GREENSCOPE tool that provides scores for the selected indicators in the economic, material efficiency, environmental and energy areas. The indicator scores describe process performance on a sustainability measurement scale, effectively determining which operating point is more sustainable if there are more than several steady states for one specific product manufacturing. Through comparisons between a representative benchmark and the optimal steady states obtained through the implementation of the proposed controller, a systematic decision can be made in terms of whether the implementation of the controller is moving the process towards a more sustainable operation. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through a case study of a continuous fermentation process for fuel production, whose material and energy time variation models are characterized by multiple steady states and oscillatory conditions.

  4. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation and decision making for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials, and energy. The implemented control strategy combines a biologically inspired method with optimal control concepts for finding more sustainable operating trajectories. The sustainability assessment of process operating points is carried out by using the U.S. E.P.A.’s Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for the ENvironmental Sustainability of Chemistries with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator (GREENSCOPE) tool that provides scores for the selected indicators in the economic, material efficiency, environmental and energy areas. The indicator scores describe process performance on a sustainability measurement scale, effectively determining which operating point is more sustainable if there are more than several steady states for one specific product manufacturing. Through comparisons between a representative benchmark and the optimal steady-states obtained through implementation of the proposed controller, a systematic decision can be made in terms of whether the implementation of the controller is moving the process towards a more sustainable operation. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through a case study of a continuous fermentation process for fuel production, whose materi

  5. MEANS OF CHEMICAL RECONNAISSANCE AND CONTROL IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CBRN TERRORISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan VIČAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear terrorism (CBRN terrorism is a special form of terrorism known for its extraordinary efficiency as superterrorism or ultra-terrorism. Detection and identification of the presence of hazardous chemical toxic substances is very difficult and can be achieved only by using advanced detection and monitoring instruments and devices that are currently only in the equipment of units of the Fire and Rescue Service of the Czech Republic and some units of the chemical troops of the Czech Army. Instigators of chemical terrorism count on the surprise factor, as well as on the difficulty and great delay in detecting the presence of hazardous chemical toxic substances. Therefore, for early warning of the population and minimization of consequences of a terrorist attack with the use of hazardous chemicals, the ability of early detection and subsequent identification is very important.

  6. FACTORS INFLUENCING ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE IN THE FOOD MANUFACTURING, CHEMICAL, AGRICULTURAL WHOLESALING AND BIOTECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Maude Roucan-Kane

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify factors determining a business investment strategy (i.e., the choice of investment commitment and form of organizational structure) in the food manufacturing, chemical, agricultural wholesaling and biotechnology industries. Propositions regarding strategic alliance theories are tested on over 400 inter-firm collaborative agreements using secondary data from major US and European companies for the 1994-97 period. Results suggest that transactions with...

  7. Decay Accelerating Factor (CD55) Protects Neuronal Cells from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Pavlakovic G, Isom GE: Dopaminergic neurotoxicity of cyanide: neurochemical, histological and behavioral characterization. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol...provided the original work is properly cited. ResearchDecay accelerating factor (CD55) protects neuronal cells from chemical hypoxia-induced injury...deposition of C3a/C5a and membrane attack complex (MAC or C5b-9) production. The present study investigates the ability of DAF to protect primary cultured

  8. Control of Maillard Reactions in Foods: Strategies and Chemical Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Ray, Colin A

    2017-06-14

    Maillard reactions lead to changes in food color, organoleptic properties, protein functionality, and protein digestibility. Numerous different strategies for controlling Maillard reactions in foods have been attempted during the past decades. In this paper, recent advances in strategies for controlling the Maillard reaction and subsequent downstream reaction products in food systems are critically reviewed. The underlying mechanisms at play are presented, strengths and weaknesses of each strategy are discussed, and reasonable reaction mechanisms are proposed to reinforce the evaluations. The review includes strategies involving addition of functional ingredients, such as plant polyphenols and vitamins, as well as enzymes. The resulting trapping or modification of Maillard targets, reactive intermediates, and advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are presented with their potential unwanted side effects. Finally, recent advances in processing for control of Maillard reactions are discussed.

  9. Efficacy and mechanisms of non-antibacterial, chemical plaque control by dentifrices - An in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; White, Don J.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van der Mei, Henny C.

    Objectives: The provision of antiplaque benefits to dentifrices assists patients in improving hygiene and reducing susceptibility to gingivitis and caries. Chemical plaque control involves different mechanisms and is mostly associated with antibacterial effects, but also includes effects on pellicle

  10. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.

  11. Application of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) to organic chemical contaminants in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropkins, K; Beck, A J

    2002-03-01

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a systematic approach to the identification, assessment, and control of hazards that was developed as an effective alternative to conventional end-point analysis to control food safety. It has been described as the most effective means of controlling foodborne diseases, and its application to the control of microbiological hazards has been accepted internationally. By contrast, relatively little has been reported relating to the potential use of HACCP, or HACCP-like procedures, to control chemical contaminants of food. This article presents an overview of the implementation of HACCP and discusses its application to the control of organic chemical contaminants in the food chain. Although this is likely to result in many of the advantages previously identified for microbiological HACCP, that is, more effective, efficient, and economical hazard management, a number of areas are identified that require further research and development. These include: (1) a need to refine the methods of chemical contaminant identification and risk assessment employed, (2) develop more cost-effective monitoring and control methods for routine chemical contaminant surveillance of food, and (3) improve the effectiveness of process optimization for the control of chemical contaminants in food.

  12. Accessible protocol for practice classroom about physical and chemical factors that affect the biomembranes integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Barros Galvão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current work is to review a protocol used in practical classes to demonstrate some factors that affect biomembrane integrity. Sugar-beet fragments were utilized as the experimental model as membrane damage could be visualized by leakage of betacyanins, hydrophilic pigments accumulated in the cell vacuoles. The tests were carried out as discrete experiments utilizing physical agents and chemical products present in the student daily routine. To test the effect of temperature, sugar-beet fragments were submitted to heat, cold or both at different times of exposition. When chemical products were tested, sugar-beet fragments were exposed to organic solvents (common alcohol and acetone or polar and amphipathic substances (disinfectant, detergent, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite. The obtained results were discussed in terms of the capacity of the physical and chemical factors to cause membrane damage. The review of this protocol using reagents that are present in the student daily routine were able to demonstrate clearly the effect of the different tested factors, allowing the utilization of this practical class under limited conditions.

  13. The Red Queen in a potato field: integrated pest management versus chemical dependency in Colorado potato beetle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyokhin, Andrei; Mota-Sanchez, David; Baker, Mitchell; Snyder, William E; Menasha, Sandra; Whalon, Mark; Dively, Galen; Moarsi, Wassem F

    2015-03-01

    Originally designed to reconcile insecticide applications with biological control, the concept of integrated pest management (IPM) developed into the systems-based judicious and coordinated use of multiple control techniques aimed at reducing pest damage to economically tolerable levels. Chemical control, with scheduled treatments, was the starting point for most management systems in the 1950s. Although chemical control is philosophically compatible with IPM practices as a whole, reduction in pesticide use has been historically one of the main goals of IPM practitioners. In the absence of IPM, excessive reliance on pesticides has led to repeated control failures due to the evolution of resistance by pest populations. This creates the need for constant replacement of failed chemicals with new compounds, known as the 'insecticide treadmill'. In evolutionary biology, a similar phenomenon is known as the Red Queen principle - continuing change is needed for a population to persevere because its competitors undergo constant evolutionary adaptation. The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is an insect defoliator of potatoes that is notorious for its ability to develop insecticide resistance. In the present article, a review is given of four case studies from across the United States to demonstrate the importance of using IPM for sustainable management of a highly adaptable insect pest. Excessive reliance on often indiscriminate insecticide applications and inadequate use of alternative control methods, such as crop rotation, appear to expedite evolution of insecticide resistance in its populations. Resistance to IPM would involve synchronized adaptations to multiple unfavorable factors, requiring statistically unlikely genetic changes. Therefore, integrating different techniques is likely to reduce the need for constant replacement of failed chemicals with new ones. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. The conundrum of chemical boll weevil control in subtropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a tropical Mesoamerican insect that invaded the United States in 1893, spreading across the Cotton Belt as the key pest of cotton and causing billions of dollars in yield losses and insecticide-based control efforts;...

  15. Comparison between chemical and biological control of Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... College of Education, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The results revealed that treatment with the fungicide carbomar or T. harzianum as well as with B. subtilis, in presence of F. solani increased the % of healthy seedlings as well as their length , fresh and dry weight than in presence of F. solani alone but still less than the control.

  16. Soft Sensors: Chemoinformatic Model for Efficient Control and Operation in Chemical Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funatsu, Kimito

    2016-12-01

    Soft sensor is statistical model as an essential tool for controlling pharmaceutical, chemical and industrial plants. I introduce soft sensor, the roles, the applications, the problems and the research examples such as adaptive soft sensor, database monitoring and efficient process control. The use of soft sensor enables chemical industrial plants to be operated more effectively and stably. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Chemical modelling as a management tool for water pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpitlaw, D. [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1996-12-31

    In a colliery currently being re-mined by opencast methods, the coal seam was originally extracted using bord and pillar mining. Depressions in the seam floor have facilitated the formation of large underground water bodies. This water has become acidic and contaminated by heavy metals. Mine water is treated by a liming plant and then released into evaporation pans. Seepage from the pans enters a natural wetlands. The de-watering of old workings ahead of mining periodically subjects the liming plant to large quantities of low quality water, and a nett export of salts such as sulphate occurs. As the mine is situated in a sensitive river catchment, this pollution is unacceptable. A chemical speciation program developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency was used to analyse effluent from the liming plant and wetland. Liming plant effluent water was found to vary greatly due to the conditions prevalent in the different water bodies. The liming plant and wetland were periodically subjected to pollution loads beyond the wetland`s assimilative capacity, resulting failure of the system. Despite this, the software provided evidence of the wetland`s pollution-ameliorating potential. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Weed clearance in Hudiara Nallah by chemical weed control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    Hudiara Nallah is a flood stream in West Punjab. It has a length of about 45km and breadth of nearly 25 metres. About 20 subsidiary drains join with the Nallah. These drains have a length of about 270km. The Nallah has a discharge capacity of 1248 cusecs. Most of the subsidiary drains start from ponds which are generally infected with Eichhornia plants. These plants enter into the subsidiary drains and finally into Hudiara Nallah. The plants float freely on the surface of water and multiply at a high rate. One plant of the weed propagates to 24 plants in a period of one month. The plants thus cover the whole drain in a few months. The weed also originates from seeds. Their heavy growth forms a mat-like surface. The weeds also choke bridges and sometimes cause damage to their structures. These obstruct the flow of water and decrease the carrying capacity of the drain. Their infestation thus causes floods and the very purpose of the drains gets lost. Thus the Nallah is heavily infested with Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth weed). Due to its fast propagation and heavy infestation it was not possible to clear the weed manually. The problem was, therefore, referred to the Chemistry Division of the Irrigation and Power Research Institute, Amritsar, by the Drainage Circle of the Irrigation Department in June 1978 when weed propagation was in full swing. A chemical treatment method of eradication was attempted

  19. Factors Controlling Nitrogen Fluxes in Groundwater in Agricultural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Green, C. T.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Predictions of effects of land use changes on water quality require identification of the relative importance of geochemical and hydrologic factors. To understand the factors controlling the transport of nitrogen in groundwater, vertical fluxes of water and solutes were estimated for 13 aquifers in agricultural areas located in California, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Texas, and Wisconsin. The aquifers are overlain by unsaturated zones with thicknesses ranging from 2.5 to 100 m. Precipitation ranges from 19 to 132 cm/yr and irrigation ranges from 0 to 120 cm/yr. Main crop types include corn, soybeans, forage, wheat, and cotton. A 1-dimensional mathematical model was developed to estimate vertical N transport in response to N inputs on the land surface from chemical fertilizer, manure and atmospheric deposition. Simulated vertical profiles of O2, NO3-, N2 from denitrification, Cl- and atmospheric age tracers were matched to observations by adjusting parameters for recharge rate, unsaturated zone travel time, N leaching ratio (defined as leaching fraction of N reaching water table of N input at land surface), Cl- leaching ratio, O2 reduction rate and denitrification rate. Results indicated that vertical NO3 fluxes below the water table were affected by both geochemical and physical factors. High vertical NO3 fluxes below the water table are associated with high N input at the land surface. Values of Cl- leaching ratios were less than 1 (0.42 to 1) likely as a result of runoff and exported harvested crops. N leaching ratios were lower (0.1 to 0.6), consistent with additional N losses such as denitrification and volatilization. The sites with high leaching ratios for both N and Cl tended to be those with high recharge rates and low ET loss, defined as the fraction of applied water lost to ET. Modeled zero-order denitrification rates in the saturated zone varied within an order of magnitude with a maximum rate of 1.6 mg

  20. Risk factors associated with lipomyelomeningocele: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Arash; Hanaei, Sara; Fadakar, Kaveh; Dadkhah, Sahar; Arjipour, Mahdi; Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, it seems that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the induction of neural tube defects. Lipomyelomeningocele (LipoMMC) is a rather common type of closed neural tube defect, but only limited studies have investigated the potential risk factors of this anomaly. Therefore, the purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the risk factors involved in LipoMMC formation. Various risk factors were evaluated in 35 children between 1 month and 10 years of age with LipoMMC in a hospital-based case-control study. The 2 control arms consisted of 35 children with myelomeningocele (MMC group) and 35 children with congenital anomalies other than central nervous system problems (control group). All groups were matched for age and visited the same hospital. A structured questionnaire was used for the collection of all data, including the mothers' weight and height during pregnancy, education, reproductive history, previous abortions, and socioeconomic status, as well as the parents' consanguinity and family history of the same anomalies. Univariate analysis of the children with LipoMMC compared to the control group showed that the use of periconceptional folic acid supplementation was significantly lower in the MMC and LipoMMC groups compared to the control group. In addition, comparison of the MMC and control groups revealed statistically significant differences regarding the use of folic acid and maternal obesity. In multivariate analysis, use of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester was an independent risk factor for LipoMMC and MMC. Furthermore, maternal obesity was a significantly positive risk factor for MMC. The probable risk factors for LipoMMC were investigated in this case-control study. Consumption of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester is an independent protective factor against LipoMMC. It seems that larger studies are needed to examine other possible

  1. Selection of chemical markers for the quality control of medicinal plants of the genus Cecropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mondragón, Andrés; Ortíz, Orlando O; Bijttebier, Sebastiaan; Vlietinck, Arnold; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc; Caballero-George, Catherina

    2017-12-01

    Several Cecropia (Cecropiaceae) species are traditionally used in Latin America for the treatment of a variety of diseases including diabetes, arterial hypertension, asthma, bronchitis, anxiety, and inflammation. At present, a number of commercial products based on these plants have been introduced into the market with very little information on methods for guaranteeing their quality and safety. This work proposes potential chemical markers for the quality control of the raw materials of Cecropia obtusifolia Bertol., Cecropia peltata L., Cecropia glaziovii Snethl., Cecropia pachystachya Trécul, and Cecropia hololeuca Miq. The Herbal Chemical Marker Ranking System (Herb MaRS) developed by the National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) at the University of Western Sydney was used for selecting chemical markers for the quality control of selected medicinal species of Cecropia. This review covers the period from 1982 to 2016. Chlorogenic acid, flavonoidal glycosides (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, isovitexin, and rutin), catechin, epicatechin, procyanidins (B2, B5, and C1), steroids (β-sitosterol), and triterpenoids (α-amyrin, pomolic, tormentic and ursolic acids) were selected as chemical markers for the quality control of the leaves. It is necessary to establish comprehensive standards for guaranteeing quality, safety and efficacy of herbal drugs. The selection of adequate chemical markers for quality control purposes requires a good knowledge about the chemical composition of medicinal plants and their associated biological properties. To the best of our knowledge this review article is the first to address the identification and quantitative determination of the chemical markers for the genus Cecropia.

  2. Factors influencing warfarin control in Australia and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaitis, Nijole; Ching, Chi Keong; Teo, Siew Chong; Chen, Liping; Badrick, Tony; Davey, Andrew K; Crilly, Julia; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra

    2017-09-01

    Warfarin is widely used for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Variations in warfarin control, as measured by time in therapeutic range (TTR), have been reported across different regions and ethnicities, particularly between Western and Asian countries. However, there is limited data on comparative factors influencing warfarin control in Caucasian and Asian patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine warfarin control and potential factors influencing this in patients with NVAF in Australia and Singapore. Retrospective data was collected for patients receiving warfarin for January to June 2014 in Australia and Singapore. TTR was calculated for individuals with mean patient TTR used for analysis. Possible influential factors on TTR were analysed including age, gender, concurrent co-morbidities, and concurrent medication. The mean TTR was significantly higher in Australia (82%) than Singapore (58%). At both sites, chronic kidney disease significantly lowered this TTR. Further factors influencing control were anaemia and ageWarfarin control was significantly higher in Australia compared to Singapore, however chronic kidney disease reduced control at both sites. The different levels of control in these two countries, together with patient factors further reducing control may impact on anticoagulant choice in these countries with better outcomes from warfarin in Australia compared to Singapore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance ratings and personality factors in radar controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether primary or second-order personality questionnaire factors were related to job performance ratings on the Employee Appraisal Record in a sample of 264 radar controllers. A Pearson correlation matrix wa...

  4. Factors Influencing Prevention and Control of Malaria among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    investigate factors that influence malaria prevention and control practices among pregnant ... treatment of clinical cases and the promotion of ... influence their decision regarding malaria ..... have the ability to purchase anti-malaria drugs that.

  5. Chemical inventory control program for mixed and hazardous waste facilities at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ades, M.J.; Vincent, A.M. III.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed Waste (MW) and Hazardous Waste (HW) are being stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) pending onsite and/or offsite treatment and disposal. The inventory control for these wastes has recently been brought under Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) in accordance with DOE Order 5480.22. With the TSRs was the question of the degree of rigor with which the inventory is to be tracked, considering that the variety of chemicals present, or that could be present, numbers in the hundreds. This paper describes the graded approach program to track Solid Waste (SW) inventories relative to TSRs. The approach uses a ratio of the maximum anticipated chemical inventory to the permissible inventory in accordance with Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) limits for on- and off-site receptors. A specific threshold ratio can then be determined. The chemicals above this threshold ratio are to be included in the chemical inventory control program. The chemicals that fall below the threshold ratio are managed in accordance with existing practice per State and RCRA hazardous materials requirements. Additionally, the facilities are managed in accordance with process safety management principles, specifically using process hazards analyses, which provides safety assurance for even the small quantities that may be excluded from the formal inventory control program. The method yields a practical approach to chemical inventory control, while maintaining appropriate chemical safety margins. The resulting number of specific chemicals that require inclusion in a rigorous inventory control program is greatly reduced by about 80%, thereby resulting in significant reduction in chemical data management while preserving appropriate safety margins

  6. Materials control and accountability at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denning, G.E.; Britschgi, J.J.; Spraktes, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The ICPP high enriched uranium recovery process has historically been operated as a single Material Balance Area (MBA), with input and output measurement capabilities. Safeguards initiated changes in the last five years have resulted in significant materials control and accountability improvements. Those changes include semi-automation of process accountability measurement, data collection and recording; definition of Sub-MBAs; standard plant cleanouts; and, bimonthly inventory estimates. Process monitoring capabilities are also being installed to provide independent operational procedural compliance verification, process anomaly detection, and enhanced materials traceability. Development of a sensitivity analysis approach to defining process measurement requirements is in progress

  7. Algorithmization of problems on the personnel information support in the automatic chemical control systems at NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilkov, N.Ya.; Kryukov, Yu.V.; Cheshun, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    When elaborating software for the standard algorithms of the information support of the efficient control (keeping) of water chemistry operation (WCO) at the NPP power units one introduces an approach when the systems of chemical control are realized as the systems of quality control of in-loop physical and chemical processes gathering force in the course of time. Elaboration of algorithms to proceed data of the operational chemical control seeks for elaboration of the statistic procedures to detect anomalies of the processes at the early stages of their development more efficient in contrast to the standard procedures of control. The introduced procedure is used in the demonstration model of the system for diagnostics of some typical reasons of violation of the first circuit WCO of WWER-1000 power units [ru

  8. The effect of biological and chemical control agents on the health status of the very early potato cultivar Rosara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cwalina-Ambroziak Bożena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The external appearance and quality of table potatoes are determined, among other factors, by the health status of the plants during the growing season. Chemical control methods are often combined with biocontrol agents to effectively fight potato pathogens. Potatoes of the very early cultivar Rosara were grown in experimental plots. The plots were located in Tomaszkowo (NE Poland, 2007-2009. The experiment involved the following treatments: 1 biological control − mycorrhizal Glomus spp. inoculum was applied to the roots, − tubers were dressed and plants were sprayed with Polyversum three times during the growing season, 2 chemical control - at two-week intervals, plants were sprayed with the following fungicides: Infinito 687.5 SC and Tanos 50 WG, Valbon 72 WG and Tanos 50 WG. In the control treatment, potato plants were not protected against pathogens. During the growing season, the severity of late blight and early blight was evaluated on a nine-point scale. The composition of fungal communities colonising potato stems was analysed. The fungistatic properties of the fungicides used in the field experiment were evaluated in an in vitro test. The symptoms of infections caused by Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria spp. were significantly reduced in the treatment which used the integrated chemical and biological control. The least diverse fungal community was isolated from fungicide-treated plants. In the in vitro test, fungicides at all analysed concentrations inhibited the linear mycelial growth of selected pathogens.

  9. Revisiting factors controlling methane emissions from high-Arctic tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastepanov, M.; Sigsgaard, C.; Tagesson, T.

    2013-01-01

    controlling methane emission, i.e. temperature and water table position. Late in the growing season CH4 emissions were found to be very similar between the study years (except the extremely dry 2010) despite large differences in climatic factors (temperature and water table). Late-season bursts of CH4...... short-term control factors (temperature and water table). Our findings suggest the importance of multiyear studies with a continued focus on shoulder seasons in Arctic ecosystems....

  10. Chemical Cocktails Enable Hepatic Reprogramming of Mouse Fibroblasts with a Single Transcription Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Liver or hepatocytes transplantation is limited by the availability of donor organs. Functional hepatocytes independent of the donor sources may have wide applications in regenerative medicine and the drug industry. Recent studies have demonstrated that chemical cocktails may induce reprogramming of fibroblasts into a range of functional somatic cells. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts can be transdifferentiated into the hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps using only one transcription factor (TF (Foxa1, Foxa2, or Foxa3 plus a chemical cocktail. These iHeps show typical epithelial morphology, express multiple hepatocyte-specific genes, and acquire hepatocyte functions. Genetic lineage tracing confirms the fibroblast origin of these iHeps. More interestingly, these iHeps are expandable in vitro and can reconstitute the damaged hepatic tissues of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient (Fah−/− mice. Our study provides a strategy to generate functional hepatocyte-like cells by using a single TF plus a chemical cocktail and is one step closer to generate the full-chemical iHeps.

  11. Conversion factors from counts to chemical ratios for the EURITRACK tagged neutron inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kanawati, W.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Eleon, C.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.

    2011-01-01

    The EURopean Illicit TRAfficking Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) uses 14 MeV neutrons produced by the 3 H(d,n) 4 H fusion reaction to detect explosives and narcotics in cargo containers. Reactions induced by fast neutrons produce gamma rays, which are detected in coincidence with the associated alpha particle to determine the neutron direction. In addition, the neutron path length is obtained from a time-of-flight measurement, thus allowing the origin of the gamma rays inside the container to be determined. Information concerning the chemical composition of the target material is obtained from the analysis of the energy spectrum. The carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen relative count contributions must be converted to chemical proportions to distinguish illicit and benign organic materials. An extensive set of conversion factors based on Monte Carlo numerical simulations has been calculated, taking into account neutron slowing down and photon attenuation in the cargo materials. An experimental validation of the method is presented by comparing the measured chemical fractions of known materials, in the form of bare samples or hidden in a cargo container, to their real chemical composition. Examples of application to real cargo containers are also reported, as well as simulated data with explosives and illicit drugs.

  12. Conversion factors from counts to chemical ratios for the EURITRACK tagged neutron inspection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kanawati, W. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perot, B., E-mail: bertrand.perot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carasco, C.; Eleon, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-10-21

    The EURopean Illicit TRAfficking Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) uses 14 MeV neutrons produced by the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}H fusion reaction to detect explosives and narcotics in cargo containers. Reactions induced by fast neutrons produce gamma rays, which are detected in coincidence with the associated alpha particle to determine the neutron direction. In addition, the neutron path length is obtained from a time-of-flight measurement, thus allowing the origin of the gamma rays inside the container to be determined. Information concerning the chemical composition of the target material is obtained from the analysis of the energy spectrum. The carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen relative count contributions must be converted to chemical proportions to distinguish illicit and benign organic materials. An extensive set of conversion factors based on Monte Carlo numerical simulations has been calculated, taking into account neutron slowing down and photon attenuation in the cargo materials. An experimental validation of the method is presented by comparing the measured chemical fractions of known materials, in the form of bare samples or hidden in a cargo container, to their real chemical composition. Examples of application to real cargo containers are also reported, as well as simulated data with explosives and illicit drugs.

  13. Human factors methods for nuclear control room design. Volume 2. Human factors survey of control room design practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Parsons, S.O.

    1979-11-01

    An earlier review of the control rooms of operating nuclear power plants identified many design problems having potential for degrading operator performance. As a result, the formal application of human factors principles was found to be needed. This report demonstrates the use of human factors in the design of power plant control rooms. The approaches shown in the report can be applied to operating power plants, as well as to those in the design stage. This study documents human factors techniques required to provide a sustained concern for the man-machine interface from control room concept definition to system implementation

  14. Meta-analysis of studies on chemical, physical and biological agents in the control of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Estelita Pereira; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Rolim Neto, Modesto Leite

    2015-09-04

    Aedes aegypti is a vector of international concern because it can transmit to humans three important arboviral diseases: yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. Epidemics that are repeated year after year in a variety of urban centers indicate that there are control failures, allowing the vector to continue expanding. To identify the most effective vector control strategies and the factors that contributed to the success or failure of each strategy, we carried out a systematic review with meta-analysis of articles published in 12 databases, from 1974 to the month of December 2013. We evaluated the association between the use of whatever chemical substance, mechanical agent, biological or integrated actions against A. aegypti and the control of the vector, as measured by 10 indicators. We found 2,791 articles, but after careful selection, only 26 studies remained for analysis related to control interventions implemented in 15 countries, with 5 biological, 5 chemical, 3 mechanical and 13 integrated strategies. The comparison among all of them, indicated that the control of A. aegypti is significantly associated with the type of strategy used, and that integrated interventions consist of the most effective method for controlling A. aegypti. The most effective control method was the integrated approach, considering the influence of eco-bio-social determinants in the virus-vector-man epidemiological chain, and community involvement, starting with community empowerment as active agents of vector control.

  15. PMBLDC motor drive with power factor correction controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, G.J.; Ramachandran, Rakesh; Arun, N.

    2012-01-01

    reliability, and low maintenance requirements. The proposed Power Factor Controller topology improves power quality by improving performance of PMBLDCM drive, such as reduction of AC main current harmonics, near unity power factor. PFC converter forces the drive to draw sinusoidal supply current in phase...

  16. Simplifying the audit of risk factor recording and control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Min; Cooney, Marie Therese; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To simplify the assessment of the recording and control of coronary heart disease risk factors in different countries and regions. DESIGN: The SUrvey of Risk Factors (SURF) is an international clinical audit. METHODS: Data on consecutive patients with established coronary heart disease...

  17. PROCESS CONTROL IN THE EDUCATION OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    lstván Csontos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Las prácticas de laboratorio demuestran la importancia de los modernos procesos de control en las tecnologías de química orgánica. Se necesitaba desarrollar un sistema que une las ventajas de los calorímetros de reacción con las de modelo de los reactores controladas de la industria. El diseño de hardware y de software se permite trasladar el programa desarrollado en el laboratorio para el nivel industrial. El algoritmo general para las reacciones de diazotación y clormetilación es aplicado para el sintésis del cloruro de benzo-diazonio y cloruro de dietoxi-benzil en las prácticas de laboratorio.

  18. Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthmaand Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.

    2006-03-01

    Most research into effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. This paper briefly reviews reported findings on associations of asthma or allergy in infants or children with risk factors related to indoor chemical emissions from residential materials or surface coatings. Associations, some strong (e.g., odds ratios up to 13), were reported. The most frequently identified risk factors were formaldehyde, aromatic organic compounds such as toluene and benzene, plastic materials and plasticizers, and recent painting. Exposures and consequent effects from indoor sources may be exacerbated by decreased ventilation. Identified risk factors may be proxies for correlated exposures. Findings suggest the frequent occurrence of important but preventable effects on asthma and allergy in infants and children worldwide from modern residential building materials and coatings.

  19. COMPLIANCE AS FACTORING BUSINESS RISK MANAGEMENT: CONTROL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Makarovych

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Indetermination of modern economy conditions and the lack of theoretical knowledge gained by domestic scientists about risk in factoring business actualize the research concerning the methodology and technique of factoring companies’ risk management. The article examines compliance which is the technology innovative for Ukrainian market of factoring risk management technologies. It is determined that the compliance is the risk management process directed to free will correspondence to state, international legislation as well as to the ethics standards accepted in the field of regulated legal relations and to the traditions of business circulation to sustain the necessary regulations and standards of market behaviour, and to consolidate the image of a factoring company. Compliance risks should be understood as the risks of missed profit or losses caused by the conflicts of interests and the discrepancy of employees’ actions to internal and external standard documents. The attention is paid to the control over the compliance. The author singles out 3 kinds of the compliance control such as institutional, operational and the compliance control over the observance of conducting business professional ethics regulations which are necessary for providing of efficient management of factoring business risks. The paper shows the organizing process of factoring business compliance control (by the development of internal standard documents, a compliance program, the foundation of compliance control subdivision, monitoring of the risks cause the choice, made by management entities of a factoring company, of the management methods of risks for their business. The development of new and improvement of existed forms of compliance control organizing process help satisfy users’ information needs and requests of the risk management factoring company department. The suggestions proposed create the grounds for the transformation and improvement of factoring

  20. Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller therapy in chest clinics in a sub-Saharan African setting: a cross-sectional study. ... Background: Adherence to controller therapy in asthma is a major concern during the management of the disease. Objective: To determine the adherence rate and identify the ...

  1. Interactive effects of chemical and biological controls on food-web composition in saline prairie lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ryan N; Wissel, Björn

    2012-11-27

    Salinity is restricting habitatability for many biota in prairie lakes due to limited physiological abilities to cope with increasing osmotic stress. Yet, it remains unclear how salinity effects vary among major taxonomic groups and what role other environmental parameters play in shaping food-web composition. To answer these questions, we sampled fish, zooplankton and littoral macroinvertebrates in 20 prairie lakes (Saskatchewan, Canada) characterized by large gradients in water chemistry and lake morphometry. We showed that salinity thresholds differed among major taxonomic groups, as most fishes were absent above salinities of 2 g L-1, while littoral macroinvertebrates were ubiquitous. Zooplankton occurred over the whole salinity range, but changed taxonomic composition as salinity increased. Subsequently, the complexity of fish community (diversity) was associated with large changes in invertebrate communities. The directional changes in invertebrate communities to smaller taxa indicated that complex fish assemblages resulted in higher predation pressure. Most likely, as the complexity of fish community decreased, controls of invertebrate assemblages shifted from predation to competition and ultimately to productivity in hypersaline lakes. Surprisingly, invertebrate predators did not thrive in the absence of fishes in these systems. Furthermore, the here identified salinity threshold for fishes was too low to be a result of osmotic stress. Hence, winterkill was likely an important factor eliminating fishes in low salinity lakes that had high productivity and shallow water depth. Ultimately, while salinity was crucial, intricate combinations of chemical and biological mechanisms also played a major role in controlling the assemblages of major taxonomic groups in prairie lakes.

  2. Plant management in natural areas: balancing chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Manning; James. Miller

    2011-01-01

    After determining the best course of action for control of an invasive plant population, it is important to understand the variety of methods available to the integrated pest management professional. A variety of methods are now widely used in managing invasive plants in natural areas, including chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods. Once the preferred...

  3. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I ampersand C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I ampersand C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I ampersand C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I ampersand C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab

  4. Human factors evaluation of the engineering test reactor control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.; Boone, M.P.

    1981-03-01

    The Reactor and Process Control Rooms at the Engineering Test Reactor were evaluated by a team of human factors engineers using available human factors design criteria. During the evaluation, ETR, equipment and facilities were compared with MIL-STD-1472-B, Human Engineering design Criteria for Military Systems. The focus of recommendations centered on: (a) displays and controls; placing displays and controls in functional groups; (b) establishing a consistent color coding (in compliance with a standard if possible); (c) systematizing annunciator alarms and reducing their number; (d) organizing equipment in functional groups; and (e) modifying labeling and lines of demarcation

  5. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine von Maltzan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results.

  6. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  7. Nanoscale control of reversible chemical reaction between fullerene C60 molecules using scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Masato; Kuwahara, Yuji; Aono, Masakazu; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2011-04-01

    The nanoscale control of reversible chemical reactions, the polymerization and depolymerization between C60 molecules, has been investigated. Using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the polymerization and depolymerization can be controlled at designated positions in ultrathin films of C60 molecules. One of the two chemical reactions can be selectively induced by controlling the sample bias voltage (V(s)); the application of negative and positive values of V(s) results in polymerization and depolymerization, respectively. The selectivity between the two chemical reactions becomes extremely high when the thickness of the C60 film increases to more than three molecular layers. We conclude that STM-induced negative and positive electrostatic ionization are responsible for the control of the polymerization and depolymerization, respectively.

  8. Dietary pattern and lifestyle factors in asthma control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Noufal Poongadan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of asthma in adults varied from 0.96% to 11.03% while in children ranged from 2.3% to 11.9% in India. A number of factors including genetic predisposition, environment, and lifestyle factors including dietary habits influence the development and expression of asthma. The goal of asthma treatment is to achieve and maintain clinical control, which can be achieved in a majority of patients with pharmacologic intervention strategy. Objective: To assess the role of diet and lifestyle factors in asthma control in Indian population. Materials and Methods: Diagnosed asthma patients (aged 12-40 years were enrolled from the outpatient clinics. All patients were followed up and reassessed after 4 weeks with asthma control test (ACT and dietary and lifestyle questionnaire. The assessment of dietary pattern was performed by food frequency questionnaire (Nordic Nutrition Recommendations-Danish Physical Activity Questionnaire. The lifestyle factor included body mass index, smoking status, tobacco chewing, alcohol consumption, duration of travel (h/week, mental stress (visual analog scale: 0-10, sports activity - h/day, television (TV watching/video games - h/day, duration of sleep - h/day. Results: Seventy-five asthma patients (43 males and 32 females were divided into three groups according to ACT, 18 (24% patients in poorly-controlled asthma, 35 (46.7% in well-controlled asthma, and 22 (29.3% patients with totally-controlled asthma. Increased consumption of vegetables and cereals in patients with total-controlled asthma while increased consumption of sugar, nonvegetarian, fast food, salted and fried snacks in patients with poorly-controlled asthma. Poorly-controlled asthma had the highest duration of watching TV and sleep and least duration of travel and sports, though the results failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The dietary and lifestyle factors too contribute to degree of control of asthma in India.

  9. Soil parameters are key factors to predict metal bioavailability to snails based on chemical extractant data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauget, B.; Gimbert, F.; Scheifler, R.; Coeurdassier, M.; Vaufleury, A. de

    2012-01-01

    Although soil characteristics modulate metal mobility and bioavailability to organisms, they are often ignored in the risk assessment of metal transfer. This paper aims to determine the ability of chemical methods to assess and predict cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) environmental bioavailability to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed in the laboratory for 28 days to 17 soils from around a former smelter. The soils were selected for their range of pH, organic matter, clay content, and Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The influence of soil properties on environmental availability (estimated using HF-HClO 4 , EDTA, CaCl 2 , NH 4 NO 3 , NaNO 3 , free ion activity and total dissolved metal concentration in soil solution) and on environmental bioavailability (modelled using accumulation kinetics) was identified. Among the seven chemical methods, only the EDTA and the total soil concentration can be used to assess Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability to snails (r² adj = 0.67 and 0.77, respectively). For Zn, none of the chemical methods were suitable. Taking into account the influence of the soil characteristics (pH and CEC) allows a better prediction of Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability (r² adj = 0.82 and 0.83, respectively). Even though alone none of the chemical methods tested could assess Zn environmental bioavailability to snails, the addition of pH, iron and aluminium oxides allowed the variation of assimilation fluxes to be predicted. A conceptual and practical method to use soil characteristics for risk assessment is proposed based on these results. We conclude that as yet there is no universal chemical method to predict metal environmental bioavailability to snails, and that the soil factors having the greatest impact depend on the metal considered. - Highlights: ► New approach to identify chemical methods able to predict metal bioavailability to snails. ► Bioavailability of cadmium, lead and zinc to snails was determined by

  10. Soil parameters are key factors to predict metal bioavailability to snails based on chemical extractant data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauget, B.; Gimbert, F., E-mail: frederic.gimbert@univ-fcomte.fr; Scheifler, R.; Coeurdassier, M.; Vaufleury, A. de

    2012-08-01

    Although soil characteristics modulate metal mobility and bioavailability to organisms, they are often ignored in the risk assessment of metal transfer. This paper aims to determine the ability of chemical methods to assess and predict cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) environmental bioavailability to the land snail Cantareus aspersus. Snails were exposed in the laboratory for 28 days to 17 soils from around a former smelter. The soils were selected for their range of pH, organic matter, clay content, and Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The influence of soil properties on environmental availability (estimated using HF-HClO{sub 4}, EDTA, CaCl{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, free ion activity and total dissolved metal concentration in soil solution) and on environmental bioavailability (modelled using accumulation kinetics) was identified. Among the seven chemical methods, only the EDTA and the total soil concentration can be used to assess Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability to snails (r Superscript-Two {sub adj} = 0.67 and 0.77, respectively). For Zn, none of the chemical methods were suitable. Taking into account the influence of the soil characteristics (pH and CEC) allows a better prediction of Cd and Pb environmental bioavailability (r Superscript-Two {sub adj} = 0.82 and 0.83, respectively). Even though alone none of the chemical methods tested could assess Zn environmental bioavailability to snails, the addition of pH, iron and aluminium oxides allowed the variation of assimilation fluxes to be predicted. A conceptual and practical method to use soil characteristics for risk assessment is proposed based on these results. We conclude that as yet there is no universal chemical method to predict metal environmental bioavailability to snails, and that the soil factors having the greatest impact depend on the metal considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach to identify chemical methods able to predict metal bioavailability

  11. An approach to quantitate and control the mutagenic hazards of environmental chemical and radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Human population, both at the occupational and non-occupational levels, is exposed to the environment polluted by man-made chemicals and radiation sources. The parameters required for quantitating mutagenic hazards of any agent are listed and it has been pointed out that though sufficient information of this nature is available in the case of radiations, it is almost impossible to collect similar information for chemical substances due to their number running into astronomical figures. A short-cut approach, therefore, is suggested to quantitate and control the mutagenic hazards of these pollutants. It is to express the mutagenic hazards of a chemical substance in terms of equivalent radiation units. The unit proposed for this purpose is called as Rem-Equivalent Chemical (REC). Total mutagenic burden to the society should take account of exposure from both chemicals and radiations. Advantages and limitation of this approach are discussed. (M.G.B.)

  12. Taking account of human factors in control-room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dien, Y.; Montmayeul, R.

    1995-07-01

    Since the Three Mile Island accident two ways for improving the Human-Machine Interface have mainly been followed: the development of computerized operator aids in existing control-rooms and the design of advanced control-rooms. Insufficient attention paid to human factors in the design of operator aids has generally led to these aids being neglected or unused by their potential users. While for the design of advanced control-rooms efforts have been made for dealing with human factors in more extensive way. Based upon this experience, a general method for taking account of human factors in a control-room design has been devised and is described in this paper. (author)

  13. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and

  14. Material compatibility and corrosion control of the KWU chemical cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odar, S.

    1994-01-01

    The concentrations of salt impurities within the deposits on the tube sheet and in the tube to tube-support-plate crevices can induce a variety of corrosion mechanisms on steam generator tubes. One of the most effective ways of counteracting corrosion mechanisms and thus of improving steam generator performance is to clean the steam generators and keep them in a clean condition. As shown by field results chemical cleaning is a way of removing hazardous deposits from steam generators. All available chemical cleaning processes use inhibitors to control the corrosion except the KWU chemical cleaning process. In this article the corrosion control technique of KWU Chemical Cleaning Process without using conventional inhibitors will be explained and the state of the field experience with respect to material compatibility will be presented. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  15. Sequence correction of random coil chemical shifts: correlation between neighbor correction factors and changes in the Ramachandran distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    Random coil chemical shifts are necessary for secondary chemical shift analysis, which is the main NMR method for identification of secondary structure in proteins. One of the largest challenges in the determination of random coil chemical shifts is accounting for the effect of neighboring residues....... The contributions from the neighboring residues are typically removed by using neighbor correction factors determined based on each residue's effect on glycine chemical shifts. Due to its unusual conformational freedom, glycine may be particularly unrepresentative for the remaining residue types. In this study, we...... in the conformational ensemble are an important source of neighbor effects in disordered proteins. Glutamine derived random coil chemical shifts and correction factors modestly improve our ability to predict (13)C chemical shifts of intrinsically disordered proteins compared to existing datasets, and may thus improve...

  16. Chemical signal activation of an organocatalyst enables control over soft material formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausel, Fanny; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Kouwenberg, D S J; Versluis, Frank; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2017-10-12

    Cells can react to their environment by changing the activity of enzymes in response to specific chemical signals. Artificial catalysts capable of being activated by chemical signals are rare, but of interest for creating autonomously responsive materials. We present an organocatalyst that is activated by a chemical signal, enabling temporal control over reaction rates and the formation of materials. Using self-immolative chemistry, we design a deactivated aniline organocatalyst that is activated by the chemical signal hydrogen peroxide and catalyses hydrazone formation. Upon activation of the catalyst, the rate of hydrazone formation increases 10-fold almost instantly. The responsive organocatalyst enables temporal control over the formation of gels featuring hydrazone bonds. The generic design should enable the use of a large range of triggers and organocatalysts, and appears a promising method for the introduction of signal response in materials, constituting a first step towards achieving communication between artificial chemical systems.Enzymes regulated by chemical signals are common in biology, but few such artificial catalysts exist. Here, the authors design an aniline catalyst that, when activated by a chemical trigger, catalyses formation of hydrazone-based gels, demonstrating signal response in a soft material.

  17. Materials Safety Data Sheets: the basis for control of toxic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchen, E.E.; Porter, W.E.

    1979-09-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets contained in this volume are the basis for the Toxic Chemical Control Program developed by the Industrial Hygiene Department, Health Division, ORNL. The three volumes are the update and expansion of ORNL/TM-5721 and ORNL/TM-5722 Material Safety Data Sheets: The Basis for Control of Toxic Chemicals, Volume I and Volume II. As such, they are a valuable adjunct to the data cards issued with specific chemicals. The chemicals are identified by name, stores catalog number where appropriate, and sequence numbers from the NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances, 1977 Edition, if available. The data sheets were developed and compiled to aid in apprising the employees of hazards peculiar to the handling and/or use of specific toxic chemicals. Space limitation necessitate the use of descriptive medical terms and toxicological abbreviations. A glossary and an abbreviation list were developed to define some of those sometimes unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. The page numbers are keyed to the catalog number in the chemical stores at ORNL.

  18. Is the efficacy of biological control against plant diseases likely to be more durable than that of chemical pesticides?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eBardin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The durability of a control method for plant protection is defined as the persistence of its efficacy in space and time. It depends on (i the selection pressure exerted by it on populations of plant pathogens and (ii on the capacity of these pathogens to adapt to the control method. Erosion of effectiveness of conventional plant protection methods has been widely studied in the past. For example, apparition of resistance to chemical pesticides in plant pathogens or pests has been extensively documented. The durability of biological control has often been assumed to be higher than that of chemical control. Results concerning pest management in agricultural systems have shown that this assumption may not always be justified. Resistance of various pests to one or several toxins of Bacillus thuringensis and apparition of resistance of the codling moth Cydia pomonella to the Cydia pomonella granulovirus have, for example, been described. In contrast with the situation for pests, the durability of biological control of plant diseases has hardly been studied and no scientific reports proving the loss of efficiency of biological control agents against plant pathogens in practice has been published so far. Knowledge concerning the possible erosion of effectiveness of biological control is essential to ensure a durable efficacy of biological control agents on target plant pathogens. This knowledge will result in identifying risk factors that can foster the selection of strains of plant pathogens resistant to biological control agents. It will also result in identifying types of biological control agents with lower risk of efficacy loss i.e. modes of action of biological control agents that does not favor the selection of resistant isolates in natural populations of plant pathogens. An analysis of the scientific literature was then conducted to assess the potential for plant pathogens to become resistant to biological control agents.

  19. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien; Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  20. Control of neuronal network organization by chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jie; Bibari, Olivier; Marchand, Gilles; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Sauter-Starace, Fabien [CEA, LETI-Minatec, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Appaix, Florence; De Waard, Michel, E-mail: fabien.sauter@cea.fr, E-mail: michel.dewaard@ujf-grenoble.fr [Inserm U836, Grenoble Institute of Neuroscience, Site Sante la Tronche, Batiment Edmond J Safra, Chemin Fortune Ferrini, BP170, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2011-05-13

    Carbon nanotube substrates are promising candidates for biological applications and devices. Interfacing of these carbon nanotubes with neurons can be controlled by chemical modifications. In this study, we investigated how chemical surface functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays (MWNT-A) influences neuronal adhesion and network organization. Functionalization of MWNT-A dramatically modifies the length of neurite fascicles, cluster inter-connection success rate, and the percentage of neurites that escape from the clusters. We propose that chemical functionalization represents a method of choice for developing applications in which neuronal patterning on MWNT-A substrates is required.

  1. The Influence of Soil Chemical Factors on In Situ Bioremediation of Soil Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breedveld, Gijs D.

    1997-12-31

    Mineral oil is the major energy source in Western society. Production, transport and distribution of oil and oil products cause serious contamination problems of water, air and soil. The present thesis studies the natural biodegradation processes in the soil environment which can remove contamination by oil products and creosote. The main physical/chemical processes determining the distribution of organic contaminants between the soil solid, aqueous and vapour phase are discussed. Then a short introduction to soil microbiology and environmental factors important for biodegradation is given. There is a discussion of engineered and natural bioremediation methods and the problems related to scaling up laboratory experiments to field scale remediation. Bioremediation will seldom remove the contaminants completely; a residue remains. Factors affecting the level of residual contamination and the consequences for contaminant availability are discussed. Finally, the main findings of the work are summarized and recommendations for further research are given. 111 refs., 41 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. Analysis of radiation and chemical factors which define the ecological situation of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    A new method of large information set statistical analysis is proposed. It permits to define the main directions of work in a given field in the world or in a particular country, to find the most important investigated problems and to evaluate the role each of them quantitatively, as well as to study the dynamics of work development in time, the methods of research used, the centres in which this research is mostly developed, authors of publications etc. Statistical analysis may be supplemented with subject analysis of selected publications. Main factors which influence on different environment components and on public health are presented as an example of this method use, and the role of radiation and chemical factors is evaluated. 18 refs., 6 tab

  3. Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Modifications in Control Room Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Clefton, Gordon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This report describes the basic aspects of control room modernization projects in the U.S. nuclear industry and the need for supplementary guidance on the integration of human factors considerations into the licensing and regulatory aspects of digital upgrades. The report pays specific attention to the integration of principles described in NUREG-0711 (Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model) and how supplementary guidance can help to raise general awareness in the industry regarding the complexities of control room modernization projects created by many interdependent regulations, standards and guidelines. The report also describes how human factors engineering principles and methods provided by various resources and international standards can help in navigating through the process of licensing digital upgrades. In particular, the integration of human factors engineering guidance and requirements into the process of licensing digital upgrades can help reduce uncertainty related to development of technical bases for digital upgrades that will avoid the introduction of new failure modes.

  4. Improvements to enforcement of multilateral environmental agreements to control international shipments of chemicals and wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Somboon, Vira; Wun'gaeo, Surichai; Middleton, Carl; Tingsabadh, Charit; Limjirakan, Sangchan

    2016-06-01

    Illegal trade in hazardous waste and harmful chemicals has caused severe damage on human health and the environment, and brought big challenges to countries to meet their commitments to related multilateral environmental agreements. Synergy-building, like organising law enforcement operations, is critical to address illegal trade in waste and chemicals, and further improve the effectiveness of environmental enforcement. This article discusses how and why law enforcement operations can help countries to implement chemical and waste-related multilateral environmental agreements in a more efficient and effective way. The research explores key barriers and factors for organising law enforcement operations, and recommends methods to improve law enforcement operations to address illegal trade in hazardous waste and harmful chemicals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Automatic control of the effluent turbidity from a chemically enhanced primary treatment with microsieving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, J; Memet, S; Günther, T; Lilja, M; Cimbritz, M; la Cour Jansen, J

    2017-10-01

    For chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) with microsieving, a feedback proportional integral controller combined with a feedforward compensator was used in large pilot scale to control effluent water turbidity to desired set points. The effluent water turbidity from the microsieve was maintained at various set points in the range 12-80 NTU basically independent for a number of studied variations in influent flow rate and influent wastewater compositions. Effluent turbidity was highly correlated with effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD). Thus, for CEPT based on microsieving, controlling the removal of COD was possible. Thereby incoming carbon can be optimally distributed between biological nitrogen removal and anaerobic digestion for biogas production. The presented method is based on common automation and control strategies; therefore fine tuning and optimization for specific requirements are simplified compared to model-based dosing control.

  6. Report: EPA Should Assess Needs and Implement Management Controls to Ensure Effective Incorporation of Chemical Safety Research Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #17-P-0294, June 23, 2017. With management controls that ensure the collaborative development of research products and prioritize chemical safety research needs, the EPA would be better able to conduct faster chemical risk assessments.

  7. Transcription Factor Zbtb20 Controls Regional Specification of Mammalian Archicortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial expression of sets of transcription factors (TFs) along the mammalian cortex controls its subdivision into functional areas. Unlike neocortex, only few recent data suggest genetic mechanisms controlling the regionalization of the archicortex. TF Emx2 plays a crucial role in patterning...... later on becoming restricted exclusively to postmitotic neurons of hippocampus (Hi) proper, dentate gyrus (DG), and two transitory zones, subiculum (S) and retrosplenial cortex (Rsp). Analysis of Zbtb20-/- mice revealed altered cortical patterning at the border between neocortex and archicortex...

  8. Active Power Factor Correction Using a Sliding Mode Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korhan KAYIŞLI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a sliding mode controller is designed for active shaping of the input current in the boost converter. Robustness of the designed controller is tested with variable output voltage references, different loads and network voltage variations. For the simulations, MATLAB/Simulink programme is used. From simulation results, the same phase was provided between input current and input voltage and nearly unity power factor was obtained.

  9. On frequency-weighted coprime factorization based controller reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Varga, Andras

    2003-01-01

    We consider the efficient solution of a class of coprime factorization based controller approximation problems by using frequency-weighted balancing related model reduction approaches. It is shown that for some special stability enforcing frequency-weights, the computation of the frequency-weighted controllability and observability grammians can be done by solving reduced order Lyapunov equations. The new approach can be used in conjunction with accuracy enhancing square-root and balancing-fr...

  10. Physical and chemical controls on habitats for life in the deep subsurface beneath continents and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of life in the continental subsurface is likely controlled by a range of physical and chemical factors. The fundamental requirements are for space to live, carbon for biomass and energy for metabolic activity. These are inter-related, such that adequate permeability is required to maintain a supply of nutrients, and facies interfaces invite colonization by juxtaposing porous habitats with nutrient-rich mudrocks. Viable communities extend to several kilometres depth, diminishing downwards with decreasing porosity. Carbon is contributed by recycling of organic matter originally fixed by photosynthesis, and chemoautotrophy using crustal carbon dioxide and methane. In the shallow crust, the recycled component predominates, as processed kerogen or hydrocarbons, but abiotic carbon sources may be significant in deeper, metamorphosed crust. Hydrogen to fuel chemosynthesis is available from radiolysis, mechanical deformation and mineral alteration. Activity in the subcontinental deep biosphere can be traced through the geological record back to the Precambrian. Before the colonization of the Earth's surface by land plants, a geologically recent event, subsurface life probably dominated the planet's biomass. In regions of thick ice sheets the base of the ice sheet, where liquid water is stable and a sediment layer is created by glacial erosion, can be regarded as a deep biosphere habitat. This environment may be rich in dissolved organic carbon and nutrients accumulated from dissolving ice, and from weathering of the bedrock and the sediment layer. PMID:26667907

  11. Traceability and Quality Control in Traditional Chinese Medicine: From Chemical Fingerprint to Two-Dimensional Barcode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical fingerprinting is currently a widely used tool that enables rapid and accurate quality evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM. However, chemical fingerprints are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval, which limit their use in Chinese medicine traceability. In this study, samples of three kinds of Chinese medicines were randomly selected and chemical fingerprints were then constructed by using high performance liquid chromatography. Based on chemical data, the process of converting the TCM chemical fingerprint into two-dimensional code is presented; preprocess and filtering algorithm are also proposed aiming at standardizing the large amount of original raw data. In order to know which type of two-dimensional code (2D is suitable for storing data of chemical fingerprints, current popular types of 2D codes are analyzed and compared. Results show that QR Code is suitable for recording the TCM chemical fingerprint. The fingerprint information of TCM can be converted into data format that can be stored as 2D code for traceability and quality control.

  12. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions.

  13. Potential risk factors for diabetic neuropathy: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooraei Mahdi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus type II afflicts at least 2 million people in Iran. Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes and lowers the patient's quality of life. Since neuropathy often leads to ulceration and amputation, we have tried to elucidate the factors that can affect its progression. Methods In this case-control study, 110 diabetic patients were selected from the Shariati Hospital diabetes clinic. Michigan Neuropathic Diabetic Scoring (MNDS was used to differentiate cases from controls. The diagnosis of neuropathy was confirmed by nerve conduction studies (nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The multiple factors compared between the two groups included consumption of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, blood pressure, serum lipid level, sex, smoking, method of diabetes control and its quality. Results Statistically significant relationships were found between neuropathy and age, gender, quality of diabetes control and duration of disease (P values in the order: 0.04, 0.04, Conclusion In this study, hyperglycemia was the only modifiable risk factor for diabetic neuropathy. Glycemic control reduces the incidence of neuropathy, slows its progression and improves the diabetic patient's quality of life. More attention must be paid to elderly male diabetic patients with poor diabetes control with regard to regular foot examinations and more practical education.

  14. Retrofitting existing chemical scrubbers to biotrickling filters for H2S emission control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, David; Deshusses, Marc A

    2003-05-27

    Biological treatment is a promising alternative to conventional air-pollution control methods, but thus far biotreatment processes for odor control have always required much larger reactor volumes than chemical scrubbers. We converted an existing full-scale chemical scrubber to a biological trickling filter and showed that effective treatment of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the converted scrubber was possible even at gas contact times as low as 1.6 s. That is 8-20 times shorter than previous biotrickling filtration reports and comparable to usual contact times in chemical scrubbers. Significant removal of reduced sulfur compounds, ammonia, and volatile organic compounds present in traces in the air was also observed. Continuous operation for >8 months showed stable performance and robust behavior for H2S treatment, with pollutant-removal performance comparable to that achieved by using a chemical scrubber. Our study demonstrates that biotrickling filters can replace chemical scrubbers and be a safer, more economical technique for odor control.

  15. Economic Benefit from Progressive Integration of Scheduling and Control for Continuous Chemical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan D. R. Beal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Performance of integrated production scheduling and advanced process control with disturbances is summarized and reviewed with four progressive stages of scheduling and control integration and responsiveness to disturbances: open-loop segregated scheduling and control, closed-loop segregated scheduling and control, open-loop scheduling with consideration of process dynamics, and closed-loop integrated scheduling and control responsive to process disturbances and market fluctuations. Progressive economic benefit from dynamic rescheduling and integrating scheduling and control is shown on a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR benchmark application in closed-loop simulations over 24 h. A fixed horizon integrated scheduling and control formulation for multi-product, continuous chemical processes is utilized, in which nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC and continuous-time scheduling are combined.

  16. Perinatal mortality and associated risk factors: a case control study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal mortality is reported to be five times higher in developing than in developed nations. Little is known about the commonly associated risk factors for perinatal mortality in Southern Nations National Regional State of Ethiopia. METHODS: A case control study for perinatal mortality was conducted in ...

  17. Factors affecting sustainable animal trypanosomosis control in parts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the factors affecting sustainable trypanosomiasis control in parts of Kaduna State within the sub-humid savannah ecological zone of Nigeria. Focus group discussions were ... More awareness and preference for pour-on and aerial spraying were higher than the use of traps, target or screens. Rearing of ...

  18. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  19. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  20. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Shunbo; Wang, Limu; Yi, Xin; Hui, Yu Sanna; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  1. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  2. Modeling and control of diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waard, H.; De Koning, W. L.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper a study is made of the heat transfer inside cylindrical resistance diffusion and low-pressure chemical vapor deposition furnaces, aimed at developing an improved temperature controller. A model of the thermal behavior is derived which also covers the important class of furnaces equipped with semitransparent quartz process tubes. The model takes into account the thermal behavior of the thermocouples. It is shown that currently used temperature controllers are highly inefficient for very large scale integration applications. Based on the model an alternative temperature controller of the linear-quadratic-Gaussian type is proposed which features direct wafer temperature control. Some simulation results are given.

  3. Volumetric and chemical control auxiliary circuit for a PWR primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1990-01-01

    The volumetric and chemical control circuit has an expansion tank with at least one water-steam chamber connected to the primary circuit by a sampling pipe and a reinjection pipe. The sampling pipe feeds jet pumps controlled by valves. An action on these valves and pumps regulates the volume of the water in the primary circuit. A safety pipe controlled by a flap automatically injects water from the chamber into the primary circuit in case of ruptures. The auxiliary circuit has also systems for purifying the water and controlling the boric acid and hydrogen content [fr

  4. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Ahn, Seyeon; Jin, Sun Hee; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Chun, Young-Jin; Lee, Ai-Young; Noh, Minsoo

    2015-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative study of the effect of chemical and physical factors on the variability of almond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamaliev, G.N.; Akhund-Zade, I.M.; Brazhnikova, G.B.

    1975-01-01

    Six vareties of almond: Texas, Krymskij, Nek-ultra, Logindok, Drejk and Myagkoskorlupyj have been studied. It is shown that gamma-irradiation at a dose up to 16 kr induces 16 to 43 % changes in plants. A dose of 32 kr induces 33 to 60 % changes, 40 t0 50 kr - 65 to 90 % changes, but with a less percentage of survived plants. High doses of gamma-radiation induces a broad spectrum of variability, is not observed under the treatment of seeds with chemical mutagens. A dose of 32 to 40 kr has been found to be critical for the varieties studied, a dose of 50 kr - to be lethal. At a dose of 50 kr the seedlings either do not survive to the end of the vegetative period, or only 3 to 5 plants survie. A chemical mutagen, ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) at a concentration of 0.1 to 0.2 % produc 12 to 13 % morphological changes, the percentage of survived plants being higher as compared with gamma-radiation. The mutagen concentration of 0.4% produces 90 to 93 % changed plants, the plant survival being 50 to 57 %. The 0.4% concentration can be taken as a critical one for the varieties studied. Comparative evaluations of gamma-radiation and chemical mutagens reveale that EMS at concentrations studied produces 3 to 4 times more changes than gamma-rays, the percentage of survived plants being also 3 to 4 times higher. However, EMS produces monotypic changes, while gamma-radiation induces a broad spectrum of variability. Thus, EMS can be used as a factor inducing dwarf varieties of almond and other fruit cultures

  6. Risk factors for cataract: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ughade Suresh

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed as a hospital-based, group-matched, case-control investigation into the risk factors associated with age-related cataract in central India. The study included 262 cases of age-related cataract and an equal number of controls. A total of 21 risk factors were evaluated: namely, low socioeconomic status (SES, illiteracy, marital status, history of diarrhoea, history of diabetes, glaucoma, use of cholinesterase inhibitors, steroids, spironolactone, nifedipine, analgesics, myopia early in life, renal failure, heavy smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, hypertension, low body mass index (BMI, use of cheaper cooking fuel, working in direct sunlight, family history of cataract, and occupational exposure. In univariate analysis, except marital status, low BMI, renal failure, use of steroids, spironolactone, analgesics, and occupational exposure, all 14 other risk factors were found significantly associated with age-related cataract. Unconditional multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed the significance of low SES, illiteracy, history of diarrhoea, diabetes, glaucoma, myopia, smoking, hypertension and cheap cooking fuel. The etiological role of these risk factors in the outcome of cataract is confirmed by the estimates of attributable risk proportion. The estimates of population attributable risk proportion for these factors highlight the impact of elimination of these risk factors on the reduction of cataract in this population.

  7. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  8. 76 FR 38169 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... (7405M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania... gold leaf, dyeing mixtures, antifreeze mixtures, extraction of resins and waxes, preservative for...: June 21, 2011. Maria J. Doa, Director, Chemical Control Division, Office of Pollution Prevention and...

  9. A cellular automata approach to chemical reactions : 1 reaction controlled systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    A direct link between the chemical reaction controlled (shrinking core) model and cellular automata, to study the dissolution of particles, is derived in this paper. Previous research on first and second order reactions is based on the concentration of the reactant. The present paper describes the

  10. Natural control in cabbage root fly populations and influence of chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu Yaman, I.K.

    1960-01-01

    To facilitate studies on the natural and chemical control of Hylemya (Erioischia) brassicae (Bch.) in Holland, the bionomics and abundance of the Anthomyiid were investigated in 1959-9 in fields in which cauliflower was grown. The numbers of eggs and larvae were estimated by scrutiny of

  11. Non- chemical methods of seed treatment for control of seed- borne pathogens on vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amein, T.; Wright, S.A.I.; Wickstrom, M.; Schmitt, A.; Koch, E.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Groot, S.P.C.; Werner, S.; Jahn, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of EU-project "Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production" (STOVE) was to evaluate non-chemical methods for control of seed-borne pathogens in organic vegetable production. Physical (hot air, hot water and electron) and biologi-cal (microorganisms and different agents of natural

  12. Control of Chemical Equilibrium by Solvent: A Basis for Teaching Physical Chemistry of Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Craig, Colleen F.; Fialkov, Yuriy; Prezhdo, Victor V.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates that the solvent present in a system can highly alter and control the chemical equilibrium of a system. The results show that the dipole moment and polarizibility of a system can be highly altered by using different mixed solvents.

  13. Controllable chemical vapor deposition of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene directly on silicon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Lindvall, Niclas; Cole, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinholes...

  14. Chemical analysis and quality control of Ginkgo biloba leaves, extracts, and phytopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van T.A.; Montoro, P.

    2009-01-01

    The chemical analysis and quality control of Ginkgo leaves, extracts, phytopharmaceuticals and some herbal supplements is comprehensively reviewed. The review is an update of a similar, earlier review in this journal [T.A. van Beek, J. Chromatogr. A 967 (2002) 21¿55]. Since 2001 over 3000 papers on

  15. Experimental Investigation of Electro-chemical Processes Controlled by High Magnetic Fields.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mathon, Ph.; Nouri, A.; Alemany, A.; Chopart, J.P.; Sobolík, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 42, 4 (2006) , s. 363-369 ISSN 0024-998X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : lorentz and magnetic force * diffusion-controlled regime * electrical current Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  16. Femtosecond laser induced and controlled chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Results from experiments aimed at bimolecular chemical reaction control of CO and H2 at room temperature and pressure, without any catalyst, using shaped femtosecond laser pulses are presented. A stable reaction product (CO2) was measured after...

  17. 78 FR 40175 - Exempt Chemical Preparations Under the Controlled Substances Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ...Standard, Inc M-8270-04-ASL, Method 8270B-- Amber ampule: 1 mL...... 1/28/2013 Base/Neutrals Mix. Accu... CSA and its implementing regulations are designed to prevent, detect, and eliminate the diversion of... controlled substances and listed chemicals for legitimate medical, scientific, research, and industrial...

  18. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  19. Phase distribution of ecologically controlled chemical elements in production of extraction phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazak, V.G.; Agnelov, A.I.; Zajtsev, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Content of 16 ecologically controlled chemical element (among them Cd, Sr, Th, U, V, Y) in solid and liquid phases of extraction phosphorus acid (EPA) production is determined. These elements are recommended to control by Scientific research institute of human ecology and environment to establish their extraction coefficients to phosphogypsum and EPA and optimal variant of production of ecologically sate phosphorus fertilizers. X-ray fluorescent, atomic-absorption and polarographic methods are used for analysis these elements

  20. Geological and Chemical Factors that Impacted the Biological Utilization of Cobalt in the Archean Eon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eli K.; Hao, Jihua; Prabhu, Anirudh; Zhong, Hao; Jelen, Ben I.; Meyer, Mike; Hazen, Robert M.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2018-03-01

    The geosphere and biosphere coevolved and influenced Earth's biological and mineralogical diversity. Changing redox conditions influenced the availability of different transition metals, which are essential components in the active sites of oxidoreductases, proteins that catalyze electron transfer reactions across the tree of life. Despite its relatively low abundance in the environment, cobalt (Co) is a unique metal in biology due to its importance to a wide range of organisms as the metal center of vitamin B12 (aka cobalamin, Cbl). Cbl is vital to multiple methyltransferase enzymes involved in energetically favorable metabolic pathways. It is unclear how Co availability is linked to mineral evolution and weathering processes. Here we examine important biological functions of Co, as well as chemical and geological factors that may have influenced the utilization of Co early in the evolution of life. Only 66 natural minerals are known to contain Co as an essential element. However, Co is incorporated as a minor element in abundant rock-forming minerals, potentially representing a reliable source of Co as a trace element in marine systems due to weathering processes. We developed a mineral weathering model that indicates that dissolved Co was potentially more bioavailable in the Archean ocean under low S conditions than it is today. Mineral weathering, redox chemistry, Co complexation with nitrogen-containing organics, and hydrothermal environments were crucial in the incorporation of Co in primitive metabolic pathways. These chemical and geological characteristics of Co can inform the biological utilization of other trace metals in early forms of life.

  1. On the quantification of the effects of organizational and management factors in chemical installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, Ioannis A.; Aneziris, Olga

    1999-01-01

    The quantitative effects of organizational and management factors in chemical installations are assessed through a linking of the results of a safety management audit with the basic events of a quantified risk assessment (QRA). A safety management audit establishes the relative position of the organizational and management aspects of a particular chemical installation with respect to an ideal management scheme, and for a number of failure causes and failure prevention combinations. A quantitative risk analysis including detailed system analysis offers a plant-specific decomposition of the plant-damage-state frequencies into events like hardware failures, maintenance-related failures, operation-related failures and so on. The basic events incorporated in the QRA are then categorized into classes similar to those explored by the management audit and are quantitatively linked to the audit results. Knowledge of these quantitative links would allow for the reflection of the deficiencies or strengths that might exist in the safety management system on the quantitative risk indices. A case study of an ammonia storage facility that has been audited demonstrates that the sensitivity of the risk indices to the value of the quantitative links is extremely high and that hence great care should be exercised in assessing these links

  2. Chemical plant factors affecting resistance in sugarcane in against Scirpophaga Nivella f

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashfaq, M.; Khan, A.; Ali, A.

    2003-01-01

    The study was conducted during 2000 to determine the role of various chemical plant factors viz., total minerals, nitrogen, fat contents, carbohydrate, macro an micro nutrients in the leaves of five genotypes of sugarcane i.e., BF-162, SPSG-26, L-118, CP-43/33 and CP-72/2086 by correlating the infestation of top borer, Scirpophaga Nivella F. at tillering stage. None of the genotype was found completely resistant to the pest. CP-43/33 and BF-162 proved susceptible and resistant varieties, respectively. Total mineral, manganese and copper contents did not show significant correlation with the pest infestation, whereas nitrogen, potassium, calcium, magnesium and ferrous contents played a positive and significant role. Phosphorous, carbohydrates, fats and zinc contents played a significant and negative effect on the pest infestation at tillering stage. (author)

  3. Reasons of chlorella strain's resistance to physical and chemical factors of environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apasheva, L M; Bujiashvilie, D M; Naydich, V I; Shevchenko, V A

    1979-07-01

    Under environmental pollution it is necessary to study the reasons of an organism's resistance as well as the specificity of it. Some chlorella strains were under the influence of uv- and x-irradiation, heat treatment, cadmium salts, insecticide, and detergent. It was shown that cells which were resistant to physical factors were resistant to chemical intoxication, as well. The positive correlation between resistance of strains and the described influences and the levels of endogenic thiols was found. The second reason for higher resistance is an increase of free radicals' concentration. It is linked with increasing P/sub 700/ quantity of electron-transport chains that make possible higher levels of photosynthetic reactions of resistant cells.

  4. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the lymphocytes of rats chronically exposed to radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of lymphocytes in peripheral blood, thymus and spleen of rats chronically exposed to combined external γ-radiation trichlorfon pesticide effect have been studied. It is shown that chronical combined trichlorfon and γ irradiation effect is accompanied by suppression of lymphopoiesis already at the early stages of the experience. The observed effects are formed depending on both daily and cumulative doses of the effect. The development of the combined effect is based on the summation of effects of chronical effect of ionizing radiation and pesticide. The revealed changes in lymphocytes population exposed to radiation and chemical factors can lead to substantial decrease of natural immunity thereby decreasing to various diseases

  5. Modeling risk evolution of digestive tract functional violations when exposed to chemical environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Kamaltdinov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern methods of health risk assessment are based on the representation of individual and public health as a dynamic process of “evolution”, which describes a continuous course of negative (and positive changes in the condition of the body. The article presents a conceptual diagram of multilevel health risk evolution modeling under the influence of environmental factors. The main aspects associated with the simulation of digestive processes in the “meso level” are considered. Some results of solving the problem of the flow in the digestive tract antroduodenal area taken into account tract motility. Further development ways of the model are outlines – account of biochemical reactions, secretory and absorptive functions tract. The proposed approach will enable not only to predict the risk of digestive system functional disorders, but also take into account basic physiological processes, mechanisms of income, distribution, excretion of chemicals.

  6. Chemical control of ticks on cattle and the resistance of these parasites to acaricides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J E; Pound, J M; Davey, R B

    2004-01-01

    Toward the end of the nineteenth century a complex of problems related to ticks and tick-borne diseases of cattle created a demand for methods to control ticks and reduce losses of cattle. The discovery and use of arsenical solutions in dipping vats for treating cattle to protect them against ticks revolutionized tick and tick-borne disease control programmes. Arsenic dips for cattle were used for about 40 years before the evolution of resistance of ticks to the chemical, and the development and marketing of synthetic organic acaricides after World War II provided superior alternative products. Most of the major groups of organic pesticides are represented on the list of chemicals used to control ticks on cattle. Unfortunately, the successive evolution of resistance of ticks to acaricides in each chemical group with the concomitant reduction in the usefulness of a group of acaricides is a major reason for the diversity of acaricides. Whether a producer chooses a traditional method for treating cattle with an acaricide or uses a new method, he must recognize the benefits, limitations and potential problems with each application method and product. Simulation models and research were the basis of recommendations for tick control strategies advocating approaches that reduced reliance on acaricides. These recommendations for controlling ticks on cattle are in harmony with recommendations for reducing the rate of selection for acaricide resistance. There is a need to transfer knowledge about tick control and resistance mitigation strategies to cattle producers.

  7. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ok-Nam [College of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seyeon; Jin, Sun Hee; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung [College of Pharmacy, Natural Products Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Sun [College of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Young-Jin [College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ai-Young, E-mail: leeay@duih.org [Department of Dermatology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang 410-773 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Minsoo, E-mail: minsoo@alum.mit.edu [College of Pharmacy, Natural Products Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induced VEGF production in normal human

  8. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Ahn, Seyeon; Jin, Sun Hee; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Chun, Young-Jin; Lee, Ai-Young; Noh, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induced VEGF production in normal human

  9. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Costa de Macêdo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. METHODS This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. RESULTS The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02, lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4, catholic religion (OR = 1.70 , four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2, three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1, use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0, and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7. Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5 and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7 were also identified as determinant factors. CONCLUSIONS Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability.

  10. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macêdo, Vilma Costa; de Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral; de Frias, Paulo Germano; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. METHODS This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. RESULTS The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. CONCLUSIONS Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. PMID:28832758

  11. Risk Factors for Anemia in Pregnancy: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutuja Pundkar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aim of the study was to find the risk factors leading to Anemia in pregnancy. The main objective was to study the various sociodemographic factors leading to anemia. And to assess the knowledge about anemia among study participants. Material and methods: The present Case control study was carried out at Primary Health Centre, to determine the risk factors leading to anemia in pregnancy. A total of 308 pregnant females were registered. Among them two groups were made, group I cases and group II controls. Each group had 50 cases each. Laboratory test were done and females having hemoglobin less than 11mg/dl were considered anemic. Anemic females were considered cases and females having Hb >11mg/dl were considered controls. Data analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: The overall mean haemoglobin (Hb was 11.55g/dL in controls, whereas it was seen that among the cases it was 9.58g/dL.It would seem that diet, family size, education, social class, gravida and parity are associated with anemia in pregnancy. Conclusion: After adjusting for all the possible covariates there seems to be significant association between Hb levels and age group, education level, family size, diet, gravida and parity.

  12. Factores de necesidad asociados al uso adecuado del control prenatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarybel Miranda Mellado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Por las implicaciones sociales de la mortalidad y morbilidad materna es importante determinar los factores de necesidad que influyen en el uso adecuado del control prenatal en gestantes de Sincelejo. Materiales y Métodos: Estudio analítico de corte transversal, que incluyó 730 gestantes, seleccionadas mediante muestreo aleatorio por conglomerados, de las comunas de la ciudad. La información fue recolectada por medio de una encuesta sociodemográfica, una ficha de uso de control prenatal y un Cuestionario para evaluar los factores de necesidad  propuestos por el Modelo de Promoción de la Salud de Nola Pender. Las gestantes fueron contactadas en sus domicilios y diligenciaron los instrumentos. Los datos fueron analizados aplicando estadística descriptiva e inferencial para determinar las asociaciones entre variables. Resultados: El 97,7% (713 de las gestantes asistía al control prenatal, con una mediana de 4 controles prenatales. Un 2,3% (17 no lo habían iniciado al momento de la encuesta y 24,4% (178 hizo uso inadecuado. El 80,7% (589 de las gestantes califican su estado de salud como bueno o muy bueno, 94,8% (692 percibieron beneficios del control prenatal. Se encontró asociación significativa entre la percepción de beneficios y el uso adecuado de control prenatal [OR=5,5 (IC 95%: 2,8 - 10,8]. Discusión y Conclusiones: La percepción que las mujeres tienen sobre los buenos resultados que reporta la asistencia al control prenatal, es el principal factor que puede explicar la adherencia al control y el cumplimiento regular de las consultas. Cómo citar este artículo: Miranda C, Castillo IY. Factores de necesidad asociados al uso adecuado del control prenatal. Rev Cuid. 2016; 7(2: 1345-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.15649/cuidarte.v7i2.340

  13. Combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls and non-chemical risk factors on blood pressure in NHANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Junenette L.; Patricia Fabian, M.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure is associated with exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical risk factors, but epidemiological analyses to date have not assessed the combined effects of both chemical and non-chemical stressors on human populations in the context of cumulative risk assessment. We developed a novel modeling approach to evaluate the combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and multiple non-chemical risk factors on four blood pressure measures using data for adults aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). We developed predictive models for chemical and other stressors. Structural equation models were applied to account for complex associations among predictors of stressors as well as blood pressure. Models showed that blood lead, serum PCBs, and established non-chemical stressors were significantly associated with blood pressure. Lead was the chemical stressor most predictive of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure, while PCBs had a greater influence on systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and blood cadmium was not a significant predictor of blood pressure. The simultaneously fit exposure models explained 34%, 43% and 52% of the variance for lead, cadmium and PCBs, respectively. The structural equation models were developed using predictors available from public data streams (e.g., U.S. Census), which would allow the models to be applied to any U.S. population exposed to these multiple stressors in order to identify high risk subpopulations, direct intervention strategies, and inform public policy. - Highlights: • We evaluated joint impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on blood pressure. • We built predictive models for lead, cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). • Our approach allows joint evaluation of predictors from population-specific data. • Lead, PCBs and established non-chemical stressors were related to blood pressure.

  14. Combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls and non-chemical risk factors on blood pressure in NHANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Junenette L., E-mail: petersj@bu.edu; Patricia Fabian, M., E-mail: pfabian@bu.edu; Levy, Jonathan I., E-mail: jonlevy@bu.edu

    2014-07-15

    High blood pressure is associated with exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical risk factors, but epidemiological analyses to date have not assessed the combined effects of both chemical and non-chemical stressors on human populations in the context of cumulative risk assessment. We developed a novel modeling approach to evaluate the combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and multiple non-chemical risk factors on four blood pressure measures using data for adults aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). We developed predictive models for chemical and other stressors. Structural equation models were applied to account for complex associations among predictors of stressors as well as blood pressure. Models showed that blood lead, serum PCBs, and established non-chemical stressors were significantly associated with blood pressure. Lead was the chemical stressor most predictive of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure, while PCBs had a greater influence on systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and blood cadmium was not a significant predictor of blood pressure. The simultaneously fit exposure models explained 34%, 43% and 52% of the variance for lead, cadmium and PCBs, respectively. The structural equation models were developed using predictors available from public data streams (e.g., U.S. Census), which would allow the models to be applied to any U.S. population exposed to these multiple stressors in order to identify high risk subpopulations, direct intervention strategies, and inform public policy. - Highlights: • We evaluated joint impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on blood pressure. • We built predictive models for lead, cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). • Our approach allows joint evaluation of predictors from population-specific data. • Lead, PCBs and established non-chemical stressors were related to blood pressure.

  15. Controlled assembly of organic whispering-gallery-mode microlasers as highly sensitive chemical vapor sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Miaomiao; Wei, Cong; Lin, Xianqing; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Fengqin; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2017-03-09

    We demonstrate the fabrication of organic high Q active whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators from π-conjugated polymer by a controlled emulsion-solvent-evaporation method, which can simultaneously provide optical gain and act as an effective resonant cavity. By measuring the shift of their lasing modes on exposure to organic vapor, we successfully monitored the slight concentration variation in the chemical gas. These microlaser sensors demonstrated high detection sensitivity and good signal repeatability under continuous chemical gas treatments. The results offer an effective strategy to design miniaturized optical sensors.

  16. Localized temperature and chemical reaction control in nanoscale space by nanowire array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C Yan; Li, Zhiyong; Williams, R Stanley; Lee, K-Cheol; Park, Inkyu

    2011-11-09

    We introduce a novel method for chemical reaction control with nanoscale spatial resolution based on localized heating by using a well-aligned nanowire array. Numerical and experimental analysis shows that each individual nanowire could be selectively and rapidly Joule heated for local and ultrafast temperature modulation in nanoscale space (e.g., maximum temperature gradient 2.2 K/nm at the nanowire edge; heating/cooling time chemical reactions such as polymer decomposition/cross-linking and direct and localized hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nanowires were demonstrated.

  17. Chemical-Reaction-Controlled Phase Separated Drops: Formation, Size Selection, and Coarsening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Jean David; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2018-02-01

    Phase separation under nonequilibrium conditions is exploited by biological cells to organize their cytoplasm but remains poorly understood as a physical phenomenon. Here, we study a ternary fluid model in which phase-separating molecules can be converted into soluble molecules, and vice versa, via chemical reactions. We elucidate using analytical and simulation methods how drop size, formation, and coarsening can be controlled by the chemical reaction rates, and categorize the qualitative behavior of the system into distinct regimes. Ostwald ripening arrest occurs above critical reaction rates, demonstrating that this transition belongs entirely to the nonequilibrium regime. Our model is a minimal representation of the cell cytoplasm.

  18. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from animal buildings: part 1 - project overview, collection methods, and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livestock facilities have historically generated public concerns due to their emissions of odorous air and various chemical pollutants. Odor emission factors and identification of principal odorous chemicals are needed to better understand the problem. Applications of odor emission factors include i...

  19. Chemical weathering as a mechanism for the climatic control of bedrock river incision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brendan P.; Johnson, Joel P. L.; Gasparini, Nicole M.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2016-04-01

    Feedbacks between climate, erosion and tectonics influence the rates of chemical weathering reactions, which can consume atmospheric CO2 and modulate global climate. However, quantitative predictions for the coupling of these feedbacks are limited because the specific mechanisms by which climate controls erosion are poorly understood. Here we show that climate-dependent chemical weathering controls the erodibility of bedrock-floored rivers across a rainfall gradient on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. Field data demonstrate that the physical strength of bedrock in streambeds varies with the degree of chemical weathering, which increases systematically with local rainfall rate. We find that incorporating the quantified relationships between local rainfall and erodibility into a commonly used river incision model is necessary to predict the rates and patterns of downcutting of these rivers. In contrast to using only precipitation-dependent river discharge to explain the climatic control of bedrock river incision, the mechanism of chemical weathering can explain strong coupling between local climate and river incision.

  20. A multi target approach to control chemical reactions in their inhomogeneous solvent environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefer, Daniel; Thallmair, Sebastian; Zauleck, Julius P P; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de

    2015-01-01

    Shaped laser pulses offer a powerful tool to manipulate molecular quantum systems. Their application to chemical reactions in solution is a promising concept to redesign chemical synthesis. Along this road, theoretical developments to include the solvent surrounding are necessary. An appropriate theoretical treatment is helpful to understand the underlying mechanisms. In our approach we simulate the solvent by randomly selected snapshots from molecular dynamics trajectories. We use multi target optimal control theory to optimize pulses for the various arrangements of explicit solvent molecules simultaneously. This constitutes a major challenge for the control algorithm, as the solvent configurations introduce a large inhomogeneity to the potential surfaces. We investigate how the algorithm handles the new challenges and how well the controllability of the system is preserved with increasing complexity. Additionally, we introduce a way to statistically estimate the efficiency of the optimized laser pulses in the complete thermodynamical ensemble. (paper)

  1. Soil chemical factors and grassland species density in Emas National Park (central Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, P K; Batalha, M A

    2008-05-01

    Studies of grasslands on specific soil types suggest that different nutrients can limit biomass production and, hence, species composition and number. The Brazilian cerrado is the major savanna region in America and once covered about 2 million km(2), mainly in the Brazilian Central Plateau, under seasonal climate, with wet summer and dry winter. In view of the importance of soil chemical factors in the distribution of the vegetation forms within the Cerrado domain and which may influence the number of species, we analyzed some soil characteristics in three herbaceous vegetation forms -- hyperseasonal cerrado, seasonal cerrado, and wet grassland -- in Emas National Park, a core cerrado site, to investigate the relationship between number of species and soil characteristics. We collected vegetation and soil samples in these three vegetation forms and submitted the obtained data to multiple linear regression. We found out that aluminum and pH were the best predictors of species density, the former positively related to species density and the latter negatively related. Since the predictable variation in species density is important in determining areas of conservation, we can postulate that these two soil factors are indicators of high species density areas in tropical grasslands, which could be used in selecting priority sites for conservation.

  2. [Chemical composition and content of antiphysiological factors of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) residual meal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gil, F; Sanginés, G L; Torreblanca, R A; Grande, M L; Carranco, J M

    1989-12-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is a perennial plant with an interesting economic value by processing it for liquid wax production. By pressing of jojoba seeds, by-product which has been called "residual meal" has been obtained, and because of its high protein content, it would be a great interest to evaluate it as animal feedstuff. The results of this study showed the following. Both seed and residual meal were analyzed in regard to their chemical proximal composition: crude protein 14.03 and 25.24%; ether extract, 48.89 and 14.73%; crude fiber, 10.03 and 10.07%; ash, 1.59 and 4.72, and nitrogen-free extract, 25.46 and 45.25, the limiting amino acids being methionine, lysine and isoleucine. The trypsin inhibitor factors were 13.747 and 11,197 TIU/g; and hemagglutinins and saponins were negative for both samples. Cyanogenic glucosides were positive in both samples. It was concluded that jojoba residual meal is an alternative as an adequate feedstuff in those regions where jojoba is produced. Nevertheless, prior to consumption it must be treated so as to eliminate the toxic factors.

  3. Human factors in aviation: Terminal control area boundary conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monan, William P.

    1989-01-01

    Air-to-air conflicts in the vicinity of Terminal Control Area (TCA) boundaries were studied to obtain a better understanding of the causal dynamics of these events with particular focus on human factor issues. The study dataset consisted of 381 Instrument Flight Rules/Visual Flight Rules (IFR/VFR) traffic conflicts in airspace layers above TCA ceiling and below TCA floors; 213 reports of incursions in TCA terminal airspace by VFR aircraft, of which 123 resulted in conflicts; and an additional set of reports describing problems with Air Traffic Control (ATC) services in and around TCAs. Results and conclusions are detailed.

  4. The human factors specialist in nuclear control centre design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.B.; Beattie, J.D.

    The main focus at Ontario Hydro for man-machine interface design is in the design of control centres. Because the control of a nuclear generating unit is highly centralized there is an increasing need for effective information display and control layout. Control panel design innovations such as the use of CRT displays and the extended use of computerized control in the Darlington station have made it possible for Ontario Hydro to continue to have one first operator for each generating unit. The human factors specialist involved in control panel design must deal with people who know much more about the specific systems being controlled, and must become a generalist in all these systems as well. Designers have to use conceptual techniques such as task analysis, systems design, panel mock-ups, anthropometric data, and personal judgement based on experience as they design panels. They must find a balance between becoming locked into existing technology and methods, slavishly following the latest technological trends, and forgetting that real people will be using what they design

  5. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  6. Control of exogenous factors affecting plasma homovanillic acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, M; Giordani, A B; Mohs, R C; Mykytyn, V V; Platt, S; Aryan, Z S; Davis, K L

    1987-04-01

    Measurements of plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) concentrations appear to be a valid research strategy in psychiatric disorders in which a central dopamine (DA) abnormality has been implicated. This study provides guidance about the control of some of the exogenous factors affecting pHVA concentrations. Fasting for 14 hours eliminates the dietary effects on pHVA in healthy human subjects. Changing position, walking for 30 minutes, or smoking two cigarettes has no effect on pHVA concentrations.

  7. Health impacts of chemical irritants used for crowd control: a systematic review of the injuries and deaths caused by tear gas and pepper spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini J. Haar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical irritants used in crowd control, such as tear gases and pepper sprays, are generally considered to be safe and to cause only transient pain and lacrimation. However, there are numerous reports that use and misuse of these chemicals may cause serious injuries. We aimed to review documented injuries from chemical irritants to better understand the morbidity and mortality associated with these weapons. Methods We conducted a systematic review using PRISMA guidelines to identify injuries, permanent disabilities, and deaths from chemical irritants worldwide between January 1, 1990 and March 15, 2015. We reviewed injuries to different body systems, injury severity, and potential risk factors for injury severity. We also assessed region, context and quality of each included article. Results We identified 31 studies from 11 countries. These reported on 5131 people who suffered injuries, two of whom died and 58 of whom suffered permanent disabilities. Out of 9261 total injuries, 8.7% were severe and required professional medical management, while 17% were moderate and 74.3% were minor. Severe injuries occurred to all body systems, with the majority of injuries impacting the skin and eyes. Projectile munition trauma caused 231 projectile injuries, with 63 (27% severe injuries, including major head injury and vision loss. Potentiating factors for more severe injury included environmental conditions, prolonged exposure time, and higher quantities of chemical agent in enclosed spaces. Conclusions Although chemical weapons may have a limited role in crowd control, our findings demonstrate that they have significant potential for misuse, leading to unnecessary morbidity and mortality. A nuanced understanding of the health impacts of chemical weapons and mitigating factors is imperative to avoiding indiscriminate use of chemical weapons and associated health consequences.

  8. Health impacts of chemical irritants used for crowd control: a systematic review of the injuries and deaths caused by tear gas and pepper spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, Rohini J; Iacopino, Vincent; Ranadive, Nikhil; Weiser, Sheri D; Dandu, Madhavi

    2017-10-19

    Chemical irritants used in crowd control, such as tear gases and pepper sprays, are generally considered to be safe and to cause only transient pain and lacrimation. However, there are numerous reports that use and misuse of these chemicals may cause serious injuries. We aimed to review documented injuries from chemical irritants to better understand the morbidity and mortality associated with these weapons. We conducted a systematic review using PRISMA guidelines to identify injuries, permanent disabilities, and deaths from chemical irritants worldwide between January 1, 1990 and March 15, 2015. We reviewed injuries to different body systems, injury severity, and potential risk factors for injury severity. We also assessed region, context and quality of each included article. We identified 31 studies from 11 countries. These reported on 5131 people who suffered injuries, two of whom died and 58 of whom suffered permanent disabilities. Out of 9261 total injuries, 8.7% were severe and required professional medical management, while 17% were moderate and 74.3% were minor. Severe injuries occurred to all body systems, with the majority of injuries impacting the skin and eyes. Projectile munition trauma caused 231 projectile injuries, with 63 (27%) severe injuries, including major head injury and vision loss. Potentiating factors for more severe injury included environmental conditions, prolonged exposure time, and higher quantities of chemical agent in enclosed spaces. Although chemical weapons may have a limited role in crowd control, our findings demonstrate that they have significant potential for misuse, leading to unnecessary morbidity and mortality. A nuanced understanding of the health impacts of chemical weapons and mitigating factors is imperative to avoiding indiscriminate use of chemical weapons and associated health consequences.

  9. New factors controlling the balance between osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-02-01

    The majority of conditions associated with bone loss, including aging, are accompanied by increased marrow adiposity possibly due to shifting of the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells (MSC). In order to study the relationship between osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis in bone marrow, we have characterized cellular models of multipotent MSC as well as pre-osteoblastic and pre-adipocytic cell populations. Using these models, we identified two secreted factors in the bone marrow microenviroment: secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP-1) and delta-like1 (preadipocyte factor 1) (Dlk1/Pref-1). Both exert regulatory effects on osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis. Our studies suggest a model for lineage fate determination of MSC that is regulated through secreted factors in the bone marrow microenvironment that mediate a cross-talk between lineage committed cell populations in addition to controlling differentiation choices of multipotent MSC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial respiratory control is lost during growth factor deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Eyal; Armour, Sean M; Thompson, Craig B

    2002-10-01

    The ability of cells to maintain a bioenergetically favorable ATP/ADP ratio confers a tight balance between cellular events that consume ATP and the rate of ATP production. However, after growth factor withdrawal, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio declines. To investigate these changes, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells isolated before the onset of apoptosis were characterized in vitro. Mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells have lost their ability to undergo matrix condensation in response to ADP, which is accompanied by a failure to perform ADP-coupled respiration. At the time of analysis, mitochondria from growth factor-deprived cells were not depleted of cytochrome c and cytochrome c-dependent respiration was unaffected, demonstrating that the inhibition of the respiratory rate is not due to loss of cytochrome c. Agents that disrupt the mitochondrial outer membrane, such as digitonin, or maintain outer membrane exchange of adenine nucleotide, such as Bcl-x(L), restored ADP-dependent control of mitochondrial respiration. Together, these data suggest that the regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability contributes to respiratory control.

  11. Margins of safety provided by COSHH Essentials and the ILO Chemical Control Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachael M; Nicas, Mark

    2006-03-01

    COSHH Essentials, developed by the UK Health and Safety Executive, and the Chemical Control Toolkit (Toolkit) proposed by the International Labor Organization, are 'control banding' approaches to workplace risk management intended for use by proprietors of small and medium-sized businesses. Both systems group chemical substances into hazard bands based on toxicological endpoint and potency. COSSH Essentials uses the European Union's Risk-phrases (R-phrases), whereas the Toolkit uses R-phrases and the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. Each hazard band is associated with a range of airborne concentrations, termed exposure bands, which are to be attained by the implementation of recommended control technologies. Here we analyze the margin of safety afforded by the systems and, for each hazard band, define the minimal margin as the ratio of the minimum airborne concentration that produced the toxicological endpoint of interest in experimental animals to the maximum concentration in workplace air permitted by the exposure band. We found that the minimal margins were always occupational exposure limits, we argue that the minimal margins are better indicators of health protection. Further, given the small margins observed, we feel it is important that revisions of these systems provide the exposure bands to users, so as to permit evaluation of control technology capture efficiency.

  12. Factors controlling floc settling velocity along a longitudinal estuarine transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, A.J.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    A 147 km longitudinal transect of flocculated cohesive sediment properties in San Francisco Bay (SFB) was conducted on June 17th, 2008. Our aim was to determine the factors that control floc settling velocity along the longitudinal axis of the estuary. The INSSEV-LF video system was used to measure floc diameters and settling velocities at 30 stations at a distance of 0.7 m above the estuary bed. Floc sizes (D) ranged from 22 μm to 639 μm and settling velocities (Ws) ranged between 0.04 mm·s− 1 and 15.8 mm·s− 1 during the longitudinal transect. Nearbed turbulent shear stresses throughout the transect duration were within the 0.2–0.5 Pa range which typically stimulates flocculation growth. The individual D–Ws–floc density plots suggest the suspended sediments encountered throughout SFB were composed of both muddy cohesive sediment and mixed sediments flocs. Mass-weighted population mean settling velocity (Wsmass) ranged from 0.5 mm·s− 1 to 10 mm·s− 1. The macrofloc and microfloc (demarcation at 160 μm) sub-populations demonstrated parameterised settling velocities which spanned nearly double the range of the sample mean settling velocities (Wsmean). The macroflocs tended to dominate the suspended mass (up to 77% of the ambient suspended solid concentration; SSC) from San Pablo Bay to Carquinez Strait (the vicinity of the turbidity maximum zone). Microfloc mass was particularly significant (typically 60–100% of the SSC) in the northern section of South Bay and most of Central Bay. The transect took eleven hours to complete and was not fully synoptic. During slack tide, larger and faster settling flocs deposited, accounting for most of the longitudinal variability. The best single predictor of settling velocity was water velocity 39 min prior to sampling, not suspended-sediment concentration or salinity. Resuspension and settling lags are likely responsible for the lagged response of settling velocity to water velocity. The distribution of

  13. Assessment of microphysical and chemical factors of aerosols over seas of the Russian Artic Eastern Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobokova, Liudmila; Polkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The newly observed kickoff of the Northern Route development drew serious attention to state of the Arctic Resource environment. Occurring climatic and environmental changes are more sensitively seen in polar areas in particular. Air environment control allows for making prognostic assessments which are required for planning hazardous environmental impacts preventive actions. In August - September 2013, RV «Professor Khlustin» Northern Sea Route expeditionary voyage took place. En-route aerosol sampling was done over the surface of the Beringov, Chukotka and Eastern-Siberia seas (till the town of Pevek). The purpose of sampling was to assess spatio-temporal variability of optic, microphysical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles of the surface layer within different areas adjacent to the Northern Sea Route. Aerosol test made use of automated mobile unit consisting of photoelectric particles counter AZ-10, aetalometr MDA-02, aspirator on NBM-1.2 pump chassis, and the impactor. This set of equipment allows for doing measurements of number concentration, dispersed composition of aerosols within sizes d=0.3-10 mkm, mass concentration of submicron sized aerosol, and filter-conveyed aerosols sampling. Filter-conveyed aerosols sampling was done using method accepted by EMEP and EANET monitoring networks. The impactor channel was upgraded to separate particles bigger than 1 mkm in size, and the fine grain fraction settled down on it. Reverse 5-day and 10-day trajectories of air mass transfer executed at heights of 10, 1500 and 3500 m were analyzed. The heights were selected by considerations that 3000 m is the height which characterizes air mass trend in the lower troposphere. 1500 m is the upper border of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the sampling was done in the Earth's surface layer at less than 10 m. Minimum values of the bespoken microphysical characteristics are better characteristic of higher latitudes where there are no man induced sources of

  14. Integrated Microfluidic Membrane Transistor Utilizing Chemical Information for On-Chip Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Schreiter, Joerg; Haefner, Sebastian; Paschew, Georgi; Voigt, Andreas; Richter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics is a great enabling technology for biology, biotechnology, chemistry and general life sciences. Despite many promising predictions of its progress, microfluidics has not reached its full potential yet. To unleash this potential, we propose the use of intrinsically active hydrogels, which work as sensors and actuators at the same time, in microfluidic channel networks. These materials transfer a chemical input signal such as a substance concentration into a mechanical output. This way chemical information is processed and analyzed on the spot without the need for an external control unit. Inspired by the development electronics, our approach focuses on the development of single transistor-like components, which have the potential to be used in an integrated circuit technology. Here, we present membrane isolated chemical volume phase transition transistor (MIS-CVPT). The device is characterized in terms of the flow rate from source to drain, depending on the chemical concentration in the control channel, the source-drain pressure drop and the operating temperature. PMID:27571209

  15. Remote-controlling chemical reactions by light: towards chemistry with high spatio-temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göstl, Robert; Senf, Antti; Hecht, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    The foundation of the chemical enterprise has always been the creation of new molecular entities, such as pharmaceuticals or polymeric materials. Over the past decades, this continuing effort of designing compounds with improved properties has been complemented by a strong effort to render their preparation (more) sustainable by implementing atom as well as energy economic strategies. Therefore, synthetic chemistry is typically concerned with making specific bonds and connections in a highly selective and efficient manner. However, to increase the degree of sophistication and expand the scope of our work, we argue that the modern aspiring chemist should in addition be concerned with attaining (better) control over when and where chemical bonds are being made or broken. For this purpose, photoswitchable molecular systems, which allow for external modulation of chemical reactions by light, are being developed and in this review we are covering the current state of the art of this exciting new field. These "remote-controlled synthetic tools" provide a remarkable opportunity to perform chemical transformations with high spatial and temporal resolution and should therefore allow regulating biological processes as well as material and device performance.

  16. Integrated Microfluidic Membrane Transistor Utilizing Chemical Information for On-Chip Flow Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Schreiter, Joerg; Haefner, Sebastian; Paschew, Georgi; Voigt, Andreas; Richter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics is a great enabling technology for biology, biotechnology, chemistry and general life sciences. Despite many promising predictions of its progress, microfluidics has not reached its full potential yet. To unleash this potential, we propose the use of intrinsically active hydrogels, which work as sensors and actuators at the same time, in microfluidic channel networks. These materials transfer a chemical input signal such as a substance concentration into a mechanical output. This way chemical information is processed and analyzed on the spot without the need for an external control unit. Inspired by the development electronics, our approach focuses on the development of single transistor-like components, which have the potential to be used in an integrated circuit technology. Here, we present membrane isolated chemical volume phase transition transistor (MIS-CVPT). The device is characterized in terms of the flow rate from source to drain, depending on the chemical concentration in the control channel, the source-drain pressure drop and the operating temperature.

  17. Controlled air incineration of hazardous chemical and mixed waste at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Vavruska, J.J.; Warner, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Controlled Air Incineration (CAI) system, originally developed for transuranic (TRU) waste volume reduction studies, is currently being qualified for hazardous chemical and mixed waste treatment under provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The objective is to obtain a permanent RCRA Part B permit for thermal disposal of hazardous and mixed wastes generated by LANL. Constructed in the mid-1970s as a demonstration project for incineration of TRU solid wastes, the CAI process was substantially modified and tested in 1980-1983 for acceptance of both liquid and solid hazardous chemicals. Successful demonstration of TRU solid waste processing objectives in 1979 and later chemical waste incineration studies have been documented in several publications. In 1984, the LANL CAI became the first US Dept. of Energy (DOE) incinerator to be permitted for polychlorinated biphenyl disposal under the Toxic Substances Control Act. Following establishment of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jurisdiction over DOE chemical waste management in 1984, LANL sought and was granted interim status for the CAI and applied for a trial burn permit in the overall laboratory RCRA Part B application. A trial burn and final report have been completed; results have been submitted to EPA and the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division. This paper provides an overview of trial burn planning and results together with the operational status of LANL's CAI

  18. Wind tunnel testing to predict control room atmospheric dispersion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmquist, L.J.; Harden, P.A.; Muraida, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recent concerns at Palisades about control room habitability in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident have led to an extensive effort to increase control room habitability margin. The heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system servicing the control room has the potential for unfiltered in-leakage through its normal outside air intake louvered isolation dampers during emergency mode. The current limiting control room habitability analysis allows for 1.2 x 10 -2 m 3 /s (25 ft 3 /min) unfiltered in-leakage into the control room envelope. This leakage value was not thought to be achievable with the existing as-built configuration. Repairing the system was considered as a potential solution; however, this would be costly and could negatively affect plant operation. In addition, the system would still be required to meet the low specified unfiltered in-leakage. A second approach to this problem was to determine the atmospheric dispersion factors (x/Q's) through a wind tunnel test using a scale model of Palisades. The results of the wind tunnel testing could yield more realistic x/Q's for control room habitability than previously employed methods. Palisades selected the wind tunnel study option based on its ease of implementation, realistic results, and low cost. More importantly, the results of the study could increase the allowable unfiltered in-leakage

  19. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms.

  20. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms

  1. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-20

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for chemical reactions far from equilibrium. We mathematically reveal that the control mechanism is formulated as pulse-density modulation control of the fusion-fission timing. We produce the droplet open-reactor system using microfluidic technologies and then perform external control and autonomous feedback control over autocatalytic chemical oscillation reactions far from equilibrium. We believe that this system will be valuable for the dynamical control over self-organized phenomena far from equilibrium in chemical and biomedical studies.

  2. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for hazardous chemical and mixed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Koenig, R.A.; Warner, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is currently the only radioactive waste incineration facility in the US permitted to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The CAI was developed in the mid-1970's as a demonstration system for volume reduction of transuranic (TRU) contaminated combustible solid wastes. It has since undergone additions and modifications to accommodate hazardous chemical wastes in response to a need within the Department of Energy (DOE) to treat mixed radioactive/chemical wastes. An overview of these additions which include a liquid feed system, a high intensity liquid injection burner, and an activated carbon adsorption unit is presented here. Also included is a discussion of the procedures required for Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the CAI

  3. Chemical Control for Host-Parasitoid Model within the Parasitism Season and Its Complex Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we develop a host-parasitoid model with Holling type II functional response function and chemical control, which can be applied at any time of each parasitism season or pest generation, and focus on addressing the importance of the timing of application pesticide during the parasitism season or pest generation in successful pest control. Firstly, the existence and stability of both the host and parasitoid populations extinction equilibrium and parasitoid-free equilibrium have been investigated. Secondly, the effects of key parameters on the threshold conditions have been discussed in more detail, which shows the importance of pesticide application times on the pest control. Thirdly, the complex dynamics including multiple attractors coexistence, chaotic behavior, and initial sensitivity have been studied by using numerical bifurcation analyses. Finally, the uncertainty and sensitivity of all the parameters on the solutions of both the host and parasitoid populations are investigated, which can help us to determine the key parameters in designing the pest control strategy. The present research can help us to further understand the importance of timings of pesticide application in the pest control and to improve the classical chemical control and to make management decisions.

  4. 76 FR 17778 - Control of Ergocristine, a Chemical Precursor Used in the Illicit Manufacture of Lysergic Acid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... 1117-AB24 Control of Ergocristine, a Chemical Precursor Used in the Illicit Manufacture of Lysergic... for the List I chemicals ergotamine and ergonovine to illicitly manufacture the schedule I controlled..., due to growing concerns regarding its use for the illicit manufacture of LSD. [[Page 17779...

  5. Environmental and occupational risk factors for progressive supranuclear palsy: Case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvan, Irene; Lees, Peter S J; Cunningham, Christopher R; Rai, Shesh N; Cambon, Alexander C; Standaert, David G; Marras, Connie; Juncos, Jorge; Riley, David; Reich, Stephen; Hall, Deborah; Kluger, Benzi; Bordelon, Yvette; Shprecher, David R

    2016-05-01

    The cause of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is largely unknown. Based on evidence for impaired mitochondrial activity in PSP, we hypothesized that the disease may be related to exposure to environmental toxins, some of which are mitochondrial inhibitors. This multicenter case-control study included 284 incident PSP cases of 350 cases and 284 age-, sex-, and race-matched controls primarily from the same geographical areas. All subjects were administered standardized interviews to obtain data on demographics, residential history, and lifetime occupational history. An industrial hygienist and a toxicologist unaware of case status assessed occupational histories to estimate past exposure to metals, pesticides, organic solvents, and other chemicals. Cases and controls were similar on demographic factors. In unadjusted analyses, PSP was associated with lower education, lower income, more smoking pack-years, more years of drinking well water, more years living on a farm, more years living 1 mile from an agricultural region, more transportation jobs, and more jobs with exposure to metals in general. However, in adjusted models, only more years of drinking well water was significantly associated with PSP. There was an inverse association with having a college degree. We did not find evidence for a specific causative chemical exposure; higher number of years of drinking well water is a risk factor for PSP. This result remained significant after adjusting for income, smoking, education and occupational exposures. This is the first case-control study to demonstrate PSP is associated with environmental factors. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. THE AGGREGATION OF BACTERIA KLEBSIELLA OXYTOCA AND KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF CHEMICAL FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Sadrtdinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article acknowledges the formation of bacterial biofilms in strains of bacteria species Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella pneumoniae when grown in liquid media under the influence of negative factors (chemical factor — containing agents. Biofilms, as a community of microorganisms cause many chronic infections (meningitis, inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity, urogenital infections and create problems in the industry (fouling of processing equipment, ship hulls, oil platforms, biocorrosion metal products. Ordinary disinfectants, such as chlorine and sodium chlorite, can not remove the biofilm, so finding an effective means of dealing with them is enough actual problem. Various antibacterial agents are ineffective in combating biofilms, since bacteria produce large amounts of polysaccharides — substances that help the colony stay without disintegration. Polysaccharide serves as a barrier layer for substances in water, including for biocides. This is the main reason for the survival of microorganisms even in the heavily chlorinated water. In the study the latest data took into account on the subject, especially concerning adverse effects of oxygen on the growth of bacterial cells and directs action as a factor in the formation of biofilms. In our study we analyzed the latest generation disinfectant as an influencing factor. Working concentrations were shown in three embodiments. The number of strains studied was 6 (3 strains of each species. All strains were obtained from the Department of Museum MVE and VSE Ulyanovsk State Agricultural Academy n.a. P.A. Stolypin. In our research the biofilm community formation phenomenon has been confirmed, marked differences in biofilm formation, depending on the intensity (in this case, concentration of the promoter and bacteria species. In vivo biofilm is easily destroyed by mechanical action (shaking test tubes with the medium. Biofilm recovery after this manipulation was not observed. The results

  7. Control charts technique - a tool to data analysis for chemical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, M.B.; Venugopal, V.

    1999-01-01

    A procedure using control charts technique has been developed to analyse data of a chemical experiment which was conducted to assign a value to uranium content in Rb 2 U(SO 4 ) 3 . A value of (34.164 ± 0.031)% has been assigned against (34.167 ± 0.042)% already assigned by analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique. These values do not differ significantly. Merits and demerits of the two techniques have been discussed. (author)

  8. Neutronics and mass transport in a chemical reactor associated with controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.; Lazareth, O.W.; Powell, J.R.

    1976-05-01

    The formation of ozone from oxygen and the dissociation carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and oxygen is studied in a gamma-neutron chemical process blanket associated with a controlled thermonuclear reactor. Materials used for reactor tube wall will affect the efficiency of the energy absorption by the reactants and consequently the yield of reaction products. Three kinds of materials, aluminum, stainless steel and fiber (Al 2 O 3 )-aluminium are investigated for the tube wall material in the study

  9. Spatial patterns and controls of soil chemical weathering rates along a transient hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Mudd, S.M.; Sanderman, J.; Amundson, Ronald; Blum, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hillslopes have been intensively studied by both geomorphologists and soil scientists. Whereas geomorphologists have focused on the physical soil production and transport on hillslopes, soil scientists have been concerned with the topographic variation of soil geochemical properties. We combined these differing approaches and quantified soil chemical weathering rates along a grass covered hillslope in Coastal California. The hillslope is comprised of both erosional and depositional sections. In the upper eroding section, soil production is balanced by physical erosion and chemical weathering. The hillslope then transitions to a depositional slope where soil accumulates due to a historical reduction of channel incision at the hillslope's base. Measurements of hillslope morphology and soil thickness were combined with the elemental composition of the soil and saprolite, and interpreted through a process-based model that accounts for both chemical weathering and sediment transport. Chemical weathering of the minerals as they moved downslope via sediment transport imparted spatial variation in the geochemical properties of the soil. Inverse modeling of the field and laboratory data revealed that the long-term soil chemical weathering rates peak at 5 g m- 2 yr- 1 at the downslope end of the eroding section and decrease to 1.5 g m- 2 yr- 1 within the depositional section. In the eroding section, soil chemical weathering rates appear to be primarily controlled by the rate of mineral supply via colluvial input from upslope. In the depositional slope, geochemical equilibrium between soil water and minerals appeared to limit the chemical weathering rate. Soil chemical weathering was responsible for removing 6% of the soil production in the eroding section and 5% of colluvial influx in the depositional slope. These were among the lowest weathering rates reported for actively eroding watersheds, which was attributed to the parent material with low amount of weatherable

  10. Risk Factors For Ectopic Pregnancy : A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshmukh J.S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: Which are the risk factors for ectopic pregnancy . Objective: To study the strength of association between hypothesised risk factors and ectopic pregnancy. Study design: Unmatched case- control study. Setting: Government Medical College, Hospital, Nagpur. Participants: 133 cases of ectopic pregnancy and equal number of controls (non pregnant women admitted to study hospital. Study variables : Pelvic inflammatory diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, IUD use at conception , past use of IUD, prior ectopic pregnancy, OC pills use at the time of conception, past use of OC pills, induced abortion, spontaneous abortion, infertility and pelvic and abdominal surgery. Statistical analysis: Odds ratios & their 95% CI, Pearson’s chi square test, unconditional logistic regression analysis and population attributable risk proportion. Results : Use of IUD at conception, prior ectopic pregnancy , pelvic inflammatory disease, sexually transmitted diseases, infertility, OC pills use at the time of conception, past use of IUD and induced abortion were found to be significantly associated with ectopic pregnancy. Conclusion: Identification of these risk factors for etopic pregnancy shall help in early detection and appropriate management in an individual case and it may help in devising a comprehensive preventive strategy for ectopic pregnancy

  11. Using sequence-specific chemical and structural properties of DNA to predict transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Bauer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the DNA binding sites recognized by each transcription factor (TF. Conventional approaches to prediction of TF binding sites involve the definition of consensus sequences or position-specific weight matrices and rely on statistical analysis of DNA sequences of known binding sites. Here, we present a method called SiteSleuth in which DNA structure prediction, computational chemistry, and machine learning are applied to develop models for TF binding sites. In this approach, binary classifiers are trained to discriminate between true and false binding sites based on the sequence-specific chemical and structural features of DNA. These features are determined via molecular dynamics calculations in which we consider each base in different local neighborhoods. For each of 54 TFs in Escherichia coli, for which at least five DNA binding sites are documented in RegulonDB, the TF binding sites and portions of the non-coding genome sequence are mapped to feature vectors and used in training. According to cross-validation analysis and a comparison of computational predictions against ChIP-chip data available for the TF Fis, SiteSleuth outperforms three conventional approaches: Match, MATRIX SEARCH, and the method of Berg and von Hippel. SiteSleuth also outperforms QPMEME, a method similar to SiteSleuth in that it involves a learning algorithm. The main advantage of SiteSleuth is a lower false positive rate.

  12. Chemical control of different Digitaria insularis populations and management of a glyphosate-resistant population

    OpenAIRE

    CORREIA,N.M.; ACRA,L.T.; BALIEIRO,G.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to control different populations of Digitaria insularisby glyphosate herbicide, isolated and mixed, besides the combination of methods (chemical and mechanical) to manage resistant adult plants. Three experiments were conducted, one in pots which were maintained under non-controlled conditions and two under field conditions. In the experiment in pots, twelve populations of D. insularis were sprayed with isolated glyphosate (1.44 and 2.16 kg a.e. ha-1) and mixed (1.44 and 2.16...

  13. X-ray fluorescence control of chemical composition of cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prekina, I.M.; Rozova, O.F.; Loran, A.V.; Teplitskaya, G.A.; Smagunova, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    A method of x-ray fluorescence analysis developed for analytical set (KRF-18 diffractometer/DVK-3 computer) is used to control cast iron composition. A quantitative evaluation of errors attributed to the violation of conditions of cast iron sampling from the flow and to the quality of preparing samples for XFA is obtained. It is shown that the main component of the integral experimental error is attributed to nonuniformity of chemical composition of cast iron. Metrological studies show that reproductibility, convergence, accuracy, and sensitivity of the method match the requirements characteristic of the control process. 4 refs.; 2 tabs

  14. Worldwide estimation of river concentrations of any chemical originating from sewage-treatment plants using dilution factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Virginie D J; Williams, Richard J; Lofthouse, Caryn; Johnson, Andrew C

    2014-02-01

    Dilution factors are a critical component in estimating concentrations of so-called "down-the-drain" chemicals (e.g., pharmaceuticals) in rivers. The present study estimated the temporal and spatial variability of dilution factors around the world using geographically referenced data sets at 0.5° × 0.5° resolution. Domestic wastewater effluents were derived from national per capita domestic water use estimates and gridded population. Monthly and annual river flows were estimated by accumulating runoff estimates using topographically derived flow directions. National statistics, including the median and interquartile range, were generated to quantify dilution factors. Spatial variability of the dilution factor was found to be considerable; for example, there are 4 orders of magnitude in annual median dilution factor between Canada and Morocco. Temporal variability within a country can also be substantial; in India, there are up to 9 orders of magnitude between median monthly dilution factors. These national statistics provide a global picture of the temporal and spatial variability of dilution factors and, hence, of the potential exposure to down-the-drain chemicals. The present methodology has potential for a wide international community (including decision makers and pharmaceutical companies) to assess relative exposure to down-the-drain chemicals released by human pollution in rivers and, thus, target areas of potentially high risk. © 2013 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  15. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities

  16. Comparison of atherogenic risk factors among poorly controlled and well-controlled adolescent phenylketonuria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Mehmet; Çakar, Sevim; Kuyum, Pınar; Makay, Balahan; Arslan, Nur

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies investigating the known risk factors of atherosclerosis in phenylketonuria patients have shown conflicting results. The primary aim of our study was to investigate the serum atherogenic markers in adolescent classical phenylketonuria patients and compare these parameters with healthy peers. The secondary aim was to compare these atherogenic markers in well-controlled and poorly controlled patients. A total of 59 patients (median age: 12.6 years, range: 11-17 years) and 44 healthy controls (median age: 12.0 years, range: 11-15 years) were enrolled in our study. Phenylketonuria patients were divided into two groups: well-controlled (serum phenylalanine levels below 360 µmol/L; 24 patients) and poorly controlled patients (serum phenylalanine levels higher than 360 µmol/L). The mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of well-controlled patients (1.0±0.2 mmol/L) were significantly lower compared with poorly controlled patients and controls (1.1±0.2 mmol/L, p=0.011 and 1.4±0.2 mmol/L, pphenylketonuria patients. In particular, these changes were more prominent in well-controlled patients. We conclude that phenylketonuria patients might be at risk for atherosclerosis, and therefore screening for atherosclerotic risk factors should be included in the phenylketonuria therapy and follow-up in addition to other parameters.

  17. Quality control in the development of coagulation factor concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, T J

    1987-01-01

    Limitation of process change is a major factor contributing to assurance of quality in pharmaceutical manufacturing. This is particularly true in the manufacture of coagulation factor concentrates, for which presumptive testing for poorly defined product characteristics is an integral feature of finished product quality control. The development of new or modified preparations requires that this comfortable position be abandoned, and that the effect on finished product characteristics of changes to individual process steps (and components) be assessed. The degree of confidence in the safety and efficacy of the new product will be determined by, amongst other things, the complexity of the process alteration and the extent to which the results of finished product tests can be considered predictive. The introduction of a heat-treatment step for inactivation of potential viral contaminants in coagulation factor concentrates presents a significant challenge in both respects, quite independent of any consideration of assessment of the effectiveness of the viral inactivation step. These interactions are illustrated by some of the problems encountered with terminal dry heat-treatment (72 h. at 80 degrees C) of factor VIII and prothrombin complex concentrates manufactured by the Blood Products Laboratory.

  18. [Emission factors and PM chemical composition study of biomass burning in the Yangtze River Delta region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xi-Bin; Huang, Cheng; Lou, Sheng-Rong; Qiao, Li-Ping; Wang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ming-hua; Chen, Chang-Hong; Wang, Qian; Li, Gui-Ling; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Gang-Feng

    2014-05-01

    The emission characteristics of five typical crops, including wheat straw, rice straw, oil rape straw, soybean straw and fuel wood, were investigated to explore the gas and particulates emission of typical biomass burning in Yangzi-River-Delta area. The straws were tested both by burning in stove and by burning in the farm with a self-developed measurement system as open burning sources. Both gas and fine particle pollutants were measured in this study as well as the chemical composition of fine particles. The results showed that the average emission factors of CO, NO, and PM2,5 in open farm burning were 28.7 g.kg -1, 1.2 g.kg-1 and 2.65 g kg-1 , respectively. Due to insufficient burning in the low oxygen level environment, the emission factors of stove burning were higher than those of open farm burning, which were 81.9 g kg-1, 2. 1 g.kg -1 and 8.5 gkg -1 , respectively. Oil rape straw had the highest emission factors in all tested straws samples. Carbonaceous matter, including organic carbon(OC) and element carbon(EC) , was the foremost component of PM2, 5from biomass burning. The average mass fractions of OC and EC were (38.92 +/- 13.93)% and (5.66 +/-1.54)% by open farm burning and (26.37 +/- 10. 14)% and (18.97 +/- 10.76)% by stove burning. Water soluble ions such as Cl-and K+ had a large contribution. The average mass fractions of CI- and K+ were (13.27 +/-6. 82)% and (12.41 +/- 3.02)% by open farm burning, and were (16.25 +/- 9.34)% and (13.62 +/- 7.91)% by stove burning. The K +/OC values of particles from wheat straw, rice straw, oil rape straw and soybean straw by open farm burning were 0. 30, 0. 52, 0. 49 and 0. 15, respectively, which can be used to evaluate the influence on the regional air quality in YRD area from biomass burning and provide direct evidence for source apportionment.

  19. Biological stability of drinking water: controlling factors, methods and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle ePrest

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g. development of opportunistic pathogens, aesthetic (e.g. deterioration of taste, odour, colour or operational (e.g. fouling or biocorrosion of pipes problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors such as (i type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii presence of predators such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv environmental conditions such as water temperature, and (v spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment or biofilm. Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discuss how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order to

  20. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  1. Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, Emmanuelle I.

    2016-02-01

    Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order

  2. Uso de diferentes herbicidas no controle de Myriophyllum aquaticum Chemical Control of Myriophyllum aquaticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Negrisoli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve a finalidade de avaliar, em condições de caixa d'água, o controle químico de Myriophyllum aquaticum (pinheiro-d'água, através de herbicidas aplicados em pós-emergência. Os herbicidas e respectivas doses (g ha-1 foram: diquat (Reward a 204 g i.a. ha-1; diquat a 102 e 204 g i.a. ha-1 + Agral a 0,1%; 2,4-D (DMA 806 BR a 167, 335, 670 e 1.340 g e.a. ha-1; glyphosate (Rodeo a 3.360 g e.a. ha-1 + Aterbane a 0,5%; e imazapyr (Arsenal a 250 g e.a. ha-1. As parcelas foram constituídas por caixas d'água de 0,60 x 0,60 x 0,45 m, com 120 litros de água + 20 litros de solo e 20 ramos por caixa. Utilizou-se um pulverizador costal a pressão constante de CO2 a 2 bar, pontas 110.02 VS, com um consumo de calda de 180 l ha-1. O controle foi avaliado visualmente aos 2, 6, 9,11, 13, 17, 20, 23, 26, 30 e 36 dias após a aplicação dos herbicidas (DAAH. Inicialmente, o herbicida diquat foi o composto que apresentou os sintomas mais severos de intoxicação nos ramos de pinheiro-d'água aos 2 DAAH, com 65% de controle em média, e aos 20 DAAH ele atingiu o controle máximo (99%, porém ocorreram rebrotas a partir dos 23 DAAH, independentemente da adição ou não de Agral e das doses testadas. O herbicida 2,4-D proporcionou 100% de controle dos ramos a partir dos 23 DAAH para as doses de 1.340 e 670 g ha-1, não ocorrendo rebrotas; já para as demais doses testadas (335 e 167 g ha-1 o controle não foi eficiente, pois ocorreram rebrotas. Os herbicidas glyphosate e imazapyr não foram eficientes no controle desta espécie.This work was carried out at the Advanced Weed Research Nucleus - UNESP, Botucatu-SP, to evaluate the control of Myriophyllum aquaticum by applying different herbicides in post emergence. The herbicides and doses (g ha-1 tested were: diquat (Reward at 204 g a.i. ha-1, diquat at 102 and 204 g a.i. ha-1 + agral at 0.1% v/v; 2,4-D (DMA 806 BR at 1,340, 670, 335 and 167 g a.e. ha-1; glyphosate (Rodeo at 3.360 g a.e. ha-1

  3. Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

  4. ZnO UV photodetector with controllable quality factor and photosensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Campos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanowires have an enormous potential for applications as ultra-violet (UV photodetectors. Their mechanism of photocurrent generation is intimately related with the presence of surface states where considerable efforts, such as surface chemical modifications, have been pursued to improve their photodetection capabilities. In this work, we report a step further in this direction demonstrating that the relative photosensitivity and quality factor (Q factor of the photodetector are entirely tunable by an applied gate voltage. This mechanism enables UV photodetection selectivity ranging from wavelengths from tens of nanometers (full width at half maximum - FWHM down to a narrow detection of 3 nm. Such control paves the way for novel applications, especially related to the detection of elements that have very sharp luminescence.

  5. Human factors in remote control engineering development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Hamel, W.R.; Draper, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Human factors engineering, which is an integral part of the advanced remote control development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is described. First, work at the Remote Systems Development Facility (RSDF) has shown that operators can perform a wide variety of tasks, some of which were not specifically designed for remote systems, with a dextrous electronic force-reflecting servomanipulator and good television remote viewing capabilities. Second, the data collected during mock-up remote maintenance experiments at the RSDF have been analyzed to provide guidelines for the design of human interfaces with an integrated advanced remote maintenance system currently under development. Guidelines have been provided for task allocation between operators, remote viewing systems, and operator controls. 6 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  6. Factors Controlling Nanoparticle Pharmacokinetics: An Integrated Analysis and Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Hunter, A.C.; Andresen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion......Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array...... are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further....

  7. [Current status of hearing loss and related influencing factors in workers with noise exposure in refining and chemical industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S S; Yu, J N; He, C H; Mu, H X; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Zhang, C Y; Yu, S F; Li, X L

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To investigate the current status of hearing loss and related influencing factors in workers with noise exposure in refining and chemical industry. Methods: From August 2015 to March 2016, the investigation method of collecting the data of past occupational health examinations and measuring noise in working environment was used to enroll 8 672 male workers. Results: Of all workers, 11.6% were diagnosed with hearing loss. There were significant differences in the distribution of hearing impairment among workers exposed to noise at different ages, device types and types of work (χ(2)=17.80, 77.80 and 30.53, all P hearing loss in workers with noise exposure in refining and chemical industry. Conclusion: The level of noise exposure and working years with noise exposure are main influencing factors for hearing loss in workers with noise exposure in refining and chemical industry.

  8. Understanding disease control: influence of epidemiological and economic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Oleś

    Full Text Available We present a model of disease transmission on a regular and small world network and compare different control options. Comparison is based on a total cost of epidemic, including cost of palliative treatment of ill individuals and preventive cost aimed at vaccination or culling of susceptible individuals. Disease is characterized by pre-symptomatic phase, which makes detection and control difficult. Three general strategies emerge: global preventive treatment, local treatment within a neighborhood of certain size and only palliative treatment with no prevention. While the choice between the strategies depends on a relative cost of palliative and preventive treatment, the details of the local strategy and, in particular, the size of the optimal treatment neighborhood depend on the epidemiological factors. The required extent of prevention is proportional to the size of the infection neighborhood, but depends on time till detection and time till treatment in a non-nonlinear (power law. The optimal size of control neighborhood is also highly sensitive to the relative cost, particularly for inefficient detection and control application. These results have important consequences for design of prevention strategies aiming at emerging diseases for which parameters are not nessecerly known in advance.

  9. Controllingchemical nose” biosensor characteristics by modulating gold nanoparticle shape and concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit S. Verma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional lock-and-key biosensors often only detect a single pathogen because they incorporate biomolecules with high specificity. “Chemical nose” biosensors are overcoming this limitation and identifying multiple pathogens simultaneously by obtaining a unique set of responses for each pathogen of interest, but the number of pathogens that can be distinguished is limited by the number of responses obtained. Herein, we use a gold nanoparticle-based “chemical nose” to show that changing the shapes of nanoparticles can increase the number of responses available for analysis and expand the types of bacteria that can be identified. Using four shapes of nanoparticles (nanospheres, nanostars, nanocubes, and nanorods, we demonstrate that each shape provides a unique set of responses in the presence of different bacteria, which can be exploited for enhanced specificity of the biosensor. Additionally, the concentration of nanoparticles controls the detection limit of the biosensor, where a lower concentration provides better detection limit. Thus, here we lay a foundation for designing “chemical nose” biosensors and controlling their characteristics using gold nanoparticle morphology and concentration. Keywords: Morphology, Color change, Staphylococcus aureus, Point-of-care, Nanocubes, Nanorods

  10. Chemical elements in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), phytoplankton and estuarine sediments from eastern Amazon (Northern Brazil): Bioaccumulation factors and trophic transfer factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, Maria P. S. P.; Costa, Marcondes L.; Berrêdo, José F.; Paiva, Rosildo S.; Souza, Crisvaldo C. S.

    2016-04-01

    The current study was conducted near Barcarena County, which is a mid-sized urban center where aluminum ore processing industries (bauxite) and Vila do Conde cargo terminal are located. It aims to discuss the bioaccumulation factors as well as factors related to the trophic transfer of chemical elements in water, oyster, phytoplankton and bottom sediments from an estuary in the Brazilian Northern coast. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF), trophic transfer factor (TTF) and biota-sediment-water were used to correlate the contents of chemical elements found in organisms. The sediment, surface water, phytoplankton and pearl oysters chemical composition was analyzed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Pearl oysters showed K, Ca, Mg, P, Mn, Fe, Zn, Al, Ba and Pb accumulation, which concentration increase is associated with their diet (phytoplankton). Al concentrations are 14 times higher in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), assuming that they are associated with wastewater emissions and with industrialization processes in the area. BAF and BSAF values are 1000 times higher than the metal concentrations in water and bioavailable fraction concentrations. The oyster-phytoplankton trophic transfer factor indicates that P, Ba, Ca, Na, Cd and Zn showed the largest transfers (from 5 to 19). These trophic transfers may be sufficient to cause significant ecotoxicological effects on the region biota.

  11. chemical concepts sjif impact factor evaluation [sjif 2012 = 3.963

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Although there seems to be no agreement about the nature of concepts, one can safely say that chemical concepts are ideas about matter. The major problem in teaching chemical concepts, however, is individuals (students) construct their own ideas about matter depending on their previous experiences in a way that in a ...

  12. Development of hazard analysis by critical control points (HACCP) procedures to control organic chemical hazards in the agricultural production of raw food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropkins, Karl; Ferguson, Andrew; Beck, Angus J

    2003-01-01

    Hazard Analysis by Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a systematic approach to the identification, assessment, and control of hazards in the food chain. Effective HACCP requires the consideration of all chemical microbiological, and physical hazards. However, current procedures focus primarily on microbiological and physical hazards, while chemical aspects of HACCP have received relatively little attention. In this article we discuss the application of HACCP to organic chemical contaminants and the problems that are likely to be encountered in agriculture. We also present generic templates for the development of organic chemical contaminant HACCP procedures for selected raw food commodities, that is, cereal crops,raw meats, and milk.

  13. Attempts to identify a control system for chemical reactivity in the living state using virtual energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, B L; Bourke, C

    2001-07-01

    This thesis explores the activation of chemicals in metabolic systems from the viewpoint that this activation is under the control of elements of the space-sea in which the chemicals are immersed. Themselves inert, the chemicals are theorised to exploit a force or action issuing from space (fluctuation) and characterized by the homogeneity (termed symmetry) of this medium. The fluctuation is heterogenized upon collision with matter from the intervention of well recognized fields of gravity and electromagnetism at the instant of its issue to form the near field of radiation. Fractions of original space waves and of their intrinsic spin are produced resulting in the activation of the orbitals (valency) in the chemical itself. The thesis continues: the disturbed fluctuation must return to space, obliging in turn, a prior return to the homogeneous state requiring special restorative wave rearrangements known as resonance. The success of the restorative resonance is signalled by a singularity of the fluctuation now propelled to infinity (space), and the contingent chemical reactions thereby terminated. Compromise to this return can occur from many causes and, in its presence, activation of the orbitals continues. They now effectively constitute autonomous reactions alienated from the system as a whole. The thesis is supported from evidence from diverse fields such as space theory, history of quantum field theory in attempts to derive its meaning, dielectrics and the near field of electromagnetic radiation, electron-space interactions at the Fermi surface during phase transitions and evolution of equilibrium conditions in resonance phenomena. The utility of the hypothesis rests on recognition of the resonance condition at various points in the system sufficiently macroscopic as to be available clinically as an abrupt interface between physiology and pathology. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. [Risk assessment and risk control for occupational exposure to chemical toxicants from an isophorone nitrile device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dejun; Fu, Xiaokuan; Kong, Fanling; Sui, Shaofeng; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yinglin; Zhou, Jingyang

    2014-06-01

    Risk assessment and risk control for occupational exposure to chemical toxicants were performed on an isophorone nitrile device with an annual production of 5,000 tons, based on improved Singaporean semi-quantitative risk assessment method, with consideration of actual situation in China and in the present project. With the use of engineering analysis and identification of occupational hazards in the improved Singaporean semi-quantitative risk assessment method, hazard rating (HR) and risk assessment were performed on chemical toxicants from an isophorone nitrile device with an annual production of 5,000 tons. The chemical toxicants in the isophorone nitrile device were mainly isophorone, hydrocyanic acid, methanol, phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, and sodium cyanide; the HR values were mild hazard (2), extreme hazard (5), mild hazard (2), mild hazard (2), moderate hazard (3), and extreme hazard (5), respectively, and the corresponding exposure rating (ER) values were 2.09, 2.72, 2.76, 1.68, 2.0, and 1.59, respectively. The risk of chemical toxicants in this project was assessed according to the formula Risk = [HR×ER](1/2). Hydrocyanic acid was determined as high risk, sodium hydroxide and sodium cyanide as medium risk, and isophorone, methanol, and phosphoric acid as low risk. Priority in handling of risks was determined by risk rating. The table of risk control measure was established for pre-assessment of occupational hazards. With risk assessment in this study, we concluded that the isophorone nitrile device with 5,000 ton annual production was a high-occupational hazard device. This device is a project of extreme occupational hazard. The improved Singaporean semi-quantitative risk assessment method is a scientific and applicable method, and is especially suitable for pre-evaluation of on-site project with no analogy.

  15. Factors to consider in the use of stem cells for pharmaceutic drug development and for chemical safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosko, James Edward; Chang, Chia-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Given the reality of the inadequacies of current concepts of the mechanisms of chemical toxicities, of the various assays to predict toxicities from current molecular, biochemical, in vitro and animal bioassays, and of the failure to generate efficacious and safe chemicals for medicines, food supplements, industrial, consumer and agricultural chemicals, the recent NAS Report, 'Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy', has drawn attention to a renewed examination of what needs to be done to improve our current approach for better assessment of potential risk to human health. This 'Commentary' provides a major paradigm challenge to the current concepts of how chemicals induce toxicities and how these various mechanisms of toxicities can contribute to the pathogenesis of some human diseases, such as birth defects and cancer. In concordance with the NAS Report to take '... advantage of the on-going revolution in biology and biotechnology', this 'Commentary' supports the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells, grown in vitro under simulated 'in vivo niche conditions'. The human being should be viewed 'as greater than the sum of its parts'. Homeostatic control of the 'emergent properties' of the human hierarchy, needed to maintain human health, requires complex integration of endogenous and exogenous signaling molecules that control cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and senescence of stem, progenitor and differentiated cells. Currently, in vitro toxicity assays (mutagenesis, cytotoxicity, epigenetic modulation), done on 2-dimensional primary rodent or human cells (which are always mixtures of cells), on immortalized or tumorigenic rodent or human cell lines do not represent normal human cells in vivo [which do not grow on plastic and which are in micro-environments representing 3 dimensions and constantly interacting factors]. In addition, with the known genetic, gender, and developmental state of cells in vivo, any in vitro

  16. Controlled density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes in a triode plasma chemical vapor deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Park, Kyu Chang; Moon, Jong Hyun; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Pribat, Didier; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Jang, Jin

    2006-01-01

    We report on the growth mechanism and density control of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using a triode plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The deposition reactor was designed in order to allow the intermediate mesh electrode to be biased independently from the ground and power electrodes. The CNTs grown with a mesh bias of + 300 V show a density of ∼ 1.5 μm -2 and a height of ∼ 5 μm. However, CNTs do not grow when the mesh electrode is biased to - 300 V. The growth of CNTs can be controlled by the mesh electrode bias which in turn controls the plasma density and ion flux on the sample

  17. Efficacy of different chemicals for the control of aphid (acyrthosiphon pisum) on guar (cymopisis tetragonolobus) crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, Q.M.U.; Hussain, I.; Abbas, G.; Abbas, Z.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of different chemicals far the control of aphid on guar crop at Adaptive Research Farm Karor during the three successive kharif seasons i.e. 2006-07 and 2008. The experiments were laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications and five treatments viz T1=control, T2 Bifenthrin at the rate 375 ml ha/sup -1/, T3=Primore 50PP at the rate 850 ml ha/sup -1/ T4=Furathiocrab at the rate 750 ml ha/sup -1/ and T5=Carbosulfan at the rate 1250 ml ha/sup -1/. All the treatments (T4) caused significant decrease in the Pest population as compared to the control. Treatment (T4) where Furathiocrab was applied at the rate. 750 ml ha/sup -1/ during the years 2006, 2007 and 2008 respectively. (author)

  18. Model-Based Integrated Process Design and Controller Design of Chemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abd Hamid, Mohd Kamaruddin Bin

    that is typically formulated as a mathematical programming (optimization with constraints) problem is solved by the so-called reverse approach by decomposing it into four sequential hierarchical sub-problems: (i) pre-analysis, (ii) design analysis, (iii) controller design analysis, and (iv) final selection......This thesis describes the development and application of a new systematic modelbased methodology for performing integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) of chemical processes. The new methodology is simple to apply, easy to visualize and efficient to solve. Here, the IPDC problem...... are ordered according to the defined performance criteria (objective function). The final selected design is then verified through rigorous simulation. In the pre-analysis sub-problem, the concepts of attainable region and driving force are used to locate the optimal process-controller design solution...

  19. Factors controlling the regional distribution of vanadium in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Although the ingestion of vanadium (V) in drinking water may have possible adverse health effects, there have been relatively few studies of V in groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater as a source of drinking water in many areas of the world, this study examines the potential sources and geochemical processes that control the distribution of V in groundwater on a regional scale. Potential sources of V to groundwater include dissolution of V rich rocks, and waste streams from industrial processes. Geochemical processes such as adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, and chemical transformations control V concentrations in groundwater. Based on thermodynamic data and laboratory studies, V concentrations are expected to be highest in samples collected from oxic and alkaline groundwater. However, the extent to which thermodynamic data and laboratory results apply to the actual distribution of V in groundwater is not well understood. More than 8400 groundwater samples collected in California were used in this study. Of these samples, high (> or = 50 μg/L) and moderate (25 to 49 μg/L) V concentrations were most frequently detected in regions where both source rock and favorable geochemical conditions occurred. The distribution of V concentrations in groundwater samples suggests that significant sources of V are mafic and andesitic rock. Anthropogenic activities do not appear to be a significant contributor of V to groundwater in this study. High V concentrations in groundwater samples analyzed in this study were almost always associated with oxic and alkaline groundwater conditions, which is consistent with predictions based on thermodynamic data.

  20. Comparison of dilution factors for German wastewater treatment plant effluents in receiving streams to the fixed dilution factor from chemical risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Moritz; von der Ohe, Peter C; Voß, Katharina; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2017-11-15

    Incomplete removal during wastewater treatment leads to frequent detection of compounds such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products in municipal effluents. A fixed standard dilution factor of 10 for effluents entering receiving water bodies is used during the exposure assessment of several chemical risk assessments. However, the dilution potential of German receiving waters under low flow conditions is largely unknown and information is sparse for other European countries. We calculated dilution factors for two datasets differing in spatial extent and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) size: a national dataset comprising 1225 large WWTPs in Central and Northern Germany and a federal dataset for 678 WWTPs of a single state in Southwest Germany. We found that the fixed factor approach overestimates the dilution potential of 60% and 40% of receiving waters in the national and the federal dataset, with median dilution factors of 5 and 14.5, respectively. Under mean flow conditions, 8% of calculated dilution factors were below 10, with a median dilution factor of 106. We also calculated regional dilution factors that accounted for effluent inputs from upstream WWTPs. For the national and the federal dataset, 70% and 60% of calculated regional dilution factors fell below 10 under mean low flow conditions, respectively. Decrease of regional dilution potential in small receiving streams was mainly driven by the next WWTP upstream with a 2.5 fold drop of median regional dilution factors. Our results show that using the standard dilution factor of 10 would result in the underestimation of environmental concentrations for authorised chemicals by a factor of 3-5 for about 10% of WWTPs, especially during low flow conditions. Consequently, measured environmental concentrations might exceed predicted environmental concentrations and ecological risks posed by effluents could be much higher, suggesting that a revision of current risk assessment practices may be required

  1. Hormonal and dietary factors in acne vulgaris versus controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Thomas Jonathan; Bazergy, Carl

    2018-01-01

    Background : Acne vulgaris is an inflammatory skin disorder with not as yet fully understood pathogenesis. In this controlled study, we assessed acne vulgaris patients for several possible pathogenic factors such as vitamin D deficiency, vegan diet, increased body mass index (BMI) and positive anti-transglutaminase antibody. Methods : We screened 10 years of records at a family medicine clinic for patients diagnosed with acne vulgaris. In eligible subjects, we collected data regarding 25-hydroxylvitamin D levels, BMI, dietary preference and serum IgA tissue transglutaminase levels. Controls were age- (+/- 12 months) and sex-matched patients seen during the study period without a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Results : 453 patients were given a diagnosis of acne vulgaris during the study period. Compared with controls, we found significant associations between vitamin D deficiency (4.0U/mL) and a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Conclusions : Our study adds important information to the current body of literature in pursuit of elucidating the pathogenesis of this complex multifactorial disease.

  2. Frequency of use controls chemical leaching from drinking-water containers subject to disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Shine, James P

    2011-12-15

    Microbial-, and chemical-based burden of disease associated with lack of access to safe water continues to primarily impact developing countries. Cost-effective health risk-mitigating measures, such as of solar disinfection applied to microbial-contaminated water stored in plastic bottles have been increasingly tested in developing countries adversely impacted by epidemic water-borne diseases. Public health concerns associated with chemical leaching from water packaging materials led us to investigate the magnitude and variability of antimony (Sb) and bromine (Br) leaching from reused plastic containers (polyethylene terephthalate, PET; and polycarbonate, PC) subject to UV and/or temperature-driven disinfection. The overall objective of this study was to determine the main and interactive effects of temperature, UV exposure duration, and frequency of bottle reuse on the extent of leaching of Sb and Br from plastic bottles into water. Regardless of UV exposure duration, frequency of reuse (up to 27 times) was the major factor that linearly increased Sb leaching from PET bottles at all temperatures tested (13-47 °C). Leached Sb concentrations (∼360 ng L(-1)) from the highly reused (27 times) PET bottles (minimal Sb leaching from PC bottles, water at much lower concentrations. Additional research on potential leaching of organic chemicals from water packaging materials is deemed necessary under relevant environmental conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed

  4. Particle size: a missing factor in risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi-Guo; Yu, Gang; Chen, Yong-Shan; Cao, Qi-Ming; Fiedler, Heidelore; Deng, Shu-Bo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2012-11-15

    For researches on toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust, selection of dust fraction is a critical influencing factor to the accuracy of human exposure risk assessment results. However, analysis of the selection of dust fraction in recent studies revealed that there is no consensus. This study classified and presented researches on distribution of toxic chemicals according to dust particle size and on relationship between dust particle size and human exposure possibility. According to the literature, beyond the fact that there were no consistent conclusions on particle size distribution of adherent fraction, dust with particle size less than 100 μm should be paid more attention and that larger than 250 μm is neither adherent nor proper for human exposure risk assessment. Calculation results based on literature data show that with different selections of dust fractions, analytical results of toxic chemicals would vary up to 10-fold, which means that selecting dust fractions arbitrarily will lead to large errors in risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals in settled dust. Taking into account the influence of dust particle size on risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals, a new methodology for risk assessment of human exposure to toxic chemicals in settled indoor dust is proposed and human exposure parameter systems to settled indoor dust are advised to be established at national and regional scales all over the world. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Statistical process control support during Defense Waste Processing Facility chemical runs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) has been developed to ensure that the wasteforms produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will satisfy the regulatory and processing criteria that will be imposed. The PCCS provides rigorous, statistically-defensible management of a noisy, multivariate system subject to multiple constraints. The system has been successfully tested and has been used to control the production of the first two melter feed batches during DWPF Chemical Runs. These operations will demonstrate the viability of the DWPF process. This paper provides a brief discussion of the technical foundation for the statistical process control algorithms incorporated into PCCS, and describes the results obtained and lessons learned from DWPF Cold Chemical Run operations. The DWPF will immobilize approximately 130 million liters of high-level nuclear waste currently stored at the Site in 51 carbon steel tanks. Waste handling operations separate this waste into highly radioactive sludge and precipitate streams and less radioactive water soluble salts. (In a separate facility, soluble salts are disposed of as low-level waste in a mixture of cement slag, and flyash.) In DWPF, the precipitate steam (Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous or PHA) is blended with the insoluble sludge and ground glass frit to produce melter feed slurry which is continuously fed to the DWPF melter. The melter produces a molten borosilicate glass which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository

  6. Beverton-Holt discrete pest management models with pulsed chemical control and evolution of pesticide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-07-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is usually managed by switching between different types of pesticides. The optimal switching time, which depends on the dynamics of the pest population and on the evolution of the pesticide resistance, is critical. Here we address how the dynamic complexity of the pest population, the development of resistance and the spraying frequency of pulsed chemical control affect optimal switching strategies given different control aims. To do this, we developed novel discrete pest population growth models with both impulsive chemical control and the evolution of pesticide resistance. Strong and weak threshold conditions which guarantee the extinction of the pest population, based on the threshold values of the analytical formula for the optimal switching time, were derived. Further, we addressed switching strategies in the light of chosen economic injury levels. Moreover, the effects of the complex dynamical behaviour of the pest population on the pesticide switching times were also studied. The pesticide application period, the evolution of pesticide resistance and the dynamic complexity of the pest population may result in complex outbreak patterns, with consequent effects on the pesticide switching strategies.

  7. NMR studies on the chemical alteration of soil organic matter precursors during controlled charring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    Beside the production of volatiles, vegetation fire transforms various amounts of labile organic components into recalcitrant dark colored and highly aromatic structures. They are incorporated into soils and are assumed to represent an important sink within the global carbon cycle. In order to elucidate the real importance of PyOM as a C-sink, a good understanding of its chemistry is crucial. Although several 'Black Carbon' (BC) models are reported, a commonly accepted view of the chemistry involved in its formation is still missing. Its biogeochemical recalcitrance is commonly associated with a highly condensed aromatic structure. However, recent studies indicated that this view may be oversimplified for PyOM derived from vegetation fire. In order to bring some more light on the structural properties of PyOM produced during vegetation fire, charred plant residues and model chars derived from typical plant macromolecules (casein, cellulose, lignin and condensed tannins) were subjected to controlled charring under oxic conditions (350°C and 450°C) and then characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Subsequently, the chemical features of the PyOM were related to its chemical recalcitrance as determined by chemical oxidation with acid potassium dichromate. Charring cellulose (350°C, 8 min) yielded in a low C-recovery (11%). Treating casein in the same way resulted in a survival of 62% of its C and 46% of its N. Comparable high C-recoveries are reported for lignin. After charring Lolium perenne, 34% of its N and C were recovered. NMR-spectroscopic studies revealed that for this sample most of the charred N and C occurred in pyrrole-type structures. Our studies further indicate that the aromatic skeleton of char accumulating after a vegetation fire must contain remains of the lignin backbone and considerable contributions of furans and anhydrosugars from thermally altered cellulose. Enhancing the temperature during the

  8. Comparison of numerical and physico-chemical models for on-line spectrophotometric control of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corriou, J.P.; Boisde, G.

    1986-04-01

    In view of on-line spectrophotometric control of fuel reprocessing streams, a physico-chemical model able to predict uranium and nitric acid concentrations in an uranyl nitrate-nitric acid system has been searched. Thus the influences of the following parameters: uranium, nitrate, hydrogen ion concentrations, ionic strength, on the equilibria of complexation of uranium (VI) nitrate have been evaluated. Extinction coefficients for the uranium mononitrate and uranium dinitrate complexes are given between 410 and 440 nm. The apparent equilibrium constants are determined as a function of the ionic strength. The limitations of this predictive model are emphasized and comparisons with numerical models are discussed. (16 refs)

  9. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.; Smith, Casey; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  10. Chemical control of vegetation on urban sites: agronomic and ecotoxicological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanin, G.; Otto, S.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of the chemical control of spontaneous vegetation on urban sites is tackled. A method is presented to identify the best herbicides under both the agronomic and ecotoxicological aspects. Selection of the herbicides from the agronomic point of view is on the basis of the qualitative characteristics of the vegetation (life-form types periodicity types botanical composition), surveyed at 5 different times on the year while selection from the environmental viewpoint is based on an evaluation integrated with a series of ecotoxicological indices. The best solution was tested in a pilot area and the contamination of the water compartment evaluated both on entering and leaving the water treatment works

  11. Effect of genes controlling radiation sensitivity on chemical mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation, x radiation, nitrogen mustard, methyl methanesulfonate, and dimethyl sulfate were found to revert all the tester strains with the same efficiency or without any dependence on simple types of base-pair changes, and it was concluded that these mutagens were nonspecific in the types of base-pair changes produced. The cycl-131 tester was used in studies designed to determine the genetic control of mutation induction using a variety of mutagens. The rad 6 and rad g genes greatly reduce the frequency of chemically induced reversion of cycl-131

  12. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. The Influence of Physico-Chemical and Ecological Factors on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dell-User

    Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research. Vol. 18, 2013 ... 1Department of Applied Science, College of Science and Technology, Kaduna Polytechnic, Kaduna. ... considered to affect the ecology of ... mapped with a handheld global positioning.

  14. Chemical energy conversion as enabling factor to move to a renewable energy economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abate, Salvatore; Centi, Gabriele; Perathoner, Siglinda [Mesina Univ. (Italy). Section Industrial Chemistry; ERIC aisbl and INSTM/CASPE, Messina (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    The role of chemical energy storage and solar fuels as key elements for the sustainable chemical and energy production is discussed in this concept paper. It is shown how chemical energy storage, with the development of drop-in carbon-based solar fuels, will play a central role in the future low-carbon economy, but it is necessary to consider its out-of-the-grid use, rather than being limited to be a tool for smart grids. Related aspects discussed are the possibility to: (i) enable a system of trading renewable energy on a world scale (out-of-the-grid), including the possibility to exploit actually unused remote resources, (ii) develop a solar-driven and low-carbon chemical production, which reduces the use of fossil fuels and (iii) create a distributed energy production, going beyond the actual limitations and dependence on the grid.

  15. Factors Influencing the Spatial Distribution of Organochlorine Pesticides in Soils surrounding Chemical Industrial Parks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.; Lu, Y.L.; Wang, T.Y.; Zhang, X.; Han, J.Y.; Luo, W.; Shi, Y.J.; Li, J.; Jiao, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    Topsoil samples (n = 105) were collected to Study the distribution of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) residues in the vicinity of chemical industrial parks in Tianjin, China. The occurrence and distribution of target organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were mapped

  16. Chemical exchange equilibria in isotope separation. Part I : Evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of chemical exchange equilibria as applied to the isotope separation processes and the isotope effects on equilibrium constants of different exchange reactions has come a long way since its inception by Urey and Rittenberg. An attempt has been made to bring relevant information together and present a unified approach to isotopic chemical exchange equilibrium constant evaluation and its implications to separation processes. (auth.)

  17. Use of direct washing of chemical dispense nozzle for defect control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnane, Michael; Mack, George; Longstaff, Christopher; Winter, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Demands for continued defect reduction in 300mm IC manufacturing are driving process engineers to examine all aspects of the chemical apply process for improvement. Historically, the defect contribution from photoresist apply nozzles has been minimized through a carefully controlled process of "dummy dispenses" to keep the photoresist in the tip "fresh" and remove any solidified material, a preventive maintenance regime involving periodic cleaning or replacing of the nozzles, and reliance on a pool of solvent within the nozzle storage block to keep the photoresist from solidifying at the nozzle tip. The industry standard has worked well for the most part but has limitations in terms of cost effectiveness and absolute defect elimination. In this study, we investigate the direct washing of the chemical apply nozzle to reduce defects seen on the coated wafer. Data is presented on how the direct washing of the chemical dispense nozzle can be used to reduce coating related defects, reduce material costs from the reduction of "dummy dispense", and can reduce equipment downtime related to nozzle cleaning or replacement.

  18. Compatibility of chemical insecticides and entomopathogenic fungi for control of soybean defoliating pest, Rachiplusia nu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizza, Sebastian A; Schalamuk, Santiago; Simón, María R; Stenglein, Sebastian A; Pacheco-Marino, Suani G; Scorsetti, Ana C

    Rachiplusia nu (Guenée) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is one of the major lepidopteran pests defoliating soybeans (Glycine max Merrill) in Argentina. The combined use of chemical insecticides and entomopathogenic fungi is a promising pest-control option to minimize adverse chemical effects. In this work, we evaluated the interactions between five insecticides-two being considered biorational-and five fungal entomopathogenic strains under laboratory conditions in order to determine the possible usefulness of combinations of these agents against R. nu. The insecticides were tested for compatibility at four doses by in vitro bioassay and for the lethality of R. nu by inoculations at three doses. Fungal strains were applied at 1×10 8 , 1×10 6 , and 1×10 4 conidia/ml. The combinations of those insecticides with Beauveria bassiana (LPSc 1067, LPSc 1082, LPSc 1098), Metarhizium anisopliae (LPSc 907), and Metarhizium robertsii (LPSc 963) caused higher R. nu-larval mortalities than any of the individual agents alone. We observed significant differences in the in vitro conidial viability, vegetative growth, and conidia production of the five strains of entomopathogenic fungi exposed to different doses of the chemical insecticides. The combination gamma-cyhalothrin-LPSc-1067 caused the highest percent mortality of R. nu larvae, with synergism occurring between the two agents at 50% and 25% of the maximum field doses. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Host Resistance and Chemical Control for Management of Sclerotinia Stem Rot of Soybean in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzar-Novakowiski, Jaqueline; Paul, Pierce A; Dorrance, Anne E

    2017-08-01

    Recent outbreaks of Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) of soybean in Ohio, along with new fungicides and cultivars with resistance to this disease, have led to a renewed interest in studies to update disease management guidelines. The effect of host resistance (in moderately resistant [MR] and moderately susceptible [MS] cultivars) and chemical control on SSR and yield was evaluated in 12 environments from 2014 to 2016. The chemical treatments evaluated were an untreated check, four fungicides (boscalid, picoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and thiophanate-methyl), and one herbicide (lactofen) applied at soybean growth stage R1 (early flowering) alone or at R1 followed by a second application at R2 (full flowering). SSR developed in 6 of 12 environments, with mean disease incidence in the untreated check of 2.5 to 41%. The three environments with high levels of SSR (disease incidence in the untreated check >20%) were used for further statistical analysis. There were significant effects (P Pyraclostrobin increased SSR compared with the untreated check in the three environments with high levels of disease. In the six fields where SSR did not develop, chemical treatment did not increase yield, nor was the yield from the MR cultivar significantly different from the MS cultivar. For Ohio, MR cultivars alone were effective for management of SSR in soybean fields where this disease has historically occurred.

  20. Controlled growth of epitaxial CeO2 thin films with self-organized nanostructure by chemical solution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Chemical solution deposition is a versatile technique to grow oxide thin films with self-organized nanostructures. Morphology and crystallographic orientation control of CeO2 thin films grown on technical NiW substrates by a chemical solution deposition method are achieved in this work. Based...

  1. Ets transcription factor GABP controls T cell homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chong T; Osmanbeyoglu, Hatice U; Do, Mytrang H; Bivona, Michael R; Toure, Ahmed; Kang, Davina; Xie, Yuchen; Leslie, Christina S; Li, Ming O

    2017-10-20

    Peripheral T cells are maintained in the absence of vigorous stimuli, and respond to antigenic stimulation by initiating cell cycle progression and functional differentiation. Here we show that depletion of the Ets family transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP) in T cells impairs T-cell homeostasis. In addition, GABP is critically required for antigen-stimulated T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Transcriptome and genome-wide GABP-binding site analyses identify GABP direct targets encoding proteins involved in cellular redox balance and DNA replication, including the Mcm replicative helicases. These findings show that GABP has a nonredundant role in the control of T-cell homeostasis and immunity.

  2. Q-factor control of multilayer micromembrane using PZT composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čekas, Elingas; Janušas, Giedrius; Palevicius, Arvydas; Janušas, Tomas; Ciganas, Justas

    2018-02-01

    Cantilever and membrane based sensors, which are capable of providing accurate detection of target analytes have been always an important research topic of medical diagnostics, food testing, and environmental monitoring fields. Here, the mechanical detection is achieved by micro- and nano-scale cantilevers for stress sensing and mass sensing, or micro- and nano-scale plates or membranes. High sensitivity is a major issue for the active element and it could be achieved via increased Q-factor. The ability to control the Q factor expands the range of application of the device and allows to achieve more accurate results. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanical and electrical properties, as well as, the ability to control the Q factor of the membrane with PZT nanocomposite. This multilayered membrane was formatted using the n-type silicon substrate by implementing the Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD), photolithography by using photomask with defined dimensions, deep etching, and e-beam evaporation techniques. Dynamic and electrical characteristics of the membrane were numerically investigated using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The use of the multilayered membrane can range from simple monitoring of particles concentration in a closed environment to inspecting glucose levels in human fluids (blood, tears, sweat, etc.).

  3. Postharvest biological control of brown rot in peaches after cold storage preceded by preharvest chemical control 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizandra Pivotto Pavanello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pathogenic fungi cause skin darkening and peach quality depreciation in post harvest. Therefore, alternative techniques to chemical treatment are necessary in order to reduce risks to human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of Trichoderma harzianum in association with different fungicides applied before harvest to 'Eldorado' peaches for brown rot control and other quality parameters during storage. The treatments consisted of five preharvest fungicide applications (control, captan, iprodione, iminoctadine and tebuconazole associated with postharvest application of T. harzianum, after cold storage (with and without application, in three evaluation times (zero, two and four days at 20 °C, resulting in a 5x2x3 factorial design. The application of T. harzianum only brought benefits to the control of brown rot when combined with the fungicide captan, at zero day shelf life. After two days, there was a greater skin darkening in peaches treated with T. harzianum compared with peaches without the treatment, except for peaches treated with the fungicide iprodione and T. harzianum The application of T. harzianum during postharvest showed no benefits for the control of brown rot, however, the association with fungicides reduced the incidence of Rhizopus stolonifer during the shelf life.

  4. Angiogenic and angiostatic factors in the molecular control of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distler, J H W; Hirth, A; Kurowska-Stolarska, M; Gay, R E; Gay, S; Distler, O

    2003-09-01

    The vascular system that ensures an adequate blood flow is required to provide the cells with sufficient supply of nutrients and oxygen. Two different mechanisms of the formation of new vessels can be distinguished: vasculogenesis, the formation of the first primitive vascular plexus de novo and angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels from preexisting ones. Both processes are regulated by a delicate balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. Physiologically, angiostatic mediators outweigh the angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis does not occur. Under certain conditions such as tumor formation or wound healing, the positive regulators of angiogenesis predominate and the endothelium becomes activated. Angiogenesis is initiated by vasodilatation and an increased permeability. After destabilization of the vessel wall, endothelial cells proliferate, migrate and form a tube, which is finally stabilized by pericytes and smooth muscle cells. Numerous soluble growth factors and inhibitors, cytokines and proteases as well as extracellular matrix proteins and adhesion molecules strictly control this multi-step process. The properties and interactions of angiogenic molecules such as VEGFs, FGFs, angiopoietins, PDGF, angiogenin, angiotropin, HGF, CXC chemokines with ELR motif, PECAM-1, integrins and VE-cadherin as well as angiostatic key players such as angiostatin, endostatin, thrombospondin, CXC chemokines without ELR motif, PEDF are discussed in this review with respect to their molecular impact on angiogenesis.

  5. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod; Lucyshyn, Doris; Jaeger, Katja E.; Aló s, Enriqueta; Alvey, Elizabeth; Harberd, Nicholas P.; Wigge, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  7. Krüppel-like factors: Three fingers in control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swamynathan Shivalingappa K

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Krüppel-like factors (KLFs, members of the zinc-finger family of transcription factors capable of binding GC-rich sequences, have emerged as critical regulators of important functions all over the body. They are characterised by a highly conserved C-terminal DNA-binding motif containing three C2H2 zinc-finger domains, with variable N-terminal regulatory domains. Currently, there are 17 KLFs annotated in the human genome. In spite of their structural similarity to one another, the genes encoding different KLFs are scattered all over the genome. By virtue of their ability to activate and/or repress the expression of a large number of genes, KLFs regulate a diverse array of developmental events and cellular processes, such as erythropoiesis, cardiac remodelling, adipogenesis, maintenance of stem cells, epithelial barrier formation, control of cell proliferation and neoplasia, flow-mediated endothelial gene expression, skeletal and smooth muscle development, gluconeogenesis, monocyte activation, intestinal and conjunctival goblet cell development, retinal neuronal regeneration and neonatal lung development. Characteristic features, nomenclature, evolution and functional diversities of the human KLFs are reviewed here.

  8. Krüppel-like factors: three fingers in control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K

    2010-04-01

    Krüppel-like factors (KLFs), members of the zinc-finger family of transcription factors capable of binding GC-rich sequences, have emerged as critical regulators of important functions all over the body. They are characterised by a highly conserved C-terminal DNA-binding motif containing three C2H2 zinc-finger domains, with variable N-terminal regulatory domains. Currently, there are 17 KLFs annotated in the human genome. In spite of their structural similarity to one another, the genes encoding different KLFs are scattered all over the genome. By virtue of their ability to activate and/or repress the expression of a large number of genes, KLFs regulate a diverse array of developmental events and cellular processes, such as erythropoiesis, cardiac remodelling, adipogenesis, maintenance of stem cells, epithelial barrier formation, control of cell proliferation and neoplasia, flow-mediated endothelial gene expression, skeletal and smooth muscle development, gluconeogenesis, monocyte activation, intestinal and conjunctival goblet cell development, retinal neuronal regeneration and neonatal lung development. Characteristic features, nomenclature, evolution and functional diversities of the human KLFs are reviewed here.

  9. Chemical control of channel interference in two-photon absorption processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Mehboob; Chattopadhyaya, Mausumi; Chakrabarti, Swapan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-05-20

    The two-photon absorption (TPA) process is the simplest and hence the most studied nonlinear optical phenomenon, and various aspects of this process have been explored in the past few decades, experimentally as well as theoretically. Previous investigations have shown that the two-photon (TP) activity of a molecular system can be tuned, and at present, performance-tailored TP active materials are easy to develop by monitoring factors such as length of conjugation, dimensionality of charge-transfer network, strength of donor-acceptor groups, polarity of solvents, self-aggregation, H-bonding, and micellar encapsulation to mention but a few. One of the most intriguing phenomena affecting the TP activity of a molecule is channel interference. The phrase "channel interference" implies that if the TP transition from one electronic state to another involves more than one optical pathway or channel, characterized by the corresponding transition dipole moment (TDM) vectors, the channels may interfere with each other depending upon the angles between the TDM vectors and hence can either increase (constructive interference) or decrease (destructive interference) the overall TP activity of a system to a significant extent. This phenomenon was first pointed out by Cronstrand, Luo, and Ågren [Chem. Phys. Lett. 2002, 352, 262-269] in two-dimensional systems (i.e., only involving two components of the transition moment vectors). For three-dimensional molecules, an extended version of this idea was required. In order to fill this gap, we developed a generalized model for describing and exploring channel interference, valid for systems of any dimensionality. We have in particular applied it to through-bond (TB) and through-space (TS) charge-transfer systems both in gas phase and in solvents with different polarities. In this Account, we will, in addition to briefly describing the concept of channel interference, discuss two key findings of our recent work: (1) how to control the

  10. Factors controlling nanoparticle pharmacokinetics: an integrated analysis and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, S M; Hunter, A C; Andresen, T L

    2012-01-01

    Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion, and adverse effects must be outlined. These concepts are critically evaluated and an integrated perspective is provided on the basis of the recent application of nanoscience approaches to nanocarrier design and engineering. The future of this exciting field is bright; some regulatory-approved products are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further.

  11. Deciphering factors controlling groundwater arsenic spatial variability in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Z.; Yang, Q.; Zheng, C.; Zheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Elevated concentrations of geogenic arsenic in groundwater have been found in many countries to exceed 10 μg/L, the WHO's guideline value for drinking water. A common yet unexplained characteristic of groundwater arsenic spatial distribution is the extensive variability at various spatial scales. This study investigates factors influencing the spatial variability of groundwater arsenic in Bangladesh to improve the accuracy of models predicting arsenic exceedance rate spatially. A novel boosted regression tree method is used to establish a weak-learning ensemble model, which is compared to a linear model using a conventional stepwise logistic regression method. The boosted regression tree models offer the advantage of parametric interaction when big datasets are analyzed in comparison to the logistic regression. The point data set (n=3,538) of groundwater hydrochemistry with 19 parameters was obtained by the British Geological Survey in 2001. The spatial data sets of geological parameters (n=13) were from the Consortium for Spatial Information, Technical University of Denmark, University of East Anglia and the FAO, while the soil parameters (n=42) were from the Harmonized World Soil Database. The aforementioned parameters were regressed to categorical groundwater arsenic concentrations below or above three thresholds: 5 μg/L, 10 μg/L and 50 μg/L to identify respective controlling factors. Boosted regression tree method outperformed logistic regression methods in all three threshold levels in terms of accuracy, specificity and sensitivity, resulting in an improvement of spatial distribution map of probability of groundwater arsenic exceeding all three thresholds when compared to disjunctive-kriging interpolated spatial arsenic map using the same groundwater arsenic dataset. Boosted regression tree models also show that the most important controlling factors of groundwater arsenic distribution include groundwater iron content and well depth for all three

  12. Chemical quality of different argentine honey varieties, irradiated to control american foulbrood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunich, C.D.; Markowski, I.; Narvaiz, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    'American foulbrood' is a disease that seriously affects bees. Honey may be contaminated with spores of the related bacteria, Paenibacillus larvae larvae, which is a great drawback for trade. The scientific literature reports that these spores, resistant to heat and chemicals, are inactivated in honey when it is irradiated al 10 kGy, being this treatment mandatory in the Republic of Southafrica. Irradiated food wholesomeness is endorsed by the World Health Organization. Considering that Argentina is an important honey producer and exporter, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on some of its commercial chemical parameters along storage time. Honeys with different characteristics, coming from five different regions of the country: Middle, Patagonia, North, Litoral, Humid Pampa, were provided by producers from a commission called 'Packaged honey' of the National Food, Fishery and Agriculture Ministry. Fifteen kg of each honey variety were packaged in 500 g polypropylene recipes with polyethylene lids, and irradiated at the semi industrial cobalt-60 facility of the Ezeiza Atomic Center, 500,000 Ci of activity, with doses of 0, 10 and 20 kilo Grays. Control and irradiated samples were stored at room temperature for 10 months. Some standardized chemical analysis required by the Argentine Food Code (AFC) were performed on the first, fourth and tenth storage months: water content, acidity, diastase content, reducing sugars, and hydroxymethylfurfural. Reducing sugars and diastase activity slightly diminished, and acidity slightly increased, along storage which is typical in this product; no significant differences were found between control and irradiated samples. Hydroxymethylfurfural values, related to aging or thermal abuse, diminished slightly though significantly due to irradiation, which would not affect the product quality as regulations require not to surpass a maximum value, 40 mg/kg in the AFC. So ionizing

  13. Post-control surveillance of Triatoma infestans and Triatoma sordida with chemically-baited sticky traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas de Arias, Antonieta; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Acosta, Nidia; López, Elsa; González, Nilsa; Zerba, Eduardo; Tarelli, Guillermo; Masuh, Héctor

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease prevention critically depends on keeping houses free of triatomine vectors. Insecticide spraying is very effective, but re-infestation of treated dwellings is commonplace. Early detection-elimination of re-infestation foci is key to long-term control; however, all available vector-detection methods have low sensitivity. Chemically-baited traps are widely used in vector and pest control-surveillance systems; here, we test this approach for Triatoma spp. detection under field conditions in the Gran Chaco. Using a repeated-sampling approach and logistic models that explicitly take detection failures into account, we simultaneously estimate vector occurrence and detection probabilities. We then model detection probabilities (conditioned on vector occurrence) as a function of trapping system to measure the effect of chemical baits. We find a positive effect of baits after three (odds ratio [OR] 5.10; 95% confidence interval [CI(95)] 2.59-10.04) and six months (OR 2.20, CI(95) 1.04-4.65). Detection probabilities are estimated at p ≈ 0.40-0.50 for baited and at just p ≈ 0.15 for control traps. Bait effect is very strong on T. infestans (three-month assessment: OR 12.30, CI(95) 4.44-34.10; p ≈ 0.64), whereas T. sordida is captured with similar frequency in baited and unbaited traps. Chemically-baited traps hold promise for T. infestans surveillance; the sensitivity of the system at detecting small re-infestation foci rises from 12.5% to 63.6% when traps are baited with semiochemicals. Accounting for imperfect detection, infestation is estimated at 26% (CI(95) 16-40) after three and 20% (CI(95) 11-34) after six months. In the same assessments, traps detected infestation in 14% and 8.5% of dwellings, whereas timed manual searches (the standard approach) did so in just 1.4% of dwellings only in the first survey. Since infestation rates are the main indicator used for decision-making in control programs, the approach we present may help improve T

  14. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, C A S; Viana, R L; Ferrari, F A S; Lopes, S R; Batista, A M; Coninck, J C P

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  15. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-04

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants.

  16. Recent applications of Chemical Imaging to pharmaceutical process monitoring and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, A A; O'Donnell, C P; Cullen, P J; Bell, S E J

    2008-05-01

    Chemical Imaging (CI) is an emerging platform technology that integrates conventional imaging and spectroscopy to attain both spatial and spectral information from an object. Vibrational spectroscopic methods, such as Near Infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy, combined with imaging are particularly useful for analysis of biological/pharmaceutical forms. The rapid, non-destructive and non-invasive features of CI mark its potential suitability as a process analytical tool for the pharmaceutical industry, for both process monitoring and quality control in the many stages of drug production. This paper provides an overview of CI principles, instrumentation and analysis. Recent applications of Raman and NIR-CI to pharmaceutical quality and process control are presented; challenges facing CI implementation and likely future developments in the technology are also discussed.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of gels. Application to protein nucleation control in the gel acupuncture technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Abel; Juárez-Martínez, Gabriela; Hernández-Pérez, Tomás; Batina, Nikola; Mundo, Manuel; McPherson, Alexander

    1999-09-01

    In this work, we present a new approach using analytical and optical techniques in order to determine the physical and chemical properties of silica gel, as well as the measurement of the pore size in the network of the gel by scanning electron microscopy. The gel acupuncture technique developed by García-Ruiz et al. (Mater. Res. Bull 28 (1993) 541) García-Ruiz and Moreno (Acta Crystallogr. D 50 (1994) 484) was used throughout the history of crystal growth. Several experiments were done in order to evaluate the nucleation control of model proteins (thaumatin I from Thaumatococcus daniellii, lysozyme from hen egg white and catalase from bovine liver) by the porous network of the gel. Finally, it is shown how the number and the size of the crystals obtained inside X-ray capillaries is controlled by the size of the porous structure of the gel.

  18. Power factor improvement in three-phase networks with unbalanced inductive loads using the Roederstein ESTAmat RPR power factor controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniş, C. M.; Cunţan, C. D.; Rob, R. O. S.; Popa, G. N.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of a power factor with capacitors banks, without series coils, used for improving power factor for a three-phase and single-phase inductive loads. In the experimental measurements, to improve the power factor, the Roederstein ESTAmat RPR power factor controller can command up to twelve capacitors banks, while experimenting using only six capacitors banks. Six delta capacitors banks with approximately equal reactive powers were used for experimentation. The experimental measurements were carried out with a three-phase power quality analyser which worked in three cases: a case without a controller with all capacitors banks permanently parallel connected with network, and two other cases with power factor controller (one with setting power factor at 0.92 and the other one at 1). When performing experiments with the power factor controller, a current transformer was used to measure the current on one phase (at a more charged or less loaded phase).

  19. A survey of process control computers at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is charged with the safe processing of spent nuclear fuel elements for the United States Department of Energy. The ICPP was originally constructed in the late 1950s and used state-of-the-art technology for process control at that time. The state of process control instrumentation at the ICPP has steadily improved to keep pace with emerging technology. Today, the ICPP is a college of emerging computer technology in process control with some systems as simple as standalone measurement computers while others are state-of-the-art distributed control systems controlling the operations in an entire facility within the plant. The ICPP has made maximal use of process computer technology aimed at increasing surety, safety, and efficiency of the process operations. Many benefits have been derived from the use of the computers for minimal costs, including decreased misoperations in the facility, and more benefits are expected in the future

  20. Assessing and controlling risks from the emission of organic chemicals from construction products into indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Veronica M; Crump, Derrick R; Harrison, Paul T C

    2013-12-01

    Construction products can be a significant source of indoor pollutants, including volatile organic compounds that may be a risk to the health and well-being of building occupants. There are currently a number of schemes for the labelling of products according to their potential to emit organic compounds. Assessment of the complex mixtures of compounds that may be released has mandated the development of test methods that allow the determination of the concentrations of the chemicals released from products in controlled test chamber environments. In response to concerns about the financial burden faced by manufacturers required to test products according to the various different labelling schemes currently in existence, the European Commission has investigated the scope for greater harmonisation. This initiative has sought to harmonise the process for the assessment of emissions data, complementing work led by the European standards organisation focussed on harmonising the test chamber procedures. The current labelling schemes have a range of requirements with respect to the number of chemicals to be quantified. A comparison of 13 schemes worldwide has identified 15 lists of target compounds, with a total of 611 chemicals occurring on at least one of the target lists. While harmonisation may clarify and perhaps simplify these requirements, at least in Europe, it can be expected that future changes to product formulations, the introduction of new products and our increasing knowledge about the potential risks to health, will require continued development of new and improved measurement techniques. There is, therefore, a particular challenge for analytical chemists to ensure the efficient provision of high quality emissions data and thereby ultimately enable effective control of risks to human health through the prevention or reduction of indoor air pollution.

  1. History of EPI Suite™ and future perspectives on chemical property estimation in US Toxic Substances Control Act new chemical risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Marcella L; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Lee, Wen-Hsiung; Lynch, David G; Orentas, Nerija S; Lee, Mari Titcombe; Wong, Edmund M; Boethling, Robert S

    2017-03-22

    Chemical property estimation is a key component in many industrial, academic, and regulatory activities, including in the risk assessment associated with the approximately 1000 new chemical pre-manufacture notices the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) receives annually. The US EPA evaluates fate, exposure and toxicity under the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act (amended by the 2016 Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21 st Century Act), which does not require test data with new chemical applications. Though the submission of data is not required, the US EPA has, over the past 40 years, occasionally received chemical-specific data with pre-manufacture notices. The US EPA has been actively using this and publicly available data to develop and refine predictive computerized models, most of which are housed in EPI Suite™, to estimate chemical properties used in the risk assessment of new chemicals. The US EPA develops and uses models based on (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ([Q]SARs) to estimate critical parameters. As in any evolving field, (Q)SARs have experienced successes, suffered failures, and responded to emerging trends. Correlations of a chemical structure with its properties or biological activity were first demonstrated in the late 19 th century and today have been encapsulated in a myriad of quantitative and qualitative SARs. The development and proliferation of the personal computer in the late 20 th century gave rise to a quickly increasing number of property estimation models, and continually improved computing power and connectivity among researchers via the internet are enabling the development of increasingly complex models.

  2. Evaluation of chemical stabilizers and windscreens for wind erosion control of uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1984-08-01

    Potential wind erosion of uranium mill tailings is a concern for the surface disposal of tailings at uranium mills. Wind-blown tailings may subsequently be redeposited on areas outside the impoundment. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating techniques for fugitive dust control at uranium mill tailings piles. Laboratory tests, including wind tunnel studies, were conducted to evaluate the relative effectiveness of 43 chemical stabilizers. Seventeen of the more promising stabilizers were applied to test plots on a uranium tailings pile at the American Nuclear Corporation-Gas Hills Project mill site in central Wyoming. The durabilities of these materials under actual site conditions were evaluated over time. In addition, field testing of commercially available windscreens was conducted. Test panels were constructed of eight different materials at the Wyoming test site to compare their durability. A second test site was established near PNL to evaluate the effectiveness of windscreens at reducing wind velocity, and thereby reduce the potential for wind erosion of mill tailings. Results of the laboratory land field tests of the chemical stabilizers and windscreens are presented, along with costs versus effectiveness of these techniques for control of wind erosion at mill tailings piles. 12 references, 4 figures, 6 tables

  3. Effect of an invasive ant and its chemical control on a threatened endemic Seychelles millipede.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James M; Samways, Michael J; Henwood, Jock; Kelly, Janine

    2011-06-01

    The impact of invasive species on island faunas can be of major local consequence, while their control is an important part of island ecosystem restoration. Among these invasive species are ants, of which some have a disruptive impact on indigenous arthropod populations. Here, we study the impact of the invasive African big-headed ant, Pheidole megacephala, on a small Seychelles island, Cousine, and assess the impact of this ant, and its chemical control, using the commercially available hydramethylnon-based bait, Siege, on the endemic keystone Seychelles giant millipede species, Sechelleptus seychellarum. We found no significant correlations in landscape-scale spatial overlap and abundance between the ant and the millipede. Furthermore, the ant did not attack healthy millipedes, but fed only on dying and dead individuals. The chemical defences of the millipede protected it from ant predation. Ingestion of the bait at standard concentration had no obvious impact on the millipede. The most significant threat to the Seychelles giant millipede in terms of P. megacephala invasion is from possible catastrophic shifts in ecosystem function through ant hemipteran mutualisms which can lead to tree mortality, resulting in alteration of the millipede's habitat.

  4. Improved CO sub 2 enhanced oil recovery -- Mobility control by in-situ chemical precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Wasson, J.A.; Durham, D.L.

    1991-06-01

    The overall objective of this study has been to evaluate the feasibility of chemical precipitation to improve CO{sub 2} sweep efficiency and mobility control. The laboratory experiments have indicated that carbonate precipitation can alter the permeability of the core samples under reservoir conditions. Furthermore, the relative permeability measurements have revealed that precipitation reduces the gas permeability in favor of liquid permeability. This indicates that precipitation is occurring preferentially in the larger pores. Additional experimental work with a series of connected cores have indicated that the permeability profile can be successfully modified. However, Ph control plays a critical role in propagation of the chemical precipitation reaction. A numerical reservoir model has been utilized to evaluate the effects of permeability heterogeneity and permeability modification on the CO{sub 2} sweep efficiency. The computer simulation results indicate that the permeability profile modification can significantly enhance CO{sub 2} vertical and horizontal sweep efficiencies. The scoping studies with the model have further revealed that only a fraction of high permeability zones need to be altered to achieve sweep efficiency enhancement. 64 refs., 30 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Strategy for control and integrated optimization of chemical processes; Estrategia para o controle e otimizacao integrada de processos quimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Antonio Ignacio de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: ailac@vm.uff.br; Araujo, Ofelia de Queiroz Fernandes; Medeiros, Jose Luiz de [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica]. E-mail: ofelia@eq.ufrj.br; jlm@eq.ufrj.br

    2004-12-01

    The increasingly market competitiveness, the frequent changes in costs of raw materials and imposition of environmental restrictions require quick responses from the industries and better control of their production. The growing increase of the computational systems processing capacity and advances in analysis and instrumentation systems favor the formulation of new strategies geared to the operational optimization of industrial processes. The optimization of a process, within a more rigid context, assumes that it is made through the optimal control theory. In this aspect, comparative studies are carried out between some formulations of the problem in terms of optimal control and a new methodology of economic optimization. The study process was a pyrolysis oven for which an economic function was developed. Such function considers the effects of the oven operation on the other subsequent parts of the Ethylene Plant, taking into account their energy consumptions and their operational restrictions. A rigorous thermal-dynamic analysis was made in the development thereof involving major parts of the product separation system upstream the oven. The results obtained met the expectations and the new optimization criterion tested can be implemented in a relatively simple computational system using personal computers currently available. Although the work is oriented towards the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons the proposed structure may be applied to other types of chemical and petrochemical processes with the same topology: a reaction system and a separation system. (author)

  6. Effect of chemical and mechanical weed control on cassava yield, soil quality and erosion under cassava cropping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Titiek; Wisnubroto, Erwin; Utomo, Wani

    2016-04-01

    Three years field experiments were conducted to study the effect of chemical and mechanical weed control on soil quality and erosion under cassava cropping system. The experiment were conducted at University Brawijaya field experimental station, Jatikerto, Malang, Indonesia. The experiments were carried out from 2011 - 2014. The treatments consist of three cropping system (cassava mono culture; cassava + maize intercropping and cassava + peanut intercropping), and two weed control method (chemical and mechanical methods). The experimental result showed that the yield of cassava first year and second year did not influenced by weed control method and cropping system. However, the third year yield of cassava was influence by weed control method and cropping system. The cassava yield planted in cassava + maize intercropping system with chemical weed control methods was only 24 t/ha, which lower compared to other treatments, even with that of the same cropping system used mechanical weed control. The highest cassava yield in third year was obtained by cassava + peanuts cropping system with mechanical weed control method. After three years experiment, the soil of cassava monoculture system with chemical weed control method possessed the lowest soil organic matter, and soil aggregate stability. During three years of cropping soil erosion in chemical weed control method, especially on cassava monoculture, was higher compared to mechanical weed control method. The soil loss from chemical control method were 40 t/ha, 44 t/ha and 54 t/ha for the first, second and third year crop. The soil loss from mechanical weed control method for the same years was: 36 t/ha, 36 t/ha and 38 t/ha. Key words: herbicide, intercropping, soil organic matter, aggregate stability.

  7. Impact of a low intensity controlled-fire in some chemical soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Murillo, Juan F.; Hueso-González, Paloma; Aranda-Gómez, Francisco; Damián Ruiz-Sinoga, José

    2014-05-01

    Some changes in chemical soil properties can be observed after fires of low intensities. pH and electric conductivity tend to increase, while C/N ratio decrease. In the case of organic matter, the content can increase due to the massive incorporation of necromass including, especially, plants and roots. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of low intensity and controlled fire in some soil properties in field conditions. El Pinarillo experimental area is located in South of Spain. Two set of closed plots were installed (24 m2: 12 m length x 2 m width). One of them was remained as control with the original vegetation cover (Mediterranean matorral: Rosmarinus officinalis, Cistus clusii, Lavandula stoechas, Chamaeropos humilis, Thymus baetica), and the other one was burnt in a controlled-fire in 2011. Weather conditions and water content of vegetation influenced in the intensity of fire (low). After the controlled-fire, soil surface sample (0-5 cm) were taken in both set of plots (B, burnt soil samples; C, control soil samples). Some soil chemical properties were analysed: organic matter content (OM), C/N ratio, pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Some changes were observed in B corroborating a controlled-fire of low intensity. pH remained equal after fire (B: pH=7.7±0.11; C: pH=7.7±0.04). An increment was obtained in the case of EC (B: EC=0.45 mScm-1±0.08 mScm-1; C: EC=0.35 mScm-1±0.07 mScm-1) and OM (B: OM=8.7%±3.8%; C: pH=7.3%±1.5%). Finally, C/N ratio decreased after fire respect to the control and initial conditions (B: C/N=39.0±14.6; C: C/N =46.5±10.2).

  8. Design of automatic power factor control system | Yanev | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maintenance of the proper power factor is a very important matter for the industry and for the economy of any country. A study of the power factor values for a number of industrial plants in Botswana shows that they operate at power-factors lower than the optimal values. If a plant power factor is different from its optimal value, ...

  9. Chemical and biological control of Sclerotinia stem rot in the soybean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Hideki Sumida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the effect of fungicides and the microbial control agent Trichoderma harzianum on the inhibition of the carpogenic and ascospore germination of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study also evaluated the chemical, fungicidal and microbial control of white mold or Sclerotinia stem rot of soybean in the field. Three experiments were conducted, as follows: 1 inhibition of carpogenic germination of sclerotia, 2 inhibition of ascospore germination, and 3 control of Sclerotinia stem rot in a soybean crop under field conditions. The treatments evaluated were fluazinam, procymidone, iprodione, thiophanate-methyl, carbendazim, benzalkonium chloride + fluazinam, and T. harzianum. Procymidone resulted in an inhibition of 13.5% and benzalkonium chloride in an inhibition of 13.9% in an ascospore germination test. Fluazinam and procymidone were the most effective in reducing the production of ascospores/apothecium, representing 65.6% and 82.4% of inhibition. Procymidone and fluazinam if combined or not with benzalkonium chloride were the most effective in controlling sclerotinia stem rot under field conditions when applied at the onset of flowering and 15 days later. In the 2009-10 harvest, these two fungicides reduced the incidence of Sclerotinia stem rot by 73.1 and 71.6% and in the 2010-11 harvest by 75.7 and 77.6%, respectively.

  10. Composition and Morphology Control of Metal Dichalcogenides via Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic and Nanoelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Leith L. J.

    The body of work reviewed here encompasses a variety of metal dichalcogenides all synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for solar and electronics applications. The first reported phase-pure CVD synthesis of iron pyrite thin films is presented with detailed structural and electrochemical analysis. The phase-pure thin film and improved crystal growth on a metallic backing material represents one of the best options for potential solar applications using iron pyrite. Large tin-sulfur-selenide solid solution plates with tunable bandgaps were also synthesized via CVD as single-crystals with a thin film geometry. Solid solution tin-sulfur-selenide plates were demonstrated to be a new material for solar cells with the first observed solar conversion efficiencies up to 3.1%. Finally, a low temperature molybdenum disulfide vertical heterostructure CVD synthesis with layered controlled growth was achieved with preferential growth enabled by Van der Waals epitaxy. Through recognition of additional reaction parameters, a fully regulated CVD synthesis enabled the controlled growth of 1-6 molybdenum disulfide monolayers for nanoelectronic applications. The improvements in synthesis and materials presented here were all enabled by the control afforded by CVD such that advances in phase purity, growth, and composition control of several metal dichalcogenides were achieved. Further work will be able to take full advantage of these advances for future solar and electronics technologies.

  11. Factors controlling high-frequency radiation from extended ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnev, Igor A.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale slip heterogeneity or variations in rupture velocity on the fault plane are often invoked to explain the high-frequency radiation from earthquakes. This view has no theoretical basis, which follows, for example, from the representation integral of elasticity, an exact solution for the radiated wave field. The Fourier transform, applied to the integral, shows that the seismic spectrum is fully controlled by that of the source time function, while the distribution of final slip and rupture acceleration/deceleration only contribute to directivity. This inference is corroborated by the precise numerical computation of the full radiated field from the representation integral. We compare calculated radiation from four finite-fault models: (1) uniform slip function with low slip velocity, (2) slip function spatially modulated by a sinusoidal function, (3) slip function spatially modulated by a sinusoidal function with random roughness added, and (4) uniform slip function with high slip velocity. The addition of "asperities," both regular and irregular, does not cause any systematic increase in the spectral level of high-frequency radiation, except for the creation of maxima due to constructive interference. On the other hand, an increase in the maximum rate of slip on the fault leads to highly amplified high frequencies, in accordance with the prediction on the basis of a simple point-source treatment of the fault. Hence, computations show that the temporal rate of slip, not the spatial heterogeneity on faults, is the predominant factor forming the high-frequency radiation and thus controlling the velocity and acceleration of the resulting ground motions.

  12. The influence of physico-chemical and ecological factors on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was conducted to determine the influence of physico-chemical parameters on the distribution of freshwater snails in Manchok water intake, Kaduna State, Nigeria from January 2013 to December, 2013. A total of eight thousand, three hundred and forty one (8341) freshwater snails were collected using a long ...

  13. Guidelines for application of chemical-specific adjustment factors in dose/concentration-response assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meek, M.E.; Renwick, A.; Ohanian, E.; Dourson, M.; Lake, B.; Naumann, B.D.; Vu, V.

    2002-01-01

    This manuscript addresses guidance in the use of kinetic and dynamic data to inform quantitatively extrapolations for interspecies differences and human variability in dose-response assessment developed in a project of the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) initiative on Harmonisation of Approaches to the Assessment of Risk from Exposure to Chemicals. The guidance has been developed and refined through a series of planning and technical meetings and larger workshops of a broad range of participants from academia, government agencies and the private sector. The guidance for adequacy of data for replacement of common defaults for interspecies differences and human variability is presented in the context of several generic categories including: determination of the active chemical species, choice of the appropriate metric (kinetic components) or endpoint (dynamic components) and nature of experimental data, the latter which includes reference to the relevance of population, route and dose and the adequacy of the number of subjects/samples. The principal objective of this guidance developed primarily as a resource for risk assessors, is to foster better understanding of the components of and criteria for adequacy of chemical-specific data to quantitate interspecies differences and human variability in kinetics and dynamics. It is anticipated that this guidance will also encourage the development of appropriate data and facilitate their incorporation in a consistent fashion in dose-response assessment for regulatory purposes (IPCS, 2001)

  14. Factors controlling black carbon distribution in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ling; Li, Qinbin; Li, Yinrui; He, Cenlin

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of black carbon (BC) in the Arctic, including BC concentration in snow (BCsnow, ng g-1) and surface air (BCair, ng m-3), as well as emissions, dry deposition, and wet scavenging using the global three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem. We find that the model underestimates BCsnow in the Arctic by 40 % on average (median = 11.8 ng g-1). Natural gas flaring substantially increases total BC emissions in the Arctic (by ˜ 70 %). The flaring emissions lead to up to 49 % increases (0.1-8.5 ng g-1) in Arctic BCsnow, dramatically improving model comparison with observations (50 % reduction in discrepancy) near flaring source regions (the western side of the extreme north of Russia). Ample observations suggest that BC dry deposition velocities over snow and ice in current CTMs (0.03 cm s-1 in the GEOS-Chem) are too small. We apply the resistance-in-series method to compute a dry deposition velocity (vd) that varies with local meteorological and surface conditions. The resulting velocity is significantly larger and varies by a factor of 8 in the Arctic (0.03-0.24 cm s-1), which increases the fraction of dry to total BC deposition (16 to 25 %) yet leaves the total BC deposition and BCsnow in the Arctic unchanged. This is largely explained by the offsetting higher dry and lower wet deposition fluxes. Additionally, we account for the effect of the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process in mixed-phase clouds, which releases BC particles from condensed phases (water drops and ice crystals) back to the interstitial air and thereby substantially reduces the scavenging efficiency of clouds for BC (by 43-76 % in the Arctic). The resulting BCsnow is up to 80 % higher, BC loading is considerably larger (from 0.25 to 0.43 mg m-2), and BC lifetime is markedly prolonged (from 9 to 16 days) in the Arctic. Overall, flaring emissions increase BCair in the Arctic (by ˜ 20 ng m-3), the updated vd more than halves BCair (by ˜ 20 ng m-3

  15. Field electron emission characteristics of chemical vapour deposition diamond films with controlled sp2 phase concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, X.; Yang, Q.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond films were synthesized in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor. The microstructure and surface morphology of deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscope and scanning electron microscope. The sp 2 phase concentration in diamond films was varied and its effect on the field electron emission (FEE) properties was investigated. Diamond films deposited under higher methane concentration exhibit better FEE property including lower turn-on electric field and larger emission current. The predominating factor modifying the FEE property is presumed to be the increase of sp 2 phase concentration. The influence of bias voltage on the FEE property of diamond films is not monotonic. Postgrowth acid treatment reduces the sp 2 phase content in diamond films without changing diamond grain sizes. The corresponding FEE property was degraded

  16. * Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Scaffolds with Chemically Conjugated Growth Factor for Ligament Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Sathy, Binulal N; Olvera, Dinorath; McCarthy, Helen O; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Dunne, Nicholas J; Haut Donahue, Tammy Lynn

    2017-08-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee is vital for proper joint function and is commonly ruptured during sports injuries or car accidents. Due to a lack of intrinsic healing capacity and drawbacks with allografts and autografts, there is a need for a tissue-engineered ACL replacement. Our group has previously used aligned sheets of electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers to develop solid cylindrical bundles of longitudinally aligned nanofibers. We have shown that these nanofiber bundles support cell proliferation and elongation and the hierarchical structure and material properties are similar to the native human ACL. It is possible to combine multiple nanofiber bundles to create a scaffold that attempts to mimic the macroscale structure of the ACL. The goal of this work was to develop a hierarchical bioactive scaffold for ligament tissue engineering using connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)-conjugated nanofiber bundles and evaluate the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on these scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. CTGF was immobilized onto the surface of individual nanofiber bundles or scaffolds consisting of multiple nanofiber bundles. The conjugation efficiency and the release of conjugated CTGF were assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, assays, and immunofluorescence staining. Scaffolds were seeded with MSCs and maintained in vitro for 7 days (individual nanofiber bundles), in vitro for 21 days (scaled-up scaffolds of 20 nanofiber bundles), or in vivo for 6 weeks (small scaffolds of 4 nanofiber bundles), and ligament-specific tissue formation was assessed in comparison to non-CTGF-conjugated control scaffolds. Results showed that CTGF conjugation encouraged cell proliferation and ligament-specific tissue formation in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that hierarchical electrospun nanofiber bundles conjugated with CTGF are a scalable and bioactive scaffold for ACL tissue engineering.

  17. Effects of simplifying fracture network representation on inert chemical migration in fracture-controlled aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Tristan; Shapiro, Allen M.; Hill, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that highly permeable 'large-scale' fractures dominate chemical migration in many fractured aquifers, recent studies suggest that the pervasive 'small-scale' fracturing once considered of less significance can be equally important for characterizing the spatial extent and residence time associated with transport processes. A detailed examination of chemical migration through fracture-controlled aquifers is used to advance this conceptual understanding. The influence of fracture structure is evaluated by quantifying the effects to transport caused by a systematic removal of fractures from three-dimensional discrete fracture models whose attributes are derived from geologic and hydrologic conditions at multiple field sites. Results indicate that the effects to transport caused by network simplification are sensitive to the fracture network characteristics, degree of network simplification, and plume travel distance, but primarily in an indirect sense since correlation to individual attributes is limited. Transport processes can be 'enhanced' or 'restricted' from network simplification meaning that the elimination of fractures may increase or decrease mass migration, mean travel time, dispersion, and tailing of the concentration plume. The results demonstrate why, for instance, chemical migration may not follow the classic advection-dispersion equation where dispersion approximates the effect of the ignored geologic structure as a strictly additive process to the mean flow. The analyses further reveal that the prediction error caused by fracture network simplification is reduced by at least 50% using the median estimate from an ensemble of simplified fracture network models, and that the error from network simplification is at least 70% less than the stochastic variability from multiple realizations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Control of trichome branching by Chromatin Assembly Factor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig Lars

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin dynamics and stability are both required to control normal development of multicellular organisms. Chromatin assembly factor CAF-1 is a histone chaperone that facilitates chromatin formation and the maintenance of specific chromatin states. In plants and animals CAF-1 is essential for normal development, but it is poorly understood which developmental pathways require CAF-1 function. Results Mutations in all three CAF-1 subunits affect Arabidopsis trichome morphology and lack of CAF-1 function results in formation of trichomes with supernumerary branches. This phenotype can be partially alleviated by external sucrose. In contrast, other aspects of the CAF-1 mutant phenotype, such as defective meristem function and organ formation, are aggravated by external sucrose. Double mutant analyses revealed epistatic interactions between CAF-1 mutants and stichel, but non-epistatic interactions between CAF-1 mutants and glabra3 and kaktus. In addition, mutations in CAF-1 could partly suppress the strong overbranching and polyploidization phenotype of kaktus mutants. Conclusion CAF-1 is required for cell differentiation and regulates trichome development together with STICHEL in an endoreduplication-independent pathway. This function of CAF-1 can be partially substituted by application of exogenous sucrose. Finally, CAF-1 is also needed for the high degree of endoreduplication in kaktus mutants and thus for the realization of kaktus' extreme overbranching phenotype.

  19. Factors controlling crystallization of miserite glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Fenik K; Moorehead, Robert; van Noort, Richard; Pollington, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a range of variables affecting the synthesis of a miserite glass-ceramic (GC). Miserite glass was synthesized by the melt quench technique. The crystallization kinetics of the glass were determined using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The glasses were ground with dry ball-milling and then sieved to different particle sizes prior to sintering. These particle sizes were submitted to heat treatment regimes in a high temperature furnace to form the GC. The crystal phases of the GC were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the cerammed glass. XRD analysis confirmed that the predominant crystalline phase of the GC was miserite along with a minor crystalline phase of cristobalite only when the particle size is <20 μm and the heat treatment at 1000°C was carried out for 4h and slowly cooled at the furnace rate. For larger particle sizes and faster cooling rates, a pseudowollastonite crystalline phase was produced. Short sintering times produced either a pseudowollastonite or xonotolite crystalline phase. The current study has shown that particle size and heat treatment schedules are major factors in controlling the synthesis of miserite GC. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.R.; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log 10 reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms

  1. 76 FR 35130 - Pipeline Safety: Control Room Management/Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ...: Control Room Management/Human Factors AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration... the Control Room Management/Human Factors regulations in order to realize the safety benefits sooner... FR 5536). By this amendment to the Control Room Management/Human Factors (CRM) rule, an operator must...

  2. Chemical profiles of two pheromone glands are differentially regulated by distinct mating factors in honey bee queens (Apis mellifera L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina L Niño

    Full Text Available Pheromones mediate social interactions among individuals in a wide variety of species, from yeast to mammals. In social insects such as honey bees, pheromone communication systems can be extraordinarily complex and serve to coordinate behaviors among many individuals. One of the primary mediators of social behavior and organization in honey bee colonies is queen pheromone, which is produced by multiple glands. The types and quantities of chemicals produced differ significantly between virgin and mated queens, and recent studies have suggested that, in newly mated queens, insemination volume or quantity can affect pheromone production. Here, we examine the long-term impact of different factors involved during queen insemination on the chemical composition of the mandibular and Dufour's glands, two of the major sources of queen pheromone. Our results demonstrate that carbon dioxide (an anesthetic used in instrumental insemination, physical manipulation of genital tract (presumably mimicking the act of copulation, insemination substance (saline vs. semen, and insemination volume (1 vs. 8 µl all have long-term effects on mandibular gland chemical profiles. In contrast, Dufour's gland chemical profiles were changed only upon insemination and were not influenced by exposure to carbon dioxide, manipulation, insemination substance or volume. These results suggest that the chemical contents of these two glands are regulated by different neuro-physiological mechanisms. Furthermore, workers responded differently to the different mandibular gland extracts in a choice assay. Although these studies must be validated in naturally mated queens of varying mating quality, our results suggest that while the chemical composition of Dufour's gland is associated with mating status, that of the mandibular glands is associated with both mating status and insemination success. Thus, the queen appears to be signaling both status and reproductive quality to the workers

  3. Chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic arsenic from Pleistocene aquifer sediments to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillispie, Elizabeth C; Andujar, Erika; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2016-08-10

    Over 150 million people in South and Southeast Asia consume unsafe drinking water from arsenic-rich Holocene aquifers. Although use of As-free water from Pleistocene aquifers is a potential mitigation strategy, such aquifers are vulnerable to geogenic As pollution, placing millions more people at potential risk. The goal of this research was to define chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic As to groundwater. Batch incubations of sediments with natural chemical variability from a Pleistocene aquifer in Cambodia were conducted to evaluate how interactions among arsenic, manganese and iron oxides, and dissolved and sedimentary organic carbon influenced As mobilization from sediments. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon produced the highest concentrations of dissolved As after >7 months, as compared to sediment samples incubated with sodium azide or without added carbon, and the extent of As release was positively correlated with the percent of initial extractable Mn released from the sediments. The mode of As release was impacted by the source of DOC supplied to the sediments, with biological processes responsible for 81% to 85% of the total As release following incubations with lactate and acetate but only up to 43% to 61% of the total As release following incubations with humic and fulvic acids. Overall, cycling of key redox-active elements and organic-carbon reactivity govern the potential for geogenic As release to groundwater, and results here may be used to formulate better predictions of the arsenic pollution potential of aquifers in South and Southeast Asia.

  4. FY98 Final Report Initial Interfacial Chemical Control for Enhancement of Composite Material Strength; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GE Fryxell; KL Alford; KL Simmons; RD Voise; WD Samuels

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) sponsored this research project to support the development of new self-assembled monolayer fiber coatings. These coatings can greatly increase the bond strength between the fiber and the resin matrix of a composite material. Composite ammunition components molded from such materials will exhibit higher strength than current materials, and will provide a major improvement in the performance of composites in military applications. Use of composite materials in military applications is desirable because of the lighter weight of the materials and their high strengths. The FY97 project investigated initial interfacial chemical control for enhancement of composite material strength. The core of the project was to modify the covalent interface of glass fibers (or other reinforcing fibers) to induce strong, uniform, defect-free adhesion between the fibers' surfaces and the polymer matrix. Installing a self-assembled monolayer tailored to the specific matrix resin accomplished this. Simply, the self-assembled monolayer modifies the fiber to make it appear to have the same chemical composition as the resin matrix. The self-assembled monolayer creates a receptive, hydrophobic interface that the thermoset resin (or polymer precursors) would wet more effectively, leading to a higher contact surface area and more efficient adhesion. The FY97 work phase demonstrated that it is possible to increase the adhesive strength, as well as increase the heat deflection temperature through the use of self-assembled monolayer

  5. Water chemical control of the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, Lucia M.L.A; Chaves, Renata D.A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Oliveira, Paulo F.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Damazio, Ilza; Fagundes, Oliene dos R.; Cintra, Maria Olivia C.; Andrade, Geraldo V. de; Amaral, Angela M.; Franco, Milton B.; Fortes, Flavio; Gomes, Nilton Carlos; Vidal, Andrea; Maretti Junior, Fausto; Knupp, Eliana A.N.; Souza, Wagner de; Guedes, Joao B.; Furtado, Renato C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor located at CDTN/CNEN has been in operation and contributed to research and with services to society since 1960. Is has been used in several activities such as nuclear power plant operation, graduate and post-graduate training courses, isotope production, and as an analytical irradiation tool of different types of samples. Among the several structural and operational safety requirements is the chemical quality control of the primary circuit cooling water. The aim of this work was to check the cooling water quality from the pool reactor. A water sampling plan was proposed (May, 2011 - June, 2012) and presents the results obtained in this period. The natural radioactivity level as gross alpha and gross beta activity and other chemical parameters (pH and electric conductivity) of the samples were analyzed. Some instrumental techniques were used: potentiometric methods (pH), conductometric methods (electrical conductivity, EC) and gross α and gross β proportional counting system). (author)

  6. Key Factors Controlling the Applicability and Efficiency of Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethenes In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Komai, T.

    2012-12-01

    Bioremediation has been considered as one of environmentally friendly and cost effective approaches for cleaning up the sites polluted by organic contaminants, such as chlorinated ethenes. Although bioremediation, in its widest sense, is not new, and many researches have been performed on bioremediation of different kinds of pollutants, an effective design and implication of in situ bioremediation still remains a challenging problem because of the complexity. Many factors may affect the applicability and efficiency of bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in situ, which include the type and concentration of contaminants, biological, geological and hydro-geological conditions of the site, physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater and soils to be treated, as well as the constraints in engineering. In this presentation, an overview together with a detailed discussion on each factor will be provided. The influences of individual factors are discussed using the data obtained or cited from different sites and experiments, and thus under different environmental conditions. The results of this study illustrated that 1) the establishment of microbial consortium is of crucial importance for a complete degradation of chlorinated ethenes, 2) in situ control of favorable conditions for increasing microbial activities for bio-degradation through a designed pathway is the key to success, 3) the focus of a successful remediation system is to design an effective delivery process that is capable of producing adequate amendment mixing of contaminant-degrading bacteria, appropriate concentrations of electron acceptors, electron donors, and microbial nutrients in the subsurface treatment area.

  7. Pressure fluctuation analysis for charging pump of chemical and volume control system of nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equipment Failure Root Cause Analysis (ERCA methodology is employed in this paper to investigate the root cause for charging pump’s pressure fluctuation of chemical and volume control system (RCV in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power plant. RCA project task group has been set up at the beginning of the analysis process. The possible failure modes are listed according to the characteristics of charging pump’s actual pressure fluctuation and maintenance experience during the analysis process. And the failure modes are analysed in proper sequence by the evidence-collecting. It suggests that the gradually untightened and loosed shaft nut in service should be the root cause. And corresponding corrective actions are put forward in details.

  8. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp² carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-04-16

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp(2) carbon structures.

  9. Public Health, Law, and Local Control: Destruction of the US Chemical Weapons Stockpile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Destruction of US chemical weapons has begun at one of the 8 sites in the continental United States, was completed on Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and is scheduled to begin in at least 3 other locations during the upcoming year. About 25% of the stockpile and 38% of the munitions had been destroyed as of December 31, 2002. However, the program has become controversial with regard to choice of technology, emergency management, and cost. This controversy is in large part due to efforts by some state and local governments and activist groups to play a more central role in a decisionmaking process that was once fully controlled by the US Army. PMID:12893599

  10. Controlled low-temperature fabrication of ZnO nanopillars with a wet-chemical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postels, B [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Wehmann, H-H [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Bakin, A [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Kreye, M [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Fuhrmann, D [Institute of Applied Physics, Technical University of Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstrasse 2, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Blaesing, J [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Hangleiter, A [Institute of Applied Physics, Technical University of Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstrasse 2, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Krost, A [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Waag, A [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-05-16

    Aqueous chemical growth (ACG) is an efficient way to generate wafer-scale and densely packed arrays of ZnO nanopillars on various substrate materials. ACG is a low-temperature growth approach that is only weakly influenced by the substrate and even allows growth on flexible polymer substrates or on conducting materials. The advanced fabrication of wafer-scale and highly vertically aligned arrays of ZnO nanopillars on various substrate materials is demonstrated. Moreover, it is possible to control the morphology in diameter and length by changing the growth conditions. Photoluminescence characterization clearly shows a comparatively strong band-edge luminescence, even at room temperature, that is accompanied by a rather weak visible luminescence in the yellow/orange spectral range.

  11. Size-controlled Synthesis and Characterization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles by Chemical Coprecipitation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia Chin Hua; Sarani Zakaria; Farahiyan, R.; Liew Tze Khong; Mustaffa Abdullah; Sahrim Ahmad; Nguyen, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles have been synthesized using the chemical coprecipitation method. The Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were likely formed via dissolution-recrystallization process. During the precipitation process, ferrihydrite and Fe(OH) 2 particles formed aggregates and followed by the formation of spherical Fe 3 O 4 particles. The synthesized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and in single crystal form. The synthesis temperature and the degree of agitation during the precipitation were found to be decisive in controlling the crystallite and particle size of the produced Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. Lower temperature and higher degree of agitation were the favorable conditions for producing smaller particle. The magnetic properties (saturation magnetization and coercivity) of the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles increased with the particle size. (author)

  12. Recent advances in the chemical quality control of MOX fuel for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Amrit; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is being fabricated at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC),Tarapur. A number of quality control steps are required to ensure the quality of the fuel. Chemical characterization of the fuel is very important from reactor performance point of view. More than three hundred batches have been analysed till to date for various specifications like percentage composition, heavy metal content, oxygen to metal ratio, trace metallic impurities, trace non-metallic impurities, cover gas content, total gas content, homogeneity test etc. During these analyses by recommended techniques, studies were carried out to see the feasibility of using methodologies which can reduce the total analysis time, convenience/safety in operation and man rem problems. The present paper describes a glimpse of those studies carried out

  13. Chemical control trials against Phytophthora capsici (Leon on pepper cultivations in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pussemier, L.

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical control trials against Phytophthora capsici (Leon on pepper cultivations in Morocco. Pepper protection trials against collar and root rot have been undertaken under laboratory and culture conditions using Aliette (80 % of phosethylaluminium and Ridomil M 58 (10 % of metalaxyl associated to 48 % of maneb. It has been proved that, contrary to Ridomil M 58, Aliette does not protect the hostplant when the Phytophthora capsici (Leon zoospores are used as inoculum. But both fongicides are active when inoculating with a mycelian suspension. Trials undertaken under plastic glasshouses confirmed the laboratory results both with an artificial inoculation and with a natural one on contaminated soil. Only Ridomil M 58 provides satisfactory protection during the first weeks after the treatment. When disease propagation conditions are particularly favorable (permanent presence of an active inoculum source, the protection given by repeated Ridomil M 58 applications gradually disappears after a few weeks.

  14. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules’ GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

  15. Dietary vitamin A and lung cancer: results of a case-control study among chemical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G G; Thompson, F E; Cook, R R

    1987-01-01

    A nested case-control study conducted among a cohort of chemical manufacturing employees provided an opportunity to test the hypothesis that lung cancer risk is inversely related to dietary intake of vitamin A. Eligible for study were 308 former male employees who had died of lung cancer between 1940 and 1980. Two control groups, one a decedent and the other a "living" series, were individually matched to the cases one-for-one. Interviews were completed with 734 subjects or their next-of-kin and included a food frequency list. A vitamin A index was developed for each subject based on the frequency of consumption of 29 food items. After adjustment for a number of potentially confounding variables (e.g., smoking, educational level, and use of vitamin supplements), there was evidence that vitamin A intake was inversely associated with lung cancer risk. The effect was most pronounced in the comparisons with the "living" controls and appeared strongest among cigarette smokers. Subjects in the lowest tertile of vitamin A intake had approximately twice the risk of lung cancer as those in the highest. Analyses of an index of carotenoids and of individual food items suggested that plant sources of vitamin A may play a more important role in producing the effect than do animal sources.

  16. Controlling Chemical Reactions in Confined Environments: Water Dissociation in MOF-74

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. A. Fuentes-Fernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The confined porous environment of metal organic frameworks (MOFs is an attractive system for studying reaction mechanisms. Compared to flat oxide surfaces, MOFs have the key advantage that they exhibit a well-defined structure and present significantly fewer challenges in experimental characterization. As an example of an important reaction, we study here the dissociation of water—which plays a critical role in biology, chemistry, and materials science—in MOFs and show how the knowledge of the structure in this confined environment allows for an unprecedented level of understanding and control. In particular, combining in-situ infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that the water dissociation reaction can be selectively controlled inside Zn-MOF-74 by alcohol, through both chemical and physical interactions. Methanol is observed to speed up water dissociation by 25% to 100%, depending on the alcohol partial pressure. On the other hand, co-adsorption of isopropanol reduces the speed of the water reaction, due mostly to steric interactions. In addition, we also investigate the stability of the product state after the water dissociation has occurred and find that the presence of additional water significantly stabilizes the dissociated state. Our results show that precise control of reactions within nano-porous materials is possible, opening the way for advances in fields ranging from catalysis to electrochemistry and sensors.

  17. Occurrence and distribution of Chytridiales related to some physical and chemical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy K. Hassan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical properties of water and soil were positively corelated with the occurrence and distribution of chytrides. Thirty-six zoosporic members of chytrids belonging to fourteen genera were recorded in the present study. Nowakowskiella, Karlingia, Cladochytrium, Endochytrium and Rhizophlyctis were the most common genera observed along River Nileshore and other canals in nine Governorates in Egypt during the winter of 1989/1990.

  18. Disease control by chemical and biological fungicides in cultivated mushrooms: button mushroom, oyster mushroom and shiitake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Potočnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly cultivated basidiomycetes worldwide and in Serbia are button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus, oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp. and shiitake (Lentinus edodes. Production of their fruiting bodies is severely afflicted by fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens that are able to cause diseases which affect yield and quality. Major A. bisporus fungal pathogens include Mycogone perniciosa, Lecanicillium fungicola, and Cladobotryum spp., the causal agents of dry bubble, wet bubble, and cobweb disease, respectively. Various Trichoderma species, the causal agents of green mould, also affect all three kinds of edible mushrooms. Over the past two decades, green mould caused by T. aggressivum has been the most serious disease of button mushroom. Oyster mushroom is susceptible to T. pleurotum and shiitake to T. harzianum. The bacterial brawn blotch disease, caused by Pseudomonas tolaasii, is distributed globally. Disease control on mushroom farms worldwide is commonly based on the use of fungicides. However, evolution of pathogen resistance to fungicides after frequent application, and host sensitivity to fungicides are serious problems. Only a few fungicides are officially recommended in mushroom production: chlorothalonil and thiabendazol in North America and prochloraz in the EU and some other countries. Even though decreased sensitivity levels of L. fungicola and Cladobotryum mycophilum to prochloraz have been detected, disease control is still mainly provided by that chemical fungicide. Considering such resistance evolution, harmful impact to the environment and human health, special attention should be focused on biofungicides, both microbiological products based on Bacillus species and various natural substances of biological origin, together with good programs of hygiene. Introduction of biofungicides has created new possibilities for crop protection with reduced application of chemicals.

  19. Redesigning a control room from an ergonomic point of view : a case study of user participation in a chemical plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der T.W.; Kragt, H.; Kragt, H.

    1992-01-01

    A field study in a chemical industry was conducted to redesign a control room with panel instrumentation into one with visual display units (VDUs). The authors had been asked to advise the project team and to participate in the application. First, a general evaluation of the central control room

  20. B827 Chemical Synthhesis Project - Industrial Control System Integration - Statement of Work & Specification with Attachments 1-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, F. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    The Chemical Synthesis Pilot Process at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 827 Complex will be used to synthesize small quantities of material to support research and development. The project will modernize and increase current capabilities for chemical synthesis at LLNL. The primary objective of this project is the conversion of a non-automated hands-on process to a remoteoperation process, while providing enhanced batch process step control, stored recipe-specific parameter sets, process variable visibility, monitoring, alarm and warning handling, and comprehensive batch record data logging. This Statement of Work and Specification provides the industrial-grade process control requirements for the chemical synthesis batching control system, hereafter referred to as the “Control System” to be delivered by the System Integrator.

  1. Human factors measurement for future air traffic control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan-Fox, Janice; Sankey, Michael J; Canty, James M

    2009-10-01

    This article provides a critical review of research pertaining to the measurement of human factors (HF) issues in current and future air traffic control (ATC). Growing worldwide air traffic demands call for a radical departure from current ATC systems. Future systems will have a fundamental impact on the roles and responsibilities of ATC officers (ATCOs). Valid and reliable methods of assessing HF issues associated with these changes, such as a potential increase (or decrease) in workload, are of utmost importance for advancing theory and for designing systems, procedures, and training. We outline major aviation changes and how these relate to five key HF issues in ATC. Measures are outlined, compared, and evaluated and are followed by guidelines for assessing these issues in the ATC domain. Recommendations for future research are presented. A review of the literature suggests that situational awareness and workload have been widely researched and assessed using a variety of measures, but researchers have neglected the areas of trust, stress, and boredom. We make recommendations for use of particular measures and the construction of new measures. It is predicted that, given the changing role of ATCOs and profound future airspace requirements and configurations, issues of stress, trust, and boredom will become more significant. Researchers should develop and/or refine existing measures of all five key HF issues to assess their impact on ATCO performance. Furthermore, these issues should be considered in a holistic manner. The current article provides an evaluation of research and measures used in HF research on ATC that will aid research and ATC measurement.

  2. Analysis of Environmental Physical-Chemical Factors and Macroalga Species In The Coastal Water of Nusalaut, Central Maluku - Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Melsasail

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The physical-chemical factors of environment are very influential on the presence and the growth of macrolaga in waters. Well-maintained water habitat is a good environment for the growth of macroalgae. A research has been conducted on the physicochemical environmental factors and the macroalgae species in the coastal waters of Nusalaut Island using transect method, and it was a survey research on four different observation stations. The results of the research showed that station I (Amet Village has the best physicochemical factors for the presence and the growth of macroalgae, compared to station II (Nalahia Village, station III (Sila Village and station IV (Leinitu Village. The most widely found macro algae are from the Rhodophyta class, with a total of 17 species of macroalgae, of which 15 species are found in station I.

  3. Relation between separation factor of carbon isotope and chemical reaction of CO2 with amine in nonaqueous solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Kenji; Kitamoto, Asashi

    1989-01-01

    The separation factor for carbon isotope exchange reaction between CO 2 and amine in nonaqueous solvent was related to absorption reaction of CO 2 in a solution. The test solutions were mixtures of primary amine (such as butylamine and tert-butylamine) or secondary amine (such as diethylamine, dipropylamine and dibutylamine) diluted with nonpolar solvent (octane or triethyalmine) or polar solvent (methanol), respectively. The isotope exchange reaction consists of three steps related to chemical reaction of CO 2 in amine and nonaqueous solvent mixture, namely the reaction between CO 2 and carbamic acid, that between CO 2 and amine carbamate, and that between CO 2 and carbamic ion. Above all, the isotope separation factor between CO 2 and carbamic acid had the highest value. The overall separation factor can be higher in amine-nonaqueous solvent mixture where the concentration of carbamic acid becomes higher. (author)

  4. Why the toxic substances control act needs an overhaul, and how to strengthen oversight of chemicals in the interim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Sarah A; Roberts, Jody A

    2011-05-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to regulate industrial chemicals not covered by other statutes. Today there are more than 83,000 such chemicals. However, the law is widely perceived as weak and outdated, and various stakeholders have called for its reform, citing the EPA's inability to regulate the use of asbestos, among other substances. We analyze the flaws in the act and suggest ways in which the EPA might better position itself to manage chemical risks and protect the public's health. In addition to the new tools and technologies it is adopting, the agency needs new allies-both inside and outside the government-in its efforts to identify and control hazardous chemicals.

  5. Dispelling urban myths about default uncertainty factors in chemical risk assessment--sufficient protection against mixture effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Olwenn V; Martin, Scholze; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Assessing the detrimental health effects of chemicals requires the extrapolation of experimental data in animals to human populations. This is achieved by applying a default uncertainty factor of 100 to doses not found to be associated with observable effects in laboratory animals. It is commonly assumed that the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic sub-components of this default uncertainty factor represent worst-case scenarios and that the multiplication of those components yields conservative estimates of safe levels for humans. It is sometimes claimed that this conservatism also offers adequate protection from mixture effects. By analysing the evolution of uncertainty factors from a historical perspective, we expose that the default factor and its sub-components are intended to represent adequate rather than worst-case scenarios. The intention of using assessment factors for mixture effects was abandoned thirty years ago. It is also often ignored that the conservatism (or otherwise) of uncertainty factors can only be considered in relation to a defined level of protection. A protection equivalent to an effect magnitude of 0.001-0.0001% over background incidence is generally considered acceptable. However, it is impossible to say whether this level of protection is in fact realised with the tolerable doses that are derived by employing uncertainty factors. Accordingly, it is difficult to assess whether uncertainty factors overestimate or underestimate the sensitivity differences in human populations. It is also often not appreciated that the outcome of probabilistic approaches to the multiplication of sub-factors is dependent on the choice of probability distributions. Therefore, the idea that default uncertainty factors are overly conservative worst-case scenarios which can account both for the lack of statistical power in animal experiments and protect against potential mixture effects is ill-founded. We contend that precautionary regulation should provide an

  6. Dispelling urban myths about default uncertainty factors in chemical risk assessment – sufficient protection against mixture effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the detrimental health effects of chemicals requires the extrapolation of experimental data in animals to human populations. This is achieved by applying a default uncertainty factor of 100 to doses not found to be associated with observable effects in laboratory animals. It is commonly assumed that the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic sub-components of this default uncertainty factor represent worst-case scenarios and that the multiplication of those components yields conservative estimates of safe levels for humans. It is sometimes claimed that this conservatism also offers adequate protection from mixture effects. By analysing the evolution of uncertainty factors from a historical perspective, we expose that the default factor and its sub-components are intended to represent adequate rather than worst-case scenarios. The intention of using assessment factors for mixture effects was abandoned thirty years ago. It is also often ignored that the conservatism (or otherwise) of uncertainty factors can only be considered in relation to a defined level of protection. A protection equivalent to an effect magnitude of 0.001-0.0001% over background incidence is generally considered acceptable. However, it is impossible to say whether this level of protection is in fact realised with the tolerable doses that are derived by employing uncertainty factors. Accordingly, it is difficult to assess whether uncertainty factors overestimate or underestimate the sensitivity differences in human populations. It is also often not appreciated that the outcome of probabilistic approaches to the multiplication of sub-factors is dependent on the choice of probability distributions. Therefore, the idea that default uncertainty factors are overly conservative worst-case scenarios which can account both for the lack of statistical power in animal experiments and protect against potential mixture effects is ill-founded. We contend that precautionary regulation should provide an

  7. What factors control the size of an eruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2017-04-01

    pressure so as to drive out magma for a much longer time during an eruption than is otherwise possible. As a consequence a much higher proportion of the magma in the chamber is driven or squeezed out during an eruption associated with caldera or graben subsidence than is possible during an ordinary poroelastic chamber behaviour. It follows that the volume of eruptive materials may approach the total volume of the chamber resulting in a large eruption. Here a large eruption is thus the consequence—not the cause—of the subsidence of the caldera/graben block. Thus, once the factors controlling large-scale subsidence of a caldera/graben block are established during a particular unrest/rifting episode, primarily using geodetic and seismic data, the probability of a large eruption can be assessed and used for reliable forecasting. Gudmundsson, A., 2015. Collapse-driven large eruptions. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 304, 1-10. Gudmundsson, A., 2016. The mechanics of large volcanic eruptions. Earth-Science Reviews, 163, 72-93.

  8. Low-impact chemical weed control techniques in UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Enriquez, O; Alvarez, R; Morelli, F; Bastida, F; Camacho, D; Menendez, J

    2012-01-01

    Dichrostachys cinerea is a thorny, acacia-like, fast-growing woody bush which invades fields, wasteland, road sides and other disturbed areas. This gregarious species has become a very aggressive invasive weed in Cuba, where no native predators or pathogens are found. It often encroaches in fallows, overgrazed areas and mismanaged veld. D. cinerea is a very difficult weed to eliminate because of its active suckering, and is liable to produce dense thickets which are quite impenetrable on account of the density and abundance of its long, stiff, sharp thorns. In the Valle de los Ingenios area (Cuba Central), the tree is unchecked and forms veritable forests in areas on which cane growing has been discontinued. Physical management by cutting and burning the plants is not a very efficient control method, since the seeds survive in the soil, and they grow very fast. Therefore, chemical methods via the use of herbicides are often necessary to eradicate this weed. A preliminary study using glyphosate and auxin-like herbicides (2,4-D + picloram, MCPA, and MCPA + 2,4-D) plus adjuvants has been carried out in order to elucidate the best mixtures rendering maximum weed control with minimum herbicide rate and environmental stress. None of the herbicides used except glyphosate and 2,4-D + picloram showed acceptable mortality rates (75-80%) at the recommended doses tested. In the failed herbicide treatments, only the use of double herbicide rates succeeded in controlling marabou. The herbicide mixture of 2,4-D + picloram formulated with either a non-ionic surfactant or a mixture of fatty acid esters was the best option to control D. cinerea in terms of maximum effectiveness and minimum environmental stress, as the reduction in active ingredients applied to the environment was x3 in these two adjuvant-amended formulations compared to 2,4-D + picloram alone.

  9. Reaction and Transport Processes Controlling In Situ Chemical Oxidation of DNAPLs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegrist, Robert L; Crimi, Michelle; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Illangasekare, Tissa; Dugan, Pamela; Heiderscheidt, Jeff; Jackson, Shannon; Petri, Ben; Sahl, Jason; Seitz, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation involves the introduction of chemical oxidants into the subsurface to destroy organic contaminants in soil and ground water, with the goal being to reduce the mass, mobility...

  10. Control to goal of cardiometabolic risk factors among Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-12

    Jul 12, 2011 ... Therapeutic goals used to define risk or poor control were values adopted by expert groups such as ... medical wards in urban healthcare centers showed that .... *Status of control was based on the mean observed value.

  11. COMPLIANCE AS FACTORING BUSINESS RISK MANAGEMENT: CONTROL ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    V.K. Makarovych

    2016-01-01

    Indetermination of modern economy conditions and the lack of theoretical knowledge gained by domestic scientists about risk in factoring business actualize the research concerning the methodology and technique of factoring companies’ risk management. The article examines compliance which is the technology innovative for Ukrainian market of factoring risk management technologies. It is determined that the compliance is the risk management process directed to free will correspondence to sta...

  12. Lifestyle factors and reproductive health: taking control of your fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rakesh; Biedenharn, Kelly R; Fedor, Jennifer M; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10 to 15% of couples are impacted by infertility. Recently, the pivotal role that lifestyle factors play in the development of infertility has generated a considerable amount of interest. Lifestyle factors are the modifiable habits and ways of life that can greatly influence overall health and well-being, including fertility. Many lifestyle factors such as the age at which to start a family, nutrition, weight, exercise, psychological stress, environmental and occupational exposu...

  13. CubeSat Form Factor Thermal Control Louvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Allison L. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Thermal control louvers for CubeSats or small spacecraft may include a plurality of springs attached to a back panel of the thermal control louvers. The thermal control louvers may also include a front panel, which includes at least two end panels interlocked with one or more middle panels. The front panel may secure the springs, shafts, and flaps to the back panel.

  14. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  15. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2010-11-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. One chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) fused to a cellular 'address' (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). The second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain from FKBP-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (FRAP1, also known as mTor). Rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBP12- and FRB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment.

  16. Negative thermal expansion in functional materials: controllable thermal expansion by chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Lei; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-06-07

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) is an intriguing physical property of solids, which is a consequence of a complex interplay among the lattice, phonons, and electrons. Interestingly, a large number of NTE materials have been found in various types of functional materials. In the last two decades good progress has been achieved to discover new phenomena and mechanisms of NTE. In the present review article, NTE is reviewed in functional materials of ferroelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, superconductors, temperature-induced electron configuration change and so on. Zero thermal expansion (ZTE) of functional materials is emphasized due to the importance for practical applications. The NTE functional materials present a general physical picture to reveal a strong coupling role between physical properties and NTE. There is a general nature of NTE for both ferroelectrics and magnetics, in which NTE is determined by either ferroelectric order or magnetic one. In NTE functional materials, a multi-way to control thermal expansion can be established through the coupling roles of ferroelectricity-NTE, magnetism-NTE, change of electron configuration-NTE, open-framework-NTE, and so on. Chemical modification has been proved to be an effective method to control thermal expansion. Finally, challenges and questions are discussed for the development of NTE materials. There remains a challenge to discover a "perfect" NTE material for each specific application for chemists. The future studies on NTE functional materials will definitely promote the development of NTE materials.

  17. Effect of the Gouy phase on the coherent phase control of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Robert J; Barge, Vishal J

    2007-11-28

    We show how the spatial phase of a focused laser beam may be used as a tool for controlling the branching ratio of a chemical reaction. Guoy discovered [Acad. Sci., Paris, C. R. 110, 1250 (1890)] that when an electromagnetic wave passes through a focus its phase increases by pi. In a coherent control scheme involving the absorption of n photons of frequency omega(m) and m photons of frequency omega(n), the overall phase shift produced by the Gouy phase is (n-m)pi. At any given point in space, this phase shift is identical for all reaction products. Nevertheless, if the yields for different reaction channels have different intensity dependencies, the Gouy phase produces a net phase lag between the products that varies with the axial coordinate of the laser focus. We obtain here analytical and numerical values of this phase as the laser focus is scanned across the diameter of the molecular beam, taking into account the Rayleigh range and astigmatism of the laser beam and saturation of the transition. We also show that the modulation depth of the interference pattern may be increased by optimizing the relative intensities of the two fields.

  18. Applications of ultrashort shaped pulses in microscopy and for controlling chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Andegeko, Yair; Zhu Xin; Dantus, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a new perspective on laser control based on insights into the effect of spectral phase on nonlinear optical processes. Gaining this understanding requires the systematic evaluation of the molecular response as a function of a series of pre-defined accurately shaped laser pulses. The effort required is rewarded with robust, highly reproducible, results. This approach is illustrated by results on selective two-photon excitation microscopy of biological samples, where higher signal and less photobleaching damage are achieved by accurate phase measurement and elimination of high-order phase distortions from the ultrashort laser pulses. A similar systematic approach applied to laser control of gas phase chemical reactions reveals surprising general trends. Molecular fragmentation pattern is found to be dependent on phase shaping. Differently shaped pulses with similar pulse duration have been found to produce similar fragmentation patterns. This implies that any single parameter that is proportional to the pulse duration, such as second harmonic generation intensity, allows us to predict the molecular fragmentation pattern within the experimental noise. This finding, is illustrated here for a series of isomers. Bond selectivity, coherent photochemistry and their applications are discussed in light of results from these systematic studies

  19. Control of manganese dioxide particles resulting from in situ chemical oxidation using permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Michelle; Ko, Saebom

    2009-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate is an approach to organic contaminant site remediation. Manganese dioxide particles are products of permanganate reactions. These particles have the potential to deposit in the subsurface and impact the flow-regime in/around permanganate injection, including the well screen, filter pack, and the surrounding subsurface formation. Control of these particles can allow for improved oxidant injection and transport and contact between the oxidant and contaminants of concern. The goals of this research were to determine if MnO(2) can be stabilized/controlled in an aqueous phase, and to determine the dependence of particle stabilization on groundwater characteristics. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to study the ability of four stabilization aids (sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP), Dowfax 8390, xanthan gum, and gum arabic) in maintaining particles suspended in solution under varied reaction conditions and time. Variations included particle and stabilization aid concentrations, ionic content, and pH. HMP demonstrated the most promising results, as compared to xanthan gum, gum arabic, and Dowfax 8390 based on results of spectrophotometric studies of particle behavior, particle filtration, and optical measurements of particle size and zeta potential. HMP inhibited particle settling, provided for greater particle stability, and resulted in particles of a smaller average size over the range of experimental conditions evaluated compared to results for systems that did not include HMP. Additionally, HMP did not react unfavorably with permanganate. These results indicate that the inclusion of HMP in a permanganate oxidation system improves conditions that may facilitate particle transport.

  20. Characteristics of Barium Hexaferrite Nanoparticles Prepared by Temperature-Controlled Chemical Coprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Jun Young; Lee, Choong Sub; Kim, Don; Kim, Yeong Il

    2012-01-01

    Ba-ferrite (BaFe 12 O 19 ) nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation method in an aqueous solution. The particle size and the crystallization temperature of the Ba-ferrite nanoparticles were controlled varying the precipitation temperature. The precipitate that was prepared at 0 .deg. C showed the crystal structure of Ba-ferrite in X-ray diffraction when it was calcined at the temperature above 580 .deg. C, whereas what was prepared at 50 .deg. C showed the crystallinity when it was calcined at the temperature higher than about 700 .deg. C. The particle sizes of the synthesized Ba-ferrite were in a range of about 20-30 nm when it was prepared by being precipitated at 0 .deg. C and calcined at 650 .deg. C. When the precipitation temperature increased, the particle size also increased even at the same calcination temperature. The magnetic properties of the Ba-ferrite nanoparticles were also controlled by the synthetic condition of precipitation and calcination temperature. The coercive force could be appreciably lowered without a loss of saturation magnetization when the Ba-ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by precipitation and calcination both at low temperatures

  1. Remote control air sampling and fast chemical analysis of the composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuczka, A; Golisz, T

    1981-01-01

    In 1979 the Central mine rescue station in Bytom (Poland) developed and introduced into use a new method of remote control air and gas (from fires) sampling and swift chemical analysis of the samples' composition. The device in this method includes: a probe (situated beyond the fire detector directly in the control zone), thick-walled elastic hose, direr, piston pump, rotameter, chromatograph and minicomputer. The basic technical data included in the set: the capacity of the pump 8 1/min, 2.5 kg mass. run on 12 V current (built at the Main Mining Affairs Inst. in Poland); the chromatograph is VARIAN 1420-10 (USA produced),the working gas is helium (balloon volume 40 1), feed--alternating 220V, capacity--1.5 kW, time for measuring gas from fires-- 15 to 20 min (as apposed to the 1.5h spent before when the SRC device was being used) at an accuracy of /sup + -/ 0.05% (volume); the chromatograph works with a mini-computer (model CDS-111C) with a 20 kg mass.and a size of 16 x 46 x 56 cm. As tests in Moszczenica coal mines, where a fire in 504/2 occurred, showed (the chromatograph was located 750m from the probe for burning gases), the method proved to be a good one although the VARIAN 1420-10 was insufficiently reliable and the VARIAN-1400-AEROGRAF proved to be better.

  2. Effects of allelopathic chemicals extracted from various plant leaves on weed control and wheat crop productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, E.A.; Khakwani, A.A.; Ghazanfarullah, A.

    2015-01-01

    A study on allelopathic effect of leaf water extracts of Eucalyptus, Acacia, Sorghum, Shishum, Sunflower, Poplar, Tobacco and Congress grass on weeds control and growth of wheat cv. Hashim-8 was conducted at Faculty of Agriculture, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan during 2012-2013. The findings of this study revealed that allelopathic chemicals in leaf water extracts of these plants significantly suppressed weeds growth by reducing weed density, fresh and dry weed biomass, and encouraged wheat yield and yield components such as days to 50% heading, plant height, tillers m-2, grain spike-1, 1000-gain weight, biological and grain yield. Even though minimum fresh and dry weed biomass and highest wheat grain yield and yield related components were observed in twice hand weeding treatment which is economically less feasible on large scale. However, our findings showed an alternative allelopathic technique to minimize weed infestation and boost wheat growth and yield using natural plant material. On the basis of present results, it is recommended that leaf water extracts of Sorghum, Sunflower and Congress grass can be applied twice (30 and 60 DAS) during the growing season to control weeds and to enhance wheat grain yield. (author)

  3. Chemical characterization of Lippia alba essential oil: an alternative to control green molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Glamočlija

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Lippia alba is reported as an antifungal against human pathogenic microorganisms but few articles report its use as an alternative to synthetic fungicides on green mould control. The objective of this study was to determine chemical characteristics of L. alba essential oil and its antifungal activity against green molds as an alternative to synthetic fungicides. Essential oil was extracted by Clevenger hydrodistillation, characterized by GC-MS analysis, and the structure of the main compounds confirmed by ¹H and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Microdilution assays evaluated the essential oil minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC. Commercial fungicides Ketoconazole and Bifonazole were used as control. Essential oil yield is of 0.15% and the major components are neral (33.32% and geranial (50.94%. The L. alba essential oil has MIC of 0.300-1.250 mg/mL and MFC of 0.600-1.250 mg/mL. Ketoconazole and Bifonazole show MIC ranging from 0.025-0.500 to 0.100-0.200 mg/mL, and MFC ranging from 0.250-0.100 to 0.200-0.250 mg/mL, respectively. L. alba essential oil is classified as citral type and the results indicate that it is a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides.

  4. 78 FR 64018 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...; Notice of Registration; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. By Notice dated June 18, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on July 1, 2013, 78 FR 39340, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N... 21 U.S.C. 823(a) and determined that the registration of Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., to...

  5. 78 FR 64016 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Registration, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals By Notice dated June 18, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on July 1, 2013, 78 FR 39337, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, 2820 N. Normandy Drive, Petersburg...) and determined that the registration of Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals is consistent with the public...

  6. 77 FR 67397 - Importer Of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Registration; Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc. By Notice dated July 17, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on July 26, 2012, 77 FR 43861, Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., 2820 N. Normandy Drive...), and determined that the registration of Boehringer Ingelheim Chemicals, Inc., to import the basic...

  7. A new insight into black blooms: Synergies between optical and chemical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongtao; Loiselle, Steven Arthur; Li, Zuochen; Shen, Qiushi; Du, Yingxun; Ma, Ronghua

    2016-06-01

    Black blooms have been associated with fish-kills and the loss of benthic fauna as well as closure of potable water supplies. Their frequency and duration has increased in recent decades in rivers, inland lakes and reservoirs, and has often been associated with the decay and release of organic matter (planktonic algae, aquatic macrophytes, sediment release, etc.). However, the interactions between microbial, chemical, hydrodynamic and optical conditions necessary for black blooms are poorly understood. The present study combines field investigations and laboratory mesocosm studies to show that black blooms are caused by a combination of high CDOM (chromophoric dissolved organic matter) absorption, the formation of CDOM-Fe complexes and low backscattering. Mesocosm experiments showed that black bloom conditions occur after 4 days, with a significant increase in the concentrations of Fe2+ and ∑S2-. Total absorption (excluding absorption due to water) at 440 nm increased by 30% over this time to 7.3 m-1. In addition, the relative contribution of CDOM absorption to the non-water total absorption increased from 18% to 50%. Regression analyses between chemical and bio-optical data in both field and mesocosm experiments indicated that the concentrations of Fe2+ co-varied positively with CDOM absorption ag(440) (R2 > 0.70), and the specific CDOM absorption (ag(440)/DOC). Conditions that favored the development of black blooms were elevated algal or macrophyte biomass and limited water column mixing.

  8. Evaluation of Chemical and Physical-morphological Factors as Potential Determinants of Biomphalaria pfeifferi (Krauss, 1848 Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utzinger Jürg

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in five sites along a small perennial river system in south-central Tanzania, which had been identified as the focus for transmission of intestinal schistosomiasis in the area. Malacological surveys preceding the study showed a focal distribution of Biomphalaria pfeifferi, intermediate host snail of Schistosoma mansoni, the snails being present in three sites but absent from the other two sites. The objective of this study was to evaluate to what extent chemical and/or physical-morphological factors determine the distribution of B. pfeifferi between these five sites. It was found that none of the chemical constituents in the waters examined were outside the tolerance range of B. pfeifferi snails. Moreover, the composition of water from B. pfeifferi-free sites was not different from that in those sites where snails occurred. Furthermore, none of the physical-morphological constituents seemed likely to be a determinant for the absence of B. pfeifferi. In view of these findings, and those of previous studies, it is concluded that the focal distribution of B. pfeifferi cannot be associated with a single environmental factor and is rather the result of more complex interactions of habitat factors

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with controlled structures for nanodevice applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yabin; Zhang, Jin

    2014-08-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a promising substitute to engineer prospective nanoelectronics, have attracted much attention because of their superb structures and physical properties. The unique properties of SWNTs rely sensitively on their specific chiral structures, including the diameters, chiral angles, and handedness. Furthermore, high-performance and integrated circuits essentially require SWNT samples with well-aligned arrays, of single conductive type and of pure chirality. Although much effort has been devoted to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNTs, their structure control, growth mechanism, and structural characterizations are still the primary obstacles for the fabrication and application of SWNT-based nanodevices. In this Account, we focus on our established CVD growth methodology to fulfill the requirements of nanodevice applications. A rational strategy was successfully exploited to construct complex architectures, selectively enrich semiconducting (s) or metallic (m) SWNTs, and control chirality. First, well-aligned and highly dense SWNT arrays are beneficial for nanodevice integration. For the directed growth mode, anisotropic interactions between the SWNTs and the crystallographic structure of substrate are crucial for their growth orientation. Just as crystals possess various symmetries, SWNTs with controlled geometries have the corresponding turning angles. Their complex architectures come from the synergetic effect of lattice and gas flow directed modes. Especially, the aligned orientations of SWNTs on graphite are chirality-selective, and their chiral angles, handedness, and (n,m) index have been conveniently and accurately determined. Second, UV irradiation and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) washing-off methods have been explored to selectively remove m-SWNTs, leaving only s-SWNT arrays on the surface. Moreover, the UV-assisted technique takes the advantages of low cost and high efficiency and it directly produces a high

  10. Pulse-density modulation control of chemical oscillation far from equilibrium in a droplet open-reactor system

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiura, Haruka; Ito, Manami; Okuaki, Tomoya; Mori, Yoshihito; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The design, construction and control of artificial self-organized systems modelled on dynamical behaviours of living systems are important issues in biologically inspired engineering. Such systems are usually based on complex reaction dynamics far from equilibrium; therefore, the control of non-equilibrium conditions is required. Here we report a droplet open-reactor system, based on droplet fusion and fission, that achieves dynamical control over chemical fluxes into/out of the reactor for c...

  11. Effect of leafhopper Arboridiakurdistanisp.nov on the some grape leaves elements and its chemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Abdulbaset Mohammed; Younis, Sara Dasco

    2017-09-01

    The leafhopper Arboridiakurdistanisucking leaves sap and causes decrease of nitrogen in leaves and lead to inhabiting the chlorophyll then decrease the rate of photosynthesis and drying of the leaf. Chemical analysis of plant leaves showed the decreasing of Nitrogen content and gave the means in July, August and September 2.699%, 2.531% and 2.063% respectively, The phosphors rate is decrease in infested leaves, the mean of phosphors content in infested leaves in July, August and September were 0.532ppm, 0.496ppm and 0.361ppm respectively. At the time of protein is decreased in grape leaves the plants should delay in growth, the proteins content were 16.865%, 15.814% and 14.689%, while the potassium content in infested grape leave in July, August and September were 0.509%, 0.509% and 0.394% respectively. The chemical control showed that the best insecticide was Actara which gave 23.33% mortality for 48hours at 0.5gm/gallon water and raised to 90.00% at rate of 1.5gm/gallon water, Marshal gave 13.33% and 80.00% after 48 hours at rate of 0.5 and 1.5gm/gallon water respectively, but Spear gave 6.67% and 33.33% after 48 hours at 0.5% and 1.5gm/gallon water respectively. Based on LC50 Value, Actara proved to be more effective than Marshal and Spear.

  12. Environment polluting conventional chemical control compared to an environmentally friendly IPM approach for control of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), in China: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Farooq, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Akram, Waseem; Khan, Fawad Zafar Ahmad; Jaleel, Waqar; Zhu, Xun; Yin, Haichen; Li, Shuzhong; Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh; Jin, Fengliang

    2017-06-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is recognized as a widely distributed destructive insect pest of Brassica worldwide. The management of this pest is a serious issue, and an estimated annual cost of its management has reached approximately US$4 billion. Despite the fact that chemicals are a serious threat to the environment, lots of chemicals are applied for controlling various insect pests especially P. xylostella. An overreliance on chemical control has not only led to the evolution of resistance to insecticides and to a reduction of natural enemies but also has polluted various components of water, air, and soil ecosystem. In the present scenario, there is a need to implement an environmentally friendly integrated pest management (IPM) approach with new management tactics (microbial control, biological control, cultural control, mating disruption, insecticide rotation strategies, and plant resistance) for an alternative to chemical control. The IPM approach is not only economically beneficial but also reduces the environmental and health risks. The present review synthesizes published information on the insecticide resistance against P. xylostella and emphasizes on adopting an alternative environmentally friendly IPM approach for controlling P. xylostella in China.

  13. Community structure, phytoplankton density and physical-chemical factor of batang palangki waters of sijunjung regency, west sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmaweti; Deswati, L.

    2018-03-01

    The long-term goal of this study is to provide an overview of the presence of phytoplankton in support of its functions in the waters of Batang Palangki as a conservation area of information on river water management, especially for Batang Palangki stakeholders. Specific targets to be achieved in achieving these objectives are (1) to know the density of phytoplankton, index of diversity of species, equitabilty index, domination index, and in Batang Palangki waters, and (2) to analyze the chemical and physical factors of the waters. The sampling method of phytoplankton is purposive sampling. The phytoplankton sampling is done By filtering 100 liters of water into the net plankton no 25 and filtered into the 25 cc, and then identified. The determination of water quality such as water temperature, water pH and watercolour. dissolved oxygen (DO) and BOD, and Hg content (mercury). The results showed that phytoplankton found from each of station was 370 individualis per liter with the highest density found in the station I of 155. The number of genus was 7, namely Neidium, Gyrogsima, Synedra, Frustulia, Fragillaria, Nitzschia and Peridinium. The diversity index averaged at 0.45, equabilty index averaged at 0.54, while the dominance index averaged at 0.28. Physical and chemical factor measurement results found that water temperature averaged at 26 °C, transparency ranged from 12 - 30 cm, velocity speed ranged from 8 - 15 m/s, while chemical factors such as DO, BOD, and COD ranged from 5.25 to 5.96 mg/L, 3.28 - 3.49 mg/L, and 47.05 - 76.25 mg/L respectively. Likewise, TOM measured in this research was 9.61 - 2.10 mg/L while Hg content ranged from 0.098 - 0.208 mg/L.

  14. Viral infections as controlling factors for the deep biosphere? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, B.; Engelhardt, T.; Sahlberg, M.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere represents the largest biotope on Earth. Throughout the last years, we have obtained interesting insights into its microbial community composition. However, one component that was completely overlooked so far is the viral inventory of deep-subsurface sediments. While viral infections were identified to have a major impact on the benthic microflora of deep-sea surface sediments (Danavaro et al. 2008), no studies were performed on deep-biosphere samples, so far. As grazers probably play only a minor role in anoxic and highly compressed deep sediments, viruses might be the main “predators” for indigenous microorganisms. Furthermore, the release of cell components, called “the viral shunt”, could have a major impact on the deep biosphere in providing labile organic compounds to non-infected microorganisms in these generally nutrient depleted sediments. However, direct counting of viruses in sediments is highly challenging due to the small size of viruses and the high background of small particles. Even molecular surveys using “universal” PCR primers that target phage-specific genes fail due to the vast phage diversity. One solution for this problem is the lysogenic viral life cycle as many bacteriophages integrate their DNA into the host genome. It is estimated that up to 70% of cultivated bacteria contain prophages within their genome. Therefore, culture collections (Batzke et al. 2007) represent an archive of the viral composition within the respective habitat. These prophages can be induced to become free phage particles in stimulation experiments in which the host cells are set under certain stress situations such as a treatment with UV exposure or DNA-damaging antibiotics. The study of the viral component within the deep biosphere offers to answer the following questions: To which extent are deep-biosphere populations controlled by viral infections? What is the inter- and intra-specific diversity and the host-specific viral

  15. Factors controlling the initiation of Snowball Earth events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.

    2012-12-01

    During the Neoproterozoic glaciations tropical continents were covered by active glaciers that extended down to sea level. To explain these glaciers, the Snowball Earth hypothesis assumes that oceans were completely sea-ice covered during these glaciation, but there is an ongoing debate whether or not some regions of the tropical oceans remained open. In this talk, I will describe past and ongoing climate modelling activities with the comprehensive coupled climate model ECHAM5/MPI-OM that identify and compare factors that control the initiation of Snowball Earth events. I first show that shifting the continents from their present-day location to their Marinoan (635 My BP) low-latitude location increases the planetary albedo, cools the climate, and thereby allows Snowball Earth initiation at higher levels of total solar irradiance and atmospheric CO2. I then present simulations with successively lowered bare sea-ice albedo, disabled sea-ice dynamics, and switched-off ocean heat transport. These simulations show that both lowering the bare sea-ice albedo and disabling sea-ice dynamics increase the critical sea-ice cover in ECHAM5/MPI-OM, but sea-ice dynamics due to strong equatorward sea-ice transport have a much larger influence on the critical CO2. Disabling sea-ice transport allows a state with sea-ice margin at 10 deg latitude by virtue of the Jormungand mechanism. The accumulation of snow on land, in combination with tropical land temperatures below or close to freezing, suggests that tropical land glaciers could easily form in such a state. However, in contrast to aquaplanet simulations without ocean heat transport, there is no sign of a Jormungand hysteresis in the coupled simulations. Ocean heat transport is not responsible for the lack of a Jormungand hysteresis in the coupled simulations. By relating the above findings to previous studies, I will outline promising future avenues of research on the initiation of Snowball Earth events. In particular, an

  16. Epigenetic and genetic factors in the cellular response to radiations and DNA-damaging chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; D'Arpa, P.

    1981-01-01

    DNA-damaging agents are widely used as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease states. Many such agents are considered to produce detrimental side effects. Thus, it is important to evaluate both therapeutic efficacy and potential risk. DNA-damaging agents can be so evaluated by comparison to agents whose therapeutic benefit and potential hazards are better known. We propose a framework for such comparison, demonstrating that a simple transformation of cytotoxicity-dose response patterns permits a facile comparison of variation between cells exposed to a single DNA-damaging agent or to different cytotoxic agents. Further, by transforming data from experiments which compare responses of 2 cell populations to an effects ratio, different patterns for the changes in cytotoxicity produced by epigenetic and genetic factors were compared. Using these transformations, we found that there is a wide variation (a factor of 4) between laboratories for a single agent (UVC) and only a slightly larger variation (factor of 6) between normal cell response for different types of DNA-damaging agents (x-ray, UVC, alkylating agents, crosslinking agents). Epigenetic factors such as repair and recovery appear to be a factor only at higher dose levels. Comparison in the cytotoxic effect of a spectrum of DNA-damaging agents in xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia cells indicates significantly different patterns, implying that the effect, and perhaps the nature, of these genetic conditions are quite different

  17. Scientific and technical conference. Problems and horizons of development of chemical and radiochemical control in nuclear energetics. Collection of summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    During scientific and technical conference on problems of development of chemical and radiochemical control in nuclear energetics following themes were considered: the problems of methodological and instrumental assurance of chemical and radiochemical control at working nuclear power plants and nuclear energetic units; modern conceptions of automation systems construction of chemical and radiochemical control on the basis of intellectual measuring channels; the ways of decision of generally system problems of organization and management of chemical and radiochemical control using computed technologies; the problems of certification of chemical and radiochemical methods of measuring in nuclear energetics [ru

  18. III Scientific-technical conference. Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005). Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Summaries of reports of the III Scientific-technical conference: Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005) are presented. The conference performed 20-22 September, 2005, in Sosnovyj Bor. Problems of methodical, instrumental and metrological supply of chemical, radiochemical and radiometric control at active NPP and NPU, modern concepts of construction of automated systems of chemical and radiometric control in the atomic energetics, directions for the decision of questions in organization and conducting of chemical and radiochemical control of water-chemical regimes of NPP and NPU are discussed [ru

  19. Organization of a system of guarantee of quality for the control of specifications of chemical reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante Gutierrez, M. G.

    2000-01-01

    Analytic methods were implemented based on valuations acid-base and redox for the quantitative determination of sodium hidroxid, iodine and iron chloride III, like part of a system of quality for the technical specifications of these reagents. The planning of its system of quality includes two fundamental parts: insurance and control of quality. In the insurance part the state of operation of the team that you uses settled down, gauges the one that achieve to maintain under the supervision of a single operator (electronic equip and glassware) and the design of the appropriate documents settled down to carry out the periodic supervision of the acting of the same ones and other aspects characteristic of the system (experimental results). Also protocolized and validated the analytic methods to use following the approaches of precision given by ASTM, organism whose methodologies are recognized in the country like official; other procedures, as that of calibration of the volumetric equipments, they were also protocolized. In the part of control of quality, the limits settled down and procedures were applied the scales and used other, to the necessary distilled water to carry out the determinations and to the used chemical reagents. With base in the obtained results you determines that the analyzed reagents fulfill the specifications of ACS (and with those reported by the maker) at the same time settled down that the laboratory 09 of the Chemistry School, used in a large part of development of this project, it didn't fulfill the necessary requirements so that it works as laboratory of control of quality. As an alternative, the administration of the School outlines as solution the use of the Laboratory of Insurance of the Quality from the Unit of Service to the Industry for such end [es

  20. Effect of Different Methods of Chemical Weed Control Irrigation Regimes on Weed Biomass and Safflower Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Matinfar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of different weed control methods and moisture regimes on safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, a field split plot experiment based on randomized complete block design with 4 replications was conducted in Takestan Iran, during growing seasons of 2007-8. Three irrigations regimes (normal irrigation, restricted irrigation at stem elongation and restricted irrigation at  flowering stage were assigned to the main plots and nine chemical weed control method (complete hand weeding, treflan with 2 L/ha as pre plant herbicide, sonalan with 3 L/ha ad pre plant herbicide, estomp with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide, gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide, treflan with 2 L/ha as pre plant herbicide+ gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide, sonalan with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide + gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide estomp with 3 L/ha as pre plant herbicide + gallant super with 0/75 L/ha as post emergence herbicide and without hand weeding to sub- plots. At the end of growing period traits like number of head   per plant, number of seed per head, 1000 grain weight, percent of seed oil, yield of seed oil and grain yield were measured. Results indicated that treflan + gallant super treatment in restricted irrigation at stem elongation stage had the lowest dry weight of weeds. In this study maximum grain yield (2927 Kg/ha was achieved from hand weeding + usual irrigation treatments. In general treflan + gallant super treatment was the most effective treatment on safflower yield and weed control.

  1. Structure and behavior as determinants: United States nuclear test ban and chemical and biological arms control policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    US efforts to control chemical and biological warfare and nuclear testing are examined with the aim of explaining the paucity of US backed agreements in these areas. Two theoretical perspectives, the behavioral and structural approaches, are used to explore US arms control outcomes. In the behavioral approach, the effects of governmental organization and the bargaining dynamics of policy-making elites with different cognitive styles are posited as important influences on US nuclear test ban and chemical and biological arms control policy outcomes. The behavioral perspective accounts for the timing of all US failed and successful entries (with one exception) into nuclear test bans and chemical and biological warfare restraints. A shortcoming of the behavior approach, however, is that it tends to overemphasize the chances for successful US entry into nuclear test and chemical and biological warfare limitations. Analysis of the same events from the structural perspective helps to correct for expectations generated by behavioral variables for a higher success rate than ultimately resulted. In the structural approach, the focus is on the effect of the organization of international politics on US nuclear test ban and chemical and biological arms control policy outcomes

  2. Investigating the effective factors on management internal controls applying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadkhani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Information technology plays an important role on increasing internal control in many organizations. In this paper, we present an empirical study to measure the impact of information technology, hiring high quality skilled management team, using high quality standards and increasing employees' awareness on managing internal control. The survey uses a questionnaire based on Likert scale and distributes among the people who work in either administration or financial sectors of governmental agencies in province of Zanjan, Iran. The results of the study indicate that the implementation of information technology positively influences management team to control their system, more effectively, using more skilled and specialized managers positively influences management internal control, an organization with suitable standard positively influences management internal control and increasing employees' awareness positively influences management internal control.

  3. Lifestyle factors and reproductive health: taking control of your fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakesh; Biedenharn, Kelly R; Fedor, Jennifer M; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-07-16

    Approximately 10 to 15% of couples are impacted by infertility. Recently, the pivotal role that lifestyle factors play in the development of infertility has generated a considerable amount of interest. Lifestyle factors are the modifiable habits and ways of life that can greatly influence overall health and well-being, including fertility. Many lifestyle factors such as the age at which to start a family, nutrition, weight, exercise, psychological stress, environmental and occupational exposures, and others can have substantial effects on fertility; lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, illicit drug use, and alcohol and caffeine consumption can negatively influence fertility while others such as preventative care may be beneficial. The present literature review encompasses multiple lifestyle factors and places infertility in context for the couple by focusing on both males and females; it aims to identify the roles that lifestyle factors play in determining reproductive status. The growing interest and amount of research in this field have made it evident that lifestyle factors have a significant impact on fertility.

  4. Environmental and hormonal factors controlling reversible colour change in crab spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llandres, Ana L; Figon, Florent; Christidès, Jean-Philippe; Mandon, Nicole; Casas, Jérôme

    2013-10-15

    Habitat heterogeneity that occurs within an individual's lifetime may favour the evolution of reversible plasticity. Colour reversibility has many different functions in animals, such as thermoregulation, crypsis through background matching and social interactions. However, the mechanisms underlying reversible colour changes are yet to be thoroughly investigated. This study aims to determine the environmental and hormonal factors underlying morphological colour changes in Thomisus onustus crab spiders and the biochemical metabolites produced during these changes. We quantified the dynamics of colour changes over time: spiders were kept in yellow and white containers under natural light conditions and their colour was measured over 15 days using a spectrophotometer. We also characterised the chemical metabolites of spiders changing to a yellow colour using HPLC. Hormonal control of colour change was investigated by injecting 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into spiders. We found that background colouration was a major environmental factor responsible for colour change in crab spiders: individuals presented with white and yellow backgrounds changed to white and yellow colours, respectively. An ommochrome precursor, 3-OH-kynurenine, was the main pigment responsible for yellow colour. Spiders injected with 20E displayed a similar rate of change towards yellow colouration as spiders kept in yellow containers and exposed to natural sunlight. This study demonstrates novel hormonal manipulations that are capable of inducing reversible colour change.

  5. Avian influenza virus (H5N1; effects of physico-chemical factors on its survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Sajid

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Present study was performed to determine the effects of physical and chemical agents on infective potential of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 (local strain virus recently isolated in Pakistan during 2006 outbreak. H5N1 virus having titer 108.3 ELD50/ml was mixed with sterilized peptone water to get final dilution of 4HA units and then exposed to physical (temperature, pH and ultraviolet light and chemical (formalin, phenol crystals, iodine crystals, CID 20, virkon®-S, zeptin 10%, KEPCIDE 300, KEPCIDE 400, lifebuoy, surf excel and caustic soda agents. Harvested amnio-allantoic fluid (AAF from embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with H5N1 treated virus (0.2 ml/egg was subjected to haemagglutination (HA and haemagglutination inhibition (HI tests. H5N1 virus lost infectivity after 30 min at 56°C, after 1 day at 28°C but remained viable for more than 100 days at 4°C. Acidic pH (1, 3 and basic pH (11, 13 were virucidal after 6 h contact time; however virus retained infectivity at pH 5 (18 h, 7 and 9 (more than 24 h. UV light was proved ineffectual in inactivating virus completely even after 60 min. Soap (lifebuoy®, detergent (surf excel® and alkali (caustic soda destroyed infectivity after 5 min at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3% dilution. All commercially available disinfectants inactivated virus at recommended concentrations. Results of present study would be helpful in implementing bio-security measures at farms/hatcheries levels in the wake of avian influenza virus (AIV outbreak.

  6. Application of factor analysis to chemically analyzed data in environmental samples after x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    The underlying principle of factorial analysis is frequency distribution and description of reaction in between and through the element series in specific environmental samples. Application of this factor analysis was elaborated to interpret the variance and covariance of certain elements Si, Al, Ca. K, Fe, Ti and Mg in three different types of common materials in environmental sediments, soil, and rock. These evaluations were proceeded after x-ray fluorescence measurements. Results of applications of factorial statistical data analysis show that three factors cause relationship between the above elements in a certain type of environmental samples are mainly recognized. In such cases, these factors represent the main reason for findings and interpret all hidden relationship between the chemical analyzed data. Factor one, the effect of weathering type alteration and oxidation reaction processes as a main one in case of soil and rock where they are characterized by the close covariance of a group of metals, like iron and manganese, commonly derived from weathered and altered igneous rocks. Factor two and three represents other processes. In case of soil, formation of alumino-silicate is revealed in factor two due to the positive covariance of these elements and also the presence of aluminum oxide, titanium oxide and silicon dioxide together is explained by these positive values. The inverse relation between Ca, K, Fe and Mg while indicate the presence of mineral salts which may be due to fertilization and water of irrigation. In case of factor three in that soil, it is the weakest factor that can be used to explain the relationship between the above elements

  7. Science and the Nonscience Major: Addressing the Fear Factor in the Chemical Arena Using Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labianca, Dominick A.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes an approach to minimizing the "fear factor" in a chemistry course for the nonscience major, and also addresses relevant applications to other science courses, including biology, geology, and physics. The approach emphasizes forensic science and affords students the opportunity to hone their analytical skills in an…

  8. Magnetic and chemical parameters of andic soils and their relation to selected pedogenesis factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grison, Hana; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Stejskalová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 139, April (2016), s. 179-190 ISSN 0341-8162 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10775S Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : andosols * magnetic susceptibility * basalts * iron oxides * frequency-dependent susceptibility Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 3.191, year: 2016

  9. Interaction of extrinsic chemical factors affecting photodegradation of dissolved organic matter in aquatic ecosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, P. J.; Molot, L. A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2014), s. 799-812 ISSN 1474-905X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/0781 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : photodegradation * dissolved organic matter * calcium * nitrate * iron * pH Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.267, year: 2014

  10. The Factor Structure of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale in Veterans Experienced Chemical Weapon Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif Nia, Hamid; Pahlevan Sharif, Saeed; Boyle, Christopher; Yaghoobzadeh, Ameneh; Tahmasbi, Bahram; Rassool, G Hussein; Taebei, Mozhgan; Soleimani, Mohammad Ali

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the factor structure of the spiritual well-being among a sample of the Iranian veterans. In this methodological research, 211 male veterans of Iran-Iraq warfare completed the Paloutzian and Ellison spiritual well-being scale. Maximum likelihood (ML) with oblique rotation was used to assess domain structure of the spiritual well-being. The construct validity of the scale was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), convergent validity, and discriminant validity. Reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha, Theta (θ), and McDonald Omega (Ω) coefficients, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and construct reliability (CR). Results of ML and CFA suggested three factors which were labeled "relationship with God," "belief in fate and destiny," and "life optimism." The ICC, coefficients of the internal consistency, and CR were >.7 for the factors of the scale. Convergent validity and discriminant validity did not fulfill the requirements. The Persian version of spiritual well-being scale demonstrated suitable validity and reliability among the veterans of Iran-Iraq warfare.

  11. Environmental exogenous factors and facial dermatitis: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hui Wang

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Contact factors play an important role in facial dermatitis. Aggravation by sunlight exposure, ingestion of spicy food, or alcohol are more reported in facial dermatitis compared with nonfacial dermatitis.

  12. Reflexivity as a control factor of personal coping behavior

    OpenAIRE

    BEKHTER A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of coping behavior control. The author defines the criteria, levels and aspects of reflexivity within the framework of personal coping behavior. In conclusion the author describes the key facets of coping behavior control and how reflexivity affects them.

  13. Occupation and occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in male breast cancer: a case-control study in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villeneuve, Sara; Cyr, Diane; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease of largely unknown aetiology. In addition to genetic and hormone-related risk factors, a large number of environmental chemicals are suspected of playing a role in breast cancer. The identification of occupations or occupational exposures associated with an in...

  14. Control of erythropoiesis by erythropoietin and stem cell factor: a novel role for Bruton's tyrosine kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Lindern, Marieke; Schmidt, Uwe; Beug, Hartmut

    2004-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) and stem cell factor (SCF) are essential factors in the control of survival, expansion and differentiation of erythroid progenitors. Upon activation, their receptors, the EpoR and c-Kit, initiate multiple signalling pathways that control many cellular processes. To control

  15. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers. Release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P; Kurkela, M; Kylloenen, H; Tapola, E [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1997-10-01

    The research was part of an ongoing cooperative research effort aimed at developing a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers. During 1996 experimental investigations of sulphur release were continued. Experiments at elevated pressures and employing larger particle sizes were performed in order to gain information about mass transfer effects. The first experiments yielding data on the rates of the sulphur-release reactions were performed. This data will be used as the basis of a drop model for sulphur release being developed in cooperation with another research group. The other part of the work during 1996 explored the possibility of using chemical equilibrium calculations to predict the release of sodium, potassium and chlorine in the recovery furnace. The approach is essentially different from that employed in earlier studies in that the effects of fume formation are taken into account. So far, the predictions of the chemical equilibrium release model have, in no way, conflicted with field measurements. (orig.)

  16. Algorithm for calculating an availability factor for the inhalation of radioactive and chemical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report presents a method of calculating the availability of buried radioactive and nonradioactive materials via an inhalation pathway. Availability is the relationship between the concentration of a substance in the soil and the dose rate to a human receptor. Algorithms presented for calculating availabiliy of elemental inorganic substances are based on atmospheric enrichment factors; those presented for calculating availability of organic substances are based on vapor pressures. The basis, use, and limitations of the developed equations are discussed. 32 references, 5 tables

  17. Salivary Chemical Factors in Relation with Oral Cancer in Smokers and Non-Smokers: a Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosratzehi, Tahereh

    2017-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity is of malignant tumors, which causes cancerous complications. DNA damage, mainly because of products of oxidative stress like reactive oxygen species, is a frequent mutagenic that triggers carcinoma. Smoking increases the probability of cancer incidence. Saliva is the first biological medium to interact with external compounds, especially smoking substances. The present study overviews the salivary level of some remarkable compounds in relation with smoking and squamous cell carcinoma. To collect data, English literature was searched in databases including PubMed, ScienceDirect and Google Scholar. The keywords used for search were as follows: 'Carcinoma, Squamous Cell', 'Smoking', 'Saliva', and 'Biomarkers'. The inclusion criteria were the presence of salivary chemical factors in relation with oral cancer and influence by smoking. Out of 239 found articles, only 56 were selected. Our results demonstrated the potential role of salivary biochemistry to predict and/or treat complications with cancer in both smoker and non-smoker individuals. Changes in concentrations of salivary chemicals including antioxidants, total antioxidant, glutathione and uric acid, epithelial growth factor, cytokine biomarkers, superoxide dismutase activity, and transcriptome were related to squamous cell carcinoma and could be used as potential biomarkers for cancer prognosis; moreover, enhancement of antioxidant level might be a potential treatment.

  18. Modular glovebox connector and associated good practices for control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Mewhinney, C.J.; Newton, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Design and associated good practices are described for a modular glovebox connector to improve control of radioactive and chemically toxic materials. The connector consists of an anodized aluminum circular port with a mating spacer, gaskets, and retaining rings for joining two parallel ends of commercially available or custom-manufactured glovebox enclosures. Use of the connector allows multiple gloveboxes to be quickly assembled or reconfigured in functional units. Connector dimensions can be scaled to meet operational requirements for access between gloveboxes. Options for construction materials are discussed, along with recommendations for installation of the connector in new or retrofitted systems. Associated good practices include application of surface coatings and caulking, use of disposable glovebags, and proper selection and protection of gasket and glove materials. Use of the connector at an inhalation toxicology research facility has reduced the time and expense required to reconfigure equipment for changing operational requirements, the dispersion of contamination during reconfigurations, and the need for decommissioning and disposal of contaminated enclosures

  19. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  20. Controlled surface diffusion in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, W C; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the growth of GaN nanowires by controlling the surface diffusion of Ga species on sapphire in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, Ga has a tendency to adsorb on the substrate surface diffusing to nanowires to contribute to their growth. The significance of surface diffusion on the growth of nanowires is dependent on the environment of the nanowire on the substrate surface as well as the gas phase species and compositions. Under nitrogen-rich growth conditions, the growth rate is strongly dependent on the surface diffusion of gallium, but the addition of 5% hydrogen in nitrogen plasma instantly diminishes the surface diffusion effect. Gallium desorbs easily from the surface by reaction with hydrogen. On the other hand, under gallium-rich growth conditions, nanowire growth is shown to be dominated by the gas phase deposition, with negligible contribution from surface diffusion. This is the first study reporting the inhibition of surface diffusion effects by hydrogen addition, which can be useful in tailoring the growth and characteristics of nanowires. Without any evidence of direct deposition on the nanowire surface, gallium and nitrogen are shown to dissolve into the catalyst for growing the nanowires at 900 deg. C.