WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical explosions

  1. New Source Model for Chemical Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoning [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    With sophisticated inversion scheme, we recover characteristics of SPE explosions such as corner frequency fc and moment M0, which are used to develop a new source model for chemical explosions.

  2. Smart phones: platform enabling modular, chemical, biological, and explosives sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Amethist S.; Coppock, Matthew; Bickford, Justin R.; Conn, Marvin A.; Proctor, Thomas J.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Reliable, robust, and portable technologies are needed for the rapid identification and detection of chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) materials. A key to addressing the persistent threat to U.S. troops in the current war on terror is the rapid detection and identification of the precursor materials used in development of improvised explosive devices, homemade explosives, and bio-warfare agents. However, a universal methodology for detection and prevention of CBE materials in the use of these devices has proven difficult. Herein, we discuss our efforts towards the development of a modular, robust, inexpensive, pervasive, archival, and compact platform (android based smart phone) enabling the rapid detection of these materials.

  3. Chemical and Photographic Evaluation of Rigid Explosive Transfer Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    01 SIAN1ARD 191 NSWC TR 84-66 * 0 CHEMICAL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF RIGID EXPLOSIVE TRANSFER LINES 0 0 BY ELEONORE G. KAYSER 0 0 RESEARCH AND... Eleonore G. Kayser j 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AN= ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM E-.EMENT. ’RCJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERSNaval Surface Weapons...J. Trom P.O. Box 5400 Dept. 529-165 Albuquerque, NM 87115 Mail Code AB37 6633 Canoga Ave. Space Ordnance Systems, Inc. Canoga Park , CA 91304 Attn

  4. Hand-Held Devices Detect Explosives and Chemical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ion Applications Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, partnered with Ames Research Center through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements to develop a miniature version ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). While NASA was interested in the instrument for detecting chemicals during exploration of distant planets, moons, and comets, the company has incorporated the technology into a commercial hand-held IMS device for use by the military and other public safety organizations. Capable of detecting and identifying molecules with part-per-billion sensitivity, the technology now provides soldiers with portable explosives and chemical warfare agent detection. The device is also being adapted for detecting drugs and is employed in industrial processes such as semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Colorimetric chemical analysis sampler for the presence of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Peter J.; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Simpson, Randall L.

    2014-07-01

    A tester for testing for explosives comprising a body, a lateral flow swab unit operably connected to the body, a explosives detecting reagent contained in the body, and a dispenser operatively connected to the body and the lateral flow swab unit. The dispenser selectively allows the explosives detecting reagent to be delivered to the lateral flow swab unit.

  6. Generation of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields during large- scale chemical and nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adushkin, V.V. [Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Dynamics of the Geospheres; Dubinya, V.A.; Karaseva, V.A.; Soloviev, S.P.; Surkov, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the main parameters of the electric field in the surface layer of the atmosphere and the results of the investigations of the natural electric field variations. Experimental investigations of the electromagnetic field for explosions in air are presented. Electromagnetic signals generated by underground nuclear and chemical explosions are discussed and explosions for 1976--1991 are listed. Long term anomalies of the earth`s electromagnetic field in the vicinity of underground explosions were also investigated. Study of the phenomenon of the irreversible shock magnetization showed that in the zone nearest to the explosion the quasistatic magnetic field decreases in inverse proportion to the distance.

  7. Identification of improvised explosives residues using physical-chemical analytical methods under real conditions after an explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrlý, Marek; Mareš, Bohumil; Turková, Ivana; Beroun, Ivo

    2016-05-01

    Within the analysis of cases relating to the use of explosives for crimes, we have experienced a shift from using industrial explosives towards substances made in amateur and illegal way. Availability of industrial explosives is increasingly limited to a narrow sphere of subjects with a relevant permission. Thus, on the part of perpetrators, terrorists, ever greater attention is paid to illegal production of explosives that are easily made from readily available raw materials. Another alarming fact is the availability of information found on the internet. Procedures of preparation are often very simple and do not require even a deeper professional knowledge. Explosive characteristics are not actually accessible for many of these substances (detonation velocity, sensitivity, working capacity, brisance, physical and chemical stability, etc.). Therefore, a project is being implemented, which on grounds of assessment of individual information available in literature and on the internet, aiming at choosing individual areas of potentially abusable substances (e.g. mixtures of nitric acid (98%) with organic substances, mixtures nitromethane and tetranitromethane with organic substances, mixtures of chlorates and perchlorates of alkali metals with organic substances, chemically individual compounds of organic base type of perchloric acid, azides, fulminates, acetylides, picrates, styphnates of heavy metals, etc.). It is directed towards preparation of these explosives also in non-stoichiometric mixtures, conducting test explosives, determination of explosive characteristics (if they are unknown) and analysis of both primary phases and post-blast residues through available analytical techniques, such as gas and liquid chromatography with mass detection, FTIR, micro-Raman spectrometry, electron microscopy with microanalysis and Raman microspectrometry directly in SEM chamber for analysis at the level of individual microparticles. The received characteristics will be used to

  8. Test results of chemical reactivity test (CRT) analysis of structural materials and explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, P.S.; Barnhart, B.V.; Walters, R.R.; Haws, L.D.; Collins, L.W.

    1980-03-21

    The chemical reactivity test, CRT, is a procedure used to screen the compatibility of component structure materials with explosives. This report contains the results of CRT materials evaluations conducted at Mound Facility. Data about materials combinations are catalogued both under the name of the explosive and the nonexplosive.

  9. Explosion of limit cycles and chaotic waves in a simple nonlinear chemical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Sturis, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    A model of an autocatalytic chemical reaction was employed to study the explosion of limit cycles and chaotic waves in a nonlinear chemical system. The bifurcation point was determined using asymptotic analysis and perturbations. Scaling laws for amplitude and period were derived. A strong...

  10. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  12. Challenges of infrared reflective spectroscopy of solid-phase explosives and chemicals on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2012-09-01

    Reliable active and passive hyperspectral imaging and detection of explosives and solid-phase chemical residue on surfaces remains a challenge and an active area of research and development. Both methods rely on reference libraries for material identification, but in many cases the reference spectra do not sufficiently resemble those instrumental signals scattered from real-world objects. We describe a physics-based model using the dispersive complex dielectric constant to explain what is often thought of as anomalous behavior of scattered or non-specular signatures encountered in active and passive sensing of explosives or chemicals on surfaces and show modeling and experimental results for RDX.

  13. Weapons of mass destruction: Overview of the CBRNEs (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockop, Leon D

    2006-11-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, made citizens of the world acutely aware of disasters consequent to present-day terrorism. This is a war being waged for reasons obscure to many of its potential victims. The term "NBCs" was coined in reference to terrorist weapons of mass destruction, i.e., nuclear, biological and chemical. The currently accepted acronym is "CBRNE" which includes Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive weapons. Non-nuclear explosives are the most common terrorist weapon now in use. Nuclear and radiological weapons are beyond the scope of this publication, which focuses on the "CBEs", i.e. chemical, biological and explosive weapons. Although neurologists will not be the first responders to CBEs, they must know about the neurological effects in order to provide diagnosis and treatment to survivors. Neurological complications of chemical, biological and explosive weapons which have or may be used by terrorists are reviewed by international experts in this publication. Management and treatment profiles are outlined.

  14. A new type of functional chemical sensitizer MgH2 for improving pressure desensitization resistance of emulsion explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y. F.; Yan, S. L.; Ma, H. H.; Shen, Z. W.; Liu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In millisecond-delay blasting and deep water blasting projects, traditional emulsion explosives sensitized by the chemical sensitizer NaNO2 often encounter incomplete explosion or misfire problems because of the "pressure desensitization" phenomenon, which seriously affects blasting safety and construction progress. A MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosive was invented to solve these problems. Experimental results show that MgH2 can effectively reduce the problem of pressure desensitization. In this paper, the factors which influence the pressure desensitization of two types of emulsion explosives are studied, and resistance to this phenomenon of MgH2-sensitized emulsion explosives is discussed.

  15. Comparison of the effects in the rock mass of large-scale chemical and nuclear explosions. Final technical report, June 9, 1994--October 9, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, A.A.

    1995-04-01

    It was found that in the first approximation the mechanical effect of underground nuclear explosion is analogous to the effect of chemical explosion. Really qualitative analysis shows that accompanying mechanical effects of nuclear and chemical explosions are the same: in the both cases explosion consequences are characterized by formation of the camouplet cavity (crater after explosion near free surface), destruction of the rock massif near explosion centre, creation of the stress wave, which forms seismoexplosive effect a long distance from explosion epicentre. Qualitative likeness of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions is the base of modelling the mechanical effects of the underground nuclear explosion. In this paper we`ll compare two explosions: nuclear (15-04-84) and chemical (27.06.95) with large power. These explosions were realized at the same geological conditions at Degelen test area, which is a part of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. In the case of the nuclear explosion, the charge was disposed in the face of the deep horizontal gallery. The charge of the chemical explosion was a semisphere from explosives at the rock massif surface. In the both case rock massif behavior after explosions was investigated at underground conditions (in the case of chemical explosion -- in the long underground excavation from explosion epicentre). Mechanical effects from the nuclear and chemical explosions were investigated with the same methods. The changes in geological medium after a large-scale explosive actions will be analyzed in detail too. Investigations of the influence of tectonic energy on the mechanical effects after underground nuclear, explosions represents the main interest. In this paper we`ll discuss this question on the data from underground nuclear explosion, realized 08.09.89 in the deep well at the Balapan test area, at the Semipalatinsk Test Site.

  16. Uniform Contribution of Supernova Explosions to the Chemical Enrichment of Abell 3112 out to R200

    CERN Document Server

    Ezer, Cemile; Ercan, E Nihal; Smith, Randall K; Bautz, Mark W; Loewenstein, Mike; McDonald, Mike; Miller, Eric D

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the metals residing in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters records all the information on a cluster's nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichment history. We present measurements from deep Suzaku and Chandra observations of the cool-core galaxy cluster Abell 3112 out its virial radius (~1470 kpc). We find that the ratio of the observed supernova type Ia explosions to the total supernova explosions have a uniform distribution at a level of 12-16% out to the cluster's virial radius. The non-varying supernova enrichment suggests that the ICM was enriched by metals at an early stage before the cluster itself was formed. We also find that the 2D delayed detonations models CDDT produce significantly worse fits to the X-ray spectra compared to simple 1D W7 models. This may indicate that CDDT explosions are not a dominant process of enriching the ICM.

  17. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2015-01-01

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent...... Boston Marathon bombing and nerve gas attacks on civilians in the Middle East. To prevent such tragic disasters, security personnel must be able to find, identify and deactivate the threats at multiple locations and levels. This involves major technical and practical challenges, such as detection...... progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in...

  18. APSTNG: neutron interrogation for detection of explosives, drugs, and nuclear and chemical warfare materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Edgar A.; Peters, Charles W.

    1993-02-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed-portal requirements for nondestructive detection, including monitoring of contraband explosives, drugs, and weapon materials, and treaty verification of sealed munitions. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14- MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in explosives, drugs, and chemical warfare agents, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs. The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Surveillance systems based on APSTNG technology can avoid the large physical size, high capital and operating expenses, and reliability problems associated with complex accelerators.

  19. Microcantilever technology for law enforcement and anti-terrorism applications: chemical, biological, and explosive material detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. D.; Rogers, B.; Whitten, R.

    2005-05-01

    The remarkable sensitivity, compactness, low cost, low power-consumption, scalability, and versatility of microcantilever sensors make this technology among the most promising solutions for detection of chemical and biological agents, as well as explosives. The University of Nevada, Reno, and Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc (NNTS) are currently developing a microcantilever-based detection system that will measure trace concentrations of explosives, toxic chemicals, and biological agents in air. A baseline sensor unit design that includes the sensor array, electronics, power supply and air handling has been created and preliminary demonstrations of the microcantilever platform have been conducted. The envisioned device would measure about two cubic inches, run on a small watch battery and cost a few hundred dollars. The device could be operated by untrained law enforcement personnel. Microcantilever-based devices could be used to "sniff out" illegal and/or hazardous chemical and biological agents in high traffic public areas, or be packaged as a compact, low-power system used to monitor cargo in shipping containers. Among the best detectors for such applications at present is the dog, an animal which is expensive, requires significant training and can only be made to work for limited time periods. The public is already accustomed to explosives and metal detection systems in airports and other public venues, making the integration of the proposed device into such security protocols straightforward.

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives using alternating current corona discharge ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, D T; Chen, L C; Yu, Z; Yamabe, S; Sakaki, S; Hiraoka, K

    2015-04-01

    The high-sensitive detection of explosives is of great importance for social security and safety. In this work, the ion source for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry using alternating current corona discharge was newly designed for the analysis of explosives. An electromolded fine capillary with 115 µm inner diameter and 12 mm long was used for the inlet of the mass spectrometer. The flow rate of air through this capillary was 41 ml/min. Stable corona discharge could be maintained with the position of the discharge needle tip as close as 1 mm to the inlet capillary without causing the arc discharge. Explosives dissolved in 0.5 µl methanol were injected to the ion source. The limits of detection for five explosives with 50 pg or lower were achieved. In the ion/molecule reactions of trinitrotoluene (TNT), the discharge products of NOx (-) (x = 2,3), O3 and HNO3 originating from plasma-excited air were suggested to contribute to the formation of [TNT - H](-) (m/z 226), [TNT - NO](-) (m/z 197) and [TNT - NO + HNO3 ](-) (m/z 260), respectively. Formation processes of these ions were traced by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. NONDESTRUCTIVE IDENTIFICATION OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND EXPLOSIVES BY NEUTRON GENERATOR-DRIVEN PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Twomey; A. J. Caffrey; D. L. Chichester

    2007-02-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is now a proven method for the identification of chemical warfare agents and explosives in military projectiles and storage containers. Idaho National Laboratory is developing a next-generation PGNAA instrument based on the new Ortec Detective mechanically-cooled HPGe detector and a neutron generator. In this paper we review PGNAA analysis of suspect chemical warfare munitions, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of replacing the californium-252 radioisotopic neutron source with a compact accelerator neutron generator.

  2. Chemical-free Extraction of Cotton Stalk Bark Fibers by Steam Flash Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuliang Hou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cotton stalk bark fibers (CSBF were extracted by steam flash explosion, completed within 0.09 s, and the extracted fibers were compared with those obtained by conventional alkaline treatment. Results indicate that the optimum steam pressure was 2.5 MPa when steaming time was set to 2 min for extracting CSBF. Under the optimized conditions, the obtained CSBF had a cellulose content of 72%, length of 48 mm, fineness of 45 dtex, crystallinity index of 68, moisture regain of 8%, water retention of 98%, and tensile strength of 2.4 cN/dtex, which were similar to results obtained by conventional alkaline treatment. Compared with bark of cotton stalks, CSBF had lower moisture regain and water retention, and higher onset decomposition temperature. The results show that moderate steam flash explosion is a chemical-free, quick, and effective method for exploring the industrial applications of bark of cotton stalks as natural cellulose fibers.

  3. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Air Blast Propagation from the Humble Redwood Chemical High Explosive Detonations Using GEODYN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipman, V D

    2011-09-20

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic models were developed using GEODYN to simulate the propagation of air blasts resulting from a series of high explosive detonations conducted at Kirtland Air Force Base in August and September of 2007. Dubbed Humble Redwood I (HR-1), these near-surface chemical high explosive detonations consisted of seven shots of varying height or depth of burst. Each shot was simulated numerically using GEODYN. An adaptive mesh refinement scheme based on air pressure gradients was employed such that the mesh refinement tracked the advancing shock front where sharp discontinuities existed in the state variables, but allowed the mesh to sufficiently relax behind the shock front for runtime efficiency. Comparisons of overpressure, sound speed, and positive phase impulse from the GEODYN simulations were made to the recorded data taken from each HR-1 shot. Where the detonations occurred above ground or were shallowly buried (no deeper than 1 m), the GEODYN model was able to simulate the sound speeds, peak overpressures, and positive phase impulses to within approximately 1%, 23%, and 6%, respectively, of the actual recorded data, supporting the use of numerical simulation of the air blast as a forensic tool in determining the yield of an otherwise unknown explosion.

  4. Medical preparedness for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) events: gaps and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Diana; Waruszynski, Barbara; Mazurik, Laurie; Szymczak, Ann-Marie; Redmond, Erin; Lichacz, Fred

    2010-11-01

    The Workshop on Medical Preparedness for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) events: national scan was held on 20 and 21 May 2010 at the Diefenbunker Museum in Ottawa, Canada. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the CBRNE Research and Technology Initiative with a Canadian national profile of existing capabilities and anticipated gaps in casualty management consistent with the community emergency response requirements. The workshop was organised to enable extensive round-table discussions and provide a summary of key gaps and recommendations for emergency response planners.

  5. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation results show that the model is significant and stable and that the predicted accuracy is within 0.146 MJ kg−1, with an overall root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP below 0.183 MJ kg−1. Strong correlations were observed between the heat of explosion and the charges (R2 = 0.9533 and 15N NMR chemical shifts (R2 = 0.9531 of the studied compounds. In addition, the dependence of the heat of explosion on the presence of activating or deactivating groups of nitroaromatic explosives was analyzed. All calculations, including optimizations, NBO charges, and 15NNitro NMR chemical shifts analyses, were performed using density functional theory (DFT and a 6-311+G(2d,p basis set. Based on these results, this practical quantitative model can be used as a tool in the design and development of highly energetic materials (HEM based on nitroaromatic compounds.

  7. Environmental impact assessment: chemical explosive fracturing project, Petroleum Technology Corporation, Leslie, Letcher and Perry counties, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonnessen, K.A.

    1977-05-19

    This review of the plans for a gas stimulation program by chemical explosive fracturing (CEF) in the Devonian shales of Letcher, Leslie and Perry counties, Kentucky also includes an assessment of the environmental consequences of the proposed project. This document was prepared at the request of the Nevada Operations Office of the Energy Research and Development Administration, and is intended to provide the information and data required for the preparation of an environmental assessment of the construction and testing program. This report was compiled from material provided by the Petroleum Technology Corporation of Redmond, Washington, Kentucky-West Virginia Gas Transmission Corporation of Prestonsburg, Kentucky and the State of Kentucky Bureau of Mines and Minerals during site visits in October, 1976.

  8. The application of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of high explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle (~1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  9. Predicting Heats of Explosion of Nitroaromatic Compounds through NBO Charges and 15N NMR Chemical Shifts of Nitro Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Infante-Castillo; Samuel P. Hernández-Rivera

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a new quantitative model to predict the heat of explosion of nitroaromatic compounds using the natural bond orbital (NBO) charge and 15N NMR chemical shifts of the nitro groups (15NNitro) as structural parameters. The values of the heat of explosion predicted for 21 nitroaromatic compounds using the model described here were compared with experimental data. The prediction ability of the model was assessed by the leave-one-out cross-validation method. The cross-validation re...

  10. Estimation Source Parameters of Large-Scale Chemical Surface Explosions and Recent Underground Nuclear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.; Kim, S.; Hofstetter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale surface explosions were conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR), Negev desert: 82 tons of strong HE explosives in August 2009, and 10&100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. The main goal was to provide strong controlled sources in different wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations. Numerous dense observations of blast waves were provided by high-pressure, acoustic and seismic sensors at near-source ( 2000 tons) ANFO surface shots at White Sands Military Range (WSMR) were analyzed for SS time delay. The Secondary Shocks were revealed on the records in the range 1.5-60 km and showed consistency with the SMR data, thus extending the charge and distance range for the developed SS delay relationship. Obtained results suggest that measured SS delays can provide important information about an explosion source character, and can be used as a new simple cost-effective yield estimator for explosions with known type of explosives. The new results are compared with analogous available data of surface nuclear explosions. Special distinctions in air-blast waves are revealed and analyzed, resulting from the different source phenomenology (energy release). Two underground nuclear explosions conducted by North Korea in 2009 and 2013 were recorded by several stations of Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth (relatively to an earthquake), this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave energy and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. A similar effect was observed before at ISN stations for the Pakistan explosion (28.05.98) at a different frequency 1.7 Hz indicating the source- and not site-effect. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of

  11. Chemical and physical modification of hemp fibres by steam explosion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutka, Anna; Kukle, Silvija; Gravitis, Janis; Berzins, Agris

    2013-12-01

    In current research attempt has been made to analyse hemp fibres treated with steam explosion (SE) technology. Disintegration of hemp fibres separated from non-retted, dew-retted and dried stems of hemp ('Purini')[1] by alkali treatment and steam explosion (SE) were investigated. An average intensive SE in combination with the hydro-thermal and alkali after-treatment allows decreasing the diameter of hemp fibres and reduce the concentration of non-celluloses components, among them hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin, waxes and water [1;2].

  12. Calorimetric studies and lessons on fires and explosions of a chemical plant producing CHP and DCPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Jing-Ming; Su, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Chiao-Ying [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Duh, Yih-Shing, E-mail: yihshingduh@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National United University, No. 1 Lien-Da, Miaoli, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed fire and explosion incidents in a plant producing CHP and DCPO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data from calorimeters reveal causes and phenomena associated with the incidents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The credible worst scenario was thermal explosion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incidents may be avoided by implementing DIERS methodology. - Abstract: Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) has been used in producing phenol, dicumyl peroxide (DCPO) and as an initiator for synthesizing acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin by copolymerization in Taiwan. Four incidents of fire and explosion induced by thermal runaway reactions were occurred in a same plant producing CHP, DCPO and bis-(tert-butylperoxy isopropyl) benzene peroxide (BIBP). The fourth fire and explosion occurred in the CHP reactor that resulted in a catastrophic damage in reaction region and even spread throughout storage area. Descriptions on the occurrences of these incidents were assessed by the features of processes, reaction schemes and unexpected side reactions. Calorimetric data on thermokinetics and pressure were used for explaining the practical consequences or which the worst cases encountered in this kind of plant. Acceptable risk associated with emergency relief system design is vital for a plant producing organic peroxide. These basic data for designing an inherently safer plant can be conducted from adiabatic calorimetry. An encouraging deduction has been drawn here, these incidents may be avoided by the implementation of API RP 520, API RP 521, DIERS technology, OSHA 1910.119 and AIChE's CCPS recommended PSM elements.

  13. Possibility Analysis of Chemical Explosion in Urea Reactor (I)%尿素合成塔化学爆炸的可能性分析(一)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈华民

    2015-01-01

    分析了可燃气爆炸极限图,阐述了尿素合成塔具备化学爆炸的条件。运用动、静态模型进行计算,对合成气爆炸性进行检验和判断。计算了尿素合成塔化学爆炸能量,探讨了点火源及爆炸过程。对几起尿素合成塔爆炸事故进行探讨,应用波的叠加现象分析了尿素合成塔的爆炸过程。%The flammable gas explosion limit diagram is analyzed, and chemical explosion conditions that urea reactor possesses are elaborated.Dynamic and static models are used to carry out calculation to verify and judge the explosiveness of syngas.The chemical explosion energy of urea reactor is calculated, the ignition source and the explosion process are discussed.Several urea reactor explosive accidents are discussed, the urea reactor explosion process is analyzed with the phenomena of superposition of waves.

  14. Calorimetric studies and lessons on fires and explosions of a chemical plant producing CHP and DCPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jing-Ming; Su, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Chiao-Ying; Duh, Yih-Shing

    2012-05-30

    Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) has been used in producing phenol, dicumyl peroxide (DCPO) and as an initiator for synthesizing acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin by copolymerization in Taiwan. Four incidents of fire and explosion induced by thermal runaway reactions were occurred in a same plant producing CHP, DCPO and bis-(tert-butylperoxy isopropyl) benzene peroxide (BIBP). The fourth fire and explosion occurred in the CHP reactor that resulted in a catastrophic damage in reaction region and even spread throughout storage area. Descriptions on the occurrences of these incidents were assessed by the features of processes, reaction schemes and unexpected side reactions. Calorimetric data on thermokinetics and pressure were used for explaining the practical consequences or which the worst cases encountered in this kind of plant. Acceptable risk associated with emergency relief system design is vital for a plant producing organic peroxide. These basic data for designing an inherently safer plant can be conducted from adiabatic calorimetry. An encouraging deduction has been drawn here, these incidents may be avoided by the implementation of API RP 520, API RP 521, DIERS technology, OSHA 1910.119 and AIChE's CCPS recommended PSM elements.

  15. Identification of Groundwater Nitrate Contamination from Explosives Used in Road Construction: Isotopic, Chemical, and Hydrologic Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James R; Böhlke, J K; Pelham, Krystle; Langlais, David M; Walsh, Gregory J

    2016-01-19

    Explosives used in construction have been implicated as sources of NO3(-) contamination in groundwater, but direct forensic evidence is limited. Identification of blasting-related NO3(-) can be complicated by other NO3(-) sources, including agriculture and wastewater disposal, and by hydrogeologic factors affecting NO3(-) transport and stability. Here we describe a study that used hydrogeology, chemistry, stable isotopes, and mass balance calculations to evaluate groundwater NO3(-) sources and transport in areas surrounding a highway construction site with documented blasting in New Hampshire. Results indicate various groundwater responses to contamination: (1) rapid breakthrough and flushing of synthetic NO3(-) (low δ(15)N, high δ(18)O) from dissolution of unexploded NH4NO3 blasting agents in oxic groundwater; (2) delayed and reduced breakthrough of synthetic NO3(-) subjected to partial denitrification (high δ(15)N, high δ(18)O); (3) relatively persistent concentrations of blasting-related biogenic NO3(-) derived from nitrification of NH4(+) (low δ(15)N, low δ(18)O); and (4) stable but spatially variable biogenic NO3(-) concentrations, consistent with recharge from septic systems (high δ(15)N, low δ(18)O), variably affected by denitrification. Source characteristics of denitrified samples were reconstructed from dissolved-gas data (Ar, N2) and isotopic fractionation trends associated with denitrification (Δδ(15)N/Δδ(18)O ≈ 1.31). Methods and data from this study are expected to be applicable in studies of other aquifers affected by explosives used in construction.

  16. Demonstrated Wavelength Portability of Raman Reference Data for Explosives and Chemical Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As Raman spectroscopy continues to evolve, questions arise as to the portability of Raman data: dispersive versus Fourier transform, wavelength calibration, intensity calibration, and in particular the frequency of the excitation laser. While concerns about fluorescence arise in the visible or ultraviolet, most modern (portable systems use near-infrared excitation lasers, and many of these are relatively close in wavelength. We have investigated the possibility of porting reference data sets from one NIR wavelength system to another: We have constructed a reference library consisting of 145 spectra, including 20 explosives, as well as sundry other compounds and materials using a 1064 nm spectrometer. These data were used as a reference library to evaluate the same 145 compounds whose experimental spectra were recorded using a second 785 nm spectrometer. In 128 cases of 145 (or 88.3% including 20/20 for the explosives, the compounds were correctly identified with a mean “hit score” of 954 of 1000. Adding in criteria for when to declare a correct match versus when to declare uncertainty, the approach was able to correctly categorize 134 out of 145 spectra, giving a 92.4% accuracy. For the few that were incorrectly identified, either the matched spectra were spectroscopically similar to the target or the 785 nm signal was degraded due to fluorescence. The results indicate that imported data recorded at a different NIR wavelength can be successfully used as reference libraries, but key issues must be addressed: the reference data must be of equal or higher resolution than the resolution of the current sensor, the systems require rigorous wavelength calibration, and wavelength-dependent intensity response should be accounted for in the different systems.

  17. Identification of groundwater nitrate contamination from explosives used in road construction: Isotopic, chemical, and hydrologic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James R.; Bohlke, John Karl; Pelham, Krystle; David M. Langlais,; Walsh, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Explosives used in construction have been implicated as sources of NO3– contamination in groundwater, but direct forensic evidence is limited. Identification of blasting-related NO3– can be complicated by other NO3– sources, including agriculture and wastewater disposal, and by hydrogeologic factors affecting NO3– transport and stability. Here we describe a study that used hydrogeology, chemistry, stable isotopes, and mass balance calculations to evaluate groundwater NO3– sources and transport in areas surrounding a highway construction site with documented blasting in New Hampshire. Results indicate various groundwater responses to contamination: (1) rapid breakthrough and flushing of synthetic NO3– (low δ15N, high δ18O) from dissolution of unexploded NH4NO3 blasting agents in oxic groundwater; (2) delayed and reduced breakthrough of synthetic NO3– subjected to partial denitrification (high δ15N, high δ18O); (3) relatively persistent concentrations of blasting-related biogenic NO3– derived from nitrification of NH4+ (low δ15N, low δ18O); and (4) stable but spatially variable biogenic NO3– concentrations, consistent with recharge from septic systems (high δ15N, low δ18O), variably affected by denitrification. Source characteristics of denitrified samples were reconstructed from dissolved-gas data (Ar, N2) and isotopic fractionation trends associated with denitrification (Δδ15N/Δδ18O ≈ 1.31). Methods and data from this study are expected to be applicable in studies of other aquifers affected by explosives used in construction.

  18. Thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosives using a mesoscopic reactive model under impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XinJie; Wu, YanQing; Huang, FengLei

    2017-01-05

    A mesoscopic framework is developed to quantify the thermal-mechanical-chemical responses of polymer-bonded explosive (PBX) samples under impact loading. A mesoscopic reactive model is developed for the cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) crystal, which incorporates nonlinear elasticity, crystal plasticity, and temperature-dependent chemical reaction. The proposed model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS by the user subroutine VUMAT. A series of three-dimensional mesoscale models were constructed and calculated under low-strength impact loading scenarios from 100m/s to 600m/s where only the first wave transit is studied. Crystal anisotropy and microstructural heterogeneity are responsible for the nonuniform stress field and fluctuations of the stress wave front. At a critical impact velocity (≥300m/s), a chemical reaction is triggered because the temperature contributed by the volumetric and plastic works is sufficiently high. Physical quantities, including stress, temperature, and extent of reaction, are homogenized from those across the microstructure at the mesoscale to compare with macroscale measurements, which will advance the continuum-level models. The framework presented in this study has important implications in understanding hot spot ignition processes and improving predictive capabilities in energetic materials.

  19. Long range standoff detection of chemical and explosive hazards on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Augustus Way, III; Christesen, Steven D.; Guicheteau, Jason A.; Pearman, William F.; Chyba, Tom

    2009-09-01

    Fielded surface detection systems rely on contact with either the liquid contamination itself or the associated chemical vapor above the contaminated surface and do not provide a standoff or remote detection capability. Conversely, standoff chemical vapor sensing techniques have not shown efficacy in detecting those contaminants as liquids or solids on surfaces. There are a number of optical or spectroscopic techniques that could be applied to this problem of standoff chemical detection on surfaces. The three techniques that have received the most interest and development are laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy. Details will be presented on the development of these techniques and their applicability to detecting CBRNE contamination on surfaces.

  20. Long-range standoff detection of chemical, biological, and explosive hazards on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Augustus Way, III; Guicheteau, Jason A.; Pearman, William F.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Christesen, Steven D.

    2010-04-01

    Fielded surface detection systems rely on contact with either the liquid contamination itself or the associated chemical vapor above the contaminated surface and do not provide a standoff or remote detection capability. Conversely, standoff chemical vapor sensing techniques have not shown efficacy in detecting those contaminants as liquids or solids on surfaces. There are a number of optical or spectroscopic techniques that could be applied to this problem of standoff chemical detection on surfaces. The three techniques that have received the most interest and development are laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy. Details will be presented on the development of these techniques and their applicability to detecting CBRNE contamination on surfaces.

  1. Hand-held portable desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion source for in situ analysis of nitroaromatic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Li, Anyin; Syed, Sarfaraz U; Smith, Barry; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-10-06

    A novel, lightweight (0.6 kg), solvent- and gas-cylinder-free, hand-held ion source based on desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization has been developed and deployed for the analysis of nitroaromatic explosives on surfaces in open air, offering portability for in-field analysis. A small, inexpensive, rechargeable lithium polymer battery was used to power the custom-designed circuitry within the device, which generates up to ±5 kV dc voltage to ignite a corona discharge plasma in air for up to 12 h of continuous operation, and allowing positive- and negative-ion mass spectrometry. The generated plasma is pneumatically transported to the surface to be interrogated by ambient air at a rate of 1-3.5 L/min, compressed using a small on-board diaphragm pump. The plasma source allows liquid or solid samples to be examined almost instantaneously without any sample preparation in the open environment. The advantages of low carrier gas and low power consumption (<6 W), as well as zero solvent usage, have aided in developing the field-ready, hand-held device for trigger-based, "near-real-time" sampling/ionization. Individual nitroaromatic explosives (such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) can be easily detected in amounts as low as 5.8 pg with a linear dynamic range of at least 10 (10-100 pg), a relative standard deviation of ca. 7%, and an R(2) value of 0.9986. Direct detection of several nitroaromatic compounds in a complex mixture without prior sample preparation is demonstrated, and their identities are confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns.

  2. Chemical sensors for classification of mine-like objects by identification of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    This paper briefly describes a prototype sensor for detecting land mines placed in shallow water. An automatic system was developed which incorporates chemical concentration technology, an ion mobility spectrometer, and control and fluid movement subsystems. The system design was successfully demonstrated using laboratory instruments and equipment. Components for the portable unit, which will weigh less than 20 pounds, have been fabricated; field demonstrations will be completed by spring 1998. 4 figs.

  3. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-05

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s.

  4. Chemical and explosives point detection through opaque containers using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, Paul W.; Maskall, Guy; Bonthron, Stuart; Bloomfield, Matthew; Tombling, Craig; Matousek, Pavel

    2011-05-01

    Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) is a novel technique used to identify the chemical Raman signature of threat materials within a few seconds through common non-metallic containers, including those containers which may not yield to inspection by conventional backscatter Raman. In particular, some opaque plastic containers and coloured glass bottles can be difficult to analyze using conventional backscatter Raman because the signal from the contents is often overwhelmed by the much stronger Raman signal and/or fluorescence originating from the container itself. SORS overcomes these difficulties and generates clean Raman spectra from both the container and the contents with no prior knowledge of either. This is achieved by making two, or more, Raman measurements at various offsets between the collection and illumination areas, each containing different proportions of the fingerprint signals from the container and content materials. Using scaled subtraction, or multivariate statistical methods, the two orthogonal signals can be separated numerically, thereby providing a clean Raman spectrum of the contents without contamination from the container. Consequently, SORS promises to significantly improve threat detection capability and decrease the falsealarm rate compared with conventional Raman spectroscopy making it considerably more suitable as an alarm resolution methodology (e.g. at airports). In this paper, the technique and method are described and a study of offset value optimization is described illustrating the difference between one and two fixed spatial offsets. It is concluded that two fixed offsets yield an improvement in the SORS measurement which will help maximize the threat detection capability.

  5. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  6. 汽油储罐化学爆炸事故后果模拟分析%Simulation Analysis of the Consequence of Chemical Gasoline Tank Explosion Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张啸

    2014-01-01

    一直以来,汽油储罐化学爆炸事故模型被用来评审加油站的安全评价报告,所以本文通过实际模拟计算来分析汽油储罐化学爆炸事故模型,以方便加油站进行安全管理。%Chemical gasoline tank explosion accident model has been used to review the safety assessment report of the gas station for a long time. So this article analyzes the chemical gasoline tank explosion model through the actual simulation to facilitate the gas station for safety management.

  7. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  8. Explosion in a rotary dryer at a chemical factory. Eikoku kagaku koho no kaiten kansoki no bakuhatsu jiko (shiryo kenkazai no netsubunkai boso hanno)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioji, Y. (Nippon Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-15

    This paper reports a dryer explosion and fire accident in the Dow Chemical {prime}s King {prime}s Lynn factory in Great Britain. Nine other accidents of dryers on the similar type are also reported to indicate the importance of advance evaluation on substances for their hazard. The subject accident occurred while a group leader was reporting a gushing sound and white smoke from the door of the dryer room at a little after 17:00 on June 27, 1976, an explosion bursted at 17:10 causing an immediate death of an operator due to a blast from the explosion. THE damage of the manufacturing equipment is estimated to have amounted to about 1.25 million pounds. The exolosion accident has occurred when the Zoalene (product name), a chicken feed additeve, has been left in a dryer in nearly a sealed condition for 27 hours after having been dried, its temperature was maintained at 120-130 {degree}C as a result of heat insulating effect of the insulators on the dryer. This caused a pyrolysis of the product, of which heat accelerated the pyrolysisand led to an explosion. One of the basic causes was that no safety evaluation technique has been established to predict danger of the drying operation. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Handheld and mobile hyperspectral imaging sensors for wide-area standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of targets in complex background with a high degree of autonomy. HSI is beneficial for the detection of threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Two HSI techniques that have proven to be valuable are Raman and shortwave infrared (SWIR) HSI. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have numerous size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations that make their potential integration onto a handheld or field portable platform difficult. The systems that are field-portable do so by sacrificing system performance, typically by providing an inefficient area search rate, requiring close proximity to the target for screening, and/or eliminating the potential to conduct real-time measurements. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focused on sensor design and detection results.

  10. Quantum chemical studies on three novel 1,2,4-triazole N-oxides as potential insensitive high explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Heming

    2014-09-01

    Three novel explosives were designed by introducing N-oxides into 1,2,4-triazole: 1-amino-3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole-2 N-oxide (ADT2NO), 1-amino-2,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole-3 N-oxide (ADT3NO), and 1-amino-3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole-4 N-oxide (ADT4NO). Their detonation performance and sensitivity were estimated by using density functional theory and compared with some famous explosives like 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) and 1-methyl-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNT). All three designed molecules are more powerful than HMX and less sensitive than TNT, indicating that ADT2NO, ADT3NO, and ADT4NO have high detonation performance as HMX and low sensitivity as TNT, making them being very valuable and may be considered as the potential candidates of insensitive high explosives. Properly introducing N-oxides into the energetic triazole derivatives can generate some superior energetic compounds with both high explosive performance and reduced sensitivity.

  11. Effects of charge design features on parameters of acoustic and seismic waves and cratering, for SMR chemical surface explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.

    2012-04-01

    A series of experimental on-surface shots was designed and conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range (SMR) in Negev desert, including two large calibration explosions: about 82 tons of strong IMI explosives in August 2009, and about 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources in different weather/wind conditions, for calibration of IMS infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Strong boosters and the upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide a reduced energy release to the ground and an enlarged energy radiation to the atmosphere, producing enhanced infrasound signals, for better observation at far-regional stations. The following observations and results indicate on the required explosives energy partition for this charge design: 1) crater size and local seismic (duration) magnitudes were found smaller than expected for these large surface explosions; 2) small test shots of the same charge (1 ton) conducted at SMR with different detonation directions showed clearly lower seismic amplitudes/energy and smaller crater size for the upward detonation; 3) many infrasound stations at local and regional distances showed higher than expected peak amplitudes, even after application of a wind-correction procedure. For the large-scale explosions, high-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. Empirical relations for air-blast parameters - peak pressure, impulse and the Secondary Shock (SS) time delay - depending on distance, were developed and analyzed. The parameters, scaled by the cubic root of estimated TNT equivalent charges, were found consistent for all analyzed explosions, except of SS

  12. Understanding Chemical Sensitivity and Surface Response in Detecting Trace Levels of Explosives Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    does not degrade contaminants on surfaces, a positive detection result leaves any explosives detected in place for subsequent forensic analysis...applications. Optical sum-frequency generation (SFG) has long been used for studying surface chemistry [Lambert et al., 2005; Shen, 2000]. SFG is...present on surfaces at low concentrations, surface selectivity and high sensitivity to surface chemistry are key advantages of VSFS in detecting HEs

  13. Influence of steaming explosion time on the physic-chemical properties of cellulose from Lespedeza stalks (Lespedeza crytobotrya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2009-11-01

    The synergistic effect of steam explosion pretreatment and sodium hydroxide post-treatment of Lespedeza stalks (Lespedeza crytobotrya) has been investigated in this study. In this case, Lespedeza stalks were firstly exploded at a fixed steam pressure (22.5 kg/m(2)) for 2-10 min. Then the steam-exploded Lespedeza stalks was extracted with 1 M NaOH at 50 degrees C for 3 h with a shrub to water ratio of 1:20 (g/ml), which yielded 57.3%, 53.1%, 55.4%, 52.8%, 53.2%, and 56.4% (% dry weight) cellulose rich fractions, comparing to 68.0% from non-steam-exploded material. The content of glucose in cellulose rich residues increased with increment of the steaming time and reached to 94.10% at the most severity. The similar increasing trend occurred during the dissolution of hemicelluloses. It is evident that at shorter steam explosion time, autohydrolysis mainly occurred on the hemicelluloses and the amorphous area of cellulose. The crystalline region of cellulose was depolymerized under a prolonged incubation time. The characteristics of the cellulose rich fractions in terms of FT-IR and CP/MAS (13)C NMR spectroscopy and thermal analysis were discussed, and the surface structure was also investigated by SEM.

  14. Exploring the Physical, Chemical and Thermal Characteristics of a New Potentially Insensitive High Explosive: RX-55-AE-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Turner, H C; Tran, T D

    2006-06-05

    Current work at the Energetic Materials Center, EMC, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes both understanding properties of old explosives and measuring properties of new ones [1]. The necessity to know and understand the properties of energetic materials is driven by the need to improve performance and enhance stability to various stimuli, such as thermal, friction and impact insult. This review will concentrate on the physical properties of RX-55-AE-5, which is formulated from heterocyclic explosive, 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide, LLM-105, and 2.5% Viton A. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure a specific heat capacity, C{sub p}, of {approx} 0.950 J/g{center_dot} C and a thermal conductivity, {kappa}, of {approx} 0.475 W/m{center_dot} C. The LLNL kinetics modeling code Kinetics05 and the Advanced Kinetics and Technology Solutions (AKTS) code Thermokinetics were both used to calculate Arrhenius kinetics for decomposition of LLM-105. Both obtained an activation energy barrier E {approx} 180 kJ mol{sup -1} for mass loss in an open pan. Thermal mechanical analysis, TMA, was used to measure the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The CTE for this formulation was calculated to be {approx} 61 {micro}m/m{center_dot} C. Impact, spark, friction are also reported.

  15. Yield and depth Estimation of Selected NTS Nuclear and SPE Chemical Explosions Using Source Equalization by modeling Local and Regional Seismograms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, C. K.; Roman-nieves, J. I.; Woods, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Source parameters of nuclear and chemical explosions are often estimated by matching either the corner frequency and spectral level of a single event or the spectral ratio when spectra from two events are available with known source parameters for one. In this study, we propose an alternative method in which waveforms from two or more events can be simultaneously equalized by setting the differential of the processed seismograms at one station from any two individual events to zero. The method involves convolving the equivalent Mueller-Murphy displacement source time function (MMDSTF) of one event with the seismogram of the second event and vice-versa, and then computing their difference seismogram. MMDSTF is computed at the elastic radius including both near and far-field terms. For this method to yield accurate source parameters, an inherent assumption is that green's functions for the any paired events from the source to a receiver are same. In the frequency limit of the seismic data, this is a reasonable assumption and is concluded based on the comparison of green's functions computed for flat-earth models at various source depths ranging from 100m to 1Km. Frequency domain analysis of the initial P wave is, however, sensitive to the depth phase interaction, and if tracked meticulously can help estimating the event depth. We applied this method to the local waveforms recorded from the three SPE shots and precisely determined their yields. These high-frequency seismograms exhibit significant lateral path effects in spectrogram analysis and 3D numerical computations, but the source equalization technique is independent of any variation as long as their instrument characteristics are well preserved. We are currently estimating the uncertainty in the derived source parameters assuming the yields of the SPE shots as unknown. We also collected regional waveforms from 95 NTS explosions at regional stations ALQ, ANMO, CMB, COR, JAS LON, PAS, PFO and RSSD. We are

  16. Portable SERS Instrument for Explosives Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    groundwater monitoring from a cone penetrometer (CPT) platform (5) Demonstrate improved capability for discriminating explosives versus colorimetry ...interference, and better discrimination of individual explosives compared to colorimetry • Applicability to virtually any environmental water...chemicals such as nitroaromatics or nitramines. While this makes colorimetry more generally applicable at explosive sites, it also limits the ability to

  17. A method of calculating of the thermodynamic properties and the composition of the explosion products of hydrocarbons and air under partial chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargatov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    We examined the approximate method to calculate composition and thermodynamic parameters of hydrocarbons-air nonequilibrium explosion products based on the assumption of the existence of a partial chemical equilibrium. With excellent accuracy of calculating thermodynamic properties and species mass fraction the respective stiff system of detailed kinetics differential equations can be replaced by the one differential equation or the two differential equations and a system of algebraic equations. This method is always consistent with the detailed kinetic mechanism. The constituent equations of the method were derived and the respective computer code written. We examine the applicability of the method by solving the test problem. The proposed method simulation results are in excellent agreement with the detailed kinetics model results corresponding the stiff ordinary differential equation solver including NO time histories.

  18. Imaging Detonations of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    of a high- pressure helium tank , a dump valve that exhausts the high- pressure gas to the gun breech, and a 25-mm-diameter, unrifled, 4.9-m-long gun...14. ABSTRACT The techniques and instrumentation presented in this report allow for mapping of temperature, pressure , chemical species, and...measurement in the explosive near- to far-field (0–500 charge diameters) of surface temperatures, peak air-shock pressures , some chemical species

  19. High Explosives Research and Development (HERD) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to provide high explosive formulation, chemical analysis, safety and performance testing, processing, X-ray, quality control and loading support for...

  20. Underground Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    continuous media including, thermal effects, electromagnetic and nuclear radiation, as well as the formation of different types of waves (shock...front’, sometimes called “hydrodynamic separation” together with reconstruction of the hydrodynamic flow due to formation of thermal boundary layer...of the charge; or pre-explosion excavation; or some other techniques. For loosening, dilatant , or retarc-producing explosions, the height of the

  1. Using the X-ray Morphologies of Young Supernova Remnants to Constrain Explosion Type, Ejecta Distribution, and Chemical Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Laura A; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Badenes, Carles; Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a complex class of sources, and their heterogeneous nature has hindered the characterization of their general observational properties. To overcome this challenge, we use statistical tools to analyze the Chandra X-ray images of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs. We apply two techniques, a power-ratio method (a multipole expansion) and wavelet-transform analysis, to measure the global and local morphological properties of the X-ray line and thermal emission in twenty-four SNRs. We find that Type Ia SNRs have statistically more spherical and mirror symmetric thermal X-ray emission than core-collapse (CC) SNRs. The ability to type SNRs based on thermal emission morphology alone enables, for the first time, the typing of SNRs with weak X-ray lines or with low-resolution spectra. We identify one source, SNR G344.7-0.1, as originating from a CC explosion that was previously unknown, and we confirm the tentative Type Ia classifications of G337.2-0.7 and G272.2-3.2. Although the g...

  2. In-Situ Real Time Detection of Explosive/Chemical Compounds in Mines Using Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    short range similar to metal detectors and ground penetrating radar systems. Although in some ways a limitation, the short range allows accurate...The QR result is orthogonal to the presently used methods of metal detection and ground penetrating radar , and therefore provides an ideal...5020 14.ABSTRACT This program was part of DARPA’s "Dog Nose" initiative to develop landmine detection technology based upon the chemical signature of

  3. Shock desensitizing of solid explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

  4. Explosive Start

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FRANCISCO; LITTLE

    2006-01-01

    I ducked involuntarily as the first set of explosions went off and made my way in double time to the street corner, where I had spotted an arcade that could be used for shelter. Running quickly in a crouched, military maneuver while inhaling gunpowder fumes, I was totally oblivious to the laughter and head-shaking coming

  5. Niche explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normark, Benjamin B; Johnson, Norman A

    2011-05-01

    The following syndrome of features occurs in several groups of phytophagous insects: (1) wingless females, (2) dispersal by larvae, (3) woody hosts, (4) extreme polyphagy, (5) high abundance, resulting in status as economic pests, (6) invasiveness, and (7) obligate parthenogenesis in some populations. If extreme polyphagy is defined as feeding on 20 or more families of hostplants, this syndrome is found convergently in several species of bagworm moths, tussock moths, root weevils, and 5 families of scale insects. We hypothesize that extreme polyphagy in these taxa results from "niche explosion", a positive feedback loop connecting large population size to broad host range. The niche explosion has a demographic component (sometimes called the "amplification effect" in studies of pathogens) as well as a population-genetic component, due mainly to the increased effectiveness of natural selection in larger populations. The frequent origins of parthenogenesis in extreme polyphages are, in our interpretation, a consequence of this increased effectiveness of natural selection and consequent reduced importance of sexuality. The niche explosion hypothesis makes detailed predictions about the comparative genomics and population genetics of extreme polyphages and related specialists. It has a number of potentially important implications, including an explanation for the lack of observed trade-offs between generalists and specialists, a re-interpretation of the ecological correlates of parthenogenesis, and a general expectation that Malthusian population explosions may be amplified by Darwinian effects.

  6. Fire Supervision and Inspection of Warehouse for Flammable and Explosive Chemicals%易燃易爆危险化学品储存场所的消防监督检查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣保华

    2013-01-01

      The warehouse of flammable and explosive chemicals has the high risk of disaster accidents, which caused great loss of property and casualty. It is important to strictly implement security measures of the fireproof, explosion-proof, waterproof, ventilation, cooling and so on to prevent fire and explosion accidents. So we must strengthen the fire supervision and inspection of the warehouse of flammable and explosive chemicals.%  易燃易爆危险化学品的储存场所,由于受到摩擦、挤压、震动、高(低)温、高(低)压、潮湿等因素的影响,常常引发越来越多的火灾、爆炸等灾害事故,造成了越来越大的损失和伤亡。严格落实防火、防爆、防潮、通风、降温等安全措施,对防止火灾和爆炸事故的发生,保障人民生命和财产安全,构建和谐社会,都具有十分重要的意义。因此,我们必须加强易燃易爆危险化学品储存场所的消防监督检查。

  7. Effects of steam-explosion pretreatment on chemical constitute and fiber conformation of bamboo%蒸汽爆破预处理对毛竹化学组成和纤维形态的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关莹; 高慧; 张龙娃

    2012-01-01

    Steam-explosion pretreatment technology was used for pretreating the bamboo in this paper. The difference of the chemical composition and fiber morphology of bamboo before and after the explosion was studied, and the degraded products were analyzed by using the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed: (l)After steam-explosion pretreatment, holocellulose content was substantially reduced, while cellulose content was relatively increased and the lignin content had a little change; (2)After steam-explosion pretreatment, the fiber length was reduced; others were some debris and cracks on the fiber surface, and the crystal-linity of the cellulose were increased obviously after steam-explosion; (3) Thirty-two compounds were identified in the steam-explosion liquid of bamboo extracted by ethyl acetate, and diethyl-pentanedioic acid ester was the main compound.%以毛竹为研究对象,采用蒸汽爆破法进行预处理并对爆破前后化学组成和纤维形态的变化进行分析,以及GC-MS技术对爆破后的降解产物进行鉴定.结果表明:(1)蒸汽爆破预处理使得半纤维素含量大幅度降低,纤维素含量相对增加,木质素含量稍有变化;(2)爆破后纤维长度降低,纤维表面明显有碎片和裂纹,爆破后的纤维相对结晶度明显提高;(3)毛竹爆破液的乙酸乙酯萃取物中,共鉴别出以戊二酸二乙酯为主的32种化合物.

  8. Explosive Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep K Sharma

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to describe the clinical and computed tomography features of 'explosive pleuritis', an entity first named by Braman and Donat in 1986, and to propose a case definition. A case report of a previously healthy, 45-year-old man admitted to hospital with acute onset pleuritic chest pain is presented. The patient arrived at the emergency room at 15:00 in mild respiratory distress; the initial chest x-ray revealed a small right lower lobe effusion. The subsequent clinical course in hospital was dramatic. Within 18 h of admission, he developed severe respiratory distress with oxygen desaturation to 83% on room air and dullness of the right lung field. A repeat chest x-ray, taken the morning after admission, revealed complete opacification of the right hemithorax. A computed tomography scan of the thorax demonstrated a massive pleural effusion with compression of pulmonary tissue and mediastinal shift. Pleural fluid biochemical analysis revealed the following concentrations: glucose 3.5 mmol/L, lactate dehydrogenase 1550 U/L, protein 56.98 g/L, amylase 68 U/L and white blood cell count 600 cells/mL. The pleural fluid cultures demonstrated light growth of coagulase-negative staphylococcus and viridans streptococcus, and very light growth of Candida albicans. Cytology was negative for malignant cells. Thoracotomy was performed, which demonstrated a loculated parapneumonic effusion that required decortication. The patient responded favourably to the empirical administration of intravenous levofloxacin and ceftriaxone, and conservative surgical methods in the management of the empyema. This report also discusses the patient's rapidly progressing pleural effusion and offers a potential case definition for explosive pleuritis. Explosive pleuritis is a medical emergency defined by the rapid development of a pleural effusion involving more than 90% of the hemithorax over 24 h, which causes compression of pulmonary tissue and

  9. Explosive Pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions associated with pneumonia (parapneumonic effusions are one of the most common causes of exudative pleural effusions in the world. Approximately 20 to 40% of patients hospitalized with pneumonia will have an accompanying pleural effusion. The term 'Explosive pleuritis' was originally described by Braman and Donat in 1986 as pleural effusions developing within hours of admission. We report a 38 years old male patient with minimal pleural effusion which progressed rapidly within one day to involve almost whole of the hemithorax. There were multiple loculations on ultrasonography of thorax. Pleural fluid was sero-sanguinous and revealed gram positive diplococcic. The patient improved with antibiotics and pigtail catheter drainage.

  10. Leidenfrost explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, F; Dorbolo, S

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing the behavior of Leidenfrost droplets composed by a mixture of water and surfactant (SDS, Sodium Dodecyl sulfate). When a droplet is released on a plate heated above a given temperature a thin layer of vapor isolates the droplet from the plate. The droplet levitates over the plate. This is called the Leidenfrost effect. In this work we study the influence of the addition of a surfactant on the Leidenfrost phenomenon. As the droplet evaporates the concentration of SDS rises up to two orders of magnitude over the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC). An unexpected and violent explosive behavior is observed. The video presents several explosions taken with a high speed camera (IDT-N4 at 30000 fps). All the presented experiments were performed on a plate heated at 300{\\deg}C. On the other hand, the initial quantity of SDS was tuned in two ways: (i) by varying the initial concentration of SDS and (ii) by varying the initial size of the droplet. By measuring the volume of th...

  11. 化工厂挥发类爆炸性气体泄漏检测系统的设计%Chemical Plant of Volatile Explosive Gas Leakage Detection System Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菲

    2012-01-01

    In view of the current traditional chemical plant dangerous gas leakage detection system, explosive gas and weak in multilayer explosive gas, under the condition of the traditional intelligent detection method is larger error problem. Designed a set of virtual instrument based on the smell of the traditional Chinese medicine quality of volatile measurement system, the use of gas sensor array front-end DATA acquisition, the USB-DATA AD816 DATA collector collect real-time signal to LabVIEW2009 for development platform, through improving k-means clustering of multilayer explosive gas clustering analysis, through the weak signal strengthen explosion, hybrid gas explosion signal effectively classification of measurement, and realize the chemical plant volatile explosive gas of leak detection, the experimental results show that the method can better detection function, overcome the disadvantages of traditional methods.%针对当前传统的化工厂危险气体泄漏检测系统中,在多层爆炸性气体和弱爆炸性气体的条件下,传统的智能检测方法存在较大误差的问题.设计了一套基于虚拟仪器的气味挥发类中药品质测量系统,利用气敏传感器组成阵列进行前端数据采集,采用USB-DATA AD816数据采集器实时采集信号,以LabVIEW2009为开发平台,通过改进K均值聚类对多层爆炸气体聚类分析,通过弱爆炸信号加强,对混合爆炸气体信号进行有效的分类测量,实现化工厂挥发类爆炸性气体泄漏检测,实验结果表明,该方法能够较好的实现检测功能,克服传统方法存在的弊端.

  12. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  13. Numerical computations of explosions in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chushkin, P. I.; Shurshalov, L. V.

    The development and the present-day state of the problem on numerical computations of explosions in gases are reviewed. In the first part, different one-dimensional cases are discussed: point explosion with counterpressure, blast-like expansion of volumes filled with a compressed hot gas, blast of charges of condensed explosive, explosion processes in real high-temperature air, in combustible detonating media and under action of other physical-chemical factors. In the second part devoted to two-dimensional flows, we consider explosion in the non-homogeneous atmosphere, blast of asymmetric charges, detonation in gas, explosion modelling of some cosmic phenomena (solar flares, the Tunguska meteorite). The survey includes about 110 works beginning with the first publications on the subject.

  14. Chaotic Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Tél, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    We investigate chaotic dynamical systems for which the intensity of trajectories might grow unlimited in time. We show that (i) the intensity grows exponentially in time and is distributed spatially according to a fractal measure with an information dimension smaller than that of the phase space,(ii) such exploding cases can be described by an operator formalism similar to the one applied to chaotic systems with absorption (decaying intensities), but (iii) the invariant quantities characterizing explosion and absorption are typically not directly related to each other, e.g., the decay rate and fractal dimensions of absorbing maps typically differ from the ones computed in the corresponding inverse (exploding) maps. We illustrate our general results through numerical simulation in the cardioid billiard mimicking a lasing optical cavity, and through analytical calculations in the baker map.

  15. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  16. Research progress in chemical reaction kinetics applied in confined explosions%化学反应动力学应用于约束爆炸的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟巍; 田宙

    2011-01-01

    The confined explosions may cause a high-temperature and high-pressure environment. Under such environment, the explosive products and oxygen in the air easily have very active chemical reactions. The research on the chemical reaction kinetics of the confined explosions can get more accurate parameters, such as total pressure, static pressure and total energy, so the physical phenomena including the thermal strain and the mechanics effect can be described more accurately. This is important to consummate the explosion phenomenology. Summarizing the research work at home and abroad, a brief introduction to the developed history and latest investigation on the chemical reaction kinetics applied in the confined explosions was given, and the research results obtained as well as the experimental and the numerical simulation methods were also presented. The focus was on the experimental studies and the numerical simulations of the small equivalent confined explosions, and some further study and problems were pointed out.%约束爆炸会产生高温高压环境,该环境下,爆炸产物和空气中的氧气等成分极易发生化学反应.研究约束爆炸中涉及到的化学反应动力学过程,将动力学过程的具体参数耦合到约束爆炸中,可以获得约束爆炸后密封容器或者密闭爆室内更精确的总压力、静态压力和爆炸释放的总热量值,进而更准确地描述约束爆炸中的热应变、力学效应等重要物理现象,对于完善爆炸现象学研究具有重要的意义.通过总结国内外在这方面的研究工作,介绍了在约束爆炸研究中引入化学反应动力学过程的发展历史和最新进展,取得的研究成果,以及进行实验采用的技术方案和数值模拟方法.重点介绍了在化爆小当量约束爆炸的研究中,考虑化学反应动力学过程的实验研究方法和数值模拟方法,并分析指出了一些有待进一步研究解决的问题.

  17. Rotationally resolved infrared spectra of the explosive bouquet compounds associated with C-4 explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasp, Trocia N.; Johnson, Tiffani; Sullivan, Michael N.; Reeve, Scott W.

    2011-05-01

    The explosive material known as Composition C4, or simply C4, is an RDX based military grade explosive. RDX itself possesses a negligible vapor pressure at room temperature suggesting it is not a good target for conventional instruments designed to detect vapor phase chemical compounds. Recent research with canines has indicated that a better approach for detecting explosive vapors such as C4 is to focus on a characteristic mixture of impurities associated with the material. These characteristic mixtures of impurity vapors are referred to by canine researchers as the explosive bouquet and are fairly unique to the specific energetic material. In this paper, we will examine and report rotationally resolved infrared spectral signatures for the known compounds comprising the explosive bouquet for C4 based explosives including isobutylene, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone.

  18. 78 FR 64246 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosives Materials AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF); Department of Justice. ACTION:...

  19. 化学发泡条件对乳化炸药性能的影响%Research on Impact Factors of Chemical Foaming of Emulsion Explosive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文艺; 任流润; 袁治雷; 杨亚军; 候万晶; 赵建平

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different sensitizing temperature,pH value of aqueous phase,blowing agent,accelerator selection and dosage period,as well as associated factors to the density and storage of emulsion explosives were examined. Results show that the best addition of NaNO2 was 1.1-1.2g to produce 1kg emulsion explosive.Under required process con-ditions,adding 46#oil could increase the yield of emulsion explosive without compromising the storage period.Sensitizing temperature at 40-50℃meets the production sensitization,use requirements.pH value of aqueous solutions should be con-trolled between 4.0 to 5.4;Through configuring compounds containing salts and an organic acid as accelerator,the storage period of the product can be extended;Selecting the appropriate charge way could make explosive density reach 1 .00-1 .20 g/cm3 .%通过试验,对比不同敏化温度、水相pH值、发泡剂用量、促进剂选择与用量以及应该注意的关联因素等对乳化炸药的密度、储存期的影响。结果表明,每生产1 kg乳化炸药,NaNO2的加入量在1.1~1.5 g为宜。在要求的工艺条件下,适当加入46#机油既可增加乳化炸药产率,又不会影响储存期;控制在40~50℃的敏化温度可以满足生产、使用的要求;水相溶液pH值应控制在4.0~5.4之间;使用盐类与有机酸复合配置的促进剂,可以延长产品的储存期;选择适当的装药方式,可使炸药密度达到1.00~1.20g/cm3的理想值。

  20. 75 FR 5545 - Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... storage of explosives incidental to that movement (49 CFR parts 171 to 180 and 397). The Bureau of Alcohol... transporting blasting agents; mixing water gel explosives; storing ammonium nitrate; and storing small...

  1. Cell phone explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Alok; Kanchan, Tanuj; Nepal, Samata; Pandey, Bhuwan Raj

    2016-03-01

    Cell phone explosions and resultant burn injuries are rarely reported in the scientific literature. We report a case of cell phone explosion that occurred when a young male was listening to music while the mobile was plugged in for charging.

  2. On the Violence of High Explosive Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarver, C M; Chidester, S K

    2004-02-09

    High explosive reactions can be caused by three general energy deposition processes: impact ignition by frictional and/or shear heating; bulk thermal heating; and shock compression. The violence of the subsequent reaction varies from benign slow combustion to catastrophic detonation of the entire charge. The degree of violence depends on many variables, including the rate of energy delivery, the physical and chemical properties of the explosive, and the strength of the confinement surrounding the explosive charge. The current state of experimental and computer modeling research on the violence of impact, thermal, and shock-induced reactions is reviewed.

  3. Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    NOV 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...2013www.ll.mit.edu Photoacoustic Sensing of Explosives (PHASE) is a promising new technology that detects trace explosive residues from significant... photoacoustic phenomena resulting from ultraviolet laser excitation. Exposed explosives are excited up to 100 meters away by using PHASE’s

  4. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Paula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined.

  5. Turbulent Combustion in SDF Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2009-11-12

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion and combustion of an aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with a continuum model for the dispersed phase, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by phenomenological models. It incorporates a combustion model based on the mass conservation laws for fuel, air and products; source/sink terms are treated in the fast-chemistry limit appropriate for such gasdynamic fields, along with a model for mass transfer from the particle phase to the gas. The model takes into account both the afterburning of the detonation products of the C-4 booster with air, and the combustion of the Al particles with air. The model equations were integrated by high-order Godunov schemes for both the gas and particle phases. Numerical simulations of the explosion fields from 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charge in a 6.6 liter calorimeter were used to validate the combustion model. Then the model was applied to 10-kg Al-SDF explosions in a an unconfined height-of-burst explosion. Computed pressure histories are compared with measured waveforms. Differences are caused by physical-chemical kinetic effects of particle combustion which induce ignition delays in the initial reactive blast wave and quenching of reactions at late times. Current simulations give initial insights into such modeling issues.

  6. Development of a new QSPR based tool to predict explosibility properties of chemical substances within the framework of REACH and GHS

    OpenAIRE

    Fayet, Guillaume; ROTUREAU, Patricia; Joubert, Laurent; Adamo, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The new European régulation of Chemicals named REACH (for "Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals") turned out in the practical registration phase in December 2008. It requires the new assessment of hazard properties for up to 140000 substances. In this context, the development of alternative prédictive methods for assessing hazardous properties of chemical substances is promoted in REACH and in the related new European classification System of substan...

  7. Simulating thermal explosion of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, Jack J.; McClelland, Matthew A.; Maienschein, Jon L.; Wardell, Jeffrey F.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2005-04-01

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical, and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives (HEs) are heated at a rate of 1°C/h until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydrotime scale. During the preignition phase, quasistatic mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydrodynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in larger scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HEs are predicted to within 5°C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  8. Simulating thermal explosion of RDX-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Tarver, C M

    2004-10-11

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two RDX-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in large scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 5 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  9. Investigation of the chemical explosion of an ion exchange resin column and resulting americium contamination of personnel in the 242-Z building, August 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-19

    As a result of an explosion in the Waste Treatment Facility, 242-Z Building, 200 West Area of the Hanford Reservation on August 30, 1976, the Manager of the Richland Operations Office (RL), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), appointed an ERDA Committee to conduct a formal investigation and to prepare a report on their findings of this occurrence. The Committee was instructed to conduct the investigation in accordance with ERDAMC 0502, insofar as circumstances would permit, to cover and explain technical elements of the casual sequence(s) of the occurrence, and to describe management systems which should have or could have prevented the occurrence. This report is the result of the investigation and presents the conclusions of the review.

  10. Explosion characteristics of flammable organic vapors in nitrous oxide atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiba, Yusuke; Takigawa, Tomihisa; Matsuoka, Yusaku; Ohtani, Hideo

    2010-11-15

    Despite unexpected explosion accidents caused by nitrous oxide have occurred, few systematic studies have been reported on explosion characteristics of flammable gases in nitrous oxide atmosphere compared to those in air or oxygen. The objective of this paper is to characterize explosion properties of mixtures of n-pentane, diethyl ether, diethylamine, or n-butyraldehyde with nitrous oxide and nitrogen using three parameters: explosion limit, peak explosion pressure, and time to the peak explosion pressure. Then, similar mixtures of n-pentane, diethyl ether, diethylamine, or n-butyraldehyde with oxygen and nitrogen were prepared to compare their explosion characteristics with the mixtures containing nitrous oxide. The explosion experiments were performed in a cylindrical vessel at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The measurements showed that explosion ranges of the mixtures containing nitrous oxide were narrow compared to those of the mixtures containing oxygen. On the other hand, the maximum explosion pressures of the mixtures containing nitrous oxide were higher than those of the mixtures containing oxygen. Moreover, our experiments revealed that these mixtures differed in equivalence ratios at which the maximum explosion pressures were observed: the pressures of the mixtures containing nitrous oxide were observed at stoichiometry; in contrast, those of the mixtures containing oxygen were found at fuel-rich area. Chemical equilibrium calculations confirmed these behaviors.

  11. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  12. Influence of Steam Explosion on Physical-Chemical Characteristic of Corn Stalk%蒸汽爆破对玉米秸秆理化特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任天宝; 徐桂转; 马孝琴; 于政道; 宋安东; 张百良

    2012-01-01

    在木质纤维素研究领域,对其理化特性进行深入研究有利于资源化开发利用。基于热解实验、傅立叶红外光谱、X射线衍射和扫描电镜分析方法,针对玉米秸秆蒸汽爆破后理化特性的变化进行了研究。结果表明:玉米秸秆蒸汽爆破后热解区域比对照具有更宽的温度范围,最大热分解速率显著提高,反应活化能降低16.25%;木质纤维素特征官能团所对应的特征峰吸收强度差异显著;细胞壁的层次结构破碎化,纤维素结晶度降低14.57%。在此基础上构建了蒸汽爆破过程机理模型。实验结果表明:蒸汽爆破对木质纤维素类材料理化特性的改变有显著影响。%In the research fields of lignocellulosic materials,the physical-chemical properties are an important foundation for the resource conversion.Employing thermal gravimetric analysis,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods,physical-chemical properties changes of steam exploded corn stalk were studied.The results of analysis showed that pyrolysis region of steam exploded corn stalk had a wider temperature range compared with the control substance,during which the maximum self-heating rate increased significantly and activation energies(E) decreased by 16.25%.The characteristic peak absorption intensity was significantly different.The hierarchical structure of the cell wall was completely destroyed,and crystallinity of lignocellulose decreased by 14.57%.Based on this analysis,a mechanism model of steam explosion pretreatment was constructed.The results indicate that physical-chemical properties of corn stalk are significantly affected by steam explosion pretreatment.

  13. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  14. Explosions and static electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of electrostatic discharges as causes of ignition of vapor/gas and dust/gas mixtures. A series of examples of static-caused explosions will be discussed. The concepts of explosion limits, the incendiveness of various discharge types and safe voltages are explained...

  15. Does the chemical signature of TYC 8442-1036-1 originate from a rotating massive star that died in a faint explosion?

    CERN Document Server

    Cescutti, G; François, P; Chiappini, C; Depagne, E; Christlieb, N; Cortés, C

    2016-01-01

    Context. We have recently investigated the origin of chemical signatures observed in Galactic halo stars by means of a stochastic chemical evolution model. We have found that rotating massive stars are a promising way to explain several signatures observed in these fossil stars. Aims. In the present paper we discuss how the extremely metal-poor halo star TYC 8442-1036-1, for which we have now obtained detailed abundances from VLT-UVES spectra, fits into the framework of our previous work. Methods. We apply a standard 1D LTE analysis to the spectrum of this star. We measure the abundances of 14 chemical elements; for Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn we compute the abundances using equivalent widths; for C, Sr and Ba we obtain the abundances by means of synthetic spectra generated by MOOG. Results. We find an abundance of [Fe/H]= $-$3.5 $\\pm$0.13 dex based on our high resolution spectrum; this points to an iron content lower by a factor of three (0.5 dex) compared to the one obtained by a low resolu...

  16. Does the chemical signature of TYC 8442-1036-1 originate from a rotating massive star that died in a faint explosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescutti, G.; Valentini, M.; François, P.; Chiappini, C.; Depagne, E.; Christlieb, N.; Cortés, C.

    2016-11-01

    Context. We have recently investigated the origin of chemical signatures observed in Galactic halo stars by means of a stochastic chemical evolution model. We found that rotating massive stars are a promising way to explain several signatures observed in these fossil stars. Aims: We discuss how the extremely metal-poor halo star TYC 8442-1036-1, for which we have now obtained detailed abundances from VLT-UVES spectra, fits into the framework of our previous work. Methods: We applied a standard one-dimensional (1D) LTE analysis to the spectrum of this star. We measured the abundances of 14 chemical elements; we computed the abundances for Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn using equivalent widths; we obtained the abundances for C, Sr, and Ba by means of synthetic spectra generated by MOOG. Results: We find an abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.5 ±0.13 dex based on our high-resolution spectrum; this points to an iron content that is lower by a factor of three (0.5 dex) compared to that obtained by a low-resolution spectrum. The star has a [C/Fe] = 0.4 dex, and it is not carbon enhanced like most of the stars at this metallicity. Moreover, this star lies in the plane [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] in a relatively unusual position, shared by a few other Galactic halo stars, which is only marginally explained by our past results. Conclusions: The comparison of the model results with the chemical abundance characteristics of this group of stars can be improved if we consider in our model the presence of faint supernovae coupled with rotating massive stars. These results seem to imply that rotating massive stars and faint supernovae scenarios are complementary to each other, and are both required in order to match the observed chemistry of the earliest phases of the chemical enrichment of the Universe. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (ID 094.B-0781(A); P.I. G. Cescutti).

  17. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  18. Photoluminescent Detection of Dissolved Underwater Trace Explosives

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A portable, rapid, and economical method for in situ trace explosive detection in aqueous solutions was demonstrated using photoluminescence. Using europium/thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the reagent, dissolved nitroglycerin was fluorescently tagged and detected in seawater solutions without sample preparation, drying, or preconcentration. The chemical method was developed in a laboratory setting and demonstrated in a flow-through configuration using lightweight, inexpensive, commercial component...

  19. Effects of Particle Beams on Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    the primary explosives do not demonstrate an ignition energy dependance on confinement. The threshold energies are: Lead azide, 24 cal/gm; Lead...This result demonstrates the strong dependance of ignition threshold on confinement. The chemical and physical changes resulting from irradiation can

  20. Research on the Low Detonation Velocity Explosives Containing Nitroesters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Some explosive mixtures detonating at low velocity were experimentally investigated. Detonation velocity and critical diameter were measured for mixtures,being different in composition and density. An attempt of physical and chemical interpretation of results obtained is also included.

  1. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  2. Effect of Steam Explosion Pretreatment on Bamboo for Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqiang Li; Benhua Fei; Zehui Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on the steam explosion pretreatment that has been applied to other types of lignocellulosic biomass, the steam explosion pretreatment of bamboo, along with a study of the chemical compositions and enzymatic hydrolyzability of substrates, was conducted. The results show that steam explosion pretreatment can greatly enhance the cellulose-to-glucose conversion yield after enzymatic hydrolysis, which is sometimes affected by bamboo age and steam explosion conditions. When the steam explosio...

  3. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  4. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  5. Explosion suppression system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  6. Constraints on eruption dynamics of basaltic explosive activity derived from chemical and microtextural study: The example of the Fontana Lapilli Plinian eruption, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, L.; Houghton, B. F.; Bonadonna, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fontana Lapilli deposit is one of very few examples of basaltic Plinian eruptions discovered so far. Juvenile clasts have uniform chemical composition and moderate ranges of density and bulk vesicularity. However, clast populations include two textural varieties which are microlite-poor and microlite-rich respectively. These two clast types have the same clast density range, making a distinction impossible on that base alone. The high bubble number density (˜ 10 7 cm - 3 ) and small bubble population of the Fontana clasts suggest that the magma underwent coupled degassing following rapid decompression and fast ascent rate, leading to non-equilibrium degassing with continuous nucleation as it is common for silicic analogues. The Fontana products have lower microlite contents (10-60 vol.%) with respect to the other documented basaltic Plinian eruptions suggesting that the brittle fragmentation, implied for the other basaltic Plinian deposits, does not apply to the Fontana products and another fragmentation mechanism led the basaltic magma to erupt in a Plinian fashion.

  7. 化工园区初始火灾爆炸引发连锁事故概率研究%Probability of the chain-fire accidents originated from the explosion in chemical industry parks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪德; 崔铁军

    2011-01-01

    The paper is inclined to present a simulated model for predicting the probability of chain-fire accidents caused by the explosion in chemical industry parks based on the analysis of the fire and explosion liability of the oil tanks over there. Careful study of the Domino Effect of the accidents helps us to confirm that the main physical effects of the chain accidents taking place in such parks are the explosion of incontrollable vapor clouds and the pool fires. To make the problem clearer, we have drawn the curves of the shock-waves in relation with the accident distance and the heat radiation with the distance by using MATLAB technology. At the same time, we have also worked out the probability curve of the overpressure with the damage, and that of the heat radiation with the damage. The fitting of the two groups of curves has enabled us to establish the connection between the objective hazardous sources affected and the original hazardous sources themselves, which may in turn promote the building-up of the connection between the hazardous material sources with the original hazardous sources, that is, the probability matrixes, on the basis of which we have worked out the accident probabilities of the hazardous oil tanks in a given affected field of the fire and the explosion. In so doing, it is possible for us to deduce the likely chain effects and the probability of the accidents in advance, which enabled us to prepare essential preventive methods. The example analysis shows that the probability of the chain accidents can be affected by the physical and chemical properties of the hazardous material sources in the field, the geographical location and the solidness of the container of the material. Corresponding relationship of the accident probabilities has been established with the MATLAB. Differences of the correspondent relationship or the accident order may in turn lead to the difference of the probabilities of the chain accidents. The above considerations may

  8. Explosion containment device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedick, William B.; Daniel, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an explosives storage container for absorbing and containing the blast, fragments and detonation products from a possible detonation of a contained explosive. The container comprises a layer of distended material having sufficient thickness to convert a portion of the kinetic energy of the explosion into thermal energy therein. A continuous wall of steel sufficiently thick to absorb most of the remaining kinetic energy by stretching and expanding, thereby reducing the momentum of detonation products and high velocity fragments, surrounds the layer of distended material. A crushable layer surrounds the continuous steel wall and accommodates the stretching and expanding thereof, transmitting a moderate load to the outer enclosure. These layers reduce the forces of the explosion and the momentum of the products thereof to zero. The outer enclosure comprises a continuous pressure wall enclosing all of the layers. In one embodiment, detonation of the contained explosive causes the outer enclosure to expand which indicates to a visual observer that a detonation has occurred.

  9. Toward Improved Fidelity of Thermal Explosion Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L; Becker, R; Howard, W M; Wemhoff, A

    2009-07-17

    We will present results of an effort to improve the thermal/chemical/mechanical modeling of HMX based explosive like LX04 and LX10 for thermal cook-off. The original HMX model and analysis scheme were developed by Yoh et.al. for use in the ALE3D modeling framework. The current results were built to remedy the deficiencies of that original model. We concentrated our efforts in four areas. The first area was addition of porosity to the chemical material model framework in ALE3D that is used to model the HMX explosive formulation. This is needed to handle the roughly 2% porosity in solid explosives. The second area was the improvement of the HMX reaction network, which included the inclusion of a reactive phase change model base on work by Henson et.al. The third area required adding early decomposition gas species to the CHEETAH material database to develop more accurate equations of state for gaseous intermediates and products. Finally, it was necessary to improve the implicit mechanics module in ALE3D to more naturally handle the long time scales associated with thermal cook-off. The application of the resulting framework to the analysis of the Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) experiments will be discussed.

  10. Explosion models, light curves, spectra and H$_{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Höflich, P; Wheeler, J C; Nomoto, K; Thielemann, F K

    1996-01-01

    From the spectra and light curves it is clear that SNIa are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs. However, details of the explosion are highly under debate. Here, we present detailed models which are consistent with respect to the explosion mechanism, the optical and infrared light curves (LC), and the spectral evolution. This leaves the description of the burning front and the structure of the white dwarf as the only free parameters. The explosions are calculated using one-dimensional Lagrangian codes including nuclear networks. Subsequently, optical and IR-LCs are constructed. Detailed NLTE-spectra are computed for several instants of time using the density, chemical and luminosity structure resulting from the LCs. The general methods and critical tests are presented (sect. 2). Different models for the thermonuclear explosion are discussed including detonations deflagrations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations (PDD) and helium detonations (sect.3). Comparisons between theoretical and obs...

  11. A real explosion: the requirement of steam explosion pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhengdao; Zhang, Bailiang; Yu, Fuqiang; Xu, Guizhuan; Song, Andong

    2012-10-01

    The severity factor is a common term used in steam explosion (SE) pretreatment that describes the combined effects of the temperature and duration of the pretreatment. However, it ignores the duration of the explosion process. This paper describes a new parameter, the explosion power density (EPD), which is independent of the severity factor. Furthermore, we present the adoption of a 5m(3) SE model for a catapult explosion mode, which completes the explosion within 0.0875 s. The explosion duration ratio of this model to a conventional model of the same volume is 1:123. The comparison between the two modes revealed a qualitative change by explosion speed, demonstrating that this real explosion satisfied the two requirements of consistency, and suggested a guiding mechanism for the design of SE devices.

  12. Explosives Safety Competency Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    Munitions Systems Journeyman CDC—AFSC 2W051 Combat Ammunition Planning and Production—AFCOMAC Munitions Systems Craftsman Course—AFSC 2W071 Combat...Ammunition Planning and Production—AFCOMAC Munitions Systems Craftsman Course—AFSC 2W071 Navy Basics of Naval Explosives Hazard Control—AMMO-18 b

  13. Explosions during galaxy formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Martel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available As an idealized model of the e ects of energy release by supernovae during galaxy formation, we consider an explosion at the center of a halo which forms at the intersection of laments in the plane of a cosmological pancake by gravitational instability during pancake collapse. Such halos resemble the virialized objects found in N{body simulations in a CDM universe and, therefore, serve as a convenient, scale{free test{bed model for galaxy formation. ASPH=P3M simulations reveal that such explosions are anisotropic. The energy and metals are channeled into the low density regions, away from the pancake plane. The pancake remains essentially undisturbed, even if the explosion is strong enough to blow away all the gas lo- cated inside the halo at the onset of the explosion and reheat the IGM surrounding the pancake. Infall quickly replenishes this ejected gas and gradually restores the gas fraction as the halo mass continues to grow. Estimates of the collapse epoch and SN energy{release for galaxies of di erent mass in the CDM model can re- late these results to scale{dependent questions of blow{out and blow{away and their implication for early IGM heating and metal enrichment and the creation of dark{matter{dominated dwarf galaxies.

  14. Conventional Weapons Underwater Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    te that the heat of detonation (the energy available per mass of explosive) is an increasing function of the aluminum content. As shown in Table 2...the heat of detonation of RDX is 6.15 MJ/kg; addition of 30 wt % Al increases this to 10.12 - a factor of 1.64. Fig. 12 indicates a bubble energy

  15. The Information Explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, William

    Three facets of the media--events, myths, and sales pitches--constitute the most important lines of force taken by the information bombardment which all of us encounter and are influenced by every day. The focus of this book is on the changes created and hastened by this information explosion of the media bombardment: how we can live with them,…

  16. Portable raman explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Heat Explosion With Convection In Porous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Allali, Karam; Bikany, Fouad; Taik, Ahmed; Volpert, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the interaction between natural convection and heat explosion in porous media. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Darcy law. Stationary and oscillating convection regimes and oscillating heat explosion are observed. The models with quasi-stationary and unstationary Darcy equation are compared.

  18. Numerical simulations of heat explosion with convection in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Allali, Karam; Bikany, Fouad; Taik, Ahmed; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this article, we study the interaction between natural convection and heat explosion in porous media. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Darcy law. Stationary and oscillating convection regimes and oscillating heat explosion are observed. The models with quasi-stationary and unstationary Darcy equation are compared.

  19. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  20. Characteristic Research on Evaporated Explosive Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The evaporation source of evaporated explosive was designed and improved based on the inherent specialties of explosive. The compatibility of explosives and addition agent with evaporation vessels was analyzed. The influence of substrate temperature on explosive was analyzed, the control method of substrate temperature was suggested. The influences of evaporation rate on formation of explosive film and mixed explosive film were confirmed. Optimum evaporation rate for evaporation explosive and the better method for evaporating mixed explosive were presented. The necessary characteristics of the evaporated explosive film were obtained by the research of the differences between the evaporated explosive and other materials.

  1. Explosive bulk charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  2. Overview of Explosive Initiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Primary Explosives Lead Azide Lead azide came to prominence around the 1920’s, owing largely to its unique blend of performance and...as its basic nature does not encourage lead azide’s tendency UNCLASSIFIED Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 5 toward...fig. 4, top). This fuse is usually a long, flexible plastic or rubber tube filled with a pyrotechnic composition such as black powder, allowing

  3. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Higashimori, Katsuaki; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This ...

  4. 道化学火灾、爆炸危险指数法在1,3丁二烯聚合安全性评价中的应用%Application of dow chemical fires and explosive index analysis method in safety evaluation of 1,3 butadiene polymerization process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽敏; 翟润培; 孙友平; 吕彩霞

    2012-01-01

    道化学火灾、爆炸危险指数法是在化工领域中广泛应用的一种评价方法,根据该法制定的指数选取规则,可对工艺单元火灾爆炸危险性进行量化和分级.以某化工厂3000t/a三聚体生产项目为背景,从工艺过程、危险物质、安全设施设计等方面,对1,3丁二烯聚合过程火灾、爆炸危险性进行分析;定量评价工艺装置及所含物料潜在危险性,得出主装置区、储罐区固有危险等级,分析不同状态下安全补偿系数对降低危险等级的影响,提出相应安全对策措施.%Dow chemical fires and explosive index analysis method is a widely used evaluation method in the field of chemical industry. According to the index selection rules, the fire explosion risk of the technics cell could be quantitated and classified. In this paper,taking the project of 3000t/a trimer production in a chemical factory as the background, the fire explosion hazard in the polymerization process of 1,3 butadiene was analyzed on the process, dangerous substances, safety facilities design and other aspects. According to the quantitative evaluation of the potentially danger for process units and materials, the intrinsic danger levels of main plant area and tank farm were obtained and some safety countermeasures were put forward by analyzing the effect of security compensation factor on danger level in different condition.

  5. Aluminum-Enhanced Underwater Electrical Discharges for Steam Explosion Triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOGELAND, STEVE R.; NELSON, LLOYD S.; ROTH, THOMAS CHRISTOPHER

    1999-07-01

    For a number of years, we have been initiating steam explosions of single drops of molten materials with pressure and flow (bubble growth) transients generated by discharging a capacitor bank through gold bridgewires placed underwater. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the field of steam explosions, however, have made it important to substantially increase these relatively mild transients in water without using high explosives, if possible. To do this with the same capacitor bank, we have discharged similar energies through tiny strips of aluminum foil submerged in water. By replacing the gold wires with the aluminum strips, we were able to add the energy of the aluminum-water combustion to that normally deposited electrically by the bridgewire explosion in water. The chemical enhancement of the explosive characteristics of the discharges was substantial: when the same electrical energies were discharged through the aluminum strips, peak pressures increased as much as 12-fold and maximum bubble volumes as much as 5-fold above those generated with the gold wires. For given weights of aluminum, the magnitudes of both parameters appeared to exceed those produced by the underwater explosion of equivalent weights of high explosives.

  6. INTEGRATION OF KRAFT PULPING ON A FOREST BIOREFINERY BY THE ADDITION OF A STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Martin-Sampedro; Maria E. Eugenio; Esteban Revilla; Juan A. Martin; J. Carlos Villar

    2011-01-01

    Steam explosion has been proposed for a wide range of lignocellulosic applications, including fractionation of biomass, pre-treatment of biomass for ethanol production, or as an alternative to conventional mechanical pulping. Nevertheless, a steam explosion process could also be used as pretreatment before chemical pulping, expecting a reduction in cooking time due to the open structure of the exploded chips. Thus, to evaluate the effect of steam explosion as a pretreatment in the kraft pulpi...

  7. Steam refining as an alternative to steam explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Fokko; Westereng, Bjørge; Horn, Svein J; Puls, Jürgen; Saake, Bodo

    2012-05-01

    In steam pretreatment the defibration is usually achieved by an explosion at the end of the treatment, but can also be carried out in a subsequent refiner step. A steam explosion and a steam refining unit were compared by using the same raw material and pretreatment conditions, i.e. temperature and time. Smaller particle size was needed for the steam explosion unit to obtain homogenous slurries without considerable amounts of solid chips. A higher amount of volatiles could be condensed from the vapour phase after steam refining. The results from enzymatic hydrolysis showed no significant differences. It could be shown that, beside the chemical changes in the cell wall, the decrease of the particle size is the decisive factor to enhance the enzymatic accessibility while the explosion effect is not required.

  8. EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolphi, John Joseph

    2012-04-01

    The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

  9. Copper Nanoparticle Synthesis By The Wire Explosion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Tay, W. H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.; Ahmad, Z.

    2009-07-01

    Wire explosion technique is performed by passing a high power pulsed current through a metallic wire to disintegrate it through Joule heating effect. In this work, the production of nanoparticles by the wire explosion technique has been investigated. Copper wires with a diameter of 125 μm and a length of 3.5 cm are exploded in air at two different pressures, namely, 1 bar and 10-2 mbar. Particles produced from the wire explosion are collected for characterization. The characterization of the particles is done by using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays (EDAX). The morphology and chemical composition of the particles produced at the two different pressures are compared. Discharge current and optical emission spectra of the wire explosion at the two pressures are also presented.

  10. Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Vasyunin, A; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01

    The problem of impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically, with the aim to better understand leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. It is rigorously shown that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., heating of mantles by cosmic rays), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number $\\lambda$. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: When $\\lambda$ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain -- this regime is commonly known as the whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of the physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, the calculations suggest tha...

  11. Nanosensors for trace explosive detection

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, co...

  12. Green primary explosives: 5-nitrotetrazolato-N2-ferrate hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, My Hang V; Coburn, Michael D; Meyer, Thomas J; Wetzler, Modi

    2006-07-05

    The sensitive explosives used in initiating devices like primers and detonators are called primary explosives. Successful detonations of secondary explosives are accomplished by suitable sources of initiation energy that is transmitted directly from the primaries or through secondary explosive boosters. Reliable initiating mechanisms are available in numerous forms of primers and detonators depending upon the nature of the secondary explosives. The technology of initiation devices used for military and civilian purposes continues to expand owing to variations in initiating method, chemical composition, quantity, sensitivity, explosive performance, and other necessary built-in mechanisms. Although the most widely used primaries contain toxic lead azide and lead styphnate, mixtures of thermally unstable primaries, like diazodinitrophenol and tetracene, or poisonous agents, like antimony sulfide and barium nitrate, are also used. Novel environmentally friendly primary explosives are expanded here to include cat[Fe(II)(NT)(3)(H(2)O)(3)], cat(2)[Fe(II)(NT)(4)(H(2)O)(2)], cat(3)[Fe(II)(NT)(5)(H(2)O)], and cat(4)[Fe(II)(NT)(6)] with cat = cation and NT(-) = 5-nitrotetrazolato-N(2). With available alkaline, alkaline earth, and organic cations as partners, four series of 5-nitrotetrazolato-N(2)-ferrate hierarchies have been prepared that provide a plethora of green primaries with diverse initiating sensitivity and explosive performance. They hold great promise for replacing not only toxic lead primaries but also thermally unstable primaries and poisonous agents. Strategies are also described for the systematic preparation of coordination complex green primaries based on appropriate selection of ligands, metals, and synthetic procedures. These strategies allow for maximum versatility in initiating sensitivity and explosive performance while retaining properties required for green primaries.

  13. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence.

  14. Multi-scale Computer Simulations to Study the Reaction Zone of Solid Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2006-06-23

    We have performed computer simulations at several different characteristic length scales to study the coupled mechanical, thermal, and chemical behavior of explosives under shock and other pressure loadings. Our objective is to describe the underlying physics and chemistry of the hot-spot theory for solid explosives, with enough detail to make quantitative predictions of the expected result from a given pressure loading.

  15. Laser machining of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Michael D.; Stuart, Brent C.; Banks, Paul S.; Myers, Booth R.; Sefcik, Joseph A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention consists of a method for machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of explosives (e.g., TNT, TATB, PETN, RDX, etc.). By using pulses of a duration in the range of 5 femtoseconds to 50 picoseconds, extremely precise and rapid machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. In this method, material is removed by a nonthermal mechanism. A combination of multiphoton and collisional ionization creates a critical density plasma in a time scale much shorter than electron kinetic energy is transferred to the lattice. The resulting plasma is far from thermal equilibrium. The material is in essence converted from its initial solid-state directly into a fully ionized plasma on a time scale too short for thermal equilibrium to be established with the lattice. As a result, there is negligible heat conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond a few microns from the laser machined surface. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces. There is no detonation or deflagration of the explosive in the process and the material which is removed is rendered inert.

  16. Controlled by Distant Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    VLT Automatically Takes Detailed Spectra of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Only Minutes After Discovery A time-series of high-resolution spectra in the optical and ultraviolet has twice been obtained just a few minutes after the detection of a gamma-ray bust explosion in a distant galaxy. The international team of astronomers responsible for these observations derived new conclusive evidence about the nature of the surroundings of these powerful explosions linked to the death of massive stars. At 11:08 pm on 17 April 2006, an alarm rang in the Control Room of ESO's Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile. Fortunately, it did not announce any catastrophe on the mountain, nor with one of the world's largest telescopes. Instead, it signalled the doom of a massive star, 9.3 billion light-years away, whose final scream of agony - a powerful burst of gamma rays - had been recorded by the Swift satellite only two minutes earlier. The alarm was triggered by the activation of the VLT Rapid Response Mode, a novel system that allows for robotic observations without any human intervention, except for the alignment of the spectrograph slit. ESO PR Photo 17a/07 ESO PR Photo 17a/07 Triggered by an Explosion Starting less than 10 minutes after the Swift detection, a series of spectra of increasing integration times (3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 minutes) were taken with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), mounted on Kueyen, the second Unit Telescope of the VLT. "With the Rapid Response Mode, the VLT is directly controlled by a distant explosion," said ESO astronomer Paul Vreeswijk, who requested the observations and is lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "All I really had to do, once I was informed of the gamma-ray burst detection, was to phone the staff astronomers at the Paranal Observatory, Stefano Bagnulo and Stan Stefl, to check that everything was fine." The first spectrum of this time series was the quickest ever taken of a gamma-ray burst afterglow

  17. Asymmetric Explosions of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ghezzi, C R; Horváth, J E

    2004-01-01

    A type Ia supernova explosion starts in a white dwarf as a laminar deflagration at the center of the star and soon several hydrodynamic instabilities (in particular, the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability) begin to act. In previous work (Ghezzi, de Gouveia Dal Pino, & Horvath 2001), we addressed the propagation of an initially laminar thermonuclear flame in presence of a magnetic field assumed to be dipolar. We were able to show that, within the framework of a fractal model for the flame velocity, the front is affected by the field through the quenching of the R-T instability growth in the direction perpendicular to the field lines. As a consequence, an asymmetry develops between the magnetic polar and the equatorial axis that gives a prolate shape to the burning front. We have here computed numerically the total integrated asymmetry as the flame front propagates outward through the expanding shells of decreasing density of the magnetized white dwarf progenitor, for several chemical compositions, and found...

  18. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  19. Active Water Explosion Suppression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    efficient in eliminating the heat of detonation , thereby eliminating the heat of combustion and the associated burning of explosive by-products in the...efficiency in eliminating the heat of detonation . In any case, the net effect of the water absorbing the detonation energy of the explosive is a major

  20. Introduction to High Explosives Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, Cary Bradford [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Preston, Daniel N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-17

    These are a set of slides for educational outreach to children on high explosives science. It gives an introduction to the elements involved in this science: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. Combined, these form the molecule HMX. Many pictures are also included to illustrate explosions.

  1. The signature-based radiation-scanning approach to standoff detection of improvised explosive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, R L; Dunn, W L; Heider, S; Matthew, C; Yang, X

    2012-07-01

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique for detection of improvised explosive devices is described. The technique seeks to detect nitrogen-rich chemical explosives present in a target. The technology compares a set of "signatures" obtained from a test target to a collection of "templates", sets of signatures for a target that contain an explosive in a specific configuration. Interrogation of nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples, which serve as surrogates for explosives, is shown experimentally to be able to discriminate samples of 3.8L and larger.

  2. The Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardell, J F; Maienschein, J L

    2002-07-05

    We have developed the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX) to provide a database of reaction violence from thermal explosion for explosives of interest. Such data are needed to develop, calibrate, and validate predictive capability for thermal explosions using simulation computer codes. A cylinder of explosive 25, 50 or 100 mm in diameter, is confined in a steel cylinder with heavy end caps, and heated under controlled conditions until reaction. Reaction violence is quantified through non-contact micropower impulse radar measurements of the cylinder wall velocity and by strain gauge data at reaction onset. Here we describe the test concept, design and diagnostic recording, and report results with HMX- and RDX-based energetic materials.

  3. Modeling of heat explosion with convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belk, Michael; Volpert, Vitaly

    2004-06-01

    The work is devoted to numerical simulations of the interaction of heat explosion with natural convection. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We show how complex regimes appear through successive bifurcations leading from a stable stationary temperature distribution without convection to a stationary symmetric convective solution, stationary asymmetric convection, periodic in time oscillations, and finally aperiodic oscillations. A simplified model problem is suggested. It describes the main features of solutions of the complete problem.

  4. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mace, Jonathan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pemberton, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Richard J [INDIAN HEAD DIVISION

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  5. IMPULSIVE SPOT HEATING AND THERMAL EXPLOSION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Röcker, T. B.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P., E-mail: ivlev@mpe.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-20

    The problem of the impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically with the aim of better understanding the leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. We rigorously show that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., the heating of mantles by cosmic rays (CRs)), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number λ. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: when λ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain—this regime is commonly known as whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, our calculations suggest that heavy CR species (e.g., iron ions) colliding with dust are able to trigger the explosion. Based on recently calculated local CR spectra, we estimate the expected rate of explosive desorption. The efficiency of the desorption, which in principle affects all solid species independent of their binding energy, is shown to be comparable to other CR desorption mechanisms typically considered in the literature. Also, the theory allows us to estimate the maximum abundances of reactive species that may be stored in the mantles, which provides important constraints on the available astrochemical models.

  6. The interaction of explosively generated plasma with explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Douglas G.; Whitley, Von H.; Johnson, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the temperature of explosively generated plasma (EGP) is of the order of 1 eV and plasma ejecta can be focused to achieve velocities as high as 25 km/s. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to determine if EGP could be used for explosive ordnance demolition and other applications. The goals were: to benignly disable ordnance containing relatively sensitive high performance explosives (PBX-9501); and to investigate the possibility of interrupting an ongoing detonation in a powerful high explosive (again PBX-9501) with EGP. Experiments were performed to establish the optimum sizes of plasma generators for the benign deactivation of high explosives, i.e., the destruction of the ordnance without initiating a detonation or comparable violent event. These experiments were followed by attempts to interrupt an ongoing detonation by the benign disruption of the unreacted explosive in its path. The results were encouraging. First, it was demonstrated that high explosives could be destroyed without the initiation of a detonation or high order reaction. Second, ongoing detonations were successfully interrupted with EGP. [LA-UR-15-25350

  7. Effect of Steam Explosion Pretreatment on Bamboo for Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the steam explosion pretreatment that has been applied to other types of lignocellulosic biomass, the steam explosion pretreatment of bamboo, along with a study of the chemical compositions and enzymatic hydrolyzability of substrates, was conducted. The results show that steam explosion pretreatment can greatly enhance the cellulose-to-glucose conversion yield after enzymatic hydrolysis, which is sometimes affected by bamboo age and steam explosion conditions. When the steam explosion pretreatment conditions were 2.0 MPa (pressure and 4 min (time, the cellulose-to-glucose conversion yield of 2-year-old bamboo substrate was 62.5%. However, the cellulose-to-glucose conversion yield of bamboo substrates after direct (without steam explosion pretreatment sodium chlorite/acetic acid delignification was 93.1%. Fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates with Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in about 88.1% to 96.2% of the corresponding theoretical ethanol yield after 24 h.

  8. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  9. 29 CFR 1910.109 - Explosives and blasting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Explosive—any chemical compound, mixture, or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion, i.e., with substantially instantaneous release of gas and heat, unless such compound..., nitroglycerin, picric acid, lead azide, fulminate of mercury, black powder, blasting caps, and...

  10. Explosion risks from nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillard, Jacques; Vignes, Alexis; Dufaud, Olivier; Perrin, Laurent; Thomas, Dominique

    2009-05-01

    Emerging nanomanufactured products are being incorporated in a variety of consumer products ranging from closer body contact products (i.e. cosmetics, sunscreens, toothpastes, pharmaceuticals, clothing) to more remote body-contact products (electronics, plastics, tires, automotive and aeronautical), hence posing potential health and environmental risks. The new field of nanosafety has emerged and needs to be explored now rather than after problems becomes so ubiquitous and difficult to treat that their trend become irreversible. Such endeavour necessitates a transdisciplinary approach. A commonly forgotten and/or misunderstood risk is that of explosion/detonation of nanopowders, due to their high specific active surface areas. Such risk is emphasized and illustrated with the present development of an appropriate risk analysis. For this particular risk, a review of characterization methods and their limitations with regard to nanopowders is presented and illustrated for a few organic and metallic nanopowders.

  11. Mixing in explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  12. Simulation of Enhanced-Explosive Devices in Chambers and Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Kuhl, A L; Beckner, V E

    2007-06-05

    Introduction: Shock-dispersed fuel (SDF) explosives use a small chemical charge to disperse a combustible fuel that burns in the post-detonation environment. The energy released in the combustion process has the potential for generating higher pressures and temperatures than conventional explosives. However, the development of these types of novel explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of the modes of energy release. Objective: The objective of this project is develop a simulation capability for predicting explosion and combustion phase of SDF charges and apply that capability to quantifying the behavior of these types of explosives. Methodology: We approximate the dynamics of an SDF charge using high Reynolds number, fast chemistry model that effectively captures the thermodynamic behavior of SDF charges and accurately models the key modes of energy release. The overall computational model is combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) , implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems. Results: We have developed a multiphase version of the model and used it to simulate an SDF charge in which the dispersed fuel is aluminum flakes. Flow visualizations show that the combustion field is turbulent for the chamber and tunnel cases studied. During the 3 milli-seconds of simulation, over 90% of the Al fuel was consumed for the chamber case, while about 40% was consumed in the tunnel case in agreement with Al-SDF experiments. Significance to DoD: DoD has a requirement to develop enhanced energetic materials to support future military systems. The SDF charges described here utilize the combustion mechanism to increase energy per gram of fuel by a factor of 7 to 10 over conventional (detonating) charges, and increase the temperature of the explosion cloud to 2,000-4,000 K (depending on the SDF fuel). Accurate numerical simulation of such SDF explosions allows one to understand the energy release mechanism

  13. Szilard Prize Lecture: Seismic Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Seismic monitoring of the more than 2000 nuclear test explosions since 1945 has been vigorously pursued, both to track the weapons development of potential adversaries, and to support initiatives in nuclear arms control, including various test ban treaties. Major funding from the US Department of Defense built up new global seismographic networks and over several decades established practical capability in monitoring nuclear explosions ``teleseismically'' (i.e. from distances more than about 1500 km), for tests that the testing nation did not attempt to conceal. What then is the capability to monitor compliance with, for example, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) of 1996, particularly if evasion scenarios are considered? Note that the CTBT, though not ratified by some countries (including the US), is now being monitored by networks that include seismographic stations at ``regional'' distances (< 1500 km) from candidate explosion locations. Years of R and D have shown that regional signals can be used to monitor down to yields significantly lower than can be detected and identified teleseismically. A US National Academy of Sciences study in 2002 concluded that ``an underground nuclear explosion cannot be confidently hidden if its yield is larger than 1 or 2 kt.'' About 1000 earthquakes and chemical explosions are now detected per day, and documented via seismic data, providing plenty of challenges for nuclear explosion monitoring organizations. Explosion monitoring capability will improve in many parts of the world, due to the growth of networks that monitor even small earthquakes to study seismic hazard. But political problems can impede improved international explosion monitoring, due to national restrictions on data access.

  14. Direct imaging of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, E.A.; Moler, R.B.; Saunders, A.W.; Trower, W.P. E-mail: trower@naxs.net

    2000-11-15

    Any technique that can detect nitrogen concentrations can screen for concealed explosives. However, such a technique would have to be insensitive to metal, both encasing and incidental. If images of the nitrogen concentrations could be captured, then, since form follows function, a robust screening technology could be developed. However these images would have to be sensitive to the surface densities at or below that of the nitrogen contained in buried anti-personnel mines or of the SEMTEX that brought down Pan Am 103, {approx}200 g. Although the ability to image in three-dimensions would somewhat reduce false positives, capturing collateral images of carbon and oxygen would virtually assure that nitrogenous non-explosive material like fertilizer, Melmac[reg] dinnerware, and salami could be eliminated. We are developing such an instrument, the Nitrogen Camera, which has met experimentally these criteria with the exception of providing oxygen images, which awaits the availability of a sufficiently energetic light source. Our Nitrogen Camera technique uses an electron accelerator to produce photonuclear reactions whose unique decays it registers. Clearly if our Nitrogen Camera is made mobile, it could be effective in detecting buried mines, either in an active battlefield situation or in the clearing of abandoned military munitions. Combat operations require that a swathe the width of an armored vehicle, 5 miles deep, be screened in an hour, which is within our camera's scanning speed. Detecting abandoned munitions is technically easier as it is free from the onerous speed requirement. We describe here our Nitrogen Camera and show its 180 pixel intensity images of elemental nitrogen in a 200 g mine simulant and in a 125 g stick of SEMTEX. We also report on our progress in creating a lorry transportable 70 MeV electron racetrack microtron, the principal enabling technology that will allow our Nitrogen Camera to be deployed in the field.

  15. Direct imaging of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, E A; Moler, R B; Saunders, A W; Trower, W P

    2000-01-01

    Any technique that can detect nitrogen concentrations can screen for concealed explosives. However, such a technique would have to be insensitive to metal, both encasing and incidental. If images of the nitrogen concentrations could be captured, then, since form follows function, a robust screening technology could be developed. However these images would have to be sensitive to the surface densities at or below that of the nitrogen contained in buried anti-personnel mines or of the SEMTEX that brought down Pan Am 103, approximately 200 g. Although the ability to image in three-dimensions would somewhat reduce false positives, capturing collateral images of carbon and oxygen would virtually assure that nitrogenous non-explosive material like fertilizer, Melmac dinnerware, and salami could be eliminated. We are developing such an instrument, the Nitrogen Camera, which has met experimentally these criteria with the exception of providing oxygen images, which awaits the availability of a sufficiently energetic light source. Our Nitrogen Camera technique uses an electron accelerator to produce photonuclear reactions whose unique decays it registers. Clearly if our Nitrogen Camera is made mobile, it could be effective in detecting buried mines, either in an active battlefield situation or in the clearing of abandoned military munitions. Combat operations require that a swathe the width of an armored vehicle, 5 miles deep, be screened in an hour, which is within our camera's scanning speed. Detecting abandoned munitions is technically easier as it is free from the onerous speed requirement. We describe here our Nitrogen Camera and show its 180 pixel intensity images of elemental nitrogen in a 200 g mine simulant and in a 125 g stick of SEMTEX. We also report on our progress in creating a lorry transportable 70 MeV electron racetrack microtron, the principal enabling technology that will allow our Nitrogen Camera to be deployed in the field.

  16. Innovations Help Chemical Makers Improve Growing Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Weike

    2007-01-01

    @@ With overheated construction all over the country, China's GDP continued its fast growth in the first half. After suffering an explosion at a Jilin aniline facility, another explosion at Cangzhou TDI and a big outbreak of water pollution at Wuxi, the chemical raw materials and chemical manufacturing sectors are getting strict supervision from the central government.

  17. Physical and Chemical Processing in Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    than the classical Troe formula, and the development of a Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis ( CEMA ) computation algorithm that allows on-the-fly...6-311++G(d,p) method. 3. Flame Stabilization and Chemical Explosive Mode Analysis ( CEMA ) Flame stabilization is essential in the understanding of

  18. Active explosion barrier performance against methane and coal dust explosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J J L du Plessis

    2015-01-01

    Preventing the propagation of methane or coal dust explosions through the use of active explosion-suppression systems remains one of the most underutilised explosion controls in underground coal mines. As part of the effort to develop better technologies to safeguard mines, the use of active barrier systems was investigated at Kloppersbos in South Africa. The system is designed to meet the requirements of the European Standard (EN 14591-4 2007) as well as the Mine Safety Standardisation in the Ministry of Coal Industry, Coal Industrial l Standard of the Peoples Republic of China (MT 694-1997). From the tests conducted, it can be concluded that the ExploSpot System was successful in stopping flame propagation for both methane and methane and coal dust hybrid explosions when ammonium phosphate powder was used as the suppression material. The use of this barrier will provide coal mine management with an additional explosion control close to the point of ignition and may find application within longwall faces further protecting mines against the risk of an explosion propagating throughout a mine.

  19. Effect of steam explosion pretreatment on dissolution efifciency of poplar chemical composition%蒸汽爆破预处理对杨木化学组分溶出效率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张中山; 杨桂花; 李蕊; 王强; 陈嘉川

    2016-01-01

    Experimental material polar wood chips were pretreated by steam-explosion. Effect of different impregnation liquid, steam pressure and steam pressure holding time on the dissolution efficiency of semi-cellulose, cellulose and lignin was investigated. Results showed that effect of impregnation liquid of 5% NaOH was better than that of deionized water and aqueous ammonia in the explosion pretreatment process. The optimal steam-explosion pretreatment conditions were impregnation liquid of 5%NaOH, steam pressure of 2.3MPa and steam pressure holding time of 6min, in which higher concentrations and dissolution efifciency of semi-cellulose, cellulose and lignin were obtained and dissolution rates of semi-cellulose, cellulose and lignin were 13.67%, 27.03% and 27.46% respectively.%以速生杨木片为原料,采用蒸汽爆破法对杨木进行预处理,探讨了不同浸渍液、蒸汽压力和保压时间对杨木片中半纤维素、木素和纤维素溶出效率的影响。实验结果表明,在蒸汽爆破预处理过程中,5%NaOH浸渍液对杨木化学组分的溶出效果优于去离子水和氨水。较理想的蒸汽爆破预处理条件为5%NaOH浸渍液,蒸汽压力2.3MPa和保压时间6min,此条件下预处理液中纤维素、半纤维素和木素的含量较高,溶出率分别为13.67%、27.03%和27.46%,溶出效果较理想。

  20. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  1. Impact of Supernova Explosions on Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, C; White, S D M; Springel, V

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of Supernova (SN) feedback on the formation of disc galaxies. For that purpose we run simulations using the extended version of the code GADGET-2 which includes a treatment of chemical and energy feedback by SN explosions. We found that our model succeeds in setting a self-regulated star formation process since an important fraction of the cold gas from the center of the haloes is efficiently heated up and transported outwards. The impact of SN feedback on galactic systems is also found to depend on virial mass: smaller systems are more strongly affected with star formation histories in which several starbursts can develop. Our implementation of SN feedback is also successful in producing violent outflows of chemical enriched material.

  2. Suppression of stratified explosive interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeks, M.K.; Shamoun, B.I.; Bonazza, R.; Corradini, M.L. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Stratified Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) experiments with Refrigerant-134a and water were performed in a large-scale system. Air was uniformly injected into the coolant pool to establish a pre-existing void which could suppress the explosion. Two competing effects due to the variation of the air flow rate seem to influence the intensity of the explosion in this geometrical configuration. At low flow rates, although the injected air increases the void fraction, the concurrent agitation and mixing increases the intensity of the interaction. At higher flow rates, the increase in void fraction tends to attenuate the propagated pressure wave generated by the explosion. Experimental results show a complete suppression of the vapor explosion at high rates of air injection, corresponding to an average void fraction of larger than 30%. (author)

  3. Detonation probabilities of high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Bement, T.R.

    1995-07-01

    The probability of a high explosive violent reaction (HEVR) following various events is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons dismantlement. In this paper, we describe the development of response curves for insults to PBX 9404, a conventional high-performance explosive used in US weapons. The insults during dismantlement include drops of high explosive (HE), strikes of tools and components on HE, and abrasion of the explosive. In the case of drops, we combine available test data on HEVRs and the results of flooring certification tests to estimate the HEVR probability. For other insults, it was necessary to use expert opinion. We describe the expert solicitation process and the methods used to consolidate the responses. The HEVR probabilities obtained from both approaches are compared.

  4. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  5. Simulation Analysis of Indoor Gas Explosion Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱新明; 陈林顺; 冯长根

    2003-01-01

    The influence factors and process of indoor gas explosion are studied with AutoReaGas explosion simulator. The result shows that venting pressure has great influence on the indoor gas explosion damage. The higher the venting pressure is, the more serious the hazard consequence will be. The ignition location has also evident effect on the gas explosion damage. The explosion static overpressure would not cause major injury to person and serious damage to structure in the case of low venting pressure (lower than 2 kPa). The high temperature combustion after the explosion is the major factor to person injury in indoor gas explosion accidents.

  6. Furball Explosive Breakout Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Joshua David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-05

    For more than 30 years the Onionskin test has been the primary way to study the surface breakout of a detonation wave. Currently the Onionskin test allows for only a small, one dimensional, slice of the explosive in question to be observed. Asymmetrical features are not observable with the Onionskin test and its one dimensional view. As a result, in 2011, preliminary designs for the Hairball and Furball were developed then tested. The Hairball used shorting pins connected to an oscilloscope to determine the arrival time at 24 discrete points. This limited number of data points, caused by the limited number of oscilloscope channels, ultimately led to the Hairball’s demise. Following this, the Furball was developed to increase the number of data points collected. Instead of shorting pins the Furball uses fiber optics imaged by a streak camera to determine the detonation wave arrival time for each point. The original design was able to capture the detonation wave’s arrival time at 205 discrete points with the ability to increase the number of data points if necessary.

  7. Disaster management following explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, B R

    2008-01-01

    Explosions and bombings remain the most common deliberate cause of disasters involving large numbers of casualties, especially as instruments of terrorism. These attacks are virtually always directed against the untrained and unsuspecting civilian population. Unlike the military, civilians are poorly equipped or prepared to handle the severe emotional, logistical, and medical burdens of a sudden large casualty load, and thus are completely vulnerable to terrorist aims. To address the problem to the maximum benefit of mass disaster victims, we must develop collective forethought and a broad-based consensus on triage and these decisions must reach beyond the hospital emergency department. It needs to be realized that physicians should never be placed in a position of individually deciding to deny treatment to patients without the guidance of a policy or protocol. Emergency physicians, however, may easily find themselves in a situation in which the demand for resources clearly exceeds supply and for this reason, emergency care providers, personnel, hospital administrators, religious leaders, and medical ethics committees need to engage in bioethical decision-making.

  8. Numerical simulation of gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Berg, A.C.; Van Wingerden, J.M.; Verhagen, T.L.

    1989-08-01

    Recent developments in numerical fluid dynamics and computer technology enable detailed simulation of gas explosions. Prins Maurits Laboratory TNO of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research developed the necessary software. This software is a useful tool to develop and evaluate explosion safe installations. One of the possible applications is the design of save offshore rigs. (f.i. to prevent Piper Alpha disasters). The two-dimensional blast model is described and an example is given. 4 figs., 6 refs.

  9. Intraperitoneal explosion following gastric perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Scott K; Borrowdale, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    The object of this study is to report a rare case of explosion during laparotomy where diathermy ignited intraperitoneal gas from a spontaneous stomach perforation. Fortunately, the patient survived but the surgeon experienced a finger burn. A literature review demonstrates other examples of intraoperative explosion where gastrointestinal gases were the fuel source. Lessons learned from these cases provide recommendations to prevent this potentially lethal event from occurring.

  10. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  11. Self-organized correlations lead to explosive synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Cao, Zhoujian; Wang, Shihong; Hu, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Very recently, a first-order phase transition, named explosive synchronization (ES), has attracted great attention due to its remarkable novelty in theory and significant impact in applications. However, so far, all observations of ES have been associated with various correlation constraints on system parameters, which restrict its generality and applications. Here we consider heterogeneous networks around Hopf bifurcation point described by chemical reaction-diffusion systems and also by their reduced order parameter versions, the complex Ginzburg-Landau equations, and demonstrate that explosive synchronization can appear as an emergent feature of oscillatory networks, and the restrictions on specific parameter correlations used so far for ES can be lifted entirely. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show with a perfect agreement that explosive synchronization can appear in networks with nodes having identical natural frequencies, and necessary correlation conditions for ES can be realized in a self-organized manner by network evolution.

  12. Reducing aluminum dust explosion hazards: case study of dust inerting in an aluminum buffing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy J

    2008-11-15

    Metal powders or dusts can represent significant dust explosion hazards in industry, due to their relatively low ignition energy and high explosivity. The hazard is well known in industries that produce or use aluminum powders, but is sometimes not recognized by facilities that produce aluminum dust as a byproduct of bulk aluminum processing. As demonstrated by the 2003 dust explosion at aluminum wheel manufacturer Hayes Lemmerz, facilities that process bulk metals are at risk due to dust generated during machining and finishing operations [U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, Investigation Report, Aluminum Dust Explosion Hayes Lemmerz International, Inc., Huntington, Indiana, Report No. 2004-01-I-IN, September 2005]. Previous studies have shown that aluminum dust explosions are more difficult to suppress with flame retardants or inerting agents than dust explosions fueled by other materials such as coal [A.G. Dastidar, P.R. Amyotte, J. Going, K. Chatrathi, Flammability limits of dust-minimum inerting concentrations, Proc. Saf. Progr., 18-1 (1999) 56-63]. In this paper, an inerting method is discussed to reduce the dust explosion hazard of residue created in an aluminum buffing operation as the residue is generated. This technique reduces the dust explosion hazard throughout the buffing process and within the dust collector systems making the process inherently safer. Dust explosion testing results are presented for process dusts produced during trials with varying amounts of flame retardant additives.

  13. Youngest Stellar Explosion in Our Galaxy Discovered

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    supernova explosions with optical telescopes across half of the Universe, but when they're in this murk, we can miss them in our own cosmic back yard," Reynolds said. "Fortunately, the expanding gas cloud from the explosion shines brightly in radio waves and X-rays for thousands of years. X-ray and radio telescopes can see through all that obscuration and show us what we've been missing," he added. Because of the obscuration, no one could have seen the original explosion 140 years ago. The astronomers are reporting their results in papers published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Background Information: Supernova Explosions Supernova explosions are the violent death throes of stars. These explosions release in one event as much energy as is being released by all the rest of the stars in a galaxy -- typically 100 billion or so. Supernovae seen in other galaxies can outshine the rest of their galaxy for days. The supernovae that have occurred in our own Galaxy and were not obscured by the gas and dust that obscured G1.9+0.3 have often provided a spectacular sight. Historical records indicate that ancient astronomers noted supernova explosions at least as early as A.D. 393, and probably earlier. The pre-telescopic astronomers Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler made extensive observations of supernovae in 1572 and 1604. Chinese astronomers noted that a supernova in 1054 was bright enough to be seen in the daytime. A supernova in 1006 remained visible for two years. Supernovae that result from the deaths of stars much more massive than the Sun enrich the galaxy with chemical elements that are produced in the cores of those stars before they explode. The heavy elements, such as carbon, oxygen, iron, siicon and calcium, that make up planets and their inhabitants were made available by supernova explosions. In addition to enriching the material between stars with heavy elements, supernovae stir up that material through the

  14. Physical explosion analysis in heat exchanger network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, M.; Zaini, D.; Shariff, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The failure of shell and tube heat exchangers is being extensively experienced by the chemical process industries. This failure can create a loss of production for long time duration. Moreover, loss of containment through heat exchanger could potentially lead to a credible event such as fire, explosion and toxic release. There is a need to analyse the possible worst case effect originated from the loss of containment of the heat exchanger at the early design stage. Physical explosion analysis during the heat exchanger network design is presented in this work. Baker and Prugh explosion models are deployed for assessing the explosion effect. Microsoft Excel integrated with process design simulator through object linking and embedded (OLE) automation for this analysis. Aspen HYSYS V (8.0) used as a simulation platform in this work. A typical heat exchanger network of steam reforming and shift conversion process was presented as a case study. It is investigated from this analysis that overpressure generated from the physical explosion of each heat exchanger can be estimated in a more precise manner by using Prugh model. The present work could potentially assist the design engineer to identify the critical heat exchanger in the network at the preliminary design stage.

  15. Molecular Outflows: Explosive versus Protostellar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Loinard, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    With the recent recognition of a second, distinctive class of molecular outflows, namely the explosive ones not directly connected to the accretion–ejection process in star formation, a juxtaposition of the morphological and kinematic properties of both classes is warranted. By applying the same method used in Zapata et al., and using 12CO(J = 2-1) archival data from the Submillimeter Array, we contrast two well-known explosive objects, Orion KL and DR21, to HH 211 and DG Tau B, two flows representative of classical low-mass protostellar outflows. At the moment, there are only two well-established cases of explosive outflows, but with the full availability of ALMA we expect that more examples will be found in the near future. The main results are the largely different spatial distributions of the explosive flows, consisting of numerous narrow straight filament-like ejections with different orientations and in almost an isotropic configuration, the redshifted with respect to the blueshifted components of the flows (maximally separated in protostellar, largely overlapping in explosive outflows), the very-well-defined Hubble flow-like increase of velocity with distance from the origin in the explosive filaments versus the mostly non-organized CO velocity field in protostellar objects, and huge inequalities in mass, momentum, and energy of the two classes, at least for the case of low-mass flows. Finally, all the molecular filaments in the explosive outflows point back to approximately a central position (i.e., the place where its “exciting source” was located), contrary to the bulk of the molecular material within the protostellar outflows.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF BARRIERS ON FLAME AND EXPLOSION WAVE IN GAS EXPLOSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林柏泉; 周世宁; 张仁贵

    1998-01-01

    This paper researches into the influence of barriers on flame and explosion wave in gasexplosion on the basis of experiment. The result shows that the barrier is very important to thetransmission of flame and explosion wave in gas explosion. When there are barriers, the speed oftransmission would be very fast and shock wave will appear in gas explosion, which would in-crease gas explosion power. The result of research is very important to prevent gas explosion anddecrease the power of it.

  17. Designing the Army’s Future Active Duty Weapons of Mass Destruction Response: Is the Defense Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosives Response Force (DCRF) the Right Force at the Right Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    alternative methods for implementing the force structure, reducing redundancy and waste , and building cooperative training strategies for the CBRNE forces...nuclear detonation, attacks with biological, blister , nerve, and radiological agents, an influenza pandemic, an toxic industrial chemical release, a

  18. Explosion limits for combustible gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Min-ming; WU Guo-qing; HAO Ji-fei; DAI Xin-lian

    2009-01-01

    Combustible gases in coal mines are composed of methane, hydrogen, some multi-carbon alkane gases and other gases. Based on a numerical calculation, the explosion limits of combustible gases were studied, showing that these limits are related to the concentrations of different components in the mixture. With an increase of C4H10 and C6H14, the Lower ExplosionLimit (LEL) and Upper Explosion-Limit (UEL) of a combustible gas mixture will decrease clearly. For every 0.1% increase in C4H10 and C6H14, the LEL decreases by about 0.19% and the UEL by about 0.3%. The results also prove that, by increasing the amount of H2, the UEL of a combustible gas mixture will increase considerably. If the level of H2 increases by 0.1%, the UEL will increase by about 0.3%. However, H2 has only a small effect on the LEL of the combustible gas mixture. Our study provides a theoretical foundation for judging the explosion risk of an explosive gas mixture in mines.

  19. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L

    2009-10-16

    Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. For example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.

  20. Explosion and explosives. Volume 32, Number 5, 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: CMDB propellants with high pressure exponent; the thermal decomposition of phenylnitromethane in 2-propanol; double exposed flash x-ray photographic observation on detonation of coal mining explosions; detonation of condensed multiple components about detonation characteristics of three liquid explosives; synthesis of N,N'-bis (2,4,6-trinitro-3-glycidoxyphenyl)-ethylene dinitramine; resistance characteristics of electric primer containing conductive particles; and formation of Meisenheimer's complex by adding an aqueous sodium hydroxide to the reaction product of epoxy compound with picric acid.

  1. An Analysis of the Initiation Process of Electro-Explosive Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar de Carvalho Faria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electro-explosive devices (an electric resistance encapsulated by a primary explosive fundamentally convert electrical energy into thermal energy, to start off an explosive chemical reaction. Obviously, the activation of those devices shall not happen by accident or, even worse, by intentional exogenous influence. From an ordinary differential equation, which describes the electro-explosive thermal behavior, a remarkable, but certainly not intuitive, dependence of the temperature response on the time constant of the heat transfer process is verified: the temperature profile dramatically changes as the time constant spans a wide range of values, from much lesser than the pulse width to much greater than the pulse period. Based on this dependence, important recommendations, concerning the efficient and safety operation of electro-explosive devices, are proposed.

  2. Very Sensitive Optical System with the Concentration and Decomposition Unit for Explosive Trace Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakrzewska Beata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The vapour pressure of most explosives is very low. Therefore, the explosive trace detection is very difficult. To overcome the problem, concentration units can be applied. At the Institute of Optoelectronics MUT, an explosive vapour concentration and decomposition unit to operate with an optoelectronic sensor of nitrogen dioxide has been developed. This unit provides an adsorption of explosive vapours from the analysed air and then their thermal decomposition. The thermal decomposition is mainly a chemical reaction, which consists in breaking up compounds into two or more simple compounds or elements. During the heating process most explosive particles, based on nitro aromatics and alkyl nitrate, release NO2 molecules and other products of pyrolysis. In this paper, the most common methods for the NO2 detection were presented. Also, an application of the concentration and decomposition unit in the NO2 optoelectronic sensor has been discussed.

  3. Optical spectroscopy to study confined and semi-closed explosions of homogeneous and composite charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Lotfi; Trzciński, Waldemar A.; Paszula, Józef

    2017-01-01

    Confined and semi-closed explosions of new class of energetic composites as well as TNT and RDX charges were investigated using optical spectroscopy. These composites are considered as thermobarics when used in layered charges or enhanced blast explosives when pressed. Two methods to estimate fireball temperature histories of both homogeneous and metallized explosives from the spectroscopic data are also presented, compared and analyzed. Fireball temperature results of the charges detonated in a small explosion chamber under air and argon atmospheres, and detonated in a semi-closed bunker are presented and compared with theoretical ones calculated by a thermochemical code. Important conclusions about the fireball temperatures and the physical and chemical phenomena occurring after the detonation of homogeneous explosives and composite formulations are deduced.

  4. The differing locations of massive stellar explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Fruchter, A S; Burud, I; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cerón, J M C; Conselice, C J; Dahlen, T; Ferguson, H C; Fynbo, J P U; Garnavich, P M; Gibbons, R A; Gorosabel, J; Gull, T R; Hjorth, J; Holland, S T; Kouveliotou, C; Levan, A J; Levay, Z; Livio, M; Metzger, M R; Nugent, P; Petro, L; Pian, E; Rhoads, J E; Riess, A G; Sahu, K C; Smette, A; Strolger, L; Tanvir, N R; Thorsett, S E; Vreeswijk, P M; Wijers, R A M J; Woosley, S E

    2006-01-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powers an even more brilliant relativistic explosion known as a long-duration gamma-ray burst. One would then expect that gamma-ray bursts and supernovae should be found in similar environments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. Using Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the host galaxies of long-duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we find that the gamma-ray bursts are far more concentrated on the very brightest regions of their hosts than are the supernovae. Furthermore, the host galaxies of the gamma-ray bursts are significantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of the supernovae. Together these results suggest that long-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the very most massive stars and may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Our results directly imply that lon...

  5. The Quiet Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A European-led team of astronomers are providing hints that a recent supernova may not be as normal as initially thought. Instead, the star that exploded is now understood to have collapsed into a black hole, producing a weak jet, typical of much more violent events, the so-called gamma-ray bursts. The object, SN 2008D, is thus probably among the weakest explosions that produce very fast moving jets. This discovery represents a crucial milestone in the understanding of the most violent phenomena observed in the Universe. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 23a/08 A Galaxy and two Supernovae These striking results, partly based on observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope, will appear tomorrow in Science Express, the online version of Science. Stars that were at birth more massive than about 8 times the mass of our Sun end their relatively short life in a cosmic, cataclysmic firework lighting up the Universe. The outcome is the formation of the densest objects that exist, neutron stars and black holes. When exploding, some of the most massive stars emit a short cry of agony, in the form of a burst of very energetic light, X- or gamma-rays. In the early afternoon (in Europe) of 9 January 2008, the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift telescope discovered serendipitously a 5-minute long burst of X-rays coming from within the spiral galaxy NGC 2770, located 90 million light-years away towards the Lynx constellation. The Swift satellite was studying a supernova that had exploded the previous year in the same galaxy, but the burst of X-rays came from another location, and was soon shown to arise from a different supernova, named SN 2008D. Researchers at the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), ESO, and at various other institutions have observed the supernova at great length. The team is led by Paolo Mazzali of INAF's Padova Observatory and MPA. "What made this event very interesting," says Mazzali, "is that the X-ray signal was very

  6. Instrument safety in explosive atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, J A

    1975-01-01

    The current "Energy Crisis" has dramatically increased our potential need for coal, the worlds most abundant fossil fuel. This will probably lead to a greater use of automation and instrumentation in the coal mining industry. The presence of methane in coal mines and in the coal itself plus the presence of coal dust, both of which can form an explosive atmosphere in air, means that the possibility of a gas or coal dust ignition must be considered when designing, purchasing and installing new equipment in this industry. In addition, many metallurgical processes involve the use of potentially explosive substances against which similar safety precautions must be taken. This paper outlines the various methods of protection currently in use and proposed for electrical instruments in explosive atmospheres, with particular emphasis on the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission.

  7. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcgrane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabitz, Herschel A [PRINCETON UNIV; Roslund, J [PRINCETON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  8. Coulomb explosion of "hot spot"

    CERN Document Server

    Oreshkin, V I; Chaikovsky, S A; Artyomov, A P

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in this paper has shown that the generation of hard x rays and high-energy ions, which are detected in pinch implosion experiments, may be associated with the Coulomb explosion of the hot spot that is formed due to the outflow of the material from the pinch cross point. During the process of material outflow, the temperature of the hot spot plasma increases, and conditions arise for the plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated. The runaway of electrons from the hot spot region results in the buildup of positive space charge in this region followed by a Coulomb explosion. The conditions for the hot spot plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated have been revealed and estimates have been obtained for the kinetic energy of the ions generated by the Coulomb explosion.

  9. Evidence for Nearby Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Canelles, M; Benitez, Narciso; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-01-01

    Supernova explosions are one of the most energetic--and potentially lethal--phenomena in the Universe. Scientists have speculated for decades about the possible consequences for life on Earth of a nearby supernova, but plausible candidates for such an event were lacking. Here we show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at~130 parsecs from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. We find that the deposition on Earth of 60Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that ~2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  10. Explosively Joining Dissimilar Metal Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    both steel, photograph (7), and the Ni-Cu specimen, photograph (8) , showed considerable pitting corrosion in the aluminum . 4. The paint was then...for 6061 -T6 aluminum and are: collision angle 5 - 200, collision velocity 270 - 350 m/sec, with an impact pressure of at least 27 Kbar (391 Kpsi...Welded Aluminum Alloy 1 .. 5 rn-i (P0 -I Op. 2si 11 6W TABLE I Explosive2 Cladder Metal Base Metal Explosive Loading (gins/in2 6061 -T6 Al 304 SS TSE- 1004

  11. Intravesical explosion during transurethral electrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgios, Kallinikas; Evangelos, Boulinakis; Helai, Habib; Ioannis, Gerzelis

    2015-05-01

    Intravesical explosion is a very rare complication of transurethral resection of prostate and transurethral resection of bladder tumour operations. In vitro studies have shown that the gases produced during the procedure could result in a blast once they are mixed with air from the atmosphere. A 79-year-old male experienced an explosion in his bladder while undergoing a transurethral resection of bladder tumour. The case is presented as well as the way that it was treated as an emergency. Precautions of such events are finally suggested.

  12. Air Blasts from Cased and Uncased Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, L. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-12

    The problem of a spherical blast in air is solved using the STUN code. For bare charges, the calculations are shown to be in excellent agreement with previous published results. It is demonstrated that, for an unconfined (uncased) chemical explosive, both range and time to effect scale inversely as the cube root of the yield and directly as the cube root of the ambient air density. It is shown that the peak overpressure decays to roughly 1/10 of ambient pressure in a scaled range of roughly 10 m/kg1/3 at sea level. At a height of 30 km, where the ambient density is a factor of 64 less, the range to the same decay increases to 40 m/kg1/3 . As a direct result of the scaling a single calculation suffices for all charge sizes and altitudes. Although the close-in results are sensitive to the nature of the explosive source and the equation of state of the air, this sensitivity is shown to virtually disappear at scaled ranges > 0.5 m/kg1/3 . For cased explosives the case thickness introduces an additional scale factor. Moreover, when the blast wave arrives at the inner case radius the case begins to expand. Fracture occurs when a critical value of the resulting hoop strain is reached, causing the case to shatter into fragments. A model is proposed to describe the size distribution of the fragments and their subsequent motion via drag interaction with the explosion products and ambient air. It is shown that a significant fraction of the charge energy is initially transmitted to the case fragments in the form of kinetic energy; for example, a 1 kg spherical charge with a 5 mm thick steel case has almost 29% of the total charge energy as initial kinetic energy of case fragments. This percentage increases with increasing case thickness and decreases with increasing charge size. The peak overpressure at a given range is 70-85% for cased explosives as compared with uncased and the peak impulse per unit area is 90-95%. The peak overpressure and

  13. The signature-based radiation-scanning approach to standoff detection of improvised explosive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, R.L.; Dunn, W.L. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-5205 (United States); Heider, S., E-mail: s79a81@ksu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-5205 (United States); Matthew, C.; Yang, X. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, 3002 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506-5205 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique for detection of improvised explosive devices is described. The technique seeks to detect nitrogen-rich chemical explosives present in a target. The technology compares a set of 'signatures' obtained from a test target to a collection of 'templates', sets of signatures for a target that contain an explosive in a specific configuration. Interrogation of nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples, which serve as surrogates for explosives, is shown experimentally to be able to discriminate samples of 3.8 L and larger. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Signature-based radiation-scanning techniques applied to detection of explosives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen-rich fertilizer samples served as surrogate explosive samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Signatures of a target compared to collections of templates of surrogate explosives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Figure-of-merit determined for neutron and neutron-induced gamma-ray signatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discrimination of surrogate explosive from inert samples of 3.8 L and larger.

  14. 46 CFR 188.10-25 - Explosive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mixture, the primary purpose of which is to function by explosion; i.e., with substantially instantaneous release of gas and heat. Explosives are discussed in more detail in 49 CFR parts 171-179....

  15. Analysis of xRAGE and flag high explosive burn models with PBX 9404 cylinder tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersen, Kyle Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-05

    High explosives are energetic materials that release their chemical energy in a short interval of time. They are able to generate extreme heat and pressure by a shock driven chemical decomposition reaction, which makes them valuable tools that must be understood. This study investigated the accuracy and performance of two Los Alamos National Laboratory hydrodynamic codes, which are used to determine the behavior of explosives within a variety of systems: xRAGE which utilizes an Eulerian mesh, and FLAG with utilizes a Lagrangian mesh. Various programmed and reactive burn models within both codes were tested using a copper cylinder expansion test. The test was based on a recent experimental setup which contained the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9404. Detonation velocity versus time curves for this explosive were obtained using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The modeled results from each of the burn models tested were then compared to one another and to the experimental results. This study validate

  16. Monte-Carlo simulations of elastically backscattered neutrons from hidden explosives using three different neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElAgib, I. [College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: elagib@ksu.edu.sa; Elsheikh, N. [College of Applied and Industrial Science, University of Juba, Khartoum, P.O. Box 321 (Sudan); AlSewaidan, H. [College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455 (Saudi Arabia); Habbani, F. [Faculty of Science, Physics Department, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, P.O. Box 321 (Sudan)

    2009-01-15

    Calculations of elastically backscattered (EBS) neutrons from hidden explosives buried in soil were performed using Monte-Carlo N-particle transport code MCNP5. Three different neutron sources were used in the study. The study re-examines the performance of the neutron backscattering methods in providing identification of hidden explosives through their chemical composition. The EBS neutron energy spectra of fast and slow neutrons of the major constituent elements in soil and an explosive material in form of TNT have shown definite structures that can be used for the identification of a buried landmine.

  17. Statistical estimation of loads from gas explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Høiset, Stian

    1998-01-01

    In the design of structures in the offshore and process industries, the possibility of a gas explosion must always be considered. This is usually incorporated by performing explosion simulations. However, estimations based on such calculations introduce uncertainties in the design process. The main uncertainties in explosion simulations are the assumption of the gas cloud,the location of the ignition point and the properties of the explosion simulator itself. In this thesis, we try to investi...

  18. The behavior limestone under explosive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Bogomolov, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    Limestone behavior under explosive loading was investigated. The behavior of the limestone by the action of the three types of explosives, including granular, ammonite and emulsion explosives was studied in detail. The shape and diameter of the explosion craters were obtained. The observed fragments after the blast have been classified as large, medium and small fragments. Three full-scale experiments were carried out. The research results can be used as a qualitative test for the approbation of numerical methods.

  19. Gas Explosions Mitigation by Ducted Venting

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The mitigation of effects of gas and dust explosions within industrial equipment is effective if venting the combustion products to safe location. The presence of relief duct is however likely to increase the severity of the explosion with respect to equipment vented to open atmosphere, due to secondary explosions occurring in the initial sections of duct, frictional drag and inertia of the gas column, acoustic and Helmholtz oscillations. The weights of these phenomena on explosion e...

  20. 75 FR 70291 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2010R-27T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2010R-27T) AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Department of...

  1. 77 FR 58410 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2012R-10T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2012R-10T) AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), Department of...

  2. 76 FR 64974 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2011R-18T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2011R-18T) AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Department of...

  3. Lead-free primary explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  4. Optical Pressure Measurements of Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Explosive Shocks in Air, 2nd ed.; Springer-Verlag: Berlin , Germany, 1985. 7. Anderson, J. D. Hypersonic and High Temperature Gas Dynamics, 2nd Ed...PDF) RDRL CIO LA T LANDFRIED RDRL WML M ZOLTOSKI RDRL WML A F DE LUCIA W OBERLE RDRL WML B J GOTTFRIED J CIEZAK

  5. Explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den D.M.; Elwenspoek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a liquid is exposed to extremely high heat-fluxes. Within a few microseconds a bubble in the form vapour film is generated, followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse and finally the bubbles collapse. This effect, which already has proven its use in curren

  6. Explosive micro-bubble actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den D.M.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Explosive evaporation occurs when a thin layer of liquid reaches a very high temperature in a very short time. At these temperatures homogeneous nucleation takes place. The nucleated bubbles almost instantly coalesce forming a vapour film followed by rapid growth due to the pressure impulse and fina

  7. INFLUENCE OF STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT ON THE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE OF WHEAT STRAW

    OpenAIRE

    Li Cui; Zhong Liu; Chuanling Si,; Lanfeng Hui; Neng Kang,; Ting Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw can solubilize a significant portion of the hemicellulosic component and enhance the enzymatic digestibility of the remaining cellulose for fermentation into ethanol. In this work, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different steam temperatures and retention times, and the chemical compositions of the raw and steam-exploded wheat straw were analyzed. Results showed that the content of hemicellulose decreased sharply at higher steam ...

  8. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints o...

  9. Numerical Simulations of Heat ExplosionWith Convection In Porous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Allali, Karam; Bikany, Fouad; Taik, Ahmed; Volpert, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the interaction between natural convection and heat explosion in porous media. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Darcy law. Stationary and oscillating convection regimes and oscillating heat explosion are observed. The models with quasi-stationary and unstationary Darcy equation are compared.

  10. Successful treatment of a severely injured victim from 8.12 Tianjin Port Explosion, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Xu Zhang; Sheng-Ting Gao; Xiao-Ning Zhang; Wei-Feng Zhen; Yu Zhu; Na Wang; Zhen-Hua Shi

    2015-01-01

    A male patient, 55 years old, was found from a container yard 65 h later following a chemical warehouse explosion in Tianjin, China on August 12, 2015.He was about 50 m away from the explosion center.He was subjected to compound multiple trauma, multi-viscera function damage, multiple fractures, hemothorax, traumatic wet lung, respiratory failure I, hypovolemic shock and impaired liver and kidney functions.After a series of successful treatments, he was rescued and recovered well.

  11. Successful treatment of a severely injured victim from 8.12 Tianjin Port Explosion, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Xu; Gao, Sheng-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zhen, Wei-Feng; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Na; Shi, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Ying; Ding, Dong-Rui; Meng, Xiang-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    A male patient, 55 years old, was found from a container yard 65 h later following a chemical warehouse explosion in Tianjin, China on August 12, 2015. He was about 50 m away from the explosion center. He was subjected to compound multiple trauma, multi-viscera function damage, multiple fractures, hemothorax, traumatic wet lung, respiratory failure I, hypovolemic shock and impaired liver and kidney functions. After a series of successful treatments, he was rescued and recovered well.

  12. Scientific Support for NQR Explosive Detection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 8 March 2004 - 7 March 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scientific Support for NQR Explosive Detection Development...Laboratory (NRL) to improve explosive detection using nuclear quadrupole resonance ( NQR ) is summarized. The work includes studies of the effects...superconducting coils for explosive detection. Additional studies involving slowly rotating NQR measurements were also pursued. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nuclear

  13. 30 CFR 77.1301 - Explosives; magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives; magazines. 77.1301 Section 77.1301... and Blasting § 77.1301 Explosives; magazines. (a) Detonators and explosives other than blasting agents shall be stored in magazines. (b) Detonators shall not be stored in the same magazine with...

  14. 14 CFR 420.63 - Explosive siting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... site plan shall include: (1) A scaled map that shows the location of all proposed explosive hazard... explosive hazard facility and all other explosive hazard facilities and each public area, including...

  15. Explosion Power and Pressure Desensitization Resisting Property of Emulsion Explosives Sensitized by MgH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yangfan; Ma, Honghao; Liu, Rong; Shen, Zhaowu

    2014-07-01

    Due to low detonation power and pressure desensitization problems that traditional emulsion explosives encounter in utilization, a hydrogen-based emulsion explosives was devised. This type of emulsion explosives is sensitized by hydrogen-containing material MgH2, and MgH2 plays a double role as a sensitizer and an energetic material in emulsion explosives. Underwater explosion experiments and shock wave desensitization experiments show that an MgH2 emulsion explosives has excellent detonation characteristics and is resistant to pressure desensitization. The pressure desensitization-resistant mechanism of MgH2 emulsion explosives was investigated using scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Chemical equilibrium modeling of detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, Laurence E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bastea, Sorin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Energetic materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Energetic materials are commonly divided into high explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. We will focus on high explosive (HE) materials here, although there is a great deal of commonality between the classes of energetic materials. Furthermore the history of HE materials is long, their condensed-phase chemical properties are poorly understood.

  17. Numerical computation algorithm of explosion equations and thermodynamics parameters of mine explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李守巨; 刘迎曦; 何翔; 周圆π

    2001-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is presented to simulate the explosion reaction process of mine explosives based on the equation of state, the equation of mass conservation and thermodynamics balance equation of explosion products. With the affection of reversible reaction of explosion products to explosion reaction equations and thermodynamics parameters considered, the computer program has been developed. The computation values show that computer simulation results are identical with the testinq ones.

  18. Numerical computation algorithm of explosion equations and thermodynamics parameters of mine explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shou-ju; LIU Ying-xi; HE Xiang; ZHOU Y uan-pai

    2001-01-01

    A new numerical algorithm is presented to simulate the explosion reacti on process of mine explosives based on the equation of state, the equation of ma ss conservation and thermodynamics balance equation of explosion products. With the affection of reversible reaction of explosion products to explosion reaction equations and thermodynamics parameters considered, the computer program has be en developed. The computation values show that computer simulation results are i dentical with the testing ones.

  19. Gas explosions - an elementary account; Eksplosiv fare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seehusen, Joachim

    2002-07-01

    Although in a typical gas explosion the flame front propagates at sub-sonic speed, it still moves fast. Safety people often believe they can run away from a gas explosion. While gas explosions are well understood in the major companies, this is not true in many small ones, and people often do not realise how small the difference may be between a small puff and a dangerous explosion. Of special interest in a ''hydrogen society'' is the fact that hydrogen is dangerous and must be handled with care. The article discusses in an elementary way some of the basic concepts from the physics of gas explosions.

  20. Damage Effects of Shelled Explosive Explosion in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The damage of concrete subjected to explosion loading is an important issue in defense engineering. The damage degree of concrete is related to many factors, such as the type of explosive charge, the depth of burial and the parameters of concrete. In this paper, three factors are considered for experiments of shelled explosives in concrete targets, which are the filling coefficient, length-to-diameter ratio and the depth of burial. The filling coefficient is from 0.1 to 1 by changing thickness of shell, and length-to-diameter ratio is from 2.5 to 10. The unconfined compressive strength of concrete target for test is 35MPa. The experimental results showed that the sizes of craters of concretes are varied as the filling coefficient, length-to-diameter ratio and the depth of burial. The optimal values of filling coefficient, length-to-diameter ratio and the depth of burial of shelled charges were obtained to get largest damage regions of concrete targets. This work provides a base for evaluating the damage of concrete and designing the penetrating warhead.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.672-677, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.434

  1. Model of non-ideal detonation of condensed high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, E. B.; Kostitsin, O. V.; Koval, A. V.; Akhlyustin, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering theory of ideal detonation allows one to describe adequately the detonation of charges with near-critical diameter. For smaller diameters, detonation velocity can differ significantly from an ideal value expected based on equilibrium chemical thermodynamics. This difference is quite evident when using non-ideal explosives; in certain cases, this value can be up to one third of ideal detonation velocity. Numerical simulation of these systems is a very labor-consuming process because one needs to compute the states inside the chemical reaction zone, as well as to obtain data on the equation of state of high-explosive detonation products mixture and on the velocity of chemical reaction; however, these characteristics are poorly studied today. For practical purposes, one can use the detonation shock dynamics model based on interrelation between local velocity of the front and its local curvature. This interrelation depends on both the equation of state of explosion products, and the reaction velocity; but the explicit definition of these characteristics is not needed. In this paper, experimental results are analyzed. They demonstrate interrelation between the local curvature of detonation front and the detonation velocity. Equation of detonation front shape is found. This equation allows us to predict detonation velocity and shape of detonation wave front in arbitrary geometry by integrating ordinary differential equation for the front shape with a boundary condition at the charge edge. The results confirm that the model of detonation shock dynamics can be used to describe detonation processes in non-ideal explosives.

  2. RANCHERO explosive pulsed power experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Goforth, J H; Armijo, E V; Atchison, W L; Bartos, Yu; Clark, D A; Day, R D; Deninger, W J; Faehl, R J; Fowler, C M; García, F P; García, O F; Herrera, D H; Herrera, T J; Keinigs, R K; King, J C; Lindemuth, I R; López, E; Martínez, E C; Martínez, D; McGuire, J A; Morgan, D; Oona, H; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Randolph, R B; Reinovsky, R E; Rodríguez, G; Stokes, J L; Sena, F C; Tabaka, L J; Tasker, D G; Taylor, A J; Torres, D T; Anderson, H D; Broste, W B; Johnson, J B; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The authors are developing the RANCHERO high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to power cylindrically imploding solid-density liners for hydrodynamics experiments. Their near-term goal is to conduct experiments in the regime pertinent to the Atlas capacitor bank. That is, they will attempt to implode liners of ~50 g mass at velocities approaching 15 km/sec. The basic building block of the HEPP system is a coaxial generator with a 304.8 mm diameter stator, and an initial armature diameter of 152 mm. The armature is expanded by a high explosive (HE) charge detonated simultaneously along its axis. The authors have reported a variety of experiments conducted with generator modules 43 cm long and have presented an initial design for hydrodynamic liner experiments. In this paper, they give a synopsis of their first system test, and a status report on the development of a generator module that is 1.4 m long. (6 refs).

  3. Determination of Nanogram Microparticles from Explosives after Real Open-Air Explosions by Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Félix; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-07-05

    Explosives are increasingly being used for terrorist attacks to cause devastating explosions. The detection of their postblast residues after an explosion is a high challenge, which has been barely investigated, particularly using spectroscopic techniques. In this research, a novel methodology using confocal Raman microscopy has been developed for the analysis of postblast residues from 10 open-air explosions caused by 10 different explosives (TNT, RDX, PETN, TATP, HMTD, dynamite, black powder, ANFO, chloratite, and ammonal) commonly used in improvised explosive devices. The methodology for the determination of postblast particles from explosives consisted of examining the samples surfaces with both the naked eye, first, and microscopically (10× and 50×), immediately afterward; and finally, analyzing the selected residues by confocal Raman spectroscopy in order to identify the postblast particles from explosives. Interestingly, confocal Raman microscopy has demonstrated to be highly suitable to rapidly, selectively, and noninvasively analyze postblast microscopic particles from explosives up to the nanogram range.

  4. Trace Explosives Detection by Photoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Some field tests in counter-terrorism efforts to detect explosive traces employ chemistries that yield colored products. We have examined a test kit of this kind, ETKPlus, based on widely used chemistries and employed extensively by the Israel Police. Our investigation focuses on the prospect of gaining sensitivity by replacing the normal colorimetric modality with photoluminescence detection, which, to our knowledge, has not been explored to date. We find two or more orders of magnitude sens...

  5. LX-10 Explosive Damage Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-03

    Suite NAWCWD TM 8757 6 where P = System pressure Vs = System volume n = Covolume we = Weight of explosive burned F = Impetus, f...simultaneously ignited and regress uniformly, and the regression rate depends only on pressure and propellant temperature. 2. Heat losses from the bomb are...and fired in a manometric closed vessel. The pressure -time history was recorded, and an analysis of the data was performed to evaluate both the

  6. EXPLOSION RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin KULICH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the article we discuss the possibilities and analytical tools that can deal with the classification of space into zones with danger of explosion for devices with the presence of compressed flammable gases. Then we continue with specifications of possibilities for practical utilization linked to variables such as ventilation degree, hypothetical volume etc., including the examples. At the end we also give a brief overview of software for modelling gas leak, including examples of an outcome.

  7. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning

    CERN Document Server

    Boeltzig, A; Cavanna, F; Cristallo, S; Davinson, T; Depalo, R; deBoer, R J; Di Leva, A; Ferraro, F; Imbriani, G; Marigo, P; Terrasi, F; Wiescher, M

    2016-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions.

  8. Fuze for explosive magnetohydrodynamic generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.

    1976-12-23

    An apparatus is examined by which high explosive charges are propelled into and detonated at the center of an MHD-X generator. The high explosive charge units are engaged and propelled by a reciprocating ram device. Detonating in each instance is achieved by striking with a firing pin a detonator charge that is in register with a booster charge, the booster charge being in detonating communication with the high explosive charge. Various safety requirements are satisfied by a spring loaded slider operating in a channel transverse and adjacent to the booster charge. The slide retains the detonator charge out of register with the booster charge until a safety pin that holds the slider in place is pulled by a lanyard attached between the reciprocating ram and the safety pin. Removal of the safety pin permits the detonator charge to slide into alignment with the booster charge. Firing pin actuation is initiated by the slider at the instant the detonator charge and the booster charge come into register.

  9. Nuclear Explosions 1945-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergkvist, Nils-Olov; Ferm, Ragnhild

    2000-07-01

    The main part of this report is a list of nuclear explosions conducted by the United States, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, France, China, India and Pakistan in 1945-98. The list includes all known nuclear test explosions and is compiled from a variety of sources including officially published information from the USA, Russia and France. The details given for each explosion (date, origin time, location, yield, type, etc.) are often compiled from more than one source because the individual sources do not give complete information. The report includes a short background to nuclear testing and provides brief information on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and the verification regime now being established to verify compliance with the treaty. It also summarizes nuclear testing country by country. The list should be used with some caution because its compilation from a variety of sources means that some of the data could be incorrect. This report is the result of cooperation between the Defence Research Establishment (FOA) and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)

  10. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-03-12

    We investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from condensed explosive charges. These states are often modeled with a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function. However, the JWL function is not a Fundamental Equation of Thermodynamics, and therefore cannot give a complete specification of such states. We use the Cheetah code of Fried to study the loci of states of the expanded detonation products gases from C-4 charges, and their combustion products air. In the Le Chatelier Plane of specific-internal-energy versus temperature, these loci are fit with a Quadratic Model function u(T), which has been shown to be valid for T < 3,000 K and p < 1k-bar. This model is used to derive a Fundamental Equation u(v,s) for C-4. Given u(v,s), one can use Maxwell's Relations to derive all other thermodynamic functions, such as temperature: T(v,s), pressure: p(v,s), enthalpy: h(v,s), Gibbs free energy: g(v,s) and Helmholz free energy: f(v,s); these loci are displayed in figures for C-4. Such complete equations of state are needed for numerical simulations of blast waves from explosive charges, and their reflections from surfaces.

  11. Improved Explosive Collection and Detection with Rationally Assembled Surface Sampling Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Bays, J. Timothy; Gerasimenko, Aleksandr A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-09-21

    Sampling and detection of trace explosives is a key analytical process in modern transportation safety. In this work we have explored some of the fundamental analytical processes for collection and detection of trace level explosive on surfaces with the most widely utilized system, thermal desorption IMS. The performance of the standard muslin swipe material was compared with chemically modified fiberglass cloth. The fiberglass surface was modified to include phenyl functional groups. When compared to standard muslin, the phenyl functionalized fiberglass sampling material showed better analyte release from the sampling material as well as improved response and repeatability from multiple uses of the same swipe. The improved sample release of the functionalized fiberglass swipes resulted in a significant increase in sensitivity. Various physical and chemical properties were systematically explored to determine optimal performance. The results herein have relevance to improving the detection of other explosive compounds and potentially to a wide range of other chemical sampling and field detection challenges.

  12. Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

  13. Quantum control for initiation and detection of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Grane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R. Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We employ quantum control methods towards detection and quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of energetic materials. Ultrafast pulse shaping of broadband Infrared ({approx}750 nm to 850 run) and ultraviolet (266 nm, 400 nm) light is utilized for control. The underlying principals behind optimal control can be utilized to both detect and initiate explosives. In each case, time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For optimal dynamic detection of explosives (ODD-Ex) a phase specific broadband infrared pulse is created which increases not only the sensitivity of detection but also the selectivity of an explosive's spectral signatures in a background of interferents. QCI on the other hand, seeks to initiate explosives by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI is ideal for use with explosive detonators as it removes the possibility of unintentional initiation from an electrical source while adding an additional safety feature, initiation only with the proper pulse shape. Quantum control experiments require: (1) the ability to phase and amplitude shape the laser pulse and (2) the ability to effectively search for the pulse shape which controls the reaction. In these adaptive experiments we utilize both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex. Pulse shaping the broadband IR light, produced by focusing 800 nm light through a pressurized tube of Argon, is straightforward as commercial pulse shapers are available at and around 800 nm. Pulse shaping in the UV requires a home built shaper. Our system is an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) pulse shaper in which consists of a fused silica AOM crystal placed in the Fourier plane of a 4-f zero dispersion compressor.

  14. Chemistry Resolved Kinetic Flow Modeling of TATB Based Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitello, P A; Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Levesque, G; Souers, P C

    2011-07-21

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB based explosives are believed to have multi-time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. They use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. They term their model chemistry resolved kinetic flow as CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. A HE-validation suite of model simulations compared to experiments at ambient, hot, and cold temperatures has been developed. They present here a new rate model and comparison with experimental data.

  15. Shock response of the commercial high explosive Detasheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, B. W.; Ramsay, J. B.; Anderson, M. U.; Graham, R. A.

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical and chemical response of the flexible commercial high explosive DetasheetR is studied under controlled impact and plane-wave, high explosive loading. Results on nonreactive material behavior, sound speed, shock-initiation sensitivity and detonation pressure are presented. The material is found to respond in a viscous manner reminiscent of viscoelastic response of polymeric materials. Time-resolved pressure and pressure-rate measurements with PVDF piezoelectric polymer gauges are presented along with Manganin pressure and plate-dent test measurements of detonation pressure. Detonation pressures of 18GPa are indicated. Pressure measurements show initiation of reaction between 3 and 8 mm for an impact stress of 3.1 GPa. Plane wave loading wedge tests show run distances to detonation consistent with the pressure measurements, and with behavior like that of XTX8003 (80 % PETN/20 % Sylgard 182R).

  16. ATEX explosive atmospheres : risk assessment, control and compliance

    CERN Document Server

    Jespen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    This book details how safety (i.e. the absence of unacceptable risks) is ensured in areas where potentially explosive atmospheres (ATEX) can arise. The book also offers readers essential information on how to comply with the newest (April 2016) EU legislation when the presence of ATEX cannot be avoided. By presenting general guidance on issues arising out of the EU ATEX legislation – especially on zone classification, explosion risk assessment, equipment categorization, Ex-marking and related technical/chemical aspects – the book provides equipment manufacturers, responsible employers, and others with the essential knowledge they need to be able to understand the different – and often complicated – aspects of ATEX and to implement the necessary safety precautions. As such, it represents a valuable resource for all those concerned with maintaining high levels of safety in ATEX environments.

  17. Experiments To Demonstrate Chemical Process Safety Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorathy, Brian D.; Mooers, Jamisue A.; Warren, Matthew M.; Mich, Jennifer L.; Murhammer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the need to educate undergraduate chemical engineering students on chemical process safety and introduces the content of a chemical process safety course offered at the University of Iowa. Presents laboratory experiments demonstrating flammability limits, flash points, electrostatic, runaway reactions, explosions, and relief design.…

  18. Haz-Mat Refresher: Chemical Precautions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Louis A.

    2012-01-01

    It is important that first responders remain aware of the possible hazards resulting from chemical accidents or the intentional use of chemicals in destructive devices. Chemical components can be utilized in the manufacturing of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), can enhance the effect of a more conventional device, or can pose hazards based on…

  19. New developments of the CARTE thermochemical code: Calculation of detonation properties of high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vincent; Desbiens, Nicolas; Auroux, Eric

    2010-07-01

    We present the improvements of the CARTE thermochemical code which provides thermodynamic properties and chemical compositions of CHON systems over a large range of temperature and pressure with a very small computational cost. The detonation products are split in one or two fluid phase (s), treated with the MCRSR equation of state (EOS), and one condensed phase of carbon, modeled with a multiphase EOS which evolves with the chemical composition of the explosives. We have developed a new optimization procedure to obtain an accurate multicomponents EOS. We show here that the results of CARTE code are in good agreement with the specific data of molecular systems and measured detonation properties for several explosives.

  20. Thermal explosion in oscillating ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilov, Vasily

    2016-07-01

    Thermal explosion problem for a medium with oscillating ambient temperature at its boundaries is considered. This is a new problem in thermal explosion theory, not previously considered in a distributed system formulation, but important for combustion and fire science. It describes autoignition of wide range of fires (such as but not limited to piles of biosolids and other organic matter; storages of munitions, explosives, propellants) subjected to temperature variations, such as seasonal or day/night variation. The problem is considered in formulation adopted in classical studies of thermal explosion. Critical conditions are determined by frequency and amplitude of ambient temperature oscillations, as well as by a number of other parameters. Effects of all the parameters on critical conditions are quantified. Results are presented for the case of planar symmetry. Development of thermal explosion in time is also considered, and a new type of unsteady thermal explosion development is discovered where thermal runaway occurs after several periods of temperature oscillations within the medium.

  1. What Dominates a Craters Size, the Largest Single Explosion of the Formation Process or the Cumulative Energy of Many? Results of Multiblast Crater Evolution Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonder, I.; Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Craters of explosive volcanic eruptions are products of many explosions. Such craters are different than products of single events such as meteorite impacts or those produced by military testing because they typically result from multiple, rather than single, explosions. We analyzed the evolution of experimental craters that were created by several detonations of chemical explosives in layered aggregates. A method to calculate an effective explosion depth for non-flat topography (e.g. for explosions below existing craters) is derived, showing how multi-blast crater sizes differ from the single blast case. It is shown that sizes of natural caters (radii, volumes) are not characteristic of the number of explosions, and therefore not characteristic for the total acting energy, that formed a crater. Also the crater size is not simply related to the largest explosion in a sequence, but depends upon that explosion and the energy of that single blast and on the cumulative energy of all blasts that formed the crater. The two energies can be combined to form an effective number of explosions that is characteristic for the crater evolution. The multi-blast crater size evolution implies that it is not correct to estimate explosion energy of volcanic events from crater size using previously published relationships that were derived for single blast cases.

  2. Burning of droplets and particles of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrikov, B.N. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Small droplets of organic diazides investigated by C.K. Law and coworkers burn in hot gas at 1 atm with rates inversely proportional to the droplet diameter presumably owing to leading chemical reaction proceeds in gas phase. These burning rates are obviously much lower than those obtained by extrapolation of the results measured for the some substances in glass tubes (at pressure of about 10{sup -2}-10{sup -1} atm, and temperature 0-100 deg C) on the burning conditions of the droplets. Kinetic constants estimated using Zel`dovich equation for the burning rate in gas phase and Semenov relation for delay time of the droplets micro-explosion in liquid phase are about the same: E {approx_equal} 0.17 MJ/mol, log{sub 10}k{sub o} {approx_equal} 15(S{sup -1}). In both of the cases the leading chemical reaction is supposed to be of the first order. Landau instability is assumed to be reflected in distortion of the droplets at burning but, as opposed to the liquids pools or columns burning, it is not followed by the burning rate augmentation or (as it is observed sometimes) by the combustion extinguishment. Simple dependence of burning rate of droplets of diazides of the row of normal alkanes on their enthalpy of formation is obtained. Burning rate of ball-shaped particles of polyvinyl-nitrate estimated by A. Merzhanov and collaborators is about the same as measured by the data E.I. Maximov, the member of the same team, for PVN strands, at extrapolation of his results on the suggested preheating temperature of the particle. Probably it is a result of the leading chemical reaction proceeding in condensed phase. (author) 10 refs.

  3. Explosively Bonded Gun Tube Liner Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FOR OFFICIAL USE ONYLFGFF ARL-CR-0771 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Explosively Bonded Gun Tube Liner Development...return it to the originator. ARL-CR-0771 ● APR 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Explosively Bonded Gun Tube Liner Development...COVERED (From - To) 12 January 2014–1 January 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Explosively Bonded Gun Tube Liner Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ORISE 1120

  4. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives induced by soft X-radiation in ion mobility spectrometry: mass spectrometric investigation of the ionization reactions of drift gasses, dopants and alkyl nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Daniel; Erler, Alexander; Ritschel, Thomas; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Beil, Andreas; Blaschke, Michael; Ludwig, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A promising replacement for the radioactive sources commonly encountered in ion mobility spectrometers is a miniaturized, energy-efficient photoionization source that produce the reactant ions via soft X-radiation (2.8 keV). In order to successfully apply the photoionization source, it is imperative to know the spectrum of reactant ions and the subsequent ionization reactions leading to the detection of analytes. To that end, an ionization chamber based on the photoionization source that reproduces the ionization processes in the ion mobility spectrometer and facilitates efficient transfer of the product ions into a mass spectrometer was developed. Photoionization of pure gasses and gas mixtures containing air, N2 , CO2 and N2 O and the dopant CH2 Cl2 is discussed. The main product ions of photoionization are identified and compared with the spectrum of reactant ions formed by radioactive and corona discharge sources on the basis of literature data. The results suggest that photoionization by soft X-radiation in the negative mode is more selective than the other sources. In air, adduct ions of O2(-) with H2 O and CO2 were exclusively detected. Traces of CO2 impact the formation of adduct ions of O2(-) and Cl(-) (upon addition of dopant) and are capable of suppressing them almost completely at high CO2 concentrations. Additionally, the ionization products of four alkyl nitrates (ethylene glycol dinitrate, nitroglycerin, erythritol tetranitrate and pentaerythritol tetranitrate) formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization induced by X-ray photoionization in different gasses (air, N2 and N2 O) and dopants (CH2 Cl2 , C2 H5 Br and CH3 I) are investigated. The experimental studies are complemented by density functional theory calculations of the most important adduct ions of the alkyl nitrates (M) used for their spectrometric identification. In addition to the adduct ions [M + NO3 ](-) and [M + Cl](-) , adduct ions such as [M + N2 O2 ](-) , [M

  5. Explosive Field Visualization Based on Image Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-yao; JIANG Ling-shuang

    2009-01-01

    m the composite sequence. Experimental results show that the new images integrate the advantages of sources, effectively improve the visualization, and disclose more information about explosive field.

  6. Momentum transfer in indirect explosive drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J.E.; Warnes, R.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cherry, C.R.; Cherry, C.R. Jr.; Fischer, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Material which is not in direct contact with detonating explosives may still be driven by the explosion through impact by driven material or by attachment to driven material. In such circumstances the assumption of inelastic collision permits estimation of the final velocity of an assemblage. Examples of the utility of this assumption are demonstrated through use of Gurney equations. The inelastic collision calculation may also be used for metal parts which are driven by explosives partially covering the metal. We offer a new discounting angle to account for side energy losses from laterally unconfined explosive charges in cases where the detonation wave travels parallel to the surface which is driven.

  7. General phenomenology of underground nuclear explosions; Phenomenologie generale des explosions nucleaires souterraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlich, S.; Supiot, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). Centre d' Etudes

    1969-07-01

    An essentially qualitatively description is given of the phenomena related to underground nuclear explosions (explosion of a single unit, of several units in line, and simultaneous explosions). In the first chapter are described the phenomena which are common to contained explosions and to explosions forming craters (formation and propagation of a shock-wave causing the vaporization, the fusion and the fracturing of the medium). The second chapter describes the phenomena related to contained explosions (formation of a cavity with a chimney). The third chapter is devoted to the phenomenology of test explosions which form a crater; it describes in particular the mechanism of formation and the different types of craters as a function of the depth of the explosion and of the nature of the ground. The aerial phenomena connected with explosions which form a crater: shock wave in the air and focussing at a large distance, and dust clouds, are also dealt with. (authors) [French] On donne une description essentiellement qualitative des phenomenes lies aux explosions nucleaires souterraines (explosion d'un seul engin, d'engins en ligne et explosions simultanees). Dans un premier chapitre sont decrits les phenomenes communs aux explosions contenues et aux explosions formant un cratere (formation et propagation d'une onde de choc provoquant la vaporisation, la fusion et la fracturation du milieu). Le deuxieme chapitre decrit les phenomenes lies aux tirs contenus (formation d'une cavite et d'une cheminee). Le troisieme chapitre est consacre a la phenomenologie des tirs formant un cratere et decrit notamment le mecanisme de formation et les differents types de crateres en fonction de la profondeur d'explosion et de la nature du terrain. Les phenomenes aeriens lies aux explosions formant un cratere: onde de pression aerienne et focalisation a grande distance, nuages de poussieres, sont egalement abordes. (auteurs)

  8. 27 CFR 70.445 - Commerce in explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commerce in explosives. 70... Cartridges, and Explosives § 70.445 Commerce in explosives. Part 55 of title 27 CFR contains the regulations..., explosives, (b) Permits for users who buy or transport explosives in interstate or foreign commerce,...

  9. 27 CFR 555.181 - Reporting of plastic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of plastic..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.181 Reporting of plastic explosives. All persons, other than an agency of the United...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only permissible explosives, approved sheathed explosive units,...

  11. The gas dynamics of explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee,\tJohn H S

    2016-01-01

    Explosions, and the non-steady shock propagation associated with them, continue to interest researchers working in different fields of physics and engineering (such as astrophysics and fusion). Based on the author's course in shock dynamics, this book describes the various analytical methods developed to determine non-steady shock propagation. These methods offer a simple alternative to the direct numerical integration of the Euler equations and offer a better insight into the physics of the problem. Professor Lee presents the subject systematically and in a style that is accessible to graduate students and researchers working in shock dynamics, combustion, high-speed aerodynamics, propulsion and related topics.

  12. Static Charge Development on Explosives .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raha

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Static charge development character of some of the important explosive crystals have been predicted on the basis of their crystal class and symmetry. Among the important mechanism of charge development, the piezoelectric and pyroelectric characters have been considered. Ammonium trinitrate, ammonium nitrate, m-dinitro-benzene, trinitro-toluene, styphnic acid, beeta-lead styphnate, 4,4'dinitro-dipheny1, a-hexamethylenetetranitramine, nitroguanidine, picric acid, dimethylnitramine, a-lead azide and beeta-lead azide are pyroelectric in nature, whereas pentaerythritol tetranitrate, picryliodide, hexamethylenetranitramine, tetranitromethane and trinitroethane are piezoelectric in nature.

  13. 75 FR 1085 - Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2009R-18T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 5 (Friday, January 8, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 1085-1087] [FR Doc No: 2010-45] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [Docket No. ATF 34N] Commerce in Explosives; List of Explosive Materials (2009R-18T) AGENCY: Bureau of...

  14. A structured approach to forensic study of explosions: The TNO Inverse Explosion Analysis tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, M.M. van der; Wees, R.M.M. van; Brouwer, S.D.; Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der; Verreault, J.

    2015-01-01

    Forensic analysis of explosions consists of determining the point of origin, the explosive substance involved, and the charge mass. Within the EU FP7 project Hyperion, TNO developed the Inverse Explosion Analysis (TNO-IEA) tool to estimate the charge mass and point of origin based on observed damage

  15. Evaluation of instant catapult steam explosion combined with chemical pretreatments on corn stalk by components and enzymatic hydrolysis analysis%瞬间弹射蒸汽爆破联用化学法预处理玉米秸秆的组分和酶解分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎阳; 郝学密; 刘晨光; 白凤武

    2014-01-01

    以瞬间弹射蒸汽爆破(instant catapult steam explosion, ICSE)为基础,联用稀酸法、碱法、氨水法、有机溶剂法以及离子液体法进行预处理,对不同方法采用组分和酶解分析,以探索出一种绿色和高效的预处理方法。ICSE处理后的物料能够显著促进传统的化学预处理过程,其中ICSE与碱法联用预处理的糖收率最高,达到了77.54%,而ICSE与离子液体联用预处理后糖收率比单纯使用离子液体提高了7.78倍,达到了60.04%。选取ICSE与离子液体联用预处理过程作为最优预处理方法,并对其采用傅里叶-红外光谱、X射线晶体衍射和扫描电镜进行表征,经 ICSE 处理后玉米秸秆变得蓬松且不完整,半纤维素组分减少,促进离子液体对于纤维素的溶解;而与离子液体联用预处理后,物料纤维素和木质素相应官能团吸收峰增强,纤维素结晶构型由纤维素-Ⅰ型转变为纤维素-Ⅱ型,结晶指数降低。%Combining with instant catapult steam explosion (ICSE), corn stalk was pretreated by different chemical methods, including dilute acid, sodium hydroxide, aqueous ammonia, organic solvent, and ionic liquid. In order to obtain a green and highly efficient process, materials were analyzed by components and enzymatic hydrolysis analysis. ICSE could significantly prompt the effects of chemical methods on lignocellulose pretreatment. Among these approaches, ICSE combined with sodium hydroxide had the highest glucose yield 77.54%. Meanwhile, compared with the solo ionic liquid pretreated method, ICSE combined with ionic liquid pretreatment increased glucose yield by 7.78 folds, reaching 60.04%. Considering the requirements of efficiency, green process and low energy cost on pretreatment, the method of ICSE plus ionic liquid was selected as the optimal method and materials then were analyzed with Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning

  16. LOW OZONE-DEPLETING HALOCARBONS AS TOTAL-FLOOD AGENTS: VOLUME 2. LABORATORY-SCALE FIRE SUPPRESSION AND EXPLOSION PREVENTION TESTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results from (1) flame suppression testing of potential Halon-1301 (CF3Br) replacement chemicals in a laboratory cup burner using n-heptane fuel and (2) explosion prevention (inertion) testing in a small-scale explosion sphere using propane and methane as fuels. ...

  17. Photoluminescent Detection of Dissolved Underwater Trace Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tye Langston

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A portable, rapid, and economical method for in situ trace explosive detection in aqueous solutions was demonstrated using photoluminescence. Using europium/thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the reagent, dissolved nitroglycerin was fluorescently tagged and detected in seawater solutions without sample preparation, drying, or preconcentration. The chemical method was developed in a laboratory setting and demonstrated in a flow-through configuration using lightweight, inexpensive, commercial components by directly injecting the reagents into a continually flowing seawater stream using a small amount of organic solvent (approximately 8% of the total solution. Europium's vulnerability to vibrational fluorescence quenching by water provided the mode of detection. Without nitroglycerin in the seawater solution, the reagent's fluorescence was quenched, but when dissolved nitroglycerin was present, it displaced the water molecules from the europium/thenoyltrifluoroacetone compound and restored fluorescence. This effort focused on developing a seawater sensor, but performance comparisons were made to freshwater. The method was found to perform better in freshwater and it was shown that certain seawater constituents (such as calcium have an adverse impact. However, the concentrations of these constituents are not expected to vary significantly from the natural seawater used herein.

  18. Modeling the kinetics of carbon coagulation in explosives detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, F. H.; Viecelli, J. A.; Glosli, J. N.

    1998-05-01

    A typical insensitive high explosive such as LX-17 has a large carbon content. The detonation behavior of these explosives is affected by a slow coagulation of carbon atoms by diffusion and their possible transformation from one chemical bonding type to another. We have used the Brenner bond order potential to compute the melting line of diamond at high pressure and high temperature by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, with the goal to refine the potential for the study of the kinetics of the graphite diamond transition. The slow diffusion-controlled kinetics of carbon clusters has been examined by including a time-dependent surface correction to the Gibbs free energy of these clusters in the nonequilibrium CHEQ code. We also propose a new explosive burn model which incorporates a partial release of the heat of detonation in a fast reaction zone, followed by a diffusion-limited release of the remaining energy. Hydrodynamic applications of the new burn model to LX-17 show that computed expansion and compression results both agree closely with experimental data.

  19. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. Gas explosion prediction using CFD models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann-Delius, C.; Okafor, E. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Buhrow, C. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg Univ. (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    A number of CFD models are currently available to model gaseous explosions in complex geometries. Some of these tools allow the representation of complex environments within hydrocarbon production plants. In certain explosion scenarios, a correction is usually made for the presence of buildings and other complexities by using crude approximations to obtain realistic estimates of explosion behaviour as can be found when predicting the strength of blast waves resulting from initial explosions. With the advance of computational technology, and greater availability of computing power, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are becoming increasingly available for solving such a wide range of explosion problems. A CFD-based explosion code - FLACS can, for instance, be confidently used to understand the impact of blast overpressures in a plant environment consisting of obstacles such as buildings, structures, and pipes. With its porosity concept representing geometry details smaller than the grid, FLACS can represent geometry well, even when using coarse grid resolutions. The performance of FLACS has been evaluated using a wide range of field data. In the present paper, the concept of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and its application to gas explosion prediction is presented. Furthermore, the predictive capabilities of CFD-based gaseous explosion simulators are demonstrated using FLACS. Details about the FLACS-code, some extensions made to FLACS, model validation exercises, application, and some results from blast load prediction within an industrial facility are presented. (orig.)

  1. 77 FR 55108 - Explosive Siting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalents of less than or equal to 450 pounds. Although decreased, the revised separation... required separation distances for division 1.1 explosives and liquid propellants with TNT equivalents that... separation from a given net explosive weight (NEW) is one percent, which is an equivalent level of safety...

  2. Explosions inside Ejecta and Most Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blinnikov, S I

    2008-01-01

    The extremely luminous supernova SN2006gy is explained in the same way as other SNIIn events: light is produced by a radiative shock propagating in a dense circumstellar envelope formed by a previous weak explosion. The problems in the theory and observations of multiple-explosion SNe IIn are briefly reviewed.

  3. Some analytical methods for explosives: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selig, W.

    1965-12-08

    This report is the second compilation of methods for analyzing explosives. All the methods were developed for routine performance by techniques, and an attempt has therefore been made to keep them as simple as possible. Methods are presented for analyzing plastic-bonded explosives based on sym-cyclomethylenetetra-nitramine (HMX), based on viton in addition to HMX, and based on pentraerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  4. Explosion risks and consequences for tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.; Berg, A.C. van den

    2014-01-01

    Tunnel accidents with transports of dangerous goods may lead to explosions. Risk assessment for these accidents is complicated because of the low probability and the unknown, but disastrous effects expected. Especially the lack of knowledge on the strength of the explosion and the consequences for t

  5. 30 CFR 7.100 - Explosion tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion tests. 7.100 Section 7.100 Mineral... Underground Coal Mines Where Permissible Electric Equipment is Required § 7.100 Explosion tests. (a) Test... agree. (ii) Remove all parts that do not contribute to the operation or ensure the...

  6. Supplier's Status for Critical Solid Propellants, Explosive, and Pyrotechnic Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, B. L.; Painter, C. R.; Nauflett, G. W.; Cramer, R. J.; Mulder, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1970's a program was initiated at the Naval Surface Warfare Center/Indian Head Division (NSWC/IHDIV) to address the well-known problems associated with availability and suppliers of critical ingredients. These critical ingredients are necessary for preparation of solid propellants and explosives manufactured by the Navy. The objective of the program was to identify primary and secondary (or back-up) vendor information for these critical ingredients, and to develop suitable alternative materials if an ingredient is unavailable. In 1992 NSWC/IHDIV funded Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (CPIA) under a Technical Area Task (TAT) to expedite the task of creating a database listing critical ingredients used to manufacture Navy propellant and explosives based on known formulation quantities. Under this task CPIA provided employees that were 100 percent dedicated to the task of obtaining critical ingredient suppliers information, selecting the software and designing the interface between the computer program and the database users. TAT objectives included creating the Explosive Ingredients Source Database (EISD) for Propellant, Explosive and Pyrotechnic (PEP) critical elements. The goal was to create a readily accessible database, to provide users a quick-view summary of critical ingredient supplier's information and create a centralized archive that CPIA would update and distribute. EISD funding ended in 1996. At that time, the database entries included 53 formulations and 108 critical used to manufacture Navy propellant and explosives. CPIA turned the database tasking back over to NSWC/IHDIV to maintain and distribute at their discretion. Due to significant interest in propellant/explosives critical ingredients suppliers' status, the Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) approached the JANNAF Executive committee (EC) for authorization to continue the critical ingredient database work. In 1999, JANNAF EC approved the PDCS panel

  7. Remanufacturing strategy for chemical equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-cheng; XU Bin-shi; WANG Hai-dou; JIANG Yi; WU Yi-xiong; GONG Jian-ming; TU Shan-dong

    2005-01-01

    Failure, especially induced by cracks, usually occurred in the service process of chemical equipment, which could cause the medium leakage, fire hazard and explosion and induced the personnel casualty and economic losses. To assure the long-term and safety service, it is necessary to apply the remanufacturing technology on the chemical equipment containing cracks. The recent research advances on the remanufacturing, the failure modes and the life extension technology for chemical equipment were reviewed. The engineering strategy of the remanufacturing for the chemical equipment was proposed, which could provide a reasonable and reliable technical route for the remanufacturing operation of chemical equipment. In the strategy, the redesign was also been considered.

  8. Suppression of Chemotactic Explosion by Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Alexander; Xu, Xiaoqian

    2016-11-01

    Chemotaxis plays a crucial role in a variety of processes in biology and ecology. In many instances, processes involving chemical attraction take place in fluids. One of the most studied PDE models of chemotaxis is given by the Keller-Segel equation, which describes a population density of bacteria or mold which is attracted chemically to substance they secrete. Solutions of the Keller-Segel equation can exhibit dramatic collapsing behavior, where density concentrates positive mass in a measure zero region. A natural question is whether the presence of fluid flow can affect singularity formation by mixing the bacteria thus making concentration harder to achieve. In this paper, we consider the parabolic-elliptic Keller-Segel equation in two and three dimensions with an additional advection term modeling ambient fluid flow. We prove that for any initial data, there exist incompressible fluid flows such that the solution to the equation stays globally regular. On the other hand, it is well known that when the fluid flow is absent, there exists initial data leading to finite time blow up. Thus the presence of fluid flow can prevent the singularity formation. We discuss two classes of flows that have the explosion arresting property. Both classes are known as very efficient mixers. The first class are the relaxation enhancing (RE) flows of (Ann Math:643-674, 2008). These flows are stationary. The second class of flows are the Yao-Zlatos near-optimal mixing flows (Mixing and un-mixing by incompressible flows. arXiv:1407.4163, 2014), which are time dependent. The proof is based on the nonlinear version of the relaxation enhancement construction of (Ann Math:643-674, 2008), and on some variations of the global regularity estimate for the Keller-Segel model.

  9. Hydrodynamics of Explosion Experiments and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kedrinskii, Valery K

    2005-01-01

    Hydronamics of Explosion presents the research results for the problems of underwater explosions and contains a detailed analysis of the structure and the parameters of the wave fields generated by explosions of cord and spiral charges, a description of the formation mechanisms for a wide range of cumulative flows at underwater explosions near the free surface, and the relevant mathematical models. Shock-wave transformation in bubbly liquids, shock-wave amplification due to collision and focusing, and the formation of bubble detonation waves in reactive bubbly liquids are studied in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on the investigation of wave processes in cavitating liquids, which incorporates the concepts of the strength of real liquids containing natural microinhomogeneities, the relaxation of tensile stress, and the cavitation fracture of a liquid as the inversion of its two-phase state under impulsive (explosive) loading. The problems are classed among essentially nonlinear processes that occur unde...

  10. Morphomechanical Innovation Drives Explosive Seed Dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofhuis, Hugo; Moulton, Derek; Lessinnes, Thomas; Routier-Kierzkowska, Anne-Lise; Bomphrey, Richard J; Mosca, Gabriella; Reinhardt, Hagen; Sarchet, Penny; Gan, Xiangchao; Tsiantis, Miltos; Ventikos, Yiannis; Walker, Simon; Goriely, Alain; Smith, Richard; Hay, Angela

    2016-06-30

    How mechanical and biological processes are coordinated across cells, tissues, and organs to produce complex traits is a key question in biology. Cardamine hirsuta, a relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, uses an explosive mechanism to disperse its seeds. We show that this trait evolved through morphomechanical innovations at different spatial scales. At the organ scale, tension within the fruit wall generates the elastic energy required for explosion. This tension is produced by differential contraction of fruit wall tissues through an active mechanism involving turgor pressure, cell geometry, and wall properties of the epidermis. Explosive release of this tension is controlled at the cellular scale by asymmetric lignin deposition within endocarp b cells-a striking pattern that is strictly associated with explosive pod shatter across the Brassicaceae plant family. By bridging these different scales, we present an integrated mechanism for explosive seed dispersal that links evolutionary novelty with complex trait innovation. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  11. [Explosion injuries - prehospital care and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsträter, Thorsten; Holsträter, Susanne; Rein, Daniela; Helm, Matthias; Hossfeld, Björn

    2013-11-01

    Explosion injuries are not restricted to war-like military conflicts or terrorist attacks. The emergency physician may also encounter such injuries in the private or industrial fields, injuries caused by fireworks or gas explosions. In such cases the injury patterns are especially complex and may consist of blunt and penetrating injuries as well as thermal damage. Emergency medical personnel must be prepared to cope with explosion trauma not only in individual cases but also in major casualty incidents (MCI). This necessitates a sound knowledge about the mechanisms and processes of an explosion as well as the particular pathophysiological relationships of explosion injuries in order to be able to initiate the best possible, guideline-conform trauma therapy.

  12. Introduction to Physics and Chemistry of Combustion Explosion, Flame, Detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Liberman, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Most of the material covered in this book deals with the fundamentals of chemistry and physics of key processes and fundamental mechanisms for various combustion and combustion related phenomena in gaseous combustible mixture. It provides the reader with basic knowledge of burning processes and mechanisms of reaction wave propagation. The combustion of a gas mixture (flame, explosion, detonation) is necessarily accompanied by motion of the gas. The process of combustion is therefore not only a chemical phenomenon but also one of gas dynamics. The material selection focuses on the gas phase and

  13. User Friendly Explosives Reactive Armour a Long term Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Dikshit

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : There is a strong need to develop explosive reactive armour (ERA for protecting battle tanks against an emerging threat of kinetic and chemical energy missiles. In this context, global trends, principle and limitations of ERA and threat perception-based types of ERA have been dwelt upon. User-friendly ERA is a long-term reality. User-friendly ERA system is thus defined to be an efficient and protective system that not only provide full protection to the tank crew, but is also harmless to the supporting infantory. The indigenously-developed ERA system is close to be termed as a user-friendly ERA.

  14. Trace Detection of RDX, HMX and PETN Explosives Using a Fluorescence Spot Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Helin; Bunes, Benjamin R.; Wu, Na; Xu, Miao; Yang, Xiaomei; Yu, Li; Zang, Ling

    2016-05-01

    1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), the major components in plastic explosives, pose a significant threat to public safety. A quick, sensitive, and low-cost detection method for these non-volatile explosives is eagerly demanded. Here we present a fluo-spot approach, which can be employed for in situ detection of trace amount of explosives. The sensor molecule is a charge-transfer fluorophore, DCM, which is strongly fluorescent in its pristine state, but non-fluorescent after the quick reaction with NO2· (or NO2+) generated from the UV photolysis of RDX, HMX (or PETN). When fabricated within silica gel TLC plate, the fluo-spot sensor features high sensitivity owing to the large surface area and porous structure of the substrate. The sensor reaction mechanism was verified by various experimental characterizations, including chromatography, UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, MS and 1H NMR spectrometry. The fluo-spot also demonstrated high selectivity towards RDX, HMX and PETN, as no significant fluorescence quenching was observed for other chemical compounds including common nitro-aromatic explosives and inorganic oxidative compounds. The DCM sensor can also be used as an economical spray kit to directly spot the explosives by naked eyes, implying great potential for quick, low-cost trace explosives detection.

  15. Merging Infrasound and Electromagnetic Signals as a Means for Nuclear Explosion Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Joseph; Lipshtat, Azi; Kesar, Amit S.; Pistinner, Shlomo; Ben Horin, Yochai

    2016-04-01

    The infrasound monitoring network of the CTBT consists of 60 stations. These stations are capable of detecting atmospheric events, and may provide approximate location within time scale of a few hours. However, the nature of these events cannot be deduced from the infrasound signal. More than two decades ago it was proposed to use the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) as a means of discriminating nuclear explosion from other atmospheric events. An EMP is a unique signature of nuclear explosion and is not detected from chemical ones. Nevertheless, it was decided to exclude the EMP technology from the official CTBT verification regime, mainly because of the risk of high false alarm rate, due to lightning electromagnetic pulses [1]. Here we present a method of integrating the information retrieved from the infrasound system with the EMP signal which enables us to discriminate between lightning discharges and nuclear explosions. Furthermore, we show how spectral and other characteristics of the electromagnetic signal emitted from a nuclear explosion are distinguished from those of lightning discharge. We estimate the false alarm probability of detecting a lightning discharge from a given area of the infrasound event, and identifying it as a signature of a nuclear explosion. We show that this probability is very low and conclude that the combination of infrasound monitoring and EMP spectral analysis may produce a reliable method for identifying nuclear explosions. [1] R. Johnson, Unfinished Business: The Negotiation of the CTBT and the End of Nuclear Testing, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, 2009.

  16. Explosion probability of unexploded ordnance: expert beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Jacqueline Anne; Small, Mitchell J; Morgan, M G

    2008-08-01

    This article reports on a study to quantify expert beliefs about the explosion probability of unexploded ordnance (UXO). Some 1,976 sites at closed military bases in the United States are contaminated with UXO and are slated for cleanup, at an estimated cost of $15-140 billion. Because no available technology can guarantee 100% removal of UXO, information about explosion probability is needed to assess the residual risks of civilian reuse of closed military bases and to make decisions about how much to invest in cleanup. This study elicited probability distributions for the chance of UXO explosion from 25 experts in explosive ordnance disposal, all of whom have had field experience in UXO identification and deactivation. The study considered six different scenarios: three different types of UXO handled in two different ways (one involving children and the other involving construction workers). We also asked the experts to rank by sensitivity to explosion 20 different kinds of UXO found at a case study site at Fort Ord, California. We found that the experts do not agree about the probability of UXO explosion, with significant differences among experts in their mean estimates of explosion probabilities and in the amount of uncertainty that they express in their estimates. In three of the six scenarios, the divergence was so great that the average of all the expert probability distributions was statistically indistinguishable from a uniform (0, 1) distribution-suggesting that the sum of expert opinion provides no information at all about the explosion risk. The experts' opinions on the relative sensitivity to explosion of the 20 UXO items also diverged. The average correlation between rankings of any pair of experts was 0.41, which, statistically, is barely significant (p= 0.049) at the 95% confidence level. Thus, one expert's rankings provide little predictive information about another's rankings. The lack of consensus among experts suggests that empirical studies

  17. Effect of steam explosion on in vitro gas production kinetics and rumen fermentation profiles of three common straws

    OpenAIRE

    Li Wen He; Qing Xiang Meng; Yong Li; Fei Wang; Li Ping Ren

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of steam explosion on in vitro gas production (GP) and rumen fermentation profiles of common straws, in vitro cultivation was conducted for 96 h with the rumen fluid collected from steers. Different types of straw had various chemical compositions, which were affected by steam explosion (P<0.01). Steam explosion increased (P<0.01) the rate and volume of GP, lag time disappeared and asymptotic GP decreased, which were also affected (P<0.01) by the type of str...

  18. Evaluation of One-Sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Remote Detection of Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Si:znal-to-Noise Ratic 0:’ -:.-e NMR Exceri."ent", Journal o_ magnetji c Resonance 2 4, :4. 1. Hu.;chnson, ed. , The ARRL Handbook f4or tne Radio...6. 3. M. Dobratz, ed., LLNL Exzlos -4-ves Handbook -- Prc,_ert_-es o~Chemical E’xolosives and Explosives Simulants, ner: cfCalifornia Technical

  19. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Korschinek, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, or the direct exposure of lethal x-rays. Another indirect effect is cloud formation, induced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere which result in a drop in the Earth's temperature, causing major glaciations of the Earth. The discovery of highly intensive gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which could be connected to SNe, initiated further discussions on possible life-threatening events in Earth's history. The probability that GRBs hit the Earth is very low. Nevertheless, a past interaction of Earth with GRBs and/or SNe cannot be exclude...

  20. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  1. Smart Phones: Platform Enabling Modular, Chemical, Biological, and Explosives Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Detection – Colorimetric test kits were purchased commercially from their respective manufacturers [IDEX and E.L.I.T.E. EL100 (Field Forensics ), MIPS...portability. The IDEX (Field Forensics ) was selected for further development due to rugged design, reproducible results, few false positives, low LOD, and...communications mediums, increased memory capacity, power reduction, global positioning systems (GPS), audio recording, accelerometers, increased video and

  2. In Situ Chemical Reduction for Organic Explosives in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    www.AdventusGroup.com March 2008 © Copyright Adventus Intellectual Property Inc. 7 Reductive DARAMEND® Bioremediation treatment time (days) re d o x...2008 © Copyright Adventus Intellectual Property Inc. 9 DARAMEND ® Technology Applications Cycled Anaerobic/Aerobic • chlorinated pesticides and...3,000 4,000 0 36 71 control standard anaerobic DARAMEND® Bioremediation Numbers in parentheses indicate total amino compounds by EPA 8330 Method

  3. Analysis of Xrage and Flag High Explosive Burn Models with PBX 9404 Cylinder Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrier, Danielle; Fessenden, Julianna; Ramsey, Scott

    2016-11-01

    High explosives are energetic materials that release their chemical energy in a short interval of time. They are able to generate extreme heat and pressure by a shock driven chemical decomposition reaction, which makes them valuable tools that must be understood. This study investigated the accuracy and performance of two Los Alamos National Laboratory hydrodynamic codes, which are used to determine the behavior of explosives within a variety of systems: xRAGE which utilizes an Eulerian mesh, and FLAG with utilizes a Lagrangian mesh. Various programmed and reactive burn models within both codes were tested, using a copper cylinder expansion test. The test was based off of a recent experimental setup which contained the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9404. Detonation velocity versus time curves for this explosive were obtained from the experimental velocity data collected using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The modeled results from each of the burn models tested were then compared to one another and to the experimental results using the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation of state parameters that were determined and adjusted from the experimental tests. This study is important to validate the accuracy of our high explosive burn models and the calibrated EOS parameters, which are important for many research topics in physical sciences.

  4. Compendium of Nitromethane Data Relevant to the Tactical Explosive System (TEXS) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    retained is rapidly metabolized through oxidative cleavage of the molecule, with generation of nitrite ion and aldehyde formation. Intermedi- ate nitrite... cigarette contained 0.53 pg NM. 516/749 "Hazardous Chemicals Data Book," G. Weiss, editor, Hoyes Data Corporation, Park Ridge, NJ, 1980. Chemical and...permittivity and weak electron -donor ahiiity. If nitronate ions are allowed to form salts in 166 NM, especially with heavy metals, explosion will result

  5. Study on Property of Desensitized Explosive Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国新; 王晓丽; 焦清介; 刘淑珍

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical sensitivity, the critical thickness of detonation wave propagation and detonation velocity of desensitized PETN film were studied by experiments. The relationship between the mass of desensitizer paraffin wax and the friction sensitivity of desensitized PETN film was tested. According to the microstructure of film, the function of desensitizer was explained. It was proved that the explosive film could make explosive element micromation and kept its inherence properties by the result of testing the propagating critical dimension of the desensitized PETN film detonation wave. The explosive velocity of confined desensitized PETN film was tested by the multiplex optical fibre.

  6. Thermodynamic Model of Afterburning in Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Howard, M; Fried, L

    2003-04-23

    Thermodynamic states encountered during afterburning of explosion products gases in air were analyzed with the Cheetah code. Results are displayed in the form of Le Chatelier diagrams: the locus of states of specific internal energy versus temperature, for six different condensed explosives charges. Accuracy of the results was confirmed by comparing the fuel and products curves with the heats of detonation and combustion, and species composition as measured in bomb calorimeter experiments. Results were fit with analytic functions u = f ( T ) suitable for specifying the thermodynamic properties required for gas-dynamic models of afterburning in explosions.

  7. Explosive Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices (INDs). The studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model results were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements are presented in this report. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another.

  8. Water waves generated by underwater explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mehaute, Bernard Le

    1996-01-01

    This is the first book on explosion-generated water waves. It presents the theoretical foundations and experimental results of the generation and propagation of impulsively generated waves resulting from underwater explosions. Many of the theories and concepts presented herein are applicable to other types of water waves, in particular, tsunamis and waves generated by the fall of a meteorite. Linear and nonlinear theories, as well as experimental calibrations, are presented for cases of deep and shallow water explosions. Propagation of transient waves on dissipative, nonuniform bathymetries to

  9. Steam explosion pretreatment of softwood: the effect of the explosive decompression on enzymatic digestibility

    OpenAIRE

    Pielhop, Thomas; Amgarten, Janick; von Rohr, Philipp Rudolf; Studer, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Steam explosion pretreatment has been examined in many studies for enhancing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass and is currently the most common pretreatment method in commercial biorefineries. The information available about the effect of the explosive decompression on the biochemical conversion is, however, very limited, and no studies prove that the latter is actually enhanced by the explosion. Hence, it is of great value to discern between the effect of the ...

  10. 30 CFR 77.1300 - Explosives and blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting. 77.1300 Section 77... Explosives and Blasting § 77.1300 Explosives and blasting. (a) No explosives, blasting agent, detonator, or any other related blasting device or material shall be stored, transported, carried, handled,...

  11. Threshold Monitoring Maps for Under-Water Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydro-acoustic energy in the 1-100 Hz range from under-water explosions can easily spread for thousands of miles due to the unique properties of the deep sound channel. This channel, aka SOFAR channel, exists almost everywhere in the earth's oceans where the water has at least 1500m depth. Once the energy is trapped in this channel it spreads out cylindrically, and hence experiences very little loss, as long as there is an unblocked path from source to receiver. Other losses such as absorption due to chemicals in the ocean (mainly boric acid and magnesium sulphate) are also quite minimal at these low frequencies. It is not surprising then that the International Monitoring System (IMS) maintains a global network of hydrophone stations listening on this particular frequency range. The overall objective of our work is to build a probabilistic model to detect and locate under-water explosions using the IMS network. A number of critical pieces for this model, such as travel time predictions, are already well known. We are extending the existing knowledge-base by building the remaining pieces, most crucially the models for transmission losses and detection probabilities. With a complete model for detecting under-water explosions we are able to combine it with our existing model for seismic events, NET-VISA. In the conference we will present threshold monitoring maps for explosions in the earth's oceans. Our premise is that explosive sources release an unknown fraction of their total energy into the SOFAR channel, and this trapped energy determines their detection probability at each of the IMS hydrophone stations. Our threshold monitoring maps compute the minimum amount of energy at each location that must be released into the deep sound channel such that there is a ninety percent probability that at least two of the IMS stations detect the event. We will also present results of our effort to detect and locate hydro-acoustic events. In particular, we will show results

  12. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rae, Philip John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Timothy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Novak, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Armstrong, Christopher Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baca, Eva V. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gunderson, Jake Alfred [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without a barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX 9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  13. NQR Stimulation Technique for Explosives Detection System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A method of customization stimulation signal based on direct digital frequency synthesis (DDS) for Nuclear Quadrapole Resonance Explosives Detection System is presented. DDS has many advantages, such as high frequency resolution, high convert speed,

  14. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rae, Philip John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Timothy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Novak, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Armstrong, Christopher Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baca, Eva V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gunderson, Jake Alfred [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  15. Highly explosive nanosilicon-based composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, D.; Diener, J.; Gross, E.; Kuenzner, N.; Kovalev, D. [Technical University of Munich, Physics Department, James-Franck-Str., 85747 Garching (Germany); Timoshenko, V.Yu. [Moscow State M.V. Lomonosov University, Physics Department, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    We present a highly explosive binary system based on porous silicon layers with their pores filled with solid oxidizers. The porous layers are produced by a standard electrochemical etching process and exhibit properties that are different from other energetic materials. Its production is completely compatible with the standard silicon technology and full bulk silicon wafers can be processed and therefore a large number of explosive elements can be produced simultaneously. The application-relevant parameters: the efficiency and the long-term stability of various porous silicon/oxidizer systems have been studied in details. Structural properties of porous silicon, its surface termination, the atomic ratio of silicon to oxygen and the chosen oxidizers were optimized to achieve the highest efficiency of the explosive reaction. This explosive system reveals various possible applications in different industrial fields, e.g. as a novel, very fast airbag igniter. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Numerical Simulation of Underwater Explosion Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Chunliang; XU Gengguang; LIU Kezhong

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation of TNT underwater explosion was carried out with AUTODYN software.Influences of artificial viscosity and mesh density on simulation results were discussed.Detonation waves in explosive and shock wave in water during early time of explosion are high frequency waves.Fine meshes (less than 1 mm) in explosive and water nearby,and small linear viscosity coefficients and quadratic viscosity coefficients (0.02 and 0.1 respectively,1/10 of default values) are needed in numerical simulation model.According to these rules,numerical computing pressure profiles can match well with those calculated by Zamyshlyayev empirical formula.Otherwise peak pressure would be smeared off and upstream relative errors would be cumulated downstream to make downstream peak pressure lower.

  17. Rabbit lung injury induced by explosive decompression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of rabbit lunginjury caused by explosive decompression. Methods: A total of 42 rabbits and 10 rats were served as the experimental animals. A slow recompressiondecompression test and an explosive decompression test were applied to the animals, respectively. And the effects of the given tests on the animals were discussed. Results: The slow recompression-decompression did not cause an obvious lung injury, but the explosive decompression did cause lung injuries in different degrees. The greater the decompression range was, the shorter the decompression duration was, and the heavier the lung injuries were. Conclusions: Explosive decompression can cause a similar lung injury as shock wave does. The primary mechanical causes of the lung injury might be a tensile strain or stress in the alveolar wall and the pulmonary surface's impacts on the inside wall of the chest.

  18. Pretreatment of Corn Stalk by Steam Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵自强; 田永生; 谭惠民

    2003-01-01

    A steam explosion pretreatment, which is one of the best ways of pretreating plant stalk, is applied at various severities to corn stalk. It could effectively modify the super-molecular structure of corn stalk and defibrating corn stalk into individual components. The relationship between yield of reducing sugar and the operating conditions, including temperature, pressure of steam explosion pretreatment and acidity, is also established. Experimental results prove that the steam explosion substantially increases the yield of reducing sugar, and the optimal condition for steam explosion is as follows: the pressure is 2.0 MPa, the pressure-retaining time 300 s, the initial acid concentration 1% and the acid treatment time 24 h.

  19. Shunting effect in explosive electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Parkevich, E. V.; Pikuz, S. A.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    An explanation is given to the results of an experiment on studying the explosive electron emission in a wire-cathode diode where a strongly nonuniform energy deposition into the wire material was observed using an X pinch as a radiation source for projection x-ray imaging. The specific input energy, contrary to the well-known observations, was not a maximum at the wire end, i.e., in the region of the strongest electric field, and the wire explosion occurred in the bulk, distant from the end. This is accounted for by the contribution of the wire side surface to explosive electron emission and by the gas desorption from the wire intensely heated by a current of density 108 A/cm2. Thus, the space between anode and cathode (wire end) is bridged by two plasmas: one generated due to the explosive electron emission from the wire side surface and the other produced from the desorbed gas.

  20. Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. H. Seabury; A. J. Caffrey

    2006-04-01

    The feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices has been studied computationally, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Monte Carlo results, in turn were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements have been previously reported. In this report we describe measurements performed on actual explosives and compare the results with calculations. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another by PGNAA

  1. Magnetorotational Explosive Instability in Keplerian Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yuri; Mond, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that deferentially rotating disks that are in the presence of weak axial magnetic field are prone to a new nonlinear explosive instability. The latter occurs due to the near-resonance three-wave interactions of a magnetorotational instability with stable Alfven-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. The dynamical equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of the three interacting modes are derived. Numerical solutions of the dynamical equations indicate that small frequency mismatch gives rise to two types of behavior: 1. explosive instability which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and 2. bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic solutions of the dynamical equations are obtained for the explosive instability regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  2. Effect of Explosive Sources on the Elastic Wave Field of Explosions in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hua Bai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A seismic wave is essentially an elastic wave, which propagates in the soil medium, with the strength of initial elastic wave being created by an explosion source that has a significant effect on seismic wave energy. In order to explore the explosive energy effect on output characteristics of the elastic wave field, four explosives with different work capacity (i.e., TNT, 8701, composition B and THL were used to study the effects of elastic wave pressure and rise time of stress wave to the peak value of explosions in soils. All the experimental data was measured under the same geological conditions using a self-designed pressure measuring system. This study was based on the analysis of the initial pressure of elastic waves from the energy output characteristics of the explosives. The results show that this system is feasible for underground pressure tests, and the addition of aluminum powder increases the pressure of elastic waves and energy release of explosions in soils. The explosive used as a seismic energy source in petroleum and gas exploration should have properties of high explosion heat and low volume of explosion gas products.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(4, pp.376-380, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.2770

  3. Effect of Explosive Sources on the Elastic Wave Field of Explosions in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hua Bai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A seismic wave is essentially an elastic wave, which propagates in the soil medium, with the strength of initial elastic wave being created by an explosion source that has a significant effect on seismic wave energy. In order to explore the explosive energy effect on output characteristics of the elastic wave field, four explosives with different work capacity (i.e., TNT, 8701, composition B and THL were used to study the effects of elastic wave pressure and rise time of stress wave to the peak value of explosions in soils. All the experimental data was measured under the same geological conditions using a self-designed pressure measuring system. This study was based on the analysis of the initial pressure of elastic waves from the energy output characteristics of the explosives. The results show that this system is feasible for underground pressure tests, and the addition of aluminum powder increases the pressure of elastic waves and energy release of explosions in soils. The explosive used as a seismic energy source in petroleum and gas exploration should have properties of high explosion heat and low volume of explosion gas products.

  4. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laintz, Kenneth E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  5. On thermal explosion in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Peter

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model of thermal explosion in porous media which is a natural generalization of the well-known problem of self-ignition introduced by (Gelfand 1963 Am. Math. Soc. Trans. 29 295-381). We rigorously prove that, similar to the Gelfand-Barenblatt problem, the thermal explosion (finite time blow-up of all solutions for the problem with non-negative initial data) occurs exclusively due to the absence of a weak solution of the corresponding stationary problem.

  6. "Explosively growing" vortices of unstably stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Horton, W.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Fedun, V.

    2016-10-01

    A new type of "explosively growing" vortex structure is investigated theoretically in the framework of ideal fluid hydrodynamics. It is shown that vortex structures may arise in convectively unstable atmospheric layers containing background vorticity. From an exact analytical vortex solution the vertical vorticity structure and toroidal speed are derived and analyzed. The assumption that vorticity is constant with height leads to a solution that grows explosively when the flow is inviscid. The results shown are in agreement with observations and laboratory experiments

  7. [Pulmonary contusion and hemothorax due to explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Herrera, Carlos; Sanjuán-Fabián, Héctor; Medellín-Sierra, Ulises Darío; Nájera-Garduño, Heladio; García-Cabello, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Folklore and "uses and customs" in countries such as Mexico, under certain circumstances, have direct influences on risks for traumatic injuries. Such is the case of gunpowder explosive objects used during celebration holidays. We present a 14-year-old male who suffered a pulmonary contusion as a consequence of an explosion of "huevo de codorniz." A pleurostomy tube was required to resolve symptomatic hemothorax. The patient was discharged 5 days after admission.

  8. Risk Assessment Study for Storage Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Azhar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, there has been rapidly increasing usage in amount of explosives due to widely expansion in quarrying and mining industries. The explosives are usually stored in the storage where the safety precaution had given high attention. As the storage of large quantity of explosive can be hazardous to workers and nearby residents in the events of accidental denotation of explosives, a risk assessment study for storage explosive (magazine had been carried out. Risk assessment study had been conducted in Kimanis Quarry Sdn. Bhd, located in Sabah. Risk assessment study had been carried out with the identification of hazards and failure scenarios and estimation of the failure frequency of occurrence. Analysis of possible consequences of failure and the effects of blast waves due to the explosion was evaluated. The risk had been estimated in term of fatalities and eardrum rupture to the workers and public. The average individual voluntary risk for fatality to the workers at the quarry is calculated to be 5.75 x 10-6 per person per year, which is much lower than the acceptable level. Eardrum rupture risk calculated to be 3.15 x 10-6 per person per year for voluntary risk. There is no involuntary risk found for fatality but for eardrum rupture it was calculated to be 6.98 x 10-8 per person per year, as given by Asian Development Bank.

  9. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management.

  10. Explosive compaction of CuCr alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金平; 罗守靖; 龚朝晖; 牛玮; 纪松

    2002-01-01

    The production of CuCr alloys utilizing explosive compaction was studied. Mixture powders of CuCr alloys placed in tubes with a dimension of d14.0mm×21.4mm can be compacted using explosive pads of 16.5mm or 22.5mm. Thicker pads of explosive make the compacts more porous. The effects of the ratio of me/mp, ratio of me/(mp+mt) and impact energy on the density of compacts were similar, they were chosen to control explosive compaction, respectively. When adequate value of the parameters me/mp, me/(mt+mp) and impact energy of unit area of tube was chosen, high density(7.858g/cm3), high hardness(HB189) and low conductance (13.6MS/m) of CuCr alloys could be made by explosive compaction. The general properties of CuCr alloys by explosive compaction are similar to those of CuCr alloys by traditional process.

  11. Statistical estimation of loads from gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeiset, Stian

    1998-12-31

    In the design of structures in the offshore and process industries, the possibility of a gas explosion must always be considered. The main uncertainties in computerized simulation of gas explosions are the assumptions of the gas cloud, the location of the ignition point and the properties of the simulator itself. This thesis quantifies the levels of these uncertainties by performing a large number of simulations on three offshore modules and one onshore plant. It is found that (1) there is an approximate linear relation between pressure and gas volume, (2) it may be possible to find a linear relation between pressure and impulse, (3) there is an inverse relation between pressure and duration, (4) the response of offshore structures exposed to gas explosions are rarely in the impulsive regime, (5) loading rates vary widely in magnitude, (6) an assumption of a triangular explosion pulse is often correct, (7) louvres increase pressure, impulse and duration of an explosion. The effect of ignition point location is studied in detail. It is possible to derive an ignition point uncertainty load factor that shows predictable behaviour by generalizing the non-parametric properties of the explosion pressure. A model for taking into account the uncertainties regarding gas volume, ignition point location and simulator imperfectness is proposed. The model is intended to produce a characteristic load for structural design. 68 refs., 51 figs., 36 tabs.

  12. Experimental Study on Unconfined Vapor Cloud Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕明树; ABULITI; Abudula

    2003-01-01

    An experimental system was setup to study the pressure field of unconfined vapor cloud explosions.The semi-spherical vapor clouds were formed by slotted 0.02mm polyethylene film.In the Center of the cloud was an ignition electrode that met ISO6164"Explosion protection System" and NFPA68 "Guide for Venting of Deflagrations". A data-acquisition system,with dymame responding time less than 0.001s with 0.5% accuracy,recorded the pressure-time diagram of acetylene-air mixture explosion with stoichiometrical ratio.The initial cloud diameters varied from 60cm to 300cm.Based on the analysis of experimental data,the quantitative relationship is obtained for the cloud explosion pressure,the cloud radius and the distance from ignition point .Present results provide a useful way to evaluate the building damage caused by unconfined vapor cloud explosions and to determine the indispensable explosion grade in the application of multi-energy model.

  13. Explosive vapor detection payload for small robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Phil J.; Pettit, Michael; Wetzel, John P.; Haas, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Detection of explosive hazards is a critical component of enabling and improving operational mobility and protection of US Forces. The Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) developed by the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) is addressing this challenge for dismounted soldiers. Under the AMDS program, ARA has developed a vapor sampling system that enhances the detection of explosive residues using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors. The Explosives Hazard Trace Detection (EHTD) payload is designed for plug-and-play installation and operation on small robotic platforms, addressing critical Army needs for more safely detecting concealed or exposed explosives in areas such as culverts, walls and vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development, robotic integration and performance of the explosive vapor sampling system, which consists of a sampling "head," a vapor transport tube and an extendable "boom." The sampling head and transport tube are integrated with the boom, allowing samples to be collected from targeted surfaces up to 7-ft away from the robotic platform. During sample collection, an IR lamp in the sampling head is used to heat a suspected object/surface and the vapors are drawn through the heated vapor transport tube to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection. The EHTD payload is capable of quickly (less than 30 seconds) detecting explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX at nanogram levels on common surfaces (brick, concrete, wood, glass, etc.).

  14. Solid Rocket Launch Vehicle Explosion Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E. H.; Blackwood, J. M.; Hays, M. J.; Skinner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical explosion data from full scale solid rocket launch vehicle accidents and tests were collected from all available literature from the 1950s to the present. In general data included peak blast overpressure, blast impulse, fragment size, fragment speed, and fragment dispersion. Most propellants were 1.1 explosives but a few were 1.3. Oftentimes the data from a single accident was disjointed and/or missing key aspects. Despite this fact, once the data as a whole was digitized, categorized, and plotted clear trends appeared. Particular emphasis was placed on tests or accidents that would be applicable to scenarios from which a crew might need to escape. Therefore, such tests where a large quantity of high explosive was used to initiate the solid rocket explosion were differentiated. Also, high speed ground impacts or tests used to simulate such were also culled. It was found that the explosions from all accidents and applicable tests could be described using only the pressurized gas energy stored in the chamber at the time of failure. Additionally, fragmentation trends were produced. Only one accident mentioned the elusive "small" propellant fragments, but upon further analysis it was found that these were most likely produced as secondary fragments when larger primary fragments impacted the ground. Finally, a brief discussion of how this data is used in a new launch vehicle explosion model for improving crew/payload survival is presented.

  15. Green primary explosives: 5-Nitrotetrazolato-N2-ferrate hierarchies

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, My Hang V.; Coburn, Michael D.; Thomas J. Meyer; Wetzler, Modi

    2006-01-01

    The sensitive explosives used in initiating devices like primers and detonators are called primary explosives. Successful detonations of secondary explosives are accomplished by suitable sources of initiation energy that is transmitted directly from the primaries or through secondary explosive boosters. Reliable initiating mechanisms are available in numerous forms of primers and detonators depending upon the nature of the secondary explosives. The technology of initiation devices used for mi...

  16. Minutes of the 23rd Explosives Safety Seminar, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Some topics of the conference include: Fragment hazards; Airblast interactions; Explosives risk assessment; Structural damage from blast; Demilitarization, disposal, decontamination; Quantity distance application; Fire protection - deluge systems; Debris hazards testing and analysis; Far field airblast effects and mitigation designs consideration; Electrostatic discharge (ESD); Underground explosion effects - large scale tests; Wall and window response to blast loads; Explosives facility design considerations, Accident/explosion effects; and Shock sensitivity of explosives.

  17. INFLUENCE OF STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT ON THE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE OF WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cui,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw can solubilize a significant portion of the hemicellulosic component and enhance the enzymatic digestibility of the remaining cellulose for fermentation into ethanol. In this work, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different steam temperatures and retention times, and the chemical compositions of the raw and steam-exploded wheat straw were analyzed. Results showed that the content of hemicellulose decreased sharply at higher steam temperatures and longer retention times; however, the content of lignin changed inconspicuously. After pretreatment, the characteristics of the straw fiber were investigated by studying their proportion of microfibrils, SEM, and FTIR. To assess the differences among various pretreatment parameters, the concentration of the reducing sugar and glucose conversion were determined. The highest reducing sugar concentration and glucose conversion were achieved at the explosion conditions of a pretreatment temperature of 220 ºC and a residence time of 3 min.

  18. Generation and characterization of nano aluminium powder obtained through wire explosion process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Sindhu; R Sarathi; S R Chakravarthy

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, nano aluminium particles were produced by wire explosion process (WEP) in nitrogen, argon and helium atmospheres. Thus produced nano particles were characterized through certain physico-chemical diagnostic studies using wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and by energy dispersive analysis by X-rays (EDAX). The size and shape of the powder were analysed by using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The particle size distribution studies were performed by adopting log-normal probability distribution. The relationship between size of the particle generated in the explosion process and the type of inert gas/pressure was analysed. The mechanisms of nano particle formation, the factors which can aid the process of formation of nano particle in the wire explosion process were analysed. It is realized that energy deposited to the conductor and duration of current flow have major impact on particles produced by this process.

  19. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  20. Generation and characterization of nano-tungsten carbide particles by wire explosion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debalina, B.; Kamaraj, M.; Murthy, B.S. [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engg., IIT Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Chakravarthi, S.R. [Dept. of Aerospace Engg, IIT Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sarathi, R., E-mail: rsarathi@iitm.ac.i [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai 600036, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-04-30

    The nano-tungsten carbide particles were produced by exploding tungsten conductor in different carburizing medium viz. carbon dioxide and methane atmosphere. The influence of gas pressure in explosion chamber on the size of the particles formed was analyzed. Methane gas was found to be a conducive medium to form tungsten carbide particles. Certain physico-chemical diagnostic studies such as wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies were carried out to characterize the nano-tungsten carbide powder produced by the wire explosion process. The size of the particles was measured by using transmission electron microscope (TEM) and its size distribution was analyzed by adopting log-normal distribution. Thermal conductivity of the gas plays a major role on the size of the particle formed by wire explosion process as observed in the present work.

  1. New numerical algorithms in SUPER CE/SE and their applications in explosion mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The new numerical algorithms in SUPER/CESE and their applications in explosion mechanics are studied. The researched al-gorithms and models include an improved CE/SE (space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element) method,a local hybrid particle level set method,three chemical reaction models and a two-fluid model. Problems of shock wave reflection over wedges,explosive welding,cellular structure of gaseous detonations and two-phase detonations in the gas-droplet system are simulated by using the above-mentioned algorithms and models. The numerical results reveal that the adopted algorithms have many advantages such as high numerical accuracy,wide application field and good compatibility. The numerical algo-rithms presented in this paper may be applied to the numerical research of explosion mechanics.

  2. X-Ray Studies of Supernova Remnants: A Different View of Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I will review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first...

  3. Experimental study on the initiation and energy release behavior of polymer bonded explosive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Cai, Xuanming; Ye, Nan; Gao, Yubo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an initially sealed vented test chamber and a test projectile with polymer bonded explosive materials were designed to complete the experiments. As the initiation takes place on the interior, great amounts of thermo-chemical energy gases were vented through a hole formed by the penetration process. The gas pressure inside the chamber was used to evaluate the energy release behavior of polymer bonded explosive materials. The experimental results reveal that the impact velocity is significant to the energy release behavior, and in some extent the gas pressure improves with the velocity of the projectile. And the critical initiation velocity and the velocity as the polymer bonded explosive materials reached the maximum reactive efficiency were obtained.

  4. Canard explosion of limit cycles in templator models of self-replication mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Templators are differential equation models for self-replicating chemical systems. Beutel and Peacock-López [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 125104 (2007)]10.1063/1.2716396 have numerically analyzed a model for a cross-catalytic self-replicating system and found two cases of canard explosion, that is......, a substantial change of amplitude of a limit cycle over a very short parameter interval. We show how the model can be reduced to a two-dimensional system and how canard theory for slow-fast equations can be applied to yield analytic information about the canard explosion. In particular, simple expressions...... for the parameter value where the canard explosion occurs are obtained. The connection to mixed-mode oscillations also observed in the model is briefly discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics....

  5. High explosive spot test analyses of samples from Operable Unit (OU) 1111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRae, D.; Haywood, W.; Powell, J.; Harris, B.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation has been completed of environmental contaminants at selected sites within the Group DX-10 (formally Group M-7) area. Soil samples taken from specific locations at this detonator facility were analyzed for harmful metals and screened for explosives. A sanitary outflow, a burn pit, a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) production outflow field, an active firing chamber, an inactive firing chamber, and a leach field were sampled. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to obtain semi-quantitative concentrations of metals in the soil. Two field spot-test kits for explosives were used to assess the presence of energetic materials in the soil and in items found at the areas tested. PETN is the major explosive in detonators manufactured and destroyed at Los Alamos. No measurable amounts of PETN or other explosives were detected in the soil, but items taken from the burn area and a high-energy explosive (HE)/chemical sump were contaminated. The concentrations of lead, mercury, and uranium are given.

  6. Serum TCDD and TEQ concentrations among Seveso women, 20 years after the explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Marcella; Mocarelli, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Wesselink, Amelia; Patterson, Don G; Turner, Wayman E; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    The Seveso Women's Health Study (SWHS) is a historical cohort study of the female population residing near Seveso, Italy, on 10 July 1976, when a chemical explosion resulted in the highest known residential exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Individual TCDD concentration was measured in serum collected near the time of the explosion, and in 1996, we collected adequate blood for TCDD and total dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ) measurement. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls were measured in 1996 serum for a sample (n=225, 23%) of the SWHS cohort and WHO 2005 TEQs were calculated. We examined characteristics that predict 1996 TCDD concentrations and estimated TCDD elimination half-life over the 20-year period since the explosion. Median lipid-adjusted TCDD and total TEQ concentrations in 1996 serum were 7.3 and 26.2 p.p.t., respectively. Initial 1976 TCDD and age at explosion were the strongest predictors of 1996 TCDD. The TCDD elimination half-life was 7.1 years for women older than 10 years in 1976, but was shorter in those who were younger. Twenty years after the explosion, TCDD concentrations in this SWHS sample, the majority of who were children in 1976, remain elevated relative to background. These data add to the limited data available on TCDD elimination half-life in children.

  7. Suppression of methane/air explosion by ultrafine water mist containing sodium chloride additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xingyan; Ren, Jingjie; Zhou, Yihui; Wang, Qiuju; Gao, Xuliang; Bi, Mingshu

    2015-03-21

    The suppression effect of ultrafine mists on methane/air explosions with methane concentrations of 6.5%, 8%, 9.5%, 11%, and 13.5% were experimentally studied in a closed visual vessel. Ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist as well as pure water mist was adopted and the droplet sizes of mists were measured by phase doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A high speed camera was used to record the flame evolution processes. In contrast to pure water mist, the flame propagation speed, the maximum explosion overpressure (ΔP(max)), and the maximum pressure rising rate ((dP/dt)max) decreased significantly, with the "tulip" flame disappearing and the flame getting brighter. The results show that the suppressing effect on methane explosion by ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist is influenced by the mist amount and methane concentration. With the increase of the mist amount, the pressure, and the flame speed both descended significantly. And when the mist amount reached 74.08 g/m(3) and 37.04 g/m(3), the flames of 6.5% and 13.5% methane explosions can be absolutely suppressed, respectively. All of results indicate that addition of NaCl can improve the suppression effect of ultrafine pure water mist on the methane explosions, and the suppression effect is considered due to the combination effect of physical and chemical inhibitions.

  8. Thermal X-ray emission from shocked ejecta in Type Ia Supernova Remnants. Prospects for explosion mechanism identification

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Borkowski, K J; Dominguez, I; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Dominguez, Inmaculada

    2003-01-01

    The explosion mechanism behind Type Ia supernovae is a matter of continuing debate. The diverse attempts to identify or at least constrain the physical processes involved in the explosion have been only partially successful so far. In this paper we propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants originated in Type Ia events to extract relevant information concerning the explosions themselves. We have produced a grid of thermonuclear supernova models representative of the paradigms currently under debate: pure deflagrations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and sub-Chandrasekhar explosions, using their density and chemical composition profiles to simulate the interaction with the surrounding ambient medium and the ensuing plasma heating, non-equilibrium ionization and thermal X-ray emission of the ejecta. Key observational parameters such as electron temperatures, emission measures and ionization time scales are presented and discussed. We find that not only is it poss...

  9. The Use of the Propellant Specific Impulse for the Prediction of the Prompt and Terminal Gurney Velocity of High Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frem, Dany

    2016-10-01

    Simple relationships are presented for the calculation of both prompt and terminal Gurney velocity of chemical high explosives. By considering that a given explosive behaves like a propellant, its specific impulse ? was calculated using Mader's ISPBKW code; it was found that the density impulse (?where ? is the explosive density and ? is an empirically optimized variable) performance factor correlates well with the terminal Gurney velocity of both ideal and nonideal explosives. Furthermore, the cylinder wall energy can be computed from (?from which the prompt Gurney velocity can be obtained through the application of the Gurney's cylinder equation. It was concluded that (? is a powerful factor for the prediction of the Gurney velocities, especially for nonideal compositions.

  10. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of explosives, mixtures, and plastic-bonded explosives determined experimentally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytos, J.F.

    1979-09-01

    The specific heat and thermal conductivity of explosives and plastic-bonded explosives of interest to WX operations, determined experimentally, are reported in three tables. Specific heat was determined by differential scanning calorimetry against sapphire standards. Thermal conductivity was determined by two means: the guarded hot-plate method or the differential scanning calorimeter comparative method on miniature samples.

  11. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  12. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  13. Explosion characteristics of methane for CFD modeling and simulation of turbulent gas flow behavior during explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skřínský, Jan; Vereš, Ján; Peer, Václav; Friedel, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The effect of initial concentration on the explosion behavior of a stoichiometric CH4/O2/N2 mixture under air-combustion conditions was studied. Two mathematical models were used with the aim at simulating the gas explosion in the middle scale explosion vessel, and the associated effects of the temperature for different gas/air concentrations. Peak pressure, maximum rate of pressure rise and laminar burning velocity were measured from pressure time records of explosions occurring in a 1 m3 closed cylindrical vessel. The results of the models were validated considering a set of data (pressure time histories and root mean square velocity). The obtained results are relevant to the practice of gas explosion testing and the interpretation of test results and, they should be taken as the input data for CFD simulation to improve the conditions for standard tests.

  14. Small-scale explosive seam welding. [using ribbon explosive encased in lead sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A unique small scale explosive seam welding technique is reported that has successfully joined a variety of aluminum alloys and alloy combinations in thicknesses to 0.125 inch, as well as titanium in thicknesses to 0.056 inch. The explosively welded joints are less than one-half inch in width and apparently have no long length limitation. The ribbon explosive developed in this study contains very small quantities of explosive encased in a flexible thin lead sheath. The evaluation and demonstration of this welding technique was accomplished in three phases: evaluation and optimization of ten major explosive welding variables, the development of four weld joints, and an applicational analysis which included photomicrographs, pressure integrity tests, vacuum effects, and fabrication of some potentially useful structures in aluminum and titanium.

  15. Report on the treatability study for inerting small quantities of radioactive explosives and explosive components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyola, V.M.; Reber, S.D.

    1996-02-01

    As a result of Sandia`s radiation hardening testing on a variety of its explosive components, radioactive waste streams were generated and have to be disposed of as radioactive waste. Due to the combined hazards of explosives and radioactivity, Sandia`s Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management organization did not have a mechanism for disposal of these waste streams. This report documents the study done to provide a method for the removal of the explosive hazard from those waste streams. The report includes the design of the equipment used, procedures followed, results from waste stream analog tests and the results from the actual explosive inerting tests on radioactive samples. As a result of the inerting treatment, the waste streams were rendered non-explosive and, thus, manageable through normal radioactive waste disposal channels.

  16. Fire investigation of a explosion fire by explosive spontaneous combustion%一起爆炸物自燃爆炸事故的调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德利; 黄志强; 谢荔珍

    2013-01-01

    通过对一起爆炸物自燃引发爆炸造成重大人员伤亡案件的调查询问、现场勘验等,全面分析该起爆炸燃烧特征.通过爆炸现场提取和追踪爆炸物来源并通过技术检验方法确定存放爆炸物的化学成分,客观排除其他因素导致火灾引发爆炸的可能,综合分析认定系爆炸物自燃引发爆炸.%By inquisition and fire scene renaissance on a fatal explosive fire induced by explosive spontaneous combustion, combustion features were analyzed. Taking evidence on fire scene, searching for source of explosive, and identifying chemical composition by technical examination, the fire cause was identified as explosive spontaneous combustion and other factors were excluded.

  17. Airport testing an explosives detection portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhykerd, C.; Linker, K.; Hannum, D.; Bouchier, F.; Parmeter, J.

    1998-08-01

    At the direction of the US Congress, following the Pan Am 103 and TWA 800 crashes, the Federal Aviation Administration funded development of non-invasive techniques to screen airline passengers for explosives. Such an explosives detection portal, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was field tested at the Albuquerque International airport in September 1997. During the 2-week field trial, 2,400 passengers were screened and 500 surveyed. Throughput, reliability, maintenance and sensitivity were studied. Follow-up testing at Sandia and at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was conducted. A passenger stands in the portal for five seconds while overhead fans blow air over his body. Any explosive vapors or dislodged particles are collected in vents at the feet. Explosives are removed from the air in a preconcentrator and subsequently directed into an ion mobility spectrometer for detection. Throughput measured 300 passengers per hour. The non-invasive portal can detect subfingerprint levels of explosives residue on clothing. A survey of 500 passengers showed a 97% approval rating, with 99% stating that such portals, if effective, should be installed in airports to improve security. Results of the airport test, as well as operational issues, are discussed.

  18. Multi-modal, ultrasensitive detection of trace explosives using MEMS devices with quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Omid; Kim, Seonghwan

    2016-05-01

    Multi-modal chemical sensors based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been developed with an electrical readout. Opto-calorimetric infrared (IR) spectroscopy, capable of obtaining molecular signatures of extremely small quantities of adsorbed explosive molecules, has been realized with a microthermometer/microheater device using a widely tunable quantum cascade laser. A microthermometer/microheater device responds to the heat generated by nonradiative decay process when the adsorbed explosive molecules are resonantly excited with IR light. Monitoring the variation in microthermometer signal as a function of illuminating IR wavelength corresponds to the conventional IR absorption spectrum of the adsorbed molecules. Moreover, the mass of the adsorbed molecules is determined by measuring the resonance frequency shift of the cantilever shape microthermometer for the quantitative opto-calorimetric IR spectroscopy. In addition, micro-differential thermal analysis, which can be used to differentiate exothermic or endothermic reaction of heated molecules, has been performed with the same device to provide additional orthogonal signal for trace explosive detection and sensor surface regeneration. In summary, we have designed, fabricated and tested microcantilever shape devices integrated with a microthermometer/microheater which can provide electrical responses used to acquire both opto-calorimetric IR spectra and microcalorimetric thermal responses. We have demonstrated the successful detection, differentiation, and quantification of trace amounts of explosive molecules and their mixtures (cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) using three orthogonal sensing signals which improve chemical selectivity.

  19. Explosion Calculations of SN1087

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Explosion calculations of SNT1987A generate pictures of Rayleigh-Taylor fingers of radioactive Ni-56 which are boosted to velocities of several thousand km/s. From the KAO observations of the mid-IR iron lines, a picture of the iron in the ejecta emerges which is consistent with the "frothy iron fingers" having expanded to fill about 50% of the metal-rich volume of the ejecta. The ratio of the nickel line intensities yields a high ionization fraction of greater than or equal to 0.9 in the volume associated with the iron-group elements at day 415, before dust condenses in the ejecta. From the KAO observations of the dust's thermal emission, it is deduced that when the grains condense their infrared radiation is trapped, their apparent opacity is gray, and they have a surface area filling factor of about 50%. The dust emission from SN1987A is featureless: no 9.7 micrometer silicate feature, nor PAH features, nor dust emission features of any kind are seen at any time. The total dust opacity increases with time even though the surface area filling factor and the dust/gas ratio remain constant. This suggests that the dust forms along coherent structures which can maintain their radial line-of-sight opacities, i.e., along fat fingers. The coincidence of the filling factor of the dust and the filling factor of the iron strongly suggests that the dust condenses within the iron, and therefore the dust is iron-rich. It only takes approximately 4 x 10(exp -4) solar mass of dust for the ejecta to be optically thick out to approximately 100 micrometers; a lower limit of 4 x 10(exp -4) solar mass of condensed grains exists in the metal-rich volume, but much more dust could be present. The episode of dust formation started at about 530 days and proceeded rapidly, so that by 600 days 45% of the bolometric luminosity was being emitted in the IR; by 775 days, 86% of the bolometric luminosity was being reradiated by the dust. Measurements of the bolometric luminosity of SN1987A from

  20. Analysis of MINIE2013 Explosion Air-Blast Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnurr, Julie M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Rodgers, Arthur J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kim, Keehoon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ford, Sean R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramirez, Abelardo L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    We report analysis of air-blast overpressure measurements from the MINIE2013 explosive experiments. The MINIE2013 experiment involved a series of nearly 70 near-surface (height-ofburst, HOB, ranging from -1 to +4 m) low-yield (W=2-20 kg TNT equivalent) chemical highexplosives tests that were recorded at local distances (230 m – 28.5 km). Many of the W and HOB combinations were repeated, allowing for quantification of the variability in air-blast features and corresponding yield estimates. We measured canonical signal features (peak overpressure, impulse per unit area, and positive pulse duration) from the air-blast data and compared these to existing air-blast models. Peak overpressure measurements showed good agreement with the models at close ranges but tended to attenuate more rapidly at longer range (~ 1 km), which is likely caused by upward refraction of acoustic waves due to a negative vertical gradient of sound speed. We estimated yields of the MINIE2013 explosions using the Integrated Yield Determination Tool (IYDT). Errors of the estimated yields were on average within 30% of the reported yields, and there were no significant differences in the accuracy of the IYDT predictions grouped by yield. IYDT estimates tend to be lower than ground truth yields, possibly because of reduced overpressure amplitudes by upward refraction. Finally, we report preliminary results on a development of a new parameterized air-blast waveform.

  1. Extension of a standoff explosive detection system to CBRN threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Alan; Waterbury, Rob; Rose, Jeremy; Pohl, Ken; Eisterhold, Megan; Thorn, Thelma; Lee, Keesoo; Dottery, Ed

    2010-04-01

    Recent progress has been made on an explosive laser standoff detection system called TREDS-2 constructed from COTS components. The TREDS-2 system utilizes combination of Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS), Townsend Effect Plasma Spectroscopy (TEPS) and Raman spectroscopy techniques with chemometric algorithms to detect hazardous materials. Extension of the detection capability of the TREDS-2 system on the real-time point detection of chemical, biological, radioactive, and nuclear threats has been tested and presented in this report. System performance of surface detection of a variety of CBRNE materials is shown. An overview of improvements to the explosives detection capabilities is given first. Challenges to sensing some specific CBRN threats are then discussed, along with the initial testing of TREDS-2 on CBRN surrogates on a limited number of surfaces. Signal processing using chemometric algorithms are shown as a demonstration of the system's capabilities. A path forward for using the specific technologies is also provided, as well as a discussion of the advantages that each technology brings to the CBRNE detection effort.

  2. Thermal properties of explosives. Quarterly report, January, February, March 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, L.C.

    1997-09-01

    Henkin`s test data are reported for comparisons of the following: dry-to-moist samples, PBX 9404 in brass and gold-plated blasting caps, Holston HMX with Bridgewater HMX, LX-04-1 and LX-04-1 + Ucon oil, and PETN, LX-04-1 and Extex. The time-to-explosion curves for HMX and PBX 9404 are also given. A description of the pyrolysis apparatus and the method of calibrating the sample temperature to the response of the thermal conductivity detector are reported. The pyrolytic decomposition curves of several standard explosives and six specially prepared HMX samples (LRL raw material No. A-311 through A-316) are included. A controlled atmosphere D.T.A. is described and the thermograms of PETN with an atmosphere of air at 85 psi, nitrogen at 85 psi and 200 psi are given. The thermograms indicate that PETN becomes more sensitive as the pressure increases. Chemical reactivity data are reported for Comp B, Comp B-3, Comp C-4, HMX, PBX 9011, PBX 9205, Tetryl and TNT. Also, test results are reported for LX-01-1 and Comp B-3 heated at 150{degrees}C for 22 hours, LX-02-1 heated at 100{degrees}C for 22 hours, and pressed pellets of PBX 9404 and PBX 9404 + powdered lead.

  3. Insights into explosion dynamics at Stromboli in 2009 from ash samples collected in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Lautze, N.; Andronico, D.; D'Auria, L.; Niemeijer, A.; Houghton, B.; Scarlato, P.

    2012-04-01

    Rapid characterization of tephra during explosive eruptions can provide valuable insights into eruptive mechanisms, also integrating other monitoring systems. Here we reveal a perspective on Stromboli's conduit processes by linking ash textures to geophysical estimates of eruption parameters of observed explosions. A three day campaign at Stromboli was undertaken by Italy's Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) in October 2009. At this time activity was moderately intense, with an average 4 to 5, both ash-rich and ash-poor, explosions per hour at each the SW and NE vents. A total of fifteen ash samples were collected in real time. We used binocular and scanning electron microscopes to analyze the components, grain size and morphology distributions, and surface chemistry of ash particles within eight selected samples. In addition, the INGV monitoring network provided visual, thermal, and seismic information on the explosions that generated the sampled ash. In each sample, the proportion of fluidal, glassy sideromelane (as opposed to blocky, microcrystalline tachylite plus lithics), the degree of "chemical freshness" (as opposed to chemical alteration), and the average size of particles appear to correlate directly with the maximum height and the seismic amplitude of the corresponding explosion, and inversely correlate with the amount of ash erupted, as estimated by monitoring videos. These observations suggest that more violent explosions (i.e., those driven by the release of larger and more pressurized gas volumes) produce ash via the fragmentation of hotter, more fluid magma, while weaker ones mostly erupt ash-sized particles derived by the fragmentation of colder magma and incorporation of conduit wall debris. The formation of fluidal ash particles (up to Pele's hairs) requires aerodynamic deformation of a relatively low-viscosity magma, in agreement with the strong acceleration imposed upon fragmented magma clots by the rapid expansion of

  4. Phases of a Type Ia supernova explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Niemeyer, J C

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf model for Type Ia supernovae, various stages of the explosion are described in terms of the burning regimes of the thermonuclear flame front. In the early flamelet regime following the ``smoldering'' phase prior to the explosion, the flame is sufficiently thin and fast to remain laminar on small scales. As the white dwarf density declines, the thermal flame structure becomes subject to penetration by turbulent eddies, and it enters the ``distributed burning'' regime. A specific control parameter for this transition is proposed. Furthermore, we outline an argument for the coincidence of the transition between burning regimes with the onset of a deflagration-detonation-transition (DDT) in the late phase of the explosion.

  5. Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Plewa, T; Lamb, D

    2004-01-01

    We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The proposed scenario follows from relaxing the assumption of symmetry in the model and involves a detonation created in an unconfined environment. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of stellar material initiating a deflagration. This deflagration results in the formation of a buoyantly-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout forms a strong pressure wave that laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface. The flow conditions at that moment support a detonation that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion fol...

  6. Viscoelastic models for explosive binder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardenhagen, S.G.; Harstad, E.N.; Maudlin, P.J.; Gray, G.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Foster, J.C. Jr. [Wright Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    1997-07-01

    An improved model of the mechanical properties of the explosive contained in conventional munitions is needed to accurately simulate performance and accident scenarios in weapons storage facilities. A specific class of explosives can he idealized as a mixture of two components: energetic crystals randomly suspended in a polymeric matrix (binder). Strength characteristics of each component material are important in the macroscopic behavior of the composite (explosive). Of interest here is the determination of an appropriate constitutive law for a polyurethane binder material. This paper is a continuation of previous work in modeling polyurethane at moderately high strain rates and for large deformations. Simulation of a large deformation (strains in excess of 100%) Taylor Anvil experiment revealed numerical difficulties which have been addressed. Additional experimental data have been obtained including improved resolution Taylor Anvil data, and stress relaxation data at various strain rates. A thorough evaluation of the candidate viscoelastic constitutive model is made and possible improvements discussed.

  7. Local magnitudes of small contained explosions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chael, Eric Paul

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between explosive yield and seismic magnitude has been extensively studied for underground nuclear tests larger than about 1 kt. For monitoring smaller tests over local ranges (within 200 km), we need to know whether the available formulas can be extrapolated to much lower yields. Here, we review published information on amplitude decay with distance, and on the seismic magnitudes of industrial blasts and refraction explosions in the western U. S. Next we measure the magnitudes of some similar shots in the northeast. We find that local magnitudes ML of small, contained explosions are reasonably consistent with the magnitude-yield formulas developed for nuclear tests. These results are useful for estimating the detection performance of proposed local seismic networks.

  8. Explosive Instability of Prominence Flux Ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurricane, O; Fong, R H L; Cowley, S C

    2002-09-04

    The rapid, Alfvenic, time scale of erupting solar-prominences has been an enigma ever since they where first identified. Investigators have proposed a variety of different mechanisms in an effort to account for the abrupt reconfiguration observed. No one mechanism clearly stands out as the single cause of these explosive events. Recent analysis has demonstrated that field lines in the solar atmosphere are metastable to ballooning type instabilities. It has been found previously that in ideal MHD plasmas marginally unstable ballooning modes inevitably become ''explosive'' evolving towards a finite time singularity via a nonlinear 3D instability called ''Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamic Detonation.'' Thus, this mechanism is a good candidate to explain explosive events observed in the solar atmosphere of our star or in others.

  9. Criticality safety in high explosives dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, S.D.

    1997-06-01

    In 1992, an incident occurred at the Pantex Plant in which the cladding around a fissile material component (pit) cracked during dismantlement of the high explosives portion of a nuclear weapon. Although the event did not result in any significant contamination or personnel exposures, concerns about the incident led to the conclusion that the current dismantlement process was unacceptable. Options considered for redesign, dissolution tooling design considerations, dissolution tooling design features, and the analysis of the new dissolution tooling are summarized. The final tooling design developed incorporated a number of safety features and provides a simple, self-contained, low-maintenance method of high explosives removal for nuclear explosive dismantlement. Analyses demonstrate that the tooling design will remain subcritical under normal, abnormal, and credible accident scenarios. 1 fig.

  10. Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

    2009-03-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

  11. Tailoring the sensitivity of initiating explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manner, Virginia W.; Preston, Daniel N.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Tappan, Bryce C.

    2017-01-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a very common nitrate ester explosive that has been widely studied due to its use in military and commercial explosives. Recent experimental work and calculations have shown that substituting the central carbon atom of PETN with a silicon atom results in an extremely sensitive contact explosive. We have attempted to develop PETN derivatives which are less sensitive, by attaching hydrogen, amino, and methyl groups to the central carbon atom, and substituting the central carbon atom (and one -CH2ONO2 group) with phosphorous oxide. We relate the handling sensitivity properties of each PETN derivative to its structure, and discuss the role of the central atom, oxygen balance, thermal stability, and inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding on impact sensitivity.

  12. [First aid to persons with explosion trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, V M; Samokhvalov, I M

    2012-10-01

    Modern organization providing medical aid to victims of explosion trauma in peace time, the success of which largely depends on the timely and professional interaction among the structures involeved into emergency relief operation is represented in the article. Content and sequence of events providing emergency medical and first medical aid to victims of the explosions, and the appropriateness of allocation affected groups, based on the predicted effectiveness of medical care is analyzed. The algorithm, currently used by ambulance crews, of assistance to victims with explosion and order evacuations is analyzed. The content of therapeutic measures in receipt of the wounded on the steps of skilled and specialized surgical care in accordance with the idea of a separation surgery on three stages (damage control). The content of the main levels of damage control orthopedics is introduced.

  13. Deformation and Failure of Polymer Bonded Explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹏万; 黄风雷; 丁雁生

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and failure of pressed polymer bonded explosives under different types of loads including tension, compression and low velocity impact are presented. Brazilian test is used to study the tensile properties. The microstructure of polymer bonded explosives and its evolution are studied by use of scanning electronic microscopy and polarized light microscopy. Polishing techniques have been developed to prepare samples for microscopic examination. The failure mechanisms of polymer bonded explosives under different loads are analyzed. The results show that interfacial debonding is the predominant failure mode in quasi-static tension, while extensive crystal fractures are induced in compression. With the increase of strain rate, more crystal fractures occur. Low velocity impact also induces extensive crystal fractures.

  14. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster (F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  15. Venting of gas explosion through relief ducts: interaction between internal and external explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, G; Willacy, S K; Phylaktou, H N; Andrews, G E; Di Benedetto, A; Salzano, E; Russo, G

    2008-06-30

    Relief ducts fitted to venting openings is a widespread configuration in the industrial practice. The presence of a duct has been reported to severely increase the violence of the vented explosion posing a problem for the proper design of the venting device. Several studies have reported the leading importance--in the whole complex explosion phenomenology--of a secondary explosion in the duct. Modern approaches in the study of simply vented explosions (without ducts) have focused on the study of the interaction between internal and external explosion as a key issue in the mechanisms of pressure generation. The issue is even more relevant when a duct is fitted to the vent due the confined nature of the external explosion. In this work the interaction between internal and external events is experimentally investigated for gas explosions vented through a relief duct. The work has aimed at studying mechanisms underlying the pressure rise of this venting configuration. The study has put the emphasis on the mutual nature of the interaction. A larger scale than laboratory has been investigated allowing drawing results with a greater degree of generality with respect to data so far presented in literature.

  16. Potential explosion hazard of carbonaceous nanoparticles: Explosion parameters of selected materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkevich, Leonid A; Dastidar, Ashok G; Hachmeister, Zachary; Lim, Michael

    2015-09-15

    Following a previous explosion screening study, we have conducted concentration and ignition energy scans on several carbonaceous nanopowders: fullerene, SWCNT, carbon black, MWCNT, graphene, CNF, and graphite. We have measured minimum explosive concentration (MEC), minimum ignition energy (MIE), and minimum ignition temperature (MITcloud) for these materials. The nanocarbons exhibit MEC ~10(1)-10(2) g/m(3), comparable to the MEC for coals and for fine particle carbon blacks and graphites. The nanocarbons are confirmed mainly to be in the St-1 explosion class, with fullerene, at K(St) ~200 bar-m/s, borderline St-1/St-2. We estimate MIE ~ 10(2)-10(3) J, an order of magnitude higher than the MIE for coals but an order of magnitude lower than the MIE for fine particle graphites. While the explosion severity of the nanocarbons is comparable to that of the coals, their explosion susceptibility (ease of ignition) is significantly less (i.e., the nanocarbons have higher MIEs than do the coals); by contrast, the nanocarbons exhibit similar explosion severity to the graphites but enhanced explosion susceptibility (i.e., the nanocarbons have lower MIEs than do the graphites). MIT(cloud) > 550 °C, comparable to that of the coals and carbon blacks.

  17. THEORIES OF ROCK BREAKAGE WITH EXPLOSIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Škrlec

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The prediction and observation of the nature and dimensions of damaged zones in the surrounding rock mass and understanding the mechanisms of fracturing and crushing of the rock mass with explosives is one of the most important parameters in blasting design in order to obtain preferred granulation and reduce damaging effects of blasting on the environment. An overview of existing rock breakage theories with the energy released by the detonation of explosives is given in this paper (the paper is published in Croatian.

  18. Equation of state of insensitive high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ree, F H; Van Thiel, M; Viecelli, J A

    1998-08-12

    Detonation of an insensitive high explosive formulated with a fluorine containing binder produces a large amount of condensed carbon and gaseous HF product, which transforms into CF{sub 4} as the pressure is increased. The former (carbon condensation) is characterized by slow energy release, while the latter (HF) has no shockwave data. We have identified that these two items are the key factors, which make reliable prediction of the performance of an insensitive high explosive very difficult. This paper describes physical models to address these issues and apply the models to analyze experimental data of LX-17.

  19. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.

    2011-01-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed...... as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework...

  20. Expansion of Metallic Cylinders under Explosive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Bola

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of expanding metallic cylinders under explosive loading was studied. Using ultra high speed photography, the expansion characteristics of aluminium and copper metallic cylinders have been evaluated with different c/m ratio, and by changing the nature of high explosive. The results obtained are comparable to those predicted by the Gurney's energy and momentum balance equations. A cylinder test has been established for comparative to the metal by octol, TNT, PEK-1, baratol and composition B are calculated. The results are in close agreement with those calculated by Kury et al.

  1. Spherical Solutions of an Underwater Explosion Bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Wardlaw

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the 1D explosion bubble flow field out to the first bubble minimum is examined in detail using four different models. The most detailed is based on the Euler equations and accounts for the internal bubble fluid motion, while the simplest links a potential water solution to a stationary, Isentropic bubble model. Comparison of the different models with experimental data provides insight into the influence of compressibility and internal bubble dynamics on the behavior of the explosion bubble.

  2. Chemicapacitive microsensors for detection of explosives and TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Hobson, Stephen T.; Cemalovic, Sabina; Mlsna, Todd E.

    2005-10-01

    Seacoast Science develops chemical sensors that use polymer-coated micromachined capacitors to measure the dielectric permittivity of an array of selectively absorbing materials. We present recent results demonstrating the sensor technology's capability to detect components in explosives and toxic industrial chemicals. These target chemicals are detected with functionalized polymers or network materials, chosen for their ability to adsorb chemicals. When exposed to vapors or gases, the permittivity of these sorbent materials changes depending on the strength of the vapor-sorbent interaction. Sensor arrays made of ten microcapacitors on a single chip have been previously shown to detect vapors of organic compounds (chemical warfare agents, industrial solvents, fuels) and inorganic gases (SO2, CO2, NO2). Two silicon microcapacitor structures were used, one with parallel electrode plates and the other with interdigitated "finger-like" electrodes. The parallel-plates were approximately 300 μm wide and separated by 750 nm. The interdigitated electrodes were approximately 400 μm long and were elevated above the substrate to provide faster vapor access. Eight to sixteen of these capacitors are fabricated on chips that are 5 x 2 mm and are packaged in less than 50 cm3 with supporting electronics and batteries, all weighing less than 500 grams. The capacitors can be individually coated with different materials creating a small electronic nose that produces different selectivity patterns in response to different chemicals. The resulting system's compact size, low-power consumption and low manufacturing costs make the technology ideal for integration into various systems for numerous applications.

  3. Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasool, Shireen R.; Al-Dahhan, Wedad; Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim; Hussein, Falah; Rodda, Kabrena E.; Yousif, Emad

    2016-08-15

    Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript is the fifth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we summarize unsafe practices involving the improper installation of a Gas Chromatograph (GC) at an Iraqi university which, if not corrected, could have resulted in a dangerous fire and explosion. We summarize the identified infractions and highlight lessons learned. By openly sharing the experiences at the university involved, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured due to similarly unsafe practices in the future.

  4. DEFLAGRATION RATES OF SECONDARY EXPLOSIVES UNDER STATIC MPA - GPA PRESSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaug, J; Young, C; Long, G; Maienschein, J; Glascoe, E; Hansen, D; Wardell, J; Black, C; Sykora, G

    2009-07-30

    We provide measurements of the chemical reaction propagation rate (RPR) as a function of pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC) and strand burner technologies. Materials investigated include HMX and RDX crystalline powders, LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton A), and Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax). The anomalous correspondence between crystal structure, including in some instances isostructural phase transitions, on pressure dependent RPRs of HMX and RDX are correlated to confocal micro-Raman spectroscopic results. The contrast between DAC GPa and strand burner MPa regime measurements yield insight into explosive material burn phenomena. Here we highlight pressure dependent physicochemical mechanisms that appear to affect the deflagration rate of precompressed energetic materials.

  5. A new computer code to evaluate detonation performance of high explosives and their thermochemical properties, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Motamedoshariati, Hadi; Moghayadnia, Reza; Nazari, Hamid Reza; Azarniamehraban, Jamshid

    2009-12-30

    In this paper a new simple user-friendly computer code, in Visual Basic, has been introduced to evaluate detonation performance of high explosives and their thermochemical properties. The code is based on recently developed methods to obtain thermochemical and performance parameters of energetic materials, which can complement the computer outputs of the other thermodynamic chemical equilibrium codes. It can predict various important properties of high explosive including velocity of detonation, detonation pressure, heat of detonation, detonation temperature, Gurney velocity, adiabatic exponent and specific impulse of high explosives. It can also predict detonation performance of aluminized explosives that can have non-ideal behaviors. This code has been validated with well-known and standard explosives and compared the predicted results, where the predictions of desired properties were possible, with outputs of some computer codes. A large amount of data for detonation performance on different classes of explosives from C-NO(2), O-NO(2) and N-NO(2) energetic groups have also been generated and compared with well-known complex code BKW.

  6. A new computer code to evaluate detonation performance of high explosives and their thermochemical properties, part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mhkeshavarz@mut-es.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr P.O. Box 83145/115 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Motamedoshariati, Hadi; Moghayadnia, Reza; Nazari, Hamid Reza; Azarniamehraban, Jamshid [Department of Chemistry, Malek-ashtar University of Technology, Shahin-shahr P.O. Box 83145/115 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-30

    In this paper a new simple user-friendly computer code, in Visual Basic, has been introduced to evaluate detonation performance of high explosives and their thermochemical properties. The code is based on recently developed methods to obtain thermochemical and performance parameters of energetic materials, which can complement the computer outputs of the other thermodynamic chemical equilibrium codes. It can predict various important properties of high explosive including velocity of detonation, detonation pressure, heat of detonation, detonation temperature, Gurney velocity, adiabatic exponent and specific impulse of high explosives. It can also predict detonation performance of aluminized explosives that can have non-ideal behaviors. This code has been validated with well-known and standard explosives and compared the predicted results, where the predictions of desired properties were possible, with outputs of some computer codes. A large amount of data for detonation performance on different classes of explosives from C-NO{sub 2}, O-NO{sub 2} and N-NO{sub 2} energetic groups have also been generated and compared with well-known complex code BKW.

  7. Steam Explosion Pretreatment of Cotton Gin Waste for Fuel Ethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    Jeoh, Tina

    1998-01-01

    Steam Explosion Pretreatment of Cotton Gin Waste for Ethanol Production By Tina Jeoh Foster A. Agblevor, Chair Biological Systems Engineering ABSTRACT The current research investigates the utilization of cotton gin waste as a feedstock to produce a value-added product - fuel ethanol. Cotton gin waste consists of pieces of burs, stems, motes (immature seeds) and cotton fiber, and is considered to be a lignocellulosic material. The three main chemical constituents are ce...

  8. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.A.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this work was to provide data and methodology assisting the transfer and acceptance of composting technology for the remediation of explosives-contaminated soils and sediments. Issues and activities addressed included: (a) chemical and toxicological characterization of compost samples from new field composting experiments, and the environmental availability of composting efficiency by isolation of bacterial consortia and natural surfactants from highly efficient composts, and (c) improved assessment of compost product suitability for land application.

  9. Recommended Hazard Classification Procedures for In-Process Propellant and Explosive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    Test Impingement Test Rubbing Friction Test Local Thermal Test Regional Thermal Test Standard Test for Hazard Detection of Chemicals...a-9 Heater winding 33 a-10 Cover plates and heater terminals 34 a-11 Local thermal test , sample data sheet 35 a-11.1 Typical DTA - DSC curve with...mm LOCAL THERMAL TEST Purpose Inprocess explosive and propellant materials may be susceptible to initiation from localized hot spots from such

  10. Landmine Detection Technologies to TraceExplosive Vapour Detection Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Large quantity of explosive is manufactured worldwide for use in various types of ammunition,arms, and mines, and used in armed conflicts. During manufacturing and usage of the explosiveequipment, some of the explosive residues are released into the environment in the form ofcontaminated effluents, unburnt explosives fumes and vapours. Limited but uncontrolledcontinuous release of trace vapours also takes place when explosive-laden landmines are deployedin the field. One of the major technolo...

  11. INFLUENCE OF STEAM EXPLOSION ON THECRYSTALLINITY OF CELLULOSE FIBER

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquet, Nicolas; Vanderghem, Caroline; Danthine, Sabine; Blecker, Christophe; Richel, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the effect of different steam explosion treatments on crystallinity properties of a pure bleached cellulose. Steam explosion process is composed of two distinct stages: vapocracking and explosive decompression. The treatment intensities is determined by a severity factor, established by a correlation between temperature process and retention time. The results show that steam explosion treatment has an impact on the crystallinity properties of pure ce...

  12. DOD Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-29

    operations include, but are not limited to: power screening equipment, power rakes, and shredders . C12.5.8.3.5.1. Nonessential Personnel...present an explosive hazard. C15.8.4.2. The use of remotely operated equipment (e.g., excavators, sifters, and shredders ) or other standoff

  13. Java: An Explosion on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Tim; Hall, Hazel

    Summer 1995 saw the release, with considerable media attention, of draft versions of Sun Microsystems' Java computer programming language and the HotJava browser. Java has been heralded as the latest "killer" technology in the Internet explosion. Sun Microsystems and numerous companies including Microsoft, IBM, and Netscape have agreed upon…

  14. Explosives safety research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, M.M. van der; Weerheijm, J.; Wees, R.M.M. van; Dongen. P. van

    2013-01-01

    The handling of explosives and ammunition introduces a safety risk for personnel and third parties. Accidents related to storage, transport and transhipment may result in severe injury and material damage. TNO has developed a number of tools to quantify the consequences and risks of accidental explo

  15. The double explosive layer cylindrical compaction method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Verbeek, H.J.; Carton, E.P.

    1999-01-01

    The standard cylindrical configuration for shock compaction is useful for the compaction of composite materials which have some plastic behavior. It can also be used to densify hard ceramics up to about 85% of the theoretical density (TMD), when low detonation velocity explosives (2-4 km s-1) are us

  16. Magic nuclei at explosive dynamo activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratyev V. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosive nucleosynthesis at conditions of magnetorotational instabilities is considered for iron group nuclides by employing arguments of nuclear statistical equilibrium. Effects of ultra-strong nuclear magnetization are demonstrated to enhance the portion of titanium product. The results are corroborated with an excess of 44Ti revealed from the Integral mission data.

  17. 76 FR 8923 - Explosive Siting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... ``energetic liquids'' to mean a liquid, slurry, or gel, consisting of, or containing an explosive, oxidizer... liquid oxygen, kerosene, and isopropyl alcohol. In 2004, the FAA waived EKAD's compliance with Sec. 420... FAA stated that, for the storage of liquid oxygen, kerosene and isopropyl alcohol, EKAD had to...

  18. RDX/Sylgard extrudable explosive development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, A.G.; Schmitz, G.T.; Stallings, T.L.; West, G.T.; Ashcraft, R.W.

    1977-10-01

    Formulation procedures for X-0208, an 80 percent RDX/20 percent Sylgard extrudable, have been developed. The extrudable explosive, made from a mixture of micronized RDX and Class E RDX, will sustain detonation in a 1.65 mm channel and can be mechanically extruded into ribbon-type configurations.

  19. Explosion of Ultrahigh Pressure Minerals in Mantle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Wenji; YANG Jingsui; FANG Qingsong; YAN Binggang; ZHANG Zhongming

    2001-01-01

    @@ The microexplosion stucture of ultrahigh pressure minerals was found for the first time in podform chromitites within the mantle peridotite facies of Luobusa ophiolite along the Yarlung Zangbo suture zone.The explosion stuctures of high-energy silicate inclusions are commonly seen in thin sections (see figure).

  20. Incremental Pressing Technique in Explosive Charge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A pressing technique has become available that might be useful for compressing granular explosives. If the height-diameter ratio of the charge is unfavorable,the high quality charge can not be obtained with the common single-action pressing. This paper presents incremental pressing technique, which can obtain the charge with higher overall density and more uniform density.

  1. Developments in vapour cloud explosion blast modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mercx, W.P.M.; Berg, A.C. van den; Hayhurst, C.J.; Robertson, N.J.; Moran, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    TNT Equivalency methods are widely used for vapour cloud explosion blast modeling. Presently, however, other types of models are available which do not have the fundamental objections TNT Equivalency models have. TNO Multi-Energy method is increasingly accepted as a more reasonable alternative to be

  2. Explosion proof vehicle for tank inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, William T [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Bauer, Scott G [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-02-28

    An Explosion Proof Vehicle (EPV) having an interior substantially filled with an inert fluid creating an interior pressure greater than the exterior pressure. One or more flexible tubes provide the inert fluid and one or more electrical conductors from a control system to the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably used in subsurface tank inspection, whereby the vehicle is submerged in a volatile fluid.

  3. Energetic nanocomposites for detonation initiation in high explosives without primary explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comet, Marc; Martin, Cédric; Klaumünzer, Martin; Schnell, Fabien; Spitzer, Denis

    2015-12-01

    The mixing of aluminum nanoparticles with a metal containing oxidizer (here, WO3 or Bi2(SO4)3) gives reactive materials called nanothermites. In this research, nanothermites were combined with high explosive nanoparticles (RDX) to prepare energetic nanocomposites. These smart nanomaterials have higher performances and are much less hazardous than primary explosives. Their flame propagation velocity can be tuned from 0.2 to 3.5 km/s, through their explosive content. They were used to initiate the detonation of a high explosive, the pentaerythritol tetranitrate. The pyrotechnic transduction of combustion into detonation was achieved with short length systems (<2 cm) and small amounts of energetic nanocomposites (˜100 mg) in semi-confined systems.

  4. Expediency of application of explosion-relief constructions to ensure explosion resistance of production buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapin Anton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a model of economic evaluation and selection of explosion-relief constructions (ERC, as well as determination of explosion protection efficiency of buildings and structures provided on a stage of construction. It has been shown that definition of economic efficiency of ERС is the evaluation of its application for buildings with remote or automatically controlled production. It has been determined that an important role in design of explosive industrial facilities is played by selection of the economically feasible and effective materials for ERC. When selecting materials it is necessary to consider probability and yield of explosions. Necessity to create the methods allow considering such probability has been revealed.

  5. Raman Detection of Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Material Fabricated Using Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Technology on Several Real World Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    chemical background. One spectroscopic technique gaining increased attention for detection is Raman. One popular explosive precursor material is...teams in efforts to keep people secure and safe. In particular, due to the increasing use by terrorists, the detection of common explosives and...encountered surfaces (e.g., textiles, metals, plastics, natural products, and even people). Non-destructive detection techniques can detect trace

  6. Effect of steam explosion on in vitro gas production kinetics and rumen fermentation profiles of three common straws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of steam explosion on in vitro gas production (GP and rumen fermentation profiles of common straws, in vitro cultivation was conducted for 96 h with the rumen fluid collected from steers. Different types of straw had various chemical compositions, which were affected by steam explosion (P<0.01. Steam explosion increased (P<0.01 the rate and volume of GP, lag time disappeared and asymptotic GP decreased, which were also affected (P<0.01 by the type of straw. The type of straw influenced (P<0.05 the final pH, while steam explosion exerted an effect (P<0.01 on the ammonia-nitrogen concentration. The proportions of individual volatile fatty acid (VFA, except acetate (A, differed (P<0.05 among the feeds. Steam explosion increased total VFA production and the proportion of propionate (P, while decreased the proportions of A, isobutyrate and valerate as well as the ratio A/P (P<0.01. The type of straw had an effect (P<0.05 on the activities of avicelase and carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase, while steam explosion increased (P<0.01 the activities of avicelase, CMCase, β-glucanase and xylanase. The available energy concentrations and digestibilities differed (P<0.01 in the feeds and were increased (P<0.05 with steam explosion processing. The interaction straw type×treatments was significant (P<0.05 for most monitored parameters. These results suggest that steam explosion could improve rumen fermentability and energy utilisation of straw, being an effective pre-treatment method in feed industry.

  7. Increase of water resistance of ammonium nitrate explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkhair Mansurov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Developed a method of kapsulating of ammonium nitrate with liquid paraffin increase finding explosives in water for 60 minutes. Placing explosives in the plastic shell, the explosive was, as in standing or running water during the day. When conducting field tests failures were absent.

  8. 46 CFR 109.559 - Explosives and radioactive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosives and radioactive materials. 109.559 Section... UNITS OPERATIONS Miscellaneous § 109.559 Explosives and radioactive materials. Except as authorized by the master or person in charge, no person may use explosives or radioactive materials and equipment...

  9. 44 CFR 15.15 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Weapons and explosives. 15.15... EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.15 Weapons and explosives. No person entering or while at Mt. Weather or the NETC will carry or possess firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, explosives or items intended...

  10. 31 CFR 0.215 - Possession of weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Possession of weapons and explosives... OF THE TREASURY EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT Rules of Conduct § 0.215 Possession of weapons and explosives. (a) Employees shall not possess firearms, explosives, or other dangerous or deadly...

  11. 36 CFR 504.14 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weapons and explosives. 504... GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.14 Weapons and explosives. No person while on the premises shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives, either openly...

  12. 31 CFR 407.13 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weapons and explosives. 407.13... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.13 Weapons and explosives. No person while on the property shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives, either openly or concealed, except for official purposes....

  13. 46 CFR 386.23 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Weapons and explosives. 386.23 Section 386.23 Shipping... AND GROUNDS AT THE UNITED STATES MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY § 386.23 Weapons and explosives. No person shall carry or possess firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons or parts thereof, explosives or...

  14. 32 CFR 228.7 - Prohibition on weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition on weapons and explosives. 228.7... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.7 Prohibition on weapons and explosives. No persons... illegal or legally controlled weapon (e.g., throwing stars, switchblades), explosives, or items...

  15. 36 CFR 702.7 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weapons and explosives. 702.7... Weapons and explosives. Except where duly authorized by law, and in the performance of law enforcement functions, no person shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives, either...

  16. 7 CFR 502.13 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weapons and explosives. 502.13 Section 502.13....13 Weapons and explosives. No person while in or on BARC property shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives, either openly or concealed, except as officially authorized...

  17. 4 CFR 25.14 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weapons and explosives. 25.14 Section 25.14 Accounts... AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.14 Weapons and explosives. No person while entering or in the GAO Building or on its grounds shall carry or possess firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, explosives...

  18. 36 CFR 520.15 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weapons and explosives. 520... Weapons and explosives. No person while on the premises shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives, either openly or concealed, except for official purposes, nor shall any...

  19. 31 CFR 91.13 - Weapons and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weapons and explosives. 91.13 Section... CONDUCT IN OR ON THE BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.13 Weapons and explosives. No person while on the property shall carry firearms, other dangerous or deadly weapons, or explosives,...

  20. Forensic analysis of explosions: Inverse calculation of the charge mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, M.M. van der; Wees, R.M.M. van; Brouwer, S.D.; Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der; Verreault, J.

    2015-01-01

    Forensic analysis of explosions consists of determining the point of origin, the explosive substance involved, and the charge mass. Within the EU fP7 project Hyperion, TNO developed the Inverse Explosion Analysis (TNO-IEA) tool to estïmate the charge mass and point of origin based on observed damage

  1. 49 CFR 173.59 - Description of terms for explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... detonating explosive without means of initiation, used for explosive welding, joining, forming, and other..., detonating, flexible. Articles consisting of a core of detonating explosive enclosed in spun fabric with... flexible protective covering, or consisting of a core of black powder surrounded by a flexible woven...

  2. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of High Explosive Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jesse J. Sabatini; Karl D. Oyler

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the recent advances in the syntheses of high explosive energetic materials. Syntheses of some relevant modern primary explosives and secondary high explosives, and the sensitivities and properties of these molecules are provided. In addition to the synthesis of such materials, processing improvement and formulating aspects using these ingredients, where applicable, are discussed in detail.

  3. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of High Explosive Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse J. Sabatini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses the recent advances in the syntheses of high explosive energetic materials. Syntheses of some relevant modern primary explosives and secondary high explosives, and the sensitivities and properties of these molecules are provided. In addition to the synthesis of such materials, processing improvement and formulating aspects using these ingredients, where applicable, are discussed in detail.

  4. 30 CFR 19.7 - Protection against explosion hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against explosion hazard. 19.7..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC CAP LAMPS § 19.7 Protection against explosion hazard. Unless properly designed, electric cap lamps may present two sources of probable explosion...

  5. 30 CFR 77.304 - Explosion release vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion release vents. 77.304 Section 77.304... Dryers § 77.304 Explosion release vents. Drying chambers, dry-dust collectors, ductwork connecting dryers... explosion release vents which open directly to the outside atmosphere, and all such vents shall be:...

  6. A model to assess dust explosion occurrence probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Junaid; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Ferdous, Refaul

    2014-03-15

    Dust handling poses a potential explosion hazard in many industrial facilities. The consequences of a dust explosion are often severe and similar to a gas explosion; however, its occurrence is conditional to the presence of five elements: combustible dust, ignition source, oxidant, mixing and confinement. Dust explosion researchers have conducted experiments to study the characteristics of these elements and generate data on explosibility. These experiments are often costly but the generated data has a significant scope in estimating the probability of a dust explosion occurrence. This paper attempts to use existing information (experimental data) to develop a predictive model to assess the probability of a dust explosion occurrence in a given environment. The pro-posed model considers six key parameters of a dust explosion: dust particle diameter (PD), minimum ignition energy (MIE), minimum explosible concentration (MEC), minimum ignition temperature (MIT), limiting oxygen concentration (LOC) and explosion pressure (Pmax). A conditional probabilistic approach has been developed and embedded in the proposed model to generate a nomograph for assessing dust explosion occurrence. The generated nomograph provides a quick assessment technique to map the occurrence probability of a dust explosion for a given environment defined with the six parameters.

  7. The Effect of Nano-Aluminumpowder on the Characteristic of RDX based Aluminized Explosives Underwater Close-Filed Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junting Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of nano-aluminum powder on the characteristic of RDX based aluminized explosives underwater closed-filed explosions, the scanning photographs along the radial of the charges were gained by a high speed scanning camera. The photographs of two different aluminized explosives underwater explosion have been analyzed, the shock wave curves and expand curves of detonation products were obtained, furthermore the change rules of shock waves propagation velocity, shock front pressure and expansion of detonation products of two aluminized explosives were investigated, and also the parameters of two aluminized explosives were contrasted. The results show that the aluminized explosive which with nano-aluminum whose initial shock waves pressure propagation velocity, shock front pressure are smaller than the aluminized explosive without nano-aluminum and has lower decrease rate attenuation of energy.

  8. Explosive limits and its container factors of polybasic explosive mixture gas containing H2, CH4 and CO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡耀元; 李勇; 朱凯汉; 周邦智; 杨元法

    2002-01-01

    Explosive characteristics of polybasic explosive mixture gas are systematically researched. Over 28000 experimental data have been obtained from 1278 effective experiments. The paper probes into the concentration explosive limits and the container factors of polybasic explosive mixture gas which contains H2, CH4 and CO. It has worked out the sufficient and necessary condition for branch-chain explosion and the unified expression of the probability of the heterogeneous chain termination. Experiments indicate that the concentration explosive limits of polybasic explosive mixture gas (H2, CH4, CO) relate to many factors. They enlarge with the augmentability of the container (linear size, geometric shape, and flame spread direction). This will be of great significance to guiding the revision of related industrial safety targets, reclaiming and reusing related industrial tail gas and waste gas, taking precautions against the explosion hazard of mixture gas in correlated industry and mines, and applying the br

  9. Phreatic and Hydrothermal Explosions: A Laboratory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Phreatic eruptions are amongst the most common eruption types on earth. They might be precursory to another type of volcanic eruption but often they stand on their one. Despite being the most common eruption type, they also are one of the most diverse eruptions, in appearance as well as on eruption mechanism. Yet steam is the common fuel behind all phreatic eruptions. The steam-driven explosions occur when water beneath the ground or on the surface is heated by magma, lava, hot rocks, or fresh volcanic deposits (such as ignimbrites, tephra and pyroclastic-flow deposits) and result in crater, tuff rings and debris avalanches. The intense heat of such material may cause water to boil and flash to steam, thereby generating an explosion of steam, water, ash, blocks, and bombs. Another wide and important field affected by phreatic explosions are hydrothermal areas; here phreatic explosions occur every few months creating explosion craters and resemble a significant hazard to hydrothermal power plants. Despite of their hazard potential, phreatic explosions have so far been overlooked by the field of experimental volcanology. A part of their hazard potential in owned by the fact that phreatic explosions are hardly predictable in occurrence time and size as they have manifold triggers (variances in groundwater and heat systems, earthquakes, material fatigue, water level, etc..) A new set of experiments has been designed to focus on this phreatic type of steam explosion, whereas classical phreatomagmatic experiments use molten fuel-coolant interaction (e.g., Zimanowski, et al., 1991). The violent transition of the superheated water to vapour adds another degree of explosivity to the dry magmatic fragmentation, driven mostly by vesicle bursting due to internal gas overpressure. At low water fractions the fragmentation is strongly enforced by the mixture of these two effects and a large fraction of fine pyroclasts are produced, whereas at high water fraction in the sample the

  10. Calculating Contained Firing Facility (CFF) explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, J W.

    1998-10-20

    The University of California awarded LLNL contract No. B345381 for the design of the facility to Parsons Infrastructure Technology, Inc., of Pasadena, California. The Laboratory specified that the firing chamber be able to withstand repeated fxings of 60 Kg of explosive located in the center of the chamber, 4 feet above the floor, and repeated firings of 35 Kg of explosive at the same height and located anywhere within 2 feet of the edge of a region on the floor called the anvil. Other requirements were that the chamber be able to accommodate the penetrations of the existing bullnose of the Bunker 801 flash X-ray machine and the roof of the underground camera room. These requirements and provisions for blast-resistant doors formed the essential basis for the design. The design efforts resulted in a steel-reinforced concrete snucture measuring (on the inside) 55 x 5 1 feet by 30 feet high. The walls and ceiling are to be approximately 6 feet thick. Because the 60-Kg charge is not located in the geometric center of the volume and a 35-K:: charge could be located anywhere in a prescribed area, there will be different dynamic pressures and impulses on the various walls floor, and ceiling, depending upon the weights and locations of the charges. The detailed calculations and specifications to achieve the design criteria were performed by Parsons and are included in Reference 1. Reference 2, Structures to Resist the E xts of Accidental L%plosions (TMS- 1300>, is the primary design manual for structures of this type. It includes an analysis technique for the calculation of blast loadings within a cubicle or containment-type structure. Parsons used the TM5- 1300 methods to calculate the loadings on the various fling chamber surfaces for the design criteria explosive weights and locations. At LLNL the same methods were then used to determine the firing zones for other weights and elevations that would give the same or lesser loadings. Although very laborious, a hand

  11. Origin of the Chemical Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T

    2010-01-01

    This review provides the necessary background from astrophysics, nuclear, and particle physics to understand the cosmic origin of the chemical elements. It reflects the year 2009 state of the art in this extremely quickly developing interdisciplinary research direction. The discussion summarizes the nucleosynthetic processes in the course of the evolution of the Universe and the galaxies contained within, including primordial nucleosynthesis, stellar evolution, and explosive nucleosynthesis in single and binary systems.

  12. Analyzed potential vorticity fields for explosive and non-explosive cyclogenesis events during FGGE.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchoffer, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Potential vorticity and jet streak properties associated with 23 explosive and non-explosive cyclones from the western North Atlantic and western North Pacific Oceans are analyzed for the period 17 January to 23 February 1979. ECMWF analyses with FGGE data are used to represent the 300 mb wind fields over these ocean areas. Relative maxima in potential vorticity are present upstream of all cyclones. Storm tracks with res...

  13. 30 CFR 77.1909 - Explosives and blasting; use of permissible explosives and shot-firing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting; use of permissible explosives and shot-firing units. 77.1909 Section 77.1909 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... blasting; use of permissible explosives and shot-firing units. Except as provided in § 77.1909-1,...

  14. Accreting He-rich material onto carbon-oxygen white dwarfs until explosive carbon ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Yuan; Liu, Dong-Dong; Zhou, Wei-Hong; Wang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play an important role in studies of cosmology and galactic chemical evolution. They are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) when their masses approach the Chandrasekar (Ch) mass limit. However, it is still not completely understood how a CO WD increases its mass to the Ch-mass limit in the classical single-degenerate (SD) model. In this paper, we studied the mass accretion process in the SD model to examine whether the WD can explode as an SN Ia. Employing the stellar evolution code called modules for experiments in stellar astrophysics (MESA), we simulated the He accretion process onto CO WDs. We found that the WD can increase its mass to the Ch-mass limit through the SD model and explosive carbon ignition finally occurs in its center, which will lead to an SN Ia explosion. Our results imply that SNe Ia can be produced from the SD model through steady helium accretion. Moreover, this work can provide initial input parameters for explosion models of SNe Ia.

  15. Numerical analysis of welded joint treated by explosion shock waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Jianjun; CHEN Huaining

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of welding residual stresses and the action of explosion shock waves on welding residual stresses. Firstly, the distributions of welding temperature field and residual stress on a butt joint were numerically simulated with the sequentially coupled method. Secondly, the effect of explosion shock waves, produced by plastic strip-like explosive, on welding residual stress distri-bution was predicted with coupled Lagrange-ALE algorithm.It was implicated that explosion treatment could effectively reduce welding residual stresses. The simulation work lays a foundation for the further research on the rule of explosion treatment's effect on welding residual stresses and the factors that may influence it.

  16. The effect of duct surface character on methane explosion propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Bai-quan; YE Qing; JIAN Cong-guang; WU Hai-jin

    2007-01-01

    The effect of duct surface character on methane explosion propagation was experimentally studied and theoretically analyzed. The roughness has effect on methane explosion propagation. The flame propagation velocity and the peak value pressure of methane explosion in rough duct are larger than the parameters in smooth duct. The heat exchange of the surface has effect on methane explosion propagation. The propagation velocity of flame and strength of explosion wave in the duct covered by heat insulation material are larger than those in duct with good heat transmittability.

  17. One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (Thermal Sensitivity) of ANPZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hust, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McClelland, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gresshoff, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. This report summarizes the recent ODTX experimental data and modeling results for 2,6-diamino-3,5-dintropyrazine (ANPZ).

  18. Determination of JWL Parameters for Non-Ideal Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, H.; Kato, Y.; Itoh, S.

    2004-07-01

    JWL equation of state is widely used in numerical simulation of detonation phenomena. JWL parameters are determined by cylinder test. Detonation characteristics of non-ideal explosive depend strongly on confinement, and JWL parameters determined by cylinder test do not represent the state of detonation products in many applications. We developed a method to determine JWL parameters from the underwater explosion test. JWL parameters were determined through a method of characteristics applied to the configuration of the underwater shock waves of cylindrical explosives. The numerical results obtained using JWL parameters determined by the underwater explosion test and those obtained using JWL parameters determined by cylinder test were compared with experimental results for typical non-ideal explosive; emulsion explosive. Good agreement was confirmed between the results obtained using JWL parameters determined by the underwater explosion test and experimental results.

  19. Preliminary Problem Definition Study of 48 Munitions Related Chemicals. Volume I. Explosives Related Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    Type 1 90±0.5 Polystyrene 8.5!0.30i-2-eahyheaxyl phcbalatw 1.5±0.3 PBX, Type 11 90O0.5 Polystyrene 9.1±0.1 Di-2-ethylhexyl. 1 ’hthalste 0.0.1 Cum Ronen... environnent from both the Civilian and Mili- tary Sectors, the three methylamines will be discussed together. B. Alternate Names Methyl-, dimethyl

  20. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtemler, Yu.; Liverts, E.; Mond, M.

    2016-06-01

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads, EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of an MRI mode with stable Alfvén-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  1. Sub-photospheric shocks in relativistic explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of shocks in opaque outflows from astrophysical explosions, in particular in cosmological gamma-ray bursts. Sub-photospheric shocks can produce neutrino emission and affect the observed photospheric radiation from the explosion. Shocks develop from internal compressive waves and can be of different types depending on the composition of the flow: (1) Shocks in `photon gas' with small plasma inertial mass have a unique structure determined by the `force-free' condition -- zero radiation flux in the plasma rest frame. Radiation dominance over plasma inertia suppresses formation of collisionless shocks mediated by collective electromagnetic fields. (2) Strong collisionless subshocks develop in the opaque flow if it is sufficiently magnetized. We evaluate the critical magnetization for this to happen. The collisionless subshock is embedded in a thicker radiation-mediated shock structure. (3) Shocks in outflows carrying a free neutron component involve dissipation through nuclear c...

  2. Towards quantum controlled initiation of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Marge T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Grane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    As a first step toward understanding and controlling excited state dynamics in explosives, transient absorption spectra of Hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB) in acetone, Trinitroaniline (TNA) in acetone and Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated in an ultrafast shaped pump/supercontinuum probe experiment for their dependence on single parameter control schemes. Two single parameter control methods, second order spectral phase (linear chirp) and the effect of pump energy on the amount of transmitted pump light were investigated. Novel transient absorption spectra were obtained for the three explosives. The spectral features found in the HNAB and TNA solutions had evidence of more complex control possibilities, while the spectral features of DAAF were dominated by intensity control.

  3. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yu; Mond, M

    2016-01-01

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly-detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of a MRI mode with stable Alfv\\'en-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  4. Earthquake-explosion discrimination using diffusion maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, N.; Bregman, Y.; Lindenbaum, O.; Ben-Horin, Y.; Averbuch, A.

    2016-12-01

    Discrimination between earthquakes and explosions is an essential component of nuclear test monitoring and it is also important for maintaining the quality of earthquake catalogues. Currently used discrimination methods provide a partial solution to the problem. In this work, we apply advanced machine learning methods and in particular diffusion maps for modelling and discriminating between seismic signals. Diffusion maps enable us to construct a geometric representation that capture the intrinsic structure of the seismograms. The diffusion maps are applied after a pre-processing step, in which seismograms are converted to normalized sonograms. The constructed low-dimensional model is used for automatic earthquake-explosion discrimination of data that are collected in single seismic stations. We demonstrate our approach on a data set comprising seismic events from the Dead Sea area. The diffusion-based algorithm provides correct discrimination rate that is higher than 90 per cent.

  5. Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W.; Angelini, S.; Freeman, K.; Chen, X.; Salmassi, T. [Center for Risk Studies and Safety, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Sienicki, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Lower head integrity under steam explosion loads in an AP600-like reactor design is considered. The assessment is the second part of an evaluation of the in-vessel retention idea as a severe accident management concept, the first part (DOE/ID-10460) dealing with thermal loads. The assessment is conducted in terms of the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and includes the comprehensive evaluation of all relevant severe accident scenarios, melt conditions and timing of release from the core region, fully 3D mixing and explosion wave dynamics, and lower head fragility under local, dynamic loading. All of these factors and brought together in a ROAAM Probabilistic Framework to evaluate failure likelihood. The conclusion is that failure is `physically unreasonable`. (author)

  6. Detecting underwater improvised explosive threats (DUIET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Terry

    2010-04-01

    Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) have presented a major threat in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices are powerful homemade land mines that can be small and easily hidden near roadsides. They are then remotely detonated when Coalition Forces pass by either singly or in convoys. Their rapid detection, classification and destruction is key to the safety of troops in the area. These land based bombs will have an analogue in the underwater theater especially in ports, lakes, rivers and streams. These devices may be used against Americans on American soil as an element of the global war on terrorism (GWOT) Rapid detection and classification of underwater improvised explosive devices (UIED) is critical to protecting innocent lives and maintaining the day to day flow of commerce. This paper will discuss a strategy and tool set to deal with this potential threat.

  7. Treatment of Explosives Residues from Range Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    1948. The bacteriostatic effects of methylene blue on the BOD test. Water Sewage Works 95:424. Sawyer, C. N., P. Callejas, N. Moore & A. Q. Y. Tom...according to a modified EPA Method 8330 using HPLC . -Water flux through the soil plots. Soil volumetric moisture content was measured using...breakdown products according to a modified EPA Method 8330 using HPLC . -Total explosives in the PMSO material. The topmost 2.5 cm of the PMSO was

  8. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Carly W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Goto, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  9. High Voltage Applications of Explosively Formed Fuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; Fowler, C. M.; Herrera, D. H.; King, J. C.; Lopez, E. A.; Martinez, E. C.; Oona, H.; Marsh, S. P.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Stokes, J.; Tabaka, L. J.; Torres, D. T.; Sena, F. C.; Kiuttu, G.; Degnan, J.

    2004-11-01

    At Los Alamos, we have primarily applied Explosively Formed Fuse (EFF) techniques to high current systems. In these systems, the EFF has interrupted currents from 19-25 MA, thus diverting the current to low inductance loads. The transferred current magnitude is determined by the ratio of storage inductance to load inductance and, with dynamic loads, the current has ranged from 12-20 MA. In a system with 18 MJ stored energy, the switch operates at a power of up to 6 TW. We are now investigating the use of the EFF technique to apply high voltages to high impedance loads in systems that are more compact. In these systems we are exploring circuits with EFF lengths from 43-100 cm, which have storage inductances large enough to apply 300-500 kV across high impedance loads. Experimental results and design considerations are presented. Using cylindrical EFF switches of 10 cm diameter and 43 cm length, currents of approximately 3 MA were interrupted producing ~200 kV. This indicates the switch had an effective resistance of ~100 mΩ where 150-200 mΩ was expected. To understand the lower performance, several parameters were studied including electrical conduction through the explosive products; current density; explosive initiation; insulator type and conductor thickness. The results show a number of interesting features, most notably that the primary mechanism of switch operation is mechanical and not electrical fusing of the conductor. Switches opening on a 1-10 μs time scale with resistances starting at 50 μΩ and increasing to perhaps 1 Ω now seem possible to construct using explosive charges as small as a few pounds.

  10. The Full Function Test Explosive Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Griffith, L V; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-12-13

    We have conducted three tests of a new pulsed power device called the Full Function Test (FFT). These tests represented the culmination of an effort to establish a high energy pulsed power capability based on high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) technology. This involved an extensive computational modeling, engineering, fabrication, and fielding effort. The experiments were highly successful and a new US record for magnetic energy was obtained.

  11. Waveforms Measured in Confined Thermobaric Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2007-05-04

    Experiments with 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges have been conducted in six different chambers. Both flake Aluminum and TNT were used as the fuel. Static pressure gauges on the chamber wall were the main diagnostic. Waveforms for explosions in air were significantly larger than those in nitrogen - thereby demonstrating a strong thermobaric (combustion) effect. This effect increases as the confinement volume decreases and the mixture richness approaches 1.

  12. Investigation of Research Needs for Underwater Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-31

    energy to the water shock. First, there are the well known properties that the Chapman-Jouget pressure of the detonation increases as the heat of detonation and...the explosive density, heat of detonation , number of moles of bubble gas, and molecular weight of the bubble gas are given. These numbers will be of...shock energy, the heat of detonation is increased, leaving a more energetic bubble. There is a continLal nonlinear interaction between the bubble and

  13. Explosive Infrasonic Events: Sensor Comparison Experiment (SCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnurr, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Garces, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rodgers, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    SCE (sensor comparison experiment) 1 through 4 consists of a series of four controlled above-ground explosions designed to provide new data for overpressure propagation. Infrasound data were collected by LLNL iPhones and other sensors. Origin times, locations HOB, and yields are not being released at this time and are therefore not included in this report. This preliminary report will be updated as access to additional data changes, or instrument responses are determined.

  14. DOE explosives safety manual. Revision 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This manual prescribes the Department of Energy (DOE) safety rules used to implement the DOE safety policy for operations involving explosives. This manual is applicable to all DOE facilities engaged in operations of development, manufacturing, handling, storage, transportation, processing, or testing of explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants, or assemblies containing these materials. The standards of this manual deal with the operations involving explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants, and the safe management of such operations. The design of all new explosives facilities shall conform to the requirements established in this manual and implemented in DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria Manual.`` It is not intended that existing physical facilities be changed arbitrarily to comply with these provisions, except as required by law. Existing facilities that do not comply with these standards may continue to be used for the balance of their functional life, as long as the current operation presents no significantly greater risk than that assumed when the facility was originally designed and it can be demonstrated clearly that a modification to bring the facility into compliance is not feasible. However, in the case of a major renovation, the facility must be brought into compliance with current standards. The standards are presented as either mandatory or advisory. Mandatory standards, denoted by the words ``shall,`` ``must,`` or ``will,`` are requirements that must be followed unless written authority for deviation is granted as an exemption by the DOE. Advisory standards denoted by ``should`` or ``may`` are standards that may be deviated from with a waiver granted by facility management.

  15. Neutrino oscillations in magnetically driven supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, Shio; Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, Tomoya, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: takiwaki.tomoya@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: kkotake@th.nao.ac.jp [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    We investigate neutrino oscillations from core-collapse supernovae that produce magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosions. By calculating numerically the flavor conversion of neutrinos in the highly non-spherical envelope, we study how the explosion anisotropy has impacts on the emergent neutrino spectra through the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect. In the case of the inverted mass hierarchy with a relatively large θ{sub 13} (sin{sup 2} 2θ{sub 13} ∼> 10{sup −3}), we show that survival probabilities of ν-bar {sub e} and ν{sub e} seen from the rotational axis of the MHD supernovae (i.e., polar direction), can be significantly different from those along the equatorial direction. The event numbers of ν-bar {sub e} observed from the polar direction are predicted to show steepest decrease, reflecting the passage of the magneto-driven shock to the so-called high-resonance regions. Furthermore we point out that such a shock effect, depending on the original neutrino spectra, appears also for the low-resonance regions, which could lead to a noticeable decrease in the ν{sub e} signals. This reflects a unique nature of the magnetic explosion featuring a very early shock-arrival to the resonance regions, which is in sharp contrast to the neutrino-driven delayed supernova models. Our results suggest that the two features in the ν-bar {sub e} and ν{sub e} signals, if visible to the Super-Kamiokande for a Galactic supernova, could mark an observational signature of the magnetically driven explosions, presumably linked to the formation of magnetars and/or long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Explosive Target balances of the German Bundesbank

    OpenAIRE

    Potrafke, Niklas; Reischmann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Using the recursive unit root test by Phillips et al. (2011) we show that the Target balances of the German Bundesbank have been explosive from the beginning of 2009 to the beginning of 2013. By implementing a full-allotment policy and reducing the required minimum quality of collaterals in October 2008, the European Central Bank (ECB) refinanced credits in the GIIPS countries (Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal and Spain) to a large extent. Private capital flowed out of the GIIPS countries, an...

  17. Explosion propagation in inert porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, G

    2012-02-13

    Porous media are often used in flame arresters because of the high surface area to volume ratio that is required for flame quenching. However, if the flame is not quenched, the flow obstruction within the porous media can promote explosion escalation, which is a well-known phenomenon in obstacle-laden channels. There are many parallels between explosion propagation through porous media and obstacle-laden channels. In both cases, the obstructions play a duel role. On the one hand, the obstruction enhances explosion propagation through an early shear-driven turbulence production mechanism and then later by shock-flame interactions that occur from lead shock reflections. On the other hand, the presence of an obstruction can suppress explosion propagation through momentum and heat losses, which both impede the unburned gas flow and extract energy from the expanding combustion products. In obstacle-laden channels, there are well-defined propagation regimes that are easily distinguished by abrupt changes in velocity. In porous media, the propagation regimes are not as distinguishable. In porous media the entire flamefront is affected, and the effects of heat loss, turbulence and compressibility are smoothly blended over most of the propagation velocity range. At low subsonic propagation speeds, heat loss to the porous media dominates, whereas at higher supersonic speeds turbulence and compressibility are important. This blending of the important phenomena results in no clear transition in propagation mechanism that is characterized by an abrupt change in propagation velocity. This is especially true for propagation velocities above the speed of sound where many experiments performed with fuel-air mixtures show a smooth increase in the propagation velocity with mixture reactivity up to the theoretical detonation wave velocity.

  18. Near-Source Scattering of Explosion-Generated Rg: Insight From Difference Spectrograms of NTS Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, I.; Chan, W.; Wagner, R.

    2005-12-01

    Several recent studies of the generation of low-frequency Lg from explosions indicate that the Lg wavetrain from explosions contains significant contributions from (1) the scattering of explosion-generated Rg into S and (2) direct S waves from the non-spherical spall source associated with a buried explosion. The pronounced spectral nulls observed in Lg spectra of Yucca Flats (NTS) and Semipalatinsk explosions (Patton and Taylor, 1995; Gupta et al., 1997) are related to Rg excitation caused by spall-related block motions in a conical volume over the shot point, which may be approximately represented by a compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) source (Patton et al., 2005). Frequency-dependent excitation of Rg waves should be imprinted on all scattered P, S and Lg waves. A spectrogram may be considered as a three-dimensional matrix of numbers providing amplitude and frequency information for each point in the time series. We found difference spectrograms, derived from a normal explosion and a closely located over-buried shot recorded at the same common station, to be remarkably useful for an understanding of the origin and spectral contents of various regional phases. This technique allows isolation of source characteristics, essentially free from path and recording site effects, since the overburied shot acts as the empirical Green's function. Application of this methodology to several pairs of closely located explosions shows that the scattering of explosion-generated Rg makes significant contribution to not only Lg and its coda but also to the two other regional phases Pg (presumably by the scattering of Rg into P) and Sn. The scattered energy, identified by the presence of a spectral null at the appropriate frequency, generally appears to be more prominent in the somewhat later-arriving sections of Pg, Sn, and Lg than in the initial part. Difference spectrograms appear to provide a powerful new technique for understanding the mechanism of near-source scattering

  19. A new type of stellar explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Perets, H B; Mazzali, P; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D -S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2009-01-01

    The explosive deaths of stars (supernovae; SNe) are generally explained by two physical processes. Young massive stars (more than eight solar masses, M_Sun) undergo gravitational core-collapse and appear as type Ib/c and II SNe. Type Ia SNe result from thermonuclear explosions of older, Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (WDs). Even the most underluminous SNe Ia eject ~1 M_Sun of C/O burning products. Here we report our discovery of the faint type Ib SN 2005E in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The lack of any trace of recent star formation near the SN location, and the very low ejected mass we find (~0.3 M_Sun) argues strongly against a core-collapse origin of this event. Our spectroscopic observations and the derived nucleosynthetic output show that the SN ejecta is dominated by helium-burning products, indicating that SN 2005E was neither a subluminous nor a regular SNe Ia. We have therefore found a new type of stellar explosion, arising from a low-mass, old stellar system. The ...

  20. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  1. Explosive Materials Combustion by Heated Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kondakov

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of ignition parameters of explosive materials (EM presents both the definite scientific interest for developing the ignition kinetics models and the practical interest from the point of view of their danger assessment. The present investigations, as opposed to the known technique for EMs ignition temperature determination, have been performed by using the model explosive material samples of high density which have been produced on the basis of HMX and TATB. Applying the technique of firing ballistic powders by a heated wire, the EM ignition temperature depending on the time (rate of heating has been investigated. The technique makes it possible to calculate heat pulses and heat flows leading to ignition. By decreasing the heat flow, the time for the EM heating up to ignition increases and temperature falls thereby approaching the critical value, characterising the danger limit under accidents associated with heating. The ignition of EM based on HMX and TATB takes place in a different manner. With the EM on the basis of HMX and with great heat flows. The ignition beginning from the surface in the form of flash is typical but when achieving the critical parameters, the heated layer flash takes place that increases the probability of the explosion realisation. EM based on TATH always ignite in the form of combustion from the surface, independent of the heat flow that points to the higher extent of its safety. These data correlate well with the higher parameters of its ignition.

  2. The Biggest Explosions in the Universe. II

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Daniel J; Smidt, Joseph; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L

    2013-01-01

    One of the leading contenders for the origin of supermassive black holes at $z \\gtrsim$ 7 is catastrophic baryon collapse in atomically-cooled halos at $z \\sim$ 15. In this scenario, a few protogalaxies form in the presence of strong Lyman-Werner UV backgrounds that quench H$_2$ formation in their constituent halos, preventing them from forming stars or blowing heavy elements into the intergalactic medium prior to formation. At masses of 10$^ 8$ \\Ms\\ and virial temperatures of 10$^4$ K, gas in these halos rapidly cools by H lines, in some cases forming 10$^4$ - 10$^6$ \\Ms\\ Pop III stars and, a short time later, the seeds of supermassive black holes. Instead of collapsing directly to black holes some of these stars died in the most energetic thermonuclear explosions in the universe. We have modeled the explosions of such stars in the dense cores of line-cooled protogalaxies in the presence of cosmological flows. In stark contrast to the explosions in diffuse regions in previous simulations, these SNe briefly e...

  3. Nitroaromatic explosives detection using electrochemically exfoliated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Ying Teng; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Detection of nitroaromatic explosives is of paramount importance from security point of view. Graphene sheets obtained from the electrochemical anodic exfoliation of graphite foil in different electrolytes (LiClO4 and Na2SO4) were compared and tested as electrode material for the electrochemical detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in seawater. Voltammetry analysis demonstrated the superior electrochemical performance of graphene produced in LiClO4, resulting in higher sensitivity and linearity for the explosives detection and lower limit of detection (LOD) compared to the graphene obtained in Na2SO4. We attribute this to the presence of oxygen functionalities onto the graphene material obtained in LiClO4 which enable charge electrostatic interactions with the –NO2 groups of the analyte, in addition to π-π stacking interactions with the aromatic moiety. Research findings obtained from this study would assist in the development of portable devices for the on-site detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

  4. Neutrino oscillations in MHD supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, S; Kotake, K [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, T, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.j [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutrino oscillations numerically in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosion models to see how asphericity has impacts on neutrino spectra. Magneto-driven explosions are one of the most attracting scenarios for producing large scale departures from spherical symmetric geometry, that are reported by many observational data. We find that the event rates at Super-Kamiokande (SK) seen from the polar direction (e.g., the rotational axis of the supernovae) decrease when the shock wave is propagating through H-resonance. In addition, we find that L-resonance in this situation becomes non-adiabatic, and the effect of L-resonance appears in the neutrino signal, because the MHD shock can propagate to the stellar surface without shock-stall after core bounce, and the shock reaches the L-resonance at earlier stage than the conventional spherical supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that we may obtain the observational signatures of the two resonances in SK for Galactic supernova.

  5. Planar blast scaling with condensed-phase explosives in a shock tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Scott L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25

    walls. Such a technique has previously been used to obtain blast scaling measurements in the planar geometry with gaseous explosives and the condensed-phase explosive nitroguanidine. Recently, there has been much interest in the blast characterization of various non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) materials. With non-ideals, the detonation reaction zone is significantly larger (up to several cm for ANFO) than more ideal explosives. Wave curvature, induced by charge-geometry, can significantly affect the energy release associated with NIHEs. To measure maximum NIHE energy release accurately, it is desirable to minimize any such curvature and, if possible, to overdrive the detonation shock to ensure completion of chemical reactions ahead of the sonic locus associated with the reaction zone. This is achieved in the current study through use of a powerful booster HE and a charge geometry consisting of short cylindrical lengths of NIHE initiated along the charge centerline.

  6. Influence of obstacle disturbance in a duct on explosion characteristics of coal gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In combination with experimental research,numerical simulation is performed to investigate the influence law of the obstacles in a duct on the explosion flame of premixed coal gas and air. The numerical method uses upwind WENO scheme and two-step chemical reaction model. The interaction mechanism is addressed between the compression wave from reflection on the right end of the duct and flame propagation. The reflected wave is found to result in the decrease of flame velocity. On this basis,we analyze the mechanism of the obstacles on flame as well as the law of flow field variation thus caused. The results suggest that,due to the obstacles,deflagration wave is repeatedly reflected,combustible gas mixture is fully compressed,temperature and pressure rise,chemical reaction speed increases,and hence flame intensity is strengthened. At the same time,a tripe point forms as a result of wall reflection of the deflagration wave from the obstacles and furthermore local flame speed increases. As the triple point propagates forward,the flame speed gradually decreases due to dissipation of energy. These conclusions provide a valuable theoretical foundation for the prediction of explosion field,prevention of fire and explosion and effective control of the com-bustion speed and flame propagation speed in detonation propulsion.

  7. PUSHing Core-Collapse Supernovae to Explosions in Spherical Symmetry: Explodability and Nucleosynthesis Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjana; Ebinger, Kevin; Frohlich, Carla; Perego, Albino; Hempel, Matthias; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the highly energetic deaths of massive stars. They play a vital role in the synthesis and dissemination of many chemical elements. CCSN nucleosynthesis calculations have previously relied on artificial explosion methods that do not adequately capture the physics of the innermost stellar layers. Multidimensional simulations currently being performed to fully unravel the explosion mechanism of CCSNe are very computationally expensive. The PUSH method, calibrated against SN1987A, provides parametrized spherically symmetric models that follow the consistent evolution of the proto-neutron star as well as the electron fraction of the ejecta. This method is computationally affordable and captures the physics relevant for nucleosynthesis calculations. Here, we present the results of a broad study that investigates the explodability and nucleosynthesis yields of progenitors covering a wide range of ZAMS masses. Comparisons of the predicted explosion properties and yields with observational CCSNe and metal-poor star data will also be presented. The complete set of nucleosynthesis yields will be a valuable input to models of galactic chemical evolution. United States Department of Energy (DOE Grant No. SC0010263).

  8. Time-Dependent Moment Tensors of the First Four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We use mainly vertical-component geophone data within 2 km from the epicenter to invert for time-dependent moment tensors of the first four SPE explosions: SPE-1, SPE-2, SPE-3 and SPE-4Prime. We employ a one-dimensional (1D) velocity model developed from P- and Rg-wave travel times for Green's function calculations. The attenuation structure of the model is developed from P- and Rg-wave amplitudes. We select data for the inversion based on the criterion that they show consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period, diagonal components of the moment tensors are well constrained. Nevertheless, the moment tensors, particularly their isotropic components, provide reasonable estimates of the long-period source amplitudes as well as estimates of corner frequencies, albeit with larger uncertainties. The estimated corner frequencies, however, are consistent with estimates from ratios of seismogram spectra from different explosions. These long-period source amplitudes and corner frequencies cannot be fit by classical P-wave explosion source models. The results motivate the development of new P-wave source models suitable for these chemical explosions. To that end, we fit inverted moment-tensor spectra by modifying the classical explosion model using regressions of estimated source parameters. Although the number of data points used in the regression is small, the approach suggests a way for the new-model development when more data are collected.

  9. La steam explosion : application en tant que prétraitement de la matière lignocellulosique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquet, N.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of steam explosion for the pretreatment of the lignocellulosic raw materials. Steam explosion is a thermomechanochemical process which allows the breakdown of lignocellulosic structural components by steam heating, hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds by organic acid formed during the process and shearing forces due to the expansion of the moisture. The process is composed of two distinct stages: vapocracking and explosive decompression. Cumul effects of both phases include modification of the physical properties of the material (specific surface area, water retention capacities, color, cellulose cristallinity rate,…, hydrolysis of hemicellulosic components (mono- and oligosaccharides released and modification of the chemical structure of lignin. These effects permit the opening of lignocellulosic structures and increase the enzymatic hydrolysis rate of cellulose components in the aim to obtain fermentable sugars used in second generation biofuels or high value-added molecules process.

  10. Explosion approach for external safety assessment: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D. Michael; Halford, Ann [Germanischer Lloyd, Loughborough (United Kingdom); Mendes, Renato F. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Several questions related to the potential for explosions are explored as this became an important subject during an enterprise risk analysis. The understanding of explosions underwent a substantial evolution in the final 20 years of the 20{sup th} century following international research projects in Europe involving several research institutes, as well gas and oil companies. This led to the development of techniques that could be used to assess the potential consequences of explosions on oil, gas and petrochemical facilities. This paper presents an overview of the potential for explosions in communities close to industrial sites or pipelines right of way (RoW), where the standard explosion assessment methods cannot be applied. With reference to experimental studies, the potential for confined explosions in buildings and Vapor Cloud Explosions is explored. Vapor Cloud Explosion incidents in rural or urban areas are also discussed. The method used for incorporating possible explosion and fire events in risk studies is also described using a case study. Standard explosion assessment methodologies and a revised approach are compared as part of an on going evaluation of risk (author)

  11. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range of conditions, for which the mass balance between magma flux and open-system gas escape repeatedly generates a viscous plug, pressurizes the magma beneath the plug, and

  12. A Sparse Semi-Blind Source Identification Method and Its Application to Raman Spectroscopy for Explosives Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and reliable detection and identification of unknown chemical substances is critical to homeland security. It is challenging to identify chemical components from a wide range of explosives. There are two key steps involved. One is a nondestructive and informative spectroscopic technique for data acquisition. The other is an associated library of reference features along with a computational method for feature matching and meaningful detection within or beyond the library. Recently several experimental techniques based on Raman scattering have been developed to perform standoff detection and identification of explosives, and they prove to be successful under certain idealized conditions. However data analysis is limited to standard least squares method assuming the complete knowledge of the chemical components. In this paper, we develop a new iterative method to identify unknown substances from mixture samples of Raman spectroscopy. In the first step, a constrained least squares method decomposes the dat...

  13. Raman detection of improvised explosive device (IED) material fabricated using drop-on-demand inkjet technology on several real world surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Mikella E.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    The requirement to detect hazardous materials (i.e., chemical, biological, and explosive) on a host of materials has led to the development of hazard detection systems. These new technologies and their capabilities could have immediate uses for the US military, national security agencies, and environmental response teams in efforts to keep people secure and safe. In particular, due to the increasing use by terrorists, the detection of common explosives and improvised explosive device (IED) materials have motivated research efforts toward detecting trace (i.e., particle level) quantities on multiple commonly encountered surfaces (e.g., textiles, metals, plastics, natural products, and even people). Non-destructive detection techniques can detect trace quantities of explosive materials; however, it can be challenging in the presence of a complex chemical background. One spectroscopic technique gaining increased attention for detection is Raman. One popular explosive precursor material is ammonium nitrate (AN). The material AN has many agricultural applications, however it can also be used in the fabrication of IEDs or homemade explosives (HMEs). In this paper, known amounts of AN will be deposited using an inkjet printer into several different common material surfaces (e.g., wood, human hair, textiles, metals, plastics). The materials are characterized with microscope images and by collecting Raman spectral data. In this report the detection and identification of AN will be demonstrated.

  14. [Synergistic mechanism of steam explosion combined with laccase treatment for straw delignification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanhua; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-06-01

    Components separation is the key technology in biorefinery. Combination of steam explosion and laccase was used, and synergistic effect of the combined pretreatment was evaluated in terms of physical structure, chemical components and extraction of lignin. The results showed that steam explosion can destroy the rigid structure and increase the specific surface area of straw, which facilitated the laccase pretreatment. The laccase pretreatment can modify the lignin structure based on the Fourier transform infrared test, as a result the delignification of straw was enhanced. Nuclei Growth model with a time dependent rate constant can describe the delignification, and the kinetics parameters indicated that the combined pretreatment improved the reaction sites and made the delignification reaction more sensitive to temperature. The combined pretreatment enhanced delignification, and can be a promising technology as an alternative to the existing pretreatment.

  15. Deconstruction of corncob by steam explosion pretreatment: Correlations between sugar conversion and recalcitrant structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Yuan, Qipeng; Cheng, Gang

    2017-01-20

    In this work, acid-catalyzed steam explosion was carried out as a pretreatment to hydrolyze hemicellulose and increase the enzymatic digestibility of corncob. Pretreatment conditions were varied to achieve structural alterations in a wide range: type of acids (sulfuric acid and oxalic acid), acid concentration (0.1-1.5wt.%) and pressure (1.0-1.8MPa). The pretreated residues were analyzed by chemical analysis, surface area measurement and x-ray diffraction. Biomass and cellulose crystallinity, lignin content and specific surface area were obtained and their correlations with sugar conversion were compared. The results suggested that these parameters were coupled together and they explained in part the diversity of the literature data that improves understanding of steam explosion pretreatment.

  16. Explosive nucleosynthesis, p-process and s-process in massive stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, M. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Nomoto, K.; Prantzos, N.; Rayet, M.; Arnould, M.

    1994-06-01

    Explosive nucleosynthesis, p-process and s-process in massive stars for the main-sequence star masses from 13 (solar mass) to 70 (solar mass) are reviewed. We examine the dependence of the supernova yields on the stellar mass and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O rate. The supernova yields and overproduction factors integrated over the initial mass function are compared with the solar system abundances. The good agreement or enough overproductions compared with the solar abundances suggest that our present model represents a good indicator to develop the present study to the chemical evolution of elements from the early universe. On the other hand, some isotopes cannot be produced enough in the present models. Another model would be necessary to get whole reasonable agreement between the relevant solar system abundances of explosive, s, and p-process classification and those by a model calculation. (author).

  17. Distribution and Fate of Military Explosives and Propellants in Soil: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Pichtel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energetic materials comprise both explosives and propellants. When released to the biosphere, energetics are xenobiotic contaminants which pose toxic hazards to ecosystems, humans, and other biota. Soils worldwide are contaminated by energetic materials from manufacturing operations; military conflict; military training activities at firing and impact ranges; and open burning/open detonation (OB/OD of obsolete munitions. Energetic materials undergo varying degrees of chemical and biochemical transformation depending on the compounds involved and environmental factors. This paper addresses the occurrence of energetic materials in soils including a discussion of their fates after contact with soil. Emphasis is placed on the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX, and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX, and the propellant ingredients nitroglycerin (NG, nitroguanidine (NQ, nitrocellulose (NC, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT, and perchlorate.

  18. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  19. Determining the TNT equivalence of gram-sized explosive charges using shock-wave shadowgraphy and high-speed video recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargather, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Explosive materials are routinely characterized by their TNT equivalence. This can be determined by chemical composition calculations, measurements of shock wave overpressure, or measurements of the shock wave position vs. time. However, TNT equivalence is an imperfect criterion because it is only valid at a given radius from the explosion center (H. Kleine et al., Shock Waves 13(2):123-138, 2003). Here we use a large retroreflective shadowgraph system and a high-speed digital video camera to image the shock wave and record its location vs. time. Optical data obtained from different explosions can be combined to determine a characteristic shock wave x-t diagram, from which the overpressure and the TNT equivalent are determined at any radius. This method is applied to gram-sized triacetone triperoxide (TATP) charges. Such small charges can be used inexpensively and safely for explosives research.

  20. Numerical modelling of the effect of using multi-explosives on the explosive forming of steel cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, T.; Kong, K.; Djordjevic, N.; Vignjevic, R.; Campbell, JC; Hughes, K.

    2016-08-01

    Modelling and analysis of underwater explosive forming process by using FEM and SPH formulation is presented in this work. The explosive forming of a steel cone is studied. The model setup includes a low carbon steel plate, plate holder, forming die as well as water and C4 explosive. The effect of multiple explosives on rate of targets deformation has been studied. Four different multi-explosives models have been developed and compared to the single explosive model. The formability of the steel plate based on forming limit failure criteria has been investigated. Aspects such as shape of plates deformation and thickness of the plate during the forming process have been examined. The model results indicate that a multi-explosives model does not always guarantee a faster rate of target deformation without central explosive. On the other hand the model results indicate that the multi-explosives setup is capable of preventing crack failure of the steel plate during the forming process which would occur if a single explosive model was used.

  1. Thermal Explosion Violence of HMX-Based and RDX-Based Explosives - Effects of Composition, Confinement, and Solid Phase Using the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F

    2002-08-26

    The Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX) has been developed to quantify the violence of thermal explosion under well defined and carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. Here we present results with HMX-based explosives (LX-04 and PBX-9501) and with Composition B. Samples are 2 inches (50 mm) in diameter and 8 inches (200 mm) in length, under confinement of 7,500-30,000 psi (50-200 MPa), with heating rates of 1-3 C/hr. We quantify reaction violence by measuring the wall velocity in the ensuing thermal explosion, and relate the measured velocity to that expected from a detonation. Results with HMX-based explosives (LX-04 and PBX-9501) have shown the importance of confinement and HMX solid phase, with reaction violence ranging from mild pressure bursts to near detonations. By contrast, Composition B has shown very violent reactions over a wide range of conditions.

  2. Thermal Explosion Violence of HMX-Based and RDX-Based Explosives - Effects of Composition, Confinement, and Solid Phase Using the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F

    2002-03-14

    The Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX) has been developed to quantify the violence of thermal explosion under well defined and carefully controlled initial and boundary conditions. Here we present results with HMX-based explosives (LX-04 and PBX-9501) and with Composition B. Samples are 2 inches (50 mm) in diameter and 8 inches (200 mm) in length, under confinement of 7,500-30,000 psi (50-200 MPa), with heating rates of 1-3 C/hr. We quantify reaction violence by measuring the wall velocity in the ensuing thermal explosion, and relate the measured velocity to that expected from a detonation. Results with HMX-based explosives (LX-04 and PBX-9501) have shown the importance of confinement and HMX solid phase, with reaction violence ranging from mild pressure bursts to near detonations. By contrast, Composition B has shown very violent reactions over a wide range of conditions.

  3. Influence of Accelerated Aging on Detonation Performance of Explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Da-yuan; HUA Cheng; WANG Xiang; HAN Yong

    2010-01-01

    To understand the aging effects on detonation performances of explosives, an accelerated aging mechanism and effect of explosives were analyzed. Based on the thermo-gravimetric (TG) curves of explosives under the heat rate of 5, 10 and 20 K·min-1, the thermal decomposition activation energy, pre-exponential factor, mechanism function and kinetic equation of the explosives were calculated by Ozawa's equation and decomposition extents. Then, according to the derived kinetic equation, the density, composition and heat of formation of GI-1, PBX-1 and PBX-2 explosive in different decompo-sition extents were calculated at accelerated aging temperatures of 70 ℃ and 75 ℃, respectively. Furthermore, the detona-tion parameters of GI-1, PBX-1 and PBX-2 explosives were found out by means of VLWR code. The results show that after accelerated aging, the density are decrease, the detonation velocity and pressure are all decreased slightly.

  4. Models of wave duration and event frequency of explosion aftershocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学政; 刘文学; 沈旭峰

    2004-01-01

    The contained underground explosion (CUE) usually generates huge number of aftershocks. This kind of aftershocks induced by three CUEs was investigated in the paper. The conclusions show that the duration of aftershock waveforms are rather short, 70 percent of them range from 2 to 7; the occurrences of the aftershocks conform to negative power function, which has the power of-1.6. The aftershock sequence attenuates a little bit faster, with power of-1.0, within two weeks of post-explosions. During the early stage of post-explosions the aftershocks show up in a cluster, however, they usually show up individually during the late stage of post-explosions. The number of aftershocks generated by the compatible explosions differs by several times because of different medium and geological structure; within one month after an explosion with Richater magnitude of 5.5, the number of aftershocks attenuates to the background. Hereafter there are still tiny numbers of aftershocks.

  5. PINS Measurements of Explosive Simulants for Cargo Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.H. Seabury

    2008-06-01

    As part of its efforts to prevent the introduction of explosive threats on commercial flights, the Transportation Security Administration (TSL) is evaluating new explosives detection systems (EDSs) for use in air cargo inspection. The TSL has contracted Battelle to develop a new type of explosives simulant to assist in this development. These are designed to mimic the elemental profile (C, H, N, O, etc.) of explosives as well as their densities. Several “neutron in—gamma out” (n,?) techniques have been considered to quantify the elemental profile in these new simulants and the respective explosives. The method chosen by Battelle is Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS), developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Battelle wishes to validate that the simulants behave like the explosive threats with this technology. The results of the validation measurements are presented in this report.

  6. Blast overpressure after tire explosion: a fatal case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomara, Cristoforo; D'Errico, Stefano; Riezzo, Irene; Perilli, Gabriela; Volpe, Umberto; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-12-01

    Fatal blast injuries are generally reported in literature as a consequence of the detonation of explosives in war settings. The pattern of lesion depends on the position of the victim in relation to the explosion, on whether the blast tracks through air or water, and whether it happens in the open air or within an enclosed space and the distance from the explosion. Tire explosion-related injuries are rarely reported in literature. This study presents a fatal case of blast overpressure due to the accidental explosion of a truck tire occurring in a tire repair shop. A multidisciplinary approach to the fatality involving forensic pathologists and engineers revealed that the accidental explosion, which caused a series of primary and tertiary blast wave injuries, was due to tire deterioration.

  7. Digitization of Nuclear Explosion Seismograms from the Former Soviet Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-30

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0089 TR-2015-0089 DIGITIZATION OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSION SEISMOGRAMS FROM THE FORMER SOVIET UNION Paul G. Richards...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Digitization of Nuclear Explosion Seismograms from the Former Soviet Union 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-12-C-0206 5b...These signals, including thousands recorded at regional distances from nuclear explosions in Eurasia, have been scanned, digitized , and

  8. Method of Testing the Flyer Sensitivity of Explosives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王桂吉; 赵剑衡

    2004-01-01

    By means of Mylar flyer shock explosives driven by electric gun, the method of testing the flyer initiation sensitivity of explosives is studied, and some experiments are done. The experimental results show that the test method established is correct, which is very important and instructive to study and evaluate the safety and reliability of explosives. For the moment, the test should be researched and discussed further.

  9. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja;

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives molecu...... process compared to existing commercial substrates. Therefore it is believed that these novel substrates will be able to make SERS more applicable in mobile explosives detection systems to be deployed in for example landmine clearance actions....

  10. Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    1~7JJ!i 5a. DATE: 6a. DATE: 7a. DATE: 8. TITLE: Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa 9. CONTRACT NUMBER: 10...00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...600 Raleigh, NC 27605 Contract Number: HDTRA2-11-D-0001 Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa 4

  11. Five-component propagation model for steam explosion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, H.S.; Maruyama, Yu; Sugimoto, Jun [Severe Accident Research Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    A five-field simulation code JASMINE-pro has been developed at JAERI for the calculation of the propagation and explosion phase of steam explosions. The basic equations and the constitutive relationships specifically utilized in the propagation models in the code are introduced in this paper. Some calculations simulating the KROTOS 1D and 2D steam explosion experiments are also stated in the paper to show the present capability of the code. (author)

  12. Burst conditions of explosive volcanic eruptions recorded on microbarographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate pressure disturbances in the atmosphere that propagate away either as acoustic or as shock waves, depending on the explosivity of the eruption. Both types of waves are recorded on microbarographs as 1- to 0.1-hertz N-shaped signals followed by a longer period coda. These waveforms can be used to estimate burst pressures end gas concentrations in explosive volcanic eruptions and provide estimates of eruption magnitudes.

  13. Progress in model development to quantify High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) to mechancial insult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-07-29

    The rapid release of chemical energy has found application for industrial and military purposes since the invention of gunpowder. Black powder, smokeless powder of various compositions, and pyrotechnics all exhibit the rapid release of energy without detonation when they are being used as designed. The rapidity of energy release for these materials is controlled by adjustments to the particle surface area (propellant grain configuration or powder particle size) in conjunction with the measured pressure-dependent burning rate, which is very subsonic. In this way a manufacturing process can be used to engineer the desired violence of the explosion. Detonations in molecular explosives, in contrast, propagate with a supersonic velocity that depends on the loading density, but is independent of the surface area. In ideal detonations, the reaction is complete within a small distance of the propagating shock front. Non-ideal detonations in molecular and composite explosives proceed with a slower velocity, and the reaction may continue well behind the shock front. We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the application described here, we are studying an HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive developed in the UK, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult, drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation have been observed to react violently. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Reaction (HEVR). The basis of our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the

  14. Detonation of the aluminized explosives with sodium azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranda, A.; Nowaczewski, J.; Trzcinski, W. [Military University of Technology Kaliskiego, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The velocity of detonation in the aluminized explosives containing sodium azide was measured. he experimental results were compared with those of calculation. Two different explosive components were used in the tests: RDX and ammonium nitrate. The contents of constituents of explosive mixture varied within a wide range. The X-ray analysis of the solid detonation products was also made. The results enable us to predict a behaviour of sodium azide and aluminium during detonation process of the explosive tested and to verify the possibility of reaction between aluminium and nitrogen during that process. (authors) 12 refs.

  15. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, D.J. [Northwest Technical Industries, Inc., Sequim, WA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques.

  16. Remote Machining and Evaluation of Explosively Filled Munitions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is used for remote machining of explosively loaded ammunition. Munition sizes from small arms through 8-inch artillery can be accommodated. Sectioning,...

  17. Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, J L

    2002-07-08

    The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

  18. Automated explosive pellet manufacturing using a PDP-14 programmable controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, D.O.

    1976-10-29

    A Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-14 Industrial Programmable Controller was employed to provide automatic, closed-loop control for an explosive pellet manufacturing system at Mound Laboratory. Programmable controllers allow the application of sophisticated and flexible control, through programming. Advantages of the PDP-14 controller are ease of installation and maintenance, capability for modular expansion, and immunity to electrical noise. Safety requirements were met by using new techniques for adapting electrical equipment to a hazardous environment and by locating the PDP-14 remotely outside the explosive area. Another advantage of the new explosion proofing (EP) methods/equipment was that they produced a minimum of clutter on the controlled explosive pellet manufacturing system.

  19. Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

  20. Some properties of repeated hits after first explosion for birth and death processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨向群

    1999-01-01

    Of repeated hits and repeated explosions after first explosion for a birth and death process with explosion some properties are investigated. The properties of repeated hits after first explosion may be expressed by the properties of the first hit after the first explosion.

  1. Optimization of biological and instrumental detection of explosives and ignitable liquid residues including canines, SPME/ITMS and GC/MSn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, Kenneth G.; Harper, Ross J.; Perr, Jeannette M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2003-09-01

    A comprehensive study and comparison is underway using biological detectors and instrumental methods for the rapid detection of ignitable liquid residues (ILR) and high explosives. Headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) has been demonstrated to be an effective sampling method helping to identify active odor signature chemicals used by detector dogs to locate forensic specimens as well as a rapid pre-concentration technique prior to instrumental detection. Common ignitable liquids and common military and industrial explosives have been studied including trinitrotoluene, tetryl, RDX, HMX, EGDN, PETN and nitroglycerine. This study focuses on identifying volatile odor signature chemicals present, which can be used to enhance the level and reliability of detection of ILR and explosives by canines and instrumental methods. While most instrumental methods currently in use focus on particles and on parent organic compounds, which are often involatile, characteristic volatile organics are generally also present and can be exploited to enhance detection particularly for well-concealed devices. Specific examples include the volatile odor chemicals 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and cyclohexanone, which are readily available in the headspace of the high explosive composition C-4; whereas, the active chemical cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) is not. The analysis and identification of these headspace 'fingerprint' organics is followed by double-blind dog trials of the individual components using certified teams in an attempt to isolate and understand the target compounds to which dogs are sensitive. Studies to compare commonly used training aids with the actual target explosive have also been undertaken to determine their suitability and effectiveness. The optimization of solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with ion trap mobility spectrometry (ITMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC/MSn) is detailed including interface development

  2. Full Scale Explosive Tests in Woomera, Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUPTA A; MENDIS P; LUMANTARNA R; NGO T

    2006-01-01

    Two large explosion trials (5 000 kg TNT and 500 kg ANFO) were conducted in Woomera,Australia in April/May 2006.Advance Protective Technologies for Engineering Structures (APTES) group tested 2 large single-storey concrete modules with individual components such as doors,windows and tiled panels.A description of the trial and details of various modules tested in these trials are presented in the paper.Numerical modelling and simulations are performed using computer programs,CONWEP,AIR3D and AUTODYN.A comparison of the pressure time histories obtained using these codes is made along with the concluding remarks.

  3. Explosively-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agee, F.J.; Lehr, F.M. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Vigil, M.; Kaye, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaudet, J.; Shiffler, D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Plasma jet generators have been designed and tested which used an explosive driver and shocktube with a rectangular cross section that optimize the flow velocity and electrical conductivity. The latest in a series of designs has been tested using a reactive load to diagnose the electrical properties of the MHD generator/electromagnet combination. The results of these tests indicate that the plasma jet/MHD generator design does generate a flow velocity greater than 25 km/s and produces several gigawatts of pulsed power in a very small package size. A larger, new generator design is also presented.

  4. Underwater Explosion Damage of Ship Hull Panels

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rarnajeyathilagam; Vendhan, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    Underwater explosion is a major threat to ships and submarines in a war environment. The prediction of the mode and the extent of the failure is an essential step in designing for shock loading. The localised failure in a hull panel is severe compared to the global response of the ship. In this study, an attempt has been made to predict the response and failure modes of three types of hull panels (flat, concave, and convex). The shock loading on the hull panel has been estimated based on the ...

  5. Target Loading from a Submerged Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Wardlaw

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure on a flat plate suspended over a submerged detonation is measured and simulated. Calculation and experiment are in relatively good agreement, although there is variation in experimental results and simulations are sensitive, near the centerline, to the computational details. This sensitivity is linked to the instability of the accelerating plume, typical of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The plate loading features an initial force at plate center, followed by an expanding circular loading pattern. The initial load is due to plume impact, while the circular load arises from the impact of water transported up the edges of the explosion cavity.

  6. Solid state gas sensors for detection of explosives and explosive precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yun

    The increased number of terrorist attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) over the past few years has made the trace detection of explosives a priority for the Department of Homeland Security. Considerable advances in early detection of trace explosives employing spectroscopic detection systems and other sensing devices have been made and have demonstrated outstanding performance. However, modern IEDs are not easily detectable by conventional methods and terrorists have adapted to avoid using metallic or nitro groups in the manufacturing of IEDs. Instead, more powerful but smaller compounds, such as TATP are being more frequently used. In addition, conventional detection techniques usually require large capital investment, labor costs and energy input and are incapable of real-time identification, limiting their application. Thus, a low cost detection system which is capable of continuous online monitoring in a passive mode is needed for explosive detection. In this dissertation, a thermodynamic based thin film gas sensor which can reliably detect various explosive compounds was developed and demonstrated. The principle of the sensors is based on measuring the heat effect associated with the catalytic decomposition of explosive compounds present in the vapor phase. The decomposition mechanism is complicated and not well known, but it can be affected by many parameters including catalyst, reaction temperature and humidity. Explosives that have relatively high vapor pressure and readily sublime at room temperature, like TATP and 2, 6-DNT, are ideal candidate for vapor phase detection using the thermodynamic gas sensor. ZnO, W2O 3, V2O5 and SnO2 were employed as catalysts. This sensor exhibited promising sensitivity results for TATP, but poor selectivity among peroxide based compounds. In order to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of the thermodynamic sensor, a Pd:SnO2 nanocomposite was fabricated and tested as part of this dissertation. A

  7. Experimental Research on Reducing Sensitivity of Emulsion Explosive in Different Sensitization Methods%不同敏化条件下乳化炸药减敏的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑛; 柏存增

    2011-01-01

    The shock wave parameters of emulsion explosive sensitized by perlite, glass microspheres and the chemical foaming method were tested by using underwater explosive device. The reduced sensitivity of emulsion explosives is calculated to measure the stability of emulsion explosives. The results showed emulsion explosive sensitized glass microspheres method has the minimum sensitivity and the best stability.%利用水下爆炸装置测试膨胀珍珠岩、玻璃微球和化学发泡3种敏化方式下乳化炸药的冲击波参数,计算乳化炸药的减敏度,衡量不同方式敏化的乳化炸药的稳定性.结果表明:玻璃微球敏化的乳化炸药减敏度最小,稳定性最好.

  8. Pourability Enhancement of PETN Explosive Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannet, M.D.; Ball, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Manufacture of precision detonators requires the pelletizing of very fine, organic, crystalline explosive powders. Production of pellets in automatic machines within critical dimensional and weight tolerances requires that the powders pour uniformly into die cavities. The pellets must be able to be initiated with low energy and have a predictable energy output. Modifications to needle-like crystalline PETN explosive powders to make them pourable were introduced by the application of about 80 A thick polymeric coatings to the individual crystals, followed by a controlled agglomeration into a spherical prill. Microencapsulation techniques provided the key to achieving the result using less than 0.5 wt. % coating (an order of magnitude less coating than in usual PBX systems). These coatings did not appreciably alter the energy required to initiate and significantly increased the strength of the pellets. A key point demonstrated, which may be translated to other applications, was that powders that exhibit performance based on physical characteristics could have their handling and strength properties tailored with little change in their primary function.

  9. Did gamma ray burst induce Cambrian explosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pisin; Ruffini, R.

    2015-06-01

    One longstanding mystery in bio-evolution since Darwin's time is the origin of the Cambrian explosion that happened around 540 million years ago (Mya), where an extremely rapid increase of species occurred. Here we suggest that a nearby GRB event 500 parsecs away, which should occur about once per 5 Gy, might have triggered the Cambrian explosion. Due to a relatively lower cross section and the conservation of photon number in Compton scattering, a substantial fraction of the GRB photons can reach the sea level and would induce DNA mutations in organisms protected by a shallow layer of water or soil, thus expediting the bio-diversification. This possibility of inducing genetic mutations is unique among all candidate sources for major incidents in the history of bio-evolution. A possible evidence would be the anomalous abundance of certain nuclear isotopes with long half-lives transmuted by the GRB photons in geological records from the Cambrian period. Our notion also imposes constraints on the evolution of exoplanet organisms and the migration of panspermia.

  10. SANFO: The missing link in explosives technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.J. [Johnson Hi-Tech Australia Pty Ltd, Queensland (Australia)

    1996-12-01

    The development of SANFO has provided the mining industry with a low cost high gas volume, variable density, blasting agent which can be blended on site in a simple agitator mixing and charging system by mine site employees. During the last decade most major explosives manufacturers have been promoting high density, high shock energy blasting agents. To offset the cost of these products they have relied on expanded borehole patterns. It has since been discovered that lower VOD products are more effective in most overburden geologies due to the longer explosion pressure period and lower shock energy. These characteristics also reduce energy loss consumed in pulverization around the perimeter of borehole. The major advantages of SANFO compared with normal ANFO or heavy ANFO are as listed. Due to problems associated with bulling when blasting soft geologies at BHP`s Riverside Mine in Central Queensland, Australia, the company was invited to develop a low density blasting agent which could be blended as required on the mine site. This paper describes the problems associated with blasting softer geologies and the use of sawdust as a cost-effective bulking agent.

  11. Explosive percolation transitions in growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. M.; Son, S.-W.; Kahng, B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent extensive studies of the explosive percolation (EP) model revealed that the EP transition is second order with an extremely small value of the critical exponent β associated with the order parameter. This result was obtained from static networks, in which the number of nodes in the system remains constant during the evolution of the network. However, explosive percolating behavior of the order parameter can be observed in social networks, which are often growing networks, where the number of nodes in the system increases as dynamics proceeds. However, extensive studies of the EP transition in such growing networks are still missing. Here we study the nature of the EP transition in growing networks by extending an existing growing network model to a general case in which m node candidates are picked up in the Achiloptas process. When m =2 , this model reduces to the existing model, which undergoes an infinite-order transition. We show that when m ≥3 , the transition becomes second order due to the suppression effect against the growth of large clusters. Using the rate-equation approach and performing numerical simulations, we also show that the exponent β decreases algebraically with increasing m , whereas it does exponentially in a corresponding static random network model. Finally, we find that the hyperscaling relations hold but in different forms.

  12. Did Gamma Ray Burst Induce Cambrian Explosion?

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Pisin

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding mystery in bio-evolution since Darwin's time is the origin of the Cambrian explosion that happened around 540 million years ago (Mya), where an extremely rapid increase of species occurred. Here we suggest that a nearby GRB event ~500 parsecs away, which should occur about once per 5 Gy, might have triggered the Cambrian explosion. Due to a relatively lower cross section and the conservation of photon number in Compton scattering, a substantial fraction of the GRB photons can reach the sea level and would induce DNA mutations in organisms protected by a shallow layer of water or soil, thus expediting the bio-diversification. This possibility of inducing genetic mutations is unique among all candidate sources for major incidents in the history of bio-evolution. A possible evidence would be the anomalous abundance of certain nuclear isotopes with long half-lives transmuted by the GRB photons in geological records from the Cambrian period. Our notion also imposes constraints on the evolution of ...

  13. Alfven Wave-Driven Supernova Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K; Yamada, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the role of Alfven waves in the core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion. We assume that Alfven waves are generated by convections inside a proto-neutron star (PNS) and emitted from its surface. Then these waves propagate outwards and dissipate via nonlinear processes and heat up matter around a stalled prompt shock. To quantitatively assess the importance of this process for revival of the stalled shock, we perform 1D time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations, taking into account the heating via the dissipation of Alfven waves. We show that the shock revival occurs if the surface field strength is larger than ~2x10^{15}G and if the amplitude of velocity fluctuation at the PNS surface is larger than ~ 20% of the local sound speed. Interestingly, the Alfven wave mechanism is self-regulating in the sense that the explosion energy is not very sensitive to the surface field strength and initial amplitude of Alfven waves as long as they are larger than the threshold values given above. It should be em...

  14. Robustness Assessment of Building Structures under Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Waggoner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, much research has focused on the behaviour of structures following the failure of a key structural component. Particular attention has been given to sudden column loss, though questions remain as to whether this event-independent scenario is relevant to actual extreme events such as explosion. Few studies have been conducted to assess the performance of floor slabs above a failed column, and the computational tools used have not been validated against experimental results. The research program presented in this paper investigates the adequacy of sudden column loss as an idealisation of local damage caused by realistic explosion events, and extends prior work by combining the development of accurate computational models with large-scale testing of a typical floor system in a prototypical steel-framed structure. The floor system consists of corrugated decking topped by a lightly reinforced concrete slab that is connected to the floor beams through shear studs. The design is consistent with typical building practices in the US. The first test has been completed, and subsequent tests are currently being planned. This paper addresses the importance of robustness design for localized damage and includes a detailed description regarding how the research program advances the current state of knowledge for assessing robustness of compositely constructed steel-framed buildings.

  15. Autonomous characterization of plastic-bonded explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Kim Dalton; DeRego, Paul; Gomez, Antonio; Baumgart, Chris

    2006-08-01

    Plastic-Bonded Explosives (PBXs) are a newer generation of explosive compositions developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Understanding the micromechanical behavior of these materials is critical. The size of the crystal particles and porosity within the PBX influences their shock sensitivity. Current methods to characterize the prominent structural characteristics include manual examination by scientists and attempts to use commercially available image processing packages. Both methods are time consuming and tedious. LANL personnel, recognizing this as a manually intensive process, have worked with the Kansas City Plant / Kirtland Operations to develop a system which utilizes image processing and pattern recognition techniques to characterize PBX material. System hardware consists of a CCD camera, zoom lens, two-dimensional, motorized stage, and coaxial, cross-polarized light. System integration of this hardware with the custom software is at the core of the machine vision system. Fundamental processing steps involve capturing images from the PBX specimen, and extraction of void, crystal, and binder regions. For crystal extraction, a Quadtree decomposition segmentation technique is employed. Benefits of this system include: (1) reduction of the overall characterization time; (2) a process which is quantifiable and repeatable; (3) utilization of personnel for intelligent review rather than manual processing; and (4) significantly enhanced characterization accuracy.

  16. Seeing a Stellar Explosion in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have for the first time obtained a three-dimensional view of the distribution of the innermost material expelled by a recently exploded star. The original blast was not only powerful, according to the new results. It was also more concentrated in one particular direction. This is a strong indication that the supernova must have been very turbulent, supporting the most recent computer models. Unlike the Sun, which will die rather quietly, massive stars arriving at the end of their brief life explode as supernovae, hurling out a vast quantity of material. In this class, Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A) in the rather nearby Large Magellanic Cloud occupies a very special place. Seen in 1987, it was the first naked-eye supernova to be observed for 383 years (eso8704), and because of its relative closeness, it has made it possible for astronomers to study the explosion of a massive star and its aftermath in more detail than ever before. It is thus no surprise that few events in modern astronomy have been met with such an enthusiastic response by scientists. SN 1987A has been a bonanza for astrophysicists (eso8711 and eso0708). It provided several notable observational 'firsts', like the detection of neutrinos from the collapsing inner stellar core triggering the explosion, the localisation on archival photographic plates of the star before it exploded, the signs of an asymmetric explosion, the direct observation of the radioactive elements produced during the blast, observation of the formation of dust in the supernova, as well as the detection of circumstellar and interstellar material (eso0708). New observations making use of a unique instrument, SINFONI [1], on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) have provided even deeper knowledge of this amazing event, as astronomers have now been able to obtain the first-ever 3D reconstruction of the central parts of the exploding material. This view shows that the explosion was stronger and

  17. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in indoor and outdoor air

    OpenAIRE

    Rudel, Ruthann A; Perovich, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen rapid development of new building materials, furnishings, and consumer products and a corresponding explosion in new chemicals in the built environment. While exposure levels are largely undocumented, they are likely to have increased as a wider variety of chemicals came into use, people began spending more time indoors, and air exchange rates decreased to improve energy efficiency. As a result of weak regulatory requirements for chemical safety testing, only limit...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 420 - Tables for Explosive Site Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...,000,000 1,800 310 Table E-7—Distances When Explosive Equivalents Apply TNT equivalent weight of.... Table E-2—Liquid Propellant Explosive Equivalents Propellant combinations Explosive equivalent...

  19. 48 CFR 252.223-7002 - Safety precautions for ammunition and explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... component part of an explosive, an ammunition or explosive end item, or of a weapon system— (i) Inert...) Oxidizers; (v) Powdered metals; or (vi) Other materials having fire or explosive characteristics. (b)...

  20. Rapidly Decaying Supernova 2010X: A Candidate ".Ia" Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Nugent, Peter; Poznanski, Dovi; Jacobsen, Janet; Sternberg, Assaf; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Rich, Douglas J.; Burke, Paul F.; Brimacombe, Joseph; Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert; Bildsten, Lars; Shen, Ken; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Hsiao, Eric; Law, Nicholas M.; Gehrels, Neil; Immler, Stefan; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan

    2010-11-01

    We present the discovery, photometric, and spectroscopic follow-up observations of SN 2010X (PTF 10bhp). This supernova decays exponentially with τ d = 5 days and rivals the current recordholder in speed, SN 2002bj. SN 2010X peaks at M r = -17 mag and has mean velocities of 10,000 km s-1. Our light curve modeling suggests a radioactivity-powered event and an ejecta mass of 0.16 M sun. If powered by Nickel, we show that the Nickel mass must be very small (≈0.02 M sun) and that the supernova quickly becomes optically thin to γ-rays. Our spectral modeling suggests that SN 2010X and SN 2002bj have similar chemical compositions and that one of aluminum or helium is present. If aluminum is present, we speculate that this may be an accretion-induced collapse of an O-Ne-Mg white dwarf. If helium is present, all observables of SN 2010X are consistent with being a thermonuclear helium shell detonation on a white dwarf, a ".Ia" explosion. With the 1 day dynamic-cadence experiment on the Palomar Transient Factory, we expect to annually discover a few such events.