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Sample records for chemical exchange protein-ligand

  1. Auto-FACE: an NMR based binding site mapping program for fast chemical exchange protein-ligand systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janarthanan Krishnamoorthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy offers a variety of experiments to study protein-ligand interactions at atomic resolution. Among these experiments, 15N Heteronuclear Single Quantum Correlation (HSQCexperiment is simple, less time consuming and highly informative in mapping the binding site of the ligand. The interpretation of 15N HSQC becomes ambiguous when the chemical shift perturbations are caused by non-specific interactions like allosteric changes and local structural rearrangement. Under such cases, detailed chemical exchange analysis based on chemical shift perturbation will assist in locating the binding site accurately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have automated the mapping of binding sites for fast chemical exchange systems using information obtained from 15N HSQC spectra of protein serially titrated with ligand of increasing concentrations. The automated program Auto-FACE (Auto-FAst Chemical Exchange analyzer determines the parameters, e.g. rate of change of perturbation, binding equilibrium constant and magnitude of chemical shift perturbation to map the binding site residues.Interestingly, the rate of change of perturbation at lower ligand concentration is highly sensitive in differentiating the binding site residues from the non-binding site residues. To validate this program, the interaction between the protein hBcl(XL and the ligand BH3I-1 was studied. Residues in the hydrophobic BH3 binding groove of hBcl(XL were easily identified to be crucial for interaction with BH3I-1 from other residues that also exhibited perturbation. The geometrically averaged equilibrium constant (3.0 x 10(4 calculated for the residues present at the identified binding site is consistent with the values obtained by other techniques like isothermal calorimetry and fluorescence polarization assays (12.8 x 10(4. Adjacent to the primary site, an additional binding site was identified which had an affinity of 3.8 times weaker

  2. Protein-Ligand Binding Potential of Mean Force Calculations with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange on Alchemical Interaction Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Minh, David D L

    2015-01-01

    A binding potential of mean force (BPMF) is a free energy of noncovalent association in which one binding partner is flexible and the other is rigid. I have developed a method to calculate BPMFs for protein-ligand systems. The method is based on replica exchange sampling from multiple thermodynamic states at different temperatures and protein-ligand interaction strengths. Protein-ligand interactions are represented by interpolating precomputed electrostatic and van der Waals grids. Using a simple estimator for thermodynamic length, thermodynamic states are initialized at approximately equal intervals. The method is demonstrated on the Astex diverse set, a database of 85 protein-ligand complexes relevant to pharmacy or agriculture. Fifteen independent simulations of each complex were started using poses from crystallography, docking, or the lowest-energy pose observed in the other simulations. Benchmark simulations completed within three days on a single processor. Overall, protocols initialized using the ther...

  3. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This

  4. Isotope separation by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 enrichment by chemical exchange in the (NO/NO2) - (H2O/HNO3) system, using a laboratory-scale experimental plant and a cascade for production of two isotopes, is presented. The results obtained from the laboratory-scale plant indicate that optimal flow rate for 15N separation is 1.55 - 1.86 ml/cm2 · min at 8 - 10 M/l nitric acid and 63.4 mg at. oxygen/cm2 · min for 18O separation at 5.8 M/l nitric acid. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) of 4.11 - 4.56 cm is in good agreement with other published data for 15N separation using exchange column with Helipak packing. The HETP of 7.74 - 10.58 cm for 18O separation is greater by 20 - 30 % than those presented by Saxena and Taylor for 'Helipak' column packing, but in good agreement with the HRTP published by Borisov et al. on 'Levina' column packing. The HETP obtained for 15N separation by the production plant is in the range 11.5 - 13.8 cm at a flow rate of 2.2 ml HNO3(10M/l)/cm2 · min for the first column and 4.4 - 4.7 cm at a flow rate of 1.66 ml HNO3(10M/l)/cm2 · min for the second column. The optimal flow rate for 18O separation by the production plant is about 63 mg at. oxygen/cm2 · min (1.01 ml HNO3/cm2 · min). Enrichment of 13C and 18O by chemical exchange of carbon dioxide with its monoethanolamine carbamate in methanol and di-n-butylamine carbamate in triethylamine has also been studied, and optimum operating conditions for the separation of 13C in a packed column was determined. The HETP obtained for the 13C in a packed column was determined. The HETP obtained for the 13C separation column is 3.62 - 8.26 cm at a flow rate of 1.1 - 4.0 mmol carbamate/cm2 · min using the same column packing as for 15N and 18O separation, that is, stainless steel triangular wire springs (2.3 x 2.3 x 0.2 mm). (author)

  5. Heat Exchanger Lab for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Jonathan W.; Evans, Edward A.; Chase, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Third year chemical engineering undergraduate students at The University of Akron designed and fabricated a heat exchanger for a stirred tank as part of a Chemical Engineering Laboratory course. The heat exchanger portion of this course was three weeks of the fifteen week long semester. Students applied concepts of scale-up and dimensional…

  6. Contamination weeping: A chemical ion exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of a chemical ion-exchange model to characterize the problem of nuclear fuel transportation cask contamination and release (''weeping''). Surface charge characteristics of Cr2O3 and stainless steel (304) powders have been measured to determine the potential for ion exchange at metal oxide -- aqueous interfaces. The solubility of pool contaminant Co and Cs electrolytes at varying pH and the adsorption characteristics of these ions on Cr2O3 and stainless steel powders in aqueous slurries have been studied. Experiments show that Co ions do reversibly adsorb on these powder surfaces and, more specifically, that adsorption occurs in the nominal pH range (pH = 4--6) of a boric acid-moderated spent fuel pool. Desorption has been demonstrated to occur at pH ≤ 3. Cs ions also have been shown to have an affinity for these surfaces although the reversibility of Cs+ bonding by H+ ion exchange has not been fully demonstrated. These results have significant implications for effective decontamination and coating processes used on nuclear fuel transportation casks. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Protoss: a holistic approach to predict tautomers and protonation states in protein-ligand complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bietz, Stefan; Urbaczek, Sascha; Schulz, Benjamin; Rarey, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of hydrogen positions is a common preprocessing step when working with crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes. An explicit description of hydrogen atoms is generally needed in order to analyze the binding mode of particular ligands or to calculate the associated binding energies. Due to the large number of degrees of freedom resulting from different chemical moieties and the high degree of mutual dependence this problem is anything but trivial. In addition to an effici...

  8. Direct Comparison of Linear and Macrocyclic Compound Libraries as a Source of Protein Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There has been much discussion of the potential desirability of macrocyclic molecules for the development of tool compounds and drug leads. But there is little experimental data comparing otherwise equivalent macrocyclic and linear compound libraries as a source of protein ligands. In this Letter, we probe this point in the context of peptoid libraries. Bead-displayed libraries of macrocyclic and linear peptoids containing four variable positions and 0–2 fixed residues, to vary the ring size, were screened against streptavidin and the affinity of every hit for the target was measured. The data show that macrocyclization is advantageous, but only when the ring contains 17 atoms, not 20 or 23 atoms. This technology will be useful for conducting direct comparisons between many different types of chemical libraries to determine their relative utility as a source of protein ligands. PMID:25623285

  9. Synthesizing Novel Anthraquinone Natural Product-Like Compounds to Investigate Protein-Ligand Interactions in Both an in Vitro and in Vivo Assay: An Integrated Research-Based Third-Year Chemical Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Nancy; McNulty, James; McLeod, David; McFadden, Meghan; Balachandran, Naresh

    2012-01-01

    A new undergraduate program in chemical biology was launched in 2008 to provide a unique learning experience for those students interested in this interdisciplinary science. An innovative undergraduate chemical biology laboratory course at the third-year level was developed as a key component of the curriculum. The laboratory course introduces…

  10. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yechun; SHEN Jianhua; LUO Xiaomin; SHEN Xu; CHEN Kaixian; JIANG Hualiang

    2004-01-01

    Studies of protein-ligand interactions are helpful to elucidating the mechanisms of ligands, providing clues for rational drug design. The currently developed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) is a complementary approach to experimental techniques in investigating the biochemical processes occurring at microsecond or second time scale, thus SMD may provide dynamical and kinetic processes of ligand-receptor binding and unbinding, which cannot be accessed by the experimental methods. In this article, the methodology of SMD is described, and the applications of SMD simulations for obtaining dynamic insights into protein-ligand interactions are illustrated through two of our own examples. One is associated with the simulations of binding and unbinding processes between huperzine A and acetylcholinesterase, and the other is concerned with the unbinding process of α-APA from HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  11. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Protein-Ligand Binding Analysis in Multi-Component Protein Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Patrick D.; West, Graham M.; Huang, Hai-Tsang; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2011-03-01

    Described here is a stable isotope labeling protocol that can be used with a chemical modification- and mass spectrometry-based protein-ligand binding assay for detecting and quantifying both the direct and indirect binding events that result from protein-ligand binding interactions. The protocol utilizes an H{2/16}O2 and H{2/18}O2 labeling strategy to evaluate the chemical denaturant dependence of methionine oxidation in proteins both in the presence and absence of a target ligand. The differential denaturant dependence to the oxidation reactions performed in the presence and absence of ligand provides a measure of the protein stability changes that occur as a result of direct interactions of proteins with the target ligand and/or as a result of indirect interactions involving other protein-ligand interactions that are either induced or disrupted by the ligand. The described protocol utilizes the 18O/16O ratio in the oxidized protein samples to quantify the ligand-induced protein stability changes. The ratio is determined using the isotopic distributions observed for the methionine-containing peptides used for protein identification in the LC-MS-based proteomics readout. The strategy is applied to a multi-component protein mixture in this proof-of-principle experiment, which was designed to evaluate the technique's ability to detect and quantify the direct binding interaction between cyclosporin A and cyclophilin A and to detect the indirect binding interaction between cyclosporin A and calcineurin (i.e., the protein-protein interaction between cyclophilin A and calcineurin that is induced by cyclosporin A binding to cyclophilin A).

  12. Predicting protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolazzi, Paola; Guerra, Concettina; Liuzzi, Giampaolo

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the identification of binding sites and concentrates on interactions involving small interfaces. In particular we focus our attention on two major interface types, namely protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces. As concerns protein-ligand binding site prediction, we classify the most interesting methods and approaches into four main categories: (a) shape-based methods, (b) alignment-based methods, (c) graph-theoretic approaches and (d) machine learning methods. Class (a) encompasses those methods which employ, in some way, geometric information about the protein surface. Methods falling into class (b) address the prediction problem as an alignment problem, i.e. finding protein-ligand atom pairs that occupy spatially equivalent positions. Graph theoretic approaches, class (c), are mainly based on the definition of a particular graph, known as the protein contact graph, and then apply some sophisticated methods from graph theory to discover subgraphs or score similarities for uncovering functional sites. The last class (d) contains those methods that are based on the learn-from-examples paradigm and that are able to take advantage of the large amount of data available on known protein-ligand pairs. As for protein-peptide interfaces, due to the often disordered nature of the regions involved in binding, shape similarity is no longer a determining factor. Then, in geometry-based methods, geometry is accounted for by providing the relative position of the atoms surrounding the peptide residues in known structures. Finally, also for protein-peptide interfaces, we present a classification of some successful machine learning methods. Indeed, they can be categorized in the way adopted to construct the learning examples. In particular, we envisage three main methods: distance functions, structure and potentials and structure alignment.

  13. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term “movable type”. Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the

  14. Ion exchange nonwoven fabric chemical filter. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlined the characteristics of EPIX filter and its complex with activated carbon to eliminate organic compounds from solvent. Elimination performance of this filter was determined using an ion chromatographic analyzer. EPIX filter showed high performance to eliminate trace amount of ionic compounds. The rate of elimination was both 99% or more for NH3 and SO2 in an early phase of filtration. Release of dust as well as impurities was significantly reduced by the use of EPIX filter. Gases once adsorbed on the filter were not released even at an elevated temperature of atmosphere. Combined use of non-woven fabrics was possible. For EPIX filter, there are three kinds; strong acid cation exchange filter and strong/weak basic anion filters. The weak basic anion filter has been applied to the conventional apparatus in wafer makers because the filter was very effective for selective boron trapping. When polyethyleneterephthalate was used as the base polymer, radical groups produced on the polymer were co-polymerized with monomer substances. The lifetime of filter was estimated on a base of gas concentration and wind velocity to determine the time to replace with a new one. Furthermore, the loss of pressure became less than a half when EPIX filter was used. (M.N.)

  15. CPMG sequences with enhanced sensitivity to chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved relaxation-compensated Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences are reported for studying chemical exchange of backbone 15N nuclei. In contrast to the original methods [J. P. Loria, M. Rance, and A. G. Palmer, J. Am. Chem. Soc.121, 2331-2332 (1999)], phenomenological relaxation rate constants obtained using the new sequences do not contain contributions from 1H-1H dipole-dipole interactions. Consequently, detection and quantification of chemical exchange processes are facilitated because the relaxation rate constant in the limit of fast pulsing can be obtained independently from conventional 15N spin relaxation measurements. The advantages of the experiments are demonstrated using basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

  16. Compact, Polyvalent Mannose Quantum Dots as Sensitive, Ratiometric FRET Probes for Multivalent Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuan; Sakonsinsiri, Chadamas; Nehlmeier, Inga; Fascione, Martin A; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Weili; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Turnbull, W Bruce; Zhou, Dejian

    2016-04-01

    A highly efficient cap-exchange approach for preparing compact, dense polyvalent mannose-capped quantum dots (QDs) has been developed. The resulting QDs have been successfully used to probe multivalent interactions of HIV/Ebola receptors DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR (collectively termed as DC-SIGN/R) using a sensitive, ratiometric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The QD probes specifically bind DC-SIGN, but not its closely related receptor DC-SIGNR, which is further confirmed by its specific blocking of DC-SIGN engagement with the Ebola virus glycoprotein. Tuning the QD surface mannose valency reveals that DC-SIGN binds more efficiently to densely packed mannosides. A FRET-based thermodynamic study reveals that the binding is enthalpy-driven. This work establishes QD FRET as a rapid, sensitive technique for probing structure and thermodynamics of multivalent protein-ligand interactions. PMID:26990806

  17. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  18. Modeling of metal interaction geometries for protein-ligand docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebeck, Birte; Reulecke, Ingo; Kämper, Andreas; Rarey, Matthias

    2008-05-15

    The accurate modeling of metal coordination geometries plays an important role for structure-based drug design applied to metalloenzymes. For the development of a new metal interaction model, we perform a statistical analysis of metal interaction geometries that are relevant to protein-ligand complexes. A total of 43,061 metal sites of the Protein Data Bank (PDB), containing amongst others magnesium, calcium, zinc, iron, manganese, copper, cadmium, cobalt, and nickel, were evaluated according to their metal coordination geometry. Based on statistical analysis, we derived a model for the automatic calculation and definition of metal interaction geometries for the purpose of molecular docking analyses. It includes the identification of the metal-coordinating ligands, the calculation of the coordination geometry and the superposition of ideal polyhedra to identify the optimal positions for free coordination sites. The new interaction model was integrated in the docking software FlexX and evaluated on a data set of 103 metalloprotein-ligand complexes, which were extracted from the PDB. In a first step, the quality of the automatic calculation of the metal coordination geometry was analyzed. In 74% of the cases, the correct prediction of the coordination geometry could be determined on the basis of the protein structure alone. Secondly, the new metal interaction model was tested in terms of predicting protein-ligand complexes. In the majority of test cases, the new interaction model resulted in an improved docking accuracy of the top ranking placements. PMID:18041759

  19. Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Exchange in Two Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sanda, F; Sanda, Frantisek; Mukamel, Shaul

    2006-01-01

    The stochastic Liouville equations are employed to investigate the combined signatures of chemical exchange (two-state-jump) and spectral diffusion (coupling to an overdamped Brownian oscillator) in the coherent response of an anharmonic vibration to three femtosecond infrared pulses. Simulations reproduce the main features recently observed in the OD stretch of phenol in benzene.

  20. Ion-exchange membranes in chemical synthesis – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroszek Hanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The applicability of ion-exchange membranes (IEMs in chemical synthesis was discussed based on the existing literature. At first, a brief description of properties and structures of commercially available ion-exchange membranes was provided. Then, the IEM-based synthesis methods reported in the literature were summarized, and areas of their application were discussed. The methods in question, namely: membrane electrolysis, electro-electrodialysis, electrodialysis metathesis, ion-substitution electrodialysis and electrodialysis with bipolar membrane, were found to be applicable for a number of organic and inorganic syntheses and acid/base production or recovery processes, which can be conducted in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. The number and the quality of the scientific reports found indicate a great potential for IEMs in chemical synthesis.

  1. Modeling and analysis of uranium isotope enrichment by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study of uranium isotopes separation by chemical exchange, starting with an accurate mathematical model, is presented. The experimental data used in this study were obtained by reverse break-through operation and the numerical algorithm, developed for simulation in a previous study, was adapted to be suitable for this kind of processes. The model parameters were identified from experimental data and simulations were carried out for different experimental conditions. (author)

  2. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.rao@uni.lu; Esposito, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.esposito@uni.lu [Complex Systems and Statistical Mechanics, Physics and Materials Science Research Unit, University of Luxembourg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Lacoste, David [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, UMR CNRS Gulliver 7083, ESPCI - 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75231 Paris (France)

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  3. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Riccardo; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  4. Charge exchange and chemical reactions with trapped Th3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the reaction rates of trapped, buffer gas cooled Th3+ and various gases and have analyzed the reaction products using trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques. Ion trap lifetimes are usually limited by reactions with background molecules, and the high electron affinity of multiply charged ions such as Th3+ make them more prone to loss. Our results show that reactions of Th3+ with carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen all occur near the classical Langevin rate, while reaction rates with argon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are orders of magnitude lower. Reactions of Th3+ with oxygen and methane proceed primarily via charge exchange, while simultaneous charge exchange and chemical reaction occurs between Th3+ and carbon dioxide. Loss rates of Th3+ in helium are consistent with reaction with impurities in the gas. Reaction rates of Th3+ with nitrogen and argon depend on the internal electronic configuration of the Th3+.

  5. Charge Exchange and Chemical Reactions with Trapped Th$^{3+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, L R; Chapman, M S

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the reaction rates of trapped, buffer gas cooled Th$^{3+}$ and various gases and have analyzed the reaction products using trapped ion mass spectrometry techniques. Ion trap lifetimes are usually limited by reactions with background molecules, and the high electron affinity of multiply charged ions such as Th$^{3+}$ make them more prone to loss. Our results show that reactions of Th$^{3+}$ with carbon dioxide, methane, and oxygen all occur near the classical Langevin rate, while reaction rates with argon, hydrogen, and nitrogen are orders of magnitude lower. Reactions of Th$^{3+}$ with oxygen and methane proceed primarily via charge exchange, while simultaneous charge exchange and chemical reaction occurs between Th$^{3+}$ and carbon dioxide. Loss rates of Th$^{3+}$ in helium are consistent with reaction with impurities in the gas. Reaction rates of Th$^{3+}$ with nitrogen and argon depend on the internal electronic configuration of the Th$^{3+}$.

  6. Technical evaluation on some chemical exchange process for uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In CEA in France, Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., in Japan and others, the industrialization of the uranium enrichment by chemical processes has been studied independently for ten years, using large amount of research expenses. In this study, technological examination was carried out on such processes and their separation characteristics, based on the published literatures. As the results, it was recognized that they have sufficient separation capability to aim at the industrialization, and the power required can be limited relatively low. However, very precise plant design and operation control system are required for them, and it is necessary to watch the future course to carry out the objective evaluation of the economic efficiency. The electric power has become a dominant factor in the production cost of enriched uranium. The separation of uranium isotopes with anion exchange resin being developed by Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., and the isotope separation by electron exchange using solvent extraction method being developed by CEA in France are introduced. Though the equilibrium separation factor is very small, they utilize reversible processes, and have the possibility of large power reduction and the cost reduction due to scaling-up. (Kako, I.)

  7. EDGA: A Population Evolution Direction-Guided Genetic Algorithm for Protein-Ligand Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Boxin; Zhang, Changsheng; Ning, Jiaxu

    2016-07-01

    Protein-ligand docking can be formulated as a search algorithm associated with an accurate scoring function. However, most current search algorithms cannot show good performance in docking problems, especially for highly flexible docking. To overcome this drawback, this article presents a novel and robust optimization algorithm (EDGA) based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA) for solving flexible protein-ligand docking problems. This method applies a population evolution direction-guided model of genetics, in which search direction evolves to the optimum solution. The method is more efficient to find the lowest energy of protein-ligand docking. We consider four search methods-a tradition genetic algorithm, LGA, SODOCK, and EDGA-and compare their performance in docking of six protein-ligand docking problems. The results show that EDGA is the most stable, reliable, and successful. PMID:26895461

  8. A High Performance Cloud-Based Protein-Ligand Docking Prediction Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jui-Le Chen; Chun-Wei Tsai; Ming-Chao Chiang; Chu-Sing Yang

    2013-01-01

    The potential of predicting druggability for a particular disease by integrating biological and computer science technologies has witnessed success in recent years. Although the computer science technologies can be used to reduce the costs of the pharmaceutical research, the computation time of the structure-based protein-ligand docking prediction is still unsatisfied until now. Hence, in this paper, a novel docking prediction algorithm, named fast cloud-based protein-ligand docking predictio...

  9. Isotope separation by chemical exchange process: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of a chemical exchange method for the separation of the isotopes of europium was demonstrated in the system EuCl2-EuCl3. The single stage separation factor, α, in this system is 1.001 or 1.0005 per mass unit. This value of α is comparable to the separation factors reported for the U4+ - U6 and U3+ - Y4+ systems. The separation of the ionic species was done by precipitation of the Eu2+ ions or by extraction of the Eu3+ ions with HDEHP. Conceptual schemes were developed for a countercurrent reflux cascades consisting of solvent extraction contractors. A regenerative electrocel, combining simultaneous europium reduction, europium oxidation with energy generation, and europium stripping from the organic phase is described. 32 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Global changes and the air-sea exchange of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present and potential future changes to the global environment have important implications for marine pollution and for the air-sea exchange of both anthropogenic and natural substances. This report addresses three issues related to the potential impact of global change on the air-sea exchange of chemicals: Global change and the air-sea transfer of the nutrients nitrogen and iron. Global change and the air-sea exchange of gases. Oceanic responses to radiative and oxidative changes in the atmosphere. The deposition of atmospheric anthropogenic nitrogen has probably increased biological productivity in coastal regions along many continental margins. Atmospheric deposition of new nitrogen may also have increased productivity somewhat in mid-ocean regions. The projected future increases of nitrogen oxide emissions from Asia, Africa and South America will provide significant increases in the rate of deposition of oxidized nitrogen to the central North Pacific, the equatorial Atlantic, and the equatorial and central South Indian Oceans. Atmospheric iron may be an important nutrient in certain open regions. Future changes will likely occur if there are changing patterns of aridity and wind speed as a result of climate change. The most important future effects on surface ocean pCO2 will likely be caused by changes in ocean circulation. The pH of the ocean would decrease by ∼0.3 units for a doubling of pCO2, reducing the capacity of the ocean to take up CO2. There is increasing evidence that dimethyl sulfide from the ocean is a source of cloud condensation nuclei and thus a factor controlling cloud albedo. By 2060 in the southern hemisphere reduction in total column stratospheric ozone from recent levels could reach 2 to 5% in the tropics, 10% at mid latitudes, and over 20% at 60 deg C. S. In this same time frame increases in ground-level effective UV-B radiation could reach 5%, 26% and 66%, at low, mid, and high latitudes in the southern hemisphere. Changes in

  11. PROLIX: rapid mining of protein-ligand interactions in large crystal structure databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Martin; Bitter, Hans-Marcus; Diederich, François; So, W Venus; Kondru, Rama

    2012-06-25

    A central problem in structure-based drug design is understanding protein-ligand interactions quantitatively and qualitatively. Several recent studies have highlighted from a qualitative perspective the nature of these interactions and their utility in drug discovery. However, a common limitation is a lack of adequate tools to mine these interactions comprehensively, since exhaustive searches of the protein data bank are time-consuming and difficult to perform. Consequently, fundamental questions remain unanswered: How unique or how common are the protein-ligand interactions observed in a given drug design project when compared to all complexed structures in the protein data bank? Which interaction patterns might explain the affinity of a tool compound toward unwanted targets? To answer these questions and to enable the systematic and comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions, we introduce PROLIX (Protein Ligand Interaction Explorer), a tool that uses sophisticated fingerprint representations of protein-ligand interaction patterns for rapid data mining in large crystal structure databases. Our implementation strategy pursues a branch-and-bound technique that enables mining against thousands of complexes within a few seconds. Key elements of PROLIX include (i) an intuitive interface that enables users to formulate complex queries easily, (ii) exceptional speed for results retrieval, and (iii) a sophisticated results summarization. Herein we describe the algorithms developed to enable complex queries and fast retrieval of search results, as well as the intuitive aspects of the user interface and summarization viewer. PMID:22582806

  12. Design of Uranium Isotope Separation Plant by Chemical Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methodology to design a solvent extraction plant for uranium isotope separation by chemical exchange is outlined. This process involves the calculator of the number of stages,the capacity of the plant,the flow rates,and reflux ration in banks of mixer settlers or pulse column used in such a plant. The feed is introduced at the middle of the plant,and the product is withdrawn at one end and the tailings at another. The redox reaction system selected is U(IV)-U(VI) and the equilibrium data of the 40% tri-n-octylamine (TOA) in benzene as the organic phase and 4 M HCI as the aqueous phase are used for the design of the real plant. The resulting analysis for the uranium isotope separation shows that more than 4000 number of stages are required and the reflux ratio is around 700 to produce only 1m3 of product containing 3% of U235 and 0,3% of U235 in the tailings. It is also known that the larger the isotope separation constant the smaller the number of stages needed. The method of design can be used for other systems where the isotope separation constants are more favorable

  13. Stable Isotope Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Exchange, and Distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwind, Dr. Roger A.; Rutherford, Dr. William M.

    1973-03-01

    Applications of stable isotopes in medicine are becoming more widespread. This has resulted from the increased availability and reduced cost of these isotopes and the improved reliability and sensitivity of detection techniques such as carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Isotopes are used in compounds labeled with either the stable isotope itself, such as carbon-13 and oxygen-18, or with the radioactive isotope that can be produced by irradiating the stable isotope, such as the irradiation of xenon-124 to produce iodine-125. As the demand for stable isotopes increases, larger scale production facilities will be justifiable. The increased size of production facilities should result in yet lower unit selling prices. A large number of methods has been suggested for the separation of stable isotopes. This paper concerns itself with four methods which have proven extremely useful for the separation of the isotopes of low and medium atomic weight elements. The four processes discussed are gas phase thermal diffusion, liquid phase thermal diffusion, chemical exchange, and distillation.

  14. Chemical exchange equilibria in isotope separation. Part I : Evaluation of separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of chemical exchange equilibria as applied to the isotope separation processes and the isotope effects on equilibrium constants of different exchange reactions has come a long way since its inception by Urey and Rittenberg. An attempt has been made to bring relevant information together and present a unified approach to isotopic chemical exchange equilibrium constant evaluation and its implications to separation processes. (auth.)

  15. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  16. Study application of the chemical cleaning in heat exchanger in RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical cleaning in heat exchanger of RSG-GAS can be carried out, this process is aimed at removing any dirts, slugs on the wall or shell with certain chemical in order to improve the performance of the heat exchanger. The performance of the heat exchanger can be determinated from the increase of global heat transfer coefficient or U global (Ug). In this paper is presented the method of evaluation of heat exchanger that can be carried out periodically when the system is operation. From the distinction result that the chemical cleaning can be to do in RSG-GAS. After chemical cleaning to do the heat exchanger of RSG-GAS performance must be obtained better U global values compared to the previous values

  17. PBSA_E: A PBSA-Based Free Energy Estimator for Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-23

    Improving the accuracy of scoring functions for estimating protein-ligand binding affinity is of significant interest as well as practical utility in drug discovery. In this work, PBSA_E, a new free energy estimator based on the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) descriptors, has been developed. This free energy estimator was optimized using high-quality experimental data from a training set consisting of 145 protein-ligand complexes. The method was validated on two separate test sets containing 121 and 130 complexes. Comparison of the binding affinities predicted using the present method with those obtained using three popular scoring functions, i.e., GlideXP, GlideSP, and SYBYL_F, demonstrated that the PBSA_E method is more accurate. This new energy estimator requires a MM/PBSA calculation of the protein-ligand binding energy for a single complex configuration, which is typically obtained by optimizing the crystal structure. The present study shows that PBSA_E has the potential to become a robust tool for more reliable estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity in structure-based drug design. PMID:27088302

  18. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; van Vliet, Bart; van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-03-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with ligands non-specifically, overlap with protein signals, modulate protein dynamics and conformational exchange and compromise sensitivity by adding highly intense background signals. In this article, we discuss the special considerations arising from these problems when conducting NMR-based ligand-binding studies with membrane proteins. While the use of (13)C and (15)N isotopes is becoming increasingly feasible, (19)F and (1)H NMR-based approaches are currently the most widely explored. By using suitable NMR parameter selection schemes independent of or exploiting the presence of detergent, (1)H-based approaches require least effort in sample preparation because of the high sensitivity and natural abundance of (1)H in both, ligand and protein. On the other hand, the (19)F nucleus provides an ideal NMR probe because of its similarly high sensitivity to that of (1)H and the lack of natural (19)F background in biologic systems. Despite its potential, the use of NMR spectroscopy is highly underdeveloped in the area of drug discovery for membrane proteins. PMID:20331645

  19. Treatment of radioactive wastewaters by chemical precipitation and ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precipitation and ion exchange methods are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to decontaminate wastewaters containing small amounts of 90Sr and 137Cs while minimizing waste generation. Distribution coefficients have been determined for strontium and cesium as functions of Ca, Na, and Mg concentrations from bench- and pilot-scale data for ion exchange resins and zeolites using actual wastewaters. Models have been used to estimate the total amount of waste that would be generated at full-scale operation. Based on these data, four process flowsheets are being tested at full-scale. 14 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Tritium separation factors in distillation and chemical exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vapour pressures of different isotopic hydrogen, water and ammonia molecules have been calculated. These vapour pressures can be used to evaluate relative volatilities of different species for separation of tritium isotopes by distillation. The equilibrium constants for various exchange reactions involving different deuterated and tritiated species of hydrogen, water and ammonia molecules have also been calculated for different temperatures. (author)

  1. Early history of chemical exchange isotope enrichment and lessons we learn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical exchange isotope enrichment process has an advantage over other isotope separation methods in that it involves two chemicals rather than one and, consequently, relatively large separation factors can be obtained. However, the chemical exchange method requires a chemical conversion of the substance enriched in the target isotope into the second substance. The idiosyncrasies of the isotope separation process by this method are pointed out using McCabe-Thiele diagram and, from them, the difficulties involved in the chemical exchange methods are itemized. Examples of the points being made are taken from the pioneering works of this field carried out by Harold C. Urey, his contemporaries, the students and the students' students. Lessons we learn from these works are discussed. (author)

  2. Setting up a large set of protein-ligand PDB complexes for the development and validation of knowledge-based docking algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilera Longendri

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of algorithms available to predict ligand-protein interactions is large and ever-increasing. The number of test cases used to validate these methods is usually small and problem dependent. Recently, several databases have been released for further understanding of protein-ligand interactions, having the Protein Data Bank as backend support. Nevertheless, it appears to be difficult to test docking methods on a large variety of complexes. In this paper we report the development of a new database of protein-ligand complexes tailored for testing of docking algorithms. Methods Using a new definition of molecular contact, small ligands contained in the 2005 PDB edition were identified and processed. The database was enriched in molecular properties. In particular, an automated typing of ligand atoms was performed. A filtering procedure was applied to select a non-redundant dataset of complexes. Data mining was performed to obtain information on the frequencies of different types of atomic contacts. Docking simulations were run with the program DOCK. Results We compiled a large database of small ligand-protein complexes, enriched with different calculated properties, that currently contains more than 6000 non-redundant structures. As an example to demonstrate the value of the new database, we derived a new set of chemical matching rules to be used in the context of the program DOCK, based on contact frequencies between ligand atoms and points representing the protein surface, and proved their enhanced efficiency with respect to the default set of rules included in that program. Conclusion The new database constitutes a valuable resource for the development of knowledge-based docking algorithms and for testing docking programs on large sets of protein-ligand complexes. The new chemical matching rules proposed in this work significantly increase the success rate in DOCKing simulations. The database developed in this work is

  3. Computational analysis of protein-ligand binding : from single continuous trajectories to multiple parallel simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsteinsdottir, Holmfridur B.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with other proteins or small molecules is essential for biological functions. Understanding the molecular basis of protein-ligand binding is of a vast interest for drug discovery, and computational methods to estimate proteinligand binding are starting to play an increasingly important role. In order to apply atomistic computational methods to the drug discovery process it is necessary to have accurate three-dimensional structures of the target prote...

  4. A Mixed QM/MM Scoring Function to Predict Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Hayik, Seth A.; Dunbrack, Roland; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein-ligand binding free energy continue to be popular as a potential cost-cutting method in the drug discovery process. However, accurate predictions are often difficult to make as estimates must be made for certain electronic and entropic terms in conventional force field based scoring functions. Mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods allow electronic effects for a small region of the protein to be calculated, treating the remaini...

  5. Strength and Character of Halogen Bonds in Protein-Ligand Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2011), s. 4272-4278. ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: Research and Development for Innovations of European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : halogen bond * protein-ligand complexes * calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.720, year: 2011

  6. Fast automated placement of polar hydrogen atoms in protein-ligand complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Lippert Tobias; Rarey Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Hydrogen bonds play a major role in the stabilization of protein-ligand complexes. The ability of a functional group to form them depends on the position of its hydrogen atoms. An accurate knowledge of the positions of hydrogen atoms in proteins is therefore important to correctly identify hydrogen bonds and their properties. The high mobility of hydrogen atoms introduces several degrees of freedom: Tautomeric states, where a hydrogen atom alters its binding partner, torsi...

  7. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J. P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Zhu, X.D.; Luo, J. T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity differ...

  8. Parameterization of an effective potential for protein-ligand binding from host-guest affinity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Lauren; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Nguyen, Crystal; Gilson, Michael K; Kurtzman, Tom; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    Force field accuracy is still one of the "stalemates" in biomolecular modeling. Model systems with high quality experimental data are valuable instruments for the validation and improvement of effective potentials. With respect to protein-ligand binding, organic host-guest complexes have long served as models for both experimental and computational studies because of the abundance of binding affinity data available for such systems. Binding affinity data collected for cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes, a popular model for molecular recognition, is potentially a more reliable resource for tuning energy parameters than hydration free energy measurements. Convergence of binding free energy calculations on CD host-guest systems can also be obtained rapidly, thus offering the opportunity to assess the robustness of these parameters. In this work, we demonstrate how implicit solvent parameters can be developed using binding affinity experimental data and the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) and validated using the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory analysis. These new solvation parameters were used to study protein-ligand binding in two drug targets against the HIV-1 virus and improved the agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding affinities. This work illustrates how benchmark sets of high quality experimental binding affinity data and physics-based binding free energy models can be used to evaluate and optimize force fields for protein-ligand systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26256816

  9. Improving protein-ligand docking with flexible interfacial water molecules using SWRosettaLigand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Xu, Weiwei; Lü, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Computational protein-ligand docking is of great importance in drug discovery and design. Conformational changes greatly affect the results of protein-ligand docking, especially when water molecules take part in mediating protein ligand interactions or when large conformational changes are observed in the receptor backbone interface. We have developed an improved protocol, SWRosettaLigand, based on the RosettaLigand protocol. This approach incorporates the flexibility of interfacial water molecules and modeling of the interface of the receptor into the original RosettaLigand. In a coarse sampling step, SWRosettaLigand pre-optimizes the initial position of the water molecules, docks the ligand to the receptor with explicit water molecules, and minimizes the predicted structure with water molecules. The receptor backbone interface is treated as a loop and perturbed and refined by kinematic closure, or cyclic coordinate descent algorithm, with the presence of the ligand. In two cross-docking test sets, it was identified that for 8 out of 14, and 16 out of 22, test instances, the top-ranked structures by SWRosettaLigand achieved better accuracy than other protocols. PMID:26515196

  10. Mass Spectrometry-Based Monitoring of Millisecond Protein-Ligand Binding Dynamics Using an Automated Microfluidic Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yongzheng; Katipamula, Shanta; Trader, Cameron D.; Orton, Daniel J.; Geng, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2016-03-24

    Characterizing protein-ligand binding dynamics is crucial for understanding protein function and developing new therapeutic agents. We have developed a novel microfluidic platform that features rapid mixing of protein and ligand solutions, variable incubation times, and on-chip electrospray ionization to perform label-free, solution-based monitoring of protein-ligand binding dynamics. This platform offers many advantages including automated processing, rapid mixing, and low sample consumption.

  11. Interaction Entropy: A New Paradigm for Highly Efficient and Reliable Computation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lili; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-01

    Efficient and reliable calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy is a grand challenge in computational biology and is of critical importance in drug design and many other molecular recognition problems. The main challenge lies in the calculation of entropic contribution to protein-ligand binding or interaction systems. In this report, we present a new interaction entropy method which is theoretically rigorous, computationally efficient, and numerically reliable for calculating entropic contribution to free energy in protein-ligand binding and other interaction processes. Drastically different from the widely employed but extremely expensive normal mode method for calculating entropy change in protein-ligand binding, the new method calculates the entropic component (interaction entropy or -TΔS) of the binding free energy directly from molecular dynamics simulation without any extra computational cost. Extensive study of over a dozen randomly selected protein-ligand binding systems demonstrated that this interaction entropy method is both computationally efficient and numerically reliable and is vastly superior to the standard normal mode approach. This interaction entropy paradigm introduces a novel and intuitive conceptual understanding of the entropic effect in protein-ligand binding and other general interaction systems as well as a practical method for highly efficient calculation of this effect. PMID:27058988

  12. Peach Bottom 2 and 3 regenerative heat exchangers: chemical decontamination and solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1977, Dow Nuclear Services, under contract to Philadelphia Electric Company, chemically decontaminated the regenerative heat exchangers at the Peach Bottom 2 and 3 Atomic Power Station. The purpose of the decontamination was to reduce the radiation levels associated with the subsequent heat exchanger repairs to be performed by PECO maintenance. Samples of piping from the regenerative heat exchangers were analyzed at Dow Chemical, Midland, Michigan, and solvent testing and selection was performed. Nuclear Solvent-1 was selected. Temporary equipment, piping and radiation shielding was installed to perform all necessary functions safely. All designs and procedures were approved by the Peach Bottom Plant Operations Review Committee. The chemical decontamination removed 10.6 curies of radioactive material in the case of Peach Bottom 3 and similarly at Peach Bottom 2, 6.3 curies of material was removed. Radioactive waste generated by decontamination that could not be treated by existing facilities was successfully solidified by the Dow Solidification process

  13. Peach Bottom 2 and 3 regenerative heat exchangers: chemical decontamination and seal ring repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1977 and early 1978, Philadelphia Electric Company chemically decontaminated and installed seal rings into the shell to channel joints of all Reactor Water Clean-up Regenerative Heat Exchangers located in Units 2 and 3 at Peach Bottom Station. The cost to perform this work was approximately $900,000. The radiation exposure accumulated during chemical decontamination and repairs of all heat exchangers was approximately 215 man-rem. This exposure was spread among approximately 300 individuals with individual exposures ranging from 0.5 to 7 rem over a one year period

  14. Fast automated placement of polar hydrogen atoms in protein-ligand complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert Tobias

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrogen bonds play a major role in the stabilization of protein-ligand complexes. The ability of a functional group to form them depends on the position of its hydrogen atoms. An accurate knowledge of the positions of hydrogen atoms in proteins is therefore important to correctly identify hydrogen bonds and their properties. The high mobility of hydrogen atoms introduces several degrees of freedom: Tautomeric states, where a hydrogen atom alters its binding partner, torsional changes where the position of the hydrogen atom is rotated around the last heavy-atom bond in a residue, and protonation states, where the number of hydrogen atoms at a functional group may change. Also, side-chain flips in glutamine and asparagine and histidine residues, which are common crystallographic ambiguities must be identified before structure-based calculations can be conducted. Results We have implemented a method to determine the most probable hydrogen atom positions in a given protein-ligand complex. Optimality of hydrogen bond geometries is determined by an empirical scoring function which is used in molecular docking. This allows to evaluate protein-ligand interactions with an established model. Also, our method allows to resolve common crystallographic ambiguities such as as flipped amide groups and histidine residues. To ensure high speed, we make use of a dynamic programming approach. Conclusion Our results were checked against selected high-resolution structures from an external dataset, for which the positions of the hydrogen atoms have been validated manually. The quality of our results is comparable to that of other programs, with the advantage of being fast enough to be applied on-the-fly for interactive usage or during score evaluation.

  15. Protein-ligand-based pharmacophores: generation and utility assessment in computational ligand profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslamani, Jamel; Li, Jiabo; Sutter, Jon; Stevens, Adrian; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Rognan, Didier

    2012-04-23

    Ligand profiling is an emerging computational method for predicting the most likely targets of a bioactive compound and therefore anticipating adverse reactions, side effects and drug repurposing. A few encouraging successes have already been reported using ligand 2-D similarity searches and protein-ligand docking. The current study describes the use of receptor-ligand-derived pharmacophore searches as a tool to link ligands to putative targets. A database of 68,056 pharmacophores was first derived from 8,166 high-resolution protein-ligand complexes. In order to limit the number of queries, a maximum of 10 pharmacophores was generated for each complex according to their predicted selectivity. Pharmacophore search was compared to ligand-centric (2-D and 3-D similarity searches) and docking methods in profiling a set of 157 diverse ligands against a panel of 2,556 unique targets of known X-ray structure. As expected, ligand-based methods outperformed, in most of the cases, structure-based approaches in ranking the true targets among the top 1% scoring entries. However, we could identify ligands for which only a single method was successful. Receptor-ligand-based pharmacophore search is notably a fast and reliable alternative to docking when few ligand information is available for some targets. Overall, the present study suggests that a workflow using the best profiling method according to the protein-ligand context is the best strategy to follow. We notably present concrete guidelines for selecting the optimal computational method according to simple ligand and binding site properties. PMID:22480372

  16. Determination of protein-ligand binding affinity by NMR: observations from serum albumin model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Lee; Rutherford, Samantha; Fletcher, Dan

    2005-06-01

    The usefulness of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein for testing NMR methods for the study of protein-ligand interactions is discussed. Isothermal titration calorimetry established the binding affinity and stoichiometry of the specific binding site for L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, naproxen, ibuprofen, salicylic acid and warfarin. The binding affinities of the same ligands determined by NMR methods are universally weaker (larger KD). This is because the NMR methods are susceptible to interference from additional non-specific binding. The L-tryptophan-BSA and naproxen-BSA systems were the best behaved model systems. PMID:15816062

  17. A Microfluidic Platform for Real-Time Detection and Quantification of Protein-Ligand Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Therese W; O'Connell, David J; Bauer, Mikael C; Persson, Jonas; Weininger, Ulrich; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara

    2016-05-10

    The key steps in cellular signaling and regulatory pathways rely on reversible noncovalent protein-ligand binding, yet the equilibrium parameters for such events remain challenging to characterize and quantify in solution. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for the detection of protein-ligand interactions with an assay time on the second timescale and without the requirement for immobilization or the presence of a highly viscous matrix. Using this approach, we obtain absolute values for the electrophoretic mobilities characterizing solvated proteins and demonstrate quantitative comparison of results obtained under different solution conditions. We apply this strategy to characterize the interaction between calmodulin and creatine kinase, which we identify as a novel calmodulin target. Moreover, we explore the differential calcium ion dependence of calmodulin ligand-binding affinities, a system at the focal point of calcium-mediated cellular signaling pathways. We further explore the effect of calmodulin on creatine kinase activity and show that it is increased by the interaction between the two proteins. These findings demonstrate the potential of quantitative microfluidic techniques to characterize binding equilibria between biomolecules under native solution conditions. PMID:27166804

  18. Recent Progress in Treating Protein-Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Nusret Duygu; Korth, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We review the first successes and failures of a "new wave" of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of "enhanced", dispersion (D), and/or hydrogen-bond (H) corrected density functional theory (DFT) or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory) and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical) perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects. PMID:27196893

  19. Challenges, Applications, and Recent Advances of Protein-Ligand Docking in Structure-Based Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Z. Grinter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The docking methods used in structure-based virtual database screening offer the ability to quickly and cheaply estimate the affinity and binding mode of a ligand for the protein receptor of interest, such as a drug target. These methods can be used to enrich a database of compounds, so that more compounds that are subsequently experimentally tested are found to be pharmaceutically interesting. In addition, like all virtual screening methods used for drug design, structure-based virtual screening can focus on curated libraries of synthesizable compounds, helping to reduce the expense of subsequent experimental verification. In this review, we introduce the protein-ligand docking methods used for structure-based drug design and other biological applications. We discuss the fundamental challenges facing these methods and some of the current methodological topics of interest. We also discuss the main approaches for applying protein-ligand docking methods. We end with a discussion of the challenging aspects of evaluating or benchmarking the accuracy of docking methods for their improvement, and discuss future directions.

  20. pK(a) based protonation states and microspecies for protein-ligand docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Tim; Exner, Thomas E

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present our reworked approach to generate ligand protonation states with our structure preparation tool SPORES (Structure PrOtonation and REcognition System). SPORES can be used for the preprocessing of proteins and protein-ligand complexes as e.g. taken from the Protein Data Bank as well as for the setup of 3D ligand databases. It automatically assigns atom and bond types, generates different protonation, tautomeric states as well as different stereoisomers. In the revised version, pKa calculations with the ChemAxon software MARVIN are used either to determine the likeliness of a combinatorial generated protonation state or to determine the titrable atoms used in the combinatorial approach. Additionally, the MARVIN software is used to predict microspecies distributions of ligand molecules. Docking studies were performed with our recently introduced program PLANTS (Protein-Ligand ANT System) on all protomers resulting from the three different selection methods for the well established CCDC/ASTEX clean data set demonstrating the usefulness of especially the latter approach. PMID:20882397

  1. Diverse, high-quality test set for the validation of protein-ligand docking performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Michael J; Verdonk, Marcel L; Chessari, Gianni; Brewerton, Suzanne C; Mooij, Wijnand T M; Mortenson, Paul N; Murray, Christopher W

    2007-02-22

    A procedure for analyzing and classifying publicly available crystal structures has been developed. It has been used to identify high-resolution protein-ligand complexes that can be assessed by reconstructing the electron density for the ligand using the deposited structure factors. The complexes have been clustered according to the protein sequences, and clusters have been discarded if they do not represent proteins thought to be of direct interest to the pharmaceutical or agrochemical industry. Rules have been used to exclude complexes containing non-drug-like ligands. One complex from each cluster has been selected where a structure of sufficient quality was available. The final Astex diverse set contains 85 diverse, relevant protein-ligand complexes, which have been prepared in a format suitable for docking and are to be made freely available to the entire research community (http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk). The performance of the docking program GOLD against the new set is assessed using a variety of protocols. Relatively unbiased protocols give success rates of approximately 80% for redocking into native structures, but it is possible to get success rates of over 90% with some protocols. PMID:17300160

  2. A New Class of Contrast Agents for MRI Based on Proton Chemical Exchange Dependent Saturation Transfer (CEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Aletras, A. H.; Balaban, R. S.

    2000-03-01

    It has been previously shown that intrinsic metabolites can be imaged based on their water proton exchange rates using saturation transfer techniques. The goal of this study was to identify an appropriate chemical exchange site that could be developed for use as an exogenous chemical exchange dependent saturation transfer (CEST) contrast agent under physiological conditions. These agents would function by reducing the water proton signal through a chemical exchange site on the agent via saturation transfer. The ideal chemical exchange site would have a large chemical shift from water. This permits a high exchange rate without approaching the fast exchange limit at physiological pH (6.5-7.6) and temperature (37°C), as well as minimizing problems associated with magnetic field susceptibility. Numerous candidate chemicals (amino acids, sugars, nucleotides, heterocyclic ring chemicals) were evaluated in this preliminary study. Of these, barbituric acid and 5,6-dihydrouracil were more fully characterized with regard to pH, temperature, and concentration CEST effects. The best chemical exchange site found was the 5.33-ppm indole ring -NH site of 5-hydroxytryptophan. These data demonstrate that a CEST-based exogenous contrast agent for MRI is feasible.

  3. Separation of selected stable isotopes by liquid-phase thermal diffusion and by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useful applications of enriched stable nuclides are unduly restricted by high cost and limited availability. Recent research on liquid phase thermal diffusion (LTD) has resulted in practical processes for separating 34S, 35Cl, and 37Cl in significant quantities (100 to 500 g/yr) at costs much lower than those associated with the electromagnetic (Calutron) process. The separation of the isotopes of bromine by LTD is now in progress and 79Br is being produced in relatively simple equivalent at a rate on the order of 0.5 g/day. The results of recent measurements show that the isotopes of Zn can be separated by LTD of zinc alkyls. The isotopes of calcium can be separated by LTD and by chemical exchange. The LTD process is based on the use of aqueous Ca(NO3)2 as a working fluid. The chemical exchange method involves isotopically selective exchange between an aqueous phase containing a calcium salt and an organic phase containing calcium in the form of a complex with a macrocyclic ligand. The LTD method is suitable for high enrichments at low through-puts; whereas, the chemical exchange techniques is appropriate for lower enrichments at much higher production rates. Current research is directed toward reducing these concepts to practical processes

  4. Treatment and disposal of steam generator and heat exchanger chemical cleaning wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet air oxidation was effective in reducing the organic loading of Ontario Hydro's EDTA-based steam generator cleaning wastes and the organic acid formulation used for heat exchanger chemical cleaning. Destruction of the complexing agents resulted in direct precipitation of iron from the waste steam generator magnetite solvent and from the heat exchanger cleaning waste. The oxidized liquors contain lower molecular weight organic acids, ammonia and amines, suitable for secondary biological treatment. The oxidized copper waste requires further treatment to reduce dissolved copper levels prior to biological digestion. A preliminary evaluation of UV and ozone degradation of these wastes showed less promise than wet air oxidation. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  5. Composition of Overlapping Protein-Protein and Protein-Ligand Interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzianisra Mohamed

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions (PPIs play a major role in many biological processes and they represent an important class of targets for therapeutic intervention. However, targeting PPIs is challenging because often no convenient natural substrates are available as starting point for small-molecule design. Here, we explored the characteristics of protein interfaces in five non-redundant datasets of 174 protein-protein (PP complexes, and 161 protein-ligand (PL complexes from the ABC database, 436 PP complexes, and 196 PL complexes from the PIBASE database and a dataset of 89 PL complexes from the Timbal database. In all cases, the small molecule ligands must bind at the respective PP interface. We observed similar amino acid frequencies in all three datasets. Remarkably, also the characteristics of PP contacts and overlapping PL contacts are highly similar.

  6. Size-Induced Enhancement of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) Contrast in Liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jason M.; Har-el, Yah-el; McMahon, Michael T.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Sherry, A. Dean; Sgouros, George; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Liposome-based chemical exchange saturation transfer (lipoCEST) agents have shown great sensitivity and potential for molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we demonstrate that the size of liposomes can be exploited to enhance the lipoCEST contrast. A concise analytical model is developed to describe the contrast dependence on size for an ensemble of liposomes. The model attributes the increased lipoCEST contrast in smaller liposomes to their larger surface-to-volume ratio, causing ...

  7. Geometrical Preferences of the Hydrogen Bonds on Protein-Ligand Binding Interface Derived from Statistical Surveys and Quantum Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Guitao; Li, Zhanting; Wang, Renxiao

    2008-11-11

    We have conducted potential of mean force (PMF) analyses to derive the geometrical parameters of various types of hydrogen bonds on protein-ligand binding interface. Our PMF analyses are based on a set of 4535 high-quality protein-ligand complex structures, which are compiled through a systematic mining of the entire Protein Data Bank. Hydrogen bond donor and acceptor atoms are classified into several basic types. Both distance- and angle-dependent statistical potentials are derived for each donor-acceptor pair, from which distance and angle cutoffs are obtained in an objective, unambiguous manner. These donor-acceptor pairs are also studied by quantum mechanics (QM) calculations at the MP2/6-311++G** level on model molecules. Comparison of the outcomes of PMF analyses and QM calculations suggests that QM calculation may serve as an alternative approach for characterizing hydrogen bond geometry. Both of our PMF analyses and QM calculations indicate that C-H···O hydrogen bonds are relatively weak as compared to common hydrogen bonds formed between nitrogen and oxygen atoms. A survey on the protein-ligand complex structures in our data set has revealed that Cα-H···O hydrogen bonds observed in protein-ligand binding are frequently accompanied by bifurcate N-H···O hydrogen bonds. Thus, the Cα-H···O hydrogen bonds in such cases would better be interpreted as secondary interactions. PMID:26620338

  8. Improving the scoring of protein-ligand binding affinity by including the effects of structural water and electronic polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2013-06-24

    Docking programs that use scoring functions to estimate binding affinities of small molecules to biological targets are widely applied in drug design and drug screening with partial success. But accurate and efficient scoring functions for protein-ligand binding affinity still present a grand challenge to computational chemists. In this study, the polarized protein-specific charge model (PPC) is incorporated into the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method to rescore the binding poses of some protein-ligand complexes, for which docking programs, such as Autodock, could not predict their binding modes correctly. Different sampling techniques (single minimized conformation and multiple molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots) are used to test the performance of MM/PBSA combined with the PPC model. Our results show the availability and effectiveness of this approach in correctly ranking the binding poses. More importantly, the bridging water molecules are found to play an important role in correctly determining the protein-ligand binding modes. Explicitly including these bridging water molecules in MM/PBSA calculations improves the prediction accuracy significantly. Our study sheds light on the importance of both bridging water molecules and the electronic polarization in the development of more reliable scoring functions for predicting molecular docking and protein-ligand binding affinity. PMID:23651068

  9. Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings in Structural Analysis of Protein-Ligand Complexes by Solution NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin U.

    Investigation of structure-function relationships in protein complexes, specifically protein-ligand interactions, carry great significance in elucidating the structural and mechanistic bases of molecular recognition events and their role in regulating cell processes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the leading structural and analytical techniques in in-depth studies of protein-ligand interactions. Recent advances in NMR methodology such as transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured in liquid crystalline alignment medium, offer a viable alternative to traditional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-based approaches for structure determination of large protein complexes. RDCs provide a way to constrain the relative orientation of two molecules in complex with each other by aligning their independently determined order tensors. The potential for utilization of RDCs can be extended to proteins with multiple ligands or even multimeric protein-ligand complexes, where symmetry properties of the protein can be taken advantage of. Availability of effective RDC data collection and analysis protocols can certainly aid this process by their incorporation into structure calculation protocols using intramolecular and intermolecular orientational restraints. This chapter discusses in detail some of these protocols including methods for sample preparation in liquid crystalline media, NMR experiments for RDC data collection, as well as software tools for RDC data analysis and protein-ligand complex structure determination.

  10. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  11. Impact of sediment-seawater cation exchange on Himalayan chemical weathering fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupker, Maarten; France-Lanord, Christian; Lartiges, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Continental-scale chemical weathering budgets are commonly assessed based on the flux of dissolved elements carried by large rivers to the oceans. However, the interaction between sediments and seawater in estuaries can lead to additional cation exchange fluxes that have been very poorly constrained so far. We constrained the magnitude of cation exchange fluxes from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system based on cation exchange capacity (CEC) measurements of riverine sediments. CEC values of sediments are variable throughout the river water column as a result of hydrological sorting of minerals with depth that control grain sizes and surface area. The average CEC of the integrated sediment load of the Ganga-Brahmaputra is estimated ca. 6.5 meq 100 g-1. The cationic charge of sediments in the river is dominated by bivalent ions Ca2+ (76 %) and Mg2+ (16 %) followed by monovalent K+ (6 %) and Na+ (2 %), and the relative proportion of these ions is constant among all samples and both rivers. Assuming a total exchange of exchangeable Ca2+ for marine Na+ yields a maximal additional Ca2+ flux of 28 × 109 mol yr-1 of calcium to the ocean, which represents an increase of ca. 6 % of the actual river dissolved Ca2+ flux. In the more likely event that only a fraction of the adsorbed riverine Ca2+ is exchanged, not only for marine Na+ but also Mg2+ and K+, estuarine cation exchange for the Ganga-Brahmaputra is responsible for an additional Ca2+ flux of 23 × 109 mol yr-1, while ca. 27 × 109 mol yr-1 of Na+, 8 × 109 mol yr-1 of Mg2+ and 4 × 109 mol yr-1 of K+ are re-absorbed in the estuaries. This represents an additional riverine Ca2+ flux to the ocean of 5 % compared to the measured dissolved flux. About 15 % of the dissolved Na+ flux, 8 % of the dissolved K+ flux and 4 % of the Mg2+ are reabsorbed by the sediments in the estuaries. The impact of estuarine sediment-seawater cation exchange appears to be limited when evaluated in the context of the long-term carbon cycle and

  12. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  13. Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Chemical Reactors with Micro-Scale Features for In-Situ Resource Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to develop compact and lightweight ceramic heat exchangers and chemical reactors suitable for high temperature processes. These devices will have...

  14. Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Michal; Horev, Judith; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Navon, Gil

    2013-10-01

    The two glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) are preferentially taken up by cancer cells, undergo phosphorylation and accumulate in the cells. Owing to their exchangeable protons on their hydroxyl residues they exhibit significant chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect in MRI. Here we report CEST-MRI on mice bearing orthotopic mammary tumors injected with 2-DG or FDG. The tumor exhibited an enhanced CEST effect of up to 30% that persisted for over one hour. Thus 2-DG/FDG CEST MRI can replace PET/CT or PET/MRI for cancer research in laboratory animals, but also has the potential to be used in the clinic for the detection of tumors and metastases, distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors and monitoring tumor response to therapy as well as tumors metabolism noninvasively by using MRI, without the need for radio-labeled isotopes.

  15. The effect of chemical and organic amendments on sodium exchange equilibria in a calcareous sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Faranak; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the reclamation of a calcareous sodic soil with the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) value of 26.6% was investigated using the cheap and readily available chemical and organic materials including natural bentonite and zeolite saturated with calcium (Ca2+), waste calcite, three metal oxide nanoparticles functionalized with an acidic extract of potato residues, and potato residues. Chemical amendments were added to the soil at a rate of 2%, while potato residues were applied at the rates of 2 and 4% by weight. The ESP in the amended soils was reduced in the range of 0.9-4.9% compared to the control soil, and the smallest and the largest decline was respectively observed in treatments containing waste calcite and 4% of potato residues. Despite the reduction in ESP, the values of this parameter were not below 15% at the end of a 40-day incubation period. So, the effect of solutions of varying sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values of 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 on sodium (Na+) exchange equilibria was evaluated in batch systems. The empirical models (simple linear, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich) fitted well to experimental data. The relations of quantity to intensity (Q/I) revealed that the potential buffering capacity for Na+ (PBCNa) varied from 0.275 to 0.337 ((cmolc kg(-1)) (mmol L(-1))(-1/2)) in the control soil and amended soils. The relationship between exchangeable sodium ratio (ESR) and SAR was individually determined for the control soil and amended soils. The values of Gapon selectivity coefficient (KG) of Na+ differed from the value suggested by U.S. Salinity Laboratory (USSL). The PHREEQC, a geochemical computer program, was applied to simulate Na+ exchange isotherms by using the mechanistic cation exchange model (CEM) along with Gaines-Thomas selectivity coefficients. The simulation results indicated that Na+ exchange isotherms and Q/I and ESR-SAR relations were influenced by the type of counter anions. The values of K G increased in

  16. Fabrication and characteristics of microcantilever-based biosensor for detection of the protein-ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a proposal for a microcantilever-based biosensor that can be used in investigating the adsorption characteristics of protein-ligand binding on a silicon nitride/gold coated surface. We have detected streptavidin-ligand binding using this microcantilever detection system. The microcantilevers can be mass-produced by a conventional surface micromachining technique. This technique has advantages of cost efficiency, simplicity, and the ability to be fabricated in an array. A transparent fluid cell system, where a gold coated microcantilever was mounted for the injection of bio-molecular solution, was fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and fused silica glass. The microcantilever was deflected as a result of the difference of surface stress caused by the formation of the self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) of biomolecules on the gold coated side of the microcantilever. The sequential specific interactions of cystamine dihydrochloride/ glutaraldehyde/streptavidin were detected by both optical and electrical methods. We confirmed that the deflections were induced by biomolecular adsorption on the gold coated microcantilever. This study proved to be applicable to real-time monitoring of biological interactions such as specific DNA sequences, proteins, and so on

  17. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  18. Mechanistic insight into gramicidin-based detection of protein-ligand interactions via sensitized photoinactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N [Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Macrae, Michael X; Blake, Steven; Yang, Jerry [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0358, La Jolla, CA 92093-0358 (United States); Egorova, Natalya S, E-mail: jerryyang@ucsd.ed, E-mail: antonen@genebee.msu.s [Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 117871 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-17

    Among the many challenges for the development of ion channel-based sensors is the poor understanding of how to engineer modified transmembrane pores with tailored functionality that can respond to external stimuli. Here, we use the method of sensitized photoinactivation of gramicidin A (gA) channels in planar bilayer lipid membranes to help elucidate the underlying mechanistic details for changes in macroscopic transmembrane ionic current observed upon interaction of C-terminally attached gA ligands with specific proteins in solution. Three different systems were studied: (i) carbonic anhydrase (CA) and gA-sulfonamide, (ii) PSD-95 protein (belonging to the 'PDZ domain-containing protein') and a gA analog carrying the KGGHRRSARYLESSV peptide sequence at the C-terminus, and (iii) an anti-biotin antibody and gA-biotin. The results challenge a previously proposed mechanistic hypothesis suggesting that protein-induced current suppression is due to steric blockage of the ion passage through gA channels, while they reveal new insight for consideration in alternative mechanistic models. Additionally, we demonstrate that the length of a linker between the ligand and the gA channel may be less important for gramicidin-based detection of monovalent compared to multivalent protein-ligand interactions. These studies collectively shed new light on the mechanism of protein-induced current alterations in bilayer recordings of gA derivatives, which may be important in the design of new gramicidin-based sensors.

  19. Mechanistic insight into gramicidin-based detection of protein-ligand interactions via sensitized photoinactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokitskaya, Tatyana I.; Macrae, Michael X.; Blake, Steven; Egorova, Natalya S.; Kotova, Elena A.; Yang, Jerry; Antonenko, Yuri N.

    2010-11-01

    Among the many challenges for the development of ion channel-based sensors is the poor understanding of how to engineer modified transmembrane pores with tailored functionality that can respond to external stimuli. Here, we use the method of sensitized photoinactivation of gramicidin A (gA) channels in planar bilayer lipid membranes to help elucidate the underlying mechanistic details for changes in macroscopic transmembrane ionic current observed upon interaction of C-terminally attached gA ligands with specific proteins in solution. Three different systems were studied: (i) carbonic anhydrase (CA) and gA-sulfonamide, (ii) PSD-95 protein (belonging to the 'PDZ domain-containing protein') and a gA analog carrying the KGGHRRSARYLESSV peptide sequence at the C-terminus, and (iii) an anti-biotin antibody and gA-biotin. The results challenge a previously proposed mechanistic hypothesis suggesting that protein-induced current suppression is due to steric blockage of the ion passage through gA channels, while they reveal new insight for consideration in alternative mechanistic models. Additionally, we demonstrate that the length of a linker between the ligand and the gA channel may be less important for gramicidin-based detection of monovalent compared to multivalent protein-ligand interactions. These studies collectively shed new light on the mechanism of protein-induced current alterations in bilayer recordings of gA derivatives, which may be important in the design of new gramicidin-based sensors.

  20. Empirical scoring functions for advanced protein-ligand docking with PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Oliver; Stützle, Thomas; Exner, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present two empirical scoring functions, PLANTS(CHEMPLP) and PLANTS(PLP), designed for our docking algorithm PLANTS (Protein-Ligand ANT System), which is based on ant colony optimization (ACO). They are related, regarding their functional form, to parts of already published scoring functions and force fields. The parametrization procedure described here was able to identify several parameter settings showing an excellent performance for the task of pose prediction on two test sets comprising 298 complexes in total. Up to 87% of the complexes of the Astex diverse set and 77% of the CCDC/Astex clean listnc (noncovalently bound complexes of the clean list) could be reproduced with root-mean-square deviations of less than 2 A with respect to the experimentally determined structures. A comparison with the state-of-the-art docking tool GOLD clearly shows that this is, especially for the druglike Astex diverse set, an improvement in pose prediction performance. Additionally, optimized parameter settings for the search algorithm were identified, which can be used to balance pose prediction reliability and search speed. PMID:19125657

  1. Influence of protonation, tautomeric, and stereoisomeric states on protein-ligand docking results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Tim; Exner, Thomas E

    2009-06-01

    In this work, we present a systematical investigation of the influence of ligand protonation states, stereoisomers, and tautomers on results obtained with the two protein-ligand docking programs GOLD and PLANTS. These different states were generated with a fully automated tool, called SPORES (Structure PrOtonation and Recognition System). First, the most probable protonations, as defined by this rule based system, were compared to the ones stored in the well-known, manually revised CCDC/ASTEX data set. Then, to investigate the influence of the ligand protonation state on the docking results, different protonation states were created. Redocking and virtual screening experiments were conducted demonstrating that both docking programs have problems in identifying the correct protomer for each complex. Therefore, a preselection of plausible protomers or the improvement of the scoring functions concerning their ability to rank different molecules/states is needed. Additionally, ligand stereoisomers were tested for a subset of the CCDC/ASTEX set, showing similar problems regarding the ranking of these stereoisomers as the ranking of the protomers. PMID:19453150

  2. Comparison of Different Ranking Methods in Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Liu, Qi; Kang, Hong; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruixin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, although many ligand-binding site prediction methods have been developed, there has still been a great demand to improve the prediction accuracy and compare different prediction algorithms to evaluate their performances. In this work, in order to improve the performance of the protein-ligand binding site prediction method presented in our former study, a comparison of different binding site ranking lists was studied. Four kinds of properties, i.e., pocket size, distance from the protein centroid, sequence conservation and the number of hydrophobic residues, have been chosen as the corresponding ranking criterion respectively. Our studies show that the sequence conservation information helps to rank the real pockets with the most successful accuracy compared to others. At the same time, the pocket size and the distance of binding site from the protein centroid are also found to be helpful. In addition, a multi-view ranking aggregation method, which combines the information among those four properties, was further applied in our study. The results show that a better performance can be achieved by the aggregation of the complementary properties in the prediction of ligand-binding sites. PMID:22942732

  3. Installation for study on photoinduced chemical exchange on the basis of NMR spectrometer and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facility for studying the kinetics of reversible photochemical processes is described. It contains the Tesla BS-567 NMR-spectrometer, the IBM PC Pentium personal computer and the LG-106M argon laser. The facility makes it possible to measure the flow rate constants from 0.01 up to 100 s-1 and the chemical exchange quantum yield. The example of using the above facility for determination of the reversible cis-trans photo-isomerization of the platinum molecules complexes is considered

  4. Design and optimization of pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI using a multiobjective genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimaru, Eriko S.; Randtke, Edward A.; Pagel, Mark D.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Pulsed Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI experimental parameters and RF saturation pulse shapes were optimized using a multiobjective genetic algorithm. The optimization was carried out for RF saturation duty cycles of 50% and 90%, and results were compared to continuous wave saturation and Gaussian waveform. In both simulation and phantom experiments, continuous wave saturation performed the best, followed by parameters and shapes optimized by the genetic algorithm and then followed by Gaussian waveform. We have successfully demonstrated that the genetic algorithm is able to optimize pulse CEST parameters and that the results are translatable to clinical scanners.

  5. Application of a chemical ion exchange model to transport cask surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide contamination of stainless steel surfaces occurs during submersion in a spent fuel storage pool, Subsequent release or desorption of these contaminants from a nuclear fuel transportation cask surface under varying environmental conditions occasionally results in the phenomenon known as contamination 'weeping'. Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of a chemical ion exchange model to characterise the problem of cask contamination and release. Surface charge characteristics of Cr2O3 and stainless steel (304) powders have been measured to determine the potential for ion exchange at metal oxide-aqueous interfaces. The solubility of Co and Cs electrolytes at varying pH and the absorption characteristics of these ions on Cr2O3 and stainless steel powders in aqueous slurries have been studied. Experiments show that Co ions do reversibly absorb on these powder surfaces and, more specifically, that absorption occurs in the nominal pH range (pH = 4-6) of a boric acid moderated spent fuel pool. Desorption has been demonstrated to occur at pH≤3. Cs+ ions also have been shown to have an affinity for these surfaces although the reversibility of Cs+ bonding by H+ ion exchange has not been fully demonstrated. These results have significant implications for effective decontamination and coating processes used on nuclear fuel transportation casks. (author)

  6. Application of a chemical ion exchange model to transport cask surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide contamination of stainless steel surfaces occur during submersion in a spent fuel storage pool. Subsequent release or desorption of these contaminants from a nuclear fuel transportation cask surface under varying environmental conditions occasionally results in the phenomenon known as contamination ''weeping.'' Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of a chemical ion-exchange model to characterize the problem of cask contamination and release. Surface charge characteristics of Cr2O3 and stainless steel (304) powders have been measured to determine the potential for ion exchange at metal oxide -- aqueous interfaces. The solubility of Co and Cs electrolytes at varying pH and the absorption characteristics of these ions on Cr2O3 and stainless steel powders in aqueous slurries have been studied. Experiments show that Co ions do reversibly adsorb on these powder surfaces and, more specifically, that adsorption occurs in the nominal pH range (pH = 4--6) of a boric acid-moderated spent fuel pool. Desorption has been demonstrated to occur at pH ≤ 3. Cs ions also have been shown to have an affinity for these surfaces although the reversibility of Cs+ bonding by H+ ion exchange has not been fully demonstrated. These results have significant implications for effective decontamination and coating processes used on nuclear fuel transportation casks. 8 refs., 5 figs

  7. Post-docking optimization and analysis of protein-ligand interactions of estrogen receptor alpha using AMMOS software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, Tania; Jereva, Dessislava; Miteva, Maria A; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-03-01

    Understanding protein-ligand interactions is a critical step in rational drug design/virtual ligand screening. In this work we applied the AMMOS_ProtLig software for post-docking optimization of estrogen receptor alpha complexes generated after virtual ligand screening protocol. Using MOE software we identified the ligand-receptor interactions in the optimized complexes at different levels of protein flexibility and compared them to the experimentally observed interactions. We analyzed in details the binding sites of three X-ray complexes of the same receptor and identified the key residues for the protein-ligand interactions. The complexes were further processed with AMMOS_ProtLig and the interactions in the predicted poses were compared to those observed in the X-ray structures. The effect of employing different levels of flexibility was analyzed. The results confirmed the AMMOS_ProtLig applicability as a helpful postdocking optimization tool for virtual ligand screening of estrogen receptors. PMID:23106778

  8. A scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries using a MapReduce approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, T; Zhang, B; Cicotti, P; Armen, R S; Taufer, M

    2012-07-01

    We present a scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries in molecular docking. Our method is a three-step process: the first step encodes the geometry of a three-dimensional (3D) ligand conformation into a single 3D point in the space; the second step builds an octree by assigning an octant identifier to every single point in the space under consideration; and the third step performs an octree-based clustering on the reduced conformation space and identifies the most dense octant. We adapt our method for MapReduce and implement it in Hadoop. The load-balancing, fault-tolerance, and scalability in MapReduce allow screening of very large conformation spaces not approachable with traditional clustering methods. We analyze results for docking trials for 23 protein-ligand complexes for HIV protease, 21 protein-ligand complexes for Trypsin, and 12 protein-ligand complexes for P38alpha kinase. We also analyze cross docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking into 24 protein conformations of the HIV protease, and receptor ensemble docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking in a pool of HIV protease receptors. Our method demonstrates significant improvement over energy-only scoring for the accurate identification of native ligand geometries in all these docking assessments. The advantages of our clustering approach make it attractive for complex applications in real-world drug design efforts. We demonstrate that our method is particularly useful for clustering docking results using a minimal ensemble of representative protein conformational states (receptor ensemble docking), which is now a common strategy to address protein flexibility in molecular docking. PMID:22658682

  9. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  10. Study of multi-site chemical exchange in solution state by NMR: 1D experiments with multiply selective excitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samanwita Pal

    2010-07-01

    Chemical exchange in solution state has been investigated traditionally by both 1D and 2D NMR, permitting the extraction of kinetic parameters (e.g. the spin-lattice relaxation time 1, the exchange rate constant and the activation parameters). This work demonstrates a simple 1D NMR approach employing multiply selective excitation to study multi-site exchange processes in solution, applying it to systems that exhibit three-site exchange. This approach involves simultaneous excitation of all - or a chosen subset of - the exchanging sites by using an appropriately modulated shaped radiofrequency pulse. The pulse sequence, as well as analysis is summarized. Significant features of the experiment, which relies on sign labelling of the exchanging sites, include considerably shorter experiment time compared to standard 2D exchange work, clear definition of the exchange time window and uniform pulse non-ideality effects for all the exchanging sites. Complete kinetic information is reported in the study of dynamic processes in superacid solutions of two weak bases, studied by 1H NMR. An analytical solution, leading to the determination of four rate parameters, is presented for proton exchange studies on these systems, which involve a mixture of two weak bases in arbitrary concentration ratio, and stoichiometric excess of the superacid.

  11. Extent of enthalpy-entropy compensation in protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Ladbury, John E; Pitt, Will R; Williams, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    The extent of enthalpy-entropy compensation in protein-ligand interactions has long been disputed because negatively correlated enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (TΔS) changes can arise from constraints imposed by experimental and analytical procedures as well as through a physical compensation mechanism. To distinguish these possibilities, we have created quantitative models of the effects of experimental constraints on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements. These constraints are found to obscure any compensation that may be present in common data representations and regression analyses (e.g., in ΔH vs. -TΔS plots). However, transforming the thermodynamic data into ΔΔ-plots of the differences between all pairs of ligands that bind each protein diminishes the influence of experimental constraints and representational bias. Statistical analysis of data from 32 diverse proteins shows a significant and widespread tendency to compensation. ΔΔH versus ΔΔG plots reveal a wide variation in the extent of compensation for different ligand modifications. While strong compensation (ΔΔH and -TΔΔS opposed and differing by modifications (twice that expected without compensation), 15% of modifications result in reinforcement (ΔΔH and -TΔΔS of the same sign). Because both enthalpy and entropy changes arise from changes to the distribution of energy states on binding, there is a general theoretical expectation of compensated behavior. However, prior theoretical studies have focussed on explaining a stronger tendency to compensation than actually found here. These results, showing strong but imperfect compensation, will act as a benchmark for future theoretical models of the thermodynamic consequences of ligand modification. PMID:21739503

  12. Consistent two-dimensional visualization of protein-ligand complex series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stierand Katrin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The comparative two-dimensional graphical representation of protein-ligand complex series featuring different ligands bound to the same active site offers a quick insight in their binding mode differences. In comparison to arbitrary orientations of the residue molecules in the individual complex depictions a consistent placement improves the legibility and comparability within the series. The automatic generation of such consistent layouts offers the possibility to apply it to large data sets originating from computer-aided drug design methods. Results We developed a new approach, which automatically generates a consistent layout of interacting residues for a given series of complexes. Based on the structural three-dimensional input information, a global two-dimensional layout for all residues of the complex ensemble is computed. The algorithm incorporates the three-dimensional adjacencies of the active site residues in order to find an universally valid circular arrangement of the residues around the ligand. Subsequent to a two-dimensional ligand superimposition step, a global placement for each residue is derived from the set of already placed ligands. The method generates high-quality layouts, showing mostly overlap-free solutions with molecules which are displayed as structure diagrams providing interaction information in atomic detail. Application examples document an improved legibility compared to series of diagrams whose layouts are calculated independently from each other. Conclusions The presented method extends the field of complex series visualizations. A series of molecules binding to the same protein active site is drawn in a graphically consistent way. Compared to existing approaches these drawings substantially simplify the visual analysis of large compound series.

  13. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  14. Chemical separation of Mo and W from terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples via anion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuichiro; Yokoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-05-20

    A new two-stage chemical separation method was established using an anion exchange resin, Eichrom 1 × 8, to separate Mo and W from four natural rock samples. First, the distribution coefficients of nine elements (Ti, Fe, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Ta, and W) under various chemical conditions were determined using HCl, HNO3, and HF. On the basis of the obtained distribution coefficients, a new technique for the two-stage chemical separation of Mo and W, along with the group separation of Ti-Zr-Hf, was developed as follows: 0.4 M HCl-0.5 M HF (major elements), 9 M HCl-0.05 M HF (Ti-Zr-Hf), 9 M HCl-1 M HF (W), and 6 M HNO3-3 M HF (Mo). After the chemical procedure, Nb remaining in the W fraction was separated using 9 M HCl-3 M HF. On the other hand, Nb and Zn remaining in the Mo fraction were removed using 2 M HF and 6 M HCl-0.1 M HF. The performance of this technique was evaluated by separating these elements from two terrestrial and two extraterrestrial samples. The recovery yields for Mo, W, Zr, and Hf were nearly 100% for all of the examined samples. The total contents of the Zr, Hf, W, and Mo in the blanks used for the chemical separation procedure were 582, 9, 29, and 396 pg, respectively. Therefore, our new separation technique can be widely used in various fields of geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and environmental sciences and particularly for multi-isotope analysis of these elements from a single sample with significant internal isotope heterogeneities. PMID:24801276

  15. Fast simulation and optimization of pulse-train chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI has been increasingly applied to detect dilute solutes and physicochemical properties, with promising in vivo applications. Whereas CEST imaging has been implemented with continuous wave (CW) radio-frequency irradiation on preclinical scanners, pulse-train irradiation is often chosen on clinical systems. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize pulse-train CEST imaging, particularly important for translational studies. Because conventional Bloch–McConnell formulas are not in the form of homogeneous differential equations, the routine simulation approach simulates the evolving magnetization step by step, which is time consuming. Herein we developed a computationally efficient numerical solution using matrix iterative analysis of homogeneous Bloch–McConnell equations. The proposed algorithm requires simulation of pulse-train CEST MRI magnetization within one irradiation repeat, with 99% computation time reduction from that of conventional approach under typical experimental conditions. The proposed solution enables determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate from pulse-train CEST MRI experiment, within 5% from those determined from quantitative CW-CEST MRI. In addition, the structural similarity index analysis shows that the dependence of CEST contrast on saturation pulse flip angle and duration between simulation and experiment was 0.98  ±  0.01, indicating that the proposed simulation algorithm permits fast optimization and quantification of pulse-train CEST MRI. (paper)

  16. Radiolytic and chemical degradation of strong acidic ion-exchange resins: Study of ligands formed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of water-soluble organic ligands by radiolytic and chemical degradation of several strong acidic ion-exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were studied and their complexing properties evaluated. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powder PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulfate and dissolved organic carbon. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated the presence of oxalate, contributing to 10 to 20% of the organic carbon. The identity of the remainder is unknown. The presence of oxalate as a complexant is consistent with results from earlier work. Complexation studies with Cu2+ and Ni2+ showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterized by its concentration ([X]T ∼ 10-5 to 10-6 M), a deprotonation constant (pKH approximately 7.4 at I = 0.1 M), and a complexation constant for the NiX complex (log KNiXapproximately 7.0 at I = 0.1 M). In the absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found

  17. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals – Part 1: Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Peltzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean warming will reduce dissolved oxygen concentrations which can pose challenges to marine life. Oxygen limits are traditionally reported simply as a static concentration thresholds with no temperature, pressure or flow rate dependency. Here we treat the oceanic oxygen supply potential for heterotrophic consumption as a dynamic molecular exchange problem analogous to familiar gas exchange processes at the sea surface. A combination of the purely physico-chemical oceanic properties temperature, hydrostatic pressure, and oxygen concentration defines the ability of the ocean to supply oxygen to any given animal. This general oceanic oxygen supply potential is modulated by animal specific properties such as the diffusive boundary layer thickness to define and limit maximal oxygen supply rates. Here we combine all these properties into formal, mechanistic equations defining novel oceanic properties that subsume various relevant classical oceanographic parameters to better visualize, map, comprehend, and predict the impact of ocean deoxygenation on aerobic life. By explicitly including temperature and hydrostatic pressure into our quantities, various ocean regions ranging from the cold deep-sea to warm, coastal seas can be compared. We define purely physico-chemical quantities to describe the oceanic oxygen supply potential, but also quantities that contain organism-specific properties which in a most generalized way describe general concepts and dependencies. We apply these novel quantities to example oceanic profiles around the world and find that temperature and pressure dependencies of diffusion and partial pressure create zones of greatest physical constriction on oxygen supply typically at around 1000 m depth, which coincides with oxygen concentration minimum zones. In these zones, which comprise the bulk of the world ocean, ocean warming and deoxygenation have a clear negative effect for aerobic life. In some shallow and warm waters the

  18. Biomimetic macroporous hydrogels: protein ligand distribution and cell response to the ligand architecture in the scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Irina N; Dainiak, Maria; Jungvid, Hans; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Galaev, Igor Yu

    2009-01-01

    Macroporous hydrogels (MHs), cryogels, are a new type of biomaterials for tissue engineering that can be produced from any natural or synthetic polymer that forms a gel. Synthetic MHs are rendered bioactive by surface or bulk modifications with extracellular matrix components. In this study, cell response to the architecture of protein ligands, bovine type-I collagen (CG) and human fibrinogen (Fg), immobilised using different methods on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) macroporous hydrogels (MHs) was analysed. Bulk modification was performed by cross-linking cryo-co-polymerisation of HEMA and poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGA) in the presence of proteins (CG/pHEMA and Fg/pHEMA MHs). The polymer surface was modified by covalent immobilisation of the proteins to the active epoxy (ep) groups present on pHEMA after hydrogel fabrication (CG-epHEMA and Fg-epHEMA MHs). The concentration of proteins in protein/pHEMA and protein-epHEMA MHs was 80-85 and 130-140 mug/ml hydrogel, respectively. It was demonstrated by immunostaining and confocal laser scanning microscopy that bulk modification resulted in spreading of CG in the polymer matrix and spot-like distribution of Fg. On the contrary, surface modification resulted in spot-like distribution of CG and uniform spreading of Fg, which evenly coated the surface. Proliferation rate of fibroblasts was higher on MHs with even distribution of the ligands, i.e., on Fg-epHEMA and CG/pHEMA. After 30 days of growth, fibroblasts formed several monolayers and deposited extracellular matrix filling the pores of these MHs. The best result in terms of cell proliferation was obtained on Fg-epHEMA. The ligands displayed on surface of these scaffolds were in native conformation, while in bulk-modified CG/pHEMA MHs most of the proteins were buried inside the polymer matrix and were less accessible for interactions with specific antibodies and cells. The method used for MH modification with bioligands strongly affects spatial

  19. The radiometric analysis of non-radioactive materials by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioisotopes to measure the composition of different materials via chemical exchange within an instrument is described. The product of the reaction is a radioactive gas which is counted and serves as the indicator of measurement. This method has been applied to a number of different liquids and gases for their specific and sensitive determination. The chief limiting condition on sensitivity is imposed by the specific activity of the radiochemical component. Where high specific activities are available, sensitivity in terms of chemical quantity will be very great. The recent development of quinol- Kr85 clathrate compounds has provided a basic radiochemical source which not only provides high specific activities at low cost but also excellent half-life and energy characteristics. These clathrate compounds can be oxidized only by very strong oxidizing agents, such as ozone to release Kr85. When coupled with a salt, such as sodium chlorite, the sensing of reducing materials such as SO2 may be accomplished. Two applications of the radiometric technique employing clathrates are described. The first is the development of a balloon-borne sonde for the meteorological analysis of ozone in the upper atmosphere. The other is its use in air pollution and process control work in the form of a portable analyser. Different gases may be analysed by this device by merely changing the radiochemical reaction cell. (author)

  20. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus Papain-Like Novel Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Protein-Ligand X-ray Structure and Biological Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Takayama, Jun; Rao, Kalapala Venkateswar; Ratia, Kiira; Chaudhuri, Rima; Mulhearn, Debbie C.; Lee, Hyun; Nichols, Daniel B.; Baliji, Surendranath; Baker, Susan C.; Johnson, Michael E.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Purdue); (UC); (UIC)

    2012-02-21

    The design, synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of a series of new generation SARS-CoV PLpro inhibitors are described. A new lead compound 3 (6577871) was identified via high-throughput screening of a diverse chemical library. Subsequently, we carried out lead optimization and structure-activity studies to provide a series of improved inhibitors that show potent PLpro inhibition and antiviral activity against SARS-CoV infected Vero E6 cells. Interestingly, the (S)-Me inhibitor 15h (enzyme IC{sub 50} = 0.56 {mu}M; antiviral EC{sub 50} = 9.1 {mu}M) and the corresponding (R)-Me 15g (IC{sub 50} = 0.32 {mu}M; antiviral EC{sub 50} = 9.1 {mu}M) are the most potent compounds in this series, with nearly equivalent enzymatic inhibition and antiviral activity. A protein-ligand X-ray structure of 15g-bound SARS-CoV PLpro and a corresponding model of 15h docked to PLpro provide intriguing molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  1. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  2. Exchange repulsive potential adaptable for electronic structure changes during chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid methods combining quantum mechanical (QM) and classical calculations are becoming important tools in chemistry. The popular approach to calculate the interaction between QM and classical calculations employs interatomic potentials. In most cases, the interatomic potential is constructed of an electrostatic (ES) potential and a non-ES potential. Because QM treatment is employed in the calculation of the ES potential, the electronic change can be considered in this ES potential. However, QM treatment of the non-ES potential is difficult because of high computational cost. To overcome this difficulty of evaluating the non-ES potential, we proposed an exchange repulsive potential as the main part of the non-ES potential on the basis of a QM approach. This potential is independent of empirical parameters and adaptable for electronic structure. We combined this potential with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field explicitly including spatial electron density distribution and successfully applied it to the chemical reactions in aqueous phase

  3. Chemical exchange saturation transfer MR imaging of Parkinson's disease at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunmei; Peng, Shuai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Min [Beijing Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Haibo; Su, Wen [Beijing Hospital, Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Zhao, Xuna [Peking University, Center for MRI Research and Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients at 3 Tesla. Twenty-seven PD patients (17 men and 10 women; age range, 54-77 years) and 22 age-matched normal controls (13 men and 9 women; age range, 55-73 years) were examined on a 3-Tesla MRI system. Magnetization transfer spectra with 31 different frequency offsets (-6 to 6 ppm) were acquired at two transverse slices of the head, including the basal ganglia and midbrain. One-way analysis of variance tests was used to compare the differences in CEST imaging signals between PD patients and normal controls. Total CEST signal between the offsets of 0 and 4 ppm in the substantia nigra was significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.006), which could be associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Protein-based CEST imaging signals at the offset of 3.5 ppm in the globus pallidus, putamen and caudate were significantly increased in PD patients, compared to normal controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, P < 0.001, respectively). CEST imaging signals could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers to aid in the non-invasive molecular diagnosis of PD. (orig.)

  4. Protein-specific force field derived from the fragment molecular orbital method can improve protein-ligand binding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Le; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-30

    Accurate computational estimate of the protein-ligand binding affinity is of central importance in rational drug design. To improve accuracy of the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) for protein-ligand simulations, we use a protein-specific FF derived by the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method and by the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. Applying this FMO-RESP method to two proteins, dodecin, and lysozyme, we found that protein-specific partial charges tend to differ more significantly from the standard AMBER charges for isolated charged atoms. We did not see the dependence of partial charges on the secondary structure. Computing the binding affinities of dodecin with five ligands by MM PBSA protocol with the FMO-RESP charge set as well as with the standard AMBER charges, we found that the former gives better correlation with experimental affinities than the latter. While, for lysozyme with five ligands, both charge sets gave similar and relatively accurate estimates of binding affinities. PMID:23420697

  5. Development of the Knowledge-based & Empirical Combined Scoring Algorithm (KECSA) to Score Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel knowledge-based protein-ligand scoring function that employs a new definition for the reference state, allowing us to relate a statistical potential to a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. In this way, the LJ potential parameters were generated from protein-ligand complex structural data contained in the PDB. Forty-nine types of atomic pairwise interactions were derived using this method, which we call the knowledge-based and empirical combined scoring algorithm (KECSA). Two validation benchmarks were introduced to test the performance of KECSA. The first validation benchmark included two test sets that address the training-set and enthalpy/entropy of KECSA The second validation benchmark suite included two large-scale and five small-scale test sets to compare the reproducibility of KECSA with respect to two empirical score functions previously developed in our laboratory (LISA and LISA+), as well as to other well-known scoring methods. Validation results illustrate that KECSA shows improved performance in all test sets when compared with other scoring methods especially in its ability to minimize the RMSE. LISA and LISA+ displayed similar performance using the correlation coefficient and Kendall τ as the metric of quality for some of the small test sets. Further pathways for improvement are discussed which would KECSA more sensitive to subtle changes in ligand structure. PMID:23560465

  6. Separation of boron isotopes at chemical isotopic exchange between, boron trifluoride and its complex with anisole in multitube mass-exchange column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are given on continuous counterflow two-phase process of boron isotopes 10B and 11B separation at chemical isotopic exchange between gaseous BF3 and its liquid complex with anisole, the process is realized in the module of three packed columns with parallel operation; each of the columns in its bottom part is connected with the others by the common unit of flow reversal (desorber), has the diameter of 78 mm, height of 46.5 m, and is filled with wire spiral-prismatic pack with 3.5·3.5·0.2 mm element

  7. Nuclear overhauser enhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging at 7 Tesla in glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE mediated chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST is a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique on the basis of saturation transfer between exchanging protons of tissue proteins and bulk water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the information provided by three dimensional NOE mediated CEST at 7 Tesla (7T and standard MRI in glioblastoma patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven glioblastoma were enrolled in this prospective ethics committee-approved study. NOE mediated CEST contrast was acquired with a modified three-dimensional gradient-echo sequence and asymmetry analysis was conducted at 3.3 ppm (B1 = 0.7 µT to calculate the magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR(asym. Contrast enhanced T1 (CE-T1 and T2-weighted images were acquired at 3T and used for data co-registration and comparison. RESULTS: Mean NOE mediated CEST signal based on MTR(asym values over all patients was significantly increased (p<0.001 in CE-T1 tumor (-1.99 ± 1.22%, tumor necrosis (-1.36 ± 1.30% and peritumoral CEST hyperintensities (PTCH within T2 edema margins (-3.56 ± 1.24% compared to contralateral normal appearing white matter (-8.38 ± 1.19%. In CE-T1 tumor (p = 0.015 and tumor necrosis (p<0.001 mean MTR(asym values were significantly higher than in PTCH. Extent of the surrounding tumor hyperintensity was smaller in eight out of 12 patients on CEST than on T2-weighted images, while four displayed at equal size. In all patients, isolated high intensity regions (0.40 ± 2.21% displayed on CEST within the CE-T1 tumor that were not discernible on CE-T1 or T2-weighted images. CONCLUSION: NOE mediated CEST Imaging at 7 T provides additional information on the structure of peritumoral hyperintensities in glioblastoma and displays isolated high intensity regions within the CE-T1 tumor that cannot be acquired on CE-T1 or T2

  8. Physico-Chemical Study of the Separation of Calcium Isotopes by Chemical Exchange Between Amalgam and Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a preliminary study of the isotopic exchange between Ca amalgam and aqueous or organic solutions of Ca salts, the main parameters governing the feasibility of a separation process based on these systems such as separation factor, exchange kinetics, rate of decomposition of the amalgam were investigated. The separation factor between 40Ca and 46Ca was found to be of the order of 1.02. The rate of the exchange reaction is rather low for aqueous solutions, extremely low for organic solutions. The amalgam seems not to be attacked by dimethyl-formamide solutions; but it is rapidly decomposed by aqueous solutions of Ca halides. This decomposition is slow in the case of aqueous solutions of calcium formate and still slower for Ca(OH)2; however, except in particular conditions, the observed rate is often much higher, owing to interfering reactions between amalgam and water vapor contained in H2 bubbles. (authors)

  9. Novel Chemically Stable Er3+-Yb3+ Codopded Phosphate Glass for Ion-Exchanged Active Waveguide Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宝玉; 赵士龙; 胡丽丽

    2003-01-01

    A novel Er3+-Yb3+ codoped phosphate glass,which combines good chemical durability with good spectroscopic properties,is developed for the ion-exchange process.The relevant properties of this glass are presented for reference in the design and modelling of ion-exchanged active waveguide devices.The weight-loss rate of this glass is 1.45 × 10-5 g.cm-2.h-1 in boiling water,which is comparable to that of Kigre's Q-246 silicate glass.The emission cross section of Er3+ in this glass is calculated to be 0.72 × 10-20 cm2 using the McCumber theory.It is found that a planar waveguide with three modes at 632.8 nm is readily realized in this glass from our primary ion-exchange experiments.

  10. High-capacity, selective solid sequestrants for innovative chemical separation: Inorganic ion exchange approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach of this task is to develop high-capacity, selective solid inorganic ion exchangers for the recovery of cesium and strontium from nuclear alkaline and acid wastes. To achieve this goal, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) is collaborating with industry and university participants to develop high capacity, selective, solid ion exchangers for the removal of specific contaminants from nuclear waste streams

  11. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1: protein,ligands, expression and pathophysiological significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiu-ping; DU Guan-hua

    2007-01-01

    Objective To review the recent research progress in lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1)including its protein, ligands, expression and pathophysiological significance.Data sources Information included in this article was identified by searching of PUBMED (1997-2006) online resources using the key term LOX-1.Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators of the field were selected.Results The key issues related to the LOX-1 protein as well as ligands for LOX-1. Factors regulating the expression of LOX-1 were summarized. The pathophysiological functions of LOX-1 in several diseases were discussed.Conclusions Identification of LOX-1 and a definition of its biological role in pathophysiologic states provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of some cardiovascular diseases especially in atherosclerosis and provide a potential selective therapeutic approach. LOX-1 is unlocking and drugs targeting LOX-1 might be a promising direction to explore.

  12. Chemical exchange saturation transfer of the cervical spinal cord at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Adrienne N; Pawate, Siddharama; Dethrage, Lindsey M; Conrad, Benjamin N; Dewey, Blake E; Barry, Robert L; Smith, Seth A

    2016-09-01

    High-magnetic-field (7 T) chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI provides information on the tissue biochemical environment. Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects the entire central nervous system, including the spinal cord. Optimal CEST saturation parameters found via simulation were implemented for CEST MRI in 10 healthy controls and 10 patients with MS, and the results were examined using traditional asymmetry analysis and a Lorentzian fitting method. In addition, T1 - and T2 *-weighted images were acquired for lesion localization and the transmitted B1 (+) field was evaluated to guide imaging parameters. Distinct spectral features for all tissue types studied were found both up- and downfield from the water resonance. The z spectra in healthy subjects had the expected z spectral shape with CEST effects apparent from 2.0 to 4.5 ppm. The z spectra from patients with MS demonstrated deviations from this expected normal shape, indicating this method's sensitivity to known pathology as well as to tissues appearing normal on conventional MRI. Examination of the calculated CESTasym revealed increased asymmetry around the amide proton resonance (Δω = 3.5 ppm), but it was apparent that this measure is complicated by detail in the CEST spectrum upfield from water, which is expected to result from the nuclear Overhauser effect. The z spectra upfield (negative ppm range) were also distinct between healthy and diseased tissue, and could not be ignored, particularly when considering the conventional asymmetry analysis used to quantify the CEST effect. For all frequencies greater than +1 ppm, the Lorentzian differences (and z spectra) for lesions and normal-appearing white matter were distinct from those for healthy white matter. The increased frequency separation and signal-to-noise ratio, in concert with prolonged T1 at 7 T, resulted in signal enhancements necessary to detect subtle tissue changes not possible at lower field strengths. This study

  13. Inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbents for chemical processing in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbents to both waste treatment and the recovery of fission products and actinides were of primary concern at this meeting. The meeting covered the two major fields of fundamental studies and industrial applications

  14. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan–albumin solution through 19F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T2 relaxation into Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of 19F T2 relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T2 relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υCPMG = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T2 distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T2 peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan–albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system

  15. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan–albumin solution through {sup 19}F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ping-Chang, E-mail: pingchang.lin@howard.edu [Howard University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T{sub 2} relaxation into Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of {sup 19}F T{sub 2} relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T{sub 2} relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υ{sub CPMG} = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T{sub 2} distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T{sub 2} peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan–albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system.

  16. Compressed images for affinity prediction-2 (CIFAP-2): an improved machine learning methodology on protein-ligand interactions based on a study on caspase 3 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdas, Ozlem; Andac, Cenk A; Gurkan-Alp, A Selen; Alpaslan, Ferda Nur; Buyukbingol, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to propose an improved computational methodology, which is called Compressed Images for Affinity Prediction-2 (CIFAP-2) to predict binding affinities of structurally related protein-ligand complexes. CIFAP-2 method is established based on a protein-ligand model from which computational affinity information is obtained by utilizing 2D electrostatic potential images determined for the binding site of protein-ligand complexes. The quality of the prediction of the CIFAP-2 algorithm was tested using partial least squares regression (PLSR) as well as support vector regression (SVR) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy ınference system (ANFIS), which are highly promising prediction methods in drug design. CIFAP-2 was applied on a protein-ligand complex system involving Caspase 3 (CASP3) and its 35 inhibitors possessing a common isatin sulfonamide pharmacophore. As a result, PLSR affinity prediction for the CASP3-ligand complexes gave rise to the most consistent information with reported empirical binding affinities (pIC(50)) of the CASP3 inhibitors. PMID:25578823

  17. A Novel Ion Exchange System to Purify Mixed ISS Waste Water Brines for Chemical Production and Enhanced Water Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Griffin; Spencer, LaShelle; Ruby, Anna-Maria; McCaskill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Current International Space Station water recovery regimes produce a sizable portion of waste water brine. This brine is highly toxic and water recovery is poor: a highly wasteful proposition. With new biological techniques that do not require waste water chemical pretreatment, the resulting brine would be chromium-free and nitrate rich which can allow possible fertilizer recovery for future plant systems. Using a system of ion exchange resins we can remove hardness, sulfate, phosphate and nitrate from these brines to leave only sodium and potassium chloride. At this point modern chlor-alkali cells can be utilized to produce a low salt stream as well as an acid and base stream. The first stream can be used to gain higher water recovery through recycle to the water separation stage while the last two streams can be used to regenerate the ion exchange beds used here, as well as other ion exchange beds in the ISS. Conveniently these waste products from ion exchange regeneration would be suitable as plant fertilizer. In this report we go over the performance of state of the art resins designed for high selectivity of target ions under brine conditions. Using ersatz ISS waste water we can evaluate the performance of specific resins and calculate mass balances to determine resin effectiveness and process viability. If this system is feasible then we will be one step closer to closed loop environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) for current or future applications.

  18. Heat recovery from a spray dryer using a glass tube heat exchanger. A demonstration at ABM Chemicals, Gloucester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This project at ABM Chemicals demonstrates the use of a glass tube heat exchanger to recover heat directly from a spray dryer exhaust to pre-heat the inlet air. It was originally envisaged that this would reduce the energy consumption of the dryer by around 20%. The background to the project, the results to date, corrosive nature of exhaust and expected savings are discussed. Reduced performance, believed to be due to a higher-than-anticipated level of fines in the exhaust, leading to fouling of the heat transfer surfaces, and eventually to the failure of a number of the glass tubes is described. Measures are currently in hand to reduce the carryover and further monitoring of the replacement exchanger is planned.

  19. Analysis of 235U enrichment by chemical exchange in U(IV) - U(VI) system on anionite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A theoretical study about the 235U enrichment by chemical exchange method in U(IV)-U(VI) system on anion-exchange resins is presented. The 235U isotope concentration profiles along the band were numerically calculated using an accurate mathematical model and simulations were carried out for the situation of product and waste withdrawal and feed supply. By means of numerical simulation, an estimation of the migration time, necessary for a desired enrichment degree, was obtained. The required migration distance, the production of uranium 3 at.% 235U per year and the plant configuration are calculated for different operating conditions. An analysis of the process scale for various experimental conditions is also presented. (authors)

  20. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N2 and F2, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules

  1. Evaluations of the conformational search accuracy of CAMDAS using experimental three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMDAS is a conformational search program, through which high temperature molecular dynamics (MD) calculations are carried out. In this study, the conformational search ability of CAMDAS was evaluated using structurally known 281 protein-ligand complexes as a test set. For the test, the influences of initial settings and initial conformations on search results were validated. By using the CAMDAS program, reasonable conformations whose root mean square deviations (RMSDs) in comparison with crystal structures were less than 2.0 Å could be obtained from 96% of the test set even though the worst initial settings were used. The success rate was comparable to those of OMEGA, and the errors of CAMDAS were less than those of OMEGA. Based on the results obtained using CAMDAS, the worst RMSD was around 2.5 Å, although the worst value obtained was around 4.0 Å using OMEGA. The results indicated that CAMDAS is a robust and versatile conformational search method and that it can be used for a wide variety of small molecules. In addition, the accuracy of a conformational search in relation to this study was improved by longer MD calculations and multiple MD simulations

  2. Chemical maintenance of heat exchangers and condensers for prevention of corrosion and fouling [Paper No.: VI B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the various types of corrosion, viz., inlet local and malignant impingement attacks, biofouling, sand erosion, etc. to which condenser tubes of the heat exchangers of the nuclear power plants are susceptible. Mention is also made to the effects of under deposit differential oxygen cell attack, leading to general wastage/pitting corrosion of heat exchanger shells and tubes outer surfaces because of stagnant conditions. Regular and systematic monitoring of water chemistry parameters helps in formulation of remedial measures whenever necessary; the data obtained from the improved maintenance methods serve as useful feed back. In the present paper these aspects of chemical maintenance are illustrated by reference to two methods commonly employed in pre-treatment of condenser cooling water/process water used in heat exchangers. Ferrous sulphate is added to condenser cooling water for promoting the formation of protective coating on inside surfaces of condenser tubes. In addition, inhibitors are also employed for corrosion prevention. Chlorine is injected as biocide in the process water/condenser cooling water to remove biogrowth which would seriously interfere with the efficiency of heat transfer. In both instances treatment schedules and treatment levels are constantly kept under review for efficient management. (author)

  3. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and MR Z-spectroscopy in vivo: a review of theoretical approaches and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) of metabolite protons that undergo exchange processes with the abundant water pool enables a specific contrast for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CEST image contrast depends on physical and physiological parameters that characterize the microenvironment such as temperature, pH, and metabolite concentration. However, CEST imaging in vivo is a complex technique because of interferences with direct water saturation (spillover effect), the involvement of other exchanging pools, in particular macromolecular systems (magnetization transfer, MT), and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs). Moreover, there is a strong dependence of the diverse effects on the employed parameters of radiofrequency irradiation for selective saturation which makes interpretation of acquired signals difficult. This review considers analytical solutions of the Bloch–McConnell (BM) equation system which enable deep insight and theoretical description of CEST and the equivalent off-resonant spinlock (SL) experiments. We derive and discuss proposed theoretical treatments in detail to understand the influence of saturation parameters on the acquired Z-spectrum and how the different effects interfere and can be isolated in MR Z-spectroscopy. Finally, we provide an overview of reported CEST effects in vivo and discuss proposed methods and technical approaches applicable to in vivo CEST studies on clinical MRI systems. (topical review)

  4. The application of Dow Chemical's perfluorinated membranes in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, G. A.

    1990-02-01

    Dow Chemical's research activities in fuel cells revolve around the development of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, useful as the proton transport medium and separator. The following work will outline some of the performance characteristics which are typical for such membranes.

  5. S4MPLE--sampler for multiple protein-ligand entities: simultaneous docking of several entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Laurent; Horvath, Dragos

    2013-01-28

    S4MPLE is a conformational sampling tool, based on a hybrid genetic algorithm, simulating one (conformer enumeration) or more molecules (docking). Energy calculations are based on the AMBER force field [Cornell et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 5179.] for biological macromolecules and its generalized version GAFF [Wang et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2004 , 25, 1157.] for ligands. This paper describes more advanced, specific applications of S4MPLE to problems more complex than classical redocking of drug-like compounds [Hoffer et al. J. Mol. Graphics Modell. 2012, submitted for publication.]. Here, simultaneous docking of multiple entities is addressed in two different important contexts. First, simultaneous docking of two fragment-like ligands was attempted, as such ternary complexes are the basis of fragment-based drug design by linkage of the independent binders. As a preliminary, the capacity of S4MPLE to dock fragment-like compounds has been assessed, since this class of small probes used in fragment-based drug design covers a different chemical space than drug-like molecules. Herein reported success rates from fragments redocking are as good as classical benchmarking results on drug-like compounds (Astex Diverse Set [Hartshorn et al. J. Med. Chem. 2007, 50, 726.]). Then, S4MPLE is successfully challenged to predict locations of fragments involved in ternary complexes by means of multientity docking. Second, the key problem of predicting water-mediated interaction is addressed by considering explicit water molecules as additional entities to be docked in the presence of the "main" ligand. Blind prediction of solvent molecule positions, reproducing relevant ligand-water-site mediated interactions, is achieved in 76% cases over saved poses. S4MPLE was also successful to predict crystallographic water displacement by a therefore tailored functional group in the optimized ligand. However, water localization is an extremely delicate issue in terms of weighing of

  6. Process and Control Design for a Novel Chemical Heat Exchange Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Haugwitz, Staffan; Hagander, Per; Norén, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    A new chemical reactor, the Open Plate Reactor (OPR), is being developed by Alfa Laval AB. It has a very flexible configuration with distributed inlet ports, cooling zones and internal sensors. This gives the OPR improved control capabilities compared to standard chemical reactors in addition to better heat transfer capacity. In this paper, we address the relationship between the process design, the number of actuators used and how to use these actuators in feedback contro...

  7. MRI nanoprobes based on chemical exchange saturation transfer: LnIII chelates anchored on the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Carniato, Fabio; Tei, Lorenzo; Hu, He; Aime, Silvio; Botta, Mauro

    2014-07-01

    The formation of ternary complexes between neutral LnIII-DO3A chelates anchored on MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and silanol groups on the surface allows obtaining highly efficient chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI nanoprobes. These new probes achieve excellent sensitivity in the μM range (per LnIII ion), significantly greater than that of other paramagnetic CEST nanosystems such as dendrimers or micelles and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding molecular agents.The formation of ternary complexes between neutral LnIII-DO3A chelates anchored on MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and silanol groups on the surface allows obtaining highly efficient chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI nanoprobes. These new probes achieve excellent sensitivity in the μM range (per LnIII ion), significantly greater than that of other paramagnetic CEST nanosystems such as dendrimers or micelles and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding molecular agents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and characterization of the materials; Z- and ST-spectra of all materials; sensitivity threshold for TmDO3A-MCM-41 and EuDO3A-MCM-41 pH and temperature dependence of ST% for TbDO3A-MCM-41. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02753a

  8. Pollutant removal from industrial discharge water using individual and combined effects of adsorption and ion-exchange processes: Chemical abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Charles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, adsorption-oriented processes for pollutant removal from metal polycontaminated surface-finishing discharge water were applied individually as well as in combination with ion-exchange treatment to remove the remaining metal ions and organic load. Several materials were compared using batch experiments, namely an activated carbon, three ion-exchange resins (IRA 402Cl, IR 120H and TP 207, and two non-conventional cross-linked polysaccharide-based biosorbents (starch and cyclodextrin. This article presents the abatements obtained in chemical pollution as monitored by complete chemical analysis. For the same experimental conditions (similar discharge water, pollutant concentrations, stirring rate, contact time, and initial pH, the highest levels of pollutant removal were attained with the combined use of two materials, an activated carbon and a mixture of two ion-exchange resins. This physicochemical treatment effectively lowered the main pollutants present in the discharge water such as Cu, Ni and COD, by more than 96%, 79% and 74% respectively (average values for three samples, while the treatment with carbon alone lowered them by 58%, 9% and 70%, and resins alone by 85%, 61% and 16%. Similar interesting results were obtained with the cyclodextrin-based adsorbent and its use alone was sufficient to obtain decreases in Cu, Ni and COD of more than 94%, 77% and 67% respectively. The adsorption-oriented process using cyclodextrin polymer could be an advantageous approach for removing organic and metallic pollutants from metal surface-finishing discharge water due to the non-toxic character of CD to humans and the environment.

  9. Arrhenius' law in turbulent media and an equivalent tunnel effect. [in binary exchange chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, S.; Sagara, K.

    1978-01-01

    The indeterminacy inherent to the formal extension of Arrhenius' law to reactions in turbulent flows is shown to be surmountable in the case of a binary exchange reaction with a sufficiently high activation energy. A preliminary calculation predicts that the turbulent reaction rate is invariant in the Arrhenius form except for an equivalently lowered activation energy. This is a reflection of turbulence-augmented molecular vigor, and causes an appreciable increase in the reaction rate. A similarity to the tunnel effect in quantum mechanics is indicated. The anomaly associated with the mild ignition of oxy-hydrogen mixtures is discussed in this light.

  10. Constructing query-driven dynamic machine learning model with application to protein-ligand binding sites prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong-Jun; Hu, Jun; Li, Qian-Mu; Tang, Zhen-Min; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We are facing an era with annotated biological data rapidly and continuously generated. How to effectively incorporate new annotated data into the learning step is crucial for enhancing the performance of a bioinformatics prediction model. Although machine-learning-based methods have been extensively used for dealing with various biological problems, existing approaches usually train static prediction models based on fixed training datasets. The static approaches are found having several disadvantages such as low scalability and impractical when training dataset is huge. In view of this, we propose a dynamic learning framework for constructing query-driven prediction models. The key difference between the proposed framework and the existing approaches is that the training set for the machine learning algorithm of the proposed framework is dynamically generated according to the query input, as opposed to training a general model regardless of queries in traditional static methods. Accordingly, a query-driven predictor based on the smaller set of data specifically selected from the entire annotated base dataset will be applied on the query. The new way for constructing the dynamic model enables us capable of updating the annotated base dataset flexibly and using the most relevant core subset as the training set makes the constructed model having better generalization ability on the query, showing "part could be better than all" phenomenon. According to the new framework, we have implemented a dynamic protein-ligand binding sites predictor called OSML (On-site model for ligand binding sites prediction). Computer experiments on 10 different ligand types of three hierarchically organized levels show that OSML outperforms most existing predictors. The results indicate that the current dynamic framework is a promising future direction for bridging the gap between the rapidly accumulated annotated biological data and the effective machine-learning-based predictors. OSML

  11. Predicting Electrophoretic Mobility of Protein-Ligand Complexes for Ligands from DNA-Encoded Libraries of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Hale, Robert L; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Chiu, Cynthia H; Shaginian, Alex; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-05-17

    Selection of target-binding ligands from DNA-encoded libraries of small molecules (DELSMs) is a rapidly developing approach in drug-lead discovery. Methods of kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) may facilitate highly efficient homogeneous selection of ligands from DELSMs. However, KCE methods require accurate prediction of electrophoretic mobilities of protein-ligand complexes. Such prediction, in turn, requires a theory that would be applicable to DNA tags of different structures used in different DELSMs. Here we present such a theory. It utilizes a model of a globular protein connected, through a single point (small molecule), to a linear DNA tag containing a combination of alternating double-stranded and single-stranded DNA (dsDNA and ssDNA) regions of varying lengths. The theory links the unknown electrophoretic mobility of protein-DNA complex with experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities of the protein and DNA. Mobility prediction was initially tested by using a protein interacting with 18 ligands of various combinations of dsDNA and ssDNA regions, which mimicked different DELSMs. For all studied ligands, deviation of the predicted mobility from the experimentally determined value was within 11%. Finally, the prediction was tested for two proteins and two ligands with a DNA tag identical to those of DELSM manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Deviation between the predicted and experimentally determined mobilities did not exceed 5%. These results confirm the accuracy and robustness of our model, which makes KCE methods one step closer to their practical use in selection of drug leads, and diagnostic probes from DELSMs. PMID:27119259

  12. Elucidating the energetics of entropically driven protein-ligand association: calculations of absolute binding free energy and entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nan-jie; Zhang, Peng; Cieplak, Piotr; Lai, Luhua

    2011-10-20

    The binding of proteins and ligands is generally associated with the loss of translational, rotational, and conformational entropy. In many cases, however, the net entropy change due to binding is positive. To develop a deeper understanding of the energetics of entropically driven protein-ligand binding, we calculated the absolute binding free energies and binding entropies for two HIV-1 protease inhibitors Nelfinavir and Amprenavir using the double-decoupling method with molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. For both ligands, the calculated absolute binding free energies are in general agreement with experiments. The statistical error in the computed ΔG(bind) due to convergence problem is estimated to be ≥2 kcal/mol. The decomposition of free energies indicates that, although the binding of Nelfinavir is driven by nonpolar interaction, Amprenavir binding benefits from both nonpolar and electrostatic interactions. The calculated absolute binding entropies show that (1) Nelfinavir binding is driven by large entropy change and (2) the entropy of Amprenavir binding is much less favorable compared with that of Nelfinavir. Both results are consistent with experiments. To obtain qualitative insights into the entropic effects, we decomposed the absolute binding entropy into different contributions based on the temperature dependence of free energies along different legs of the thermodynamic pathway. The results suggest that the favorable entropic contribution to binding is dominated by the ligand desolvation entropy. The entropy gain due to solvent release from binding site appears to be more than offset by the reduction of rotational and vibrational entropies upon binding. PMID:21899337

  13. Chemical composition effects on an ion-exchange process in glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Míka, M.; Špirková, J.; Třešňáková, P.; Salavcová, L.; Ondráček, František; Lahodný, F.; Janáková, S.; Švecová, B.; Malichová, H.

    Warszawa : Conference Engine , 2007. s. 162-163. ISBN 83-89585-16-2. [European Materials Research Society, E-MRS 2007 Fall Meeting. 17.05.2007-21.09.2007, Warszawa] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : ion exchenge * chemical exchenge Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engine ering http://science24.com/events/1302/boa/boa.pdf

  14. The radiolytic and chemical degradation of organic ion exchange resins under alkaline conditions: effect on radionuclide speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loon, L. van; Hummel, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The formation of water soluble organic ligands by the radiolytic and chemical degradation of several ion exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were characterised and their role on radionuclide speciation evaluated thoroughly. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powdex PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. A small part of the carbon (10-20%) could be identified as oxalate. The identity of the remainder is unknown. Complexation studies with Cu{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterised by its concentration, a deprotonation constant and a complexation constant for the NiX complex. The influence of oxalate and ligand X on the speciation of radionuclides is examined in detail. For oxalate no significant influence on the speciation of radionuclides is expected. The stronger complexing ligand X may exert some influence depending on its concentration and the values of other parameters. These critical parameters are discussed and limiting values are evaluated. In absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found. Irradiation of strong basic anion exchange resins (Powdex PAO and Lewatite M-500) resulted in the formation of mainly ammonia, amines and dissolved organic carbon. Up to 50% of the carbon could be identified as methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethylamine. Complexation studies with Eu{sup 3+} showed that the complexing capacity under near field conditions was negligible. The speciation of cations such as Ag, Ni, Cu and Pd can be influenced by the presence of amins. The strongest amine-complexes are formed with Pd and therefore, as an example, the aqueous Pd-ammonia system is examined in great detail. (author) 30 figs., 10 tabs., refs.

  15. The radiolytic and chemical degradation of organic ion exchange resins under alkaline conditions: effect on radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of water soluble organic ligands by the radiolytic and chemical degradation of several ion exchange resins was investigated under conditions close to those of the near field of a cementitious repository. The most important degradation products were characterised and their role on radionuclide speciation evaluated thoroughly. Irradiation of strong acidic cation exchange resins (Powdex PCH and Lewatite S-100) resulted in the formation of mainly sulphate and dissolved organic carbon. A small part of the carbon (10-20%) could be identified as oxalate. The identity of the remainder is unknown. Complexation studies with Cu2+ and Ni2+ showed the presence of two ligands: oxalate and ligand X. Although ligand X could not be identified, it could be characterised by its concentration, a deprotonation constant and a complexation constant for the NiX complex. The influence of oxalate and ligand X on the speciation of radionuclides is examined in detail. For oxalate no significant influence on the speciation of radionuclides is expected. The stronger complexing ligand X may exert some influence depending on its concentration and the values of other parameters. These critical parameters are discussed and limiting values are evaluated. In absence of irradiation, no evidence for the formation of ligands was found. Irradiation of strong basic anion exchange resins (Powdex PAO and Lewatite M-500) resulted in the formation of mainly ammonia, amines and dissolved organic carbon. Up to 50% of the carbon could be identified as methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethylamine. Complexation studies with Eu3+ showed that the complexing capacity under near field conditions was negligible. The speciation of cations such as Ag, Ni, Cu and Pd can be influenced by the presence of amins. The strongest amine-complexes are formed with Pd and therefore, as an example, the aqueous Pd-ammonia system is examined in great detail. (author) 30 figs., 10 tabs., refs

  16. 2,4-Difluoro anisole. A promising complexing agent for boron isotopes separation by chemical exchange reaction and distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although methods of boron isotopes separation were intensively pursued about 60 years, the chemical exchange distillation is the only method that has been applied in industrial scale production of 10B. The present anisole BF3 system suffers from the drawbacks like high melting point, relatively low separation coefficient and instability under reaction conditions, which demand a continuous search for more effective and efficient donors for boron isotope separation. A series of fluoro-substituted anisole derivatives were screened in this paper, among which 2,4-difluoro anisole exhibited good properties compared with anisole. Studies on the boron trifluoride and 2,4-difluoro anisole adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is reported. The results showed that 2,4-difluoro anisole is better than anisole in separation coefficient, freezing point and stability under pyrolysis conditions, which suggest a further detailed investigations on boron trifluoride and 2,4-difluoro anisole adduct. (author)

  17. Chemical treatment of secondary waste solutions resulting from wet oxidative degradation of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present experimental work has been carried out to evaluate the chemical treatment process of radioactive secondary waste solutions resulting from the wet oxidative degradation of simulated spent radioactive cation-exchange resins using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The present study aims mainly to evaluate the ability of ferrocyanide compound of nickel for selective fixation of radio-cesium from the secondary waste solution in presence of traces of soluble organic residues. Based on the data obtained, it was found that, using 5 x 10-3 of nickel ferrocyanide, at ph range from 1-9 and in the presence of traces of soluble organic carbon, more than 99% of the radiocesium initially found could be efficiently removed from the secondary radioactive waste solutions under consideration

  18. Separation of stable isotopes of alkali and alkaline earth metals in chemical exchange systems with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical isotope exchange in two-phase water - organic systems Men+ (water) - MeLn+ (org), where Me = Li, Ca, K, Mg; L = crown ethers with 5 to 6 oxygen atoms in macrocyclic ring; org = CHCl3, CH2Cl2 has been studied. The process of isotope separation has been realized by extraction chromatography. The chromatographic column contained a fixed aqueous phase. The organic solution of metal complex with crown ether was eluted through the column. On contact with the fixed aqueous phase in the course of chromatography, metal salt reextraction occurred and interphase isotope exchange between aqueous and organic phases resulted. Isotope separation factors in these systems were in the range of: 1.0032 - 1.020 (6Li/7Li), 1.0016 - 1.0038 (40Ca/44Ca), 1.0007 - 1.0011 (39K/41K), 1.0014 - 1.0044 (24Mg/26Mg). The theoretical model has been proposed to interpret the high separation factors in crown ether extraction systems. According to this model, the potential in such systems has a very flat bottom. This type of potential results in weakening the force field and decreasing of β-factor (i.e., (s/s')f) in spite of comparatively high energy of complexation. This model can interpret both high separation factors and their strong dependence on the type of crown ether. (author)

  19. Separation of 15N by chemical exchange in NO, NO2 - HNO3 system under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic isotopic exchange reaction is responsible for the separation of 15N in the Nitrox system that between gaseous nitrogen oxides and aqueous nitric acid with a single stage separation factor α = 1.055 for 10M nitric acid, at 25 deg C and atmospheric pressure takes place. In order to know what happens in 15N separation at higher pressure, when the isotopic transport between two phases is improved, a stainless steel laboratory experimental plant with a 1000 mm long x 18 mm i.d. column, packed with triangular wire springs 1.8 x 1.8 x 0.2 mm2, was utilised. At 1.5 atm (absolute), and 2.36 ml x cm-2 x min-1 flow rate HETP was 7% smaller than at atmospheric pressure and 1.5 times smaller flow rate. HETP at 3.14 ml x cm-2 x min-1 flow rate and 1.8 atm is practically equal with that obtained at atmospheric pressure and 2 times smaller flow rate. The operation of the 15N separation plant at 1.8 atm (absolute), instead of atmospheric pressure, will permit doubling of the 10M nitric acid flow rate and of 15N production of the given column. (author)

  20. Chemical and dimensional evolution of cationic ions exchange resins in cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IERs) are widely used by the nuclear industry to decontaminate radioactive effluents. After use they are usually encapsulated in cementitious materials. However, the solidified waste forms can exhibit a strong expansion, possibly leading to cracking. Its origin is not well understood as well as the conditions when it occurs.In this work, the interactions between cationic resins in the Na+ or Ca2+ form and tricalcium silicate (C3S), Portland cement (CEM I) or Blast furnace slag cement (CEM III/C) are investigated at an early age in order to gain a better understanding of the expansion process.The results show that during the hydration of a paste of C3S or CEM I containing IERs in the Na+ form, the resins exhibit a transient expansion of small magnitude due to the decrease in the osmotic pressure of the interstitial solution. This expansion, which occurs just after cement setting, is sufficient to damage the material which is poorly consolidated for several reasons: small hydration degree, precipitation of less cohesive sodium bearing C-S-H, heterogeneous microstructure with highly porous zones and lastly cleavable crystals of portlandite at the interface between resins and paste. This expansion can be prevented by performing a calcium pretreatment of the resins or by using a CEM III/C cement with a slower rate of hydration than that of Portland cement. (author)

  1. Kinetic bottlenecks to chemical exchange rates for deep-sea animals II: Carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Hofmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature-driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Discussion of these impacts has so far focused only on changes in the oceanic bulk fluid properties (ΔpH, Δ[∑CO2] etc. as the critical variable and with a major focus on carbonate shell dissolution. Here we describe the rate problem for animals that must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyze the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary layer around marine animals in an ocean changing in temperature (T and CO2 concentration in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas since, as with gas exchange of CO2 at the air-sea interface, the influence of the ensemble of reactions within the CO2-HCO3-CO32– acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions significantly facilitate CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations.The effect of these reactions can be described by an enhancement factor. For organisms, this means mechanically increasing flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer as is required to alleviate O2 stress seems not necessary to facilitate CO2 efflux. Nevertheless the elevated pCO2 cost most likely is non-zero. Regionally as with O2 the combination of T, P, and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around

  2. A study of the wet chemical oxidation and solidification of radioactive spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the research works on the decomposition of Ion-Exchange Resins (IERs) in H2O2-Fe2+/Cu2+ catalysis systems for volume reduction and improvement of immobilization in cement. The resins used in the study were polystyrene strong acidic and basic resins containing about 45% of water. The radioactive spent resins loading 60Co, 137Cs, 134Cs, 90Sr and 51Cr with a radioactive activity level of 4GBq/m3 were obtained from a reactor installation. It has been found in batch scale experiment that many factors has influence on the decomposition of IERs, and the most important ones are H2O2 dosage, H2O2 dose rate, temperature and pH value. The best temperature range is 97-99 deg. C. The pH-value of resin slurry chosen in this study is 2.0-3.0. The appropriate dosage of H2O2(30% vol.) is 200 ml/25 g wet mixed resins. The decomposition ratio is 100% and more than 90% for cation and anion IERs respectively, while it is 85% for mixed resins (as TOC-value). The analytical results indicates that the radioactive nuclides loaded in the spent resins are concentrated in decomposition solution and solid residues. No radioactivity enters into the off-gas, while the condensate from the reaction system has a radioactive activity of 1.65 Bq/l. Foaming is a problem associated with resin dissolution. Addition of a little amount of anti-foam agent can solve this problem very well. Three cementation materials have been chosen for encapsulation of decomposition residue. All of the tree kind of solidification materials can produce qualified cemented products with excellent properties for long term storage. The adopted volume reduction (VR) process can significantly reduce waste volume of solidified product decreases by 40% compared with that of original spent resin. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Separation and sampling technique of light element isotopes by chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium and boron isotope separation technique were studied. Granulation of lithium isotope separation agent was carried out by cure covering in solution. Separation of lithium isotope was stepped up by ammonium carbonate used as elusion agent. Styrene and ester resin derived three kinds of agents such as 2-amino-1, 3-propanediol (1, 3-PD), 2-amino-2-methyl-1, 3-propanediol (Me-1,3-PD) and tris(2-hydroxyethyl)amine (Tris) were used as absorbent.The ester resin with Tris showed larger amount of adsorption (1.4 mmol/g) than other resins. However, all resins with agent indicated more large adsorption volume of boron than the objective value (0.5 mmol/g). Large isotope shift was shown by the unsymmetrical vibration mode of lithium ion on the basis of quantum chemical calculation of isotope effect on dehydration of hydrated lithium ion. (S.Y.)

  4. Alterations in chemical shifts and exchange broadening upon peptide boronic acid inhibitor binding to α-lytic protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    α-Lytic protease, a bacterial serine protease of 198 aminoacids (19800 Da), has been used as a model system for studies of catalytic mechanism, structure-function relationships, and more recently for studies of pro region-assisted protein folding. We have assigned the backbones of the enzyme alone, and of its complex with the tetrahedral transition state mimic N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Ala-Pro-boroVal, using double- and triple-resonance 3D NMR spectroscopy on uniformly15N- and 13C/15N-labeled protein.Changes in backbone chemical shifts between the uncomplexed and inhibited form of the protein are correlated with distance from the inhibitor, the displacement of backbone nitrogens, and change in hydrogen bond strength upon inhibitor binding (derived from previously solved crystal structures).A comparison of the solution secondary structure of the uninhibited enzyme with that of the X-ray structure reveals no significant differences.Significant line broadening, indicating intermediate chemical exchange, was observed in many of the active site amides (including three broadened to invisibility), and in a majority of cases the broadening was reversed upon addition of the inhibitor. Implications and possible mechanisms of this line broadening are discussed

  5. Transport properties of proton-exchange membranes: Effect of supercritical-fluid processing and chemical functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Ayazo

    NafionRTM membranes commonly used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), are tipically limited by high methanol permeability (also known as the cross-over limitation). These membranes have phase segregated sulfonated ionic domains in a perfluorinated backbone, which makes processing challenging and limited by phase equilibria considerations. This study used supercritical fluids (SCFs) as a processing alternative, since the gas-like mass transport properties of SCFs allow a better penetration into the membranes and the use of polar co-solvents influenced their morphology, fine-tuning the physical and transport properties in the membrane. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity were performed to the NafionRTM membranes processed with SCFs at 40ºC and 200 bar and the co-solvents as: acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropyl alcohol, HPLC-grade water, acetic acid, cyclohexanone. The results obtained for the permeability data were of the order of 10 -8-10-9 cm2/s, two orders of magnitude lower than unprocessed Nafion. Proton conductivity results obtained using AC impedance electrochemical spectroscopy was between 0.02 and 0.09 S/cm, very similar to the unprocessed Nafion. SCF processing with ethanol as co-solvent reduced the methanol permeability by two orders of magnitude, while the proton conductivity was only reduced by 4%. XRD analysis made to the treated samples exhibited a decreasing pattern in the crystallinity, which affects the transport properties of the membrane. Also, SAXS profiles of the Nafion membranes processed were obtained with the goal of determining changes produced by the SCF processing in the hydrophilic domains of the polymer. With the goal of searching for new alternatives in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) triblock copolymer of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) and poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) SEBS were studied. These sulfonated tri-block copolymers had lower methanol permeabilities, but also lower proton

  6. Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-08-01

    In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

  7. Comparison of methods for nutrient measurement in calcareous soils: Ion-exchange resin bag, capsule, membrane, and chemical extractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, S.K.; Belnap, J.; Miller, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Four methods for measuring quantities of 12 plant-available nutrients were compared using three sandy soils in a series of three experiments. Three of the methods use different ion-exchange resin forms-bags, capsules, and membranes-and the fourth was conventional chemical extraction. The first experiment compared nutrient extraction data from a medium of sand saturated with a nutrient solution. The second and third experiments used Nakai and Sheppard series soils from Canyonlands National Park, which are relatively high in soil carbonates. The second experiment compared nutrient extraction data provided by the four methods from soils equilibrated at two temperatures, "warm" and "cold." The third experiment extracted nutrients from the same soils in a field equilibration. Our results show that the four extraction techniques are not comparable. This conclusion is due to differences among the methods in the net quantities of nutrients extracted from equivalent soil volumes, in the proportional representation of nutrients within similar soils and treatments, in the measurement of nutrients that were added in known quantities, and even in the order of nutrients ranked by net abundance. We attribute the disparities in nutrient measurement among the different resin forms to interacting effects of the inherent differences in resin exchange capacity, differences among nutrients in their resin affinities, and possibly the relatively short equilibration time for laboratory trials. One constraint for measuring carbonate-related nutrients in high-carbonate soils is the conventional ammonium acetate extraction method, which we suspect of dissolving fine CaCO3 particles that are more abundant in Nakai series soils, resulting in erroneously high Ca2+ estimates. For study of plant-available nutrients, it is important to identify the nutrients of foremost interest and understand differences in their resin sorption dynamics to determine the most appropriate extraction method.

  8. Evolution of Fe species during the synthesis of over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5 obtained by chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battiston, AA; Bitter, JH; de Groot, FMF; Overweg, AR; Stephan, O; van Bokhoven, JA; Kooyman, PJ; van der Spek, C; Vanko, G; Koningsberger, DC

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of iron in over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5 prepared via chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3 was studied at each stage of the synthesis. Different characterization techniques (EXAFS, HR-XANES, Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy, Al-27 NMR, EELS, HR-TEM, XRD, N-2 physisorption, and FTIR spectroscopy) we

  9. Sister chromatid exchanges in the bone marrow cells of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in the bone marrow of in vivo rats induced by gamma radiation doses and by the chemical mutagens, mitomycin C (MMC), cyclophosphamide (CP), and sulphonate-methylmethane (SMM), were studied. The purpose was to evaluate the sensitivity and reproducibility of a simplified SCE in vivo detecting system developed in our laboratory and to compare the results obtained with those reported elsewhere. Simplification consisted in administering the amounts of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) necessary to observe the SCE, after first adsorbing the BrdU in activated carbon and then injecting it interperitoneally, into the rats. The results were a longer time in vivo ADN incorporation without convulsions in the rats, and a reduction in the time course as compared to other methods. We observed a basal rate of 3.6+-0.37 SCE/cell and that: 0.44 Gy of gamma radiation induced 7.7+-0.73 SCE/cell; 1.6 μg/g of MMC induced 8.1+-1.20 SCE/cell; 5 μg/g of CP induced 8.25+-1.5 SCE/cell, 40 μg/g of SMM induced 22.0+-5 SCE/cell and 380 μg/g of sulphonate-ethylmethane induced 8.6+-1.2 SCE/cell. This showed that all the agents were capable of inducing SCE in the bone marrow cells of rats in vivo under our conditions. We noted a greater induced efficiency for gamma radiation than the obtained by other investigators and a relatively similar efficiency in the case of chemical mutagens as reported in other studies. (author)

  10. Chemical diffusion and surface exchange in selected Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, K. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Department of Hydrogen Energy, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Klimkowicz, A. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Department of Hydrogen Energy, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Shibaura Institute of Technology, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, 3-7-5, Toyosu, Koto-ku, 135-8548 Tokyo (Japan); Świerczek, K., E-mail: xi@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Department of Hydrogen Energy, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Malik, A. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Department of Hydrogen Energy, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Ariga, Y.; Tominaga, T.; Takasaki, A. [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, 3-7-5, Toyosu, Koto-ku, 135-8548 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Characterization of basic physicochemical properties of selected Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides. • Determination of D and K for Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides. • Strong effect of enthalpy of oxidation and influence of porosity recorded. • Possibility of using X-ray diffraction data for evaluation of transport coefficients. - Abstract: In this paper, a discussion on determination of chemical diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange reaction coefficient (K) was given on a basis of electrical conductivity and mass relaxation experiments, performed for selected Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides. The synthesized materials were analyzed in terms of their basic physicochemical properties (crystal structure, oxygen nonstoichiometry, electrical conductivity). Gathered relaxation-type data were critically analyzed, and a strong effect of the enthalpy of the oxidation process, as well as an influence of the porosity were observed, showing limitations of applicability of these techniques, especially for simultaneous determination of D and K. An additional discussion and results were also given regarding possibility of using X-ray diffraction data, recorded during change of the oxygen partial pressure at elevated temperatures, for evaluation of the considered transport coefficients.

  11. Chemical diffusion and surface exchange in selected Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Characterization of basic physicochemical properties of selected Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides. • Determination of D and K for Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides. • Strong effect of enthalpy of oxidation and influence of porosity recorded. • Possibility of using X-ray diffraction data for evaluation of transport coefficients. - Abstract: In this paper, a discussion on determination of chemical diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange reaction coefficient (K) was given on a basis of electrical conductivity and mass relaxation experiments, performed for selected Ln–Ba–Sr–Co–Fe perovskite-type oxides. The synthesized materials were analyzed in terms of their basic physicochemical properties (crystal structure, oxygen nonstoichiometry, electrical conductivity). Gathered relaxation-type data were critically analyzed, and a strong effect of the enthalpy of the oxidation process, as well as an influence of the porosity were observed, showing limitations of applicability of these techniques, especially for simultaneous determination of D and K. An additional discussion and results were also given regarding possibility of using X-ray diffraction data, recorded during change of the oxygen partial pressure at elevated temperatures, for evaluation of the considered transport coefficients

  12. Oxidative degradation of anion exchange resin in chloride form during purification of reactor coolant after alkaline permanganate treatment in dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In boiling water reactors, primary system piping is contaminated by radioactive species like 51Cr and 60Co, resulting in high radiation fields. Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) is a preferred choice to reduce the radiation field. In DCD process, oxidation step involving alkaline permanganate or acid permanganate is employed for effective dissolution of oxides (rich in chromium), from the metal surfaces of reactor components. After completion of the oxidation step, removal of the unused chemicals is carried out by the use of ion exchange process. This poses a problem of possible degradation of ion exchange resin by the oxidative chemicals during the removal. In this paper, this aspect has been investigated and the results obtained are discussed. (author)

  13. Characterization of protein/ligand interactions by 1H/3H exchange: application to the hAsf1/ histone H3 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first chapter will be exposed the main current methods of identification to high debit of the interactions protein-protein. Then the methods allowing to characterize the surfaces of interaction or to determine the structures of the complexes will be listed by discussing the main advantages and the inconveniences. Our approach of characterization of the zones of interaction protein-protein is a method of 'foot-printing' 1, based on the identification and radicals' quantification formed on the residues of proteins accessible to the water. The second chapter will so discuss the development of this method of radical identification using the atom of tritium as radioactive label. Our approach will finally be validated in the third chapter by applying it to the characterization of amino acids involved in the interaction enter the human protein anti silencing factor 1 (hAsf11-156) and a fragment of the histone H3. (N.C.)

  14. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR technique for in-vivo liver imaging at 3.0 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shu-Zhong; Deng, Min; Wang, Yi-Xiang J. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (China); Yuan, Jing [Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Medical Physics and Research Department, Happy Valley, Hong Kong (China); Wei, Juan [Philips Healthcare Asia, Shanghai (China); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kennedy Krieger Institute, F.M. Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI for liver imaging at 3.0-T. Images were acquired at offsets (n = 41, increment = 0.25 ppm) from -5 to 5 ppm using a TSE sequence with a continuous rectangular saturation pulse. Amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) and GlycoCEST signals were quantified as the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTR{sub asym}) at 3.5 ppm and the total MTR{sub asym} integrated from 0.5 to 1.5 ppm, respectively, from the corrected Z-spectrum. Reproducibility was assessed for rats and humans. Eight rats were devoid of chow for 24 hours and scanned before and after fasting. Eleven rats were scanned before and after one-time CCl4 intoxication. For reproducibility, rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -1.49 % to 1.28 % and -0.317 % to 0.345 %. Human liver APTw and GlycoCEST measurements had 95 % limits of agreement of -0.842 % to 0.899 % and -0.344 % to 0.164 %. After 24 hours, fasting rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.38 ± 0.86 % to 0.67 ± 1.12 % and from 0.34 ± 0.26 % to -0.18 ± 0.37 % respectively (p < 0.05). After CCl4 intoxication rat liver APTw and GlycoCEST signals decreased from 2.46 ± 0.48 % to 1.10 ± 0.77 %, and from 0.34 ± 0.23 % to -0.16 ± 0.51 % respectively (p < 0.05). CEST liver imaging at 3.0-T showed high sensitivity for fasting as well as CCl4 intoxication. (orig.)

  15. FORest canopy atmosphere transfer (FORCAsT 1.0: a 1-D model of biosphere–atmosphere chemical exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ashworth

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biosphere-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in governing atmospheric composition, mediating the concentration of key species such as ozone and aerosol, thereby influencing air quality and climate. The exchange of reactive trace gases and their oxidation products (both gas and particle phase is of particular importance in this process. The FORCAsT (FORest Canopy AtmoSphere Transfer one-dimensional model is developed to study the emission, deposition, chemistry and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and their oxidation products in the atmosphere within and above the forest canopy. We include an equilibrium partitioning scheme, making FORCAsT one of the few canopy models currently capable of simulating the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA from VOC oxidation in a forest environment. We evaluate the capability of FORCAsT to reproduce observed concentrations of key gas-phase species and report modeled SOA concentrations within and above a mixed forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS during the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX field campaign in summer 2009. We examine the impact of two different gas-phase chemical mechanisms on modelled concentrations of short-lived primary emissions, such as isoprene and monoterpenes, and their oxidation products. While the two chemistry schemes perform similarly under high-NOx conditions, they diverge at the low levels of NOx at UMBS. We identify peroxy radical and alkyl nitrate chemistry as the key causes of the differences, highlighting the importance of this chemistry in understanding the fate of biogenic VOCs (bVOCs for both the modelling and measurement communities.

  16. Biochemical imaging of cervical intervertebral discs with glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging: feasibility and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Mueller-Lutz, Anja; Zimmermann, Lisa; Boos, Johannes; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Miese, Falk [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Schmitt, Benjamin [Siemens Ltd. Australia, Healthcare Sector, Macquarie Park, NSW (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer (gagCEST) imaging at 3T in the assessment of the GAG content of cervical IVDs in healthy volunteers. Forty-two cervical intervertebral discs of seven healthy volunteers (four females, three males; mean age: 21.4 ± 1.4 years; range: 19-24 years) were examined at a 3T MRI scanner in this prospective study. The MRI protocol comprised standard morphological, sagittal T2 weighted (T2w) images to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based grading system for cervical intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) and biochemical imaging with gagCEST to calculate a region-of-interest analysis of nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF). GagCEST of cervical IVDs was technically successful at 3T with significant higher gagCEST values in NP compared to AF (1.17 % ± 1.03 % vs. 0.79 % ± 1.75 %; p = 0.005). We found topological differences of gagCEST values of the cervical spine with significant higher gagCEST effects in lower IVDs (r = 1; p = 0). We could demonstrate a significant, negative correlation between gagCEST values and cervical disc degeneration of NP (r = -0.360; p = 0.019). Non-degenerated IVDs had significantly higher gagCEST effects compared to degenerated IVDs in NP (1.76 % ± 0.92 % vs. 0.52 % ± 1.17 %; p < 0.001). Biochemical imaging of cervical IVDs is feasible at 3T. GagCEST analysis demonstrated a topological GAG distribution of the cervical spine. The depletion of GAG in the NP with increasing level of morphological degeneration can be assessed using gagCEST imaging. (orig.)

  17. FORest Canopy Atmosphere Transfer (FORCAsT) 1.0: a 1-D model of biosphere-atmosphere chemical exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, K.; Chung, S. H.; Griffin, R. J.; Chen, J.; Forkel, R.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in governing atmospheric composition, mediating the concentrations of key species such as ozone and aerosol, thereby influencing air quality and climate. The exchange of reactive trace gases and their oxidation products (both gas and particle phase) is of particular importance in this process. The FORCAsT (FORest Canopy Atmosphere Transfer) 1-D model is developed to study the emission, deposition, chemistry and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their oxidation products in the atmosphere within and above the forest canopy. We include an equilibrium partitioning scheme, making FORCAsT one of the few canopy models currently capable of simulating the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) from VOC oxidation in a forest environment. We evaluate the capability of FORCAsT to reproduce observed concentrations of key gas-phase species and report modeled SOA concentrations within and above a mixed forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) during the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign in the summer of 2009. We examine the impact of two different gas-phase chemical mechanisms on modelled concentrations of short-lived primary emissions, such as isoprene and monoterpenes, and their oxidation products. While the two chemistry schemes perform similarly under high-NOx conditions, they diverge at the low levels of NOx at UMBS. We identify peroxy radical and alkyl nitrate chemistry as the key causes of the differences, highlighting the importance of this chemistry in understanding the fate of biogenic VOCs (bVOCs) for both the modelling and measurement communities.

  18. Advanced cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (cardioCEST) MRI for in vivo cell tracking and metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Ashley; Yang, Zhengshi; Ye, Shaojing; Powell, David K.; Thalman, Scott; Watt, David S.; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Unrine, Jason; Thompson, Katherine; Fornwalt, Brandon; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Vandsburger, Moriel

    2016-01-01

    An improved pre-clinical cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) pulse sequence (cardioCEST) was used to selectively visualize paramagnetic CEST (paraCEST)-labeled cells following intramyocardial implantation. In addition, cardioCEST was used to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity upon myocardial creatine CEST contrast. CEST pulse sequences were designed from standard turbo-spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences, and a cardiorespiratory-gated steady-state cine gradient-echo sequence. In vitro validation studies performed in phantoms composed of 20mM Eu-HPDO3A, 20mM Yb-HPDO3A, or saline demonstrated similar CEST contrast by spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences. Skeletal myoblast cells (C2C12) were labeled with either Eu-HPDO3A or saline using a hypotonic swelling procedure and implanted into the myocardium of C57B6/J mice. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry confirmed cellular levels of Eu of 2.1 × 10−3 ng/cell in Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells and 2.3 × 10−5 ng/cell in saline-labeled cells. In vivo cardioCEST imaging of labeled cells at ±15ppm was performed 24 h after implantation and revealed significantly elevated asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio values in regions of Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells when compared with surrounding myocardium or saline-labeled cells. We further utilized the cardioCEST pulse sequence to examine changes in myocardial creatine in response to diet-induced obesity by acquiring pairs of cardioCEST images at ±1.8 ppm. While ventricular geometry and function were unchanged between mice fed either a high-fat diet or a corresponding control low-fat diet for 14 weeks, myocardial creatine CEST contrast was significantly reduced in mice fed the high-fat diet. The selective visualization of paraCEST-labeled cells using cardioCEST imaging can enable investigation of cell fate processes in cardioregenerative medicine, or multiplex imaging of cell survival with imaging of cardiac structure and function and

  19. chemical studies and sorption behavior of some hazardous metal ions on polyacrylamide stannic (IV) molybdophosphate as 'organic - inorganic' composite cation - exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    compsite materials formed by the combination of multivalent metal acid salts and organic polymers provide a new class of (organic-inorganic) hypride ion exchangers with better mechanical and granulometric properties, good ion-exchange capacity, higher chemical and radiation stabilites, reproducibility and selectivity for heavy metals. this material was characterized using X-ray (XRD and XRF), IR, TGA-DTA and total elemental analysis studies. on the basis of distribution studies, the material has been found to be highly selective for pb(II). thermodynamic parameters (i.e δG0, δ S0 and δH0) have also been calculated for the adsorption of Pb2+, Cs+, Fe3+, Cd2+, Cu+2, Zn2+, Co2+ and Eu3+ions on polyacrylamide Sn(IV) molybdophosphate showing that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous endothermic. the mechanism of diffusion of Fe3+, Co2+, Cu+2, Zn2+, Cd2+, Cs+, Pb2+ and Eu3+ in the H-form of polyacrylamide Sn(IV) molybdophosphate composite as cation exchanger was studied as a function of particle size, concentration of the exchanging ions, reaction temperature, dring temperature and pH. the exchange rate was controlled by particle diffusion mechanism as a limited batch techneque and is confirmed from straight lines of B versus 1/r2 polts. the values of diffusion coefficients, activation energy and entropy of activation were calculated and their significance was discussed. the data obtained have been comared with that reported for other organic and inorganic exchangers.

  20. Towards standards for data exchange and integration and their impact on a public database such as CEBS (Chemical Effects in Biological Systems)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration, re-use and meta-analysis of high content study data, typical of DNA microarray studies, can increase its scientific utility. Access to study data and design parameters would enhance the mining of data integrated across studies. However, without standards for which data to include in exchange, and common exchange formats, publication of high content data is time-consuming and often prohibitive. The MGED Society ( (www.mged.org)) was formed in response to the widespread publication of microarray data, and the recognition of the utility of data re-use for meta-analysis. The NIEHS has developed the Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) database, which can manage and integrate study data and design from biological and biomedical studies. As community standards are developed for study data and metadata it will become increasingly straightforward to publish high content data in CEBS, where they will be available for meta-analysis. Different exchange formats for study data are being developed: Standard for Exchange of Nonclinical Data (SEND; (www.cdisc.org)); Tox-ML ( (www.Leadscope.com)) and Simple Investigation Formatted Text (SIFT) from the NIEHS. Data integration can be done at the level of conclusions about responsive genes and phenotypes, and this workflow is supported by CEBS. CEBS also integrates raw and preprocessed data within a given platform. The utility and a method for integrating data within and across DNA microarray studies is shown in an example analysis using DrugMatrix data deposited in CEBS by Iconix Pharmaceuticals

  1. Chemical studies on the synthesis and characterization of some ion- exchange materials and its use in the treatment of hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Now inorganic ion exchange materials play an important role in analytical chemistry, based originally on their thermal and radiation resistance as well as their stability to chemical attack.Vanadate salts are one of the main categories of inorganic ion exchange materials widely used in separation and preconcentration of some toxic and hazardous elements from different waste media. Attempts in this study are focused on the preparation of two inorganic ion exchange materials ,Tin Vanadate (SnV) and Titanium Potassium Vanadate(TiKV) for treatment of hazardous waste.These material were characterized using X-ray spectra (XRD and XRF), IR, TGA-DTA and total elemental analysis studies. On the basis of distribution studies, the materials have been found that they are highly selective for Pb(II) and Cs(I)ions. Thermodynamic parameters (i.e. ΔG, ΔS and ΔH) have also been calculated for the adsorption of Pb2+, Cs+, Fe3+, Cd2+, Cu+2, Zn2+and Co2+ ions on Tin Vanadate (SnV) and Titanium Potassium Vanadate(TiKV) showing that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The mechanism of diffusion of Fe3+, Co2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Cs+and Pb2+ ions for Tin Vanadate (SnV) and Titanium Potassium Vanadate(TiKV) as cation exchangers were studied as a function of particle size, concentration of the exchanging ions, reaction temperatures and drying temperatures. The exchange rate was controlled by a particle diffusion mechanism as a limited batch technique and is confirmed from straight lines of B versus 1/r2 plots. The values of diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation were calculated and their significance was discussed. The data obtained have been compared with that reported for other inorganic exchangers. Exchange isotherms for Cs+ ,Co2+and Cd2+ions were determined at 25, 45 and 65±1 degree C. These isotherms showed that Cs+ ,Co2+and Cd2+ are physically adsorbed. Finally, separations of the above mentioned cations on Tin Vanadate

  2. Evolution of Fe Species during the Synthesis of Over-Exchanged Fe/ZSM5 Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition of FeCl3

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Battiston, A.A.; Bitter, J.H.; Groot, F.M.F. de; Overweg, A.R.; Stephan, O; Bokhoven, J.A. van; Kooyman, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of iron in over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5 prepared via chemical vapor deposition of FeCl{3} was studied at each stage of the synthesis. Different characterization techniques (EXAFS, HR-XANES, }5{}7{Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, }2{}7{Al NMR, EELS, HR-TEM, XRD, N{2} physisorption, and FTIR spectroscopy) were applied in order to correlate the changes occurring in the local environment of the Fe atoms with migration and aggregation phenomena of iron at micro- and macroscopic scale. Mononuclea...

  3. Evolution of Fe species during the synthesis of over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5 obtained by chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3

    OpenAIRE

    Battiston, AA; Bitter, JH; de Groot, FMF; Overweg, AR; Stephan, O; van Bokhoven, JA; Kooyman, PJ; van der Spek, C.; Vanko, G.; Koningsberger, DC

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of iron in over-exchanged Fe/ZSM5 prepared via chemical vapor deposition of FeCl3 was studied at each stage of the synthesis. Different characterization techniques (EXAFS, HR-XANES, Fe-57 Mossbauer spectroscopy, Al-27 NMR, EELS, HR-TEM, XRD, N-2 physisorption, and FTIR spectroscopy) were applied in order to correlate the changes occurring in the local environment of the Fe atoms with migration and aggregation phenomena of iron at micro- and macroscopic scale. Mononuclear isolate...

  4. Method for heavy-water production by H2S--H2O chemical exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses a heavy water production stage in a bithermal H2S gas H2O liquid exchange plant wherein the cold tower is operated under temperature and pressure conditions such that H2S in the liquid phase is formed and is maintained in the separation units (sieve trays or plates) of the cold tower. It has been found that the presence of liquid H2S acts as an efficient anti-foaming agent

  5. Induction of chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and specific locus mutations by radiation and chemicals, and the application of the studies to population monitoring and risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major portion of the research of the Mammalian Cytogenetics Group can be considered to be directed towards estimating the genetic risk, and potentially the carcinogenicity, of radiation and chemical exposures to man. The approach taken is to attempt to determine the mechanism of induction of chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and specific locus mutations, and to apply the information obtained to the interpretation of data from currently used assay systems, or for the development of new, more sensitive, or more predictive, assays. This report is divided into several sections, each one representing a separate series of experiments. There is a logical progression to the sections, and there is a clear relationship between them. The sections are: (1) x-ray-induced chromosome aberrations and the involvement of repair of DNA base damage; (2) hypothesis for the mechanism of induction of chromosome aberrations; (3) the induction of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from Down's syndrome individuals; (4) the induction of chromosome aberrations by chemical agents; (5) interactive effects of radiation and chemical agents; (6) risk estimation and population monitoring; (7) the mechanism of induction of sister chromatid exchanges and specific locus mutations; and (8) studies with a transplantable mouse myeloid leukemia - an animal model. The intention of these studies is to improve our ability to extrapolate from data obtained with laboratory animals to the likely outcome in man, in order to provide estimates of the genetic, and potentially the carcinogenic, risk to man from exposures to radiation and chemical agents. There are several studies that have been recently initiated but are not reported here because of limited results so far. These particularly involve the development or improvement of assay systems to provide a greater predictive value or greater sensitivity

  6. Chemical and radiation stability of SuperLig reg-sign 644, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and CS-100 cesium ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the Initial Pretreatment Module Project within Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) under the task ''Develop and Test Sorbents.'' The purpose of the study was to assess and compare the chemical and radiolytic stability of several cesium-selective ion exchange materials in simulated alkaline Hanford tank waste matrices. Pretreatment of nuclear process wastes to remove of cesium and other radionuclides by ion exchange was proposed previously as one method of minimizing the amount of high-level radioactive waste at Hanford. In this study, PNL evaluated three cesium-selective materials SuperLig reg-sign 644, resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F), and CS-100 for chemical and radiation stability in 1 M NaOH and a simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). The objective of the study is to investigate the stability of the newly produced SuperLig reg-sign 644 under a variety of conditions in an attempt to simulate and predict the degradation process. The following specific conclusions and recommendations resulted from the study

  7. Water-soluble gold nanoclusters prepared by protein-ligand interaction as fluorescent probe for real-time assay of pyrophosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hao-Hua; Wang, Fei-Fei; Shi, Xiao-Qiong; Peng, Hua-Ping; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-15

    This paper reports a new and facile method for the synthesis of water-soluble thiolate-protected AuNCs via protein-ligand interaction. Using 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a model ligand and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein, water-soluble AuNCs (BSA/MPA-AuNCs) with intense orange-yellow fluorescent emission (quantum yield=16%) are obtained. Results show that AuNCs produced with this method have hydrophobic interactions with BSA. The synthetic strategy is then successfully extended to produce water-soluble AuNCs protected by other thiolates. Moreover, a sensitive and eco-friendly sensing system is established for detection of the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase), which relies on the selective coordination of Fe(3+)with BSA/MPA-AuNCs, the higher affinity between pyrophosphate (PPi) and Fe(3+), and the hydrolysis of PPi by PPase. A good linearity between the fluorescence intensity and PPase activity within the range from 0.1 to 3U/L is found, with a detection limit down to 0.07U/L. Additionally, the fluorescent assay developed here is utilized to assay the PPase activity in real biological samples and as well as to evaluate PPase inhibitor, illustrating the great potential for biological analysis. PMID:27093483

  8. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  9. Cleaning chemical and mechanical of heat exchangers in french nuclear plants; Limpieza mecanica y quimica de intercambiadores de calor en centrales nucleares francesas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, J. t.; Guerra, P.; Carreres, C.

    2013-03-01

    This project was carried out under the frame of the approval of LAINSA as a supplier of EDF in France. The inspection performed on systems called the moisture separator reheaters (GSS) of CPO series reactor of EDF nuclear power plants has shown evidence of significant clogging due to deposits of magnetite inside the tubes of tube bundle. The pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the heating was close to maximum design criterion. This effect could result in equipment damage and loss of plant productivity. The aim of the work was the design, development, approval and implementation of a procedure for un blocking the tubes of the GSS respecting the integrity of materials and ensuring the harmlessness of cleaning procedures. The procedure used was to completely remove magnetite deposits in order to recover a passage diameter and a surface finish equivalent to the origin, thus avoiding the replacement of the GSS and obtaining a considerable reduction of costs. The achieve these objectives we have developed a procedure that is basically a mechanical pre-cleaning of all tubes of the GSS in order to unblock tem, followed by a chemical cleaning where magnetite is dissolved and crawled out of the tube bundle. The main results were: -Corrosion less than 10 microns. 100-110 Kg of magnetite removed by heat exchanger. -Final pressure drop similar to that of new equipment. -Waste water: 70 m{sup 3} per exchanger, which were managed by an authorized waste management company. This procedure has been applied successfully in 14 GSS type heat exchangers in Fessenheim and Bugey nuclear power plants in France between 2009 and 2011. This project demonstrates that the long experience of LAINSA in the Spanish nuclear industry along with the knowledge and experience in chemical cleaning of SOLARCA, have served to successfully work demanding and mature markets such as the French nuclear market, solving the problem of deposits of magnetite with an effective and safe method for the treated

  10. Intracellular water exchange for measuring the dry mass, water mass and changes in chemical composition of living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Feijó Delgado

    Full Text Available We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cell's buoyant mass sequentially in an H2O-based fluid and a D2O-based fluid. Rapid exchange of intracellular H2O for D2O renders the cell's water content neutrally buoyant in both measurements, and thus the paired measurements yield the mass and density of the cell's dry material alone. Utilizing this same property of rapid water exchange, we also demonstrate the quantification of intracellular water mass. In a population of E. coli, we paired these measurements to estimate the percent dry weight by mass and volume. We then focused on cellular dry density - the average density of all cellular biomolecules, weighted by their relative abundances. Given that densities vary across biomolecule types (RNA, DNA, protein, we investigated whether we could detect changes in biomolecular composition in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells. In E. coli, and S. cerevisiae, dry density increases from stationary to exponential phase, consistent with previously known increases in the RNA/protein ratio from up-regulated ribosome production. For mammalian cells, changes in growth conditions cause substantial shifts in dry density, suggesting concurrent changes in the protein, nucleic acid and lipid content of the cell.

  11. No oxygen isotope exchange between water and APS-sulfate at surface temperature: Evidence from quantum chemical modeling and triple-oxygen isotope experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Issaku E.; Asatryan, Rubik; Bao, Huiming

    2012-10-01

    In both laboratory experiments and natural environments where microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction (MDSR) occurs in a closed system, the δ34S ((34S/32S)sample/(34S/32S)standard - 1) for dissolved SO42- has been found to follow a typical Rayleigh-Distillation path. In contrast, the corresponding δ18O ((18O/16O)sample/(18O/16O)standard) - 1) is seen to plateau with an apparent enrichment of between 23‰ and 29‰ relative to that of ambient water under surface conditions. This apparent steady-state in the observed difference between δ18O and δ18OO can be attributed to any of these three steps: (1) the formation of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS) from ATP and SO42-, (2) oxygen exchange between sulfite (or other downstream sulfoxy-anions) and water later in the MDSR reaction chain and its back reaction to APS and sulfate, and (3) the re-oxidation of produced H2S or precursor sulfoxy-anions to sulfate in environments containing Fe(III) or O2. This study examines the first step as a potential pathway for water oxygen incorporation into sulfate. We examined the structures and process of APS formation using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) hybrid density functional theory, implemented in the Gaussian-03 program suite, to predict the potential for oxygen exchange. We conducted a set of in vitro, enzyme-catalyzed, APS formation experiments (with no further reduction to sulfite) to determine the degree of oxygen isotope exchange between the APS-sulfate and water. Triple-oxygen-isotope labeled water was used in the reactor solutions to monitor oxygen isotope exchange between water and APS sulfate. The formation and hydrolysis of APS were identified as potential steps for oxygen exchange with water to occur. Quantum chemical modeling indicates that the combination of sulfate with ATP has effects on bond strength and symmetry of the sulfate. However, these small effects impart little influence on the integrity of the SO42- tetrahedron due to the high activation energy required for

  12. Modeling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behavior of ion exchange resins encapsulated into a cement-based matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange resins (IER) are widely used in the nuclear industry to purge non directly storable infected effluents. IER then become a solid waste which could be stored as any classical nuclear waste. One way of conditioning consists in embedding it into a cement paste matrix. This process raises some concerns regarding the cohesiveness of the composite. Once embedded, the IER might indeed interact with the cement paste which would lead, in some cases, to the swelling of the composite. This thesis has been set up to address this potential issue, with the aim to develop a numerical tool able to predict the mechanical behavior of this kind of material. This work only focuses on the long term behavior and more specifically on the potential degradations of the cement paste/IER composite due to cationic IER. (author)

  13. Surface Chemical Composition Effect on Internal Gas Flow and Molecular Heat Exchange in a Gas-Solids System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhov, Alexander; Borisov, Sergey; Porodnov, Boris

    2011-05-01

    On the basis of classical knowledge about movement of atoms and lattice theory of F. Goodman and G. Wachman the program modeling helium atom interaction with a three-dimensional crystal tungsten lattice taking into account partial surface covering by chemisorbed oxygen atoms is developed. An efficiency of molecular heat exchange of helium for pure and partially chemisorbed tungsten surface is calculated for different temperatures. Similar model of the surface and procedure of calculations have been applied for description of free-molecular gas flow in long cylindrical channel with clean and fully chemisorbed metal surface. Within the limits of the developed approach the results of calculations for both problems agree well with available experiments with surface contamination control.

  14. Quantum chemical ab initio prediction of proton exchange barriers between CH4 and different H-zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Christian; Sauer, Joachim

    2015-09-14

    A hybrid MP2:DFT (second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory-density functional theory) method that combines MP2 calculations for cluster models with DFT calculations for the full periodic structure is used to localize minima and transition structures for proton jumps at different Brønsted sites in different frameworks (chabazite, faujasite, ferrierite, and ZSM-5) and at different crystallographic positions of a given framework. The MP2 limit for the periodic structures is obtained by extrapolating the results of a series of cluster models of increasing size. A coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) correction to MP2 energies is calculated for cluster models consisting of three tetrahedra. For the adsorption energies, this difference is small, between 0.1 and 0.9 kJ/mol, but for the intrinsic proton exchange barriers, this difference makes a significant (10.85 ± 0.25 kJ/mol) and almost constant contribution across different systems. The total values of the adsorption energies vary between 22 and 34 kJ/mol, whereas the total proton exchange energy barriers fall in the narrow range of 152-156 kJ/mol. After adding nuclear motion contributions (harmonic approximation, 298 K), intrinsic enthalpy barriers between 134 and 141 kJ/mol and apparent energy barriers between 105 and 118 kJ/mol are predicted for the different sites examined for the different frameworks. These predictions are consistent with experimental results available for faujasite, ferrierite, and ZSM-5. PMID:26374003

  15. BDflex: A method for efficient treatment of molecular flexibility in calculating protein-ligand binding rate constants from Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greives, Nicholas; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-10-01

    A method developed by Northrup et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 1517 (1984)], 10.1063/1.446900 for calculating protein-ligand binding rate constants (ka) from Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations has been widely used for rigid molecules. Application to flexible molecules is limited by the formidable computational cost to treat conformational fluctuations during the long BD simulations necessary for ka calculation. Here, we propose a new method called BDflex for ka calculation that circumvents this problem. The basic idea is to separate the whole space into an outer region and an inner region, and formulate ka as the product of kE and bar η _d, which are obtained by separately solving exterior and interior problems. kE is the diffusion-controlled rate constant for the ligand in the outer region to reach the dividing surface between the outer and inner regions; in this exterior problem conformational fluctuations can be neglected. bar η _d is the probability that the ligand, starting from the dividing surface, will react at the binding site rather than escape to infinity. The crucial step in reducing the determination of bar η _d to a problem confined to the inner region is a radiation boundary condition imposed on the dividing surface; the reactivity on this boundary is proportional to kE. By confining the ligand to the inner region and imposing the radiation boundary condition, we avoid multiple-crossing of the dividing surface before reaction at the binding site and hence dramatically cut down the total simulation time, making the treatment of conformational fluctuations affordable. BDflex is expected to have wide applications in problems where conformational fluctuations of the molecules are crucial for productive ligand binding, such as in cases where transient widening of a bottleneck allows the ligand to access the binding pocket, or the binding site is properly formed only after ligand entrance induces the closure of a lid.

  16. Chemical and radiation stability of a proprietary cesium ion exchange material manufactured from WWL membrane and SuperLig{reg_sign} 644

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Berry, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Pretreatment of nuclear process wastes for ion exchange removal of Cs and other radionuclides is one way to minimize amount of high-level radioactive waste at Hanford. This study evaluated Cs-selective SuperLig{reg_sign}644 (IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork UT) entrapped in a proprietary WWL web membrane (3M) for chemical/radiation stability in simulated caustic neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), 0.5M HNO{sub 3}, water, and air. After exposure up to 2.0E+09 rad, the material was evaluated for Cs uptake in 5M sodium NCAW simulants with varying Cs contents. Radiolytic stability appears to be sufficient for ion exchange pretreatment of radioactive Cs: essentially no decrease in Cs selectivity or loading (Kd) was observed during {sup 60}Cs gamma irradiation in water or 0.5M HNO{sub 3} up to 1.0E+09 rad. Cs Kd decreased by a factor of 2 after 2.0E+09 rad exposure. Cs Kd did not change during irradiation in 5M NCAW or ambient air up to 1.0E+08 rad, but decreased by more than an order of magnitude between 1.0E+08 and 2.0E+09 rad (not typical of process conditions). Chemical stability under caustic conditions is lower than in air or under neutral/acidic conditions. Results indicate that this material is less stable in caustic solution irrespective of radiation exposure. Samples of the membrane retained their physical form throughout the entire experiment and were only slightly brittle after exposure to 2.0E+09 rad. (The material evaluated was a finely ground (400 mesh) particulate engineered to form a polymeric fiber (WWL), not the macroscopic form of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 resin (20 to 50 mesh).)

  17. Chemical and radiation stability of a proprietary cesium ion exchange material manufactured from WWL membrane and SuperLig reg-sign 644

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretreatment of nuclear process wastes for ion exchange removal of Cs and other radionuclides is one way to minimize amount of high-level radioactive waste at Hanford. This study evaluated Cs-selective SuperLig reg-sign 644 (IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork UT) entrapped in a proprietary WWL web membrane (3M) for chemical/radiation stability in simulated caustic neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), 0.5M HNO3, water, and air. After exposure up to 2.0E+09 rad, the material was evaluated for Cs uptake in 5M sodium NCAW simulants with varying Cs contents. Radiolytic stability appears to be sufficient for ion exchange pretreatment of radioactive Cs: essentially no decrease in Cs selectivity or loading (Kd) was observed during 60Cs gamma irradiation in water or 0.5M HNO3 up to 1.0E+09 rad. Cs Kd decreased by a factor of 2 after 2.0E+09 rad exposure. Cs Kd did not change during irradiation in 5M NCAW or ambient air up to 1.0E+08 rad, but decreased by more than an order of magnitude between 1.0E+08 and 2.0E+09 rad (not typical of process conditions). Chemical stability under caustic conditions is lower than in air or under neutral/acidic conditions. Results indicate that this material is less stable in caustic solution irrespective of radiation exposure. Samples of the membrane retained their physical form throughout the entire experiment and were only slightly brittle after exposure to 2.0E+09 rad. (The material evaluated was a finely ground (400 mesh) particulate engineered to form a polymeric fiber (WWL), not the macroscopic form of SuperLig reg-sign 644 resin (20 to 50 mesh).)

  18. Modelling of the interaction between chemical and mechanical behaviour of ion exchange resins incorporated into a cement-based matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bescop P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a predictive model, based on experimental data, to determine the macroscopic mechanical behavior of a material made up of ion exchange resins solidified into a CEM III cement paste. Some observations have shown that in some cases, a significant macroscopic expansion of this composite material may be expected, due to internal pressures generated in the resin. To build the model, we made the choice to break down the problem in two scale’s studies. The first deals with the mechanical behavior of the different heterogeneities of the composite, i.e. the resin and the cement paste. The second upscales the information from the heterogeneities to the Representative Elementary Volume (REV of the composite. The heterogeneities effects are taken into account in the REV by applying a homogenization method derived from the Eshelby theory combined with an interaction coefficient drawn from the poroelasticity theory. At the first scale, from the second thermodynamic law, a formulation is developed to estimate the resin microscopic swelling. The model response is illustrated on a simple example showing the impact of the calculated internal pressure, on the macroscopic strain.

  19. Mixed ion-exchanger chemically modified carbon paste ion-selective electrodes for determination of triprolidine hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Yousry M. Issa; Fekria M. Abu Attia; Nahla S. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Triprolidine hydrochloride (TpCl) ion-selective carbon paste electrodes were constructed using Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA as ion-exchangers. The two electrodes revealed Nernstian responses with slopes of 58.4 and 58.1 mV decade−1 at 25 °C in the ranges 6 × 10−6–1 × 10−2 and 2 × 10−5–1 × 10−2 M for Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA, respectively. The potentials of these electrodes were independent of pH in the ranges of 2.5–7.0 and 4.5–7.0, and detection limits were 6 × 10−6 and 1 × 10−5 M ...

  20. Isolation of cell nuclei in microchannels by short-term chemical treatment via two-step carrier medium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Kaori; Yamada, Masumi; Seki, Minoru

    2012-08-01

    Separation/purification of nuclei from cells is a critical process required for medical and biochemical research applications. Here, we report a flow-through microfluidic device for isolating cell nuclei by selectively digesting the cell membrane by using the concept of hydrodynamic filtration (HDF). When a cell suspension is continuously introduced into a microchannel (main channel) possessing multiple side channels, cells flow through the main channel, whereas the carrier medium of the cells is drained through the side channels. Introductions of a cell treatment solution containing a surfactant and a washing buffer enable the two-step exchange of the carrier-medium and the cell treatment by the surfactant for a short span of time. The precise control of the treatment time by changing the flow rate and/or the size of the microchannel enables the selective digestion of cell membranes, resulting in the isolation of cell nuclei after separation from membrane debris and cytoplasmic components according to size. We examined several surfactant molecules and demonstrated that Triton X-100 exhibited high efficiency regarding nucleus isolation for both adherent (HeLa) and nonadherent (JM) cells, with a recovery ratio of ~80 %. In addition, the isolation efficiency was evaluated by western blotting. The presented flow-through microfluidic cell-nucleus separator may be a useful tool for general biological applications, because of its simplicity in operation, high reproducibility, and accuracy. PMID:22544390

  1. Chemical Studies on the Retention of some Heavy Metals from Simulated Waste Water using Polymeric Species Impregnated Inorganic Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retention of some toxic heavy metals such as Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ ions from simulated waste water was carried out by poly (acrylamide-acrylic acid ) impregnated silicon titanate as inorganic ion exchanger [P (AM-AA)-SiTi). X-ray fluorescence technique was used for the follow of the dissociation of the matrix. The data obtained indicated that impregnated silicon titanate are stable in low pH range and the dissociation of silicon titanate from the polymeric resin was appeared after pH 3-4. Sorption isotherms and capacities of P(AM-AA)-SiTi for Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ ions were determined. Effects of some salts and complexing agents on the sorption behaviour of the studied elements on P(AM-AA)-SiTi were investigated. Finally, separation of Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ ions from simulated waste water was carried out using column technique

  2. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of ZrO2 nanoparticles and their application to improve the chemical stability of Nafion membrane in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Vatanparast, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    Zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) nanoparticles were fabricated successfully via ultrasonic-assisted method using ZrO(NO3)2·H2O, ethylenediamine and hydrazine as precursors in aqueous solution. Morphology, structure and composition of the obtained products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Then, the synthesized nanoparticles were used to prepare Nafion/ZrO2 nanocomposite membranes. The properties of the membranes were studied by ion exchange capacity (IEC) proton conductivity (σ), thermal stability and water uptake measurements. The ex-situ Fenton's test was used to investigate the chemical stability of the membranes. From our results, compared with Nafion membrane, the nanocomposite membrane exhibited lower fluoride release and weight loss. Therefore, it can concluded that Nafion/ZrO2 nanocomposite exhibit more chemical stability than the pure Nafion membrane. ATR-FTIR spectra and SEM surface images of membranes also confirm these results. PMID:27544443

  3. Mixed ion-exchanger chemically modified carbon paste ion-selective electrodes for determination of triprolidine hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousry M. Issa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Triprolidine hydrochloride (TpCl ion-selective carbon paste electrodes were constructed using Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA as ion-exchangers. The two electrodes revealed Nernstian responses with slopes of 58.4 and 58.1 mV decade−1 at 25 °C in the ranges 6 × 10−6–1 × 10−2 and 2 × 10−5–1 × 10−2 M for Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA, respectively. The potentials of these electrodes were independent of pH in the ranges of 2.5–7.0 and 4.5–7.0, and detection limits were 6 × 10−6 and 1 × 10−5 M for Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN and Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA, respectively. The electrodes showed a very good selectivity for TpCl with respect to a large number of inorganic cations and compounds. The standard addition, potentiometric titration methods and FIA were applied to the determination of TpCl in pure solutions and pharmaceutical preparations. The results obtained were in close agreement with those found by the official method. The mean recovery values were 100.91% and 97.92% with low coefficient of variation values of 0.94%, and 0.56% in pure solutions, 99.82% and 98.53% with coefficient of variation values of 2.20%, and 0.73% for Actifed tablet and Actifed syrup, respectively, using the Tp-TPB/Tp-CoN electrode, and 98.85%, and 99.18% with coefficient of variation values of 0.48% and 0.85% for Actifed tablet and Actifed syrup, respectively, using the Tp-TPB/Tp-PTA electrode.

  4. Investigation into the Cause of Spontaneous Emulsification of a Free Steel Droplet; Validation of the Chemical Exchange Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Stephen; Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Fruehan, Richard; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-05-01

    Small Fe-based droplets have been heated to a molten phase suspended within a slag medium to replicate a partial environment within the basic oxygen furnace (BOF). The confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) has been used as a heating platform to interrogate the effect of impurities and their transfer across the metal/slag interface, on the emulsification of the droplet into the slag medium. The samples were then examined through X-ray computer tomography (XCT) giving the mapping of emulsion dispersion in 3D space, calculating the changing of interfacial area between the two materials, and changes of material volume due to material transfer between metal and slag. Null experiments to rule out thermal gradients being the cause of emulsification have been conducted as well as replication of the previously reported study by Assis et al.[1] which has given insights into the mechanism of emulsification. Finally chemical analysis was conducted to discover the transfer of oxygen to be the cause of emulsification, leading to a new study of a system with undergoing oxygen equilibration.

  5. Targeting of chemical mutagens to differentiating B-lymphocytes in vivo: detection by direct DNA labeling and sister chromatid exchange induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, S.E.; Nanna, U.C.; Dietert, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo systems for analyzing mutagen interactions with a specific differentiating cell population are rare. Taking advantage of the unique anatomical features of the bursa of Fabricius in the chicken, the authors explored the possibility of targeting chemical mutagens to a defined differentiating cell population in the animal, namely, the B-lymphocytes series. Such cells are known to be the targets for the oncogene-activating avian leukosis virus. Targeting of chemicals to cells of the bursa was demonstrated by application of the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to the anal lips of neonatal chicks. Bright nuclear fluorescence of cells in the bursa demonstrated to occur within minutes after the application of 500..mu..l of DAPI. DAPI labeling of nuclei was detected up to several days after a single application. No nuclear labeling was exhibited in cells of neighboring tissues. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)(10..mu..l) was applied to the anal lips of day-old chicks to study dose-response kinetics for mutagen targeting to DNA of dividing B-lymphocytes in the bursa. Since the mitotic index was found to be quite high (25-30%) in the bursa, chromosome analysis was used to assay for genome damage. Sister chromatid exchange frequencies of 3.9, 7.3, and 9.0 (baseline 2.5) per cell were obtained at MMS dosages per animal of 50 ..mu..g, 100..mu..g, and 200..mu..g, respectively. These results indicate the rapid and quantitative localization of DNA-binding chemicals to cells of the bursa, particularly the resident B-lymphocytes. The bursa should be a useful system for studying mutagen-DNA interactions in the differentiating B-lymphocyte and subsequent influences on the development of immunity and lymphoproliferative disease.

  6. Targeting of chemical mutagens to differentiating B-lymphocytes in vivo: detection by direct DNA labeling and sister chromatid exchange induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo systems for analyzing mutagen interactions with a specific differentiating cell population are rare. Taking advantage of the unique anatomical features of the bursa of Fabricius in the chicken, the authors explored the possibility of targeting chemical mutagens to a defined differentiating cell population in the animal, namely, the B-lymphocytes series. Such cells are known to be the targets for the oncogene-activating avian leukosis virus. Targeting of chemicals to cells of the bursa was demonstrated by application of the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) to the anal lips of neonatal chicks. Bright nuclear fluorescence of cells in the bursa demonstrated to occur within minutes after the application of 500μl of DAPI. DAPI labeling of nuclei was detected up to several days after a single application. No nuclear labeling was exhibited in cells of neighboring tissues. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)(10μl) was applied to the anal lips of day-old chicks to study dose-response kinetics for mutagen targeting to DNA of dividing B-lymphocytes in the bursa. Since the mitotic index was found to be quite high (25-30%) in the bursa, chromosome analysis was used to assay for genome damage. Sister chromatid exchange frequencies of 3.9, 7.3, and 9.0 (baseline 2.5) per cell were obtained at MMS dosages per animal of 50 μg, 100μg, and 200μg, respectively. These results indicate the rapid and quantitative localization of DNA-binding chemicals to cells of the bursa, particularly the resident B-lymphocytes. The bursa should be a useful system for studying mutagen-DNA interactions in the differentiating B-lymphocyte and subsequent influences on the development of immunity and lymphoproliferative disease

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of ten docking programs on a diverse set of protein-ligand complexes: the prediction accuracy of sampling power and scoring power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Sun, Huiyong; Yao, Xiaojun; Li, Dan; Xu, Lei; Li, Youyong; Tian, Sheng; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-05-14

    As one of the most popular computational approaches in modern structure-based drug design, molecular docking can be used not only to identify the correct conformation of a ligand within the target binding pocket but also to estimate the strength of the interaction between a target and a ligand. Nowadays, as a variety of docking programs are available for the scientific community, a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and limitations of each docking program is fundamentally important to conduct more reasonable docking studies and docking-based virtual screening. In the present study, based on an extensive dataset of 2002 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBbind database (version 2014), the performance of ten docking programs, including five commercial programs (LigandFit, Glide, GOLD, MOE Dock, and Surflex-Dock) and five academic programs (AutoDock, AutoDock Vina, LeDock, rDock, and UCSF DOCK), was systematically evaluated by examining the accuracies of binding pose prediction (sampling power) and binding affinity estimation (scoring power). Our results showed that GOLD and LeDock had the best sampling power (GOLD: 59.8% accuracy for the top scored poses; LeDock: 80.8% accuracy for the best poses) and AutoDock Vina had the best scoring power (rp/rs of 0.564/0.580 and 0.569/0.584 for the top scored poses and best poses), suggesting that the commercial programs did not show the expected better performance than the academic ones. Overall, the ligand binding poses could be identified in most cases by the evaluated docking programs but the ranks of the binding affinities for the entire dataset could not be well predicted by most docking programs. However, for some types of protein families, relatively high linear correlations between docking scores and experimental binding affinities could be achieved. To our knowledge, this study has been the most extensive evaluation of popular molecular docking programs in the last five years. It is expected that our work

  8. Effects of field-applied composted cattle manure and chemical fertilizer on ammonia and particulate ammonium exchanges at an upland field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Koga, Nobuhisa; Yanai, Yosuke

    The present study aimed to investigate the NH 3 volatilization loss from field-applied compost and chemical fertilizer and evaluate the atmosphere-land exchange of NH 3 and particulate NH 4+ (pNH 4) at an upland field with volcanic ash soil (Andosol) in Hokkaido, northern Japan. Two-step basal fertilization was conducted on the bare soil surface. First, a moderately fermented compost of cattle manure was applied by surface incorporation (mixing depth, 0-15 cm) at a rate of 117 kg N ha -1 as total nitrogen (T-N) corresponding to 9.9 kg N ha -1 as ammoniacal nitrogen (NH 4-N). Twelve days later, a chemical fertilizer containing 10% (w/w) of NH 4-N as a mixture of ammonium sulfate and ammonium phosphates was applied by row placement (cover depth, 3 cm) at a rate of 100 kg N ha -1 as NH 4-N. The study period was divided into the first-half, beginning after the compost application (CCM period), and the second-half, beginning after the chemical fertilizer application (CF period). The mean air concentrations of NH 3 and pNH 4 (1.5 m height) were 7.6 and 3.0 μg N m -3, respectively, in the CCM period; the values were 3.7 and 3.9 μg N m -3, respectively, in the CF period. The composition ratios of NH 3 to the sum of NH 3 and pNH 4 (1.5 m height) were 72% and 49% in the CCM and CF periods, respectively. The NH 3 volatilization loss from the compost was 0.8% of the applied T-N (or 9.3% of the applied NH 4-N) and that from the chemical fertilizer was near zero. Excluding the period immediately after the compost application, the upland field acted as a net sink for NH 3 and pNH 4.

  9. Screening protein-ligand interactions using {sup 1}H NMR techniques for detecting the ligand; Mapeamento das interacoes proteina-ligante atraves de tecnicas de RMN de {sup 1}H utilizando deteccao do ligante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Isis Martins; Marsaioli, Anita Jocelyne [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica]. E-mail: anita@iqm.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    NMR is a valuable screening tool for the binding of ligands to proteins providing structural information on both protein and ligands and is thus largely applied to drug-discovery. Among the recent NMR techniques to probe weak binding protein-ligand complexes we have critically evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of STD (Saturation Transfer Difference), WaterLOGSY (Water Ligand Observation with Gradient Spectroscopy), NOE pumping and DOSY-NOESY (Diffusion-Ordered NOESY) using a mixture of BSA (bovine serum albumin) plus salicylic acid, caffeine, citric acid, adipic acid and D-glucose. (author)

  10. Vertical exchange and chemical conversion of trace elements over topographically complex terrain; Vertikaler Austausch und chemische Umwandlung von Spurenstoffen ueber topographisch gegliedertem Gelaende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntze, K.

    2001-10-01

    The influence of topography on the vertical exchange of trace elements was investigated with the aid of a numeric simulation model. It is a couopled 3D model consisting of the mesoscale model KAMM and the dispersion model DRAIS, extended by the gaseous phase mechanism of the RADM model. This way, both meteorological and chemical processes can be analyzed in a preselected time and spatial resolution. The simulations were validated by a comparison with measurements made during the TRACT campaign. Satisfactory agreement between the two was established. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde der Einfluss der Topographie auf den vertikalen Austausch von Spurenstoffen mit Hilfe eines numerischen Simulationsmodells untersucht. Bei dem Simulationsmodell handelt es sich um ein dreidimensionales gekoppeltes Modell, welches aus dem mesoskaligen Modell KAMM und dem um den Gasphasenmechanismus des RADM-Modells erweiterten Ausbreitungsmodell DRAIS besteht. Mit diesem Modellsystem war es moeglich, sowohl meterologische als auch chemische Prozesse in einer vorher gewaehlten zeitlichen und raeumlichen Aufloesung zu betrachten. Um die Qualitaet der Simulation und damit deren Verwendbarkeit fuer die Untersuchungen festzustellen, wurde ein Vergleich mit Messungen durchgefuehrt. Dazu wurden berechnete meterologische und chemische Groessen mit den waehrend der Feldmesskampagne TRACT gemessenen Groessen verglichen. Der Vergleich der simulierten Groessen sowohl mit Radiosondenaufstiegen als auch mit Zeitreihen und Flugzeugmessungen lieferte eine gute Uebereinstimmung. (orig.)

  11. Quantum Chemical and FTIR Spectroscopic Studies on the Linkage Isomerism of Carbon Monoxide in Alkali-Metal-Exchanged Zeolites: A Review of Current Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garrone

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: When adsorbed (at a low temperature on alkali-metal-exchanged zeolites, CO forms both M(CO+ and M(OC+ carbonyl species with the extra-framework alkali-metal cation of the zeolite. Both quantum chemical and experimental results show that C-bondend adducts are characterized by a C−O stretching IR band at a frequency higher than that of 2143 cm-1 for free CO, while for O-bonded adducts this IR band appears below 2143 cm-1. The cation-CO interaction energy is higher for M(CO+ than for M(OC+ carbonyls, although the corresponding difference decreases substantially when going from Li+ to Cs+. By means of variable-temperature FTIR spectroscopy, this energy difference was determined for several alkali-metal cations, and the existence of a thermal equilibrium between M(CO+ and M(OC+ species was established. The current state of research in this field is reviewed here, with a view to gain more insight into the thermal isomerization process.

  12. Gas exchange, growth, and chemical parameters in a native Atlantic forest tree species in polluted areas of Cubatão, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, R M; Delitti, W B C; Moraes, J A P V

    2003-03-01

    The Atlantic forest species near the industrial complex of Cubatão, Brazil have been subjected to heavy air pollution for decades. In this study, we used some physiological parameters (gas exchange, growth and chemical contents) to biomonitor the effects of air pollution on Tibouchina pulchra, one of the most common tree species in this forest. Under standardized conditions, saplings were exposed to the environment from April to July and from July to September of 1998, at three different sites in the vicinity of the industrial complex: the Valley of Pilões River (VP), the control area; the Valley of Mogi River (VM), near fertilizer, metallurgical, and cement industries sustaining high concentrations of fluorides, N and S oxides, and particulate materials; and Caminho do Mar (CM), near petrochemical industries under N and S oxides, photooxidants, and organic compounds. Plants exposed to CM and VM conditions presented visible injuries, reductions in net photosynthesis, growth parameters, and ascorbate concentrations, and increased F, N, and S foliar concentrations. These results indicate that the environmental conditions around these industries are still harmful to plants. PMID:12651190

  13. Characterization of protein/ligand interactions by {sup 1}H/{sup 3}H exchange: application to the hAsf{sup 1}/ histone H{sup 3} complex; Caracterisation des interactions proteine / ligand par echange {sup 1}H/{sup 3}H: application au complexe entre la proteine hAsf{sup 1} et l'histone H{sup 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, G

    2007-05-15

    In the first chapter will be exposed the main current methods of identification to high debit of the interactions protein-protein. Then the methods allowing to characterize the surfaces of interaction or to determine the structures of the complexes will be listed by discussing the main advantages and the inconveniences. Our approach of characterization of the zones of interaction protein-protein is a method of 'foot-printing' 1, based on the identification and radicals' quantification formed on the residues of proteins accessible to the water. The second chapter will so discuss the development of this method of radical identification using the atom of tritium as radioactive label. Our approach will finally be validated in the third chapter by applying it to the characterization of amino acids involved in the interaction enter the human protein anti silencing factor 1 (hAsf11-156) and a fragment of the histone H{sup 3}. (N.C.)

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MR Imaging Is Superior to Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Diagnosis and Severity Evaluation of Parkinson's Disease: a Study on Substantia Nigra and Striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by nigrostriatal cell loss. To date the diagnosis of PD is still based primarily on the clinical manifestations which may be typical and obvious only in advanced-stage PD. Thus, it is crucial to find a reliable marker for the diagnosis of PD. We conducted this study to assess the diagnostic efficiency of chemical-exchange-saturation-transfer (CEST imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI in PD at 3 Tesla by evaluating changes on substantia nigra and striatum. Twenty-three PD patients and twenty-three age-matched normal controls were recruited. All patients and controls were imaged on a 3 Tesla MR system, using an 8-channel head coil. CEST imaging was acquired in two transverse slices of the head, including substantia nigra and striatum. The magnetization-transfer-ratio asymmetry at 3.5 ppm, MTRasym(3.5ppm, and the total CEST signal intensity between 0 and 4 ppm were calculated. Multi-slice DTI was acquired for all the patients and normal controls. Quantitative analysis was performed on the substantia nigra, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate. The MTRasym(3.5ppm value, the total CEST signal intensity and fractional anisotropy (FA value of the substantia nigra were all significantly lower in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.003, P = 0.004 and P < 0.001, respectively. The MTRasym(3.5ppm values of the putamen and the caudate were significantly higher in PD patients than in normal controls (P = 0.010 and P = 0.009, respectively. There were no significant differences for the mean diffusivity (MD in these four regions between PD patients and normal controls. In conclusion, CEST MR imaging provided multiple CEST image contrasts in the substantia nigra and the striatum in PD and may be superior to DTI in the diagnosis of PD.

  16. Changes of mineralogical-chemical composition, cation exchange capacity, and phosphate immobilization capacity during the hydrothermal conversion process of coal fly ash into zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyi Wu; Yanming Sui; Xuechu Chen; Shengbing He; Xinze Wang; Hainan Kong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2008-08-15

    In the search for a technique to augment the nutrient removal capacity of zeolite synthesized from fly ash (ZFA), the present study investigated the changes of mineralogical-chemical composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and phosphate immobilization capacity (PIC) during the synthesis process. The ZFAs were obtained as a function of temperature (40-120{sup o}C), liquid/solid ratio (1-18 ml/g), NaOH concentration (0.5-4 mol/L) and reaction time (2-72 h). The formation of low-silica zeolites (P1, hydroxysodalite, and chabazite) and the stability of mullite were observed, causing a marked decrease in SiO{sub 2} content but roughly no change in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content during the synthesis process. The decrease in K{sub 2}O, MgO content and the insignificant change in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} content were related to the solubility of the oxides while the increase in Na{sub 2}O and CaO was due to the increase in CEC. A high CEC was achieved under a high temperature, a high liquid/solid ratio, a long reaction time, and an appropriate NaOH concentration (2 mol/L), while a maximum PIC was achieved under relatively mild synthesis conditions instead (e.g., a reasonably short reaction time 10 h). This discrepancy was explained by the fact that different controlling factors/components in ZFA are responsible for CEC (content and kind of zeolite) and PIC (Ca component, specific surface area, and dissociated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Barter exchanges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    Although barter is often perceived as something that proceeded money, barter is still used. The focus of the paper is on barter exchanges. Barter exchanges are used both in developing countries as well as in developed countries (including the U.S.). They are used by both organizations and...... individuals. They usually allow to exchange good but some include also services. Some exchanges allow only for bi-directional barter, i.e. when only two parties are involved in the exchange. But probably most of the barter exchanges use barter money; this makes it easier to exchange goods and services as the...

  18. Development of novel strategy for the synthesis of organometallic compounds usable as protein ligands: application to the human cyclophilin hCyp-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a new strategy for the development of bioactive organometallic compounds, basing on the combinatorial assembly of sub-chemical libraries (A and B) independent but complementary and able to coordinate a metallic heart M to form A-M-B complex potential ligands of biomolecules. The coordination of metals, well adapted to the production of molecular variety is usually used in medicinal chemistry, in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Among the useful elements, the rhenium and the technetium are metals of choice for the development of the assembly strategy because of their chemical and radiochemical properties and of the structure analogy of their complexes. This strategy was validated in vitro. The protein chosen for this purpose was the cyclophilin hCyp-18. (N.C.)

  19. Adaptive predictive control of laboratory heat exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Bobál, Vladimír; Kubalčík, Marek; Dostál, Petr; Novák, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Heat exchange belongs to the class of basic thermal processes which occur in a range of industrial technologies, particularly in the energetic, chemical, polymer and rubber industry. The process of heat exchange is often implemented by through-flow heat exchangers. It is apparent that for an exact theoretical description of dynamics of heat exchange processes it is necessary to use partial differential equations. Heat exchange is namely a process with distributed parameters. It is also necess...

  20. Tunneling chemical exchange reaction $\\textrm{D}+\\textrm{HD}\\rightarrow\\textrm{D}_{2}+\\textrm{H}$ in solid HD at temperatures below 1$\\,$K

    CERN Document Server

    Sheludiakov, S; Järvinen, J; Zvezdov, D; Lehtonen, L; Vainio, O; Vasiliev, S; Khmelenko, V V; Lee, D M

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study of the exchange tunneling reaction D+HD$\\rightarrow$D$_{2}$+H in solid HD at temperatures between 130~mK and 1.5~K by electron spin resonance. The reaction proceeds at almost the same rate ($\\sim3\\times10^{-27}$cm$^{3}$s$^{-1}$) within this temperature range. This observation differs strongly with the recombination rate of H atoms in solid H$_{2}$ which was found substantially reduced upon lowering temperature below 1$\\,$K. These results suggest that the tunneling exchange reaction $\\textrm{H}+\\textrm{H}_{2}\\rightarrow\\textrm{H}_{2}+\\textrm{H}$ can take place in solid H$_{2}$ even though recombination is suppressed at ultra low temperatures in pure hydrogen.

  1. Electrical conductivity and oxygen exchange kinetics of La2NiO4+delta thin films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, G.; Burriel, M.; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Santiso, J.

    2008-01-01

    -ray diffraction was used to confirm the high crystalline quality of the obtained material. Electrical characterizations were performed on thin (50 nm) and thick (335 nm) layers. The total specific conductivity, which is predominantly electronic, was found to be larger for the thinner films measured (50 nm...... the electrical conductivity relaxation technique, from which the surface exchange coefficient was determined. (C) 2008 The Electrochemical Society.......), probably due to the effect of the strain present in the layers. Those thin films (50 nm) showed values even larger than those observed for single crystals and, to our knowledge, are the largest conductivity values reported to date for the La2NiO4+delta material. The oxygen exchange kinetics was studied by...

  2. Physico-chemical study of the thermal degradation of ions exchange resins of nuclear origin: research of conditions to limit the pollution transfer, application to electric cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ions exchange resins are one solid form of radioactive wastes. They are found mainly during the demineralization operations of the water from reactors cooling systems. This study aims to determine the conditions of a thermal processing leading to the production of a smaller residue, containing the whole activity. A protocol is proposed and validated on resins allowing a decrease of the volume of 63% for 99,93% of the activity. (A.L.B.)

  3. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team

  4. Chapter 11. Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.; Culver, Gene

    1998-01-01

    Most geothermal fluids, because of their elevated temperature, contain a variety of dissolved chemicals. These chemicals are frequently corrosive toward standard materials of construction. As a result, it is advisable in most cases to isolate the geothermal fluid from the process to which heat is being transferred. The task of heat transfer from the geothermal fluid to a closed process loop is most often handled by a plate heat exchanger. The two most common types used in geothermal applications are: bolted and brazed. For smaller systems, in geothermal resource areas of a specific character, downhole heat exchangers (DHEs) provide a unique means of heat extraction. These devices eliminate the requirement for physical removal of fluid from the well. For this reason, DHE-based systems avoid entirely the environmental and practical problems associated with fluid disposal. Shell and tube heat exchangers play only a minor role in low-temperature, direct-use systems. These units have been in common use in industrial applications for many years and, as a result, are well understood. For these reasons, shell and tube heat exchangers will not be covered in this chapter.

  5. Chemical studies on polyaniline titanotungstate as a new composite cation exchanger and its analytical applications for removal of cesium from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline titanotungstate has been synthesized by incorporation of organic polymer polyaniline into the inorganic precipitate of titanotungstate. This material was characterized using IR, X-Ray, SEM and DTA-TGA analysis. The influences of initial concentration of metal ions, particle size and temperature have been reported. The material stability was investigated in water, acids, alkaline solutions, and at high temperature up to 850 degree C. Ion-exchange capacity and distribution coefficients (Kd) for ten metal ions have been determined. It was found that the polyaniline titanotungstate has high affinity and high selectivity for Cs+. The material has high separation for Cs+ ion from other metal ions. The comparison of composite (PATiW) and inorganic material (TiW) was studied and indicated that the composite material is better than the inorganic one in selectivity of Cs+. Thermodynamic parameter of Cs+ exchange process, such as changes in Gibbs free energy (δGo), enthalpy (δHo), and entropy (δSo) have been calculated. It was found that numerical value of δG decrease with an increase in temperature,indicating that the sorption reaction of adsorbent was spontaneous and more favorable at higher temperature. The positive value of δHo corresponds to the endothermic nature of sorption processes and suggested that chemisorptions were the predominant mechanism. A comparison of kinetic models applied to the sorption rate data of Cs+ was evaluated for the pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, homogeneous particle diffusion, shell model and intraparticle diffusion models. The results showed that Cs+ is sorption onto PATiW and TiW with particle diffusion mechanism. Self diffusion coefficient (Di), Activation energy (Ea) and entropy (δS*) of activation were also computed from thelinearized form of Arrhenius equation. Column studies in acid and alkaline solutions were studied. A kinetic study for removal cesium from milk was investigated.

  6. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction

  7. Molecular packing and chemical association in liquid water simulated using ab initio hybrid Monte Carlo and different exchange-correlation functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Valery; Dixit, Purushottam D; Asthagiri, D

    2010-01-01

    In the free energy of hydration of a solute, the chemical contribution is given by the free energy required to expel water molecules from the coordination sphere and the packing contribution is given by the free energy required to create the solute-free coordination sphere (the observation volume) in bulk water. With the SPC/E water model as a reference, we examine the chemical and packing contributions in the free energy of water simulated using different electron density functionals. The density is fixed at a value corresponding to that for SPC/E water at a pressure of 1 bar. The chemical contribution shows that water simulated at 300 K with BLYP is somewhat more tightly bound than water simulated at 300 K with the revPBE functional or at 350 K with the BLYP and BLYP-D functionals. The packing contribution for various radii of the observation volume is studied. In the size range where the distribution of water molecules in the observation volume is expected to be Gaussian, the packing contribution is expect...

  8. Physico-Chemical Study of the Separation of Calcium Isotopes by Chemical Exchange Between Amalgam and Salt Solutions; Etude physico-chimique de la separation des isotopes du calcium par echange chimique entre amalgame et solution saline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duie, P.; Dirian, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique. Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    In a preliminary study of the isotopic exchange between Ca amalgam and aqueous or organic solutions of Ca salts, the main parameters governing the feasibility of a separation process based on these systems such as separation factor, exchange kinetics, rate of decomposition of the amalgam were investigated. The separation factor between {sup 40}Ca and {sup 46}Ca was found to be of the order of 1.02. The rate of the exchange reaction is rather low for aqueous solutions, extremely low for organic solutions. The amalgam seems not to be attacked by dimethyl-formamide solutions; but it is rapidly decomposed by aqueous solutions of Ca halides. This decomposition is slow in the case of aqueous solutions of calcium formate and still slower for Ca(OH){sub 2}; however, except in particular conditions, the observed rate is often much higher, owing to interfering reactions between amalgam and water vapor contained in H{sub 2} bubbles. (authors) [French] On a fait une etude preliminaire, pour des systemes amalgame de calcium - solution aqueuse ou organique de sels de calcium, des principaux parametres pouvant intervenir dans l'application d'un procede d'echange a l'enrichissement isotopique du calcium: facteur de separation, cinetique de l'echange, cinetique de la decomposition de l'amalgame. Les facteurs de separation {sup 40}Ca-{sup 46}Ca sont de l'ordre de 1,02. L'echange est assez lent pour les solutions aqueuses, extremement lent pour les solutions organiques. La decomposition de l'amalgame est pratiquement inexistante avec les solutions dans le dimethyl- formamide, appreciable pour les solutions alcooliques, rapide pour les solutions aqueuses d'halogenures; elle est normalement lente pour les solutions aqueuses de formiate et surtout de chaux, mais la decomposition est en general acceleree par une reaction parasite entre l'amalgame et l'eau a l'etat vapeur, reaction que l'on n'evite dans des

  9. Estimating ground-water exchange with lakes using water-budget and chemical mass-balance approaches for ten lakes in ridge areas of Polk and Highlands counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, L.A.; Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Water budget and chemical mass-balance approaches were used to estimate ground-water exchange with 10 lakes in ridge areas of Polk and Highlands Counties, Florida. At each lake, heads were monitored in the surficial aquifer system and deeper Upper Floridan aquifer, lake stage and rainfall were measured continuously, and lakes and wells were sampled three times between October 1995 and December 1996. The water-budget approach computes net ground-water flow (ground-water inflow minus outflow) as the residual of the monthly waterbudget equation. Net ground-water flow varied seasonally at each of the 10 lakes, and was notably different between lakes, illustrating short-term differences in ground-water fluxes. Monthly patterns in net ground-water flow were related to monthly patterns of other hydrologic variables such as rainfall, ground-water flow patterns, and head differences between the lake and the Upper Floridan aquifer. The chemical mass-balance approach combines the water budget and solute or isotope mass-balance equations, and assumes steady-state conditions. Naturally occurring tracers that were analyzed for include calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and bromide, the isotopes deuterium and oxygen-18. Chloride and sodium were the most successful solute tracers; however, their concentrations in ground water typically varied spatially, and in places were similar to that in lake water, limiting their sensitivity as tracers. In contrast, the isotopes were more robust tracers because the isotopic composition of ground water was relatively uniform and was distinctly different from the lake water. Groundwater inflow computed using the chemical massbalance method varied significantly between lakes, and ranged from less than 10 to more than 150 inches per year. Both water-budget and chemical mass-balance approaches had limitations, but the multiple lines of evidence gained using both approaches improved the understanding of the role of ground water in the

  10. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections

  11. Basic physical and chemical properties of ReillexTM-HPQ anion exchange resin and its sorption behavior of halides in aqueous nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ReillexTM-HPQ anion exchange resin has a good potential toward the pretreatment of liquid nuclear wastes. In this work, a short procedure was devised to convert 99.997% of the resin from its chloride form to the nitrate form as a foundation of all quantitative measurements. It is determined that the resin can be dried to a constant mass at 60 degree C in 28 hours and the electrostatic effect during weighings can hence be eliminated. The weight ratio between resins dried at 110 degree C and 60 degree C is 0.927±0.005 (one standard deviation). The resin has an apparent pKa of 3.36±0.05. The sorption capacity from primarily the weakly basic ionogenic sites (RNH+) is 1.08±0.04 meq/g for resins dried at 60 degree C. In highly basic solutions, the resin became unstable and started to release a substantial amount of methanol. In nitric acid solutions, the selectivity sequence of halide ions versus nitrate and pertechnetate ions is: TcO4- > I- > NO3- > Br- > Cl- > F-. The HPQ resin showed no sorption of fluoride ions. Although the sorption of chloride ions is also low the data can be modeled well by an equation similar to the Freundlich isotherm at a pH range between 2.0 and 3.0. Both bromide and iodide ions showed moderate sorptions when [HNO3] = 1.00 M and the sorption data can be fitted well to an equation closely related to the Temkin isotherm. 25 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  12. International Exchanges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>On April 1st,2014,CPAPD Deputy Secretary General Ms.Chen Huaifan met with Mr.Djudjuk Juyoto Suntani,President of the World Peace Committee,Indonesia,who headed the delegation,in the CPAPD office.The two sides exchanged views on issues of common concern including cooperation between the two organizations and the inheritance of Chinese culture.

  13. Heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type is described in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration

  14. Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Ohadi, Michael; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Cetegen, Edvin

    2013-01-01

    In Next Generation Microchannel Heat Exchangers, the authors’ focus on the new generation highly efficient heat exchangers and presentation of novel data and technical expertise not available in the open literature.  Next generation micro channels offer record high heat transfer coefficients with pressure drops much less than conventional micro channel heat exchangers. These inherent features promise fast penetration into many mew markets, including high heat flux cooling of electronics, waste heat recovery and energy efficiency enhancement applications, alternative energy systems, as well as applications in mass exchangers and chemical reactor systems. The combination of up to the minute research findings and technical know-how make this book very timely as the search for high performance heat and mass exchangers that can cut costs in materials consumption intensifies.

  15. Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid metal heated tube and shell heat exchanger where straight tubes extend between upper and lower tube sheets. In order to prevent thermal stress problems, one tube sheet is fixed to the shell, and the other tube sheet is sealed to the shell by means of a flexible bellows. In the event of a catastrophic bellows failure, a housing that utilizes a packing gland sliding seal is used to enclose and back-up the bellows. Also, a key and slot arrangement is provided for preventing relative rotation between the shell and tube sheet which could damage the bellows and cause failure thereof. This exchanger is seen to be of use in sodium cooled reactors between the liquid sodium circuit on the steam generator

  16. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  17. Fouling analyses for heat exchangers of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling of heat exchanges is generated by water-borne deposits, commonly known as foulants including particulate matter from the air, migrated corrosion produces; silt, clays, and sand suspended in water; organic contaminants; and boron based deposits in plants. This fouling is known to interfere with normal flow characteristics and reduce thermal efficiencies of heat exchangers. In order to analyze the fouling for heat exchangers of nuclear power plant, the fouling factor is introduced based on the ASME O and M codes and TEMA standards. This paper focuses on the fouling analyses for the heat exchangers of several primary systems; the RHR heat exchanger of the residual heat removal system, the letdown heat exchanger of the chemical and volume control system, and the CCW heat exchanger of the component cooling water system, Based on the results of the fouling levels for the three heat exchangers are assumed

  18. Observing and preventing rubidium runaway in a direct-infusion xenon-spin hyperpolarizer optimized for high-resolution hyper-CEST (chemical exchange saturation transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei) NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenon is well known to undergo host-guest interactions with proteins and synthetic molecules. As xenon can also be hyperpolarized by spin exchange optical pumping, allowing the investigation of highly dilute systems, it makes an ideal nuclear magnetic resonance probe for such host molecules. The utility of xenon as a probe can be further improved using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer using hyperpolarized nuclei (Hyper-CEST), but for highly accurate experiments requires a polarizer and xenon infusion system optimized for such measurements. We present the design of a hyperpolarizer and xenon infusion system specifically designed to meet the requirements of Hyper-CEST measurements. One key element of this design is preventing rubidium runaway, a chain reaction induced by laser heating that prevents efficient utilization of high photon densities. Using thermocouples positioned along the pumping cell we identify the sources of heating and conditions for rubidium runaway to occur. We then demonstrate the effectiveness of actively cooling the optical cell to prevent rubidium runaway in a compact setup. This results in a 2–3-fold higher polarization than without cooling, allowing us to achieve a polarization of 25% at continuous flow rates of 9 ml/min of 129Xe. The simplicity of this design also allows it to be retrofitted to many existing polarizers. Combined with a direction infusion system that reduces shot-to-shot noise down to 0.56% we have captured Hyper-CEST spectra in unprecedented detail, allowing us to completely resolve peaks separated by just 1.62 ppm. Due to its high polarization and excellent stability, our design allows the comparison of underlying theories of host-guest systems with experiment at low concentrations, something extremely difficult with previous polarizers

  19. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  20. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  1. Fouling analyses of heat exchangers for PSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling of heat exchangers is generated by water-borne deposits, commonly known as foulants including particulate matter from the air, migrated corrosion produces; silt, clays, and sand suspended in water; organic contaminants; and boron based deposits in plants. This fouling is known to interfere with normal flow characteristics and reduce thermal efficiencies of heat exchangers. This paper focuses on fouling analyses for six heat exchangers of two primary systems in two nuclear power plants; the regenerative heat exchangers of the chemical and volume control system and the component cooling water heat exchangers of the component cooling water system. To analyze the fouling for heat exchangers, fouling factor was introduced based on the ASME O and M codes and TEMA standards. Based on the results of the fouling analyses, the present thermal performances and fouling levels for the six heat exchangers were predicted

  2. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  3. Characterization of mu s-ms dynamics of proteins using a combined analysis of N-15 NMR relaxation and chemical shift: Conformational exchange in plastocyanin induced by histidine protonations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, M. A. S.; Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2004-01-01

    analysis of the exchange terms shows that the observed mus-ms dynamics in A. v. PCu are caused primarily by the protonation/deprotonation of two histidine residues, His92 and His61, His92 being ligated to the Cu(l) ion. Also the exchange rate of the protonation/deprotonation process of His92 and its pH and...

  4. Natural ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to natural ion exchangers. Ion exchange properties of minerals are described. Structural types of porous matrixes of natural ion exchangers are considered. Types of sorption centres in minerals are considered as well.

  5. Totalization Data Exchange (TDEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Totalization Data Exchange (TDEX) process is an exchange between SSA and its foreign country partners to identify deaths of beneficiaries residing abroad. The...

  6. An antibody binding site on cytochrome c defined by hydrogen exchange and two-dimensional NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a protein antigen, horse cytochrome c (cyt c), with a monoclonal antibody has been studied by hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange labeling and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) methods. The H-exchange rate of residues in three discontiguous regions of the cyt c polypeptide backbone was slowed by factors up to 340-fold in the antibody-antigen complex compared with free cyt c. The protected residues, 36 to 38, 59, 60, 64 to 67, 100, and 101, and their hydrogen-bond acceptors, are brought together in the three-dimensional structure to form a contiguous, largely exposed protein surface with an area of about 750 square angstroms. The interaction site determined in this way is consistent with prior epitope mapping studies and includes several residues that were not previously identified. The hydrogen exchange labeling approach can be used to map binding sites on small proteins in antibody-antigen complexes and may be applicable to protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions in general

  7. The Gravitational Heat Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2015-01-01

    The heat exchangers are present in many sectors of the economy. They are widely used in Refrigerators, Air-conditioners, Engines, Refineries, etc. Here we show a heat exchanger that works based on the gravity control. This type of heat exchanger can be much more economic than the conventional heat exchangers.

  8. Exchange Reactions. Proceedings of the Symposium on Exchange Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions are of great interest to chemists. The study of exchange reactions in particular helps to shed light on the dynamics of chemical change, providing an insight into the structures and the reactivities of the chemical species involved. The main theme of this meeting was the subject of oxidation-reduction reactions in which the net result is the transfer of one or more electrons between the different oxidation states of the same element. Other studies reported included the transfer of protons, atoms, complex ligands or organic radicals between molecules. Heterogeneous exchange, which is of importance in many cases of catalytic action, was also considered. For a long time isotopic tracers have formed the most convenient means of studying exchange reactions and today a considerable amount of work continues to be done with their aid. Consequently, several papers presented at this Symposium reported on work carried out by purely radiochemical tracer methods. In recognition, however, of the important role which nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance play in this field, in particular in the study of fast reactions, a number of reports on investigations in which these techniques had been used was included in the programme. By kind invitation of the United States Government the Symposium on Exchange Reactions was held from 31 May to 4 June at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, Long Island, N.Y., USA. It was attended by 46 participants from nine countries and one inter-governmental organization. The publication of these Proceedings makes the contents of the papers and the discussion available to a wider audience

  9. The possibility of exchange

    OpenAIRE

    AJ Julius

    2013-01-01

    I first characterize a moral mistake in coercion. The principle of independence with which I criticize coercion seems also to condemn exchange. I propose an account of exchange from which it follows that exchange upholds independence after all. In support of that account I argue that, of the accounts of exchange that occur to me, only this one has the consequence that, on general assumptions, a person can take part in exchange while acting, intending, and believing with sufficient reason. I a...

  10. Ion exchange characteristics of decontaminating formulations as suited to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchangers are employed in the chemical decontamination process for metal ion removal, regeneration of decontaminants and removal of the formulation chemicals from the coolant. Decontaminants can interact with both strong base and acid ion exchangers leading to a loss of the required chemical concentrations in the liquid phase for effectively decontaminating the radioactive deposits. In order to understand these interactions, adsorption of EDTA, HEEDTA, DTPA and NTA on strong cation exchanger was studied under dynamic conditions. Selective retention of decontaminant formulation on anion exchanger, pickup of metals by preequilibrated anion exchanger and the effect of temperature on the cation exchanger were studied. (author)

  11. A generic implementation of replica exchange with solute tempering (REST2) algorithm in NAMD for complex biophysical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sunhwan; Jiang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering (REST2) is a powerful sampling enhancement algorithm of molecular dynamics (MD) in that it needs significantly smaller number of replicas but achieves higher sampling efficiency relative to standard temperature exchange algorithm. In this paper, we extend the applicability of REST2 for quantitative biophysical simulations through a robust and generic implementation in greatly scalable MD software NAMD. The rescaling procedure of force field parameters controlling REST2 "hot region" is implemented into NAMD at the source code level. A user can conveniently select hot region through VMD and write the selection information into a PDB file. The rescaling keyword/parameter is written in NAMD Tcl script interface that enables an on-the-fly simulation parameter change. Our implementation of REST2 is within communication-enabled Tcl script built on top of Charm++, thus communication overhead of an exchange attempt is vanishingly small. Such a generic implementation facilitates seamless cooperation between REST2 and other modules of NAMD to provide enhanced sampling for complex biomolecular simulations. Three challenging applications including native REST2 simulation for peptide folding-unfolding transition, free energy perturbation/REST2 for absolute binding affinity of protein-ligand complex and umbrella sampling/REST2 Hamiltonian exchange for free energy landscape calculation were carried out on IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer to demonstrate efficacy of REST2 based on the present implementation.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and ion exchange properties of a new inorganic ion exchange material: zirconium(IV) iodooxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new three component inorganic ion exchange material zirconium (IV) iodooxalate (ZIO) has been synthesized by adding a mixture of O.1M potassium iodate and O.1M oxalic acid to O.1M zirconium oxychloride in different volume ratios at pH 1. Among several samples synthesized, ZIO-6 is selected for detailed studies owing to its highest ion exchange capacity and chemical stability. The material has been characterized on the basis of chemical composition, pH-titration, FTIR and thermogravimetric studies. The ion exchange capacity of the material for Na+ ion has been found to be 2.70 meq g-l dry exchanger. The ion exchange capacity varies and is found to depend upon the crystal ionic radius of exchanging cations. The chemical stability of the material has been tested in acidic, neutral and basic media. The sorption studies of some metal ions have been made in distilled water and nitric acid. (author)

  13. 钼酸铵溶液化学沉淀法和离子交换法除钒研究%Removal of Vanadium from Ammonium Molybdate Solution by Chemical Precipitation and Ion Exchange

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张报清; 雷霆; 方树铭; 王学文; 沈波涛; 姬成岗

    2012-01-01

    对采用化学沉淀法、运用A,B两种强碱性阴离子树脂交换法,从钼酸铵溶液中分离除钒的工艺条件进行了研究.研究结果表明:控制溶液pH值在8~9时,钒主要以VO3-状态存在,沉钒效率高,偏钒酸铵沉淀纯度也高,达98.5%以上.A树脂能够深度分离钼酸铵溶液中的钒,最佳工艺条件是:控制料液pH值在7.28左右和降低Cl-浓度.Cl-与A树脂有较强的亲和力,其浓度的增加会显著降低A树脂对钒的吸附容量.在溶液pH值为7.28,几乎不含Cl-的条件下,A树脂饱和吸钒容量达到了21.73 g·L-1,此工艺可控制钼酸铵溶液中钒浓度在0.02 g·L-1以下.A树脂最高解析回收率达到98.68%,确保了钼钒深度分离后钒的回收利用效果.B树脂能够有效回收A树脂解析液中的钒和钼,其吸钒容量达到26.22 g·L-,吸钼容量达到了71.06g·L-1.B树脂为A树脂的优化树脂,其饱和吸附容量大于A树脂的饱和吸附容量.%The process conditions of vanadium removal from ammonium molybdate solution by chemical precipitation and ion exchange using A and B two kinds of alkaline anion resins were studied. It was found that controlling the pH value between 8 and 9, vanadium existed mainly as VO3- , the efficiency of NH4VO3's precipitating was significant, and purity of NH4VO3 was high as above 98. 5%. Resin A could separate vanadium from ammonium molybdate greatly, the best technological conditions were pH value of about 7.28 and reducing the concentration of Cl-. Cl- had strong appetency with resin A, and the increase of Cl- concentration notably reduced adsorption capacity of resin A. Resin A's adsorption capacity of vanadium reached 21.73 g·L-1 under the conditions of 7.27 pH value and without Cl-. This technology could control the concentration of vanadium under 0.02 g·L-1 in ammonium molybdate solution. The highest stripping recovery rate of resin A was 98.68% , this ensured the good recovery result after the separation of

  14. A rapid identification of hit molecules for target proteins via physico-chemical descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Goutam; Jayaram, B

    2013-06-21

    We report here a novel computationally fast protocol (RASPD) for identifying good candidates for any target protein from any molecule/million molecule database. A QSAR-type equation sets up the extent of complementarity of the physico-chemical properties of the target protein and the candidate molecule and an estimate of the binding energy is generated. A correlation coefficient of 0.84 and an average error ±1.45 kcal mol(-1) are obtained for the calculated protein-ligand binding energies against experiment for more than 380 protein-ligand complexes. RASPD is seen to perform better than other popular scoring functions in predicting binding energies. The most interesting feature of this methodology is that it takes only a fraction of a second for calculating the binding energy of any ligand without docking in the active site of the target protein as opposed to several minutes for regular docking and scoring methods, while the accuracy in sorting good candidates remains comparable to that of conventional techniques. An entire million compound library, a (~10(5) compound) natural product library and a (~10(5) compound) NCI database can be scanned against a specified target protein within a few minutes for identifying hit molecules. The RASPD methodology is freely accessible at . PMID:23646352

  15. UtilityTelecom_EXCHANGE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The UtilityTelecom_EXCHANGE represents Vermont Telephone Exchange boundaries as defined by the VT Public Service Board. The original data was created by UVM in...

  16. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  17. Heat exchanger design

    OpenAIRE

    Loukota, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis solves design of a heat exchanger for hot water boiler with gasification chamber for preheating the combustion air with the heat of the combustion products. Calculation values were experimentally measured. Thesis contains brief description of the shell and tube heat exchanger, stoichiometric combustion calculation, geometrical dimensions design of the heat exchanger, pressure loss and thermal performance calculation. It also includes drawings of the designed exchanger.

  18. Charge exchange system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  19. Ion Exchanger Catalyst Modification for Reactions Involving Lipophilic Reagents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanková, Libuše; Holub, Ladislav; Jeřábek, Karel

    Bratislava: Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering, 2011 - (Markoš, J.), s. 229 ISBN 978-80-227-3503-2. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /38./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 23.05.2011-27.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ion exchangers * catalysts * lipophilic Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  20. Ion exchange properties of carboxylate bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagasse fibers were chemically modified using three different reactions: esterification using monochloro acetic acid, esterification using succinic anhydride, and oxidation using sodium periodate and sodium chlorite to prepare cation exchanger bearing carboxylic groups. Bagasse was crosslinked using epichlorohydrin before chemical modification to avoid loss of its constituents during the chemical modification. The structure of the prepared derivatives was proved using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and chemical methods. The ability of the prepared bagasse cation exchangers to adsorb heavy metal ions (Cu+2, Ni+2, Cr+3, Fe+3), on a separate basis or in a mixture of them, at different metal ion concentration was tested. Thermal stability of the different bagasse derivative was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  1. Synthesis, characterization and ion exchange properties of zirconium(IV) tungstoiodophosphate, a new cation exchanger

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weqar Ahmad Siddiqui; Shakeel Ahmad Khan

    2007-02-01

    Zirconium(IV) tungstoiodophosphate has been synthesized under a variety of conditions. The most chemically and thermally stable sample is prepared by adding a mixture of aqueous solutions of 0.5 mol L-1 sodium tungstate, potassium iodate and 1 mol L-1 orthophosphoric acid to aqueous solution of 0.1 mol L-1 zirconium(IV) oxychloride. Its ion exchange capacity for Na+ and K+ was found to be 2.20 and 2.35 meq g-1 dry exchanger, respectively. The material has been characterized on the basis of chemical composition, pH titration, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis. The effect on the exchange capacity of drying the exchanger at different temperatures has been studied. The analytical importance of the material has been established by quantitative separation of Pb2+ from other metal ions.

  2. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A ampersand 038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports

  3. ANALYSIS OF HELICAL BAFFLE HEAT EXCHANGER FOR OPTIMUM HELIX ANGLE THROUGH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Roktutpal Borah; R.K Chitharthan

    2015-01-01

    Heat exchangers are very important heat & mass exchange apparatus in many industries like electric power generation, chemical industries, oil refining, etc. The most common heat exchangers used are shell-&-tube heat exchangers (STHXs). Among different kinds of baffles used in STHX, segmental baffles are most commonly used in conventional STHXs to support tubes & change fluid flow direction. But, conventional heat exchangers with segmental baffles in shell-side have some drawbacks ...

  4. Inorganic anion exchangers for the treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic anion exchangers are evaluated for Tc, I and S isotope removal from aqueous nuclear waste streams. Chemical, thermal, and radiation stabilities were examined. Selected exchangers were examined in detail for their selectivities, kinetics and mechanism of the sorption process (especially in NO3-, OH- and BO3- environments). Cement encapsulation and leaching experiments were made on the exchangers showing most promise for 'radwaste' treatment. (author)

  5. Data requirements for reliable chemical shift assignments in deuterated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The information required for chemical shift assignments in large deuterated proteins was investigated using a Monte Carlo approach (Hitchens et al., 2002). In particular, the consequences of missing amide resonances on the reliability of assignments derived from Cα and CO or from Cα and Cβ chemical shifts was investigated. Missing amide resonances reduce both the number of correct assignments as well as the confidence in these assignments. More significantly, a number of undetectable errors can arise when as few as 9% of the amide resonances are missing from the spectra. However, the use of information from residue specific labeling as well as local and long-range distance constraints improves the reliability and extent of assignment. It is also shown that missing residues have only a minor effect on the assignment of protein-ligand complexes using Cα and CO chemical shifts and Cα inter-residue connectivity, provided that the known chemical shifts of the unliganded protein are utilized in the assignment process

  6. Adaptively Compressed Exchange Operator

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Fock exchange operator plays a central role in modern quantum chemistry. The large computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator hinders Hartree-Fock calculations and Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, even for systems consisting of hundreds of atoms. We develop the adaptively compressed exchange operator (ACE) formulation, which greatly reduces the computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator without loss of accuracy. The ACE formulation does not depend on the size of the band gap, and thus can be applied to insulating, semiconducting as well as metallic systems. In an iterative framework for solving Hartree-Fock-like systems, the ACE formulation only requires moderate modification of the code, and can be potentially beneficial for all electronic structure software packages involving exchange calculations. Numerical results indicate that the ACE formulation can become advantageous even for small systems with tens...

  7. Exchange Rate Regime Choice

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The choice of an adequate exchange rate regime proves to be a highly sensitive field within which the economic authorities present and confirm themselves. The advantages and disadvantages of fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes, which have been quite relativized from the conventional point of view, together with simultaneous, but not synchronised effects of structural and external factors, remain permanently questioned throughout a complex process of exchange rate regime decision making. ...

  8. Exchange and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Peter A. Cornelisse; Erik Thorbecke

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a framework explaining why different types of transactions occur in different settings- particularly in developing countries. The approach we propose is based on a new concept which we call “exchange-configuration”. The latter consists of three building blocks or elements: the item exchanged; the actors engaged in decisions related to the item being exchanged; and, the environment – physical, social, technological, and legal – within which the actors op...

  9. Microsoft Exchange 2013 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Van Horenbeeck, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book is a practical, hands-on guide that provides the reader with a number of clear, step-by-step exercises.""Microsoft Exchange 2013 Cookbook"" is targeted at network administrators who deal with the Exchange server in their day-to-day jobs. It assumes you have some practical experience with previous versions of Exchange (although this is not a requirement), without being a subject matter expert.

  10. The Amsterdam power exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, M. [Price Waterhouse Coopers, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Continental Europe`s first electricity exchange is taking shape. While the Amsterdam Power Exchange (APX) still faces challenges, most of the critical issues have been resolved and concrete steps towards its implementation are being made. The emergence of a spot market for electricity represents a quantum leap in the European liberalization process. The exchange is a tool that will fundamentally alter the way utilities operate with implications beyond the boundaries of the Netherlands. (UK)

  11. Exchange Rate Economics

    OpenAIRE

    John Williamson

    2008-01-01

    The paper summarizes the current theory of how a floating exchange rate is determined, dividing the subject into what determines the steady state and what determines the transition to steady state. The inadequacies of this model are examined, and an alternative “behavioral” model, which recognizes that the foreign exchange market is populated by both fundamentalists and chartists is presented. It is argued that the main importance of understanding the foreign exchange market for development s...

  12. Usable optimistic fair exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Küpçü, Alptekin; Lysyanskaya, A.

    2012-01-01

    Fairly exchanging digital content is an everyday problem. It has been shown that fair exchange cannot be achieved without a trusted third party (called the Arbiter). Yet, even with a trusted party, it is still non-trivial to come up with an efficient solution, especially one that can be used in a p2p file sharing system with a high volume of data exchanged. We provide an efficient optimistic fair exchange mechanism for bartering digital files, where receiving a payment in return for a file (b...

  13. Microplate Heat Exchanger Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a microplate heat exchanger for cryogenic cooling systems used for continuous flow distributed cooling systems, large focal plane arrays, multiple...

  14. Exchange rate regime choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beker Emilija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of an adequate exchange rate regime proves to be a highly sensitive field within which the economic authorities present and confirm themselves. The advantages and disadvantages of fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes, which have been quite relativized from the conventional point of view, together with simultaneous, but not synchronized effects of structural and external factors, remain permanently questioned throughout a complex process of exchange rate regime decision making. The paper reflects the attempt of critical identification of the key exchange rate performances with emphasis on continuous non-uniformity and (uncertainty of shelf life of a relevant choice.

  15. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  16. Roles of Na+/H+ exchange in regulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and cell death after chemical anoxia in NIH3T3 fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rentsch, Maria L; Ossum, Carlo G; Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2007-01-01

    , p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2, p53, and Akt activity, and cell death, after chemical anoxia in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. The NHE1 inhibitor 5'-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) (5 muM), as well as removal of extracellular Na(+) [replaced by N-methyl-D: -glucamine (NMDG......(+))], prevented recovery of intracellular pH (pH(i)) during chemical anoxia (10 mM NaN(3) +/- 10 mM glucose), indicating that activation of NHE was the dominating mechanism of pH(i) regulation under these conditions. NHE activation by chemical anoxia was unaffected by inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and...... extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) (PD98059). In contrast, chemical anoxia activated p38 MAPK in an NHE-dependent manner, while ERK1/2 activity was unaffected. Anoxia-induced cell death was caspase-3-independent, mildly attenuated by EIPA, potently exacerbated by SB203580, and unaffected by PD98059...

  17. Heat exchangers: operation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main operation problems for heat exchangers are fouling, corrosion, vibrations and mechanical resistance. Fouling and corrosion lead to an over dimensioning, energy consumption increase, corroded pieces change, shutdown costs. Vibrations are taken in account during the dimensioning phase of the heat exchangers. Mechanical resistance problems are, for the classical ones, described in regulation texts. (A.B.). 5 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Handicapping Social Exchange Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishler, Barbara

    The economic theory of social exchange has some serious shortcomings when applied to minorities--especially the disabled. First, it assumes dyads comprise the basic unit where exchange occurs and that rewards and costs must occur at that level. Second, the model standardizes the experience of white, Western European and American males. The model…

  19. Building Relationships through Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  20. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  1. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  2. Standardizing exchange formats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international network of co-operating data centres is described who maintain identical data bases which are simultaneously updated by an agreed data exchange procedure. The agreement covers ''data exchange formats'' which are compatible to the centres' internal data storage and retrieval systems which remain different, optimized at each centre to the available computer facilities and to the needs of the data users. Essential condition for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data compilation, including critical data analysis and validation. The systems described (''EXFOR'', ''ENDF'', ''CINDA'') are used for ''nuclear reaction data'', but the principles used for data compilation and exchange should be valid also for other data types. (author). 24 refs, 4 figs

  3. Shell-and-double concentric-tube heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougriou, Chérif; Baadache, Khireddine

    2010-03-01

    This study concerns a new type of heat exchangers, which is that of shell-and-double concentric-tube heat exchangers. These heat exchangers can be used in many specific applications such as air conditioning, waste heat recovery, chemical processing, pharmaceutical industries, power production, transport, distillation, food processing, cryogenics, etc. The case studies include both design calculations and performance calculations. It is demonstrated that the relative diameter sizes of the two tubes with respect to each other are the most important parameters that influence the heat exchanger size.

  4. Thermal stability of ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of heat, radiation and oxidants on carbonchain polymers, such as ion-exchange resins, often cause irreversible chemical changes in macro molecules. These changes can be e g the rupture of the carbon-carbon single or double bond, and/or the degradation of the macro molecule. Ion-exchange materials also contain the far less stable bonds between functional groups and the polymer matrix. For this reason the thermal stability of ion-exchange mat- erials is mainly based on the behaviour of the functional groups, which are responsible for the ion-exchange. The solidification of the ion-exchange resin waste usually involves elevated tempera- tures. Bituminization is carried out at 130-160 degrees C. Cementa- tion is carried out at room temperature. However, cementation can generate temperatures of up to 100-120 degrees C in the solidifica- tion product during the curing period. In this study the swelling/ shrinking properties of different ion-exchange materials have been studied in air and water as a function of the drying time and temp- erature. The air dried resins were used as the reference material. The effect of sodium sulphate as a possible additive to reduce swelling was studied, The experiments which were performed and re- sults observed are discussed in detail in the Appendices. (Authors)

  5. Chlorine isotope effects in ion exchange reactions with a strongly basic anion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As can be shown by the results of this study, the chemical preenrichment of the stable chlorine isotopes in inorganic ion-exchange equilibria is feasible in principle. This process should be performed in chromotographic separation columns at temperatures as low as possible. Because of the dependence of the isotopic effect on the elution medium concentration a very low concentration is desirable for the chemical enrichment process. Smaller elution concentrations however result in increasingly longer elution times. (HK)

  6. Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange with Torsional Flattening for Binding Mode Prediction and Binding Free Energy Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentes, Ahmet; Deng, Nan-Jie; Vijayan, R S K; Xia, Junchao; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics modeling of complex biological systems is limited by finite simulation time. The simulations are often trapped close to local energy minima separated by high energy barriers. Here, we introduce Hamiltonian replica exchange (H-REMD) with torsional flattening in the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM), to reduce energy barriers along torsional degrees of freedom and accelerate sampling of intramolecular degrees of freedom relevant to protein-ligand binding. The method is tested on a standard benchmark (T4 Lysozyme/L99A/p-xylene complex) and on a library of HIV-1 integrase complexes derived from the SAMPL4 blind challenge. We applied the torsional flattening strategy to 26 of the 53 known binders to the HIV Integrase LEDGF site found to have a binding energy landscape funneled toward the crystal structure. We show that our approach samples the conformational space more efficiently than the original method without flattening when starting from a poorly docked pose with incorrect ligand dihedral angle conformations. In these unfavorable cases convergence to a binding pose within 2-3 Å from the crystallographic pose is obtained within a few nanoseconds of the Hamiltonian replica exchange simulation. We found that torsional flattening is insufficient in cases where trapping is due to factors other than torsional energy, such as the formation of incorrect intramolecular hydrogen bonds and stacking. Work is in progress to generalize the approach to handle these cases and thereby make it more widely applicable. PMID:27070865

  7. Heat exchanger design handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Thulukkanam, Kuppan

    2013-01-01

    Completely revised and updated to reflect current advances in heat exchanger technology, Heat Exchanger Design Handbook, Second Edition includes enhanced figures and thermal effectiveness charts, tables, new chapter, and additional topics--all while keeping the qualities that made the first edition a centerpiece of information for practicing engineers, research, engineers, academicians, designers, and manufacturers involved in heat exchange between two or more fluids.See What's New in the Second Edition: Updated information on pressure vessel codes, manufacturer's association standards A new c

  8. Anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  9. Surface exchange kinetics and chemical diffusivities of BaZr{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.65}Y{sub 0.15}O{sub 3−δ} by electrical conductivity relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dae-Kwang; Jeon, Sang-Yun; Singh, Bhupendra [Ionics Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwang-Ju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jun-Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sun-Ju, E-mail: song@chonnam.ac.kr [Ionics Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwang-Ju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Electrical conductivity relaxation in BaCe{sub 0.65}Zr{sub 0.2}Y{sub 0.15}O{sub 3−δ} was monitored. • Monotonic relaxation behavior was observed during oxidation/reduction. • Nonmonotonic twofold relaxation behavior was observed during hydration/dehydration. • Surface exchange coefficients and diffusivities of O and H were calculated. - Abstract: Perovskite-type oxide BaCe{sub 0.65}Zr{sub 0.2}Y{sub 0.15}O{sub 3−δ} (BCZY2015) was synthesized by a solid state reaction method. BCZY2015 samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The time dependent variation in electrical conductivity of BCZY2015 was monitored during the oxidation/reduction in oxygen partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) range of −2.28 ⩽ log (pO{sub 2}/atm) ⩽ −0.68 at a fixed water vapor pressure (pH{sub 2}O), and during the hydration/dehydration in −3.15 ⩽ log (pH{sub 2}O/atm) ⩽ −2.35 range in air. The electrical conductivity showed a monotonic relaxation behavior by the ambipolar diffusion of V{sub o}{sup ··} and OH{sub o}{sup ·} during the oxidation/reduction and the relaxation process was governed by the diffusivity of oxygen (D-tilde{sub vO}). On the other hand, during the hydration/dehydration process, a non-monotonic twofold relaxation behavior was observed due to the decoupled diffusion of H and O components with the mediation of holes, and the conductivity relaxation process was governed by the diffusivities of both H (D-tilde{sub iH}) and O (D-tlde{sub vH}). The values of surface exchange coefficients and diffusivities of oxygen and hydrogen were calculated from Fick’s second law by the nonlinear least squares fitting of the conductivity data, as proposed by Yoo et al. (2008)

  10. A Laboratory Exercise Using a Physical Model for Demonstrating Countercurrent Heat Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Catherine; Davis-Berg, Elizabeth C.; Botz, Jason T.

    2012-01-01

    A physical model was used in a laboratory exercise to teach students about countercurrent exchange mechanisms. Countercurrent exchange is the transport of heat or chemicals between fluids moving in opposite directions separated by a permeable barrier (such as blood within adjacent blood vessels flowing in opposite directions). Greater exchange of…

  11. Adsorption Assisted Ion Exchanger Catalyst for Fatty Acid Esterification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Karel; Holub, Ladislav; Hanková, Libuše; Corain, B.; Centomo, P.

    - : -, 2011, s. 18. ISBN N. [IUPAC International Conference on Chemical Research Applied to World Needs /19./. Kuala Lumpur (MY), 27.09.2011-29.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : ion exchanger * catalysts * acid esterification Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  12. Support for heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very large heat exchangers which are typical of many nuclear power plants place great demands on their supports. The support here described is for a vertical heat exchanger. A convex Lubrit plate allows a certain amount of transverse and rotational movement of the heat exhanger relative to the foundation. Taps engaging in the support surface of the heat exchanger and between the support box and the concrete foundation ensure that relative movement is restricted to those surfaces where it is intended. A steel box structure embedded in the concrete foundation dissipates heat transferred through the support system and avoids overheating the concrete. Horizontal stays support the heat exchanger against the concrete walls. (JIW)

  13. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge...

  14. Central Data Exchange

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Central Data Exchange (CDX) enables fast, efficient and more accurate environmental data submissions from state and local governments, industry and tribes to...

  15. Exchange Risk Management Policy

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    At the Finance Committee of March 2005, following a comment by the CERN Audit Committee, the Chairman invited the Management to prepare a document on exchange risk management policy. The Finance Committee is invited to take note of this document.

  16. HUD Exchange Grantee Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The About Grantees section of the HUD Exchange brings up contact information, reports, award, jurisdiction, and location data for organizations that receive HUD...

  17. Opinion Exchange Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Mossel, Elchanan; Tamuz, Omer

    2014-01-01

    We survey a range of models of opinion exchange. From the introduction: "The exchange of opinions between individuals is a fundamental social interaction... Moreover, many models in this field are an excellent playground for mathematicians, especially those working in probability, algorithms and combinatorics. One of the goals of this survey is to introduce such models to mathematicians, and especially to those working in discrete mathematics, information theory, optimization and probability ...

  18. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  19. Biodegradation of ion-exchange media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion Exchange resin waste from the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory provided a mixed microbial culture which was used to evaluate the ability of different resin types to support biological activity. The culture of bacteria and fungi grew after the dewatered resin wastes were mixed with water, nutrient slats and a secondary carbon source. The effects of environment factors such as resin chemicals sorbed on the resins and radiation damage were examined. Heavier growths were seen in Amberlite IRN resins subjected to 100 Mrad of gamma irradiation. The presence of organic acids anions (used in dilute chemical decontamination processes) on the resins encouraged heavier microbial growths

  20. Fouling of heat exchanger surfaces: General principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    This Data Item ESDU 86038 is an addition to the Heat Transfer Sub-series. The importance of various parameters that affect fouling are discussed. Appropriate methods for dealing with fouling in all stages from design through to operation of heat exchanger equipment are indicated. Methods of suppressing fouling by additives, or of cleaning equipment chemically or mechanically, are considered. A brief outline of the physical process of fouling including some mathematical models is given.

  1. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  2. Aspects of the super-equivalent sorption of glycine by cation exchanger KU-2-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, O. N.; Khokhlov, V. Yu.; Trunaeva, E. S.; Nechaeva, L. S.

    2016-07-01

    The structure formed in a sorbent during the super-equivalent sorption of glycine by cation exchanger KU-2-8 is optimized via quantum chemical simulation. The differential thermodynamic characteristics of ion exchange and super-equivalent sorption in the studied system are calculated using a thermodynamic approach that allows us to describe the simultaneous exchange and super-equivalent sorption of compounds by ion-exchangers.

  3. Preparation, properties and ion-exchange behavior of stannic silicomolybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion-exchange properties of stannic silicomolybdate were studied using the batch method. Preparation of stannic silicomolybdate is shown. The sorbent is stable in water and diluted mineral acids. X-ray diffraction study shows amorphous structure and chemical analysis was performed. The ion-exchange capacities for alkali metals and strontium cations were determined by using fotometric measurements and chemical analyses of the equilibrated exchangers by atomic absorption. The tow techniques showed similar results which revealed that the capacities was changed in values and orders with the changing of the preparation method of the exchangers. The exchangers showed high selectivity for cesium and strontium cations. The results showed decreasing of Kd with increasing of the concentration of ion-exchanger. Also the effect of nitrate anions was investigated by studying the distribution coefficients in nitrate media. The results showed that nitrate anion from nitric acid or ammonium nitrate, led to decrease the distribution coefficients. The results obtained reveal that the properties of the exchangers is slightly changed with the change of the conditions of preparation but the general behaviour of Cs+ and Sr++ cations almost remain the same. Also nitrate solution can be used to reextract these cations from the exchangers. 4 tabs

  4. Predicting protein ligand binding motions with the conformation explorer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Samuel C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the structure of proteins bound to known or potential ligands is crucial for biological understanding and drug design. Often the 3D structure of the protein is available in some conformation, but binding the ligand of interest may involve a large scale conformational change which is difficult to predict with existing methods. Results We describe how to generate ligand binding conformations of proteins that move by hinge bending, the largest class of motions. First, we predict the location of the hinge between domains. Second, we apply an Euler rotation to one of the domains about the hinge point. Third, we compute a short-time dynamical trajectory using Molecular Dynamics to equilibrate the protein and ligand and correct unnatural atomic positions. Fourth, we score the generated structures using a novel fitness function which favors closed or holo structures. By iterating the second through fourth steps we systematically minimize the fitness function, thus predicting the conformational change required for small ligand binding for five well studied proteins. Conclusions We demonstrate that the method in most cases successfully predicts the holo conformation given only an apo structure.

  5. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepina, Monica Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl–arabinogalactan–peptidoglycan complex coats the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a structure composed of galactofuranosyl (Galf) residues attached via alternating β-(1→6) and β-(1→5) linkages synthesized by bifunctional galactofuranosyltransferases, GlfT1 and GlfT2. We have used Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy to examine the active site architecture of GlfT2 using trisaccharide acceptor substrates, β-D-Galf-(1→6)-β-D-Galf-(1→5)-β-D-Galf-O(CH2)7CH...

  6. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; Van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with

  7. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  8. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized.

  9. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized

  10. On exchangeable multinomial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, E. Olusegun; Cheon, Kyeongmi; Yuan, Yilian; Szabo, Aniko

    2016-01-01

    We derive an expression for the joint distribution of exchangeable multinomial random variables, which generalizes the multinomial distribution based on independent trials while retaining some of its important properties. Unlike de Finneti's representation theorem for a binary sequence, the exchangeable multinomial distribution derived here does not require that the finite set of random variables under consideration be a subset of an infinite sequence. Using expressions for higher moments and correlations, we show that the covariance matrix for exchangeable multinomial data has a different form from that usually assumed in the literature, and we analyse data from developmental toxicology studies. The proposed analyses have been implemented in R and are available on CRAN in the CorrBin package.

  11. Ion exchange phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  12. Tubular heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns a heat exchanger of which the tubes, placed in a long casing, cross the casing cover in a sealed manner. These tubes are fixed to the tube plate forming this cover or to the branch tubes it comprises by means of compression joints. These joints make it possible to do away with welds that are sources of defects and to improve the operational safety of the apparatus. An advantageous form of the heat exchanger under the invention includes a manifold for each thermal exchange fluid, and one end of each tube is connected to this manifold by a pipe that is itself connected to the tube by a threaded connection. The latter provides for easy disconnection of the pipe in order to introduce a probe for inspecting the state of the tubes

  13. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  14. Chemical research at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the research projects in the Chemical Research group will be given. The work involves actinide waste and processing chemistry, separations chemistry, radiation studies, and calorimetry and thermodynamics. Details will be given of the actinide separations research, including work with macroreticular anion exchangers and bidentate organophosphorus extractants

  15. Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory

  16. STRUCTURAL FEATURE AND EXCHANGE KINETICS OF CARBOXYLATED POLYPROPYLENE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chinyung; YANG Chaoshiung; YANG Chong

    1987-01-01

    The present article deals with the exchange process of bivalent metal ions, such as Zn2 +, Cd2 + and Hg2+, etc., taken up by non-crosslinked carboxylated polypropylene (CPP) resin. The control factor of the exchange rate deduced from the kinetic data is governed basically by the chemical reaction rather than the mass transfer effect particle diffusion and/or liquid film diffusion. In solution, all the graft chains in the outer shell ofa CPP resin could form a "quasi-macromolecular solution" domain. This opinion further demonstrates the structural pattern of CPP resin proposed in earlier paper[1].

  17. Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory.

  18. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  19. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  20. Heat exchanger panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  1. Tuning Exchange Anisotropy of Exchange-Biased System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; HU Jing-Guo; R.L.Stamps

    2008-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy in FM/AFM bilayers has given a lot of static magnetization properties such as enhanced coercivity and magnetization loop shifts.These phenomena are primarily from the effective anisotropies intro-duced into a ferromagnet by exchange coupling with a strongly anisotropic antiferromagnet.These effective anisotropies can also be used to explain the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.In this article,the dynamic con-sequences such as exchange-induced susceptibility,exchange-induced permeability,and the corresponding domain wall characteristics in the exchange-biased structures of ferromagnet/antiferromagnetl/antiferromagnet2 are studied.The results show that the second antiferromagnetic layer can largely affect the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.Especially in the ease of critical temperature,the effects become more obvious.Practically,the exchange anisotropy of biased bilayer system can be tuned by exchange coupling with the second antiferromagnetic layer.

  2. Electrochemical regeneration of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAN-DECON™, CAN-DEREM™ and CAN-DEREM Plus™ processes developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are dilute regenerative chemical decontamination processes that employ ion exchange resin to remove dissolved metals and radionuclides and to regenerate the reagents. Depending on the system volume and oxide and radionuclide inventories, a large volume of spent ion exchange resin may be generated. Storage and long term disposal of spent resin may be one of the impediments to routine use of chemical decontamination processes. An electrochemical method is being developed by AECL for the regeneration of spent ion exchange resin generated during application of CAN-DECON, CAN-DEREM and CAN-DEREM Plus processes. In addition, some of the work being carried out is directed at methods for liquid waste treatment. This paper will describe the three-compartment electrochemical cell developed for laboratory tests. The cell consists of an anode, cathode and central compartment, the latter containing either solid spent resin or spent solution. The anode and the cathode compartments are separated from the central section by cation exchange membranes which allow cations to transport from anode to cathode compartments through the membranes. The paper will discuss the results of cyclic voltammetry tests performed in CAN-DEREM reagents to determine the iron redox potential in these electrolytes. The results of iron deposition tests performed in simulated spent CAN-DEREM reagents to study the current efficiency of iron deposition as a function of iron concentration, pH, cathode material and temperature will be presented. The results of tests of several commercial cation exchange membranes to study transport efficiency of iron through these membranes will also be discussed. (author)

  3. Organic resin anion exchangers for the treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic anion exchange resins are evaluated for 99-TcO4- (pertechnate) removed from aqueous nuclear waste streams. Chemical, thermal and radiation stabilities were studied. Selected resins were examined in detail for their selectivities in the presence of I-, NO3-, SO4=, CO3=, Cl- and OH-. Ion exchange equilibria and kinetic mechanisms were determined. Preliminary investigations of cement encapsulation in polymer modified form were made and some leach studies carried out. (author)

  4. A Review on Heat Transfer Improvent of Plate Heat Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Nandan; Gurpreet Singh Sokhal

    2015-01-01

    Plate heat exchanger has found a wide range of application in various industries like food industries, chemical industries, power plants etc. It reduces the wastage of energy and improves the overall efficiency of the system. Hence, it must be designed to obtain the maximum heat transfer possible. This paper is presented in order to study the various theories and results given over the improvement of heat transfer performance in a plate heat exchanger. However, there is still a la...

  5. Multi-period design of heat exchanger networks

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Heat exchanger networks are an integral part of chemical processes as they recover available heat and reduce utility consumption, thereby improving the overall economics of an industrial plant. This paper focuses on heat exchanger network design for multi-period operation wherein the operating conditions of a process may vary with time. A typical example is the hydrotreating process in petroleum refineries where the operators increase reactor temperature to compensate for catalyst deactivatio...

  6. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  7. Technology Performance Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  8. Global Foreign Exchange Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Crystal Ossolinski; Andrew Zurawski

    2010-01-01

    The most recent six-monthly data on global foreign exchange turnover show a rebound in activity between April and October 2009 across all markets and major currency pairs. The broad-based increase in turnover is in line with the improvement in global economic and financial conditions since early 2009. Despite the rebound, turnover remains below the peak in early 2008.

  9. Heat exchanger vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heat exchangers of various types are common items of plant in the generation and transmission of electricity. The amount of attention given to the flow-induced vibrations of heat exchangers by designers is usually related to the operational history of similar items of plant. Consequently, if a particular design procedure yields items of plant which behave in a satisfactory manner during their operational life, there is little incentive to improve or refine the design procedure. On the other hand, failures of heat exchangers clearly indicate deficiencies in the design procedures or in the data available to the designer. When such failures are attributable to flow-induced vibrations, the identification of the mechanisms involved is a prime importance. Ideally, basic research work provides the background understanding and the techniques necessary to be able to identify the important mechanisms. In practice, the investigation of a flow-induced vibration problem may identify the presence of mechanisms but may not be able to quantify their effects adequately. In these circumstances the need for additional work is established and the objectives of the research programme emerge. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background to the current research programme at C.E.R.L. on heat exchanger vibration

  10. Currency Exchange Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  11. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  12. The Chicago Climate Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About the organization and activities of the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). According to the author the CCX is the world's first and North America's only voluntary, legally binding integrated greenhouse gas reduction and trading system for all 6 GHG emission sources, with offset projects in North America and worldwide

  13. 'Carbon-Money Exchange' to contain global warming and deforestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper builds a basic theory of 'Carbon-Money Exchange' in which carbon as currency in nature's household (ecosystems) and money as currency in humankind's household (economy) are exchanged just like in a foreign exchange. The simple chemical equation below makes it possible (CO2→C+O2=C+O2→CO2). The left-hand side represents the work of plants to remove atmospheric CO2. The right-hand side represents the work of humans as fossil fuel consumers to produce it. The exchange of the two currencies is possible by copying the fossil fuel market. The paper concludes that this new exchange can automatically contain global warming and deforestation, replacing onerous emissions trading. Moreover, it could revolutionize the conventional economy, creating counter-capitalism, or 'carbonism'

  14. Chemical treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third manual of three commissioned by the IAEA on the three principal techniques used in concentrating radioactive liquid wastes, namely chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion exchange. The present manual deals with chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation, commonly called ''chemical treatment'' of low-activity wastes. Topics discussed in the manual are: (i) principles of coagulation on flocculation and sedimentation and associated processes; (ii) process and equipment; (iii) conditioning and disposal of flocculation sludge; (iv) sampling and the equipment required for experiments; and (v) factors governing the selection of processes. 99 refs, 17 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Lithium Alkyl Exchange Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic analyses of two types of exchange reactions of organo- lithium reagents, both alkyl and aryl types, RLi, have been made: (1) halogen-metal interchange with alkyl and aryl halides, R'X, and (2) hydrogen-metal interchange (commonly called metallation) with aromatic hydrocarbons, R'H. Rates of these RLi + R'X ⇄ RX + R'Li; (1) . RLi + R'H ⇄ RH+ R'Li (2) reactions have been determined, conditions under which the systems attain equilibrium have been established, and the positions of equilibrium measured, all as functions of the reactants, solvents and catalysts employed. Concerning halogen-lithium interchange between alkyl groups (1), the conclusion is reached that equilibration proceeds to yield the less sterically demanding alkyl group attached to lithium. The data show, for example, that isobutyllithium is much less stable than n-butyllithium, and again, that 2,6-dimethyl- phenyllithium is much less stable than phenyllithium. The exchange is general with iodides, occurs with some bromides and does not occur with chlorides. The exchange is quite slow in hydrocarbon media and is catalysed by relatively small amounts of ethers. In the presence of the optically active methyl ether of menthol, methyl iodide exchanges with racemic s-butyllithium to give optically active s-butyl iodide. In work with the second reaction, hydrogen-lithium interchange (2), nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry has been used for rate studies. Catalysts (Lewis bases) have been evolved for establishing equilibria in rather unreactive systems, e.g. phenyllithium can be demonstrated to exchange with benzene by labelling the latter radioactivity. From the correlations of structure and reactivity found in this study, the conclusion is reached that the basic alkyllithium structure is dimeric, R2Li2 The arrangement of the groups within this dimer satisfactorily explain the special steric effects noted in organolithium reagent stability. (author)

  16. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  17. Gas exchange measurements in natural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct knowledge of the rates of gas exchange in lakes and the ocean is based almost entirely on measurements of the isotopes 14C, 222Rn and 3He. The distribution of natural radiocarbon has yielded the average rate of CO2 exchange for the ocean and for several closed basin lakes. That of bomb produced radiocarbon has been used in the same systems. The 222Rn to 226Ra ratio in open ocean surface water has been used to give local short term gas exchange rates. The radon method generally cannot be used in lakes, rivers, estuaries or shelf areas because of the input of radon from sediments. A few attempts have been made to use the excess 3He produced by decay of bomb produced tritium in lakes to give gas transfer rates. The uncertainty in the molecular diffusivity of helium and in the diffusivity dependence of the rate of gas transfer holds back the application of this method. A few attempts have been made to enrich the surface waters of small lakes with 226Ra and 3H in order to allow the use of the 222Rn and 3He methods. While these studies give broadly concordant results, many questions remain unanswered. The wind velocity dependence of gas exchange rate has yet to be established in field studies. The dependence of gas exchange rate on molecular diffusivity also remains in limbo. Finally, the degree of enhancement of CO2 exchange through chemical reactions has been only partially explored. 49 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  18. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  19. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  20. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  1. Analytical applications of ion exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Inczédy, J

    2013-01-01

    Analytical Applications of Ion Exchangers presents the laboratory use of ion-exchange resins. This book discusses the development in the analytical application of ion exchangers. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the history and significance of ion exchangers for technical purposes. This text then describes the properties of ion exchangers, which are large molecular water-insoluble polyelectrolytes having a cross-linked structure that contains ionic groups. Other chapters consider the theories concerning the operation of ion-exchange resins and investigate th

  2. Preparation of a Cation Exchanger from Cork Waste: Thermodynamic Study of the Ion Exchange Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An ion exchanger was prepared by sulfonation of cork-waste chars. The exchange properties of the resultant materialwere characterized using Na+, Ca2+ or Fe3+ aqueous solutions, The content of metal ions in the solutions weredetermined by atomic absorption spectrometry. On the basis of the results obtained, the chemical equilibrium andits thermodynamic aspects related to the ion exchange process were studied. It was found that equilibrium constantK varies by the order: Na+<Ca2+<Fe3+, its value increasing with increasing temperature, and that △H°>0 and△S°>0, with -△G° following the sequence: Ca2+>Na+>Fe3+,

  3. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  4. Exchange Rate Risk and the Macroeconomics of Exchange Rate Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Rudiger Dornbusch

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the link between portfolio diversification models of exchange risk and the macroeconomics of exchange rate determination. A first part sets out the mean-variance model of portfolio choice for the case of two nominal assets with random real returns. From there the model is made "international" by a specification of the world inflation process. The concept of exchange risk is discussed in terms of the variability of the real exchange rate. The paper shows that when all rand...

  5. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references

  6. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  7. Chemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yardimeden

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials. Advantages and disadvantages of the chemical machining are mentioned.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, chemical machining process was described its importance as nontraditional machining process. The steps of process were discussed in detail. The tolerances of machined parts were examined.Findings: Paper describes the chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials.Practical implications: The machining operation should be carried out carefully to produce a desired geometry. Environmental laws have important effects when chemical machining is used.Originality/value: The importance of nontraditional machining processes is very high.

  8. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  9. Heat exchanger with removable orifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor steam generator heat exchanger is described which has orifices in the entrance openings of the heat exchange tubes which, although securely fastened to the tubes, can be easily removed by remote handling equipment. (U.K.)

  10. Data Exchange Inventory (DEXI) System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — DEXI is an intranet application used by SSA users to track all incoming and outgoing data exchanges between SSA and our data exchange partners. Information such as...

  11. EXCHANGE RATE - REGIMES AND POLICIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak Lučić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Exchange rate of one currency is the price of the currency expressed in units of other currency. It is formed by the interaction of supply and demand in the foreign exchange market. Given that the exchange rate has a direct impact on the competitiveness of a country in terms of features of its exports and imports, in its balance of payments, and indirectly the overall economic and social development, in addition to acting in market principles - supply and demand in the formation of the equilibrium exchange rate, exchange rate is subject to different, stronger or weaker, more or less, forms of intervention. In the search for the optimal exchange rate policy of the national currency, the monetary authorities are positioned between the two extremes - the complete abandonment of the exchange rate to the market laws of supply and demand, or fixing the exchange rate for any of the selected anchor currency.

  12. Plate heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plate exchanger described includes a series of individual modules joined together, communicating in pairs to delimit two flow circuits separated by two fluids mutually exchanging calories. Each module includes at least one flat frame around a central cavity, at least two apertures made in the frame respectively for the inlet and oulet of the fluids crossing the cavity and at least one opening in the frame for the fluids to pass to a neighbouring module. The frames of the modules form a stack plane upon plane and are isolated by a thin leak-tight sheet parallel to the plane of the frames and separating the fluid substances in two superimposed frames. The heat transfer between these fluids occurs through this thin sheet from one module to the next in the stack

  13. Compact cryocooler heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact heat exchangers are subject to different constraints as a room temperature gas is cooled down by a cold stream returning from a JT valve (or a similar cryoprocess component). In particular, the optimization of exchangers for liquid helium systems has to cover a wide range in temperature and density of the fluid. In the present work we address the following thermodynamic questions: 1. The optimization of intermediate temperatures which optimize stage operation (a stage is assumed to have a constant cross section); 2. The optimum temperature difference available for best overall economic performance values. The results are viewed in the context of porous media concepts applied to rather low speeds of fluid flow in narrow passages. In this paper examples of fluid/solid constraints imposed in this non-classical low temperature area are presented

  14. Inverse indirect magnetic exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Schwabe, Andrej; Titvinidze, Irakli; Potthoff, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic moments strongly coupled to the spins of conduction electrons in a nanostructure can confine the conduction-electron motion due to scattering at almost localized Kondo singlets. We study the resulting local-moment formation in the conduction-electron system and the magnetic exchange coupling mediated by the Kondo singlets. Its distance dependence is oscillatory and induces robust ferro- or antiferromagnetic order in multi-impurity systems.

  15. Exchange Rate Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Yablonskyy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze the foreign exchange currency forecasting techniques. Moreover the central idea behind the topic is to develop the strategy of forecasting by choosing indicators and techniques to make own forecast on currency pair EUR/USD. This thesis work is a mixture of theory and practice analyses. The goal during the work on this project was to study different types of forecasting techniques and make own forecast, practice forecasting and trading on Forex platform, ba...

  16. Membrane Based Heat Exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Aarnes, Sofie Marie

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of the energy used to acclimatise buildings is a huge challenge simultaneously with the implementation of air tight low energy buildings. In residential buildings with several living units centralised air handling units are the most energy efficient system. However, in a centralised system there is important to avoid leakages of pollutions between the exhaust air and the supply air. This leads to that flat plate heat exchangers are used instead of the more energy efficient rotary he...

  17. Knowledge exchange at HKU

    OpenAIRE

    Bacon-shone, J

    2010-01-01

    This talk will explain the KE process in HKU and how we currently answer the following questions: * What is Knowledge Exchange and how is it different from Technology Transfer? * How to identify good KE? * How does good KE benefit the university and its reputation? * How to reward good KE at the individual, department and faculty level? * How to manage our stakeholder relationships from a KE perspective? John Bacon-Shone is currently Associate Director ...

  18. The Exchange Rate Forecasting Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Vitek

    2005-01-01

    We survey and update the empirical literature concerning the predictability of nominal exchange rates using structural macroeconomic models over the recent floating exchange rate period. In particular, we consider both flexible and sticky price versions of the monetary model of nominal exchange rate determination. In agreement with the existing empirical literature, we find that nominal exchange rate movements are difficult to forecast, with a random walk generally dominating the monetary mod...

  19. Exchange currents in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from Adler's low-energy theorem for the soft pion production amplitudes the predictions of the meson exchange currents theory for the nuclear physics are discussed. The results are reformulated in terms of phenomenological lagrangians. This method allows one to pass naturally to the more realistic case of hard mesons. The predictions are critically compared with the existing experimental data. The main processes in which vector isovector exchange currents, vector isoscalar exchange currents and axial exchange currents take place are pointed out

  20. The exchangeability of shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaba Dramane

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes.

  1. Hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two most widely used methods for following hydrogen isotope exchange reactions, namely dedeuteriation and detritiation, involve in the first place the synthesis of an appropriately labelled compound. Rates of dedeuteriation are usually followed by measuring changes in the 1H n.m.r. spectrum of the substrate (examples are given); the method not only gives the rate but also the site(s) of exchange. It is limited to rather slow reactions and is not as accurate as some of the other methods. The development of deuterium n.m.r. spectroscopy means that changes in the 2H n.m.r. spectrum can also be used to measure rates of dedeuteriation. The development of liquid scintillation counting greatly eased the problem of how to detect weak β emitters; the attractions of tritium as a tracer were thereby much enhanced. Nowadays the study of rates of detritiation constitutes one of the most versatile and accurate methods of following hydrogen isotope exchange. Examples of the technique are given. (U.K.)

  2. Soviets seek scientific exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    GEOS-A, associated with the Soviet Union's Institute of Earth Physics, is seeking to promote exchange between Soviet and Western geophysicists. GEOS-A is a nonprofit, private organization formed by specialists from the U.S.S.R. Academy of Scientists.GEOS-A aims to promote the transfer of academic research results to industry and education. It also seeks to stimulate international scientific exchange and to support independent nongovernmental programs and expertise in geophysics and ecology. The organization would like to cooperate with Western universities in exchanging students and young scientists and in building scientific relationships between the two countries. This would include inviting students and young specialists for collaborative scientific research, consultations, language practice, and graduate study in any institute of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences. Participants would live in rented private apartments in downtown Moscow for approximately one week to several months. All living expenses would be covered at a rate higher than the academy's standard one (unfortunately travel to and from the Soviet Union cannot be covered).

  3. Timing Foreign Exchange Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel W. Malone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve short-horizon exchange rate forecasts, we employ foreign exchange market risk factors as fundamentals, and Bayesian treed Gaussian process (BTGP models to handle non-linear, time-varying relationships between these fundamentals and exchange rates. Forecasts from the BTGP model conditional on the carry and dollar factors dominate random walk forecasts on accuracy and economic criteria in the Meese-Rogoff setting. Superior market timing ability for large moves, more than directional accuracy, drives the BTGP’s success. We explain how, through a model averaging Monte Carlo scheme, the BTGP is able to simultaneously exploit smoothness and rough breaks in between-variable dynamics. Either feature in isolation is unable to consistently outperform benchmarks throughout the full span of time in our forecasting exercises. Trading strategies based on ex ante BTGP forecasts deliver the highest out-of-sample risk-adjusted returns for the median currency, as well as for both predictable, traded risk factors.

  4. Heat exchanger tube tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain types of heat-exchangers have tubes opening through a tube sheet to a manifold having an access opening offset from alignment with the tube ends. A tool for inserting a device, such as for inspection or repair, is provided for use in such instances. The tool is formed by a flexible guide tube insertable through the access opening and having an inner end provided with a connector for connection with the opening of the tube in which the device is to be inserted, and an outer end which remains outside of the chamber, the guide tube having adequate length for this arrangement. A flexible transport hose for internally transporting the device slides inside of the guide tube. This hose is long enough to slide through the guide tube, into the heat-exchanger tube, and through the latter to the extent required for the use of the device. The guide tube must be bent to reach the end of the heat-exchanger tube and the latter may be constructed with a bend, the hose carrying anit-friction elements at interspaced locations along its length to make it possible for the hose to negotiate such bends while sliding to the location where the use of the device is required

  5. Integrated Foreign Exchange Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom; Høg, Esben; Kuhn, Jochen

    Empirical research has focused on export as a proxy for the exchange rate exposure and the use of foreign exchange derivatives as the instrument to deal with this exposure. This empirical study applies an integrated foreign exchange risk management approach with a particular focus on the role of...

  6. Experimental study on heat exchange of several types of exchangers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志华; 赵振华; 于洋

    2009-01-01

    Aiming at the ground-coupled source heat pump that possesses the shortcomings of occupying larger land,this article studies the heat exchanged of heat exchanger in piling,and compares it with common heat exchangers buried directly. The result indicates that the heat exchanger makes the best use of structure of building,saves land,reduces the construction cost,and the heat exchanged is obviously more than exchangers buried directly. In winter condition,when W-shape pipe heat exchanger in pile foundation is 50 m deep and diameter is 800 mm,it transfers 1.2-1.3 times as large as the one of single U-shape buried directly at the flow rate of 0.6 m/s,whose borehole diameter is 300 mm. And in summer condition it does about 2.0-2.3 times as that of U-shape one.

  7. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  8. Real Exchange Rate Targets, Nominal Exchange Rate Policies, and Inflation Real Exchange Rate Targets, Nominal Exchange Rate Policies, and Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    J. Saúl Lizondo

    1991-01-01

    Real Exchange Rate Targets, Nominal Exchange Rate Policies, and Inflation Thh paper examines the implications of some nominal exchange rate policies aimed or attaining a given real exchange rate target. A policy rule that sets the rate of nominal depreciation as a function of the departures of the real exchange rate from its target level is unable to achieve the target. In contrast, a policv rule that sets the change in the rate of depreciation as a function of those departures may lead the e...

  9. Mechanistic study on exchange between labeled cyanide and nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of a clean, rapid exchange between the nitrile function of mandelonitrile and cyanide was examined for the preparation of labeled mandelonitrile which could be subsequently rapidly reduced with borane to labeled phenylethanolamine (PEOH). The mandelonitrile exchange (CN-CN) was studied using [13C]-NaCN with crown ethers in THF, monitoring the results with 13C-NMR. A large increase in the intensity of the signal due to [13C]-nitrile was observed. The exchange was also carried out using [14C]-NaCN, and the exchanged nitrile was reduced to [14C]-PEOH. The chemical yield for the reduction of [14C]-mandelonitrile to [14C]-PEOH was 60% and the overall radio-chemical yield of the cyanide-exchange and borane reduction (based on [14C]-NaCN used) was 20%. Mechanisms are proposed which were found to be consistent with results of cyanide exchange of appropriately selected nitriles. (author)

  10. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  11. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  12. Asymmetric exchange in flocks

    OpenAIRE

    Dadhichi, Lokrshi Prawar; Chajwa, Rahul; Maitra, Ananyo; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    As the constituents of a flock are polar, one expects a fore-aft asymmetry in their interactions. We show here that the resulting antisymmetric part of the "exchange coupling" between a bird and its neighbours, if large enough, destabilizes the flock through spontaneous turning of the birds. The same asymmetry also yields a natural mechanism for a difference between the speed of advection of information along the flock and the speed of the flock itself. We show that the absence of detailed ba...

  13. Ion exchange resins. January 1970-August 1988 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-August 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, regeneration, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; food processing; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Methods are included for the processing of spent ion exchange resins and of protecting ion exchange resins from oxidation and chemical degradation. (Contains 227 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. State Health Facts - State Decisions on Exchanges

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — State Decisions For Creating Health Insurance Exchanges, including Exchange Decision, Federal Approval Status, Structure of Exchange, and Type of Exchange.

  15. Characterization of Antimony exchanged Hydrous Zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentavalent 125Sb bearing species are persistent even after chemical treatment in low level liquid waste effluents. It was found that Hydrous Zirconium Oxide (HZO) had an efficiency better that 80% for Sb pick in a wide pH range of 1-13 for concentrations up to 150 mg/l. HZO coated on poly urethane foam was used in WMD Trombay for removal for 125Sb from waste effluent. The exchange capacity of HZO with 40% moisture content ranged between 0.7-0.9 meq/g for removal of Sb(V). In order to understand the mechanism of Sb uptake by HZO, freshly prepared HZO exchanged with trivalent and pentavalent Sb from aqueous solutions was characterized with FTIR and XRD. The FTIR analysis confirmed presence of surface hydroxyl groups. Sb exchanged HZO samples showed modification in characteristic frequencies of -OH group when compared with unexchanged HZO. The broadening of -OH stretching frequency at 3400 cm-1 in Sb exchanged HZO-B indicated of ingress of disorderliness or weakening of -OH bond. The spectral shift was towards lower frequencies indicating clustering of low frequency bonds around -OH groups and weakening of -O-H bond. This change in -OH profile shows it to be the site of exchange/sorption. The XRD analysis showed HZO to be amorphous. Both pentavalent and trivalent antimony was exchanged with HZO, heat treated at 600℃ and analysed with XRD. Hydrous Zirconium Oxide (Heated up to 600℃) had an X-Ray diffraction pattern identical to Aldrich make pure Zirconia (Monoclinic) (PCPDF-371484). Pentavalent Sb loaded HZO and trivalent Sb loaded HZO showed different crystalline structures on heat treatment. Sb(V) loaded HZO shows Orthorhombic structure (PCCPDF-371413) and Sb(III) exchanged Zirconia shows tetragonal structure (PCPDF-501089). Cubic Sb2O5 antimony oxide crystals were also detected in the sample. From the above analysis it could be understood that the surface hydroxyl group helped in sorption of Sb species. But this was not purely surface phenomenon. Sb after

  16. Chemical machining

    OpenAIRE

    A. Yardimeden; T. Ozben; O. Cakir

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and mac...

  17. Chemical Radioprotectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Upadhyay

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Work on the development of chemicals capable of protecting biological systemsfrom radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine being the first molecule to be reported. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, inducing oxygen depletion,antioxidants and modulators of immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. Mechanism of action of some chemical radioprotectors and their combinations have been elucidated, while further understanding is required in many instances. The present review elaborates on structure-activity relationship of some of the chemical radioprotectors, their evaluation, and assessment, limitation, and future prospects.

  18. Phosphorus-contained polycondensation type ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulkun Tursunov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes synthesis and research of new polycondensation type phosphorus-contained ion-exchange polymers by phosphorylation of polymers received through the interaction of furfural (accessible and cheap product of hydrolytic and cotton scraping industry of Uzbekistan with benzyl bromide (chloride. Furfural and its derivatives possess high reactionary ability thanks to presence of carbonyl groups, and presence of a heterocyclic cycle gives to the received polymers high thermal and chemical stability. Polycondensation reaction kinetics of furfural and benzyl bromide, and phosphorylation reaction of the received benzyl bromide-furfural polymer were studied. Sorption, kinetic and thermo-chemical properties of received ion-exchange resins were studied using physico-chemical and chemical analyses to find out specific objects of practical application. Particularly, sorption and selective properties of received ion-exchange resins to ions of such metals as copper, nickel, calcium, magnesium, and uranyl ion were studied. Received results support the application of the investigated ion-exchange resins in processes of clearing of industrial and waste waters of hydrometallurgical manufactures.

  19. Potential heat exchange fluids for use in sulfuric acid vaporizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of liquids have been screened as candidate heat exchange fluids for service in thermochemical cycles that involve the vaporization of sulfuric acid. The required chemical and physical criteria of the liquids is described with the results of some preliminary high temperature test data presented.

  20. Plate heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a plate heat exchanger required to handle corrosive, toxic or radioactive fluids, wherein each plate has a peripheral recess or like formation adapted for receiving an elastomeric gasket, the plates are welded together in pairs by the method comprising the steps of inserting into the gasket recess of a first plate of said pair a metal packing piece and welding the second place (e.g. by a laser or electron beam weld running along the base of the recess) superimposing a second plate on to the first in contact with the packing piece and welding the second plate to the packing piece (e.g. by a laser or electron beam weld). The packing piece may be of hollow or solid cross section and is preferably of the same material (e.g. titanium or stainless steel) as the plates. In use a service fluid in heat exchange with the said corrosive etc. fluid is confined by peripheral and normally elastomeric gaskets. (author)

  1. A Review on Heat Transfer Improvent of Plate Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Nandan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plate heat exchanger has found a wide range of application in various industries like food industries, chemical industries, power plants etc. It reduces the wastage of energy and improves the overall efficiency of the system. Hence, it must be designed to obtain the maximum heat transfer possible. This paper is presented in order to study the various theories and results given over the improvement of heat transfer performance in a plate heat exchanger. However, there is still a lack in data and generalized equations for the calculation of different parameters in the heat exchanger. It requires more attention to find out various possible correlations and generalized solutions for the performance improvement of plate heat exchanger.

  2. Study on actinoid isolation by antimonide ion exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Masamichi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Kubota, Masumitsu; Yamagishi, Isao

    1996-01-01

    To establish a containment of long-life nuclides and an effective reduction of waste volume is important to reduce the loadings on the natural environment. Chemical isolation of radioactive nuclides from wastes was attempted by using inorganic ion exchanger with high specificity and thermal stability. In this study, titanium antimonide was used as an ion exchanger to investigate the adsorption of trivalent metallic ions according to Kielland plot curves. When the ionic equivalent fraction (X-bar{sub M}) was around 0.005, Kielland plot curve of either of 3-valent metallic ions was bent, suggesting the exchanger had two different adsorption sites. The slope of the curve became smaller as an elevation of temperature. These results show that the ion radius was decreased resulting from partial elimination of the hydrated water of ion and thus, the steric conditions around the exchange site might be improved. (M.N.)

  3. Oxygen exchange reaction kinetics for cerium(IV) oxide at 1000 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk oxygen exchange rate kinetics on CeO2 at 1000 °C were observed to have a first order dependence on the fraction of reaction remaining and to be independent of oxygen partial pressure, total pressure, particle size, and specific surface area. This suggests that the exchange reaction is dominated by an internal chemical reaction that is occurring throughout the bulk of the material, and not at the material surface. Oxygen exchange rates were limited by this internal chemical reaction for all CeO2 powders studied (15 nm to −325 mesh), and had a rate constant of 1.19×10−2 s−1 with a time to completion of 617 s. These results are similar to the exchange rates observed previously on PuO2, suggesting that oxygen exchange on PuO2 may also be dominated by an internal chemical reaction under similar conditions. This work will help guide future experiments on 238PuO2 oxygen exchange reactions. - Graphical abstract: Oxygen exchange kinetics on CeO2 at 1000 °C are independent of a wide range of experimental conditions and exhibit first-order chemical reaction kinetics. - Highlights: • Stable oxygen exchange rates obtained on a variety of CeO2 powders at 1000 °C. • Exchange rates are independent of atmospheric composition and specific surface area. • Exchange rates are limited by an internal chemical reaction, not a surface reaction. • CeO2 exchange rates appear similar to the rates observed on PuO2 at 1000 °C

  4. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [3H]5α-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 μM concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost

  5. Synthesis of Heat Exchanger Network Considering Multipass Exchangers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李绍军; 姚平经

    2001-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for synthesis of heat exchanger networks in recent years, most of which consider single pass exchangers. In this study some evolutionary rules have been proposed for synthesis of multipass exchanger networks. The method is based on the heuristic that optimal networks should feature maximum energy recovery and have the minimum number of shells. The effectiveness of the developed evolutionary rules is demonstrated through some literature examples.

  6. Inter- and intra-annular proton exchange in gaseous benzylbenzenium ions (protonated diphenylmethane)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuck, Dietmar; Bäther, Wolfgang

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct proton exchange reactions occur in metastable gaseous benzylbenzenium ions, generated by isobutane chemical ionization of diphenylmethane and four deuterium-labelled analogues. Whereas the proton ring-walk at the benzenium moiety is fast giving rise to a completely random intraannular proton exchange, the interannular proton exchange is surprisingly slow and competes with the elimination of benzene. A kinetic isotope effect of kH/kD= 5 has been determined for the interannular pro...

  7. COMPARATIVE THERMAL ANALYSIS OF HELIXCHANGER WITH SEGMENTAL HEAT EXCHANGER USING BELL-DELAWARE METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pavithran; P. V. Hadgekar; Shinde, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    Heat exchangers are important heat transfer apparatus in oil refining, chemical engineering, environmental protection, electric power generation etc. The present work modifies the existing Bell-Delaware method used for conventional heat exchanger, taking into consideration the helical geometry of Helixchanger. Thermal analysis was carried out to study the impacts of various baffle inclination angles on fluid flow and heat transfer of heat exchangers with helical baffles. The analysis was con...

  8. Physical explosion analysis in heat exchanger network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, M.; Zaini, D.; Shariff, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The failure of shell and tube heat exchangers is being extensively experienced by the chemical process industries. This failure can create a loss of production for long time duration. Moreover, loss of containment through heat exchanger could potentially lead to a credible event such as fire, explosion and toxic release. There is a need to analyse the possible worst case effect originated from the loss of containment of the heat exchanger at the early design stage. Physical explosion analysis during the heat exchanger network design is presented in this work. Baker and Prugh explosion models are deployed for assessing the explosion effect. Microsoft Excel integrated with process design simulator through object linking and embedded (OLE) automation for this analysis. Aspen HYSYS V (8.0) used as a simulation platform in this work. A typical heat exchanger network of steam reforming and shift conversion process was presented as a case study. It is investigated from this analysis that overpressure generated from the physical explosion of each heat exchanger can be estimated in a more precise manner by using Prugh model. The present work could potentially assist the design engineer to identify the critical heat exchanger in the network at the preliminary design stage.

  9. Extraction and ion exchange equilibrium. A study by means logarith-mic diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general logarithmic mole fraction diagram for the study of distribution equilibria of a) a neutral chemical species between two inmiscible solvents and b) and ionic species between an aqueous phase and ion-exchange resin, is proposed. (Author)

  10. Er~(3+)/Yb~(3+) Codoped Phosphate Glass for Ion-Exchanged Planar Waveguide Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel Er3+/Yb3+ codoped phosphate glass was developed, which exhibited good chemical durability in molten salts and excellent spectroscopic properties. Preliminary results of ion exchange at different time and temperature, and with varying melt concentrations indicated that WM4 glass was suitable for ion-exchange experiments and there was no deterioration of surface quality.

  11. The Portfolio Selection by Using Quadratic Programming Approach Case Study of Malaysia Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    YOUSFAT, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses the quadratic approach to select the optimum portfolio of the Malaysian stovk exchange. This framework deals with ten biggest firms posted on the stock exchange during 2014. The result shows that the optimum portfolio includes 22 % of Axiata Group shares, 11% of Genting shares, 30 % of Petronas Chemicals shares, 1% of Sime Darbi shares and 36 % of Tenaga Nasional shares.

  12. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  13. Dissociative charge exchange of H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to molecular dissociation, in particular the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule H2 arising from electron capture of its ion H2+ in a collision. Thereby the important practical question how a chemical bond can be broken is implicitly addressed. This thesis opens (chapter I) with an overview of the available experimental approaches in molecular physics. Further the simple Demkov model for NRCE is described. In chapter II a novel experimental technique for measurements on dissociative processes is introduced which combines a high efficiency with a high energy resolution. A detailed description of the techniques applied in the detector, which has a high spatial and timing resolution with 30 μm and 350 psec FWHM respectively for the detection of one particle, is given in chapter III. A semi-classical theory for NRCE in the medium energy range between a diatomic molecular ion and an atom is developed in chapter IV. The experiments on dissociative charge exchange of H2+ with Ar, Mg, Na and Cs targets at keV energies are described in Chapter V. The predissociation of the c3PIsub(u)-state of H2 populated after charge exchange of H2 with several targets at keV energies; is the subject of chapter VI. In chapter VII, orientational oscillations in the cross section for charge exchange of H2+ with alkali targets are discussed. The last chapter deals with predissociation of highly excited states in H2. (Auth.)

  14. Study of isotopic exchange reactors (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the general case of the theory of first-order isotopic chemical exchange between a gaseous and a liquid phase in a reactor, starting from fundamental reaction kinetics data, and without making any limiting hypothesis concerning the value of the separation factor. The cases of counter-current reactors and of co-current reactors are considered successively. The general deuterium conservation equation requires the definition of the quotient of the reactor; the performances of this reactor are characterised by its overall efficiency. The idea of the ratio is introduced because it represents a convenient intermediary in the calculations. The search for an additive value for reactors in series leads logically to the defining of an exchange capacity, and a total efficiency, or number of theoretical reactors. This method of expressing the performances of a reactor is more general than the efficiency due to Murphee which only has a physical significance in the particular case of homogeneous liquid reactors. The relationships between these various quantities are established, and the representation due to Mc Cabe and Thiele is generalized. The reactor performances are linked to the first - order reaction kinetics by the transfer number. The relationships are given for a certain number of concrete cases. Finally the application of these calculations is given, together with the approximations necessary in the case where, because of the presence of several components in each phase, the exchange reaction no longer obeys a single kinetic law. (authors)

  15. The Stability of Exchange Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Doğan, G.; Assen, M. van; Rijt, A. van de; V.W. Buskens

    2007-01-01

    Economic and sociological exchange theories predict divisions of exchange benefits given an assumed fixed network of exchange relations. Since network structure has been found to have a large impact on actors’ payoffs, actors have strong incentives for network change.Weanswer the question what happens to both the network structure and actor payoffs whenmyopic actors change their links in order to maximize their payoffs. We investigate the networks that are stable, the networks that are effici...

  16. Relative exchangeability with equivalence relations

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Harry; Towsner, Henry

    2016-01-01

    We describe an Aldous--Hoover-type characterization of random relational structures that are exchangeable relative to a fixed structure which may have various equivalence relations. Our main theorem gives the common generalization of the results on relative exchangeability due to Ackerman \\cite{Ackerman2015} and Crane and Towsner \\cite{CraneTowsner2015} and hierarchical exchangeability results due to Austin and Panchenko \\cite{AustinPanchenko2014}.

  17. Diffusion-Exchange Weighted Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Saadallah Ramadan

    2009-01-01

    A method has been developed whereby diffusion and exchange in micro cellular structures in the human brain are correlated to produce a new type of image contrast leading to determination of water exchange rates in vivo. The diffusion method relies on differential apparent diffusion coefficients as detectable nuclei exchange between adjacent compartments marked with different apparent diffusion coefficient values (e.g. intra- and extra-cellular compartments). A new pulse sequence was developed...

  18. Information exchange in paediatric care

    OpenAIRE

    Mårtenson Wikström, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Information exchange is an essential component for all involved in the paediatric care encounter. Despite this, most of the research about information exchange concerns adults and the significance of the child’s existence in the encounter have not been given sufficient attention. Therefore, the overall aims of this thesis were twofold. Firstly, the aim was to identify, describe and generate concepts in information exchange between minors, parents/guardians and health care professionals in pae...

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Ion Exchange Properties of Lithium Zirconium Silicate as Inorganic Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new three components inorganic ion exchange material lithium zirconium silicate (Li Zr Si) has been synthesized by adding a mixture of lithium hydroxide (LiOH)and zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCI2) to sodium metasilicate (Na2Si O3) in different volume ratios. the synthesized materials ratios I,II and III have been characterize on the basis of chemical composition, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analysis . from the data obtained the synthesized different ratios of lithium zirconium silicates can be written as (Zr O)2 Li2 (SiO3)3. 10.7H2O, (Zr O) Li2(SiO3)2-5.3H2O and (Zr o)Li4 (SiO3)3- 4.4 H2O with amorphous structure. The chemical stability of the materials has been tested in water and acidic media. The ion exchange capacities of these materials for Na+, K+and Cs+ ions have been found to take the order Na+>K+>Cs+for all synthesized materials and depend on the crystal ionic radii of exchanging cations

  20. Cosmologies with Energy Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Barrow, John D.

    2006-01-01

    We provide a simple mathematical description of the exchange of energy between two fluids in an expanding Friedmann universe with zero spatial curvature. The evolution can be reduced to a single non-linear differential equation which we solve in physically relevant cases and provide an analysis of all the possible evolutions. Particular power-law solutions exist for the expansion scale factor and are attractors at late times under particular conditions. We show how a number of problems studied in the literature, such as cosmological vacuum energy decay, particle annihilation, and the evolution of a population of evaporating black holes, correspond to simple particular cases of our model. In all cases we can determine the effects of the energy transfer on the expansion scale factor. We also consider the situation in the presence of anti-decaying fluids and so called phantom fluids which violate the dominant energy conditions.

  1. Sister chromatid exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) are cytological manifestations of DNA double-strand breakage and rejoining at homologous sites between the two chromatids of a chromosome. The occurrence of SCEs was deduced from the transformation of small ring chromosomes to large ring chromosomes following cell division. Using tritiated thymidine as marker and microautoradiography for detection, others demonstrated the occurrence of SCEs from the silver grain pattern on the sister chromatids. This method was eventually replaced by cytochemical methods. One showed that if cells were grown in medium containing 5-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) for two cycles, the sister chromatids can be distinguished by the differential quenching of the fluorescence of the fluorochrome Hoechst 33258. Reduced staining with Giemsa stain of the BrdUrd-incorporated chromatids was also found to be useful in differentiating sister chromatids. The authors review in this chapter only those studies which have implications on the origin of SCEs

  2. Redundancy of Exchangeable Estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana P. Santhanam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exchangeable random partition processes are the basis for Bayesian approaches to statistical inference in large alphabet settings. On the other hand, the notion of the pattern of a sequence provides an information-theoretic framework for data compression in large alphabet scenarios. Because data compression and parameter estimation are intimately related, we study the redundancy of Bayes estimators coming from Poisson–Dirichlet priors (or “Chinese restaurant processes” and the Pitman–Yor prior. This provides an understanding of these estimators in the setting of unknown discrete alphabets from the perspective of universal compression. In particular, we identify relations between alphabet sizes and sample sizes where the redundancy is small, thereby characterizing useful regimes for these estimators.

  3. Asymmetric exchange in flocks

    CERN Document Server

    Dadhichi, Lokrshi Prawar; Maitra, Ananyo; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    As the constituents of a flock are polar, one expects a fore-aft asymmetry in their interactions. We show here that the resulting antisymmetric part of the "exchange coupling" between a bird and its neighbours, if large enough, destabilizes the flock through spontaneous turning of the birds. The same asymmetry also yields a natural mechanism for a difference between the speed of advection of information along the flock and the speed of the flock itself. We show that the absence of detailed balance, and not merely the breaking of Galilean invariance, is responsible for this difference. We delineate the conditions on parameters and wavenumber for the existence of the turning instability. Lastly we present an alternative perspective based on flow-alignment effects in an active liquid crystal with turning inertia in contact with a momentum sink.

  4. Exchange bias theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on the exchange bias (EB) phenomenon has witnessed a flurry of activity during recent years, which stems from its use in magnetic sensors and as stabilizers in magnetic reading heads. EB was discovered in 1956 but it attracted only limited attention until these applications, closely related to giant magnetoresistance, were developed during the last decade. In this review, I initially give a short introduction, listing the most salient experimental results and what is required from an EB theory. Next, I indicate some of the obstacles in the road towards a satisfactory understanding of the phenomenon. The main body of the text reviews and critically discusses the activity that has flourished, mainly during the last 5 years, in the theoretical front. Finally, an evaluation of the progress made, and a critical assessment as to where we stand nowadays along the road to a satisfactory theory, is presented

  5. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  6. Heat exchanger repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two ways to rapir heater tubes in tubular heat exchangers, partial replacement of tubes and a technique called sleeving. In the former case, the defective tube section is cut out, removed, and replaced by a new section butt welded to the old piece of tube which remained in place. In the sleeving technique, a tube sleeve is slid into the defective tube and, after expansion, welded to the original tube. In this case, the welding technique employed is not laser welding, as is often maintained in the literature, but TIG pulsation welding. The results of preliminary tests and the qualification of both processes are outlined in the article; an account is given also of the replacement of the tube sections when repairing condensate coolers. (orig.)

  7. The Radioecology Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, Catherine L.; Beresford, Nicholas A.; Patel, Sabera; Wells, Claire; Howard, Brenda J. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Mora, Juan Carlos; Real, Almudena [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Hinton, Thomas [IRSN-Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Vesterbacka, Pia; Muikku, Maarit; Outola, Iisa [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Skuterud, Lavrans; AlbumYtre-Eide, Martin [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini Naeringspark 13, Oesteraas, 1332 (Norway); Bradshaw, Clare; Stark, Karolina; Jaeschke, Ben [Stockholms Universitet, Universitetsvaegen 10, Stockholm, 10691 (Sweden); Oughton, Deborah; Skipperud, Lindis [NMBU Norwegian University of Life Science P.O. Box 5003N-1432 Aas, Oslo (Norway); Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Vanhoudt, Nathalie [SCK.CEN, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Avenue Herrmann-Debroux 40, BE-1160 Brussels (Belgium); Willrodt, Christine; Steiner, Martin [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Willy-Brandt-Strasse 5, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The Radioecology Exchange (www.radioecology-exchange.org) was created in 2011 under the EU FP7 STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) network of excellence. The project aims to integrate the research efforts on radioecology of nine European organisations into a sustainable network. The web site (together with associated Twitter feeds and Facebook page) currently provides the gateway to project outputs and other on-line radiation protection and radioecological resources. In 2013, the EU FP7 COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) project commenced; it aims to strengthen research on the impact of radiation on man and the environment. COMET includes the STAR partners with the addition of one Japanese and two Ukrainian research institutes. As STAR and COMET interact closely together and with the European Radioecology Alliance (www.er-alliance.org/), the Radioecology Exchange will be modified to become an international 'hub' for information related to radioecology. Project specific information will be hosted on separate web sites www.star-radioecology.org and www.comet-radioecology.org. This paper will present an overview of the resources hosted on the Radioecology Exchange inviting other scientists to contribute. Highlighted aspects of the site include: Social media (News blog, Twitter, Facebook) - Items announcing project outputs, training courses, jobs, studentships etc. Virtual laboratory - Information which encourages integration through joint research and integrated use of data and sample materials. These pages will focus on three categories: (1) Methodological: descriptions and video clips of commonly used analytical methods and protocols and the procedures used in STAR and COMET; (2) Informative: databases made available by STAR/COMET partners together with details of sample archives held. Fact-sheets on radio-ecologically important radionuclides and 'topical descriptions' which show absorbed

  8. The Radioecology Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioecology Exchange (www.radioecology-exchange.org) was created in 2011 under the EU FP7 STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) network of excellence. The project aims to integrate the research efforts on radioecology of nine European organisations into a sustainable network. The web site (together with associated Twitter feeds and Facebook page) currently provides the gateway to project outputs and other on-line radiation protection and radioecological resources. In 2013, the EU FP7 COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) project commenced; it aims to strengthen research on the impact of radiation on man and the environment. COMET includes the STAR partners with the addition of one Japanese and two Ukrainian research institutes. As STAR and COMET interact closely together and with the European Radioecology Alliance (www.er-alliance.org/), the Radioecology Exchange will be modified to become an international 'hub' for information related to radioecology. Project specific information will be hosted on separate web sites www.star-radioecology.org and www.comet-radioecology.org. This paper will present an overview of the resources hosted on the Radioecology Exchange inviting other scientists to contribute. Highlighted aspects of the site include: Social media (News blog, Twitter, Facebook) - Items announcing project outputs, training courses, jobs, studentships etc. Virtual laboratory - Information which encourages integration through joint research and integrated use of data and sample materials. These pages will focus on three categories: (1) Methodological: descriptions and video clips of commonly used analytical methods and protocols and the procedures used in STAR and COMET; (2) Informative: databases made available by STAR/COMET partners together with details of sample archives held. Fact-sheets on radio-ecologically important radionuclides and 'topical descriptions' which show absorbed dose estimations for

  9. Data Exchange in Grid Workflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hongwei; MIAO Huaikou

    2006-01-01

    In existing web services-based workflow, data exchanging across the web services is centralized, the workflow engine intermediates at each step of the application sequence.However, many grid applications, especially data intensive scientific applications, require exchanging large amount of data across the grid services.Having a central workfiow engine relay the data between the services would results in a bottleneck in these cases.This paper proposes a data exchange model for individual grid workflow and multiworkflows composition respectively.The model enables direct communication for large amounts of data between two grid services.To enable data to exchange among multiple workflows, the bridge data service is used.

  10. Mastering Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Elfassy, David

    2013-01-01

    The bestselling guide to Exchange Server, fully updated for the newest version Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 is touted as a solution for lowering the total cost of ownership, whether deployed on-premises or in the cloud. Like the earlier editions, this comprehensive guide covers every aspect of installing, configuring, and managing this multifaceted collaboration system. It offers Windows systems administrators and consultants a complete tutorial and reference, ideal for anyone installing Exchange Server for the first time or those migrating from an earlier Exchange Server version.Microsoft

  11. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial discoloration. Scarring Reactivation of cold sores What can I expect after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  12. Unnecessary Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  13. Chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of chemical kinetics. It starts summary of chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism, and explains basic velocity law, experiment method for determination of reaction velocity, temperature dependence of reaction velocity, theory of reaction velocity, theory on reaction of unimolecular, process of atom and free radical, reaction in solution, catalysis, photochemical reaction, such as experiment and photochemical law and rapid reaction like flame, beam of molecule and shock tube.

  14. Chemical shift imprint of intersubunit communication in a symmetric homodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bradley T; Sapienza, Paul J; Lee, Andrew L

    2016-08-23

    Allosteric communication is critical for protein function and cellular homeostasis, and it can be exploited as a strategy for drug design. However, unlike many protein-ligand interactions, the structural basis for the long-range communication that underlies allostery is not well understood. This lack of understanding is most evident in the case of classical allostery, in which a binding event in one protomer is sensed by a second symmetric protomer. A primary reason why study of interdomain signaling is challenging in oligomeric proteins is the difficulty in characterizing intermediate, singly bound species. Here, we use an NMR approach to isolate and characterize a singly ligated state ("lig1") of a homodimeric enzyme that is otherwise obscured by rapid exchange with apo and saturated forms. Mixed labeled dimers were prepared that simultaneously permit full population of the lig1 state and isotopic labeling of either protomer. Direct visualization of peaks from lig1 yielded site-specific ligand-state multiplets that provide a convenient format for assessing mechanisms of intersubunit communication from a variety of NMR measurements. We demonstrate this approach on thymidylate synthase from Escherichia coli, a homodimeric enzyme known to be half-the-sites reactive. Resolving the dUMP1 state shows that active site communication occurs not upon the first dUMP binding, but upon the second. Surprisingly, for many sites, dUMP1 peaks are found beyond the limits set by apo and dUMP2 peaks, indicating that binding the first dUMP pushes the enzyme ensemble to further conformational extremes than the apo or saturated forms. The approach used here should be generally applicable to homodimers. PMID:27466406

  15. QUESPOWR MRI: QUantification of Exchange as a function of Saturation Power On the Water Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randtke, Edward A; Pagel, Mark D; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-09-01

    QUantification of Exchange as a function of Saturation Power On the Water Resonance (QUESPOWR) MRI is a new method that can estimate chemical exchange rates. This method acquires a series of OPARACHEE MRI acquisitions with a range of RF powers for the WALTZ16(∗) pulse train, which are applied on the water resonance. A QUESPOWR plot can be generated from the power dependence of the % water signal, which is similar to a QUESP plot that is generated from CEST MRI acquisition methods with RF saturation applied off-resonance from water. A QUESPOWR plot can be quantitatively analyzed using linear fitting methods to provide estimates of average chemical exchange rates. Analyses of the shapes of QUESPOWR plots can also be used to estimate relative differences in average chemical exchange rates and concentrations of biomolecules. The performance of QUESPOWR MRI was assessed via simulations, an in vitro study with iopamidol, and an in vivo study with a mouse model of mammary carcinoma. The results showed that QUESPOWR MRI is especially sensitive to chemical exchange between water and biomolecules that have intermediate to fast chemical exchange rates and chemical shifts that are close to water, which are notoriously difficult to assess with other CEST MRI methods. In addition, in vivo QUESPOWR MRI detected acidic tumor tissues relative to normal tissues that are pH-neutral, and therefore may be a new paradigm for tumor detection with MRI. PMID:27404128

  16. QUESPOWR MRI: QUantification of Exchange as a function of Saturation Power On the Water Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randtke, Edward A.; Pagel, Mark D.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-09-01

    QUantification of Exchange as a function of Saturation Power On the Water Resonance (QUESPOWR) MRI is a new method that can estimate chemical exchange rates. This method acquires a series of OPARACHEE MRI acquisitions with a range of RF powers for the WALTZ16∗ pulse train, which are applied on the water resonance. A QUESPOWR plot can be generated from the power dependence of the % water signal, which is similar to a QUESP plot that is generated from CEST MRI acquisition methods with RF saturation applied off-resonance from water. A QUESPOWR plot can be quantitatively analyzed using linear fitting methods to provide estimates of average chemical exchange rates. Analyses of the shapes of QUESPOWR plots can also be used to estimate relative differences in average chemical exchange rates and concentrations of biomolecules. The performance of QUESPOWR MRI was assessed via simulations, an in vitro study with iopamidol, and an in vivo study with a mouse model of mammary carcinoma. The results showed that QUESPOWR MRI is especially sensitive to chemical exchange between water and biomolecules that have intermediate to fast chemical exchange rates and chemical shifts that are close to water, which are notoriously difficult to assess with other CEST MRI methods. In addition, in vivo QUESPOWR MRI detected acidic tumor tissues relative to normal tissues that are pH-neutral, and therefore may be a new paradigm for tumor detection with MRI.

  17. On-line fouling monitor for heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological and/or chemical fouling in utility service water system heat exchangers adversely affects operation and maintenance costs, and reduced heat transfer capability can force a power deaerating or even a plant shut down. In addition, service water heat exchanger performance is a safety issue for nuclear power plants, and the issue was highlighted by NRC in Generic Letter 89-13. Heat transfer losses due to fouling are difficult to measure and, usually, quantitative assessment of the impact of fouling is impossible. Plant operators typically measure inlet and outlet water temperatures and flow rates and then perform complex calculations for heat exchanger fouling resistance or ''cleanliness''. These direct estimates are often imprecise due to inadequate instrumentation. Electric Power Research Institute developed and patented an on-line condenser fouling monitor. This monitor may be installed in any location within the condenser; does not interfere with routine plant operations, including on-line mechanical and chemical treatment methods; and provides continuous, real-time readings of the heat transfer efficiency of the instrumented tube. This instrument can be modified to perform on-line monitoring of service water heat exchangers. This paper discusses the design, construction of the new monitor, and algorithm used to calculate service water heat exchanger fouling

  18. Ion exchange materials, method of forming ion exchange materials, and methods of treating liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertsching, Alan K.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wey, John E.

    2007-12-25

    The invention includes an ion affinity material having an organic component which is sulfonated and which is chemically bonded to an inorganic substrate component. The invention includes a method of forming a metal binding material. A solid support material comprising surface oxide groups is provided and an organic component having at least one alkyl halide is covalently linked to at least some of the surface oxide groups to form a modified support material. The at least one alkyl halide is subsequently converted into an alkyl sulfonate. The invention further includes a method and system for extracting ions from a liquid. An ion exchange material having a sulfonated alkyl silane component covalently bonded to a metal oxide support material is provided and a liquid is exposed to the ion exchange material.

  19. Fixed Points for Stochastic Open Chemical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, V A

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of this paper we give a short review of the hierarchy of stochastic models, related to physical chemistry. In the basement of this hierarchy there are two models --- stochastic chemical kinetics and the Kac model for Boltzman equation. Classical chemical kinetics and chemical thermodynamics are obtained as some scaling limits in the models, introduced below. In the second part of this paper we specify some simple class of open chemical reaction systems, where one can still prove the existence of attracting fixed points. For example, Michaelis\\tire Menten kinetics belongs to this class. At the end we present a simplest possible model of the biological network. It is a network of networks (of closed chemical reaction systems, called compartments), so that the only source of nonreversibility is the matter exchange (transport) with the environment and between the compartments. Keywords: chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, Kac model, mathematical biology

  20. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  1. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  2. Electronic trading on futures exchanges

    OpenAIRE

    Asani Sarkar; Michelle Tozzi

    1998-01-01

    Although the open outcry method is still the best way to trade highly active contracts on futures exchanges, electronic systems can improve the efficiency and cost effectiveness of trading some types of futures and options. In recent years, the volume of electronic trades on futures exchanges has more than doubled, and it should continue to grow rapidly.

  3. Heat exchanger performance monitoring guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling can occur in many heat exchanger applications in a way that impedes heat transfer and fluid flow and reduces the heat transfer or performance capability of the heat exchanger. Fouling may be significant for heat exchanger surfaces and flow paths in contact with plant service water. This report presents guidelines for performance monitoring of heat exchangers subject to fouling. Guidelines include selection of heat exchangers to monitor based on system function, safety function and system configuration. Five monitoring methods are discussed: the heat transfer, temperature monitoring, temperature effectiveness, delta P and periodic maintenance methods. Guidelines are included for selecting the appropriate monitoring methods and for implementing the selected methods. The report also includes a bibliography, example calculations, and technical notes applicable to the heat transfer method

  4. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  5. The influence of gold(i) on the mechanism of thiolate, disulfide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garusinghe, Gamage S P; Bessey, S Max; Bruce, Alice E; Bruce, Mitchell R M

    2016-07-28

    The mechanism of gold(i)-thiolate, disulfide exchange was investigated by using initial-rate kinetic studies, 2D ((1)H-(1)H) ROESY NMR spectroscopy, and electrochemical/chemical techniques. The rate law for exchange is overall second order, first order in gold(i)-thiolate and disulfide. 2D NMR experiments show evidence of association between gold(i)-thiolate and disulfide. Electrochemical/chemical investigations do not show evidence of free thiolate and are consistent with a mechanism involving formation of a [Au-S, S-S], four-centered metallacycle intermediate during gold(i)-thiolate, disulfide exchange. PMID:27353236

  6. Chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Wing-Fai

    2015-09-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One on-going research subject is finding new paths to synthesize species either in the gas-phase or on grain surfaces. Specific formation routes for water or carbon monoxide are discussed in more details. 13th Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  7. Energy-Exchange Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine what energy savings can be achieved by coordinating the resources and requirements of two facilities, the 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and a housing development named Starrett City with its own total energy system. It was determined that three energy exchange options were economically and technically feasible. These include: the transfer of digester gas produced at the 26th Ward to the boilers at the Starrett City's total energy plant (TEP); the transfer of hot water heated at the TEP to the 26th Ward for space and process heating; and the transfer of coal effluent waste water from the 26th Ward to the condenser cooling systems at the TEP. Technical information is presented to support the findings. The report addresses those tasks of the statement of work dedicated to data acquisition, analysis, and energy conservation strategies internal to the Starrett City TEP and the community it supplies as well as to the 26th Ward WPCP. (MCW)

  8. Electrically switched ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilga, M.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  9. Some extra-high capacity heat exchangers of special design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technical advances in developing high-capacity power generating equipment, in using new heat transfer media, in seawater desalination, and in chemical processing require the development of higher unit-capacity heat exchangers. Up-to-date solutions illustrating the progress made in the development of such heat exchangers is discussed and suggestions are made which may be of interest in this field. Specific heat transfer systems discussed include systems for air-cooled condensing power plants, multiple reheating cycles for steam turbines, and systems using liquid lead as the transfer medium. (U.S.)

  10. Reillex/trademark/ HPQ: A new, macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin for separating plutonium using nitrate anion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is the major aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure scrap materials. Most strong-base anion exchange resins incorporate a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer. A newly available, macroporous anion exchange resin based on a copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene has been evaluated. Comparative data for Pu(IV) sorption kinetics and capacity are presented for this new resin and two other commonly used anion exchange resins. The new resin offers high capacity and rapid sorption kinetics for Pu(IV) from nitric acid, as well as greater stability to chemical and radiolytic degradation. 8 refs., 12 figs

  11. Performance of Helical Coil Heat Recovery Exchanger using Nanofluid as Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Bozorgan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant condidate in chemical processes for heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on reducing the number of turns in a helical coil heat recovery exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity in a biomass heating plant using γ-Al2O3/n-decane nanofluid as coolant. The nanofluid flows through the tubes and the hot n-hexane flows through the shell. The numerical results show that using nanofluid as coolant in a helical coil heat exchanger can reduce the manufacturing cost of the heat exchanger and pumping power by reducing the number of turns of the coil.

  12. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  13. Characterization of electroactive Cs ion-exchange materials using XAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various ion exchange materials have been proposed for the removal of Cs from high level waste streams produced during the reprocessing of fuel rods. Cs can be released from loaded traditional exchange resins by elution and then the resin can be reused. However large quantities of secondary wastes are generated. Another class of single use exchangers is directly incorporated in the loaded state into a solid waste form (e.g., borosilicate glass logs). A third alternative is electroactive ion-exchange materials, where the uptake and elution of Cs are controlled by an applied potential. This approach has several advantages over traditional reusable ion-exchange resin including much reduced secondary waste, higher Cs selectivity, and higher durability. XAS experiments were conducted at the Fe K-edge and Cs LIII-edge on a series of electrochemically produced nickel ferrocyanide films to determine the effects of deposition conditions and subsequent alkali exchange on structural and chemical aspects of the films. The deposition conditions include methods described in the literature and PNNL proprietary procedures. Although the performance and the durability of the films do vary with processing conditions, Fe K-edge EXAFS results indicate that all deposition conditions result in the formation of the cubic phase. Initial results from Cs LIII-edge EXAFS analysis suggest that the Cs ion is present as a hydrated species

  14. Asynchronous replica exchange software for grid and heterogeneous computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F.; Zhang, Baofeng; Samlalsingh, Sade; Mentes, Ahmet; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-11-01

    Parallel replica exchange sampling is an extended ensemble technique often used to accelerate the exploration of the conformational ensemble of atomistic molecular simulations of chemical systems. Inter-process communication and coordination requirements have historically discouraged the deployment of replica exchange on distributed and heterogeneous resources. Here we describe the architecture of a software (named ASyncRE) for performing asynchronous replica exchange molecular simulations on volunteered computing grids and heterogeneous high performance clusters. The asynchronous replica exchange algorithm on which the software is based avoids centralized synchronization steps and the need for direct communication between remote processes. It allows molecular dynamics threads to progress at different rates and enables parameter exchanges among arbitrary sets of replicas independently from other replicas. ASyncRE is written in Python following a modular design conducive to extensions to various replica exchange schemes and molecular dynamics engines. Applications of the software for the modeling of association equilibria of supramolecular and macromolecular complexes on BOINC campus computational grids and on the CPU/MIC heterogeneous hardware of the XSEDE Stampede supercomputer are illustrated. They show the ability of ASyncRE to utilize large grids of desktop computers running the Windows, MacOS, and/or Linux operating systems as well as collections of high performance heterogeneous hardware devices.

  15. Some Aspects of Electron-Exchange Reactions in Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most theories of electron exchange reactions are based upon the Franck-Condon principle. This principle requires that the inner co-ordination shells of the reactants and the polarization of the surrounding medium rearrange to some intermediate nonequilibrium configuration before the electron transfer takes place. The calculation of this reorganization requires a knowledge of such properties of the reactants as force constants, interatomic distances, etc. Unfortunately all these quantities are not known for any electron exchange reactions of interest and consequently an a priori calculation of exchange rates cannot be made with confidence at the present time. However, R. A. Marcus has shown that the rates of exchange reactions (ΔG° = 0) can be readily related to the rates of electron-transfer reactions which are accompanied by a net chemical change (ΔG° < 0). Experimental evidence bearing on the Marcus predictions are summarized. Exchange reactions between ions of like charge are often catalysed by oppositely charged ions. Important information about the nature of this catalysis can be obtained if the substitution rates are slower than, or comparable to, the electron-transfer rates. This approach has recently been used to study the effect of anions on exchange reactions between substitution labile cations. Some recent results of these studies are discussed. (author)

  16. Ion exchange defines the biological activity of titanate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Mónika; Pfeiffer, Ilona

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional titanate nanotubes (TiONTs) were subjected to systematic ion exchange to determine the impact of these modifications on biological activities. Ion exchanged TiONTs (with Ag, Mg, Bi, Sb, Ca, K, Sr, Fe, and Cu ions) were successfully synthesized and the presence of the substituted ions was verified by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A complex screening was carried out to reveal differences in toxicity to human cells, as well as in antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities between the various modified nanotubes. Our results demonstrated that Ag ion exchanged TiONTs exerted potent antibacterial and antifungal effects against all examined microbial species but were ineffective on viruses. Surprisingly, the antibacterial activity of Cu/TiONTs was restricted to Micrococcus luteus. Most ion exchanged TiONTs did not show antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial and fungal species. Incorporation of various ions into nanotube architectures lead to mild, moderate, or even to a massive loss of human cell viability; therefore, this type of biological effect exerted by TiONTs can be greatly modulated by ion exchange. These findings further emphasize the contribution of ion exchange in determining not only the physical and chemical characteristics but also the bioactivity of TiONT against different types of living cells. PMID:26972521

  17. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.d [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s{sup -1}. Backbone amide {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41{epsilon}. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D{sub 2}O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long {sup 15}N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  18. Exchange transfusion for severe malaria: A comparison of red cell exchange with whole blood exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udani S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare exchange transfusions done for severe malaria using the traditional whole blood exchange method with therapeutic red cell exchange (TREX done using a Cobe spectra cell separator. Methods: 6 children with acute, severe malaria and parasitic infestation rates (IR >50% with multi organ failure, were subjected to exchange transfusions. 3 had whole blood single volume exchanges and 3 had TREX using the Cobe-Spectra cell separator. The two groups were compared for difficulties encountered, time taken, complications, quantity of blood products used, metabolic and hematological derangements and fall in IR. Results: The TREX took less time per 100 ml of blood exchanged, resulted in a 24% more efficient decrease in the IR and required less donor plasma. 3/3 tolerated the TREX well whereas one child had complications of hypocalcemia and acidosis with the whole blood exchange. The rise in hemoglobin/hematocrit was comparable in both and the platelet count was not significantly altered in either group. There was no significant alteration in the DIC profile in either group. All 6 children recovered within comparable time frames. Conclusion: The TREX was safer, more efficacious and less time consuming. This procedure is recommended whenever available for red cell exchange in malaria.

  19. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  20. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  1. Chemical Mahjong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  2. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  3. A novel electrochemical ion exchange system and its application in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansheng; Li, Yongbin; Liu, Zhigang; Wu, Tao; Tian, Ying

    2011-06-01

    A novel electrochemical ion exchange system with porous cylinder electrodes is proposed for treatment of wastewater. This system can be used for desalination without the costly ion-exchange membrane and extra chemical reagents. Since the electrodes are completely uniform and no ion-exchange membrane was used in this system, it can be operated by switching anodes and cathodes flexibly for eliminating the scaling on the surface of electrodes. The strong base ion-exchange resin grains placed among the anode and cathode have played as supporting electrolyte, which is capable for the treatment of wastewater with low conductivity. The concentrated and neutralized anolyte containing chlorine is effective for disinfection and contaminants removal. Under the experimental conditions, the removal percentage of total dissolved salts was 83% and the removal percentage of chemical oxygen demand was 92% without consumption of extra chemical reagents. PMID:25084577

  4. Effect of polyamine reagents on exchange capacity in ion exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, T. I.; Dyachenko, F. V.; Bogatyreva, Yu. V.; Borodastov, A. K.; Ershova, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of compounds involved in complex reagents is described using Helamin 906H reagent as an example. The working exchange capacity of KU-2-8chs cation exchanger in hydrogen form and Amberlite IRA 900Cl anion exchanger in OH form remained almost unchanged when they were used repeatedly to purify water that contained Helamin 906H reagent; in addition, this capacity was the same upon filtration of water that did not contain this reagent. Leakage of total organic carbon was observed earlier than that of calcium ions upon filtration of the solution through the cation exchanger layer. The test results obtained in industrial conditions indicated that using H-OH filters to purify turbine condensate enables the decrease of the concentration of organic and other impurities therein.

  5. Temperature dependence of exchange field in exchange-spring magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pr8Fe88B4 ribbons prepared by melt spinning have been investigated by x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermomagnetic analysis, atom force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interface device magnetometer. The results show that the annealed ribbons consist of the Pr2Fe14B and α-Fe phases. The magnetization of soft α-Fe phase remains parallel to the magnetization of the hard Pr2Fe14B phase for fields less than the exchange field (Hex). The exchange field in exchange-spring magnets, determined from the demagnetization curves measured at various temperatures, increases with decreasing grain size and measure temperature. The temperature dependence of exchange field was analyzed qualitatively by the expression Hex=(AK)1/2/(Mst). [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  6. HEAT EXCHANGERS IN SEWAGE PIPES

    OpenAIRE

    Podobeková, Veronika; Peráčková, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses utilization of heat from waste water in sewage. During the year, temperature of water in sewage ranges between 10 °C and 20 °C and the heat from sewage could be used for heating, cooling and hot water preparation in building. The heat is extracted through a transfer surface area of the heat exchanger into the heat pump, which is able to utilize the low–potential energy. Different design and types of the heat exchangers in sewage are dealt with: heat exchangers embedded i...

  7. Use of the neutron diffraction - H/D exchange technique to determine the conformational dynamics of trypsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reported here are studies analyzing the extent and nature of the inherent conformational fluctuations in trypsin by neutron diffraction - hydrogen exchange techniques. The pattern of exchange investigates systematic relationships between exchangeable sites and the structural and chemical properties of the molecule. Our findings that pH 7, 200 and 1 year of soaking all sites of trypsin are fully exchanged except those which are especially well protected by the structure. Essentially all the sites in which the peptide hydrogens are bonded directly to water molecules - either in the bulk solvent regions or in interior clusters - are fully exchanged. 41 references, 10 figures

  8. Chemical flashlamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have characterized the optical output and Nd:glass pumping performance of large-scale (120-cm-long, 1.2-cm-inner-diam), metal-oxidizer chemical flashlamps supplied to us by G.T.E. Sylvania. The experimental results were obtained on the same test bed that was used to study xenon electrical flashlamps, as described in Dependence of Flashlamp Performance on Gas Fill and Bore Size, earlier in this section. The peak Nd inversion levels produced by the chemical lamps were less than or equal to 10% of those generated by a xenon lamp of similar size and energy loading. The Peak Nd levels are in good agreement with predictions for the pumping rates in Nd:glass by a blackbody at the color temperatures of 30000 to 50000C, which they have measured during the burn of the pyrotechnic lamp

  9. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat...

  10. Mass exchange processes with input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate a system of interacting clusters evolving through mass exchange and supplemented by input of small clusters. Three possibilities depending on the rate of exchange generically occur when input is homogeneous: continuous growth, gelation, and instantaneous gelation. We mostly study the growth regime using scaling methods. An exchange process with reaction rates equal to the product of reactant masses admits an exact solution which allows us to justify the validity of scaling approaches in this special case. We also investigate exchange processes with a localized input. We show that if the diffusion coefficients are mass-independent, the cluster mass distribution becomes stationary and develops an algebraic tail far away from the source. (paper)

  11. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  12. Compact heat exchangers modeling: Condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cascales, J.R.; Vera-Garcia, F. [Technical University of Cartagena, Thermal and Fluid Engineering Department, C/Dr. Fleming, s/n 30202 Cartagena, Murcia (Spain); Gonzalvez-Macia, J.; Corberan-Salvador, J.M. [Technical University of Valencia, Applied Thermodynamic Department, Valencia (Spain); Johnson, M.W.; Kohler, G.T. [Modine Manufacturing Company, Commercial Products Group, Racine, WI (United States)

    2010-01-15

    A model for the analysis of compact heat exchangers working as either evaporators or condensers is presented. This paper will focus exclusively on condensation modeling. The model is based on cell discretization of the heat exchanger in such a way that cells are analyzed following the path imposed by the refrigerant flowing through the tubes. It has been implemented in a robust code developed for assisting with the design of compact heat exchangers and refrigeration systems. These heat exchangers consist of serpentine fins that are brazed to multi-port tubes with internal microchannels. This paper also investigates a number of correlations used for the calculation of the refrigerant side heat transfer coefficient. They are evaluated comparing the predicted data with the experimental data. The working fluids used in the experiments are R134a and R410A, and the secondary fluid is air. The experimental facility is briefly described and some conclusions are finally drawn. (author)

  13. Production, safety, exchange, and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Hausken, Kjell

    2011-01-01

    Two agents convert resources into safety investment and production while exchanging goods voluntarily. Safety investment ensures reduction of costly risk. High unit cost of safety effort reduces both productive effort and safety effort, which reduces income.

  14. Definition of Magnetic Exchange Length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, GS; Hong, YK; Park, J; Lee, J; Lee, W; Choi, BC

    2013-08-01

    The magnetostatic exchange length is an important parameter in magnetics as it measures the relative strength of exchange and self-magnetostatic energies. Its use can be found in areas of magnetics including micromagnetics, soft and hard magnetic materials, and information storage. The exchange length is of primary importance because it governs the width of the transition between magnetic domains. Unfortunately, there is some confusion in the literature between the magnetostatic exchange length and a similar distance concerning magnetization reversal mechanisms in particles known as the characteristic length. This confusion is aggravated by the common usage of two different systems of units, SI and cgs. This paper attempts to clarify the situation and recommends equations in both systems of units.

  15. Evaluation of electrochemical ion exchange for cesium elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical elution was investigated as an alternative method to acid elution for the desorption of cesium from loaded ion exchange resins. The approach was found to have several potential advantages over existing technologies, in particular, electrochemical elution eliminates the need for addition of chemicals to elute cesium from the ion exchange resin. Also, since, in the electrochemical elution process the eluting solution is not in direct contact with the ion exchange material, very small volumes of the eluting solution can be used in a complete recycle mode in order to minimize the total volume of the cesium elute. In addition, the cesium is eluted as an alkaline solution that does not require neutralization with caustic to meet the tank farm specifications. Other advantages include easy incorporation of the electrochemical elution process into the present cesium recovery schemes

  16. Decontamination of Primary Heat Exchanger Heat Transfer Plate in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor, a 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, a plate type primary heat exchanger transfers the reactor core residual heat absorbed by a primary coolant to a secondary coolant. There was a leakage in the gasket of the no. one heat exchanger after about five years of normal operation. The leaking heat transfer plate pack was replaced with a new one and decontaminated. This paper describes the method of decontaminating the radioactivity of the no. 1 heat exchanger used plate pack and the results. A chemical treatment method was applied to the decontamination. This treatment method consists of cleaning the used plate with a hydro jet after properly depositing it in a scale agent

  17. Organometallic cation-exchanged phyllosilicates

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Shay

    1991-01-01

    Organotin (IV) complexes formed between 0 01 M dimethyltin dichloride solutions prepared at pH 2 6 and 4 0, and trimethyltin chloride prepared at pH 3 4, with Na- 119 montmori 1lonite clay have been characterised using Sn Mflssbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and water sorption isotherms Following cation exchange, Mttssbauer spectroscopy identified two tin species in the dimethyltin (IV)-exchanged clay prepared at pH 2 6 A cis specie...

  18. Exchange rate determination in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Thai-Ha Le

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the determinants of the exchange rate in Vietnam and suggests policy implications. Gregory-Hansen cointegration tests and generalised variance decomposition (VDC) analysis were applied to monthly data from July 2004 to December 2013. The model was built based on the three popular approaches to exchange rate determination, which are purchasing power parity (PPP) approach, balance of payment (BOP) approach, and monetary and portfolio approach. This study finds that the p...

  19. On learning by exchanging advice

    OpenAIRE

    Eugénio da Costa Oliveira; Luís Nunes

    2003-01-01

    One of the main questions concerning learning in Multi-Agent Systems is: (How) can agents benefit from mutual interaction during the learning process?. This paper describes the study of an interactive advice-exchange mechanism as a possible way to improve agents' learning performance. The advice-exchange technique, discussed here, uses supervised learning (backpropagation), where reinforcement is not directly coming from the environment but is based on advice given by peers with better perfor...

  20. Risk, Uncertainty and Exchange Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Hodrick, Robert J

    1987-01-01

    This paper explores a new direction for empirical models of exchange rate determination. The motivation arises from two well documented facts, the failure of log-linear empirical exchange rate models of the 1970's and the variability of risk premiums in the forward market. Rational maximizing models of economic behavior imply that changes in the conditional variances of exogenous processes, such as future monetary policies, future government spending, and future rates of income growth, can ha...

  1. Gift Exchange in the Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Dur, Robert

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a model of manager-employee relationships where employees care more for their manager when they are more convinced that their manager cares for them. Managers can signal their altruistic feelings towards their employees in two ways: by offering a generous wage and by giving attention. Contrary to the traditional gift-exchange hypothesis, we show that altruistic managers may offer lower wages and nevertheless build up better social-exchange relationships with their emplo...

  2. External evaluation of Innovation Exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Fergus

    2010-01-01

    From recruiters to estate agents to bankers,brokerage is big business. Within the private sector, innovation brokerage — bringing people together to innovate — is well developed. But what is the power of brokerage to drive social innovation and support much needed social change? These questions are at the heart of Innovation Exchange. Innovation Exchange is a pilot programme primarily funded by the Office of the Third Sector in the Cabinet Office. In its work to 31 March 2010, the Excha...

  3. Shared Year Exchange in Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsegaard, Helle Wendner; Wederkinck, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Beskrivelse af Shared Year Exchange in Nursing, et udviklingsporjekt omhandlende udvikling, beskrivelse og implementering af et fælles studieår for sygeplejerskestuderende ved Metropol og La Trobe University Australien.......Beskrivelse af Shared Year Exchange in Nursing, et udviklingsporjekt omhandlende udvikling, beskrivelse og implementering af et fælles studieår for sygeplejerskestuderende ved Metropol og La Trobe University Australien....

  4. Knowledge Exchange, Matching, and Agglomeration

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Berliant; Robert R. Reed III; Ping Wang

    2000-01-01

    Despite wide recognition of their significant role in explaining sustained growth and economic development, uncompensated knowledge spillovers have not yet been fully modeled with a microeconomic foundation. This paper illustrates the exchange of knowledge as well as its consequences for agglomerative activity in a general-equilibrium search-theoretic framework. Agents, possessing differentiated types of knowledge, search for partners to exchange ideas in order to improve production efficacy....

  5. Tritium Exchange in Biological Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whenever tritium-labelled water is employed as a test solute or tracer in biological systems, an appreciable exchange between tritium and labile hydrogen atoms occurs that frequently affects the nature and interpretation of experimental results. The studies reported here are concerned with the magnitude of the effect that tritium exchange introduces into measurements of total body water and water metabolism in animals and humans. Direct measurements of exchange were made in rats, guinea pigs, pigeons, and rabbits. Tritium-labelled water was administered intravenously or by mouth, and tritium space and turnover determined from the concentration of tritium in blood. The animals were then desiccated to constant weight in vacuo. The specific activity of water collected periodically during desiccation increased by 50% as a result of isotope effects. Water from combustion of dried rabbit tissues contained about 2% of the tritium originally given to the animal. Adipose tissue alone contained little or no exchange tritium. The dried tissues of the other animals were rehydrated with inactive water and the appearance of tritium in the water observed. The specific activity of the water increased in exponential fashion, i.e., 1-exp. (kt), with about 90% of exchange occurring with a half-time of 1 h, and the remaining 10% with a half-time of 10 h. The total tritium extracted accounted for 1.5 to 3.5% of the dose given to the animal, which agrees with the difference between the tritium space and total body water determined by desiccation. An indirect estimate of exchange in humans was derived from concurrent measurements of tritium and antipyrene spaces. The average difference of about 2% in water volume agrees with the direct estimates of exchanges in animals. It is evident that tritium space should be reduced by about 2% to identify it with total body water. The magnitude and relatively slow rate of exchange may also influence the interpretation of metabolic studies with

  6. Exchange Rate Regimes and Location

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Luca Antonio

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of fixed versus flexible exchange rate regimes on location choices of firms and on the degree of specialization of countries. In a two-country two-differentiated-good monetary model, demand, supply, and monetary shocks arise after wages are set and prices are optimally chosen. The exchange rate performs then an adjustment role for firms located in the country relatively specialized in the good they produce, but it constitutes a factor of disturbance for the...

  7. Persistent, Nonfundamental Exchange Rate Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Irasema Alonso

    2004-01-01

    A trading-post model of money is used to show how exchange rates can be affected by extrinsic uncertainty. With no uncertainty in fundamentals, we demonstrate that there exist equilibria where exchange rates as well as consumption allocations follow a stationary random process. The uctuations are permanent, and they affect economic welfare. These findings also apply when the currency supplies grow at different rates. Then, the only stationary equilibria in which both monies are valued are tho...

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Ion Exchange Properties of Lithium Zirconium Silicate as Inorganic Ion Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new three components inorganic ion exchange material lithium zirconium silicate (LiZrSi) has been synthesized by adding a mixture of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and zirconium oxychloride(ZrOCl2) to sodium metasilicate (Na2SiO3) at different ratios. The synthesized materials ratios I, II and III have been characterized on the basis of chemical composition, X-ray fluorescence, XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal analysis. From the data obtained, the synthesized different ratios of lithium zirconium silicates can be written as (ZrO)2Li2(SiO3)3. 10.7H2O, (ZrO)Li2(SiO3)2. 5.3H2O and (ZrO)Li4(SiO3.3. 4.4H2O with amorphous structure. The solubility of the materials has been tested in water and acidic media. The ion exchange capacities of these materials for Na+, K+ and Cs+ ions have been found to take the order Na+ > K+ > Cs+ for all synthesized materials and depend on the ionic radii of exchanging cations

  9. Development of techniques to dispose of the Windscale AGR heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a gas-cooled nuclear power plant the gas side of the heat exchanger tubes becomes contaminated with radioactive deposits carried from the reactor in the coolant stream. In order to dispose of the heat exchangers in the safest and most cost-effective way during plant decommissioning, the deposits have to be removed. In situ chemical decontamination is considered to be the only viable method. This paper describes the research and development of chemical decontamination methods for the Windscale AGR heat exchangers, and the testing of a selected method on an in situ superheater. The research involved characterization of tube corrosion and radioactivity deposits, laboratory testing of chemical reagents on actual tube samples, and the provision and operation of a plant to apply the selected reagent. Disposal of radioactive effluent is an important consideration in chemical decontamination and in the present case was the major factor in determining the process

  10. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Dept. Biotechnology, Mocow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  11. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  12. Plastic heat exchangers: a state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D; Holtz, R E; Koopman, R N; Marciniak, T J; MacFarlane, D R

    1979-07-01

    Significant increases in energy utilization efficiency can be achieved through the recovery of low-temperature rejected heat. This energy conserving possibility provides incentive for the development of heat exchangers which could be employed in applications where conventional units cannot be used. Some unique anticorrosion and nonstick characteristics of plastics make this material very attractive for heat recovery where condensation, especially sulfuric acid, and fouling occur. Some of the unique characteristics of plastics led to the commercial success of DuPont's heat exchangers utilizing polytetrafluoroethylene (trade name Teflon) tubes. Attributes which were exploited in this application were the extreme chemical inertness of the material and its flexibility, which enabled utilization in odd-shaped spaces. The wide variety of polymeric materials available ensures chemical inertness for almost any application. Lower cost, compoundability with fillers to improve thermal/mechanical properties, and versatile fabrication methods are incentives for many uses. Also, since many plastics resist corrosion, they can be employed in lower temperature applications (< 436 K), where condensation can occur and metal units have been unable to function. It is clear that if application and design can be merged to produce a cost-effective alternate to present methods of handling low-temperature rejected heat, then there is significant incentive for plastic heat exchangers, to replace traditional metallic heat exchangers or to be used in services where metals are totally unsuited.

  13. Flows and chemical reactions in heterogeneous mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This book - a sequel of previous publications 'Flows and Chemical Reactions' and 'Chemical Reactions in Flows and Homogeneous Mixtures' - is devoted to flows with chemical reactions in heterogeneous environments.  Heterogeneous media in this volume include interfaces and lines. They may be the site of radiation. Each type of flow is the subject of a chapter in this volume. We consider first, in Chapter 1, the question of the generation of environments biphasic individuals: dusty gas, mist, bubble flow.  Chapter 2 is devoted to the study at the mesoscopic scale: particle-fluid exchange of mom

  14. Rhizosphere chemical dialogues: plant-microbe interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badri, D.V.; van der Lelie, D.; Weir, T. L.; Vivanco, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Every organism on earth relies on associations with its neighbors to sustain life. For example, plants form associations with neighboring plants, microflora, and microfauna, while humans maintain symbiotic associations with intestinal microbial flora, which is indispensable for nutrient assimilation and development of the innate immune system. Most of these associations are facilitated by chemical cues exchanged between the host and the symbionts. In the rhizosphere, which includes plant roots and the surrounding area of soil influenced by the roots, plants exude chemicals to effectively communicate with their neighboring soil organisms. Here we review the current literature pertaining to the chemical communication that exists between plants and microorganisms and the biological processes they sustain.

  15. Evaluating the uncertainty in exchange parameters determined from off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion for systems in fast exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-07-01

    Spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) is a powerful NMR technique for characterizing fast microsecond timescale exchange processes directed toward short-lived excited states in biomolecules. At the limit of fast exchange, only kex = k1 + k-1 and Φex = pGpE(Δω)2 can be determined from R1ρ data limiting the ability to characterize the structure and energetics of the excited state conformation. Here, we use simulations to examine the uncertainty with which exchange parameters can be determined for two state systems in intermediate-to-fast exchange using off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion. R1ρ data computed by solving the Bloch-McConnell equations reveals small but significant asymmetry with respect to offset (R1ρ (ΔΩ) ≠ R1ρ (-ΔΩ), which is a hallmark of slow-to-intermediate exchange, even under conditions of fast exchange for free precession chemical exchange line broadening (kex/Δω > 10). A grid search analysis combined with bootstrap and Monte-Carlo based statistical approaches for estimating uncertainty in exchange parameters reveals that both the sign and magnitude of Δω can be determined at a useful level of uncertainty for systems in fast exchange (kex/Δω analysis of experimental R1ρ data measured in three nucleic acid systems with exchange processes occurring on the slow (kex/Δω = 0.2; pE = ∼0.7%), fast (kex/Δω = ∼10-16; pE = ∼13%) and very fast (kex = 39,000 s-1) chemical shift timescales.

  16. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  17. Recent experimental and assessment studies of uranium enrichment by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical exchange methods for isotopic separation have been used successfully for only a limited number of light elements. However, a chemical exchange process involving uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) in acid solution in contact with an ion exchange resin has recently been claimed by Japanese workers to be feasible for the production of slightly enriched uranium (3% 235U). The technical and economic feasibility of such a process was examined by A.A.E.C. staff. Exchange rates of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) species in perchlorate and sulphate solutions in the presence and absence of ion exchange resins were published. The single stage separation factor for a process has been found to be 1.0013. The energy requirement for a conceptual chemical plant was estimated to be about 1100 kWh/SWU and this value lies between that for plants based on the gaseous diffusion and centrifuge enrichment processes. The capital cost was estimated to be very much higher than the costs for either of the other processes and would not be reduced sufficiently to become attractive even if the expensive electrolytic reduction stage could be replaced by a chemical reduction stage. It is therefore concluded on the basis of current technology that the ion exchange process is not an economically attractive method of uranium enrichment. (author)

  18. Ion exchange performance of commercial crystalline silicotitanates for cesium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST), invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A ampersand M University, has been commercialized in a joint Sandia-UOP effort. The original developmental materials exhibited high selectivity for the ion exchange of cesium, strontium, and several other radionuclides from highly alkaline solutions containing molar concentrations of Na+. The materials also showed excellent chemical and radiation stability. Together, the high selectivity and stability of the CSTs made them excellent candidates for treatment of solutions such as the Hanford tank supernates and other DOE radwastes. Sandia National Laboratories and UOP have teamed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop CSTs in the powdered form and in an engineered form suitable for column ion exchange use. A continuous-flow, column ion exchange process is expected to be used to remove Cs and other radionuclides from the Hanford supernatant. The powder material invented by the Sandia and Texas A ampersand M team consists of submicron-size particles. It is not designed for column ion exchange but may be used in other applications

  19. Ion exchange performance of commercial crystalline silicotitanates for cesium removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, R.; Dangieri, T.J.; Fennelly, D.J. [and others

    1996-03-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CST), invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University, has been commercialized in a joint Sandia-UOP effort. The original developmental materials exhibited high selectivity for the ion exchange of cesium, strontium, and several other radionuclides from highly alkaline solutions containing molar concentrations of Na{sup +}. The materials also showed excellent chemical and radiation stability. Together, the high selectivity and stability of the CSTs made them excellent candidates for treatment of solutions such as the Hanford tank supernates and other DOE radwastes. Sandia National Laboratories and UOP have teamed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop CSTs in the powdered form and in an engineered form suitable for column ion exchange use. A continuous-flow, column ion exchange process is expected to be used to remove Cs and other radionuclides from the Hanford supernatant. The powder material invented by the Sandia and Texas A&M team consists of submicron-size particles. It is not designed for column ion exchange but may be used in other applications.

  20. Global evaluation of ammonia bi-directional exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bi-directional air–surface exchange of ammonia (NH3 has been neglected in many air quality models. In this study, we implement the bi-directional exchange of NH3 in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. We also introduce an updated diurnal variability scheme for NH3 livestock emissions and evaluate the recently developed MASAGE_NH3 bottom up inventory. While updated diurnal variability improves comparison of modeled-to-hourly in situ measurements in the Southeastern US, NH3 concentrations decrease throughout the globe, up to 17 ppb in India and Southeastern China, with corresponding decreases in aerosol nitrate by up to 7 μg m−3. The ammonium (NH4+ soil pool in the bi-directional exchange model largely extends the NH3 lifetime in the atmosphere. Including bi-directional exchange generally increases NH3 gross emissions (7.1% and surface concentrations (up to 3.9 ppb throughout the globe in July, except in India and Southeastern China. In April and October, it decreases NH3 gross emissions in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g., 43.6% in April in China and increases NH3 gross emissions in the Southern Hemisphere. Bi-directional exchange does not largely impact NH4+ wet deposition overall. While bi-directional exchange is fundamentally a better representation of NH3 emissions from fertilizers, emissions from primary sources are still underestimated and thus significant model biases remain when compared to in situ measurements in the US. The adjoint of bi-directional exchange has also been developed for the GEOS-Chem model and is used to investigate the sensitivity of NH3 concentrations with respect to soil pH and fertilizer application rate. This study thus lays the groundwork for future inverse modeling studies to more directly constrain these physical processes rather than tuning bulk uni-directional NH3 emissions.

  1. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  2. Chemical sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the author focuses on chemical sputtering by keV ions, treating two specific examples: the chemical effects occurring when bombarding simple condensed gases and the mechanisms of the ion-assisted etching process. First, however, the mechanism of sputtering of condensed gases in general is discussed. These mechanisms have been investigated using condensed noble gases as target material. The thesis is a compilation of articles published elsewhere. Contents: sputtering of condensed noble gases by keV heavy ions; surface distribution as an observable factor in the energy distribution of sputtered particles; reactive sputtering of simple condensed gases by keV heavy ion bombardment; mass spectra of nozzle-produced small molecular clusters of H2O, NH3, CO and CH4; mass and energy distribution of particles sputter-etched from Si in a XeF2 environment; argon-ion assisted etching of silicon by molecular chlorine; energy distribution of sputtered poly-atomic molecules. (Auth.)

  3. Conflict and Fairness in Social Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molm, Linda D.; Collett, Jessica L.; Schaefer, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Inherent to all social exchange relations are elements of both cooperation and competition. We develop and test a theoretical model which proposes that the relative salience of the competitive, conflictual elements of exchange mediate and explain the negative effects of negotiated exchange, as compared with reciprocal exchange, on actors'…

  4. 76 FR 56094 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    .... Regulation of Off-Exchange Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR 3281 (Jan. 20, 2010). \\13\\ Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, 76 FR 22633 (Apr. 22, 2011). \\14\\ Id. \\15\\ Retail Foreign... proposed and final rules. \\16\\ Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, 76 FR 22633 (Apr. 22, 2011)....

  5. 77 FR 62177 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ...\\ Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, 76 FR 41375 (July 14, 2011). \\10\\ Retail Foreign Exchange...). \\53\\ Compare 12 CFR 48.3(b) with Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, 76 FR 41375, 41377 (July 14... this NPR. \\55\\ Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, 76 FR 56094 (Sept. 12, 2011). III. Request...

  6. 76 FR 22633 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... delivery in connection with its line of business.\\20\\ In addition, the definition does not include... of Off-Exchange Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR 55409 (Sept. 10, 2010... Act. Regulation of Off-Exchange Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR...

  7. 78 FR 42439 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... Broker-Dealers for Certain Forex Transactions, Exchange Act Release No. 61090 (Dec. 1, 2009), 74 FR 64776...''). \\2\\ See Investor Bulletin: Foreign Currency Exchange (Forex) Trading for Individual Investors (July... Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions, Exchange Act Release No. 64874 (July 13, 2011), 76 FR 41676...

  8. Ion exchange behaviour of polymeric zirconium cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric zirconium cations formed in weakly acid solutions (pH2) are taken up strongly into macroporous cation exchange resins, while uptake into normal cation exchange resins (pore diameter about 1 nm) is low. Macroporous cation exchange resins loaded with polymeric Zr cations are shown to function as ligand exchange sorbents. (Authors)

  9. Building Cohesion in Positively Connected Exchange Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This research investigates the process through which individuals build cohesive relationships in positively connected exchange relations. Positive connections exist any time exchange in one relation must precede exchange in another. Such situations arise through gatekeeping, in generalized exchange contexts, and when resources diffuse across a…

  10. Listening to agent agendas in student exchanges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Gertrud

    2003-01-01

    The paper is based upon a research study of short-term student exchanges. The study took place from 1996-2000, and comprises seven classes of students from six Danish business schools. Short-term student exchanges in terms of EU funded exchanges and local school exchanges are means to develop the...

  11. A Colorful Ion Exchange Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Adélio

    1999-11-01

    A colorful ion-exchange experiment is described. The use of a resin with an adsorbed acid-base indicator allows students to follow the progress of the ion-exchange front along the column. In parallel, students can follow the ion-exchange breakthrough curve using a continuous conductometric cell at the column outlet. In the present example, K+ (KCl) exchanges with H+ (HCl) in a strong cationic resin (Amberlite IR 120). The adsorbed indicator is methyl violet. Sorption equilibrium is favorable to the K+ ions. Monovalent ions, used in this experiment, have the disadvantage of usually being colorless (except perhaps permanganate, but this is an extremely strong oxidant which attacks the resin). On the other hand, many divalent ions are colorful but the shape of the concentration front is hard to explain qualitatively as well as quantitatively. That is because the shape of the front depends on the total ionic concentration. However, color can be introduced in a monovalent ion-exchange system by adding an appropriate acid-base indicator to the resin. The text describes this experiment qualitatively. A simplified quantitative description, using the solute movement theory, can be found online.

  12. Fair Exchange in Strand Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Guttman

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Many cryptographic protocols are intended to coordinate state changes among principals. Exchange protocols coordinate delivery of new values to the participants, e.g. additions to the set of values they possess. An exchange protocol is fair if it ensures that delivery of new values is balanced: If one participant obtains a new possession via the protocol, then all other participants will, too. Fair exchange requires progress assumptions, unlike some other protocol properties. The strand space model is a framework for design and verification of cryptographic protocols. A strand is a local behavior of a single principal in a single session of a protocol. A bundle is a partially ordered global execution built from protocol strands and adversary activities. The strand space model needs two additions for fair exchange protocols. First, we regard the state as a multiset of facts, and we allow strands to cause changes in this state via multiset rewriting. Second, progress assumptions stipulate that some channels are resilient-and guaranteed to deliver messages-and some principals are assumed not to stop at certain critical steps. This method leads to proofs of correctness that cleanly separate protocol properties, such as authentication and confidentiality, from invariants governing state evolution. G. Wang's recent fair exchange protocol illustrates the approach.

  13. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional

    CERN Document Server

    Constantin, L A; Della Sala, F

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e. the electron density, its gradient and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for {the exchange of} any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredie...

  14. Ion-exchange resins. October 1983-December 1987 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for October 1983-December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Regeneration and disposal of ion-exchange resins are also covered. (This updated bibliography contains 430 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Ion-exchange resins. January 1988-December 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1988-December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning preparation, properties, and applications of ion-exchange resins. Applications include water and waste treatment; chemical recovery, separation, purification, and catalysis; desalination; and ore treatment and recovery. Regeneration and disposal of ion-exchange resins are also covered. (This updated bibliography contains 174 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  16. Tropospheric response to a nuclear exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immediate effects of a full-scale nuclear war would be large and severe. The survivors of such a war would have to endure possible changes in the chemical structure of the atmosphere. These changes may come about as a result of changes caused by the nuclear explosions themselves (direct effects) or as a result of changes caused by fires that may start after the explosions (indirect effects). This paper focuses on the expected global-scale changes in the chemical structure of the atmosphere from both direct and indirect effects after a full-scale nuclear exchange. The immediate effects of a nuclear explosion include the creation of a hot mass of air or fireball which rises in the atmosphere to a level that depends on the yield of the explosion. Because the fireball is hot, it is able to dissociate atmospheric nitrogen, N2. As the fireball cools, nitrogen atoms recombine with oxygen to form nitrogen oxides, NO and NO2. In addition, dust and recondensed gases are swept up through the stem of the fireball and deposited at the same level to which the fireball rises. This paper focuses on the response of atmospheric ozone to a nuclear war

  17. Expenditure Switching and Exchange Rate Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Engel

    2002-01-01

    Nominal exchange rate changes can lead to 'expenditure switching' when they change relative international prices. A traditional argument for flexible nominal exchange rates posits that when prices are sticky in producers' currencies, nominal exchange rate movements can change relative prices between home and foreign goods. But if prices are fixed ex ante in consumers' currencies, nominal exchange rate flexibility cannot achieve any relative price adjustment. In that case nominal exchange rate...

  18. A Theory of Financial Exchange Organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirrong, Craig

    2000-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on the economic functions of financial exchanges and the properties of prices determined on exchanges, there has been little research on their organization and governance. The heterogeneity of the suppliers of financial services who are members of financial exchanges explains salient features of exchange organization. When suppliers of financial services are heterogeneous, one expects to observe exchanges organized as not-for-profit firms, especially...

  19. OPTIMASI KINERJA HEAT EXCHANGER TABUNG KOSENTRIS

    OpenAIRE

    Didik Wahjudi

    2000-01-01

    Heat exchanger effectiveness is affected by some factors such as pipe shape, temperature, cold and hot air direction and velocity entering the heat exchanger. Research about heat exchanger has been done but the significance level of the heat exchanger effectiveness resulted is unknown. A designed experiment should be done to optimize the performance of concentric tube heat exchanger with measured significance level. From the analysis of result of previous experiment, factors that seem to affe...

  20. Clearing Barter Exchange Markets: Kidney Exchange and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Glorie (Kristiaan)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Advanced computer assisted markets, otherwise known as smart markets, are becoming an important part of our modern society. This dissertation considers smart barter exchange markets, which enable people to trade a wide range of goods: from shifts, to houses, to kidneys.

  1. Heat exchanger fouling and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouling of heat transfer surfaces introduces perhaps the major uncertainty into the design and operation of heat exchange equipment. After a brief description of the various types of fouling the chapter goes on to review the current theories of fouling including the turbulent burst theory. Fouling in equipment involving boiling and evaporation is often more severe than in single phase heat exchangers and moreover, in aqueous systems, is frequently associated with corrosion. The reasons for this are identified and illustrated by reference to corrosion in nuclear power plant steam generators. Finally the modification of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics by fouling layers is briefly reviewed

  2. Complete Convergence of Exchangeable Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Stoica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that exchangeable sequences converge completely in the Baum-Katz sense under the same conditions as i.i.d. sequences do. Problem statement: The research was needed as the rate of convergence in the law of large numbers for exchangeable sequences was previously obtained under restricted hypotheses. Approach: We applied powerful techniques involving inequalities for independent sequences of random variables. Results: We obtained the maximal rate of convergence and provided an example to show that our findings are sharp. Conclusion/Recommendations: The technique used in the paper may be adapted in the similar study for identically distributed sequences.

  3. Exchange of Parametric CAD Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hua; PRATT J Michael; SRIRAM D Ram

    2006-01-01

    A method to exchange digital CAD model construction history data using ISO10303 is presented. The primary intention of this research is to demonstrate the utility of ISO10303-108 in achieving parametric CAD model exchange between commercial CAD systems. ISO10303-108, still under development, has been used to represent geometric and dimensional constraints on the sketch profile. Schemas from Parts 42, 50 of ISO 10303 are also used. ISO10303-42 is adopted to represent geometric and topological information and ISO10303-50 is used to represent the mathematical expression.

  4. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  5. Americium and samarium determination in aqueous solutions after separation by cation-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of trivalent americium and samarium in aqueous samples has been determined by means of alpha-radiometry and UV-Vis photometry, respectively, after chemical separation and pre-concentration of the elements by cation-exchange using Chelex-100 resin. Method calibration was performed using americium (241Am) and samarium standard solutions and resulted in a high chemical recovery for cation-exchange. Regarding, the effect of physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, salinity, competitive cations and colloidal species) on the separation recovery of the trivalent elements from aqueous solutions by cation-exchange has also been investigated. The investigation was performed to evaluate the applicability of cation-exchange as separation and pre-concentration method prior to the quantitative analysis of trivalent f-elements in water samples, and has shown that the method could be successfully applied to waters with relatively low dissolved solid content. (author)

  6. Failure analysis of a heat exchanger used of a wood pulp bleaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study involved an investigation of the failure of a heat exchanger used in the ozone destruction stage of a wood pulp bleaching process at a pulp plant. The following procedures were carried out to determine the causes of the failure: a chemical analysis of the component, atomic absorption spectroscopy, measurements of hardness and of corrosion-related mass loss, characterization by scanning electron microscopy, and chemical microanalysis by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion damage of the heat exchanger was caused by chloric and sulfuric acid, which led to pitting, grooving and cracking, as well as generalized corrosion of the component (AISI 316L steel). Nitric acid caused minimal damage to the heat exchanger, with minor generalized corrosion and occasional pitting. White crystals rich in sulfur and chlorine were identified as the corrosive agents acting inside the heat exchanger. (author)

  7. A mesoscale chemical transport model (MEDIUM) nested in a global chemical transport model (MEDIANTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claveau, J.; Ramaroson, R. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    1997-12-31

    The lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (UT-LS) are frequently subject to mesoscale or local scale exchange of air masses occurring along discontinuities. This exchange (e.g. downward) can constitute one of the most important source of ozone from the stratosphere down to the middle troposphere where strong mixing dilutes the air mass and competing the non-linear chemistry. The distribution of the chemical species in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere depends upon various source emissions, e.g. from polluted boundary layer or from aircraft emissions. Global models, as well as chemical transport models describe the climatological state of the atmosphere and are not able to describe correctly the stratosphere and troposphere exchange. Mesoscale models go further in the description of smaller scales and can reasonably include a rather detailed chemistry. They can be used to assess the budget of NO{sub x} from aircraft emissions in a mesoscale domain. (author) 4 refs.

  8. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  9. The Portfolio Selection by Using Quadratic Programming Approach Case Study of Malaysia Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali YOUSFAT

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the quadratic approach to select the optimum portfolio of the Malaysian stovk exchange. This framework deals with ten biggest firms posted on the stock exchange during 2014. The result shows that the optimum portfolio includes 22 % of Axiata Group shares, 11% of Genting shares, 30 % of Petronas Chemicals shares, 1% of Sime Darbi shares and 36 % of Tenaga Nasional shares.

  10. Achieving reduced fouling of cooling water exchangers with stainless steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good performance of cooling water heat exchangers plays a vital role in the over all energy efficiency of a chemical plant. Heavy fouling on carbon steel tubes of the cooling water exchangers was causing poor performance and frequent cleaning requirement. The carbon steel tubes were replaced with stainless steel tubes. Improved performance was achieved and cleaning frequency reduced. The paper covers the details of study and methodology applied for the above changes along with summary of results. (author)

  11. A model for thermal exchange in axons during action potential propagation.

    OpenAIRE

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Gallot, Guilhem

    2008-01-01

    International audience Several experiments have shown that during propagation of the action potential in axons, thermal energy is locally exchanged. In this paper, we use a simple model based on statistical physics to show that an important part of this exchange comes from the physics of the effusion. We evaluate, during the action potential propagation, the variation of internal energy and of the energy associated with the chemical potential of the effusion of water and ions to extract th...

  12. Constraints from observations and modeling on atmosphere–surface exchange of mercury in eastern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Shaojie Song; Selin, Noelle E; Lynne E. Gratz; Jesse L. Ambrose; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Viral Shah; Lyatt Jaeglé; Amanda Giang; Bin Yuan; Lisa Kaser; Apel, Eric C.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Blake, Nicola J.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Roy L. Mauldin III

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atmosphere–surface exchange of mercury, although a critical component of its global cycle, is currently poorly constrained. Here we use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to interpret atmospheric Hg0 (gaseous elemental mercury) data collected during the 2013 summer Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distributions, Sources and Sinks (NOMADSS) aircraft campaign as well as ground- and ship-based observations in terms of their constraints on the atmosphere–surface exchange of Hg...

  13. Wall thickness measurements of pipes in heat exchangers using ultrasonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat exchangers and reactors used in the chemical industry for heat exchange and conversion are exposed to the influence of corrosion and wear. These defect parts must be identified during operation in order to prevent damage occurring to the plant and to restrict break-down times. By means of manual ultrasonic wall thickness measurement worn parts in piping both on the inner and outer sides can be reliably detected in the assembled state. (orig.)

  14. Irradiation effects on the storage and disposal of radwaste containing organic ion-exchange media. [3 functional forms of resin - sulfonic acid cation exchanger, quarternary ammonium anion exchanger and mixed bed combination of the two

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swyler, K.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Dayal, R.

    1983-10-01

    Polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based ion exchangers are commonly used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. Self-irradiation from sorbed radionuclides may affect the properties of radwaste containing these ion-exchange media. The effects of external irradiation on anion, cation, and mixed bed PS-DVB ion exchangers have been investigated under conditions relevant to radwaste storage and disposal. Three effects are emphasized in the present report: (1) release of acids, radionuclides or chemically aggressive species through radiolytic attack on the functional group, (2) radiolytic generation/uptake of corrosive or combustible gases, (3) effect of irradiation on solidification of resins in cement. Special consideration was placed on external variables such as radiation dose rate, resin chemical loading and moisture conditions, accessibility to atmospheric oxygen, and interactions in multicomponent systems. Such variables may affect the correspondence between laboratory results and field performance. 40 references, 24 figures, 28 tables.

  15. Monetary Exchange with Multilateral Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julien, Benoît; Kennes, John; King, Ian

    This paper analyzes monetary exchange in a search model allowing for multilateral matches to be formed, according to a standard urn-ballprocess. We consider three physical environments: indivisible goods and money, divisible goods and indivisible money, and divisible goods and money. We compare the...

  16. The Commodity and its Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines fishing quota as a commodity in both a conceptual perspective and through ethnographic examples. Inspired by Marx’s ideas of the commodity, use-value, exchange-value, and ground rent, the chapter combines a theoretical approach with ethnographic material. The different aspects...

  17. Commodity exchanges - Function and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the potential impacts that a futures market may have on the international trade of uranium. The discussion first centers around the New York Mercantile Exchange. The following market aspects are discussed: long-term contracting; spot market; commoditization and pricing; and advantages, disadvantages, risks, and provisions of futures market contracts

  18. Exchange interactions in barium hexaferrite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Pavel; Rusz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 18 (2005), 184433/1-184433/6. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : hexaferrites * exchange interaction * density functional theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2005

  19. Primer on nuclear exchange models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafemeister, David [Physics Department, Cal Poly University, San Luis Obispo, California (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Basic physics is applied to nuclear force exchange models between two nations. Ultimately, this scenario approach can be used to try and answer the age old question of 'how much is enough?' This work is based on Chapter 2 of Physics of Societal Issues: Calculations on National Security, Environment and Energy (Springer, 2007 and 2014)

  20. Knowledge Exchange with Sistema Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julie; Moran, Nikki; Duffy, Celia; Loening, Gica

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a knowledge exchange project, funded by the Scottish Funding Council and undertaken by a group of researchers from three higher education institutions in Scotland and the project partner, Sistema Scotland. This newly established charity is attempting to implement a major programme of social change, developed in Venezuela,…