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Sample records for chemical evolution modeller

  1. Models of Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    The basic principles underlying galactic chemical evolution and the most important results of chemical evolution models are discussed. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, for which we possess the majority of observational constraints, is described. Then, it is shown how different star formation histories influence the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. Finally, the role of abundances and abundance ratios as cosmic clocks is emphasized an...

  2. Modelling the chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their...

  3. A chemical evolution model for galaxy clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Portinari, L.; A. Moretti(Fermilab, Batavia, IL, USA); Chiosi, C.

    2001-01-01

    We develop a toy-model for the chemical evolution of the intracluster medium, polluted by the galactic winds from elliptical galaxies. The model follows the "galaxy formation history" of cluster galaxies, constrained by the observed luminosity function.

  4. Chemical Evolution models of Local Group galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi., M

    2003-01-01

    Status quo and perspectives of standard chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies are summarized, discussing what we have learnt from them, what we know we have not learnt yet, and what I think we will learn in the near future. It is described how Galactic chemical evolution models have helped showing that: i) stringent constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis can be derived from the observed Galactic abundances of the light elements, ii) the Milky Way has been accreting external gas...

  5. Uncertainties in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; O’Shea, Brian W.; Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Jones, Samuel; Fryer, Chris L.

    2016-06-01

    We use a simple one-zone galactic chemical evolution model to quantify the uncertainties generated by the input parameters in numerical predictions for a galaxy with properties similar to those of the Milky Way. We compiled several studies from the literature to gather the current constraints for our simulations regarding the typical value and uncertainty of the following seven basic parameters: the lower and upper mass limits of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), the slope of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF, the slope of the delay-time distribution function of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the number of SNe Ia per M ⊙ formed, the total stellar mass formed, and the final mass of gas. We derived a probability distribution function to express the range of likely values for every parameter, which were then included in a Monte Carlo code to run several hundred simulations with randomly selected input parameters. This approach enables us to analyze the predicted chemical evolution of 16 elements in a statistical manner by identifying the most probable solutions, along with their 68% and 95% confidence levels. Our results show that the overall uncertainties are shaped by several input parameters that individually contribute at different metallicities, and thus at different galactic ages. The level of uncertainty then depends on the metallicity and is different from one element to another. Among the seven input parameters considered in this work, the slope of the IMF and the number of SNe Ia are currently the two main sources of uncertainty. The thicknesses of the uncertainty bands bounded by the 68% and 95% confidence levels are generally within 0.3 and 0.6 dex, respectively. When looking at the evolution of individual elements as a function of galactic age instead of metallicity, those same thicknesses range from 0.1 to 0.6 dex for the 68% confidence levels and from 0.3 to 1.0 dex for the 95% confidence levels. The uncertainty in our chemical evolution model

  6. The Impact of Modeling Assumptions in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    CERN Document Server

    Côté, Benoit; Ritter, Christian; Herwig, Falk; Venn, Kim A

    2016-01-01

    We use the OMEGA galactic chemical evolution code to investigate how the assumptions used for the treatment of galactic inflows and outflows impact numerical predictions. The goal is to determine how our capacity to reproduce the chemical evolution trends of a galaxy is affected by the choice of implementation used to include those physical processes. In pursuit of this goal, we experiment with three different prescriptions for galactic inflows and outflows and use OMEGA within a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code to recover the set of input parameters that best reproduces the chemical evolution of nine elements in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Sculptor. Despite their different degrees of intended physical realism, we found that all three prescriptions can reproduce in an almost identical way the stellar abundance trends observed in Sculptor. While the three models have the same capacity to fit the data, the best values recovered for the parameters controlling the number of Type Ia supernovae and the strength of gal...

  7. Galactic chemical evolution and nucleocosmochronology - Standard model with terminated infall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Some exactly soluble families of models for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy are presented. The parameters considered include gas mass, the age-metallicity relation, the star mass vs. metallicity, the age distribution, and the mean age of dwarfs. A short BASIC program for calculating these parameters is given. The calculation of metallicity gradients, nuclear cosmochronology, and extinct radioactivities is addressed. An especially simple, mathematically linear model is recommended as a standard model of galaxies with truncated infall due to its internal consistency and compact display of the physical effects of the parameters.

  8. Galactic chemical evolution and nucleocosmochronology - Analytic quadratic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Quadratic models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy for a star formation rate proportional to the square of the gas mass are studied. The search for analytic solutions to the gas mass and star mass for time-dependent rates of gaseous infall onto the disk is examined. The quadratic models are compared to models having linear star formation rates. The mass, metallicity, number of stars, and U-235/U-238 isotopic ratio for the models which are subjected to the same infall rate, the same initial disk mass, and the same final gas fraction are compared. The results of the comparison indicate that: (1) the average dwarf age is greater in the quadratic model, (2) the metallicity grows initially faster in the quadratic model, (3) the quadratic model has a smaller percentage of low-Z dwarfs, and (4) the U-235/U-238 isotopic ratio indicates a younger quadratic model.

  9. Constraints on chemical evolution models from QSOALS abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauroesch, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Models of the formation and early chemical evolution of our Galaxy are guided and constrained by our knowledge of abundances in globular cluster stars and halo field stars. The abundance patterns identified in halo and disk stars should be discernible in absorption lines of gas clouds in forming galaxies which are accidentally lying in front of background QSO's. Conversely, the ensemble of QSO absorption line systems (QSOALS) at each redshift may suggest a detailed model for the formation of our Galaxy that is testable using abundance patterns in halo stars.

  10. Secondary metallicity in analytic models of chemical evolution of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D. D.; Pantelaki, I.

    1986-01-01

    Analytic models of the chemical evolution of galactic regions that grow in mass owing to the continuous infall of matter are characterized, emphasizing the solutions for secondary nuclei (defined as those nuclei whose stellar yields are proportional to the abundance of a primary seed nucleus) in the families of models described by Clayton (1984 and 1985). Wide variations in time dependence of both primary and secondary nuclei as well as in the ratio of secondary to primary are displayed by these model families, confirming again the usefulness of these families as interpretive guides if galaxies do in fact evolve with substantial infall. Additionally, analytic solutions are presented for two other possible interesting systems: the evolution of abundances if the primary metallicity in the infall is increasing in time, and the evolution of abundances if the primary yield changes linearly with time owing to continuous changes in the stellar mass function, the opacity, or other astrophysical agents. Finally, test evaluations of the instantaneous recycling approximation on which these analytic models rely are presented.

  11. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH usinga simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass Mx of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of Mx depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = tsat. Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > tsat, part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  12. A Chemical Evolution Model for the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zhen; Jing, Y P

    2015-01-01

    Fornax is the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy and its star formation history (SFH) has been derived from observations. We estimate the time evolution of its gas mass and net inflow and outflow rates from the SFH using a simple star formation law that relates the star formation rate to the gas mass. We present a chemical evolution model on a 2D mass grid with supernovae (SNe) as sources of metal enrichment. We find that a key parameter controlling the enrichment is the mass M_x of the gas to mix with the ejecta from each SN. The choice of M_x depends on the evolution of SN remnants and on the global gas dynamics. It differs between the two types of SNe involved and between the periods before and after Fornax became an MW satellite at time t = t_sat . Our results indicate that due to the global gas outflow at t > t_sat , part of the ejecta from each SN may directly escape from Fornax. Sample results from our model are presented and compared with data.

  13. Chemical Evolution Models of Local dSph Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Carigi, L; Gilmore, G; Carigi, Leticia; Hernandez, Xavier; Gilmore, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We calculate chemical evolution models for 4 dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way (Carina, Ursa Minor, Leo I and Leo II) for which reliable non-parametric star formation histories have been derived. In this way, the independently obtained star formation histories are used to constrain the evolution of the systems we are treating. This allows us to obtain robust inferences on the history of such crucial parameters of galactic evolution as gas infall, gas outflows and global metallicities for these systems. We can then trace the metallicity and abundance ratios of the stars formed, the gas present at any time within the systems and the details of gas ejection, of relevance to enrichment of the galaxies environment. We find that galaxies showing one single burst of star formation (Ursa Minor and Leo II) require a dark halo slightly larger that the current estimates for their tidal radii, or the presence of a metal rich selective wind, which might carry away much of the energy output of their supernovae b...

  14. Analytic models of the chemical evolution of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for constructing analytic models of the chemical evolution of galaxies subject to infall of metal-poor material onto a maturing disk. A class of linear models is discussed which takes the star-formation rate within a defined region to be proportional to the mass of interstellar gas within that region, and the instantaneous recycling approximation is adopted. The solutions are obtained by approximately matching the infall rate to parametrized familiies of functions for which the equations are exactly soluble. The masses, the primary and secondary metallicities, and the gas concentrations of radioactive chronometers can all then be analytically expressed. Surveys of galactic abundances in location and in time can be compared to the parameter spaces of the analytic representations.

  15. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  16. PNe as observational constraints in chemical evolution models for NGC 6822

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Martínez, L.; L. Carigi; Peña, M. (Marian); M. Peimbert

    2011-01-01

    Chemical evolution models are useful for understanding the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. Model predictions will be more robust as more observational constraints are used. We present chemical evolution models for the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 using chemical abundances of old and young Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and \\ion{H}{ii} regions as observational constraints. Two sets of chemical abundances, one derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs) and one, from recombinatio...

  17. Modeling the chemical evolution of nitrogen oxides near roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Jason; DenBleyker, Allison; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Allen, David; Zhang, K. Max

    2011-01-01

    The chemical evolution of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) in the vicinity of roadways is numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT and a Gaussian-based model, CALINE4. CFD-VIT-RIT couples a standard k- ɛ turbulence model for turbulent mixing and the Finite-Rate model for chemical reactions. CALINE4 employs a discrete parcel method, assuming that chemical reactions are independent of the dilution process. The modeling results are compared to the field measurement data collected near two roadways in Austin, Texas, State Highway 71 (SH-71) and Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), under parallel and perpendicular wind conditions during the summer of 2007. In addition to ozone (O 3), other oxidants and reactive species including hydroperoxyl radical (HO 2), organic peroxyl radical (RO 2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH 3CHO) are considered in the transformation from NO to NO 2. CFD-VIT-RIT is shown to be capable of predicting both NO x and NO 2 profiles downwind. CALINE4 is able to capture the NO x profiles, but underpredicts NO 2 concentrations under high wind velocity. Our study suggests that the initial NO 2/NO x ratios have to be carefully selected based on traffic conditions in order to assess NO 2 concentrations near roadways. The commonly assumed NO 2/NO x ratio by volume of 5% may not be suitable for most roadways, especially those with a high fraction of heavy-duty truck traffic. In addition, high O 3 concentrations and high traffic volumes would lead to the peak NO 2 concentration occurring near roadways with elevated concentrations persistent over a long distance downwind.

  18. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  19. Modelling the chemical evolution in galaxies with KROME

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, Stefano; Capelo, Pedro R; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present and test chemical models for three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution. The microphysics is modelled by employing the public chemistry package KROME and the chemical networks have been tested to work in a wide range of densities and temperatures. We describe a simple H/He network following the formation of H2, and a more sophisticated network which includes metals. Photochemistry, thermal processes, and different prescriptions for the H2 catalysis on dust are presented and tested within a simple one-zone framework. We explore the effect of changing some of the key parameters such as metallicity, radiation and non-equilibrium versus equilibrium metal cooling approximations on the transition between the different gas phases. We find that employing an accurate treatment of the dust-related processes induces a faster HI-H2 transition. In addition, we show when the equilibrium assumption for metal cooling holds, and how a non-equilibrium approach affects the thermal ...

  20. Modelling the spectro-photometric and chemical evolution of Low Surface Brightness spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, L. B. van den; de Blok, W J G

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history and chemical evolution of Low Surface Brightness (LSB) spiral galaxies by means of their observed spectro-photometric and chemical properties. We present preliminary results for Johnson-Cousins UBVRI magnitudes and stellar [O/H] abundance ratios using a galactic chemical evolution model incorporating a detailed metallicity dependent set of stellar input data covering all relevant stages of stellar evolution. Comparison of our model results with observ...

  1. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution using chemical equilibrium codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical equilibrium codes are a modern tool in studying interaction between groundwater and solid phases. The most common used programs and application subjects are shortly presented in this article. The main emphasis is laid on the approach method of using calculated results in evaluating groundwater evolution in hydrogeological system. At present in geochemical equilibrium modelling also kinetic as well as hydrologic constrains along a flow path are taken into consideration

  2. Inflow, Outflow, Yields, and Stellar Population Mixing in Chemical Evolution Models

    OpenAIRE

    Brett H. Andrews(Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA); Weinberg, David H.; Schönrich, Ralph; Johnson, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical evolution models are powerful tools for interpreting stellar abundance surveys and understanding galaxy evolution. However, their predictions depend heavily on the treatment of inflow, outflow, star formation efficiency (SFE), the IMF, the SNIa delay time distribution, stellar yields, and mixing of stellar populations. Using flexCE, a new, flexible one-zone chemical evolution code, we investigate the effects of individual parameters and the trade-offs between them. Two of the most im...

  3. Chemical evolution of the solar nebula: A new model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, B. M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The common notion of a hot solar nebula from which meteoritic minerals condensed is not supported by theories of star formation. A model is developed which can give the same sequence of condensation without recourse to hot solar nebula. In this model, the solar nebula was formed from the matter ejected by the Sun during its T Tauri phase and the chemical condensation took place in this outflowing matter. Isotopic anomalies and the unique minerals found in meteorites may be explained by this model.

  4. Chemical evolution and life

    OpenAIRE

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before na...

  5. A Physically Based Coupled Chemical and Physical Weathering Model for Simulating Soilscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgoose, G. R.; Welivitiya, D.; Hancock, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    A critical missing link in existing landscape evolution models is a dynamic soil evolution models where soils co-evolve with the landform. Work by the authors over the last decade has demonstrated a computationally manageable model for soil profile evolution (soilscape evolution) based on physical weathering. For chemical weathering it is clear that full geochemistry models such as CrunchFlow and PHREEQC are too computationally intensive to be couplable to existing soilscape and landscape evolution models. This paper presents a simplification of CrunchFlow chemistry and physics that makes the task feasible, and generalises it for hillslope geomorphology applications. Results from this simplified model will be compared with field data for soil pedogenesis. Other researchers have previously proposed a number of very simple weathering functions (e.g. exponential, humped, reverse exponential) as conceptual models of the in-profile weathering process. The paper will show that all of these functions are possible for specific combinations of in-soil environmental, geochemical and geologic conditions, and the presentation will outline the key variables controlling which of these conceptual models can be realistic models of in-profile processes and under what conditions. The presentation will finish by discussing the coupling of this model with a physical weathering model, and will show sample results from our SSSPAM soilscape evolution model to illustrate the implications of including chemical weathering in the soilscape evolution model.

  6. Modelling the chemical evolution of star forming filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of star forming filaments incorporating - to our knowledge - the largest chemical network used to date on-the-fly in a 3D-MHD simulation. The network contains 37 chemical species and about 300 selected reaction rates. For this we use the newly developed package KROME (Grassi et al. 2014). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using such a complex chemical network in 3D-MHD simulations on modern supercomputers. We perform simulations with different strengths of the interstellar radiation field and the cosmic ray ionisation rate and find chemical and physical results in accordance with observations and other recent numerical work.

  7. Modelling the chemical evolution of molecular clouds as a function of metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Penteado, Em M; Rocha-Pinto, H J

    2014-01-01

    The Galaxy is in continuous elemental evolution. Since new elements produced by dying stars are delivered to the interstellar medium, the formation of new enerations of stars and planetary systems is influenced by this metal enrichment. We aim to study the role of the metallicity on the gas phase chemistry of the interstellar medium. Using a system of coupled-ordinary differential equations to model the chemical reactions, we simulate the evolution of the abundance of molecules in the gas phase for different initial interstellar elemental compositions. These varying initial elemental compositions consider the change in the "elemental abundances" predicted by a self-consistent model of the elemental evolution of the Galaxy. As far as we are aware, this is the first attempt to combine elemental evolution of the Galaxy and chemical evolution of molecular clouds. The metallicity was found to have a strong effect on the overall gas phase composition. With decreasing metallicity, the number of long carbon chains wa...

  8. Chemical evolution of local galaxies in a hierarchical model

    CERN Document Server

    Calura, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the chemical properties of local galaxies within a cosmological framework in the hierarchical picture of galaxy formation. To this aim, we use a hierarchical semi-analytic model which includes the contribution from (i) low and intermediate mass stars, (ii) type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and (iii) massive stars. - Abridged - We compare our predictions with available observations in the Milky Way (MW), in local dwarf galaxies and in local ellipticals. For Milky-Way-like galaxies, we can successfully reproduce the [O-Fe] vs [Fe/H] relation observed in disc stars and the stellar metallicity distribution (SMD). For dwarf galaxies, the stellar metallicity vs mass relation is reproduced by assuming that a substantial fraction of the heavy elements is lost through metal-enhanced outflows and a type Ia SN realization probability lower than the one of MW-like galaxies. - Abridged - In ellipticals, the observations indicate higher [alpha/Fe] values in larger galaxies. - Abridged - Our results computed with a st...

  9. Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic color-magnitude diagram of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed database of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photo-chemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colors than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.

  10. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial conditions are probably set by results of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBNS) without intervening complications affecting the composition of visible matter so that extrapolation of observed abundances to BBNS products seems fairly secure. Primordial helium and deuterium abundances deduced in this way place upper and lower limits on baryonic density implying that both baryonic and non-baryonic dark matter exist and predicting no more than 3 neutrino flavours as recently confirmed in accelerator experiments. The validity of simple galactic chemical evolution models assumed in extrapolating back to the Big Bang is examined in the light of the frequency distribution of iron or oxygen abundances in the Galactic halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  11. Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; de Boer, T. J. L.; Cignoni, M.; Tosi, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed data base of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photochemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, where the observed CMD extends towards bluer colours than the synthetic one; we suggest that this is a signature of metal-poor stellar populations in the data, which cannot be captured by our assumed one-zone chemical evolution model.

  12. Chemical evolution of spiral galaxies: models with star formation proportional to molecular hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi, M.; Angeles I. Díaz

    1990-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Tosi, M., Díaz, A.I. Chemical evolution of spiral galaxies: models with star formation proportional to molecular hydrogen. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 246 (1990): 616-623

  13. Towards an Integrated Model of Earth's Thermo-Chemical Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-05-01

    It has long been a challenge for geodynamicists, who have typically modeled homogeneous mantles, to explain the geochemical evidence for the existence of several distinct chemical reservoirs, in terms of a dynamically and chemically self-consistent model. While the mixing behavior of generalized tracers has received much attention in the modeling community, a recent trend has been towards mantle convection models that track the evolution of specific chemical species, both major and minor, and can thus be related to geochemical observations. However, obtaining realistic chemical evolution in such models is dependent on their having a reasonable representation of plate tectonic behavior since the recycling of oceanic crust and complementary depleted residuum is a key process in Earth that other terrestrial planets may lack. In general, this has required inserting plate motions by hand in models. In recent years, however, we have learned how to perform numerical simulations of mantle convection in which plate tectonic behavior is introduced self-consistently through plastic yielding of the lithosphere. In this presentation, models of mantle convection that combine a treatment of geochemical evolution with self-consistently generated plate tectonics, will be presented. Preliminary results indicate that the system can self-consistently evolve regions which have a HIMU-like signature as well as regions with a high He3/He4 ratio.

  14. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galax...

  15. Chemical and luminosity evolution, and counts of galaxies in a merger model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, P.; Schramm, D. N.

    1993-01-01

    A merger model is applied to the chemical and luminosity evolution of galaxies. Two aspects are focused on. The first is the problem of abundance ratios as a function of metallicity. The second is related to the luminosity evolution of galaxies. In relation to the former, we calculate the evolution of several chemical elements exploring a broad space of possible star formation rates, including those derived using phenomenological arguments from a multiple merger galaxy formation scenario. We are able to reproduce the observed plateau in the ratio of the abundances of oxygen to iron versus metallicity as a direct consequence of one of the merging SFR used; we have utilized a standard Type II supernovae nucleosynthesis scenario coupled with a reasonable binary model for Type Ia supernovae and its consequent nucleosynthetic yields. Following the consequent luminosity effects in a straightforward way enables the estimation of the evolution of bolometric luminosity. We have used our recently developed code for photometric evolution of galaxies to make a preliminary computation of the number-magnitude relationship, assuming a standard picture of galaxy evolution, in the B and K bands.

  16. Chemical evolution and life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before natural selection took place, the latter being the birthmark of living systems. In this contribution, I review the arguments defended by each side and show how both views presuppose a dichotomous definition of “life”.

  17. Stellar Yields and Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Brad K.

    1997-01-01

    Several speakers at IAU Symposium #187 (Cosmic Chemical Evolution) alluded to the zeroth-order agreement between Type II supernovae (SNe) stellar yield compilations, as predicted by the models of those most responsible for driving progress in the field - i.e., Arnett (1991,1996); Maeder (1992); Woosley & Weaver (1995); Langer & Henkel (1995); Thielemann et al. (1996). It is important though for those entering (or indeed, already involved in!) the chemical evolution field to be cognizant of th...

  18. Lighting up stars in chemical evolution models: the CMD of Sculptor

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenzo, Fiorenzo; de Boer, Thomas J L; Cignoni, Michele; Tosi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel approach to draw the synthetic color-magnitude diagram of galaxies, which can provide - in principle - a deeper insight in the interpretation and understanding of current observations. In particular, we `light up' the stars of chemical evolution models, according to their initial mass, metallicity and age, to eventually understand how the assumed underlying galaxy formation and evolution scenario affects the final configuration of the synthetic CMD. In this way, we obtain a new set of observational constraints for chemical evolution models beyond the usual photospheric chemical abundances. The strength of our method resides in the very fine grid of metallicities and ages of the assumed database of stellar isochrones. In this work, we apply our photo-chemical model to reproduce the observed CMD of the Sculptor dSph and find that we can reproduce the main features of the observed CMD. The main discrepancies are found at fainter magnitudes in the main sequence turn-off and sub-giant branch, wh...

  19. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  20. A new galactic chemical evolution model with dust: results for dwarf irregular galaxies and DLA systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gioannini, Lorenzo; Vladilo, Giovanni; Calura, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We present a galactic chemical evolution model which adopts updated prescriptions for all the main processes governing the dust cycle. We follow in detail the evolution of the abundances of several chemical species (C, O, S, Si, Fe and Zn) in the gas and dust of a typical dwarf irregular galaxy. The dwarf irregular galaxy is assumed to evolve with a low but continuous level of star formation and experience galactic winds triggered by supernova explosions. We predict the evolution of the gas to dust ratio in such a galaxy and discuss critically the main processes involving dust, such as dust production by AGB stars and Type II SNe, destruction and accretion (gas condensation in clouds). We then apply our model to Damped Lyman-Alpha systems which are believed to be dwarf irregulars, as witnessed by their abundance patterns. Our main conclusions are: i) we can reproduce the observed gas to dust ratio in dwarf galaxies. ii) We find that the process of dust accretion plays a fundamental role in the evolution of du...

  1. EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS AND A HIERARCHICAL CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early phases of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and formation history of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars are investigated using hierarchical galaxy formation models. We build a merger tree of the Galaxy according to the extended Press-Schechter theory. We follow the chemical evolution along the tree and compare the model results to the metallicity distribution function and abundance ratio distribution of the Milky Way halo. We adopt three different initial mass functions (IMFs). In a previous study, we argued that the typical mass, Mmd, of EMP stars should be high, Mmd ∼ 10 Msun, based on studies of binary origin carbon-rich EMP stars. In this study, we show that only the high-mass IMF can explain an observed small number of EMP stars. For relative element abundances, the high-mass IMF and the Salpeter IMF predict similar distributions. We also investigate dependence on nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae (SNe). The theoretical SN yields by Kobayashi et al. and Chieffi and Limongi show reasonable agreement with observations for α-elements. Our model predicts a significant scatter of element abundances at [Fe/H] < -3. We adopted the stellar yields derived in the work of Francois et al., which produce the best agreement between the observational data and the one-zone chemical evolution model. Their yields well reproduce a trend of the averaged abundances of EMP stars but predict much larger scatter than do the observations. The model with hypernovae predicts Zn abundance, in agreement with the observations, but other models predict lower [Zn/Fe]. Ejecta from the hypernovae with large explosion energy is mixed in large mass and decreases the scatter of the element abundances.

  2. Inflow, Outflow, Yields, and Stellar Population Mixing in Chemical Evolution Models

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Brett H; Schönrich, Ralph; Johnson, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Chemical evolution models are powerful tools for interpreting stellar abundance surveys and understanding galaxy evolution. However, their predictions depend heavily on the treatment of inflow, outflow, star formation efficiency (SFE), the IMF, the SNIa delay time distribution, stellar yields, and mixing of stellar populations. Using flexCE, a new, flexible one-zone chemical evolution code, we investigate the effects of individual parameters and the trade-offs between them. Two of the most important parameters are the SFE and outflow mass-loading parameter, which shift the knee in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] and the equilibrium abundances, respectively. One-zone models with simple star formation histories follow narrow tracks in [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] that do not match the observed bimodality in this plane. A mix of one-zone models with variations in their inflow timescales and outflow mass-loading parameters, as motivated by the inside-out galaxy formation scenario with radial mixing, reproduces the high- and low-alpha sequences b...

  3. Evolution of chemical abundances in Seyfert galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ballero, S. K.; Matteucci, F; Ciotti, L.; Calura, F; P. Padovani

    2007-01-01

    We computed the chemical evolution of spiral bulges hosting Seyfert nuclei, based on updated chemical and spectro-photometrical evolution models for the bulge of our Galaxy, made predictions about other quantities measured in Seyferts, and modeled the photometry of local bulges. The chemical evolution model contains detailed calculations of the Galactic potential and of the feedback from the central supermassive black hole, and the spectro-photometric model covers a wide range of stellar ages...

  4. A simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir model of chemical evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple closed-box (CB models of chemical evolution are extended on two respects, namely (i simple closed-(box+reservoir (CBR models allowing gas outflow from the box into the reservoir (Hartwick 1976 or gas inflow into the box from the reservoir (Caimmi 2007 with rate proportional to the star formation rate, and (ii simple multistage closed-(box+reservoir (MCBR models allowing different stages of evolution characterized by different inflow or outflow rates. The theoretical differential oxygen abundance distribution (TDOD predicted by the model maintains close to a continuous broken straight line. An application is made where a fictitious sample is built up from two distinct samples of halo stars and taken as representative of the inner Galactic halo. The related empirical differential oxygen abundance distribution (EDOD is represented, to an acceptable extent, as a continuous broken line for two viable [O/H]-[Fe/H] empirical relations. The slopes and the intercepts of the regression lines are determined, and then used as input parameters to MCBR models. Within the errors (-+σ, regression line slopes correspond to a large inflow during the earlier stage of evolution and to low or moderate outflow during the subsequent stages. A possible inner halo - outer (metal-poor bulge connection is also briefly discussed. Quantitative results cannot be considered for applications to the inner Galactic halo, unless selection effects and disk contamination are removed from halo samples, and discrepancies between different oxygen abundance determination methods are explained.

  5. Evolution of Autocatalytic Sets in Computational Models of Chemical Reaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Wim

    2016-06-01

    Several computational models of chemical reaction networks have been presented in the literature in the past, showing the appearance and (potential) evolution of autocatalytic sets. However, the notion of autocatalytic sets has been defined differently in different modeling contexts, each one having some shortcoming or limitation. Here, we review four such models and definitions, and then formally describe and analyze them in the context of a mathematical framework for studying autocatalytic sets known as RAF theory. The main results are that: (1) RAF theory can capture the various previous definitions of autocatalytic sets and is therefore more complete and general, (2) the formal framework can be used to efficiently detect and analyze autocatalytic sets in all of these different computational models, (3) autocatalytic (RAF) sets are indeed likely to appear and evolve in such models, and (4) this could have important implications for a possible metabolism-first scenario for the origin of life.

  6. Evolution of Autocatalytic Sets in Computational Models of Chemical Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Wim

    2016-06-01

    Several computational models of chemical reaction networks have been presented in the literature in the past, showing the appearance and (potential) evolution of autocatalytic sets. However, the notion of autocatalytic sets has been defined differently in different modeling contexts, each one having some shortcoming or limitation. Here, we review four such models and definitions, and then formally describe and analyze them in the context of a mathematical framework for studying autocatalytic sets known as RAF theory. The main results are that: (1) RAF theory can capture the various previous definitions of autocatalytic sets and is therefore more complete and general, (2) the formal framework can be used to efficiently detect and analyze autocatalytic sets in all of these different computational models, (3) autocatalytic (RAF) sets are indeed likely to appear and evolve in such models, and (4) this could have important implications for a possible metabolism-first scenario for the origin of life. PMID:26499126

  7. Beverton-Holt discrete pest management models with pulsed chemical control and evolution of pesticide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A.

    2016-07-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is usually managed by switching between different types of pesticides. The optimal switching time, which depends on the dynamics of the pest population and on the evolution of the pesticide resistance, is critical. Here we address how the dynamic complexity of the pest population, the development of resistance and the spraying frequency of pulsed chemical control affect optimal switching strategies given different control aims. To do this, we developed novel discrete pest population growth models with both impulsive chemical control and the evolution of pesticide resistance. Strong and weak threshold conditions which guarantee the extinction of the pest population, based on the threshold values of the analytical formula for the optimal switching time, were derived. Further, we addressed switching strategies in the light of chosen economic injury levels. Moreover, the effects of the complex dynamical behaviour of the pest population on the pesticide switching times were also studied. The pesticide application period, the evolution of pesticide resistance and the dynamic complexity of the pest population may result in complex outbreak patterns, with consequent effects on the pesticide switching strategies.

  8. Mass and Metallicity Requirement in Stellar Models for Galactic Chemical Evolution Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Côté, Benoit; Heger, Alexander; Ritter, Christian; O'Shea, Brian W; Herwig, Falk; Travaglio, Claudia; Bisterzo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    We used a one-zone chemical evolution model to address the question of how many metallicities and massive stars are required in grids of stellar models for galactic chemical evolution applications. We used a set of yields that includes seven masses between 13 and 30 Msun, 15 metallicities between 0 and 0.03 in mass fraction, and different remnant mass prescriptions. We ran several simulations where we sampled subsets of stellar models to explore the impact of different grid resolutions. Stellar yields from low- and intermediate-mass stars and from Type Ia supernovae have been included in our simulations, but with a fixed grid resolution. We compared our results with the stellar abundances observed in the Milky Way for O, Na, Mg, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, and Mn. Our results suggest that the range of metallicity considered is more important than the number of metallicities within that range, which only affects our numerical predictions by about 0.1 dex. We found that our predictions at [Fe/H] < -2 are very sensitiv...

  9. Introduction to Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    In this lecture I will introduce the concept of galactic chemical evolution, namely the study of how and where the chemical elements formed and how they were distributed in the stars and gas in galaxies. The main ingredients to build models of galactic chemical evolution will be described. They include: initial conditions, star formation history, stellar nucleosynthesis and gas flows in and out of galaxies. Then some simple analytical models and their solutions will be discussed together with the main criticisms associated to them. The yield per stellar generation will be defined and the hypothesis of instantaneous recycling approximation will be critically discussed. Detailed numerical models of chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type, able to follow the time evolution of the abundances of single elements, will be discussed and their predictions will be compared to observational data. The comparisons will include stellar abundances as well as interstellar medium ones, measured in galaxies. I will show how, from these comparisons, one can derive important constraints on stellar nucleosynthesis and galaxy formation mechanisms. Most of the concepts described in this lecture can be found in the monograph by Matteucci (2012).

  10. Extremely Metal-Poor Stars and a Hierarchical Chemical Evolution Model

    CERN Document Server

    Komiya, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Early phases of the chemical evolution and formation history of extremely metal poor (EMP) stars are investigated using hierarchical galaxy formation models. We build a merger tree of the Galaxy according to the extended Press-Schechter theory. We follow the chemical evolution along the tree, and compare the model results to the metallicity distribution function (MDF) and abundance ratio distribution of the Milky Way halo. We adopt three different initial mass functions (IMFs). In a previous studies, we argue that typical mass of EMP stars should be high-mass(~10Msun) based on studies of binary origin carbon-rich EMP stars. In this study, we show that only the high-mass IMF can explain a observed small number of EMP stars. For relative element abundances, the high-mass IMF and the Salpeter IMF predict similar distributions. We also investigate dependence on nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae (SNe). The theoretical SN yields by Kobayashi et al.(2006) and Chieffi & Limonge (2004) show reasonable agreement...

  11. A NEW CHEMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES BASED ON OBSERVED LONG STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new chemical evolution model for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the local universe. Our main aim is to explain both their observed star formation histories and metallicity distribution functions simultaneously. Applying our new model for the four local dSphs, that is, Fornax, Sculptor, Leo II, and Sextans, we find that our new model reproduces the observed chemical properties of the dSphs consistently. Our results show that the dSphs have evolved with both a low star formation efficiency and a large gas outflow efficiency compared with the Milky Way, as suggested by previous works. Comparing the observed [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation of the dSphs with the model predictions, we find that our model favors a longer onset time of Type Ia supernovae (i.e., 0.5 Gyr) than that suggested in previous studies (i.e., 0.1 Gyr). We discuss the origin of this discrepancy in detail

  12. Chemical Evolution of the Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Standard models for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy are reviewed with particular emphasis on the history of the abundance gradients in the disk. The effects on the disk structure and metallicity of gas accretion are discussed, showing that a significant fraction of the current disk mass has been accreted in the last Gyrs and that the chemical abundances of the infalling gas can be non primordial but should not exceed 0.3 Z(sun). The distributions with time and with galactocentric distanc...

  13. Evolution of the quaternary magmatic system, Mineral Mountains, Utah: Interpretations from chemical and experimental modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, W.P.; Crecraft, H.R.

    1982-09-01

    The evolution of silicic magmas in the upper crust is characterized by the establishment of chemical and thermal gradients in the upper portion of magma chambers. The chemical changes observed in rhyolite magmas erupted over a period of 300,000 years in the Mineral Mountains are similar to those recorded at Twin Peaks, Utah, and in the spatially zoned Bishop Tuff from Long Valley, California. Chemical and fluid dynamic models indicate that cooling of a silicic magma body from the top and sides can result in the formation of a roof zone above a convecting region which is chemically and thermally stratified, as well as highly fractionated and water rich. Crystallization experiments have been performed with sodium carbonate solutions as an analog to crystallization in magmatic systems. Top and side cooling of a homogeneous sodium carbonate solution results in crystallization along the top and sides and upward convection of sodium carbonate-depleted fluid. A stably stratified roof zone, which is increasingly water rich and cooler upwards, develops over a thermally and chemically homogeneous convecting region. Crystallization at the top ultimately ceases, and continued upward convection of water-rich fluid causes a slight undersaturation adjacent to the roof despite cooler temperatures. By analogy, crystallization at the margins of a magma chamber and buoyant rise of the fractionated boundary layer into the roof zone can account for the chemical evolution of the magma system at the Mineral Mountains. To produce compositionally stratified silicic magmas requires thermal input to a silicic system via mafic magmas. The small volume, phenocryst-poor rhyolite magma which persisted for at least 300,000 years in the Mineral Mountains requires the presence of a continued thermal input from a mafic magma source. The presence of silicic lavas signifies that there is a substantial thermal anomaly both in the crust and upper mantle. The production of silicic lavas requires (1) the

  14. Modeling the chemical evolution of a collapsing prestellar core in two spatial dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Hogerheijde, M R

    2009-01-01

    The physical conditions in a collapsing cloud can be traced by observations of molecular lines. To correctly interpret these observations the abundance distributions of the observed species need to be derived. The chemistry in a collapsing molecular cloud is not in a steady state as the density and temperature evolve. We therefore need to follow chemical reactions, both in the gas phase and on dust grains, as well as gas-grain interactions, to predict the abundance distributions. Our aim is to model the abundances of molecules, in the gas phase and on grain mantles in the form of ice, from prestellar core collapse to disk formation. We use a 2-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation as a physical model from which we take the density, temperature, and the flow of the gas. Trace particles, moving along with the gas, are used to follow the chemistry during prestellar core collapse and disk formation. The evolution of the abundances and the composition of ices on grain mantles were compared to observations. We also...

  15. Chemical Evolution in Omega Centauri

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Verne V.

    2003-01-01

    The globular cluster Omega Centauri displays evidence of a complex star formation history and peculiar internal chemical evolution, setting it apart from essentially all other globular clusters of the Milky Way. In this review we discuss the nature of the chemical evolution that has occurred within Omega Cen and attempt to construct a simple scenario to explain its chemistry.

  16. The galactic habitable zone of the Milky Way and M31 from chemical evolution models with gas radial flows

    CERN Document Server

    Spitoni, E; Sozzetti, A

    2014-01-01

    The galactic habitable zone is defined as the region with sufficient abundance of heavy elements to form planetary systems in which Earth-like planets could be born and might be capable of sustaining life, after surviving to close supernova explosion events. Galactic chemical evolution models can be useful for studying the galactic habitable zones in different systems. We apply detailed chemical evolution models including radial gas flows to study the galactic habitable zones in our Galaxy and M31. We compare the results to the relative galactic habitable zones found with "classical" (independent ring) models, where no gas inflows were included. For both the Milky Way and Andromeda, the main effect of the gas radial inflows is to enhance the number of stars hosting a habitable planet with respect to the "classical" model results, in the region of maximum probability for this occurrence, relative to the classical model results. These results are obtained by taking into account the supernova destruction process...

  17. Mercury's thermo-chemical evolution from numerical models constrained by Messenger observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, N.; Breuer, D.; Plesa, A. C.; Wagner, F.; Laneuville, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Messenger spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury for almost one year, has been delivering a great deal of new information that is changing dramatically our understanding of the solar system's innermost planet. Tracking data of the Radio Science experiment yielded improved estimates of the first coefficients of the gravity field that permit to determine the normalized polar moment of inertia of the planet (C/MR2) and the ratio of the moment of inertia of the mantle to that of the whole planet (Cm/C). These two parameters provide a strong constraint on the internal mass distribution and, in particular, on the core mass fraction. With C/MR2 = 0.353 and Cm/C = 0.452 [1], interior structure models predict a core radius as large as 2000 km [2], leaving room for a silicate mantle shell with a thickness of only ~ 400 km, a value significantly smaller than that of 600 km usually assumed in parametrized [3] as well as in numerical models of Mercury's mantle dynamics and evolution [4]. Furthermore, the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the surface abundance of radioactive elements, revealing, besides uranium and thorium, the presence of potassium. The latter, being moderately volatile, rules out traditional formation scenarios from highly refractory materials, favoring instead a composition not much dissimilar from a chondritic model. Considering a 400 km thick mantle, we carry out a large series of 2D and 3D numerical simulations of the thermo-chemical evolution of Mercury's mantle. We model in a self-consistent way the formation of crust through partial melting using Lagrangian tracers to account for the partitioning of radioactive heat sources between mantle and crust and variations of thermal conductivity. Assuming the relative surface abundance of radiogenic elements observed by Messenger to be representative of the bulk mantle composition, we attempt at constraining the degree to which uranium, thorium and potassium are concentrated in the silicate mantle through a broad

  18. The chemical evolution of the solar neighbourhood

    OpenAIRE

    Vanbeveren, D.; De Donder, E.

    2002-01-01

    Recent models of galactic chemical evolution account for updated evolutionary models of massive stars (with special emphasis on stellar winds) and for the effects of intermediate mass and massive binaries. The results are summarised. We also present a critical discussion on possible effects of stellar rotation on overall galactic chemical evolutionary simulations.

  19. Chemical Evolution of Protostellar Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William D.; vanDishoeck, Ewine F.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Whittet, Douglas C. B.

    2000-01-01

    We review the chemical processes that are important in the evolution from a molecular cloud core to a protostellar disk. These cover both gas phase and gas grain interactions. The current observational and theoretical state of this field are discussed.

  20. Topics on Galactic Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    I discuss three different topics in Galactic chemical evolution:the "puzzling" absence of any observational signature of secondary elements ; the building of the Galactic halo in the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation, as evidenced from its metallicity distribution ; and the potentially important role that radial migration may play in the evolution of galactic disks, according to recent studies.

  1. The Chemical Evolution of Phosphorus

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Heather R; Frebel, Anna; Roederer, Ian U; Cescutti, Gabriele; Matteucci, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is one of the few remaining light elements for which little is known about its nucleosynthetic origin and chemical evolution, given the lack of optical absorption lines in the spectra of long-lived FGK-type stars. We have identified a P I doublet in the near-ultraviolet (2135/2136 A) that is measurable in stars of low metallicity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope-STIS spectra, we have measured P abundances in 13 stars spanning -3.3 <= [Fe/H] <= -0.2, and obtained an upper limit for a star with [Fe/H] ~ -3.8. Combined with the only other sample of P abundances in solar-type stars in the literature, which spans a range of -1 <= [Fe/H] <= +0.2, we compare the stellar data to chemical evolution models. Our results support previous indications that massive-star P yields may need to be increased by a factor of a few to match stellar data at all metallicities. Our results also show that hypernovae were important contributors to the P production in the early universe. As P is one of the ke...

  2. Concrete Chemical Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this analysis are to discuss and evaluate testing results that were performed for the M andO by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) to evaluate the potential long-term evolution of organic admixtures in cementitious materials at elevated temperatures. The testing was designed to help provide a basis for a determination by the Performance Assessment group (PA) of the long-term acceptability and longevity of cementitious materials for repository use. The main purpose of the testing was to assess the evolution of gases (especially CO2) from hydrated cement paste at elevated temperatures and to determine the impact on alkalinity, i.e., the pH value of cement paste pore solution. This information in turn can be used as scoping information to determine if further tests of this nature are needed to support PA. As part of this discussion and evaluation of the PSU results, an assessment of alkalinity in a ''cementitious repository'' and an evaluation of organic materials are presented

  3. Concrete Chemical Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.H. Tang

    1998-07-31

    The objectives of this analysis are to discuss and evaluate testing results that were performed for the M&O by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) to evaluate the potential long-term evolution of organic admixtures in cementitious materials at elevated temperatures. The testing was designed to help provide a basis for a determination by the Performance Assessment group (PA) of the long-term acceptability and longevity of cementitious materials for repository use. The main purpose of the testing was to assess the evolution of gases (especially CO{sub 2}) from hydrated cement paste at elevated temperatures and to determine the impact on alkalinity, i.e., the pH value of cement paste pore solution. This information in turn can be used as scoping information to determine if further tests of this nature are needed to support PA. As part of this discussion and evaluation of the PSU results, an assessment of alkalinity in a ''cementitious repository'' and an evaluation of organic materials are presented.

  4. Chemical evolution in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Most of the complex molecules in interstellar space ar probably contained in small, frozen interstellar dust grains which are about as old as the earth and have been photochemically converted into large organic molecules. These molecules' maximum molecular weight is limited only by the approximately 0.1-micron grain size. Their evolution leads from cool, evolved stellar atmospheres' formation of seedlings to destruction through incorporation into the material of new stars. Organic dust constitutes about 0.1 percent of the total mass of the Milky Way, far outweighing any estimates of total planetary mass in the Galaxy. Because comets may be virtually pure, aggregated interstellar dust, they offer a source of interstellar organic material for detailed study.

  5. Galaxy formation and chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The manner the galaxy accretes matter along with the star formation rates at different epochs, influence the evolution of the stable isotopic inventories of the galaxy. A detailed analysis is presented here to study the dependence of the galactic chemical evolution on the accretion scenario of the galaxy along with the star formation rate during the early accretionary phase of the galactic thick disk and thin disk. Our results indicate that a rapid early accretion of the galaxy during the for...

  6. Chemical evolution of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Tarafdar, Sankar P.; Villere, Karen R.; Huntress, Wesley T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The principles behind the coupled chemical-dynamical evolution of molecular clouds are described. Particular attention is given to current problems involving the simplest species (i.e., C. CO, O2, and H2) in quiescent clouds. The results of a comparison made between the molecular abundances in the Orion ridge and the hot core (Blake, 1986) are presented.

  7. A Model for the Thermal and Chemical Evolution of the Moon's Interior: Implications for the Onset of Mare Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Paul C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    Crystallization of the lunar magma ocean creates a chemically stratified Moon consisting of an anorthositic crust and magma ocean cumulates overlying the primitive lunar interior. Within the magma ocean cumulates the last liquids to crystallize form dense, ilmenite-rich cumulates that contain high concentrations of incompatible radioactive elements. The underlying olivine-orthopyroxene cumulates are also stratified with later crystallized, denser, more Fe-rich compositions at the top. This paper explores the chemical and thermal consequences of an internal evolution model accounting for the possible role of these sources of chemical buoyancy. Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes the dense ilmenite-rich cumulate layer and underlying Fe-rich cumulates to sink toward the center of the Moon, forming a dense lunar core. After this overturn, radioactive heating within the ilmenite-rich cumulate core heats the overlying mantle, causing it to melt. In this model, the source region for high-TiO2 mare basalts is a convectively mixed layer above the core-mantle boundary which would contain small and variable amounts of admixed ilmenite and KREEP. This deep high-pressure melting, as required for mare basalts, occurs after a reasonable time interval to explain the onset of mare basalt volcanism if the content of radioactive elements in the core and the chemical density gradients above the core are sufficiently high but within a range of values that might have been present in the Moon. Regardless of details implied by particular model parameters, gravitational overturn driven by the high density of magma ocean Fe-rich cumulates should concentrate high-TiO2 mare basalt sources, and probably a significant fraction of radioactive heating, toward the center of the Moon. This will have important implications for both the thermal evolution of the Moon and for mare basalt genesis.

  8. Chemical Evolution in Hierarchical Clustering Scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Tissera, Patricia B.; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    We present first results of an implementation of chemical evolution in a cosmological hydrodynamical code, focusing the analysis on the effects of cooling baryons according to their metallicity. We found that simulations with primordial cooling can underestimate the star formation rate from $z < 3$ and by up to $\\approx 20 %$. We constructed simulated spectra by combining the star formation and chemical history of galactic systems with spectra synthesis models and assess the impact of chemica...

  9. The Chemical Evolution of Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Balser, D S

    2006-01-01

    We report on measurements of the 4He abundance toward the outer Galaxy HII region S206 with the NRAO Green Bank telescope. Observations of hydrogen and helium radio recombination lines between 8-10 GHz were made toward the peak radio continuum position in S206. We derive 4He/H = 0.08459 +/- 0.00088 (random) +/- 0.0010 (known systematic), 20% lower than optical recombination line results. It is difficult to reconcile the large discrepancy between the optical and radio values even when accounting for temperature, density, and ionization structure or for optical extinction by dust. Using only M17 and S206 we determine dY/dZ = 1.41 +/- 0.62 in the Galaxy, consistent with standard chemical evolution models. High helium abundances in the old stellar population of elliptical galaxies can help explain the increase in UV emission with shorter wavelength between 2000 and 1200 Angstrom, called the UV-upturn or UVX. Our lower values of dY/dZ are consistent with a normal helium abundance at higher metallicity and suggest ...

  10. Modeling the chemical evolution of Omega Centauri using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcolini, A; D'Ercole, A; Gibson, B K; Ferraro, F R

    2007-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical and chemical model for the globular cluster Omega Cen, under the assumption that it is the remnant of an ancient dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph), the bulk of which was disrupted and accreted by our Galaxy ~10 Gyr ago. We highlight the very different roles played by Type II and Type Ia supernovae (SNe) in the chemical enrichment of the inner regions of the putative parent dSph. While the SNe II pollute the interstellar medium rather uniformly, the SNe Ia ejecta may remain confined inside dense pockets of gas as long as succesive SNe II explosions spread them out. Stars forming in such pockets have lower alpha-to-iron ratios than the stars forming elsewhere. Owing to the inhomogeneous pollution by SNe Ia, the metal distribution of the stars in the central region differs substantially from that of the main population of the dwarf galaxy, and resembles that observed in Omega Cen. This inhomogeneous mixing is also responsible for a radial segregation of iron-rich stars with depleted [alp...

  11. Galactic chemical evolution hydrogen through zinc

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Timmes, F X; Woosley, S E

    1994-01-01

    Using the output from a grid of 60 Type II supernova models (Woosley \\& Weaver 1994) of varying mass (11 \\ltaprx M/M\\sun \\ltaprx 40) and metallicity (0, 10^{-4}, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 Z\\sol), the chemical evolution of 76 stable isotopes, from hydrogen to zinc, is calculated. The chemical evolution calculation employs a simple dynamical model for the Galaxy (infall with a 4 billion year e-folding time scale onto a exponential disk and 1/r^2 bulge), and standard evolution parameters, such as a Salpeter initial mass function and a quadratic Schmidt star formation rate. The theoretical results are compared in detail with observed stellar abundances in stars with metallicities in the range -3.0 \\ltaprx [Fe/H] \\ltaprx 0.0 dex. While our discussion focuses on the solar neighborhood where there are the most observations, the supernovae rates, an intrinsically Galactic quantity, are also discussed.

  12. Chemical evolution of the early Martian hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical evolution of the early Martian hydrosphere is discussed. The early Martian ocean can be modeled as a body of relatively pure water in equilibrium with a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. The chemical weathering of lavas, pyroclastic deposits, and impact melt sheets would have the effect of neutralizing the acidity of the juvenile water. As calcium and other cations are added to the water by chemical weathering, they are quickly removed by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and other minerals, forming a deposit of limestone beneath the surface of the ocean. As the atmospheric carbon dioxide pressure and the temperature decrease, the Martian ocean would be completely frozen. Given the scenario for the chemical evolution of the northern lowland plains of Mars, it should be possible to draw a few conclusions about the expected mineralogy and geomorphology of this regions.

  13. AGB stars and the chemical evolution of galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are important players in the chemical evolution modelling of galaxies, because they are major producers of several chemical elements and excellent tracers of the structure and of the star formation activity of their parent galaxies. A few examples on the importance of AGB stars are presented in this review, together with a number of open problems affecting chemical evolution model predictions related to the element enrichment by AGB stars: the evolution of ...

  14. Evolution of chemical abundances in Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ballero, S K; Ciotti, L; Calura, F; Padovani, P

    2007-01-01

    We computed the chemical evolution of spiral bulges hosting Seyfert nuclei, based on updated chemical and spectro-photometrical evolution models for the bulge of our Galaxy, made predictions about other quantities measured in Seyferts, and modeled the photometry of local bulges. The chemical evolution model contains detailed calculations of the Galactic potential and of the feedback from the central supermassive black hole, and the spectro-photometric model covers a wide range of stellar ages and metallicities. We followed the evolution of bulges in the mass range 10^9 - 10^{11} Msun by scaling the star formation efficiency and the bulge scalelength as in the inverse-wind scenario for elliptical galaxies, and considering an Eddington limited accretion onto the central supermassive black hole. We successfully reproduced the observed black hole-host bulge mass relation. The observed nuclear bolometric luminosity is reproduced only at high redshift or for the most massive bulges; in the other cases, at z = 0 a r...

  15. Galaxy evolution: the effect of dark matter on the chemical evolution of ellipticals and galaxy clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, F.; Gibson, B. K.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies and its consequences on the evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM). We use chemical evolution models taking into account dark matter halos and compare the results with previous models where dark matter was not considered. In particular, we examine the evolution of the abundances of some relevant heavy elements such as oxygen, magnesium and iron and conclude that models including dark matter halos and an initial mass fu...

  16. Stochastic processes, galactic star formation, and chemical evolution. Effects of accretion, stripping, and collisions in multiphase multi-zone models

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G D; Galli, D

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports simulations allowing for stochastic accretion and mass loss within closed and open systems modeled using a previously developed multi-population, multi-zone (halo, thick disk, thin disk) treatment. The star formation rate is computed as a function of time directly from the model equations and all chemical evolution is followed without instantaneous recycling. Several types of simulations are presented here: (1) a closed system with bursty mass loss from the halo to the thick disk, and from the thick to the thin disk, in separate events to the thin disk; (2) open systems with random environmental (extragalactic) accretion, e.g. by infall of high velocity clouds directly to the thin disk; (3) schematic open system single and multiple collision events and intracluster stripping. For the open models, the mass of the Galaxy has been explicitly tracked with time. We present the evolution of the star formation rate, metallicity histories, and concentrate on the light elements. We find a wide range...

  17. Chemical evolution in spiral and irregular galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of models of chemical evolution of the interstellar medium in our galaxy and other galaxies is presented. These models predict the time variation and radial dependence of chemical composition in the gas as function of the input parameters; initial mass function, stellar birth rate, chemical composition of mass lost by stars during their evolution (yields), and the existence of large scale mass flows, like infall from the halo, outflow to the intergalactic medium or radial flows within a galaxy. At present there is a considerable wealth of observational data on the composition of HII regions in spiral and irregular galaxies to constrain the models. Comparisons are made between theory and the observed physical conditions. In particular, studies of helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances are reviewed. In many molecular clouds the information we have on the amount of H2 is derived from the observed CO column density, and a standard CO/H2 ratio derived for the solar neighborhood. Chemical evolution models and the observed variations in O/H and N/O values, point out the need to include these results in a CO/H2 relation that should be, at least, a function of the O/H ratio. This aspect is also discussed.

  18. Chemical Evolution of the Juvenile Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wasserburg, G J

    2009-01-01

    Only massive stars contribute to the chemical evolution of the juvenile universe corresponding to [Fe/H]-0.32. Recent observations show that there are stars with [Sr/Fe]<-2 and [Fe/H]<-3. This proves that the two-component model is not correct and that a third component is necessary to explain the observations. This leads to a simple three-component model including low-mass and normal SNe II and hypernovae (HNe), which gives a good description of essentially all the data for stars with [Fe/H]<-1.5. We conclude that HNe are more important than normal SNe II in the chemical evolution of the low-A elements, in sharp distinction to earlier models. (Abridged)

  19. Characterizing the local population of star-forming and passive galaxies with analytical models of chemical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Spitoni, E; Matteucci, F

    2016-01-01

    Analytical models of chemical evolution, including inflow and outflow of gas, are important tools to study how the metal content in galaxies evolves as a function of time. In this work, we present new analytical solutions for the evolution of the gas mass, total mass and metallicity of a galactic system, when a decaying exponential infall rate of gas and galactic winds are assumed. We apply our model to characterize a sample of local star-forming and passive galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, with the aim of reproducing their observed mass-metallicity relation; in this way, we can derive how the two populations of star-forming and passive galaxies differ in their particular distribution of ages, formation time scales, infall masses and mass loading factors. We find that the local passive galaxies are on average older and assembled on shorter typical time-scales than the local star-forming ones; on the other hand, the larger mass star-forming galaxies show generally older ages and longer typical ...

  20. Models of disk chemical evolution focusing the pure dynamical radial mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Re Fiorentin P.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed N-body simulations to study the dynamical evolution of a stellar disk inside a Dark Matter (DM halo. Our results evidence how a standard -radially decreasing- metallicity gradient produces a negative vϕ vs. [Fe/H] correlation, similar to that shown by the thin disk stars, while an inverse radial gradient generates a positive rotation-metallicity correlation, as that observed in the old thick population.

  1. Inhomogeneous chemical evolution of the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinie, Guy; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Clayton, Donald D.; Mathews, Grant J.

    1993-01-01

    We present analytical models for inhomogeneous chemical evolution (ICE) of systems in which the star formation history resembles a series of bursts, localized in space and/or time, with intermittent periods of remixing. The additional parameter of this model is the metallicity increment of bursting subsystems, but this parameter is constrained by the spread in the age-metallicity relation. We apply this model to the solar annulus in the Galactic disk and show that ICE models yield an improved fit to the observed shape of the stellar abundance distribution function (ADF). The G-dwarf problem can be alleviated with ICE models, but infall of metal poor gas and/or some preenrichment of the disk during the epoch of protogalactic evolution is still required to explain the paucity of low-metallicity dwarfs. ICE models also suggest an explanation of the reduced frequency of metal-rich G-dwarfs relative to the predictions of the simple model. It does not seem likely that chemical evolution of the solar annulus proceeded in a medium that was well-mixed at all times.

  2. Abundance Ratios in Stars vs. Hot Gas in Elliptical Galaxies: the Chemical Evolution Modeller Point of View

    CERN Document Server

    Pipino, A

    2009-01-01

    I will present predictions from chemical evolution model aimed at a self-consistent study of both optical (i.e. stellar) and X-ray (i.e.gas) properties of present-day elliptical galaxies. Detailed cooling and heating processes in the interstellar medium (ISM) are taken into and allow a reliable modelling of the SN-driven galactic wind. SNe Ia activity, in fact, may power a galactic wind lasting for a considerable amount of the galactic lifetime, even in the case for which the efficiency of energy transfer into the ISM per SN Ia event is less than unity. The model simultaneously reproduces the mass-metallicity, the colour-magnitude, the L_X - L_B and the L_X - T relations, as well as the observed trend of the [Mg/Fe] ratio as a function of sigma, by adopting the prescriptions of Pipino & Matteucci (2004) for the gas infall and star formation timescales. The "iron discrepancy", namely the too high predicted iron abundance in X-ray haloes of ellipticals compared to observations, can be solved by taking into ...

  3. Chemical evolution during the process of proto-star formation by considering a two dimensional hydrodynamic model

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01

    Chemical composition of a molecular cloud is highly sensitive to the physical properties of the cloud. In order to obtain the chemical composition around a star forming region, we carry out a two dimensional hydrodynamical simulation of the collapsing phase of a proto-star. A total variation diminishing scheme (TVD) is used to solve the set of equations governing hydrodynamics. This hydrodynamic code is capable of mimicking evolution of the physical properties during the formation of a proto-star. We couple our reasonably large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. To have a realistic estimate of the abundances of bio-molecules in the interstellar medium, we include the recently calculated rate coefficients for the formation of several interstellar bio-molecules into our gas phase network. Chemical evolution is studied in detail by keeping grain at the constant temperature throughout the simulation as well as by using the temperature variation ...

  4. Chemical Evolution of Blue Compact Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Shi; Xu Kong; Fu-Zhen Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Based on a sample of 72 Blue Compact Galaxies (BCGs) observed with the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and about 4000 strong emission line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,we analyzed their chemical evolution history using the revised chemical evolution model of Larsen et al. Our sample covers a much larger metallicity range (7.2<12+log(O/H) <9.0). We found that, in order to reproduce the observed abundance pattern and gas fraction over the whole metallicity range, a relatively continuous star formation history is needed for high metallicity galaxies, while assuming a series of instantaneous bursts with long quiescent periods (some Gyrs) for low metallicity galaxies. Model calculations also show that only the closed-box model is capable of reproducing the observational data over the whole metallicity range. Models that consider the ordinary winds and/or inflow can only fit the observations in the low metallicity range, and a model with enriched wind cannot fit the data in the whole metallicity range. This implies that the current adopted simple wind and inflow models are not applicable to massive galaxies, where the underlying physics of galactic winds or inflow could be more complicated.

  5. Equilibrium and Sudden Events in Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, David H; Freudenburg, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    We present new analytic solutions for one-zone (fully mixed) chemical evolution models and explore their implications. In contrast to existing analytic models, we incorporate a realistic delay time distribution for Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and can therefore track the separate evolution of $\\alpha$-elements produced by core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and iron peak elements synthesized in both CCSNe and SNIa. In generic cases, $\\alpha$ and iron abundances evolve to an equilibrium at which element production is balanced by metal consumption and gas dilution, instead of continuing to increase over time. The equilibrium absolute abundances depend principally on supernova yields and the outflow mass loading parameter $\\eta$, while the equilibrium abundance ratio [$\\alpha$/Fe] depends mainly on yields and secondarily on star formation history. A stellar population can be metal-poor either because it has not yet evolved to equilibrium or because high outflow efficiency makes the equilibrium abundance itself low. Sy...

  6. Multiphase chemical evolution in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Y; Okoshi, K

    1996-01-01

    The recent {\\em ASCA} results show that the iron abundance of the X-ray gas of elliptical galaxies is less than the solar abundance (Z_{\\sun}). The observed low iron abundance is inconsistent with the predictions of the previous chemical evolution models. In order to solve this problem, we present a simple model of chemical evolution for elliptical galaxies after the galactic wind period under the assumption that the gases ejected from stars do not mix with the circumferential gas. The ejected gas components evolve separately according to their birth time and origin. We have investigated their evolution qualitatively. The gas components originated from supernova remnant shells cool and drop out of the hot gas faster than the other components because of their high density and metal abundance. As a result, supernovae cannot heat the whole gas of the elliptical galaxies effectively, in contrary to the previous results. If the metal abundance of mass-loss gas is not uniform, the mass-loss gas with higher abundanc...

  7. Galacti chemical evolution: Hygrogen through zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmes, F. X.; Woosley, S. E.; Weaver, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    Using the output from a grid of 60 Type II supernova models (Woosley & Weaver 1995) of varying mass (11 approx. less than (M/solar mass) approx. less than 40) and metallicity (0, 10(exp -4), 0.01, and 1 solar metallicity), the chemical evolution of 76 stable isotopes, from hydrogen to zinc, is calculated. The chemical evolution calculation employs a simple dynamical model for the Galaxy (infall with a 4 Gyr e-folding timescale onto a exponential dsk and 1/r(exp 2) bulge), and standard evolution parameters, such as a Salpeter initial mass function and a quadratic Schmidt star formation rate. The theoretical results are compared in detail with observed stellar abundances in stars with metallicities in the range -3.0 approx. less than (Fe/H) approx. less than 0.0 dex. While our discussion focuses on the solar neighborhood where there are the most observations, the supernova rates, an intrinsically Galactic quality, are also discussed.

  8. Layered Model for Radiation-Induced Chemical Evolution of Icy Surface Composition on Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Hill, Matthew E.; Richardson, John D.; Sturner, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of albedos and surface colors on observed Kuiper Belt and Inner Oort Cloud objects remains to be explained in terms of competition between primordial intrinsic versus exogenic drivers of surface and near-surface evolution. Earlier models have attempted without success to attribute this diversity to the relations between surface radiolysis from cosmic ray irradiation and gardening by meteoritic impacts. A more flexible approach considers the different depth-dependent radiation profiles produced by low-energy plasma, suprathermal, and maximally penetrating charged particles of the heliospheric and local interstellar radiation environments. Generally red objects of the dynamically cold (low inclination, circular orbit) Classical Kuiper Belt might be accounted for from erosive effects of plasma ions and reddening effects of high energy cosmic ray ions, while suprathermal keV-MeV ions could alternatively produce more color neutral surfaces. The deepest layer of more pristine ice can be brought to the surface from meter to kilometer depths by larger impact events and potentially by cryovolcanic activity. The bright surfaces of some larger objects, e.g. Eris, suggest ongoing resurfacing activity. Interactions of surface irradiation, resultant chemical oxidation, and near-surface cryogenic fluid reservoirs have been proposed to account for Enceladus cryovolcanism and may have further applications to other icy irradiated bodies. The diversity of causative processes must be understood to account for observationally apparent diversities of the object surfaces.

  9. Galaxy Formation and Chemical Evolution in Hierarchical Hydrodynamical Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Cora, S. A.; Mosconi, M. B.; P. B. Tissera; Lambas, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    We report first results of an implementation of a chemical model in a cosmological code, based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. We show that chemical SPH simulations are a promising tool to provide clues for the understanding of the chemical properties of galaxies in relation to their formation and evolution in a cosmological framework.

  10. Chemical evolution in hierarchical scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Tissera P.B.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the chemical properties of Milky-Way mass galaxies. We found common global chemical patterns with particularities which reflect their different assembly histories in a hierarchical scenario. We carried out a comprehensively analysis of the dynamical components (central spheroid, disc, inner and outer haloes) and their chemical properties.

  11. Stellar nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1988-01-01

    Current theoretical models of nucleosynthesis (N) in stars are reviewed, with an emphasis on their implications for Galactic chemical evolution. Topics addressed include the Galactic population II red giants and early N; N in the big bang; star formation, stellar evolution, and the ejection of thermonuclearly evolved debris; the chemical evolution of an idealized disk galaxy; analytical solutions for a closed-box model with continuous infall; and nuclear burning processes and yields. Consideration is given to shell N in massive stars, N related to degenerate cores, and the types of observational data used to constrain N models. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  12. Galactic chemical evolution: the observational side

    OpenAIRE

    McWilliam, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In this review I outline some ideas in chemical evolution, necessary for understanding the evolution of galaxies from measured elemental abundance ratios. I then discuss abundance results from studies of Local Group dwarf galaxies and the globular cluster Omega Cen. I present a qualitative scenario of prolonged chemical enrichment in a leaky box that can explain the observed abundance ratios in these systems. Space limitations prevent a comprehensive review of this vast field, so I have restr...

  13. The possible role of soluble salts in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, N.; Chang, S.

    1982-01-01

    A model for a prebiotic environment in which concentration, condensation, and chemical evolution of biomolecules could have occurred is proposed. The principal reactions expected of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and some of their precursors in this environment are discussed. The model is based on the concept of a fluctuating system in which hydration and dehydration processes occur in a cyclic manner, with allowance for high concentrations of soluble salts, such as chlorides and sulfates. It is concluded that the proposed prebiotic environment with its dynamical characteristics is a plausible model for the chemical evolution from biomonomers through random oligomers toward self-replicating chemical systems.

  14. The impact of chemical evolution on the observable properties of stellar populations

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi., M

    2000-01-01

    The major effects of the chemical evolution of galaxies on the characteristics of their stellar populations are reviewed. A few examples of how the observed stellar properties derived from colour--magnitude diagrams can constrain chemical evolution models are given.

  15. The potential for chemical evolution on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J. I.; Welch, C.

    2002-01-01

    Sampling of organics to determine oxygen content, extent of acetylene polymerization, existence of chiral molecules and enantiomeric excesses, and searches for specific polymer products, would be of interest in assessing how organic chemistry evolves toward biochemistry. Such efforts would require fairly sophisticated chemical analyses from landed missions. This paper examines this chemistry and the potential instruments that could distinguish chemical evolution.

  16. A geochemical modelling study of the evolution of the chemical composition of seawater linked to a "snowball" glaciation

    OpenAIRE

    Hir, G.; Goddéris, Y.; Y. Donnadieu; Ramstein, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Snowball Earth theory initially proposed by Kirschvink (1992) to explain the Neoproterozoic glacial episodes, suggested that the Earth was fully ice-covered at 720 Ma (Sturtian episode) and 640 Ma (Marinoan episode). This succession of extreme climatic crises induced environmental perturbations which are considered as a strong selective pressure on the evolution of life (Hoffman et al., 1998). Using a numerical model of carbon-alkalinity global cycles, we quantify enviro...

  17. Chemical evolution of Elliptical Galaxies and the ICM

    OpenAIRE

    Pipino, Antonio; Matteucci, Francesca

    2002-01-01

    We present a new model for the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies taking into account SN feedback, detailed nucleosynthesis and galactic winds. We discuss the effect of galactic winds on the chemical enrichment of the ICM and compute the energy per particle injected by the galaxies into the ICM.

  18. Simulating emission and chemical evolution of coarse sea-salt particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Kelly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-salt particles from the coastal surf zone is known to be elevated compared to that from the open ocean. Despite the importance of sea-salt emissions and chemical processing, the US EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model has traditionally treated coarse sea-salt particles as chemically inert and has not accounted for enhanced surf-zone emissions. In this article, updates to CMAQ are described that enhance sea-salt emissions from the coastal surf zone and allow dynamic transfer of HNO3, H2SO4, HCl, and NH3 between coarse particles and the gas phase. Predictions of updated CMAQ models and the previous release version, CMAQv4.6, are evaluated using observations from three coastal sites during the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE in Tampa, FL in May 2002. Model updates improve predictions of NO3, SO42−, NH4+, Na+, and Cl concentrations at these sites with only a 8% increase in run time. In particular, the chemically interactive coarse particle mode dramatically improves predictions of nitrate concentration and size distributions as well as the fraction of total nitrate in the particle phase. Also, the surf-zone emission parameterization improves predictions of total sodium and chloride concentration. Results of a separate study indicate that the model updates reduce the mean absolute error of nitrate predictions at coastal CASTNET and SEARCH sites in the eastern US. Although the new model features improve performance relative to CMAQv4.6, some persistent differences exist between observations and predictions

  19. Simulating emission and chemical evolution of coarse sea-salt particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Kelly

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-salt particles from the coastal surf zone is known to be elevated compared to that from the open ocean. Despite the importance of sea-salt emissions and chemical processing, the US EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model has traditionally treated coarse sea-salt particles as chemically inert and has not accounted for enhanced surf-zone emissions. In this article, updates to CMAQ are described that enhance sea-salt emissions from the coastal surf zone and allow dynamic transfer of HNO3, H2SO4, HCl, and NH3 between coarse particles and the gas phase. Predictions of updated CMAQ models and the previous release version, CMAQv4.6, are evaluated using observations from three coastal sites during the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE in Tampa, FL in May 2002. Model updates improve predictions of NO3, SO42−, NH4+, Na+, and Cl concentrations at these sites with only a 8% increase in run time. In particular, the chemically interactive coarse particle mode dramatically improves predictions of nitrate concentration and size distributions as well as the fraction of total nitrate in the particle phase. Also, the surf-zone emission parameterization improves predictions of total sodium and chloride concentration. Results of a separate study indicate that the model updates reduce the mean absolute error of nitrate predictions at coastal CASTNET and SEARCH sites in the eastern US. Although the new model features improve performance relative to CMAQv4.6, some persistent differences exist between observations and predictions

  20. Is the mantle chemically stratified? Insights from sound velocity modeling and isotope evolution of an early magma ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Eugenia; Huang, Shichun; Petaev, Michail I.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-04-01

    The upper mantle is widely accepted to be pyrolitic, but the bulk composition of the lower mantle remains highly disputed. Recent modeling of the lower mantle shear wave velocity profile has suggested that the lower mantle is enriched in bridgmanite, therefore implying a higher Si/Mg than that of the upper mantle. We improve upon such modeling by taking into account Ca-perovskite and considering the distribution of Fe between bridgmanite and ferropericlase, more appropriate for Al-bearing systems. Using available experimental data, we derive a means to constrain Fe-Mg partitioning for bridgmanite and ferropericlase, constrain suitable values for the lower mantle, and apply these to lower mantle shear wave velocity calculations. Calculations that consider the effects of minor chemical components such as Ca and Al suggest that the lower mantle shear wave velocities can resolve PREM for a pyrolitic composition to within 1%. We also model chemical fractionations of the 147Sm-143Nd and 176Lu-176Hf systems induced by a crystallizing magma ocean that would produce a putative Si-enriched lower mantle. The comparison of the calculated 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf signatures with those of the terrestrial array shows that a Si-enriched lower mantle, if ever formed, no longer exists. Both mineralogical calculations and geochemical magma ocean modeling support the idea that the Earth's lower mantle is likely pyrolitic and that the mantle as a whole need not be chemically stratified.

  1. Chemical evolution of Local Group dwarf galaxies in a cosmological context -- I. A new modelling approach and its application to the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Donatella

    2013-01-01

    We present a new approach for chemical evolution modelling, specifically designed to investigate the chemical properties of dwarf galaxies in a full cosmological framework. In particular, we focus on the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy as a test bed for our model. We select four candidate Sculptor-like galaxies from the satellite galaxy catalogue generated by implementation of a version of the Munich semi-analytic model for galaxy formation on the level 2 Aquarius dark matter simulations. We follow explicitly the evolution of several chemical elements, both in the cold gas out of which the stars form and in the hot medium residing in the halo. We take into account in detail the lifetimes of stars of different initial masses, the distribution of the delay times for type Ia supernova explosions and the dependency of the stellar yields from the initial metallicity of the stars. We allow large fractions of metals to be deposited into the hot phase, either directly as stars die or through reheated gas flows power...

  2. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, E; Elettreby, M. F.

    2004-01-01

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here we will introduce random version of BS model. Also we generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  3. On Multiobjective Evolution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, E.; Elettreby, M. F.

    Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) phenomena could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. The Bak-Sneppen (BS) model is a simple and robust model of biological evolution that exhibits punctuated equilibrium behavior. Here, we will introduce random version of BS model. We also generalize the single objective BS model to a multiobjective one.

  4. Comets - Chemistry and chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, B.

    1982-01-01

    Research on the chemical composition and conditions in comets and their possible role in the origin of life on earth is surveyed. The inorganic and organic compounds and ions indicated in the ultraviolet and visible spectra of comets are noted, and evidence for the existence of at least a small proportion of complex organic molecules in comets is presented. It is then pointed out that while cometary material could have reached the earth and provided volatile elements from which biochemical compounds could have formed, it is unlikely that a cometary nucleus could have withstood the temperatures and pressures necessary to sustain an environment in which life could have originated.

  5. Isotopic anomalies - Chemical memory of Galactic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1988-01-01

    New mechanisms for the chemical memory of isotopic anomalies are proposed which are based on the temporal change during the chemical evolution of the Galaxy of the isotopic composition of the mean ejecta from stars. Because of the differing temporal evolution of primary and secondary products of nucleosynthesis, the isotopic composition of the bulk interstellar medium changes approximately linearly with time, and thus any dust component having an age different from that of average dust will be isotopically anomalous. Special attention is given to C, O, Mg, Si, and isotopically heavy average-stellar condensates of SiC.

  6. Radiation-induced chemical evolution of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical evolution in glycilglycine (Gly2) films irradiated with 146 nm vacuum ultraviolet light was studied. It is found that quantum efficiency of chemical evolution from Gly2 to glycilglycilglycine (Gly3) is smaller than that to glycilglycilglycilglycine (Gly4) due to the multiple step of reaction. Furthermore, we have carried out measurement of soft X-ray natural circular dichroism spectra for serine and alanine films in the energy region of oxygen 1s transition and we report the splitting of 1s→π* transitions.

  7. Synthetic photometry for M and K giants and stellar evolution: hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres and chemical abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aringer, B.; Girardi, L.; Nowotny, W.; Marigo, P.; Bressan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on a grid of hydrostatic spherical COMARCS models for cool stars, we have calculated observable properties of these objects, which will be mainly used in combination with stellar evolution tracks and population synthesis tools. The high-resolution opacity sampling and low-resolution convolved spectra as well as bolometric corrections for a large number of filter systems are made electronically available. We exploit those data to study the effect of mass, C/O ratio and nitrogen abundance on the photometry of K and M giants. Depending on effective temperature, surface gravity and the chosen wavelength ranges, variations of the investigated parameters cause very weak to moderate and, in the case of C/O values close to 1, even strong shifts of the colours. For the usage with stellar evolution calculations, they will be treated as correction factors applied to the results of an interpolation in the main quantities. When we compare the synthetic photometry to observed relations and to data from the Galactic bulge, we find in general a good agreement. Deviations appear for the coolest giants showing pulsations, mass-loss and dust shells, which cannot be described by hydrostatic models.

  8. Modelling of chemical evolution in the near-field of the spent nuclear fuel repository. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been planned to dispose of spent nuclear fuel in Finland in a repository at a depth of about 500 m in crystalline bedrock. The near-field barriers in the excavated space comprise a compacted bentonite buffer (clay) surrounding a copper-lined iron canister, the canister itself and the spent fuel matrix (UO2). The barriers mutually interact via the groundwater and tend towards a thermodynamic equilibrium with each other and the geochemical environment. The evolution of the near-field chemistry arising from the interactions between the groundwater, bentonite, canister and the spent fuel was calculated for the groundwater and bentonite composition considered in the context of the Finnish nuclear waste disposal concept. The approach employs equilibrium modelling (EQ3/6) with the modelling of three successive closed systems. The pH, Eh and actinide solubilities as well as their solubility-limiting phases were determined in the solution equilibrated with spent fuel. (orig.)

  9. Synthetic photometry for M and K giants and stellar evolution: hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres and chemical abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Aringer, Bernhard; Nowotny, Walter; Marigo, Paola; Bressan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Based on a grid of hydrostatic spherical COMARCS models for cool stars we have calculated observable properties of these objects, which will be mainly used in combination with stellar evolution tracks and population synthesis tools. The high resolution opacity sampling and low resolution convolved spectra as well as bolometric corrections for a large number of filter systems are made electronically available. We exploit those data to study the effect of mass, C/O ratio and nitrogen abundance on the photometry of K and M giants. Depending on effective temperature, surface gravity and the chosen wavelength ranges variations of the investigated parameters cause very weak to moderate and, in the case of C/O values close to one, even strong shifts of the colours. For the usage with stellar evolution calculations they will be treated as correction factors applied to the results of an interpolation in the main quantities. When we compare the synthetic photometry to observed relations and to data from the Galactic Bu...

  10. Chemical Evolution of the Juvenile Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Qian, Y.-Z.

    2009-09-01

    Models of average Galactic chemical abundances are in good general agreement with observations for [Fe/H] > -1.5, but there are gross discrepancies at lower metallicities. Only massive stars contribute to the chemical evolution of the `juvenile universe' corresponding to [Fe/H] SN II contributions. Both low-mass (~8-11 Msolar) and normal (~12-25 Msolar) SNe II produce neutron stars, which have intense neutrino-driven winds in their nascent stages. These winds produce elements such as Sr, Y and Zr through charged-particle reactions (CPR). Such elements are often called the `light r-process elements', but are considered here as products of CPR and not the r process. The observed absence of production of the low-A elements (Na through Zn including Fe) when the true r-process elements (Ba and above) are produced requires that only low-mass SNe II be the site if the r process occurs in SNe II. Normal SNe II produce the CPR elements in addition to the low-A elements. This results in a two-component model that is quantitatively successful in explaining the abundances of all elements relative to hydrogen for -3 = -0.32. Recent observations show that there are stars with [Sr/Fe] <~ -2 and [Fe/H] < -3. This proves that the two-component model is not correct and that a third component is necessary to explain the observations. The production of CPR elements associated with the formation of neutron stars requires that the third component must be massive stars ending as black holes. It is concluded that stars of ~25-50 Msolar (possibly up to ~100 Msolar) are the appropriate candidates. These produce hypernovae (HNe) that have very high Fe yields and are observed today. Stars of ~140-260 Msolar are completely disrupted upon explosion. However, they produce an abundance pattern greatly deficient in elements of odd atomic numbers, which is not observed, and therefore they are not considered as a source here. Using a Salpeter initial mass function, it is shown that HNe are a source

  11. The Chemical Evolution of Dynamically Hot Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Richer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the chemical properties of M32, the bulges of M31 and the Milky Way, and the dwarf spheroidal galaxies NGC 205, NGC 185, Sagittarius, and Fornax using oxygen abundances for their planetary nebulae. Our principal result is that the mean stellar oxygen abundances correlate very well with thei r mean velocity dispersions, implying that the balance between energy input from type II supernovae and the gravitational potential controls chemical evolution in bulges, ellipticals, and dwarf spheroidals. It appears that chemical evolution ceases once supernovae have injected sufficient energy that a galacti c wind develops. All of the galaxies follow a single relation between oxygen abundance and luminosity, but the dwarf spheroidals have systematically higher [O/Fe] ratios than the other galaxies. Consequently, dynamically hot galaxies do not share a common star formation history nor need to a common chemical evolution, despite attaining similar mean stellar oxygen abundances when formin g similar masses. The oxygen abundances support previous indications that stars in higher luminosity ellipticals and bulges were formed on a shorter time scale than their counterparts in less luminous systems.

  12. Close Pairs as Probes of the Galaxy's Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbeveren, D; Vanbeveren, Dany; Donder, Erwin De

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the galaxy in which we live is one of the great intellectual challenges facing modern science. With the advent of high quality observational data, the chemical evolution modeling of our galaxy has been the subject of numerous studies in the last years. However, all these studies have one missing element which is the evolution of close binaries. Reason: their evolution is very complex and single stars only perhaps can do the job. (Un)Fortunately at present we know that a significant fraction of the observed intermediate mass and massive stars are members of a binary or multiple system and that certain objects can only be formed through binary evolution. Therefore galactic studies that do not account for close binaries may be far from realistic. We implemented a detailed binary population in a galactic chemical evolutionary model. Notice that this is not something simple like replacing chemical yields. Here we discuss three topics: the effect of binaries on the evolution of 14N, the evolution of t...

  13. Soluble minerals in chemical evolution. I - Adsorption of 5-prime-AMP on CaSO4 - A model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Chan, S.; Calderon, J.; Lahav, N.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-prime-AMP onto solid CaSO4-2H2O was studied in a saturated suspension as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration. The adsorption is pH-dependent and is directly correlated with the charge on the 5-prime-AMP molecule which is determined by the state of protonation of the N-1 nitrogen of the purine ring and the phosphate oxygens. It is proposed that the binding that occurs between the nucleotide and the salt is electrostatic in nature. The adsorption decreases with increasing ionic strength of the solution which means that in a fluctuating environment of wetting and drying cycles, a biomolecule similar to 5-prime-AMP could be expected to desorb during the drying phase. The results indicate that CaSO4-2H2O can serve as a concentrating surface for biomolecules. The significance of this is discussed with regard to the possible role of soluble minerals and their surfaces in a geochemical model consistent with the evolution of the earth and the origin of life.

  14. Chemical evolution: A solar system perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.

    1989-01-01

    During the last three decades major advances were made in the understanding of the formation of carbon compounds in the universe and of the occurrence of processes of chemical evolution in the solar system and beyond. This was made possible by the development of new astronomical techniques and by the exploration of the solar system by means of properly instrumented spacecraft. Some of the major findings made as a result of these observations are summarized.

  15. Contrasting the chemical evolution of the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Renda, Agostino; Kawata, Daisuke; Fenner, Yeshe; Gibson, Brad K.

    2004-01-01

    The chemical evolution history of a galaxy hides clues about how it formed and has been changing through time. We have studied the chemical evolution history of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) to find which are common features in the chemical evolution of disc galaxies as well as which are galaxy-dependent. We use a semi-analytic multi-zone chemical evolution model. Such models have succeeded in explaining the mean trends of the observed chemical properties in these two Local Group spi...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chemical evolution in the LMC with a new model (Acharyya+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, K.; Herbst, E.

    2016-02-01

    Using a new network and a new model, we have studied chemical complexity in cold portions of dense clouds of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We varied the hydrogen number density between 1x105 and 5x105/cm3 and, for each density, we ran models for AV=3, 5, and 10. Then, for each density and visual extinction we varied the grain temperature between 10 and 50K in small intervals, while keeping the gas temperature constant at 20K. We used a gas-to-dust mass ratio based on a variety of observations and analyses, and scaled the elemental abundances of the LMC so that they are representative of so-called "low" metallic abundances. We found that although the LMC is metal-poor, it still shows a rich chemistry; almost all the major observed species in the gas phase of our Galaxy should be detectable using present-day observational facilities. We compared our model results with observed gas-phase abundances in some cold and dense sources, and found reasonably good agreement for most species. We also found that some observed results, especially for methanol, are better matched if these regions currently possess lower temperatures, or possessed them in the past. Finally, we discussed our simulated abundances for H2O ice with respect to total hydrogen, and CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3 ices with respect to water ice, and compared our values with those for two observed ices --CO2 and CO-- detected in front of young stellar objects in the LMC. (1 data file).

  17. Evolution of Business Models

    OpenAIRE

    Antero, Michelle C.; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ERP industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past decades due to changing market demands, thereby creating new challenges and opportunities, which have to be managed by ERP vendors. This paper inquires into the necessary evolution of business models in a technology-intensive industry (e.g., develop new offerings, engage in partnerships, and the utilize new sales channels). This paper draws from strategy process perspective to develop an evolutionary business model (EBM...

  18. Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal and Blue Compact Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lanfranchi, G A; Lanfranchi, Gustavo A.; Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    We studied the chemical evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) and Blue Compact Galaxies (BCGs) by means of comparison between the predictions of chemical evolution models and several observed abundance ratios. Detailed models with up to date nucleosynthesis taking into account the role played by supernovae of different types (II, Ia) were developed for both types of galaxies allowing us to follow the evolution of several chemical elements. The models are specified by the prescriptions of the star formation (SF) and galactic wind efficiencies chosen to reproduce the main features of these galaxies. We also investigated a possible connection in the evolution of dSph and BCGs and compared the predictions of the models to the abundance ratios observed in Damped Lyman alpha Systems (DLAs). The main conclusions are: i) the observed distribution of [alpha/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] in dSph is mainly a result of the SF rate coupled with the wind efficiency; ii) a low SF efficiency and a high wind efficiency are required to reprod...

  19. Evolution of the habitable zone of low-mass stars. Detailed stellar models and analytical relationships for different masses and chemical compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2014-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the habitable zone (HZ) of low-mass stars - only due to stellar evolution - and evaluate the related uncertainties. These uncertainties are then compared with those due to the adoption of different climate models. We computed stellar evolutionary tracks from the pre-main sequence phase to the helium flash at the red-giant branch tip for stars with masses in the range [0.70 - 1.10] Msun, metallicity Z in the range [0.005 - 0.04], and various initial helium contents. We evaluated several characteristics of the HZ, such as the distance from the host star at which the habitability is longest, the duration of this habitability, the width of the zone for which the habitability lasts one half of the maximum, and the boundaries of the continuously habitable zone (CHZ) for which the habitability lasts at least 4 Gyr. We developed analytical models, accurate to the percent level or lower, which allowed to obtain these characteristics in dependence on the mass and the chemical composit...

  20. Evolution of Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antero, Michelle C.; Hedman, Jonas; Henningsson, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ERP industry has undergone dramatic changes over the past decades due to changing market demands, thereby creating new challenges and opportunities, which have to be managed by ERP vendors. This paper inquires into the necessary evolution of business models in a technology-intensive industry (e...... of SAP to explain how its success in a technology-intensive industry hinges on its ability to reconfigure its business model. The paper contributes to the extant literature on business models in two ways: first, by identifying and explaining the need for an evolutionary perspective; and second...

  1. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, William J

    2013-01-01

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, $Z \\approx 0.1 Z_\\odot $ filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, $Z=10^{-3} Z_\\odot$ filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which lead...

  2. Simulating emission and chemical evolution of coarse sea-salt particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, J T; Bhave, P. V.; C. G. Nolte; Shankar, U.; K. M. Foley

    2009-01-01

    Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-salt particles from the coastal surf zone is known to be elevated compared to that from the open ocean. Despite the importance of sea-salt emissions and chemical processing, the US EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (C...

  3. Evolution of associative learning in chemical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon McGregor

    Full Text Available Organisms that can learn about their environment and modify their behaviour appropriately during their lifetime are more likely to survive and reproduce than organisms that do not. While associative learning - the ability to detect correlated features of the environment - has been studied extensively in nervous systems, where the underlying mechanisms are reasonably well understood, mechanisms within single cells that could allow associative learning have received little attention. Here, using in silico evolution of chemical networks, we show that there exists a diversity of remarkably simple and plausible chemical solutions to the associative learning problem, the simplest of which uses only one core chemical reaction. We then asked to what extent a linear combination of chemical concentrations in the network could approximate the ideal Bayesian posterior of an environment given the stimulus history so far? This Bayesian analysis revealed the 'memory traces' of the chemical network. The implication of this paper is that there is little reason to believe that a lack of suitable phenotypic variation would prevent associative learning from evolving in cell signalling, metabolic, gene regulatory, or a mixture of these networks in cells.

  4. Chemical evolution of primitive solar system bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.; Mills, T.

    1989-01-01

    Observations on organic molecules and compounds containing biogenic elements in the interstellar medium and in the primitive bodies of the solar system are reviewed. The discovery of phosphorus molecular species in dense interstellar clouds, the existence of organic ions in the dust and gas phase of the comas of Comet Halley, and the presence of presolar, deuterium-hydrogen ratios in the amino acids of carbonaceous chondrites are discussed. The relationships between comets, dark asteroids, and carbonaceous chondrites are examined. Also, consideration is given to the chemical evolution of Titan, the primitive earth, and early Mars.

  5. Simulating Emission and Chemical Evolution of Coarse Sea-Salt Particles in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical processing of sea-salt particles in coastal environments significantly impacts concentrations of particle components and gas-phase species and has implications for human exposure to particulate matter and nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. Emission of sea-sal...

  6. Chemical Properties of Starburst Galaxies Near and Far: Clues to Galaxy Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Contini, T.; Treyer, M. -A.; Mouhcine, M.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R. S.,

    2001-01-01

    The determination of chemical abundances in star-forming galaxies and the study of their evolution on cosmological timescales are powerful tools for understanding galaxy formation and evolution. This contribution presents the latest results in this domain. We show that detailed studies of chemical abundances in UV-selected, HII and starburst nucleus galaxies, together with the development of new chemical evolution models, put strong constraints on the evolutionary stage of these objects in te...

  7. Oparin's coacervates as an important milestone in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2015-09-01

    Although Oparin's coacervate model for the origin of life by chemical evolution is almost 100 years old, it is still valid. However, the structure of his originally proposed coacervate is not considered prebiotic, based on some recent developments in prebiotic chemistry. We have remedied this deficiency of the Oparin's model, by substituting his coacervate with a prebiotically feasible one. Oparin's coacervates are aqueous structures, but have a boundary with the rest of the aqueous medium. They exhibit properties of self-replication, and provide a path to a primitive metabolism, via chemical competition and thus a primitive selection. Thus, coacervates are good models for proto-cells. We review here some salient points of Oparin's model and address also some philosophical views on the beginning of natural selection in primitive chemical systems.

  8. Chemical Models of Collapsing Envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, E A

    1999-01-01

    We discuss recent models of chemical evolution in the developing and collapsing protostellar envelopes associated with low-mass star formation. In particular, the effects of depletion of gas-phase molecules onto grain surfaces is considered. We show that during the middle to late evolutionary stages, prior to the formation of a protostar, various species selectively deplete from the gas phase. The principal pattern of selective depletions is the depletion of sulfur-bearing molecules relative to nitrogen-bearing species: NH3 and N2H+. This pattern is shown to be insensitive to the details of the dynamics and marginally sensitive to whether the grain mantle is dominated by polar or non-polar molecules. Based on these results we suggest that molecular ions are good tracers of collapsing envelopes. The effects of coupling chemistry and dynamics on the resulting physical evolution are also examined. Particular attention is paid to comparisons between models and observations.

  9. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: Implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering, R. A.

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation.

  10. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Separating disk chemical substructures with cluster models. Evidence of a separate evolution in the metal-poor thin disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Schultheis, M.; Guiglion, G.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Kordopatis, G.; Hill, V.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Koposov, S. E.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.; Chiappini, C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Recent spectroscopic surveys have begun to explore the Galactic disk system on the basis of large data samples, with spatial distributions sampling regions well outside the solar neighborhood. In this way, they provide valuable information for testing spatial and temporal variations of disk structure kinematics and chemical evolution. Aims: The main purposes of this study are to demonstrate the usefulness of a rigorous mathematical approach to separate substructures of a stellar sample in the abundance-metallicity plane, and provide new evidence with which to characterize the nature of the metal-poor end of the thin disk sequence. Methods: We used a Gaussian mixture model algorithm to separate in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane a clean disk star subsample (essentially at RGC -0.25 dex) highlight a change in the slope at solar metallicity. This holds true at different radial regions of the Milky Way. The distribution of Galactocentric radial distances of the metal-poor part of the thin disk ([Fe/H] levels might be due to their origin from gas pre-enriched by outflows from the thick disk or the inner halo. The smooth trends of their properties (their spatial distribution with respect to the plane, in particular) with [Fe/H] and [Mg/Fe] suggested by the data indicates a quiet dynamical evolution, with no relevant merger events. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme ID 188.B-3002. These data products have been processed by the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit (CASU) at the Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, and by the FLAMES/UVES reduction team at INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri. These data have been obtained from the Gaia-ESO Survey Data Archive, prepared and hosted by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, which is funded by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council.

  11. The Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2010-11-01

    Astrochemistry or Astrochemical Dynamics presents a newly emerging, interdisciplinary and innovative field comprising scientists in chemistry, physics, biology, astronomy, and planetary chemistry. The prime directive of Astrochemical Dynamics is to understand the origin and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium and of our Solar System. Here, the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and thick atmosphere - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. Titan's most prominent optically visible features are the aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation, have been the least understood to date. This talk reviews recent laboratory studies on the role of polyacetylenes (polyynes) and (hetero)aromatic molecules like the phenyl radical, benzene, and pyridine in the formation of Titan's organic haze layers utilizing crossed molecular beam experiments. Those investigations provide key concepts on the formation mechanisms of unsaturated hydrocarbon molecules - in particular polyynes and aromatic compounds - together with their hydrogen deficient precursors from the "bottom up" in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan. A brief outline to future research directions tackling also the heterogeneous chemistry on Titan and in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres in the outer Solar System in general will also be presented.

  12. Chemical Evolution of Presolar Organics in Astromaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, Scott; Keller, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    Sub-micron, hollow organic globules reported from several carbonaceous chondrites, interplanetary dust particles, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by NASA?s Stardust mission are enriched in N-15/N-14 and D/H compared with terrestrial materials and the parent materials [1-4]. These anomalies are ascribed to the preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material from where H, C, and N isotopic constraints point to chemical fractionation near 10 K [5]. An origin well beyond the planet forming region and their survival in meteorites suggests submicrometer organic globules were once prevalent throughout the solar nebula. The survival of the membrane structures indicates primitive meteorites and cometary dust particles would have delivered these organic precursors to the early Earth as well as other planets and satellites. The physical, chemical, and isotopic properties of the organic globules varies to its meteorite types and its lithologies. For example, organic globules in the Tagish Lake meteorite are always embedded in fined grained (poorly crystallized) saponite, and hardly encapsulated in coarse grained serpentine, even though saponite and serpentine are both main components of phyllosilicate matrix of the Tagish Lake meteorite. The organic globules are commonly observed in the carbonate-poor lithology but not in the carbonate-rich one. In Tagish Lake, isolated single globules are common, but in the Bells (CM2) meteorite, globules are mostly aggregated. We will review the evolutions of the organic globules from its birth to alteration in the parent bodies in terms of its own physical and chemical properties as well as its associated minerals.

  13. Chemical evolution of A- and B-type stars in open clusters: observed abundances vs. diffusion models. Am stars in the Praesepe cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, L.; Bagnulo, S.; Monier, R.; Khan, S. A.; Kochukhov, O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Wade, G. A.; Weiss, W. W.

    2008-04-01

    We have decided to address the problem of how abundances and peculiarities change during main sequence evolution. We have setup a program to measure the atmospheric abundance patterns from tens of A-type star members of clusters of different ages, and compare the results with theory predictions. In this paper we present the overall project and we focus on the results obtained for a sample of Am stars of the Praesepe cluster (log t= 8.85 ± 0.15; González-García et al., 2006). We have obtained spectra for eight Am stars, two normal A-type stars and one blue straggler, that are probable members of the Praesepe cluster. For all of these stars we have determined fundamental parameters and photospheric abundances for a large number of chemical elements. For seven stars we also obtained spectra in circular polarisation and applied the LSD technique to measure the mean longitudinal magnetic field. We have found good agreement between abundance predictions of diffusion models and measured abundances, except for Na and S. Li appears to be overabundant in three stars of our sample. No magnetic field was detected in any of the analysed stars.

  14. From the CMD of Omega Centauri and (super-)AGB stellar models to a Galactic plane passage gas purging chemical evolution scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Herwig, Falk; Navarro, Julio F; Ferguson, Jason; Paxton, Bill

    2012-01-01

    [Abbreviated] We have investigated the color-magnitude diagram of Omega Centauri and find that the blue main sequence (bMS) can be reproduced only by models that have a of helium abundance in the range Y=0.35-$0.40. To explain the faint subgiant branch of the reddest stars ("MS-a/RG-a" sequence), isochrones for the observed metallicity ([Fe/H]\\approx0.7) appear to require both a high age (~13Gyr) and enhanced CNO abundances ([CNO/Fe]\\approx0.9$). Y~0.35 must also be assumed in order to counteract the effects of high CNO on turnoff colors, and thereby to obtain a good fit to the relatively blue turnoff of this stellar population. This suggest a short chemical evolution period of time (=6.8M_sun, M_He,core>=1.245M_sun) predict too large N-enhancements, which limits their role in contributing to the extreme populations. We show quantitatively that highly He- and N-enriched AGB ejecta have particularly efficient cooling properties. Based on these results and on the reconstruction of the orbit of Omega Cen with re...

  15. Modeling chemical kinetics graphically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Heck

    2012-01-01

    In literature on chemistry education it has often been suggested that students, at high school level and beyond, can benefit in their studies of chemical kinetics from computer supported activities. Use of system dynamics modeling software is one of the suggested quantitative approaches that could h

  16. From chemical reactions to evolution: Emergence of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, T.; Fanelli, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Chemoton model constitutes a minimalistic description of a protocell unit. The original formulation assumes three coupled chemical networks, representing a proto-metabolism, a template duplication and the membrane growth. An improved version is here proposed that explicitly incorporates the effects of the volume changes, due to the membrane growth. A stochastic mechanism is also introduced that mimics a stochastic source of error in the template duplication process. Numerical simulations are performed to monitor the time evolution of a family of protocells, under the chemoton hypothesis. An open-ended Darwinian evolution under the pressure of the environment is reproduced thus allowing to conclude that differentiation into species is an emergent property of the model.

  17. Modeling in Chemical Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap van Brakel

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Models underlying the use of similarity considerations, dimensionless numbers, and dimensional analysis in chemical engineering are discussed. Special attention is given to the many levels at which models and ceteris paribus conditions play a role and to the modeling of initial and boundary conditions. It is shown that both the laws or dimensionless number correlations and the systems to which they apply are models. More generally, no matter which model or description one picks out, what is being modeled is itself a model of something else. Instead of saying that the artifact S models the given B, it is therefore better to say that S and B jointly make up B and S.

  18. The chemical evolution of Manganese in different stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cescutti, G; Lanfranchi, G A; McWilliam, A

    2008-01-01

    Aims. To model the chemical evolution of manganese relative to iron in three different stellar systems: the solar neighbourhood, the Galactic bulge and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy, and compare our results with the recent and homogeneous observational data. Methods. We adopt three chemical evolution models well able to reproduce the main properties of the solar vicinity, the galactic Bulge and the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal. Then, we compare different stellar yields in order to identify the best set to match the observational data in these systems. Results. We compute the evolution of manganese in the three systems and we find that in order to reproduce simultaneously the [Mn/Fe] versus [Fe/H] in the Galactic bulge, the solar neighbourhood and Sagittarius, the type Ia SN Mn yield must be metallicity-dependent. Conclusions. We conclude that the different histories of star formation in the three systems are not enough to reproduce the different behaviour of the [Mn/Fe] ratio, unlike the situation f...

  19. Natural evidence for chemical and early biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Oparin (1924) and Haldane (1929) have independently hypothesized that life arose under reducing conditions through an evolutionary sequence of events involving increasingly complex organic substances. The natural evidence for this hypothesis of chemical evolution is considered, giving particular attention to tangible samples which have been chemically analyzed in earth-bound laboratories. It is found that meteorites provide naturally occurring evidence in support of chemical evolution, but not of biological evolution. Studies on the early Precambrian Swaziland Sequence and the Bulawayan System of southern Africa provide evidence for very early biological evolution.

  20. The chemical evolution of galaxies causing damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Ulrich; Alvensleben, Uta Fritze - v.; Fricke, Klaus J.

    1997-01-01

    We have compiled all available data on chemical abundances in damped Lyman alpha absorption systems for comparison with results from our combined chemical and spectrophotometric galaxy evolution models. Preliminary results from chemically consistent calculations are in agreement with observations of damped Ly$\\alpha$ systems.

  1. Sixth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Sara (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Chang, Sherwood (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The 6th Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life was convened at NASA Ames Research Center, November 17-20, 1997. This Symposium is convened every three years under the auspices of NASA's Exobiology Program Office. All Principal Investigators funded by this Program present their most recent research accomplishments at the Symposium. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of the biogenic elements, prebiotic evolution (both planetary and chemical), evolution of early organisms and evolution of organisms in extreme environments, solar system exploration, and star and planet formation. The Symposium was attended by over 200 scientists from NASA centers and Universities nationwide.

  2. TESTING THE ROLE OF SNe Ia FOR GALACTIC CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF p-NUCLEI WITH TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS AND WITH s-PROCESS SEEDS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bulk of p isotopes is created in the ''gamma processes'' mainly by sequences of photodisintegrations and beta decays in explosive conditions in Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) or in core collapse supernovae (ccSN). The contribution of different stellar sources to the observed distribution of p-nuclei in the solar system is still under debate. We explore single degenerate Type Ia supernovae in the framework of two-dimensional SNIa delayed-detonation explosion models. Travaglio et al. discussed the sensitivity of p-nuclei production to different SNIa models, i.e., delayed detonations of different strength, deflagrations, and the dependence on selected s-process seed distributions. Here we present a detailed study of p-process nucleosynthesis occurring in SNIa with s-process seeds at different metallicities. Based on the delayed-detonation model DDT-a of TRV11, we analyze the dependence of p-nucleosynthesis on the s-seed distribution obtained from different strengths of the 13C pocket. We also demonstrate that 208Pb seed alone changes the p-nuclei production considerably. The heavy-s seeds (140 ≤A < 208) contribute with about 30%-40% to the total light-p nuclei production up to 132Ba (with the exception of 94Mo and 130Ba, to which the heavy-s seeds contribute with about 15% only). Using a Galactic chemical evolution code from Travaglio et al., we study the contribution of SNIa to the solar stable p-nuclei. We find that explosions of Chandrasekhar-mass single degenerate systems produce a large amount of p-nuclei in our Galaxy, both in the range of light (A ≤ 120) and heavy p-nuclei, at almost flat average production factors (within a factor of about three). We discussed in details p-isotopes such as 94Mo with a behavior diverging from the average, which we attribute to uncertainties in the nuclear data or in SNIa modeling. Li et al. find that about 70% of all SNeIa are normal events. If these are explained in the framework of explosions of

  3. TMDs: Evolution, modeling, precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Alesio Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The factorization theorem for qT spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and Z-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final χ2/points ≲ 1. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.

  4. TMDs: Evolution, modeling, precision

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Melis, Stefano; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2014-01-01

    The factorization theorem for $q_T$ spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and $Z$-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final $\\chi^2/{\\rm points}\\lesssim 1$. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.

  5. Theory of Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Michael

    In order to deal with the complexity of natural systems simplified models are employed to illustrate the principal and regulatory factors controlling a chemical system. Following the aphorism of Albert Einstein: Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler, models need not to be completely realistic to be useful (Stumm and Morgan 1996), but need to meet a successful balance between realism and practicality. Properly constructed, a model is neither too simplified that it is unrealistic nor too detailed that it cannot be readily evaluated and applied to the problem of interest (Bethke 1996). The results of a model have to be at least partially observable or experimentally verifiable (Zhu and Anderson 2002). Geochemical modeling theories are presented here in a sequence of increasing complexity from geochemical equilibrium models to kinetic, reaction path, and finally coupled transport and reaction models. The description is far from complete but provides the needs for the set up of reactive transport models of hydrothermal systems as done within subsequent chapters. Extensive reviews of geochemical models in general can be found in the literature (Appelo and Postma 1999, Bethke 1996, Melchior and Bassett 1990, Nordstrom and Ball 1984, Paschke and van der Heijde 1996).

  6. Dynamical and chemical evolution of the thin disc

    CERN Document Server

    Just, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Our detailed analytic local disc model (JJ-model) quantifies the interrelation between kinematic properties (e.g. velocity dispersions and asymmetric drift), spatial parameters (scale-lengths and vertical density profiles), and properties of stellar sub-populations (age and abundance distributions). Any consistent radial extension of the disc evolution model should predict specific features in the different distribution functions and in their correlations. Large spectroscopic surveys (SEGUE, RAVE, APOGEE, Gaia-ESO) allow significant constraints on the long-term evolution of the thin disc. We discuss the qualitative difference of correlations (like the alpha-enhancement as function of metallicity) and distribution functions (e.g. in [Mg/H] or [Fe/H]) for the construction of a disc model. In the framework of the JJ-model we build a local chemical enrichment model and show that significant vertical gradients for main sequence and red clump stars are expected in the thin disc. A Jeans analysis of the asymmetric d...

  7. Chemical evolution of the Earth: Equilibrium or disequilibrium process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.

    1985-01-01

    To explain the apparent chemical incompatibility of the Earth's core and mantle or the disequilibrium process, various core forming mechanisms have been proposed, i.e., rapid disequilibrium sinking of molten iron, an oxidized core or protocore materials, and meteorite contamination of the upper mantle after separation from the core. Adopting concepts used in steady state thermodynamics, a method is devised for evaluating how elements should distribute stable in the Earth's interior for the present gradients of temperature, pressure, and gravitational acceleration. Thermochemical modeling gives useful insights into the nature of chemical evolution of the Earth without overly speculative assumptions. Further work must be done to reconcile siderophile elements, rare gases, and possible light elements in the outer core.

  8. Galactic chemical evolution: Carbon through Zinc

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, C; Nomoto, K; Tominaga, N; Ohkubo, T

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of heavy element abundances from C to Zn in the solar neighborhood adopting our new nucleosynthesis yields. Our yields are calculated for wide ranges of metallicity (Z=0-Z_\\odot) and the explosion energy (normal supernovae and hypernovae), based on the light curve and spectra fitting of individual supernovae. The elemental abundance ratios are in good agreement with observations. Among the alpha-elements, O, Mg, Si, S, and Ca show a plateau at [Fe/H] < -1, while Ti is underabundant overall. The observed abundance of Zn ([Zn/Fe] ~ 0) can be explained only by the high energy explosion models, which requires a large contribution of hypernovae. The observed decrease in the odd-Z elements (Na, Al, and Cu) toward low [Fe/H] is reproduced by the metallicity effect on nucleosynthesis. The iron-peak elements (Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni) are consistent with the observed mean values at -2.5 < [Fe/H] < -1$, and the observed trend at the lower metallicity can be explained by the energy effect. ...

  9. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  10. Chemical effects of ionizing radiation and sonic energy in the context of chemical evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation and sonic energy are considered as sources for chemical evolution processes. These sources have still a modest place in the interdisciplinary approach for the prebiological synthesis of organic compounds. Studies in Radiation Chemistry and Sonochemistry can provide a deeper insight into the chemical processes that may have importance for prebiotic chemistry. The present work concerns the analysis of some chemical reactions induced by ionizing radiation or cavitation in aqueous media that may be relevant to chemical evolution studies. (author)

  11. A simple and general method for solving detailed chemical evolution with delayed production of iron and other chemical elements

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenzo, Fiorenzo; Spitoni, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a new theoretical method for solving the chemical evolution of galaxies, by assuming the instantaneous recycling approximation for chemical elements restored by massive stars and the Delay Time Distribution formalism for the delayed chemical enrichment by Type Ia Supernovae. The galaxy gas mass assembly history, together with the assumed stellar yields and initial mass function, represent the starting point of this method. We derive a very simple and general equation which closely relates the Laplace transforms of the galaxy gas accretion and star formation history, which can be used to simplify the problem of retrieving these quantities in most of current galaxy evolution models. We find that - once the galaxy star formation history has been reconstructed from our assumptions - the differential equation for the evolution of the chemical element $X$ can be suitably solved with classical methods. We apply our model to reproduce the $[\\text{O/Fe}]$ and $[\\text{Si/Fe}]$ vs. $[\\text{Fe/...

  12. Chemical evolution of two-component galaxies. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to confirm and refine the results obtained in a previous paper the chemical evolution of two-component (spheroid + disk) galaxies is derived rejecting the instantaneous recycling approximation, by means of numerical computations, accounting for (i) the collapse phase of the gas, assumed to be uniform in density and composition, and (ii) a birth-rate stellar function. Computations are performed relatively to the solar neighbourhood and to model galaxies which closely resemble the real morphological sequence: in both cases, numerical results are compared with analytical ones. The numerical models of this paper constitute a first-order approximation, while higher order approximations could be made by rejecting the hypothesis of uniform density and composition, and making use of detailed dynamical models. (Auth.)

  13. Landscape Evolution Modelling-LAPSUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landscape evolution modelling can make the consequences of landscape evolution hypotheses explicit and theoretically allows for their falsification and improvement. ideally, landscape evolution models (LEMs) combine the results of all relevant landscape forming processes into an ever-adapting digital landscape (e.g. DEM). These processes may act on different spatial and temporal scales. LAPSUS is such a LEM. Processes that have in different studies been included in LAPSUS are water erosion and deposition, landslide activity, creep, solidification, weathering, tectonics and tillage. Process descriptions are as simple and generic as possible, ensuring wide applicability. (Author) 25 refs.

  14. Landscape Evolution Modelling-LAPSUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baartman, J. E. M.; Temme, A. J. A. M.; Schoorl, J. M.; Claessens, L.; Viveen, W.; Gorp, W. van; Veldkamp, A.

    2009-07-01

    Landscape evolution modelling can make the consequences of landscape evolution hypotheses explicit and theoretically allows for their falsification and improvement. ideally, landscape evolution models (LEMs) combine the results of all relevant landscape forming processes into an ever-adapting digital landscape (e.g. DEM). These processes may act on different spatial and temporal scales. LAPSUS is such a LEM. Processes that have in different studies been included in LAPSUS are water erosion and deposition, landslide activity, creep, solidification, weathering, tectonics and tillage. Process descriptions are as simple and generic as possible, ensuring wide applicability. (Author) 25 refs.

  15. Conference on chemical evolution and the origin of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains 19 summaries of papers presented at the Conference on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. A separate indexing is provided for each summary

  16. Domains of States of Chemical Systems: Le Chatelier Response, Structure of the Domains and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Zilbergleyt, B.

    2005-01-01

    The paper investigates influence of the Le Chatelier response on the chemical system behavior under stress, the shape of its domains of states in terms of static and dynamic bifurcation diagrams, and the system proneness to evolution. The usage of maps in thermodynamics of chemical systems is discussed. Thermodynamics of chemical triggers, designed in similarity with laser, is described. Results of this work are important in context of new model of chemical equilibrium.

  17. On the transition period from chemical to biological evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the consequences of the hypothesis that biological evolution was contemporary with an important event in chemical evolution, namely, the induction of a small chiral bias by the electroweak neutral interaction, amplified by the Salam enhancement factor, which we discuss in terms of familiar crystallographic terms. (author). 18 refs, 3 tabs

  18. Modeling Protein Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Richard; Pollock, David

    The study of biology is fundamentally different from many other scientific pursuits, such as geology or astrophysics. This difference stems from the ubiquitous questions that arise about function and purpose. These are questions concerning why biological objects operate the way they do: what is the function of a polymerase? What is the role of the immune system? No one, aside from the most dedicated anthropist or interventionist theist, would attempt to determine the purpose of the earth's mantle or the function of a binary star. Among the sciences, it is only biology in which the details of what an object does can be said to be part of the reason for its existence. This is because the process of evolution is capable of improving an object to better carry out a function; that is, it adapts an object within the constraints of mechanics and history (i.e., what has come before). Thus, the ultimate basis of these biological questions is the process of evolution; generally, the function of an enzyme, cell type, organ, system, or trait is the thing that it does that contributes to the fitness (i.e., reproductive success) of the organism of which it is a part or characteristic. Our investigations cannot escape the simple fact that all things in biology (including ourselves) are, ultimately, the result of an evolutionary process.

  19. Chemical evolution and the preservation of organic compounds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the environment on early Mars and early Earth were very similar. Since life is abundant on Earth, it seems likely that conditions on early Earth were conducive to chemical evolution and the origin of life. The similarity between early Mars and early Earth encourages the hypothesis that chemical evolution might have also occurred on Mars, but that decreasing temperatures and the loss of its atmosphere brought the evolution to a halt. The possibility of finding on Mars remnants of organic material dating back to this early clement period is addressed.

  20. Calculating Chemical Evolution on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B. S.; Denny, J. E.; Clayton, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed an interactive web site that may be of interest to cosmochemists seeking to understand the evolution of isotopes in the Galaxy. The URL is http://photon.phys.clemson.edu/gce.html. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Modelling microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural evolution of materials under irradiation is characterised by some unique features that are not typically present in other application environments. While much understanding has been achieved by experimental studies, the ability to model this microstructural evolution for complex materials states and environmental conditions not only enhances understanding, it also enables prediction of materials behaviour under conditions that are difficult to duplicate experimentally. Furthermore, reliable models enable designing materials for improved engineering performance for their respective applications. Thus, development and application of mesoscale microstructural model are important for advancing nuclear materials technologies. In this chapter, the application of the Potts model to nuclear materials will be reviewed and demonstrated, as an example of microstructural evolution processes. (author)

  2. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  3. Evolution of exocrine chemical defense in leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Pasteels, Jacques M.; Rowell-Rahier, Martine; Braekman, J.C.; Daloze, D.; Duffey, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we speculate on possible scenarios for the evolution of the very high diversity in chemical compounds liberated by exocrine glands of adults Chrysomelidae. Shift in host plant affinities and subsequent adaptation of the beetles to the plant toxins strongly influence the nature of the beetles' chemical defense.

  4. On radial gas flows, the Galactic Bar and chemical evolution in the Galactic Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Portinari, L.; Chiosi, C.

    2000-01-01

    We develop a numerical chemical model allowing for radial flows of gas, with the aim to analyse the possible role of gas flows in the chemical evolution of the Galactic Disc. The dynamical effects of the Galactic Bar on the radial gas profile of the Disc are especially addressed.

  5. New chemical evolution analytical solutions including environment effects

    CERN Document Server

    Spitoni, E

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, more and more interest has been devoted to analytical solutions, including inflow and outflow, to study the metallicity enrichment in galaxies. In this framework, we assume a star formation rate which follows a linear Schmidt law, and we present new analytical solutions for the evolution of the metallicity (Z) in galaxies. In particular, we take into account environmental effects including primordial and enriched gas infall, outflow, different star formation efficiencies, and galactic fountains. The enriched infall is included to take into account galaxy-galaxy interactions. Our main results can be summarized as: i) when a linear Schmidt law of star formation is assumed, the resulting time evolution of the metallicity Z is the same either for a closed-box model or for an outflow model. ii) The mass-metallicity relation for galaxies which suffer a chemically enriched infall, originating from another evolved galaxy with no pre-enriched gas, is shifted down in parallel at lower Z values, if co...

  6. ABC model and floral evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guisheng; MENG Zheng; KONG Hongzhi; CHEN Zhiduan; LU Anming

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces the classical ABC model of floral development and thereafter ABCD, ABCDE and quartet models, and presents achievements in the studies on floral evolution such as the improved understanding on the relationship of reproductive organs between gnetophytes and angiosperms, new results in perianth evolution and identified homology of floral organs between dicots and monocots. The evo-devo studies on plant taxa at different evolutionary levels are useful to better understanding the homology of floral organs, and to clarifying the mysteries of the origin and subsequent diversification of flowers.

  7. AGB yields and Galactic Chemical Evolution: last updated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Wiescher, M.; Gallino, R.; Köppeler, F.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Imbriani, G.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the s-process abundances at the epoch of the Solar-system formation as the outcome of nucleosynthesis occurring in AGB stars of various masses and metallicities. The calculations have been performed with the Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model presented by [1, 2]. With respect to previous works, we used updated solar meteoritic abundances, a neutron capture cross section network that includes the most recent measurements, and we implemented the s-process yields with an extended range of AGB initial masses. The new set of AGB yields includes a new evaluation of the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg rate, which takes into account the most recent experimental information.

  8. CMS computing model evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CMS Computing Model was developed and documented in 2004. Since then the model has evolved to be more flexible and to take advantage of new techniques, but many of the original concepts remain and are in active use. In this presentation we will discuss the changes planned for the restart of the LHC program in 2015. We will discuss the changes planning in the use and definition of the computing tiers that were defined with the MONARC project. We will present how we intend to use new services and infrastructure to provide more efficient and transparent access to the data. We will discuss the computing plans to make better use of the computing capacity by scheduling more of the processor nodes, making better use of the disk storage, and more intelligent use of the networking.

  9. CMS Computing Model Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Grandi, Claudio; Colling, D; Fisk, I; Girone, M

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Computing Model was developed and documented in 2004. Since then the model has evolved to be more flexible and to take advantage of new techniques, but many of the original concepts remain and are in active use. In this presentation we will discuss the changes planned for the restart of the LHC program in 2015. We will discuss the changes planning in the use and definition of the computing tiers, that were defined with the MONARC project. We will present how we intend to use new services and infrastructure to provide more efficient and transparent access to the data. We will discuss the computing plans to make better use of the computing capacity by scheduling more of the processor nodes, making better use of the disk storage, and more intelligent use of the networking.

  10. Evolution of nuclear chemical industry in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present characteristics can be summarized in one word: expansion. Impelled by the CEA, but also by such organisations as the Electricite de France and the Merchant Marine, the French nuclear effort for the years 1957-1961 reaches about 600 thousand millions francs; over half this sum will be spent by chemical industry on research, pilot installations, construction of plants and delivery. The aim is to work efficiently, quickly and profitably. This is achieved through close collaboration between the big state organisations and private industry. It is chiefly along the following lines that this large scale effort is carried on: - thorough chemical treatment of increasing tonnages of ores from the French Union, with the aim of producing pure, plentiful and cheap uranium. - careful preparation of nuclear fuels, economical and perfectly adapted to the various types of reactor in operation or under construction. - Further treatment of irradiated fuels to extract the plutonium completely, as well as the uranium and certain fission products. industrial manufacture of material of nuclear purity or corrosion resistant required by the technology of energy producing or research reactors. - Supply to the many foreign or French users of isotopes and radioactive tracers required by medicine, industry and agriculture in ever-increasing numbers. - Meticulous chemical treatment of gaseous or liquid effluent in strictly controlled stations in order that reactors and their annexes will be perfectly safe to use. This account shows the great extent of the effort laid out by a young, energetic chemical industry in full swing. Having made sure of its techniques and set up numerous installations it is fully in a position to confront the French atomic programme. In addition it is able and anxious to associate with the developments of foreign atomic industry, especially EURATOM and Eurochemic. (author)

  11. The Chemical Evolution of the Universe I High Column Density Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Mathlin, G P; Churches, D K; Edmunds, M G

    2000-01-01

    We construct a simple, robust model of the chemical evolution of galaxies from high to low redshift, and apply it to published observations of damped Lyman-alpha quasar absorption line systems (DLAs). The elementary model assumes quiescent star formation and isolated galaxies (no interactions, mergers or gas flows). We consider the influence of dust and chemical gradients in the galaxies, and hence explore the selection effects in quasar surveys. We fit individual DLA systems to predict some observable properties of the absorbing galaxies, and also indicate the expected redshift behaviour of chemical element ratios involving nucleosynthetic time delays. Despite its simplicity, our `monolithic collapse' model gives a good account of the distribution and evolution of the metallicity and column density of DLAs, and of the evolution of the global star formation rate and gas density below redshifts z 3. However, from the comparison of DLA observations with our model, it is clear that star formation rates at higher...

  12. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  13. The Bologna Open Clusters Chemical Evolution project (in short: BOCCE)

    OpenAIRE

    Bragaglia, Angela

    2007-01-01

    I present here our project, the Bologna Open Clusters Chemical Evolution (BOCCE) project, aimed at using Open Clusters as tracers of the disk properties and their evolution with time. We are collecting and homogeneously analyzing data, both photometric and spectroscopic, on a large sample of open clusters, representative of the old cluster population, and I show here results obtained on a subset of our clusters.

  14. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION IN HIERARCHICAL MODELS OF COSMIC STRUCTURE. II. THE FORMATION OF THE MILKY WAY STELLAR HALO AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE OLDEST STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents theoretical star formation and chemical enrichment histories for the stellar halo of the Milky Way (MW) based on new chemodynamical modeling. The goal of this study is to assess the extent to which metal-poor stars in the halo reflect the star formation conditions that occurred in halo progenitor galaxies at high redshift, before, and during the epoch of re-ionization. Simple prescriptions that translate dark-matter (DM) halo mass into baryonic gas budgets and star formation histories yield models that resemble the observed MW halo in its total stellar mass, metallicity distribution, and the luminosity function and chemical enrichment of dwarf satellite galaxies. These model halos in turn allow an exploration of how the populations of interest for probing the epoch of re-ionization are distributed in physical and phase space, and of how they are related to lower-redshift populations of the same metallicity. The fraction of stars dating from before a particular time or redshift depends strongly on radius within the galaxy, reflecting the 'inside-out' growth of cold DM halos, and on metallicity, reflecting the general trend toward higher metallicity at later times. These results suggest that efforts to discover stars from z>6-10 should select for stars with [Fe/H] ∼10 and 15%-40% are from z>15. The oldest, most metal-poor stars-those most likely to reveal the chemical abundances of the first stars-are most common in the very center of the Galaxy's halo: they are in the bulge, but not of the bulge. These models have several implications for the larger project of constraining the properties of the first stars and galaxies using data from the local universe.

  15. Chemical Evolution of Irregular and Blue Compact Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    L. Carigi; Colin, P.; Peimbert, M.; Sarmiento, A

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the chemical evolution of metal poor galaxies and conclude that their oxygen deficiency is not due to: the production of black holes by massive stars or a varying slope of the Initial Mass Function, IMF, at the high-mass end. A varying IMF at the low-mass end alone or in combination with: (a) an outflow of oxygen-rich material, (b) an outflow of well-mixed material, and (c) the presence of dark matter that does not participate in the chemical evolution process, is needed to explain...

  16. The Chemical Evolution of Globular Clusters - II. Metals and Fluorine

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; Gibson, Brad K; Karakas, Amanda I; Pilkington, Kate; Calura, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In the first paper in this series, we proposed a new framework in which to model the chemical evolution of globular clusters. This model, is predicated upon the assumption that clusters form within an interstellar medium enriched locally by the ejecta of a single Type Ia supernova and varying numbers of asymptotic giant branch stars, superimposed on an ambient medium pre-enriched by low-metallicity Type II supernovae. Paper I was concerned with the application of this model to the observed abundances of several reactive elements and so-called non-metals for three classical intermediate-metallicity clusters, with the hallmark of the work being the successful recovery of many of their well-known elemental and isotopic abundance anomalies. Here, we expand upon our initial analysis by (a) applying the model to a much broader range of metallicities (from the factor of three explored in Paper I, to now, a factor of ~50; i.e., essentially, the full range of Galactic globular cluster abundances, and (b) incorporating...

  17. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and y-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  18. Chemical Evolution in Hierarchical Models of Cosmic Structure II: The Formation of the Milky Way Stellar Halo and the Distribution of the Oldest Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tumlinson, Jason

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical star formation and chemical enrichment histories for the stellar halo of the Milky Way based on new chemodynamical modeling. The goal of this study is to assess the extent to which metal-poor stars in the halo reflect the star formation conditions that occurred in halo progenitor galaxies at high redshift, before and during the epoch of reionization. Simple prescriptions that translate dark-matter halo mass into baryonic gas budgets and star formation histories yield models that resemble the observed Milky Way halo in its total stellar mass, metallicity distribution, and the luminosity function and chemical enrichment of dwarf satellite galaxies. These model halos in turn allow an exploration of how the populations of interest for probing the epoch of reionization are distributed in physical and phase space, and of how they are related to lower-redshift populations of the same metallicity. The fraction of stars dating from before a particular time or redshift depends strongly o...

  19. The isotopic and chemical evolution of planets: Mars as a missing link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaolo, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The study of planetary bodies has advanced to a stage where it is possible to contemplate general models for the chemical and physical evolution of planetary interiors, which might be referred to as UMPES (Unified Models of Planetary Evolution and Structure). UMPES would be able to predict the internal evolution and structure of a planet given certain input parameters such as mass, distance from the sun, and a time scale for accretion. Such models are highly dependent on natural observations because the basic material properties of planetary interiors, and the processes that take place during the evolution of planets are imperfectly understood. The idea of UMPES was particularly unrealistic when the only information available was from the earth. However, advances have been made in the understanding of the general aspects of planetary evolution now that there is geochemical and petrological data available for the moon and for meteorites.

  20. Star Formation History and Chemical Evolution of the Sextans Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Hong Soo; Harris, Jason; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We present the star formation history and chemical evolution of the Sextans dSph dwarf galaxy as a function of galactocentric distance. We derive these from the $VI$ photometry of stars in the $42' \\times 28'$ field using the SMART model developed by Yuk & Lee (2007, ApJ, 668, 876) and adopting a closed-box model for chemical evolution. For the adopted age of Sextans 15 Gyr, we find that $>$84% of the stars formed prior to 11 Gyr ago, significant star formation extends from 15 to 11 Gyr ago (...

  1. The age of the Galactic disk - Inflow, chemical evolution, astration, and radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of Galactic evolution and observational data on the age of the Galaxy are compared, with a focus on recent results. Topics addressed include the infall of material and its effects on the age-metallicity relation, the distribution of metallicity, the present gas fraction and metallicity, and the age spectrum of interstellar nuclei; the chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood; the key results of nuclear cosmochronology; and astration effects on Galactic age. It is found that both nuclear cosmochronology and detailed stellar and Galactic evolution models tend to support an age of 12-16 Gyr.

  2. Model of evolution of surface grain structure under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion and chemical reactions in multicomponent systems play an important role in numerous technology applications. For example, surface treatment of materials and coatings by particle beam leads to chemical composition and grain structure change. To investigate the thermal-diffusion and chemical processes affecting the evolution of surface structure, the mathematical modeling is efficient addition to experiment. In this paper two-dimensional model is discussed to describe the evolution of titanium nitride coating on the iron substrate under implantation of boron and carbon. The equation for diffusion fluxes and reaction rate are obtained using Gibbs energy expansion into series with respect to concentration and their gradients

  3. Chemical evolution of giant molecular clouds in simulations of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, Alexander J.; Schaye, Joop

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) within hydrodynamic simulations of isolated, low-mass (M* ~ 10^9 M_sol) disc galaxies. We study the evolution of molecular abundances and the implications for CO emission and the X_CO conversion factor in individual clouds. We define clouds either as regions above a density threshold n_H,min = 10 cm^-3, or using an observationally motivated CO intensity threshold of 0.25 K km s^-1. Our simulations include a non-equilibrium chemical model with 157 species, including 20 molecules. We also investigate the effects of resolution and pressure floors (i.e. Jeans limiters). We find cloud lifetimes up to ~40 Myr, with a median of 13 Myr, in agreement with observations. At one tenth solar metallicity, young clouds (<10-15 Myr) are underabundant in H2 and CO compared to chemical equilibrium, by factors of ~3 and 1-2 orders of magnitude, respectively. At solar metallicity, GMCs reach chemical equilibrium faster (within ~1 Myr). We also compute CO emission from individual clouds. The mean CO intensity, I_CO, is strongly suppressed at low dust extinction, A_v, and possibly saturates towards high A_v, in agreement with observations. The I_CO - A_v relation shifts towards higher A_v for higher metallicities and, to a lesser extent, for stronger UV radiation. At one tenth solar metallicity, CO emission is weaker in young clouds (<10-15 Myr), consistent with the underabundance of CO. Consequently, X_CO decreases by an order of magnitude from 0 to 15 Myr, albeit with a large scatter.

  4. Stochastic evolution of refractory interstellar dust during the chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liffman, Kurt; Clayton, Donald D.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution course of refractoary interstellar dust during the chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium (ISM) is studied using a simple model of the chemical evolution of ISM. It is assumed that, in this medium, the stars are born in molecular clouds, but new nucleosynthesis products and stellar return are entered into a complementary diffuse medium; the well-mixed matter of each interstellar phase is repeatedly cycled stochastically through the complementary phase and back. The dust is studied on a particle-by-particle bases as it is sputtered by shock waves in the diffuse medium, accretes an amorphous mantle of gaseous refractory atoms while its local medium joins the molecular cloud medium, and encounters the possibility of astration within molecular clouds. Results are presented relevant to the size spectrum of accreted mantles, its age spectrum and the distinction among its several lifetimes, depletion factors of refractory atoms in the diffuse gas, and isotopic anomalies.

  5. Chemical evolution of viscously evolving galactic discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Catherine J.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the Lin-Pringle (1987) model of galactic disk formation to reproduce the observed radial distributions of total gas surface density and metals in disk galaxies is investigated. It is found that a satisfactory fit is obtained provided that there exists an outer cut-off to the star-forming disk beyond which gas is allowed to viscously evolve. The metallicity gradient is then established by radial inflow of gas from beyond this cut-off.

  6. Carbon Monoxide Isotopes: On the Trail of Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.

    1995-01-01

    From the early days of the discovery of radio emission from carbon monoxide it was realized that it offered unusual potential for under- standing the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and external galaxies through measurements of molecular isotopes. These results bear on stellar nucleosynthesis, star formation, and gases in the interstellar medium. Progress in isotopic radio measurements will be reviewed.

  7. Oxygen abundances and the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Tosi., M; Angeles I. Díaz

    1983-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Memorie della Società Astronomica Italiana. Tosi, M. and A. I. Díaz. Oxygen abundances and the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. Memorie della Società Astronomica Italiana 54, 4 (1983): 889-890

  8. Losing track of the time: the chemical clock of prestellar core evolution in hydrodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, L.; Glover, S.; Caselli, P.

    2016-05-01

    The ortho:para ratio of H2D+ is a proposed observational indicator of prestellar core ages, and thus a possible tool to determine the typical star formation time scale. The conversion of the measured ratio to an age estimate requires modelling of the chemical evolution. Such models usually consider static, one zone models of physical conditions. The relevant chemical time scales, however, are comparable to the dynamic time scale, therefore the history of gas might affect the ratio. To investigate the significance of gas dynamics and history on the spin-state ratio, we analyse prestellar cores formed in various environment in a hydrodynamic simulation. The fully time dependent, spatially resolved chemical evolution of the cores are computed using a state-of-art ortho:para and deuteration chemical network. The true ages are compared to the once indicated by the ortho:para ratio.

  9. Magnesium isotopes as a probe of the Milky Way chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Thygesen, Anders Overaa

    2015-01-01

    The study of elemental abundance ratios from spectroscopy of stars has for a long time been used to investigate the structure and the chemical evolution history of the Milky Way. However, even with the ever-increasing number of stars with detailed abundances, many details about the Milky Way evolution are still not understood. While elemental abundance measurements already provide a lot of information, nucleosynthesis models predict not only bulk abundances of an element, but also its isotopi...

  10. Galactic chemical evolution of heavy elements from Barium to Europium

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglio, C; Gallino, R; Busso, M; Ferrini, F; Straniero, O

    1999-01-01

    We follow the chemical evolution of the Galaxy for elements from Ba to Eu, using an evolutionary model suitable to reproduce a large set of Galactic (local and non local) and extragalactic constraints. Input stellar yields for neutron-rich nuclei have been separated into their s-process and r-process components. The production of s-process elements in thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars of low mass proceeds from the combined operation of two neutron sources: the dominant reaction 13C(alpha,n)16O, which releases neutrons in radiative conditions during the interpulse phase, and the reaction 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg, marginally activated during thermal instabilities. The resulting s-process distribution is strongly dependent on the stellar metallicity. For the standard model discussed in this paper, it shows a sharp production of the Ba-peak elements around Z = Z_sun/4. Concerning the r-process yields, we assume that the production of r-nuclei is a primary process occurring in stars near the lowest mass lim...

  11. Reconstructing the cosmic evolution of the chemical elements

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The chemical elements are created in nuclear fusion processes in the hot and dense cores of stars. The energy generated through nucleosynthesis allows stars to shine for billions of years. When these stars explode as massive supernovae, the newly made elements are expelled, chemically enriching the surrounding regions. Subsequent generations of stars are formed from gas that is slightly more element enriched than that from which previous stars formed. This chemical evolution can be traced back to its beginning soon after the Big Bang by studying the oldest and most metal-poor stars still observable in the Milky Way today. Through chemical analysis, they provide the only available tool for gaining information about the nature of the short-lived first stars and their supernova explosions more than thirteen billion years ago. These events set in motion the transformation of the pristine universe into a rich cosmos of chemically diverse planets, stars, and galaxies.

  12. The Chemical Evolution of Starburst Nucleus Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Coziol, R; Davoust, E; Considère, S

    1997-01-01

    The metallicities derived from spectroscopic observations of a sample of Starburst Nucleus Galaxies (SBNGs) are compared to those of several other types of galaxies (normal giant galaxies, Irregular and HII galaxies) drawn from the literature. The SBNGs are deficient in metals with respect to normal galaxies of same morphological type, suggesting that - SBNGs are galaxies still in the process of formation. Breaking the SBNGs into early-types (Sb and earlier) and late-types reveals that the former seem to follow the same linear luminosity-metallicity relation as the irregular and elliptical galaxies, whereas the latter and the giant spirals show comparable (0.2 and 0.3 dex) excess abundances with respect to the linear relation. This difference between the two types of SBNGs is consistent with the predictions of the model of hierarchical formation of galaxies: the early-type SBNGs are building their bulges by successive mergers of small stellar and gaseous systems, while the late-type SBNGs are mostly accreting...

  13. Layered Model for Radiation-Induced Chemical Evolution of Icy Surface Composition and Dynamics on Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Richardson, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of albedos and surface colors on observed Kuiper Belt and Inner Oort Cloud objects remains to be explained in terms of competition between primordial intrinsic versus exogenic drivers of surface and near-surface evolution. Earlier models have attempted without success to attribute this diversity to the relations between surface radiolysis from cosmic ray irradiation and gardening by meteoritic impacts. A more flexible approach considers the different depth-dependent radiation profiles produced by low-energy plasma, suprathermal, and maximally penetrating charged particles of the heliospheric and local interstellar radiation environment. Generally red objects of the dynamically cold (low inclination, circular orbit) Classical Kuiper Belt might be accounted for from erosive effects of plasma ions and reddening effects of high energy cosmic ray ions, while suprathermal keV-MeV ions could alternatively produce more color neutral surfaces. The deepest layer of more pristine ice can be brought to the surface from meter to kilometer depths by larger impact events and potentially by cryovolcanic activity. The bright surfaces of some larger objects, e.g. Eris, suggest ongoing resurfacing activity. Cycles of atmospheric formation and surface freezeout can further account for temporal variation as observed on Pluto. The diversity of causative processes must therefore be understood to account for observationally apparent diversities of the object surfaces.

  14. The Chemical Evolution of Galaxies: The Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Hartwick, F D A

    2016-01-01

    The predictions of the multiple burst accretion model of chemical evolution are compared to the observations of the stellar masses and metallicities of star-forming galaxies. With the addition of one parameter, the model can account for the observations of the star-forming galaxies if the observations of the galaxies are identified with the star bursting behaviour of the model. This consistency with the model holds only if galaxy downsizing is assumed to occur.

  15. The New Model of Chemical Evolution of r-process Elements Based on The Hierarchical Galaxy Formation I: Ba and Eu

    CERN Document Server

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the chemical enrichment of r-process elements in the early evolutionary stages of the Milky Way halo within the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation using a semi-analytic merger tree. In this paper, we focus on heavy r-process elements, Ba and Eu, of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars and give constraints on their astronomical sites. Our models take into account changes of the surface abundances of EMP stars by the accretion of interstellar matter (ISM). We also consider metal-enrichment of intergalactic medium (IGM) by galactic winds and the resultant pre-enrichment of proto-galaxies. The trend and scatter of the observed r-process abundances are well reproduced by our hierarchical model with $\\sim 10\\%$ of core-collapse supernovae in low-mass end ($\\sim 10M_{\\odot}$) as a dominant r-process source and the star formation efficiency of $\\sim 10^{-10} \\hbox{yr}^{-1}$. For neutron star mergers as an r-process source, their coalescence timescale has to be $ \\sim 10^7$yrs, and the event rates $...

  16. The new model of chemical evolution of r-process elements based on the hierarchical galaxy formation. I. Ba and Eu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the chemical enrichment of r-process elements in the early evolutionary stages of the Milky Way halo within the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation using a semi-analytic merger tree. In this paper, we focus on heavy r-process elements, Ba and Eu, of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars and give constraints on their astronomical sites. Our models take into account changes of the surface abundances of EMP stars by the accretion of interstellar medium (ISM). We also consider metal-enrichment of intergalactic medium by galactic winds and the resultant pre-enrichment of proto-galaxies. The trend and scatter of the observed r-process abundances are well reproduced by our hierarchical model with ∼10% of core-collapse supernovae in low-mass end (∼10 M ☉) as a dominant r-process source and the star formation efficiency of ∼10–10 yr–1. For neutron star mergers as an r-process source, their coalescence timescale has to be ∼107 yr, and the event rates ∼100 times larger than currently observed in the Galaxy. We find that the accretion of ISM is a dominant source of r-process elements for stars with [Ba/H] < –3.5. In this model, a majority of stars at [Fe/H] < –3 are formed without r-process elements, but their surfaces are polluted by the ISM accretion. The pre-enrichment affects ∼4% of proto-galaxies, and yet, is surpassed by the ISM accretion in the surface of EMP stars.

  17. The fast debris evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H. G.; Swinerd, G. G.; Newland, R. J.; Saunders, A.

    2009-09-01

    The 'particles-in-a-box' (PIB) model introduced by Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] removed the need for computer-intensive Monte Carlo simulation to predict the gross characteristics of an evolving debris environment. The PIB model was described using a differential equation that allows the stability of the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment to be tested by a straightforward analysis of the equation's coefficients. As part of an ongoing research effort to investigate more efficient approaches to evolutionary modelling and to develop a suite of educational tools, a new PIB model has been developed. The model, entitled Fast Debris Evolution (FADE), employs a first-order differential equation to describe the rate at which new objects ⩾10 cm are added and removed from the environment. Whilst Talent [Talent, D.L. Analytic model for orbital debris environmental management. J. Spacecraft Rocket, 29 (4), 508-513, 1992.] based the collision theory for the PIB approach on collisions between gas particles and adopted specific values for the parameters of the model from a number of references, the form and coefficients of the FADE model equations can be inferred from the outputs of future projections produced by high-fidelity models, such as the DAMAGE model. The FADE model has been implemented as a client-side, web-based service using JavaScript embedded within a HTML document. Due to the simple nature of the algorithm, FADE can deliver the results of future projections immediately in a graphical format, with complete user-control over key simulation parameters. Historical and future projections for the ⩾10 cm LEO debris environment under a variety of different scenarios are possible, including business as usual, no future launches, post-mission disposal and remediation. A selection of results is presented with comparisons with predictions made using the DAMAGE environment model

  18. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION AND THE GALACTIC HABITABLE ZONE OF M31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Carigi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have computed the Galactic Habitable Zones (GHZs of the Andromeda galaxy (M31 based on the probability of terrestrial planet formation, which depends on the metallicity (Z of the interstellar medium, and the number of stars formed per unit surface area. The GHZ was obtained from a chemical evolution model built to reproduce a metallicity gradient in the galactic disk, [O/H](r=−0.015 dex kpc−1 × r(kpc + 0.44 dex. If we assume that Earth-like planets form with a probability law that follows the Z distribution shown by stars with detected planets, the most probable GHZ per pc2 is located between 3 and 7 kpc for planets with ages between 6 and 7 Gyr. However, the highest number of stars with habitable planets is located in a ring between 12 and 14 kpc with a mean age of 7 Gyr. 11% and 6.5% of the all formed stars in M31 may have planets capable of hosting basic and complex life, respectively.

  19. The Temperature Structure in Ionized Nebulae and the Chemical Evolution of Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    A few results that indicate the presence of temperature variations in gaseous nebulae are reviewed. The evidence is based on: a) temperatures derived from different methods, and b) on comparisons of abundances predicted by models of galactic chemical evolution with abundances derived from observations.

  20. XMM tests galaxy evolutions models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    Current models of galaxy evolution rely critically on feedback supernova and AGN feedback processes. The energy released by past star formation and AGN activity imprints a fossil record on the thermodynamic properties of the intra-group-medium (IGM). This can be decoded by studying the X-ray emission. for an unbiased sample of groups with known galaxy and AGN properties. Therefore we propose an X-ray survey with XMM-Newton for 255 ksec to observe 17 galaxy groups with Msim10(13) M_odot selected from our Zurich ENvironmental Survey that host >8 members.

  1. The chemical evolution in the early phases of massive star formation I

    CERN Document Server

    Gerner, T; Semenov, D; Linz, H; Vasyunina, T; Bihr, S; Shirley, Y L; Henning, Th

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the chemical evolution of young (high-mass) star-forming regions is a central topic in star formation research. Chemistry is employed as a unique tool 1) to investigate the underlying physical processes and 2) to characterize the evolution of the chemical composition. We observed a sample of 59 high-mass star-forming regions at different evolutionary stages varying from the early starless phase of infrared dark clouds to high-mass protostellar objects to hot molecular cores and, finally, ultra-compact HII regions at 1mm and 3mm with the IRAM 30m telescope. We determined their large-scale chemical abundances and found that the chemical composition evolves along with the evolutionary stages. On average, the molecular abundances increase with time. We modeled the chemical evolution, using a 1D physical model where density and temperature vary from stage to stage coupled with an advanced gas-grain chemical model and derived the best-fit chi^2 values of all relevant parameters. A satisfying overall a...

  2. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  3. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part IV. A petrographic and chemical model for the evolution of the Tradewater Formation coals in Western Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graese, A.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A depositional model for the coals of the Tradewater Formation and associated rock units was constructed as a predictive device for the occurrence of economically important low sulfur coal. Twenty-one cores were examined and ninety-eight coal samples were analyzed for maceral, ash, and sulfur contents. These data were then analyzed to determine regional variation as well as vertical variation in single coal columns. Core data indicate that the majority of the Tradewater rocks consist of irregularly distributed, coarsening-upward, fine-grained detrital material which was deposited in shallow bodies of water. Minor fossiliferous shales and limestones suggest a marine influence. Less common coarse-grained, fining-upward sequences appear to be deposits of meandering channels. Like the detrital rocks, the coal seams are also irregularly distributed and exhibit variable petrographic and chemical properties reflecting changes in the Eh and pH of the coal swamp waters as well as detrital influx into the swamps. These swamps were relatively limited in extent and probably occupied the upper reaches of the tidal zone. The lack of significant stratigraphic and geographic trends in the regional data suggests that this mode of deposition was widespread and continued for a long period of time. 42 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Chemical Evolution of the Galactic Disk and Bulge

    OpenAIRE

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Invited Review at IAU Symp 164 on Stellar Populations. The Milky Way Galaxy offers a unique opportunity for testing theories of galaxy formation and evolution. The study of the spatial distribution, kinematics and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy allows one to address specific questions pertinent to this meeting such as When was the Galaxy assembled? Is this an ongoing process? What was the merging history of the Milky Way?

  5. A model of lunar evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been many models describing the evolution of the sister planet. As information from the intensive exploration by the Apollo program has accumulated, more constraints on these models have emerged. A hypothesis in which there is a present day asthenosphere, a heat flow between 24 and 32 ergs cm-2s-1 and a crust which developed early in the Moon's history by melting of the outer 100 to 200 km is specifically considered. A constraint which keeps the deep interior below the Curie point of iron for the first 1 to 1.5 b.y. so that it is able to carry the memory of an early field which magnetized the cold interior is also introduced. The magnetized mare basalts and breccias cooled in this field from above the Curie point of iron (approximately 8000C) and acquired a thermoremanent magnetization. While fully recognizing that some of these constraints are subject to other interpretations, it is nevertheless instructive to consider the thermal history that follows from such a model. It is a consequence of this model that solid body convection took place late in lunar history. This may well have contributed to the lunar center of figure and center of mass offset, to the low order terms in its gravity field and to, its disequilibrium moment of inertia differences. (Auth.)

  6. Inhomogeneous Chemical Evolution of the Galaxy in the Solar Neighbourhood

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sahijpal

    2013-12-01

    -body numerical simulations of an inhomogeneous Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE) of the solar neighbourhood with a high temporal resolution are presented. The solar annular ring is divided into distinct spatial grids of area ∼ 1–2 kpc2. Each grid evolves distinctly in terms of star formation and nucleosynthetic yields from numerous generations of stars. The evolution of the galaxy is simulated by considering discrete episodes of star formation. Subsequent to the evolution of the simulated stars within each grid the stellar nucleosynthetic yields are homogenized within the grid rather than the traditionally adopted criteria of homogenizing over the entire solar annular ring. This provides a natural mechanism of generating heterogeneities in the elemental abundance distribution of stars. A complex chemical evolutionary history is inferred that registers episodes of time-dependent contributions from SN II+Ib/c with respect to SN Ia. It was observed that heterogeneities can remerge even after episodes of large scale homogenizations on scales larger than the grid size. However, a comparison of the deduced heterogeneities with the observed scatter in the elemental abundances of the dwarf stars suggest only a partial match, specifically, for [Fe/H] > -0.5. The deduced heterogeneities in the case of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulphur, calcium and titanium can explain the observed heterogeneities for [Fe/H] < -0.5. It may not be possible to explain the entire observed spread exclusively on the basis of the inhomogeneous GCE.

  7. Comet impacts and chemical evolution on the bombarded earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Aggarwal, Hans

    1992-01-01

    Amino acids yields for previously published shock tube experiments are used with minimum Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) impactor mass and comet composition to predict AIB amino acid K/T boundary sediment column density. The inferred initial concentration of all amino acids in the K/T sea and in similar primordial seas just after 10 km comet impacts would have been at least 10 exp -7 M. However, sinks for amino acids must also be considered in calculating amino acid concentrations after comet impacts and in assessing the contribution of comets to the origin of life. The changing concentration of cometary amino acids due to ultraviolet light is compared with the equilibrium concentration of amino acids produced in the sea from corona discharge in the atmosphere, deposition in water, and degradation by ultraviolet light. Comets could have been more important than endogenous agents for initial evolution of amino acids. Sites favorable for chemical evolution of amino acids are examined, and it is concluded that chemical evolution could have occurred at or above the surface even during periods of intense bombardment of earth before 3.8 billion years ago.

  8. Inhomogeneous halo collapse and early Galactic chemical evolution - Globular cluster metallicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinie, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Mathews, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A new solution to the observed Galactic globular cluster metallicity distribution is proposed by considering inhomogeneous collapse of a centrally condensed proto-Galaxy. In contrast to the standard one-zone model, it is shown that, for inhomogeneous models, the metallicity distribution can be reproduced without the need to decrease the nucleosynthetic yield for metal-poor stars. Chemical evolution in free fall is calculated analytically. A hybrid hydroparticle code is developed to study the effect of supernova induced pressure.

  9. The Evolution Model of Intelligent Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazaluk Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the evolution model of reasonable matter (noogenesis, discovering the planetary and cosmic scale of the mind development. The author considers a historiography of this problem field, a contribution of scientific community to the development of basic provisions - noogenesis. According to the author, the evolution model of reasonable matter consists of three interdependent and mutually complementary models: 1. Models of continuous and nonlinear complication of structures of reasonable matter (neuro-evolution; 2. Models of continuous and nonlinear complication of types of interacting (or shown functions structures of the system of reasonable matter. 3. Models of continuous and nonlinear complication of the surroundings of reasonable matter (socio-cultural evolution. All these models include the author's understanding and corresponding arguments. In conclusion the author compares models of living and reasonable matter (biological evolution and noogenesis

  10. The role of cometary particle coalescence in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Mckay, C. P.; Carle, G. C.; Valentin, J. R.; Scattergood, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    Important prebiotic organic compounds might have been transported to earth in dust or produced in vapor clouds resulting from atmospheric explosions or impacts of comets. These compounds coalesced in the upper atmosphere with particles ejected from craters formed by impacts of large objects. Coalescence during exposure to UV radiation concentrated organic monomers and enhanced formation of oligomers. Continuing coalescence added material to the growing particles and shielded prebiotic compounds from prolonged UV radiation. These particles settled into the lower atmosphere where they were scavenged by rain. Aqueous chemistry and evaporation of raindrops containing monomers in high temperature regions near the earth's surface also promoted continued formation of oligomers. Finally, these oligomers were deposited in the oceans where continued prebiotic evolution led to the most primitive cell. Results of present studies suggest that prebiotic chemical evolution may be an inevitable consequence of impacting comets during the late accretion of planets anywhere in the universe if oceans remained on those planetary surfaces.

  11. A paradigm-based evolution of chemical engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandru Woinaroschy

    2016-01-01

    A short presentation of chemical engineering evolution, as guided by its paradigms, is exposed. The first paradigm–unit operations–has emerged as a necessity of systematization due to the explosion of chemical industrial applica-tions at the end of 19th century. The birth in the late 1950s of the second paradigm–transport phenomena–was the consequence of the need for a deep, scientific knowledge of the phenomena that explain what happens inside of unit operations. In the second part of 20th century, the importance of chemical product properties and qualities has become essential y in the market fights. Accordingly, it was required with additional and even new fundamen-tal approaches, and product engineering was recognized as the third paradigm. Nowadays chemical industry, as a huge materials and energy consumer, and with a strong ecological impact, couldn't remain outside of sustainability requirements. The basics of the fourth paradigm–sustainable chemical engineering–are now formulated.

  12. Modeling the evolution of Sakurai's object

    CERN Document Server

    Herwig, F

    2002-01-01

    Sakurai's object is a born again AGB star of the very late thermal pulse flavor. In this contribution I will discuss new models of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis models of this phase. Two most intriguing properties of Sakurai's objects have so far not been understood theoretically: the peculiar chemical appearance, in particular the high lithium abundance and the short time scale of only a few years on which the transition from the dwarf configuration into the born again giant appearance has occurred. A new nucleosynthesis mode of hot hydrogen-deficient He3 burning can explain the extraordinary lithium abundance. During the thermal pulse He3 is ingested from the envelope together with the protons into the hot He-flash convection zone. The first network calculations show that due to the large C12 abundance protons are rather captured by carbon than destroy newly formed Be7 and ultimately Li7. Moreover, the short evolution time scale has been reproduced by making the assumption that the convective effici...

  13. Simple models of evolution and extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    1999-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to the mathematical modeling of large-scale biological evolution and extinction. We give three examples of simple models in this field: the coevolutionary avalanche model of Bak and Sneppen, the environmental stress model of Newman, and the increasing fitness model of Sibani, Schmidt, and Alstrom. We describe the features of real evolution which these models are intended to explain and compare the results of simulations against data drawn from the fossil record.

  14. Simple models of evolution and extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, M. E. J.

    1999-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to the mathematical modeling of large-scale biological evolution and extinction. We give three examples of simple models in this field: the coevolutionary avalanche model of Bak and Sneppen, the environmental stress model of Newman, and the increasing fitness model of Sibani, Schmidt, and Alstrom. We describe the features of real evolution which these models are intended to explain and compare the results of simulations against data drawn from the fossi...

  15. Proactive Quality Guidance for Model Evolution in Model Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Ganser, Andreas; Lichter, Horst; Roth, Alexander; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Model evolution in model libraries differs from general model evolution. It limits the scope to the manageable and allows to develop clear concepts, approaches, solutions, and methodologies. Looking at model quality in evolving model libraries, we focus on quality concerns related to reusability. In this paper, we put forward our proactive quality guidance approach for model evolution in model libraries. It uses an editing-time assessment linked to a lightweight quality model, corresponding m...

  16. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  17. Different-sized dust grains and the chemical evolution of protostellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochina, O. V.; Wiebe, D. S.

    2014-04-01

    Results of modeling the chemical evolution of protostellar objects are presented. The models take into account the existence of different dust populations with distinct grain sizes, total mass fractions, and temperatures. In addition to "classical" dust grains, the models include an entirely different second dust population, with dust grain sizes of 30 Å and a higher temperature. Two chemical-evolution models are compared, one taking into account only classical dust and the other including both dust populations. The influence of a complex dust composition on the general evolution of the molecular contents of prestellar cores and the abundances of a number of chemical species is studied. At early evolutionary stages, differences are mainly determined by the modification changes in the photoprocesses' balance due to efficient UV absorption by the second population of dust grains and in collisional reactions with the dust grains. At late stages, distinctions between the models are also determined by the increasing dominance of additional reaction channels. The species that respond to the presence of small grains in different ways are separated into different groups. Allowing for the presence of small grains makes it possible to significantly lower the water abundance in the gas phase.

  18. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  19. An Evolution Model of Space Debris Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Various types of models including engineering models andevolution models have been developed to understand space debris environment since 1960s. Evolution model, consisting of a set of supporting models such as Launch Model, Breakup Model and Atmosphere Model, can reliably predicts the evolution of space debris environment. Of these supporting models, Breakup Model is employed to describe the distribution of debris and debris cloud during a explosion or collision case which is one of the main factors affecting the amount of total space debris. An analytical orbit debris environment model referred to as the “Particles-In-Boxes" model has been introduced. By regarding the orbit debris as the freedom particles running in the huge volume, the sources and sinks mechanism is established. Then the PIB model is expanded to the case of multiple-species in multiple-tier system. Combined with breakup model, the evolution of orbit debris environment is predicted.

  20. The gas-ice chemical interplay during cloud evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hocuk, S

    2014-01-01

    During the evolution of diffuse clouds to molecular clouds, gas-phase molecules freeze out on surfaces of small dust particles to form ices. On dust surfaces, water is the main constituent of the icy mantle in which a complex chemistry is taking place. We aim to study the formation pathways and the composition of the ices throughout the evolution of diffuse clouds. For this purpose, we use time-dependent rate equations to calculate the molecular abundances in both gas phase and on solid surfaces (onto dust grains). We fully consider the gas-dust interplay by including the details of freeze-out, chemical and thermal desorption, as well as the most important photo-processes on grain surfaces. The difference in binding energies of chemical species on bare and icy surfaces is also incorporated into our equations. Using the numerical code FLASH, we perform a hydrodynamical simulation of a gravitationally bound diffuse cloud and follow its contraction. We find that while the dust grains are still bare, water format...

  1. Security issues for the software evolution model

    OpenAIRE

    Rambidis, Anastasios X.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis examines the security requirements of the software evolution model and identifies possible security mechanisms called "control classes" that are applicable to the model. Then, based on combinations of "control lasses," proposes a suitable security level for each of the model's databases. Furthermore this thesis deals with the possibility of using Pretty Good Privacy as a method for protection of software data stored in databases. The software evolution model captures all the neces...

  2. Inhomogeneous chemical evolution of the galactic disk: evidence for sequential stellar enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, van den, L.B.; Jong, de, Franciska

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the abundance variations observed among similarly aged F and G dwarfs in the local Galactic disk. We present arguments in support of combined infall of metal-deficient gas and sequential enrichment by successive stellar generations in the local Galactic disk ISM. We show that galactic chemical evolution models which take into account these processes simultaneously are consistent with both the observed abundance variations among similarly aged dwarfs in the solar n...

  3. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  4. Bacterial Evolution and Bak-Sneppen Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Indrani; Chaudhuri, Indranath

    2002-01-01

    Recently, Lenski et al [Elena,Lenski,Travisano] have carried out several experiments on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. They have further quantified the relative contributions of adaptation, chance and history to bacterial evolution. In this paper, we show that a modified $M$-trait Bak-Sneppen model can explain many of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  5. Testing the role of SNe Ia for Galactic chemical evolution of p-nuclei with 2D models and with s-process seeds at different metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Travaglio, C; Rauscher, T; Ropeke, F K; Hillebrandt, W

    2014-01-01

    The bulk of p isotopes is created in the 'gamma processes' mainly by sequences of photodisintegrations and beta decays in explosive conditions in Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) or in core collapse supernovae (ccSN). The contribution of different stellar sources to the observed distribution of p-nuclei in the Solar System is still under debate. We explore single degenerate Type Ia supernovae in the framework of two-dimensional SNIa delayed-detonation explosion models. Travaglio et al. (2011, TRV11) discussed the sensitivity of p-nuclei production to different SNIa models, i.e. delayed detonations of different strength, deflagrations, and the dependence on selected s-process seed distributions. Here we present a detailed study of p-process nucleosynthesis occuring in SNIa with s-process seeds at different metallicities. Based on the delayed-detonation model DDT-a of TRV11, we analyze the dependence of p-nucleosynthesis on the s-seed distribution obtained from different strengths of the 13C-pocket. Using a Galactic c...

  6. Simulating the evolution of the chemical composition of the 1988/89 winter vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. L.; Mckenna, D. S.; Poole, L. R.; Solomon, S.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988/89 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) observations of the chemical composition and aerosol characteristics of the winter vortex were obtained from a NASA ER-2 aircraft. In this paper we present interpretations of observations obtained on three ER-2 flights using a Lagrangian coupled photochemical-microphysical model. It is argued that observations obtained on Jaunary 16 and 19, and February 10, represent different stages of the chemical evolution of the vortex, from the early stages of chlorine release, the onset of denitrification and the intensively processed state.

  7. Chemical evolution of circumstellar matter around young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; Blake, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent observational studies of the chemical composition of circumstellar matter around both high- and low-mass young stellar objects are reviewed. The molecular abundances are found to be a strong function of evolutionary state, but not of system mass or luminosity. The data are discussed with reference to recent theoretical models.

  8. Planetary Nebulae as Probes of the Chemical Evolution of Dynamically Hot Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Michael G. Richer; McCall, Marshall L.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of chemical abundances in planetary nebulae in nearby galaxies is now relatively straightforward. The challenge is to use these chemical abundances to infer the chemical evolution of their host galaxies. At this point, our understanding of chemical evolution based upon planetary nebulae in galaxies without star formation is strongly coupled to our understanding of the relationship between the chemical abundances in stars and planetary nebulae in the Milky Way bulge. Supposing ...

  9. Galactic chemical evolution - Z versus ln(1/mu) relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ways in which a radial abundance gradient in a disk galaxy may be interpreted are reexamined, asking how metallicity Z depends upon gas mass fraction mu in analytic models characterized by a temporally varying history of metal-poor infall. Six different such models are studied, and it is shown that the metallicity versus gas fraction relationship is well approximated by an expression which is the analog of the Z = y ln(1/mu) relation for closed evolution. The approximation appears valid when the infall rate is nonneglible, but not so great that it dominates the gas budget. 13 references

  10. Galactic chemical evolution - Z versus ln(1/mu) relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1987-01-01

    The ways in which a radial abundance gradient in a disk galaxy may be interpreted are reexamined, asking how metallicity Z depends upon gas mass fraction mu in analytic models characterized by a temporally varying history of metal-poor infall. Six different such models are studied, and it is shown that the metallicity versus gas fraction relationship is well approximated by an expression which is the analog of the Z = y ln(1/mu) relation for closed evolution. The approximation appears valid when the infall rate is nonneglible, but not so great that it dominates the gas budget.

  11. Time Evolution of Thermo-Mechanically and Chemically Coupled Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozimek, C.; Karlstrom, L.; Erickson, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complexity in the volcanic eruption cycle reflects time variation both of magma inputs to the crustal plumbing system and of crustal melt storage zones (magma chambers). These data include timing and volumes of eruptions, as well as erupted compositions. Thus models must take into account the coupled nature of physical attributes. Here we combine a thermo-mechanical model for magma chamber growth and pressurization with a chemical model for evolving chamber compositions, in the limit of rapid mixing, to study controls on eruption cycles and compositions through time. We solve for the mechanical evolution of a 1D magma chamber containing melt, crystals and bubbles, in a thermally evolving and viscoelastic crust. This pressure and temperature evolution constrains the input values of a chemical box model (Lee et al., 2013) that accounts for recharge, eruption, assimilation and fractional crystallization (REAFC) within the chamber. We plan to study the influence of melt supply, input composition, and chamber depth eruptive fluxes and compositions. Ultimately we will explore multiple chambers coupled by elastic-walled dikes. We expect that this framework will facilitate self-consistent inversion of long-term eruptive histories in terms of magma transport physics. Lee, C.-T. A., Lee, T.-C., Wu, C.-T., 2013. Modeling the compositional evolution of recharging, evacuating, and fractionating (REFC) magma chambers: Implications for differentiationof arc magmas. Geochemica Cosmochimica Acta, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2013.08.009.

  12. Chemical modeling of waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-10-01

    The processing of waste from underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and other facilities will require an understanding of the chemical interactions of the waste with process chemicals. Two aspects of sludge treatment should be well delineated and predictable: (1) the distribution of chemical species between aqueous solutions and solids, and (2) potential problems due to chemical interactions that could result in process difficulties or safety concerns. It is likely that the treatment of waste tank sludge will begin with washing, followed by basic or acidic leaching. The dissolved materials will be in a solution that has a high ionic strength where activity coefficients are far from unity. Activity coefficients are needed in order to calculate solubilities. Several techniques are available for calculating these values, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. The techniques adopted and described here is the Pitzer method. Like any of the methods, prudent use of this approach requires that it be applied within concentration ranges where the experimental data were fit, and its use in large systems should be preceded by evaluating subsystems. While much attention must be given to the development of activity coefficients, other factors such as coprecipitation of species and Ostwald ripening must also be considered when one aims to interpret results of sludge tests or to predict results of treatment strategies. An understanding of sludge treatment processes begins with the sludge tests themselves and proceeds to a general interpretation with the aid of modeling. One could stop with only data from the sludge tests, in which case the table of data would become an implicit model. However, this would be a perilous approach in situations where processing difficulties could be costly or result in concerns for the environment or health and safety.

  13. Chemical evolution. XL - Clay-mediated oxidation of diaminomaleonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Hagan, W. J., Jr.; Alwis, K. W.; Mccrea, J.

    1982-01-01

    The inhibition of the oligomerization of HCN by montmorillonite clays is shown to be caused by oxidation of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) by ferric ion in the clay lattice, with ferrous ion and oxalic acid the reaction products. It is demonstrated that diiminosuccinonitrile is the initial reaction product and is rapidly hydrolized to oxalic acid and HCN. The same oxidative transformations are effected by ferric ion bound to Dowex 50, ferric ion in solution, and Ni(NH3)6(2+). The rate of reaction of DAMN indicates no catalytic role for the clay in the oxidation of DAMN, and little reaction of the latter was observed with montmorillonite in which the bulk of the iron was in the divalent state. The possible significance of these redox reactions to chemical evolution is discussed.

  14. Structure Model of Urban Traffic System Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ke-jin; ZHANG Dian-ye

    2008-01-01

    A structure model of urban traffic system evolution is built based on the analysis of the factors influencing the system evolution and the hierarchy between the factors. Then the influencing degrees of the factors are quantificationally analyzed by DEMATE (decision making trial and evaluation laboratory). The analysis results indicate that the traffic mode structure which achieves the highest central degree is the dominant influencing factor of the urban traffic system evolution, and that economy development and the traffic poficy axe the second important factors that also affect the traffic mode structures. Furthermore, physical geography is a basic restriction to the urban traffic system evolution.

  15. Markov Model Applied to Gene Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季星来; 孙之荣

    2001-01-01

    The study of nucleotide substitution is very important both to our understanding of gene evolution and to reliable estimation of phylogenetic relationships. In this paper nucleotide substitution is assumed to be random and the Markov model is applied to the study of the evolution of genes. Then a non-linear optimization approach is proposed for estimating substitution in real sequences. This substitution is called the "Nucleotide State Transfer Matrix". One of the most important conclusions from this work is that gene sequence evolution conforms to the Markov process. Also, some theoretical evidences for random evolution are given from energy analysis of DNA replication.

  16. Cosmic chemical evolution with intermediate mass pop III stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the consequences of an early population of intermediate mass stars (IMS) in the 2 – 8 Msun range on cosmic chemical evolution. We discuss the implications of this population as it pertains to several cosmological and astrophysical observables. Some very metal-poor galactic stars show large enhancements of carbon, typical of the C-rich ejecta of IMS; moreover, halo star carbon and oxygen abundances show a scatter, which imply a wide range of star-formation and nucleosynthetic histories contributed to the first generations of stars. Also, recent analyses of the He abundance in metal-poor extragalactic H II regions suggest an elevated primitive abundance of Helium, Yp ≅ 0.256 by mass, higher than the predicted result from big bang nucleosynthesis assuming the baryon density determined by WMAP, Yp ≅ 0.249. This offset suggests a prompt initial enrichment of He in early metal-poor structures, and IMS Pop III stars are again good candidates. We also discuss the effect of these Pop III stars on global cosmic evolution for example the reionization of the Universe. We conclude that if IMS are to be associated with some Population III stars, their relevance is limited to low mass structures involving a little fraction of the total baryon content of the Universe typical at redshift 10 [1].

  17. Evolution of autocatalytic sets in a competitive percolation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of autocatalytic sets (ACSs) is a widespread process in biological, chemical, and ecological systems and is of great significance in many applications such as the evolution of new species or complex chemical organization. In this paper, we propose a competitive model with an m-selection rule in which an abrupt emergence of a macroscopic independent ACS is observed. By numerical simulations, we find that the maximal increase of the size grows linearly with the system size. We analytically derive the threshold tα where the explosive transition occurs and verify it by simulations. Moreover, our analysis explains how this giant independent ACS grows and reveals that, as the selection rule becomes stricter, the phase transition is dramatically postponed, and the number of the largest independent ACSs coexisting in the system increases accordingly. Our result indicates that suppression during evolution could lead to the abrupt appearance of giant ACSs. (paper)

  18. Galactic chemical abundance evolution in the solar neighborhood up to the Iron peak

    CERN Document Server

    Alibes, A; Canal, R; Alibes, Andreu; Labay, Javier; Canal, Ramon

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a detailed standard chemical evolution model to study the evolution of all the chemical elements up to the iron peak in the solar vicinity. We consider that the Galaxy was formed through two episodes of exponentially decreasing infall, out of extragalactic gas. In a first infall episode, with a duration of $\\sim$ 1 Gyr, the halo and the thick disk were assembled out of primordial gas, while the thin disk formed in a second episode of infall of slightly enriched extragalactic gas, with much longer timescale. The model nicely reproduces the main observational constraints of the solar neighborhood, and the calculated elemental abundances at the time of the solar birth are in excellent agreement with the solar abundances. By the inclusion of metallicity dependent yields for the whole range of stellar masses we follow the evolution of 76 isotopes of all the chemical elements between hydrogen and zinc. Those results are confronted with a large and recent body of observational data, and we discuss ...

  19. Microstructure evolution model in micromagnetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Kružík, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2004), s. 159-182. ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/00/0768; GA AV ČR IAA1075005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : variational inequalities evolution * micromagnetics * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.546, year: 2004

  20. Chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks - the effects of viscous accretion, turbulent mixing and disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzeller, Dominikus; Walsh, Catherine; Millar, Tom J

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks considering radial viscous accretion, vertical turbulent mixing and vertical disk winds. We study the effects on the disk chemical structure when different models for the formation of molecular hydrogen on dust grains are adopted. Our gas-phase chemistry is extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry (Rate06) to which we have added detailed gas-grain interactions. We use our chemical model results to generate synthetic near- and mid-infrared LTE line emission spectra and compare these with recent Spitzer observations. Our results show that if H2 formation on warm grains is taken into consideration, the H2O and OH abundances in the disk surface increase significantly. We find the radial accretion flow strongly influences the molecular abundances, with those in the cold midplane layers particularly affected. On the other hand, we show that diffusive turbulent mixing affects the disk chemistry in the warm molecular layers, influencing the line ...

  1. Modelling the Evolution of Communication Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Spike, Matthew John

    2012-01-01

    An framework using exemplar theory is used to recreate a number of published models of the evolution of communication. This is then used to examine the mechanics behind models of observational, feedback and reinforcement learning. A Pólya urn model is then used to investigate and compare the basic mechanics of each model and theory.

  2. Modelling language evolution: Examples and predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan; Zhang, Menghan

    2014-06-01

    We survey recent computer modelling research of language evolution, focusing on a rule-based model simulating the lexicon-syntax coevolution and an equation-based model quantifying the language competition dynamics. We discuss four predictions of these models: (a) correlation between domain-general abilities (e.g. sequential learning) and language-specific mechanisms (e.g. word order processing); (b) coevolution of language and relevant competences (e.g. joint attention); (c) effects of cultural transmission and social structure on linguistic understandability; and (d) commonalities between linguistic, biological, and physical phenomena. All these contribute significantly to our understanding of the evolutions of language structures, individual learning mechanisms, and relevant biological and socio-cultural factors. We conclude the survey by highlighting three future directions of modelling studies of language evolution: (a) adopting experimental approaches for model evaluation; (b) consolidating empirical foundations of models; and (c) multi-disciplinary collaboration among modelling, linguistics, and other relevant disciplines.

  3. Chemical Evolution of Mn in Three Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Men-Quan Liu; Jie Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Based on an improved model, more reasonable nucleosyn-thesis and explosion rate of SNeIa and CCSNe, we studied Mn evolution for three local dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), considering the detailed SNe yield and explosion rates for different types of progenitors. The results can explain the main observation ofMn abundance for tens stars in those dSphs, and give some constraints to the nucleosynthesis and explosion ratio of different types of supernovae and Star Formation Rates (SFR) in those dSphs.

  4. An algebraic model of software evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Benjamin J.d

    1990-01-01

    A model of the software evolution process, called the Abstraction Refinement Model, is described which builds on the algebraic influence of the Laws of Programming and the transformational Draco Paradigm. The result is an algebraic structure consisting of the states of the software product (system descriptions) ordered by a relation of relative correctness with transformations defined between the system descriptions. This structure is interpreted as the software evolution space, ...

  5. On the origin and early evolution of biological catalysis and other studies on chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1991-01-01

    One of the lines of research in molecular evolution which we have developed for the past three years is related to the experimental and theoretical study of the origin and early evolution of biological catalysis. In an attempt to understand the nature of the first peptidic catalysts and coenzymes, we have achieved the non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes ADPG, GDPG, and CDP-ethanolamine, under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the primitive Earth. We have also accomplished the prebiotic synthesis of histidine, as well as histidyl-histidine, and we have measured the enhancing effects of this catalytic dipeptide on the dephosphorylation of deoxyribonucleotide monophosphates, the hydrolysis of oligo A, and the oligomerization 2', 3' cAMP. We reviewed and further developed the hypothesis that RNA preceded double stranded DNA molecules as a reservoir of cellular genetic information. This led us to undertake the study of extant RNA polymerases in an attempt to discover vestigial sequences preserved from early Archean times. In addition, we continued our studies of on the chemical evolution of organic compounds in the solar system and beyond.

  6. Second Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); model. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Recent findings by NASA Exobiology investigators are reported. Scientific papers are presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  7. Second Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devincenzi, D.L.; Dufour, P.A.

    1986-05-01

    Recent findings by NASA Exobiology investigators are reported. Scientific papers are presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  8. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks II. Gas-rich environments

    CERN Document Server

    Molano, Germán Chaparro

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims. Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the main source of ionization in the midplane of the disk, in a way that is consistent with current knowledge of the gas and grain environment present in those regions. We trace the effects of cosmic rays by identifying the main chemical reaction channels and also the main contributors to the gas opacity to cosmic-ray-induced UV photons. This information is crucial in implementing gas opacities for cosmic-ray-induced reactions in full 2D protoplanetary disk models. Methods. We considered time-dependent chemical models within the range 1-10 AU in the midplane of a T Tauri disk. The extinction of cosmic-ray-induced UV photons by gaseous species was included in the calculation of photorates at each timestep. We integrated...

  9. Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial. Trieste conference on chemical evolution, 4: Physics of the origin and evolution of life. Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document includes 19 summaries of papers presented at the Trieste Conference on Chemical Evolution, 4: Physics of the Origin and Evolution of Life (Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial), Miramare, Trieste, 4-8 September 1995. The abstracts have been indexed individually. 3 refs, 1 fig

  10. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols

  11. Statistics of Certain Models of Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Standish, Russell K.

    1998-01-01

    In a recent paper, Newman surveys the literature on power law spectra in evolution, self-organised criticality and presents a model of his own to arrive at a conclusion that self-organised criticality is not necessary for evolution. Not only did he miss a key model (Ecolab) that has a clear self-organised critical mechanism, but also Newman's model exhibits the same mechanism that gives rise to power law behaviour as does Ecolab. Newman's model is, in fact, a ``mean field'' approximation of a...

  12. The effects of stimulated star formation on the evolution of the galaxy. III - The chemical evolution of nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Steven N.; Ferrini, Federico; Palla, Francesco

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of models for star formation in galaxies with disk and halo components is discussed. Two phases for the halo (gas and stars) and three for the disk (including clouds) are used in these calculations. The star-formation history is followed using nonlinear phase-coupling models which completely determine the populations of the phases as a function of time. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, including the effects of both spontaneous and stimulated star formation and mass exchange between the spatial components of the system, the observed chemical history of the galaxy can easily be obtained. The most sensitive parameter in the detailed metallicity and star-formation history for the system is the rate of return of gas to the diffuse phase upon stellar death.

  13. Effects of stimulated star formation on the evolution of the Galaxy. III. The chemical evolution of nonlinear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of models for star formation in galaxies with disk and halo components is discussed. Two phases for the halo (gas and stars) and three for the disk (including clouds) are used in these calculations. The star-formation history is followed using nonlinear phase-coupling models which completely determine the populations of the phases as a function of time. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, including the effects of both spontaneous and stimulated star formation and mass exchange between the spatial components of the system, the observed chemical history of the galaxy can easily be obtained. The most sensitive parameter in the detailed metallicity and star-formation history for the system is the rate of return of gas to the diffuse phase upon stellar death. 36 references

  14. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports

  15. Trends in Substitution Models of Molecular Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eArenas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost forty years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis.

  16. Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae: tracers of the chemical evolution of nearby galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Magrini, Laura; Stanghellini, Letizia; Goncalves, Denise R.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the chemical composition of Planetary Nebulae in external galaxies is of paramount importance in the fields of stellar evolution and of the chemical enrichment history of galaxies. In the last years a number of spectroscopic studies with 6-8m-class telescopes have been devoted to this subject improving our knowledge of, among other, the time-evolution of the radial metallicity gradient in disk galaxies, the chemical evolution of dwarf galaxies, and the stellar evolution at low me...

  17. Chemical evolution of giant molecular clouds in simulations of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richings, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) identified in hydrodynamic simulations of isolated, low-mass (M* ~ 10^9 M_sol) disc galaxies, with a particular focus on the evolution of molecular abundances and the implications for CO emission and the X_CO conversion factor in individual clouds. We define clouds either as regions above a density threshold n_H,min = 10 cm^-3, or using an observationally motivated velocity-integrated CO line intensity threshold of 0.25 K km s^-1. Our simulations include a non-equilibrium treatment for the chemistry of 157 species, including 20 molecules. We use a suite of runs to carefully investigate the effects of numerical resolution and pressure floors (i.e. Jeans mass limiters). We find cloud lifetimes up to ~40 Myr, with a median of 13 Myr, in agreement with observations. At ten per cent solar metallicity, young clouds (<10-15 Myr) tend to be underabundant in H2 and CO compared to chemical equilibrium, by factors of ~3 and 1-2 orders of magnitude, respectively....

  18. The Galactic Habitable Zone I. Galactic Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    González, G; Ward, P; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Brownlee, Donald; Ward, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Analogous to the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in the Milky Way where an Earth-like planet can retain liquid water on its surface and provide a long-term habitat for animal-like aerobic life. In this paper we examine the dependence of the GHZ on Galactic chemical evolution. The single most important factor is likely the dependence of terrestrial planet mass on the metallicity of its birth cloud. We estimate, very approximately, that a metallicity at least half that of the Sun is required to build a habitable terrestrial planet. The mass of a terrestrial planet has important consequences for interior heat loss, volatile inventory, and loss of atmosphere. A key issue is the production of planets that sustain plate tectonics, a critical recycling process that provides feedback to stabilize atmospheric temperatures on planets with oceans and atmospheres. Due to the more recent decline from the early intense star formation ac...

  19. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Apel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs, predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers were able to approximate the observed MCMA daytime patterns and absolute values of the VOC OH reactivity. The MOZART model is also in agreement with observations showing that NMHCs dominate the reactivity distribution except in the afternoon hours. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height.

    A northeast transport event was studied in which air originating in the MCMA was intercepted aloft with the Department of Energy (DOE G1 on 18 March and downwind with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind; ozone was shown to be photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial extent and temporal evolution of the plume

  20. Chemical Modeling of Cometary Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, S. B.

    2009-09-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of 1P/Halley. The anions O-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not previously been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydrodynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of the hydrocarbon and nitrile anions Cn-, CnH- and CnN- in the coma. We calculate the effects of these anions on the charge balance and examine their impact on cometary coma chemistry. References: Chaizy, P. et al. 1991, Nature, 349, 393 Rodgers, S.D. & Charnley, S.B. 2002, MNRAS, 330, 660

  1. Modeling the evolution of galactic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytic model for evolution of galactic magnetic fields in hierarchical galaxy formation frameworks is introduced. Its major innovative components include explicit and detailed treatment of the physics of merger events, mass gains and losses, gravitational energy sources and delays associated with formation of large-scale magnetic fields. This paper describes the model, its implementation, and core results obtained by its means

  2. QSO evolution in the interaction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Robertis, M.

    1985-06-01

    QSO evolution is investigated according to the interaction hypothesis described most recently by Stockton (1982), in which activity results from an interaction between two galaxies resulting in the transfer of gas onto a supermassive black hole (SBH) at the center of at least one participant. Explicit models presented here for interactions in cluster environments show that a peak QSO population can be formed in this way at zroughly-equal2--3, with little activity prior to this epoch. Calculated space densities match those inferred from observations for this epoch. Substantial density evolution is expected in such models, since, after virialization, conditions in the cores of rich clusters lead to the depletion of gas-rich systems through ram-pressure stripping. Density evolution parameters of 6--12 are easily accounted for. At smaller redshifts, however, QSOs should be found primarily in poor clusters or groups. Probability estimates provided by this model are consistent with local estimates for the observed number of QSOs per interaction. Significant luminosity-dependent evolution might also be expected in these models. It is suggested that the mean SBH mass increases with lookback time, leading to a statistical brightening with redshift. Undoubtedly, both forms of evolution contribute to the overall QSO luminosity function.

  3. QSO evolution in the interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    QSO evolution is investigated according to the interaction hypothesis described most recently by Stockton (1982), in which activity results from an interaction between two galaxies resulting in the transfer of gas onto a supermassive black hole (SBH) at the center of at least one participant. Explicit models presented here for interactions in cluster environments show that a peak QSO population can be formed in this way at zroughly-equal2--3, with little activity prior to this epoch. Calculated space densities match those inferred from observations for this epoch. Substantial density evolution is expected in such models, since, after virialization, conditions in the cores of rich clusters lead to the depletion of gas-rich systems through ram-pressure stripping. Density evolution parameters of 6--12 are easily accounted for. At smaller redshifts, however, QSOs should be found primarily in poor clusters or groups. Probability estimates provided by this model are consistent with local estimates for the observed number of QSOs per interaction. Significant luminosity-dependent evolution might also be expected in these models. It is suggested that the mean SBH mass increases with lookback time, leading to a statistical brightening with redshift. Undoubtedly, both forms of evolution contribute to the overall QSO luminosity function

  4. A stochastic model of evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Guiol, Herve; Schinazi, Rinaldo B

    2009-01-01

    We propose an alternative to the Bak-Sneppen model for species survival. In our model the number of species is random. Births and deaths occur with constant probabilities and it is only the species with lowest fitness which is removed. We show that there is a sharp phase transition when the birth probability is larger than the death probability. The set of species with fitness higher than a certain critical value approach an uniform distribution. On the other hand the species with fitness less than the critical disappear after a finite (random) time.

  5. A simple and general method for solving detailed chemical evolution with delayed production of iron and other chemical elements

    OpenAIRE

    Vincenzo, Fiorenzo; Matteucci, Francesca; Spitoni, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a new theoretical method for solving the chemical evolution of galaxies, by assuming the instantaneous recycling approximation for chemical elements restored by massive stars and the Delay Time Distribution formalism for the delayed chemical enrichment by Type Ia Supernovae. The galaxy gas mass assembly history, together with the assumed stellar yields and initial mass function, represent the starting point of this method. We derive a very simple and general equatio...

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Chemical Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Joshua; Fox, William P.; Varazo, Kristofoland

    2007-01-01

    In beginning chemistry classes, students are taught a variety of techniques for balancing chemical equations. The most common method is inspection. This paper addresses using a system of linear mathematical equations to solve for the stoichiometric coefficients. Many linear algebra books carry the standard balancing of chemical equations as an…

  7. Model of Interaction between Learning and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Red'ko, Vladimir G.

    2014-01-01

    The model of interaction between learning and evolutionary optimization is designed and investigated. The evolving population of modeled organisms is considered. The mechanism of the genetic assimilation of the acquired features during a number of generations of Darwinian evolution is studied. It is shown that the genetic assimilation takes place as follows: phenotypes of modeled organisms move towards the optimum at learning; then the selection takes place; genotypes of selected organisms al...

  8. Evolution of Gross Domestic Product - Analysis Models

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin ANGHELACHE; Catalin DEATCU; Daniel DUMITRESCU; Adina Mihaela DINU

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a use case for macro economical models, the objective being the structural analysis of the Gross Domestic Product. The authors first introduce the theoretical foundation of the model, then offer a snapshot on GDP evolution. The econometric models proposed for analysis are designed with the help of EViews software and their performance and reliability are described through the optics of the statistical tests.

  9. FAME: Face Association through Model Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Golge, Eren; Duygulu, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    We attack the problem of learning face models for public faces from weakly-labelled images collected from web through querying a name. The data is very noisy even after face detection, with several irrelevant faces corresponding to other people. We propose a novel method, Face Association through Model Evolution (FAME), that is able to prune the data in an iterative way, for the face models associated to a name to evolve. The idea is based on capturing discriminativeness and representativenes...

  10. Model of early Universe evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An open isotropic cosmological model at a nonzero cosmological constant with regard to spontaneous symmetry breaking and vacuum polarization is considered. It is shown that consideration of quantum effects leads to the lack of initial singularity and de Sitter expansion. The problem of the vacuum energy-momentum tensor corresponding to field deviations Φ having the quantum character is studied

  11. Chemical reactor modeling multiphase reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical Reactor Modeling closes the gap between Chemical Reaction Engineering and Fluid Mechanics.  The second edition consists of two volumes: Volume 1: Fundamentals. Volume 2: Chemical Engineering Applications In volume 1 most of the fundamental theory is presented. A few numerical model simulation application examples are given to elucidate the link between theory and applications. In volume 2 the chemical reactor equipment to be modeled are described. Several engineering models are introduced and discussed. A survey of the frequently used numerical methods, algorithms and schemes is provided. A few practical engineering applications of the modeling tools are presented and discussed. The working principles of several experimental techniques employed in order to get data for model validation are outlined. The monograph is based on lectures regularly taught in the fourth and fifth years graduate courses in transport phenomena and chemical reactor modeling, and in a post graduate course in modern reactor m...

  12. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  13. Modeling video evolution for action recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, Basura; Gavves, Stratis; Oramas Mogrovejo, José Antonio; Ghodrati, Amir; Tuytelaars, Tinne

    2015-01-01

    Fernando B., Gavves E., Oramas Mogrovejo J., Ghodrati A., Tuytelaars T., ''Modeling video evolution for action recognition'', 28th IEEE conference on computer vision and pattern recognition - CVPR 2015, pp. 5378-5387, June 7-12, 2015, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

  14. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH

  15. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH

  16. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Junkermann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs, predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18~March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19~March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19~March plume and to help interpret

  17. Probing the Mass Assembly and Chemical Evolution of High-z Galaxies with MASSIV

    CERN Document Server

    Contini, T; Queyrel, J; Vergani, D; Tasca, L; Amram, P; Garilli, B; Kissler-Patig, M; Fèvre, O Le; Moultaka, J; Paioro, L; Tresse, L; Bournaud, F; Perez-Montero, E

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the different mechanisms of galaxy assembly at various cosmic epochs is a key issue for galaxy evolution and formation models. We present MASSIV (Mass Assembly Survey with SINFONI in VVDS) in this context, an on-going survey with VLT/SINFONI aiming to probe the kinematics and chemical abundances of a unique sample of 84 star-forming galaxies selected in the redshift range z ~ 1-2. This large sample, spanning a wide range of stellar masses, is unique at these high redshifts and statistically representative of the overall galaxy population. In this paper, we give an overview of the MASSIV survey and then focus on the spatially-resolved chemical properties of high-z galaxies and their implication on the process of galaxy assembly.

  18. Chemical Evolution of Interstellar Dust into Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Comets are believed to retain some interstellar materials, stored in fairly pristine conditions since-their formation. The composition and properties of cometary dust grains should reflect those of grains in the outer part of the protosolar nebula which, at least in part, were inherited from the presolar molecular cloud. However, infrared emission features in comets differ from their interstellar counterparts. These differences imply processing of interstellar material on its way to incorporation in comets, but C and N appear to be retained. Overall dust evolution from the interstellar medium (ISM) to planetary materials is accompanied by an increase in proportion of complex organics and a decrease in pure carbon phases. The composition of cometary dust grains was measured in situ during fly-by missions to comet Halley in 1986. The mass spectra of about 5000 cometary dust grains with masses of 5 x 10(exp -17) - 5 x 10(exp -12) g provide data about the presence and relative abundances of the major elements H, C, N, O,Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni. The bulk abundances of major rock-forming elements integrated over all spectra were found to be solar within a factor of 2, while the volatile elements H, C, N, O in dust are depleted in respect to their total cosmic abundances. The abundances of C and N in comet dust are much closer to interstellar than to meteoritic and are higher than those of dust in the diffuse ISM. In dense molecular clouds dust grains are covered by icy mantles, the average composition of which is estimated to be H:C:N:O = 96:14:1:34. Up to 40% of elemental C and O may be sequestered in mantles. If we use this upper limit to add H, C, N and O as icy mantle material to the abundances residing in dust in the diffuse ISM, then the resulting values for H. C, and N match cometary abundances. Thus, ice mantles undergoing chemical evolution on grains in the dense ISM appear to have been transformed into less volatile and more complex organic

  19. A Simple Model for the Evolution of Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Fussy, S; Schwabl, H; Fussy, Siegfried; Groessing, Gerhard; Schwabl, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    A simple model of macroevolution is proposed exhibiting both the property of punctuated equilibrium and the dynamics of potentialities for different species to evolve towards increasingly higher complexity. It is based on the phenomenon of "fractal evolution" which has been shown to constitute a fundamental property of nonlinear discretized systems with one memory- or random-based feedback loop. The latter involves a basic "cognitive" function of each species given by the power of distinction of states within some predefined resolution. The introduction of a realistic background noise limiting the range of the feedback operation yields a pattern signature in fitness space with a distribution of temporal boost/mutation distances according to a randomized devil's staircase function. Introducing a further level in the hierarchy of the system's rules, the possibility of an adaptive evolutionary change of the resolution itself is implemented, thereby providing a time-dependent measure of the species' cognitive abi...

  20. Modeling of microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural evolution under irradiation is an extremely complex phenomenon involving numerous interacting mechanisms which alter both the microstructure and microchemistry of structural alloys. Predictive procedures which correlate primary irradiation and material variables to microstructural response are needed to extrapolate from the imperfect data base, which will be available, to fusion reactor conditions. Clearly, a marriage between models and experiments is needed. Specific steps to achieving such a marriage in the form of composite correlation model analysis are outlined and some preliminary results presented. The strongly correlated nature of microstructural evolution is emphasized and it is suggested that rate theory models, resting on the principle of material balances and focusing on coupled point defect-microchemical segregation processes, may be a practical approach to correlation model development. (orig.)

  1. The thermal evolution of universe: standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of the dynamical evolution of the Universe following a model based on the theory of General Relativity is made. The model admits the Cosmological principle,the principle of Equivalence and the Robertson-Walker metric (of which an original derivation is presented). In this model, the universe is considered as a perfect fluid, ideal and symmetric relatively to the number of particles and antiparticles. The thermodynamic relations deriving from these hypothesis are derived, and from them the several eras of the thermal evolution of the universe are established. Finally, the problems arising from certain specific predictions of the model are studied, and the predictions of the abundances of the elements according to nucleosynthesis and the actual behavior of the universe are analysed in detail. (author)

  2. Criticality in Simple Models of Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, Jan; Jackson, A. D.; Wettig, Tilo

    1994-01-01

    We consider two, apparently similar, models of biological evolution which have been claimed to exhibit self-organized critical behaviour. A careful reanalysis of these models, including several new analytic results for one of them, suggests that they are qualitatively different. We demonstrate the limitations of the mean field description of these systems. We argue that a more precise definition of self-organized criticality is desirable and establish several criteria in this connection.

  3. Chemical evolution and the galactic habitable zone of M31 (the Andromeda Galaxy)

    CERN Document Server

    Carigi, L; Garcia-Rojas, J

    2012-01-01

    We have computed the Galactic Habitable Zones (GHZs) of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) based mainly, but not exclusively, on the probability of terrestrial planet formation, which depends on the metallicity (Z) of the interstellar medium. The GHZ was therefore obtained from a chemical evolution model built to reproduce a precise metallicity gradient in the galactic disk, [O/H](r) $ = -0.015 \\pm 0.003 dex kpc^{-1} x r(kpc) + 0.44 \\pm 0.04 dex $. This gradient is the most probable when intrinsic scatter is present in the observational data. The chemical evolution model predicted a higher star formation history in both the halo and disk components of M31 and a less efficient inside-out galactic formation, compared to those of the Milky Way. If we assumed that Earth-like planets form with a probability law that follows the Z distribution shown by stars with detected planets, the most probable GHZ with basic life is located between 6 and 17 kpc on planets with ages between 4.5 and 1 Gy, and the most probable GHZ with ...

  4. Assimilating chemical compound with a regional chemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Yang, S.; Liang, M.; Hsu, S.; Tseng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    To constrain the source and sink of the chemical compounds at surface during model simulation, chemical compound assimilation with Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) has been implemented for the WRF-ChemT model. In this study, a two-tier system is applied to assimilating the meteorological and chemical variables in an OSSE framework. The unobserved surface flux is estimated according to the observations in the chemical component. A long-term nature run with total constant emission of 5.3×108 g/s is assumed to be the truth state in the OSSE. The simulated observations are obtained from the truth state by adding random errors. In order to generate the initial CO2 ensembles with similar spatial distribution as truth state without other prior information, the initial perturbation fields of CO2 are randomly chosen from three long-term runs with different emissions. The results indicate that in the constant emission case, the system can successfully estimate the unobserved chemical forcing and improve the distribution of the chemical compound. Under the scenario of diurnal forcing induced by human activities, the problem in estimating surface flux becomes more complex and difficult. A set of experiments with different initial chemical states suggest that the estimation of flux is sensitive to the quality of initial CO2 and CO2 surface flux. Strategies are designed to retrieve the time-varying information. The results show that with time-varying information and reliable initial ensembles, the estimation of surface flux have been significantly improved. Couple assimilation with meteorological and chemical components Surface flux estimation

  5. Global Models of Planet Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mordasini, C; Dittkrist, K -M; Jin, S; Alibert, Y

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increase in observational data on exoplanets, the processes that lead to the formation of planets are still not well understood. But thanks to the high number of known exoplanets, it is now possible to look at them as a population that puts statistical constraints on theoretical models. A method that uses these constraints is planetary population synthesis. Its key element is a global model of planet formation and evolution that directly predicts observable planetary properties based on properties of the natal protoplanetary disk. To do so, global models build on many specialized models that address one specific physical process. We thoroughly review the physics of the sub-models included in global formation models. The sub-models can be classified as models describing the protoplanetary disk (gas and solids), the (proto)planet (solid core, gaseous envelope, and atmosphere), and finally the interactions (migration and N-body interaction). We compare the approaches in different global models and id...

  6. Fourth Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Robert A., Jr. (Editor); Andersen, Dale T. (Editor); Bzik, Sara E. (Editor); Rummel, John D. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This symposium was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, July 24-27, 1990. The NASA exobiology investigators reported their recent research findings. Scientific papers were presented in the following areas: cosmic evolution of biogenic compounds, prebiotic evolution (planetary and molecular), early evolution of life (biological and geochemical), evolution of advanced life, solar system exploration, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

  7. Computational modelling of evolution: ecosystems and language

    CERN Document Server

    Lipowski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Recently, computational modelling became a very important research tool that enables us to study problems that for decades evaded scientific analysis. Evolutionary systems are certainly examples of such problems: they are composed of many units that might reproduce, diffuse, mutate, die, or in some cases for example communicate. These processes might be of some adaptive value, they influence each other and occur on various time scales. That is why such systems are so difficult to study. In this paper we briefly review some computational approaches, as well as our contributions, to the evolution of ecosystems and language. We start from Lotka-Volterra equations and the modelling of simple two-species prey-predator systems. Such systems are canonical example for studying oscillatory behaviour in competitive populations. Then we describe various approaches to study long-term evolution of multi-species ecosystems. We emphasize the need to use models that take into account both ecological and evolutionary processe...

  8. Modelling the sulphur chemistry evolution in Orion KL

    CERN Document Server

    Esplugues, G B; Goicoechea, J R; Cernicharo, J

    2014-01-01

    We study the sulphur chemistry evolution in the Orion KL along the gas and grain phases of the cloud. We investigate the processes that dominate the sulphur chemistry and to determine how physical and chemical parameters, such as the final star mass and the initial elemental abundances, influence the evolution of the hot core and of the surrounding outflows and shocked gas (the plateau). We independently modelled the chemistry evolution of both components using the time-dependent gas-grain model UCL_CHEM and considering two different phase calculations. Phase I starts with the collapsing cloud and the depletion of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces. Phase II starts when a central protostar is formed and the evaporation from grains takes place. We show how the gas density, the gas depletion efficiency, the initial sulphur abundance, the shocked gas temperature and the different chemical paths on the grains leading to different reservoirs of sulphur on the mantles affect sulphur-bearing molecules at differ...

  9. The origin of nitrogen and the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Angeles I. Díaz; Tosi, M.

    1986-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Astronomy and Astrophysics. Diaz, A.I. and M. Tosi. The origin of nitrogen and the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. Astronomy and Astrophysics 158 (1986): 60-66

  10. Chemodynamical Modelling of Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Berczik, P; Theis, C; Spurzem, R; Theis, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    We present our recently developed 3-dimensional chemodynamical code for galaxy evolution. This code follows the evolution of different galactic components like stars, dark matter and different components of the interstellar medium (ISM), i.e. a diffuse gaseous phase and the molecular clouds. Stars and dark matter are treated as collisionless N-body systems. The ISM is numerically described by a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach for the diffuse gas and a sticky particle scheme for the molecular clouds. Additionally, the galactic components are coupled by several phase transitions like star formation, stellar death or condensation and evaporation processes within the ISM. As an example we show the dynamical and chemical evolution of a star forming dwarf galaxy with a total baryonic mass of $2 \\cdot 10^9 M_\\odot$. After a moderate collapse phase the stars and the molecular clouds follow an exponential radial distribution, whereas the diffuse gas shows a central depression as a result of stellar feed...

  11. Chemical Evolution of the Stellar and Gaseous Components of Galaxies in Hydrodynamical Cosmological Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Cora, S. A.; P. B. Tissera; Lambas, D. G.; Mosconi, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the effects of mergers on the chemical properties of galactic objects in hierarchical clustering scenarios. We adopt a hydrodynamical chemical code that allows to describe the coupled evolution of dark matter and baryons within a cosmological context. We found that disk-like and spheroid-like objects have distinctive metallicity patterns that may be the result of different evolution.

  12. The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, Lev M.; Gerasimov, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) Earth's initial atmosphere; (2) continuous degassing; (3) impact processes and the Earth's protoatmosphere; and (4) the evolution of an impact-generated atmosphere.

  13. Global models of planet formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasini, C.; Mollière, P.; Dittkrist, K.-M.; Jin, S.; Alibert, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the strong increase in observational data on extrasolar planets, the processes that led to the formation of these planets are still not well understood. However, thanks to the high number of extrasolar planets that have been discovered, it is now possible to look at the planets as a population that puts statistical constraints on theoretical formation models. A method that uses these constraints is planetary population synthesis where synthetic planetary populations are generated and compared to the actual population. The key element of the population synthesis method is a global model of planet formation and evolution. These models directly predict observable planetary properties based on properties of the natal protoplanetary disc, linking two important classes of astrophysical objects. To do so, global models build on the simplified results of many specialized models that address one specific physical mechanism. We thoroughly review the physics of the sub-models included in global formation models. The sub-models can be classified as models describing the protoplanetary disc (of gas and solids), those that describe one (proto)planet (its solid core, gaseous envelope and atmosphere), and finally those that describe the interactions (orbital migration and N-body interaction). We compare the approaches taken in different global models, discuss the links between specialized and global models, and identify physical processes that require improved descriptions in future work. We then shortly address important results of planetary population synthesis like the planetary mass function or the mass-radius relationship. With these statistical results, the global effects of physical mechanisms occurring during planet formation and evolution become apparent, and specialized models describing them can be put to the observational test. Owing to their nature as meta models, global models depend on the results of specialized models, and therefore on the development of

  14. Chemical equilibrium modeling of detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, Laurence E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bastea, Sorin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Energetic materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Energetic materials are commonly divided into high explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. We will focus on high explosive (HE) materials here, although there is a great deal of commonality between the classes of energetic materials. Furthermore the history of HE materials is long, their condensed-phase chemical properties are poorly understood.

  15. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  16. Probabilistic models for CRISPR spacer content evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Kupczok, Anne; Bollback, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Background The CRISPR/Cas system is known to act as an adaptive and heritable immune system in Eubacteria and Archaea. Immunity is encoded in an array of spacer sequences. Each spacer can provide specific immunity to invasive elements that carry the same or a similar sequence. Even in closely related strains, spacer content is very dynamic and evolves quickly. Standard models of nucleotide evolution cannot be applied to quantify its rate of change since processes other than single nucleotide ...

  17. Comparison of skid resistance evolution models

    OpenAIRE

    Cerezo, Véronique; Do, Minh Tan; Kane, Malal

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of a research aiming at modeling the evolution of road surface skid resistance using statistical and phenomenological approaches. Data are provided by a database composed of measurements collected on French roads during ten years: skid resistance values (Sideway Force Coefficient measured by SCRIM machine), macrotexture values (Mean Profile Depth), road geometry, traffic and age. Principal component analyses determine the connection between relevant factors. Analys...

  18. Using Transiting Planets to Model Starspot Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hebb, Leslie; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Photometry from Kepler has revealed the presence of cool starspots on the surfaces of thousands of stars, presenting a wide range of spot morphologies and lifetimes. Understanding the lifetime and evolution of starspots across the main sequence reveals critical information about the strength and nature of stellar dynamos. We probe the dynamo by modeling the starspot properties over time using Kepler light curves. In particular, we use planetary systems like Kepler 17 that show in-transit star...

  19. Microstructural and continuum evolution modeling of sintering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braginsky, Michael V.; Olevsky, Eugene A. (San Diego State University, San Diego, CA); Johnson, D. Lynn (Northwest University, Evanston, IL); Tikare, Veena; Garino, Terry J.; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2003-12-01

    All ceramics and powder metals, including the ceramics components that Sandia uses in critical weapons components such as PZT voltage bars and current stacks, multi-layer ceramic MET's, ahmindmolybdenum & alumina cermets, and ZnO varistors, are manufactured by sintering. Sintering is a critical, possibly the most important, processing step during manufacturing of ceramics. The microstructural evolution, the macroscopic shrinkage, and shape distortions during sintering will control the engineering performance of the resulting ceramic component. Yet, modeling and prediction of sintering behavior is in its infancy, lagging far behind the other manufacturing models, such as powder synthesis and powder compaction models, and behind models that predict engineering properties and reliability. In this project, we developed a model that was capable of simulating microstructural evolution during sintering, providing constitutive equations for macroscale simulation of shrinkage and distortion during sintering. And we developed macroscale sintering simulation capability in JAS3D. The mesoscale model can simulate microstructural evolution in a complex powder compact of hundreds or even thousands of particles of arbitrary shape and size by 1. curvature-driven grain growth, 2. pore migration and coalescence by surface diffusion, 3. vacancy formation, grain boundary diffusion and annihilation. This model was validated by comparing predictions of the simulation to analytical predictions for simple geometries. The model was then used to simulate sintering in complex powder compacts. Sintering stress and materials viscous module were obtained from the simulations. These constitutive equations were then used by macroscopic simulations for simulating shrinkage and shape changes in FEM simulations. The continuum theory of sintering embodied in the constitutive description of Skorohod and Olevsky was combined with results from microstructure evolution simulations to model shrinkage

  20. Minimal model for genome evolution and growth

    CERN Document Server

    Hsieh, L C; Ji, F M; Lee, H C

    2002-01-01

    Textual analysis of typical microbial genomes reveals that they have the statistical characteristics of a DNA sequence of a much shorter length. This peculiar property supports an evolutionary model in which a genome evolves by random mutation but primarily grows by random segmental self-copying. That genomes grew mostly by self-copying is consistent with the observation that repeat sequences in all genomes are widespread and intragenomic and intergenomic homologous genes are preponderance across all life forms. The model predicates the coexistence of the two competing modes of evolution: the gradual changes of classical Darwinism and the stochastic spurts envisioned in ``punctuated equilibrium''.

  1. Evolution of multidimensional flat anisotropic cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dynamics of a flat multidimensional anisotropic cosmological model filled with an anisotropic fluidlike medium. By an appropriate choice of variables, the dynamical equations reduce to a two-dimensional dynamical system. We present a detailed analysis of the time evolution of this system and the conditions of the existence of spacetime singularities. We investigate the conditions under which violent, exponential, and power-law inflation is possible. We show that dimensional reduction cannot proceed by anti-inflation (rapid contraction of internal space). Our model indicates that it is very difficult to achieve dimensional reduction by classical means

  2. Brand Equity Evolution: a System Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Crescitelli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in brand management lies in monitoring brand equity over time. This paper aimsto present a simulation model able to represent this evolution. The model was drawn on brand equity concepts developed by Aaker and Joachimsthaler (2000, using the system dynamics methodology. The use ofcomputational dynamic models aims to create new sources of information able to sensitize academics and managers alike to the dynamic implications of their brand management. As a result, an easily implementable model was generated, capable of executing continuous scenario simulations by surveying casual relations among the variables that explain brand equity. Moreover, the existence of a number of system modeling tools will allow extensive application of the concepts used in this study in practical situations, both in professional and educational settings

  3. Optimal evolution models for quantum tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research presented in this article concerns the stroboscopic approach to quantum tomography, which is an area of science where quantum physics and linear algebra overlap. In this article we introduce the algebraic structure of the parametric-dependent quantum channels for 2-level and 3-level systems such that the generator of evolution corresponding with the Kraus operators has no degenerate eigenvalues. In such cases the index of cyclicity of the generator is equal to 1, which physically means that there exists one observable the measurement of which performed a sufficient number of times at distinct instants provides enough data to reconstruct the initial density matrix and, consequently, the trajectory of the state. The necessary conditions for the parameters and relations between them are introduced. The results presented in this paper seem to have considerable potential applications in experiments due to the fact that one can perform quantum tomography by conducting only one kind of measurement. Therefore, the analyzed evolution models can be considered optimal in the context of quantum tomography. Finally, we introduce some remarks concerning optimal evolution models in the case of n-dimensional Hilbert space. (paper)

  4. Modeling Evolution of Weighted Clique Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a weighted clique network evolution model, which expands continuously by the addition of a new clique (maximal complete sub-graph) at each time step. And the cliques in the network overlap with each other. The structural expansion of the weighted clique network is combined with the edges' weight and vertices' strengths dynamical evolution. The model is based on a weight-driven dynamics and a weights' enhancement mechanism combining with the network growth. We study the network properties, which include the distribution of vertices' strength and the distribution of edges' weight, and find that both the distributions follow the scale-free distribution. At the same time, we also find that the relationship between strength and degree of a vertex are linear correlation during the growth of the network. On the basis of mean-field theory, we study the weighted network model and prove that both vertices' strength and edges' weight of this model follow the scale-free distribution. And we exploit an algorithm to forecast the network dynamics, which can be used to reckon the distributions and the corresponding scaling exponents. Furthermore, we observe that mean-field based theoretic results are consistent with the statistical data of the model, which denotes the theoretical result in this paper is effective. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. Modeling Evolution of Weighted Clique Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Hua; Jiang, Feng-Ling; Chen, Sheng-Yong; Wang, Wan-Liang

    2011-11-01

    We propose a weighted clique network evolution model, which expands continuously by the addition of a new clique (maximal complete sub-graph) at each time step. And the cliques in the network overlap with each other. The structural expansion of the weighted clique network is combined with the edges' weight and vertices' strengths dynamical evolution. The model is based on a weight-driven dynamics and a weights' enhancement mechanism combining with the network growth. We study the network properties, which include the distribution of vertices' strength and the distribution of edges' weight, and find that both the distributions follow the scale-free distribution. At the same time, we also find that the relationship between strength and degree of a vertex are linear correlation during the growth of the network. On the basis of mean-field theory, we study the weighted network model and prove that both vertices' strength and edges' weight of this model follow the scale-free distribution. And we exploit an algorithm to forecast the network dynamics, which can be used to reckon the distributions and the corresponding scaling exponents. Furthermore, we observe that mean-field based theoretic results are consistent with the statistical data of the model, which denotes the theoretical result in this paper is effective.

  6. Geochemical modelling study on the age and evolution of the groundwater at the Romuvaara site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry (e.g. pH and redox conditions) in the radioactive waste disposal environment. A model of the hydrogeochemical evolution and the chemical flowpaths in different parts of the bedrock at the Romuvaara (in Finland) site has been created. The significance of chemical reactions along different flowpaths is calculated. Furthermore, the consistency of the hydrogeochemical model and the hydrogeological model is examined. (107 refs.)

  7. Geochemical modelling study on the age and evolution of the groundwater at the Romuvaara site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Vuorinen, U.; Leino-Forsman, H. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Snellman, M. [Imatran Voima Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the study was to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry (e.g. pH and redox conditions) in the radioactive waste disposal environment. A model of the hydrogeochemical evolution and the chemical flowpaths in different parts of the bedrock at the Romuvaara (in Finland) site has been created. The significance of chemical reactions along different flowpaths is calculated. Furthermore, the consistency of the hydrogeochemical model and the hydrogeological model is examined. (107 refs.).

  8. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  9. Nonlinear Front Evolution of Hydrodynamic Chemical Waves in Vertical Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder, J. W.; Vasquez, D.A.; Edwards, Boyd F.

    1997-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of three-dimensional reaction-diffusion fronts in vertical cylinders is considered using the viscous hydrodynamic fluid equations in the limit of infinite thermal diffusivity. A nonlinear front evolution equation is presented and used to examine the transition from nonaxisymmetric to axisymmetric convection observed in experiments performed in cylinders. Comparisons with experiments show excellent agreement in both the shape and speed of the front.

  10. The Role of Sexual Selection in the Evolution of Chemical Signals in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Steiger; Johannes Stökl

    2014-01-01

    Chemical communication is the most ancient and widespread form of communication. Yet we are only beginning to grasp the complexity of chemical signals and the role they play in sexual selection. Focusing on insects, we review here the recent progress in the field of olfactory-based sexual selection. We will show that there is mounting empirical evidence that sexual selection affects the evolution of chemical traits, but form and strength of selection differ between species. Studies indicate t...

  11. The Dynamical and Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with GEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Yves

    2011-01-01

    We present a fully parallel chemo-dynamical Tree/SPH code, GEAR, which allows to perform high resolution simulations with detailed chemical diagnostics. Starting from the public version of Gadget-2, we included the complex treatment of the baryon physics: gas cooling, star formation law, chemical evolution and supernovae feedback. We qualified the performances of GEAR with the case of dSph galaxies. GEAR conserves the total energy budget of the systems to better than 5% over 14Gyr and proved excellent convergence of the results with numerical resolution. We showed that models of dSphs in a static Euclidean space, where the expansion of the universe is neglected are valid. In addition, we tackled some of the existing open questions in the field, like the stellar mass fraction of dSphs and its link with the predicted dark matter halo mass function, the effect of the supernova feedback, the spatial distribution of the stellar populations, and the origin of the diversity in star formation histories and chemical a...

  12. Testing spherical evolution for modelling void abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Neyrinck, Mark; Paranjape, Aseem

    2015-08-01

    We compare analytical predictions of void volume functions to those measured from N-body simulations, detecting voids with the ZOBOV void finder. We push to very small, non-linear voids, below few Mpc radius, by considering the unsampled dark matter density field. We also study the case where voids are identified using haloes. We develop analytical formula for the void abundance of both the excursion set approach and the peaks formalism. These formulas are valid for random walks smoothed with a top-hat filter in real space, with a large class of realistic barrier models. We test the extent to which the spherical evolution approximation, which forms the basis of the analytical predictions, models the highly aspherical voids that occur in the cosmic web, and are found by a watershed-based algorithm such as ZOBOV. We show that the volume function returned by ZOBOV is quite sensitive to the choice of treatment of subvoids, a fact that has not been appreciated previously. For reasonable choices of subvoid exclusion, we find that the Lagrangian density δv of the ZOBOV voids - which is predicted to be a constant δv ≈ -2.7 in the spherical evolution model - is different from the predicted value, showing substantial scatter and scale dependence. This result applies to voids identified at z = 0 with effective radius between 1 and 10 h-1 Mpc. Our analytical approximations are flexible enough to give a good description of the resulting volume function; however, this happens for choices of parameter values that are different from those suggested by the spherical evolution assumption. We conclude that analytical models for voids must move away from the spherical approximation in order to be applied successfully to observations, and we discuss some possible ways forward.

  13. Prebiotic coordination chemistry: The potential role of transition-metal complexes in the chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M.

    1979-01-01

    In approaching the extremely involved and complex problem of the origin of life, consideration of the coordination chemistry appeared not only as a possibility but as a necessity. The first model experiments appear to be promising because of prebiotic-type synthesis by means of transition-metal complexes. It is especially significant that in some instances various types of vitally important substances (nucleic bases, amino acids) are formed simultaneously. There is ground to hope that systematic studies in this field will clarify the role of transition-metal complexes in the organizatorial phase of chemical evolution. It is obvious that researchers working in the fields of the chemistry of cyano and carbonyl complexes, and of the catalytic effect of transition-metal complexes are best suited to study these aspects of the attractive and interesting problem of the origin of life.

  14. Chemical Evolution and the Galactic Habitable Zone of M31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carigi, Leticia; Garcia-Rojas, Jorge; Meneses-Goytia, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    We have computed the Galactic Habitable Zones (GHZs) of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) based on the probability of terrestrial planet formation, which depends on the metallicity (Z) of the interstellar medium, and the number of stars formed per unit surface area. The GHZ was obtained from a chemical evo

  15. A cement degradation model for evaluating the evolution of retardation factors in radionuclide leaching models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Radionuclide retardation and physical parameters evolve during concrete leaching. • C–S–H dissolution model uncertainty is assessed using an ensemble approach. • A mixed-tank reactor model simplifies the chemical evolution of a disposal system. • Evolution of retardation factors is included in the radionuclide leaching model. - Abstract: Near-surface cement-based disposal systems for hazardous materials such as radioactive waste will undergo chemical alterations due to interaction with the surrounding environment. One of the most relevant long-term geochemical alteration processes is decalcification or leaching of the cement phases by percolating water. Consequently, the cementitious components of the disposal system will evolve through different chemical degradation states, also altering physical material parameters such as porosity and bulk density and chemical parameter relevant to solute migration such as the solid–liquid partition coefficient or distribution ratio. This paper presents a novel approach in which geochemical modelling serves as a fundamental basis for assessing the evolution of geochemical conditions within a cement-based near-surface disposal facility. On one hand, geochemical modelling is used to quantify uncertainties related to the infiltrating water composition and C–S–H degradation model, both of which allow for various conceptualisations of the evolution of retardation factor. On the other hand, the concept of mixed tank reactor is used to represent cement degradation within the entire disposal system. This paves the way to establish a link between the evolution of the geochemical conditions and the evolution of the retardation factor via the knowledge of amount of percolated water through the system. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated via a number of case studies concerning leaching of radionuclides (14C and 94Nb) from a cementitious near-surface disposal facility. The studies reveal that there

  16. Influence of Population III stars on cosmic chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Rollinde, E.; Vangioni, E.; Maurin, D.; Olive, K. A.; Daigne, F.; Silk, J.; Vincent, F.

    2008-01-01

    New observations from the Hubble ultra deep field suggest that the star formation rate at z>7 drops off faster than previously thought. Using a newly determined star formation rate for the normal mode of Population II/I stars (PopII/I), including this new constraint, we compute the Thomson scattering optical depth and find a result that is marginally consistent with WMAP5 results. We also reconsider the role of Population III stars (PopIII) in light of cosmological and stellar evolution const...

  17. On detonation initiation by a temperature gradient for a detailed chemical reaction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation is investigated for combustion mixture whose chemistry is governed by a detailed chemical kinetics. We show that a detailed chemical reaction model has a profound effect on the spontaneous wave concept for detonation initiation by a gradient of reactivity. The evolution to detonation due to a temperature gradient is considered for hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures at different initial pressures. It is shown that the minimal length of the temperature gradient for which a detonation can be ignited is much larger than that predicted from a one-step chemical model. - Highlights: → We study detonation initiation by temperature gradient for detailed chemical models. → Detailed chemical models have a profound effect on the spontaneous wave concept. → Initiating detonation by temperature gradient differs from one-step model. → In real fuels DDT can not be initiated by temperature gradient.

  18. Chemical and statistical soot modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Blanquart, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    The combustion of petroleum based fuels like kerosene, gasoline, or diesel leads to the formation of several kind of pollutants. Among them, soot particles are particularly bad for their severe consequences on human health. Over the past decades, strict regulations have been placed on car and aircraft engines in order to limit these particulate matter emissions. Designing low emission engines requires the use of predictive soot models which can be applied to the combustion of real fuels. ...

  19. Testing spherical evolution for modelling void abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Paranjape, Aseem

    2013-01-01

    We compute analytical predictions for the volume function of voids based on the excursion set approach and the peaks formalism for random walks smoothed with a top-hat filter in real space and a large class of realistic barrier models. We test our prediction by comparing with voids identified in the dark matter density field in N-body simulations using the ZOBOV void finder. This tests the extent to which the spherical evolution approximation, which forms the basis of the analytical predictions, models the highly aspherical voids that occur in the cosmic web, and are found by a watershed-based algorithm such as ZOBOV. We show that the volume function returned by ZOBOV is quite sensitive to the choice of treatment of sub-voids, a fact that has not been appreciated previously. For reasonable choices of sub-void exclusion, we find that the Lagrangian density deltav of the ZOBOV voids -- which is predicted to be a constant deltav=-2.7 in the spherical evolution model -- is quite different from the predicted value...

  20. Culinary evolution models for Indian cuisines

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Culinary systems, the practice of preparing a refined combination of ingredients that is palatable as well as socially acceptable, are examples of complex dynamical systems. They evolve over time and are affected by a large number of factors. Modeling the dynamic nature of evolution of regional cuisines may provide us a quantitative basis and exhibit underlying processes that have driven them into the present day status. This is especially important given that the potential culinary space is practically infinite because of possible number of ingredient combinations as recipes. Such studies also provide a means to compare and contrast cuisines and to unearth their therapeutic value. Herein we provide rigorous analysis of modeling eight diverse Indian regional cuisines, while also highlighting their uniqueness, and a comparison among those models at the level of flavor compounds which opens up molecular level studies associating them especially with non-communicable diseases such as diabetes.

  1. Structural evolution during the reduction of chemically derived graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Akbar; Mattevi, Cecilia; Acik, Muge; Chabal, Yves J; Chhowalla, Manish; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2010-07-01

    The excellent electrical, optical and mechanical properties of graphene have driven the search to find methods for its large-scale production, but established procedures (such as mechanical exfoliation or chemical vapour deposition) are not ideal for the manufacture of processable graphene sheets. An alternative method is the reduction of graphene oxide, a material that shares the same atomically thin structural framework as graphene, but bears oxygen-containing functional groups. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the atomistic structure of progressively reduced graphene oxide. The chemical changes of oxygen-containing functional groups on the annealing of graphene oxide are elucidated and the simulations reveal the formation of highly stable carbonyl and ether groups that hinder its complete reduction to graphene. The calculations are supported by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Finally, more effective reduction treatments to improve the reduction of graphene oxide are proposed. PMID:20571578

  2. Late stages of the evolution of A-type stars on the main sequence: comparison between observed chemical abundances and diffusion models for 8 Am stars of the Praesepe cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Fossati, L; Monier, R; Khan, S A; Kochukhov, O; Landstreet, J; Wade, G; Weiss, W

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We aim to provide observational constraints on diffusion models that predict peculiar chemical abundances in the atmospheres of Am stars. We also intend to check if chemical peculiarities and slow rotation can be explained by the presence of a weak magnetic field. Methods. We have obtained high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of eight previously-classified Am stars, two normal A-type stars and one Blue Straggler, considered to be members of the Praesepe cluster. For all of these stars we have determined fundamental parameters and photospheric abundances for a large number of chemical elements, with a higher precision than was ever obtained before for this cluster. For seven of these stars we also obtained spectra in circular polarization and applied the LSD technique to constrain the longitudinal magnetic field. Results. No magnetic field was detected in any of the analysed stars. HD 73666, a Blue Straggler previously considered as an Ap (Si) star, turns out to have the abundances of a no...

  3. The Chemical and Dynamical Evolution of Isolated Dwarf Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Pilkington, K.; Gibson, B. K.; Calura, F; Stinson, G.S.; Brook, C. B.; Brooks, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of simulations (Governato et al. 2010) which successfully produce bulgeless (dwarf) disk galaxies, we provide an analysis of their associated cold interstellar media (ISM) and stellar chemical abundance patterns. A preliminary comparison with observations is undertaken, in order to assess whether the properties of the cold gas and chemistry of the stellar components are recovered successfully. To this end, we have extracted the radial and vertical gas density profiles, neutral h...

  4. Chemical evolution on the giant planets and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, J.; Owen, T.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus, and Titan are characterized chemically in a review of recent observational and theoretical investigations. Compositions are indicated in tables, and special emphasis is given to the formation of HCN on Jupiter, the differentiation of polar and equatorial zones in the Jovian atmosphere, the mechanisms responsible for the color of the Great Red Spot, and the possible origin of the N2-dominated atmosphere of Titan.

  5. Mathematical modeling a chemical engineer's perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Aris

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is the art and craft of building a system of equations that is both sufficiently complex to do justice to physical reality and sufficiently simple to give real insight into the situation. Mathematical Modeling: A Chemical Engineer's Perspective provides an elementary introduction to the craft by one of the century's most distinguished practitioners.Though the book is written from a chemical engineering viewpoint, the principles and pitfalls are common to all mathematical modeling of physical systems. Seventeen of the author's frequently cited papers are reprinted to illus

  6. Chemical Evolution in the Interstellar Medium: From Astrochemistry to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Great strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material thanks to advances in infrared astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by earlier astrochemical standards, are widespread and very abundant throughout much of the Universe. In cold molecular clouds, the birthplace of planets and stars, interstellar molecules freeze onto dust and ice particles forming mixed molecular ices dominated by simple species such as water, methanol, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. Within these clouds, and especially in the vicinity of star and planet forming regions, these ices and PAHs are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic rays forming hundreds of far more complex species, some of biogenic interest. Eventually, these are delivered to primordial planets by comets and meteorites. Astrochemical evolution, highlights of this field from a chemist's perspective, and the astronomer's infrared toolbox will be reviewed.

  7. The evolution of plant chemical defence - new roles for hydroxynitrile glucosides in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Camilla

    function and evolution. Further, it contributes to our understanding of the formation and role of biosynthetic gene clusters in plant chemical defence. The bifurcation in hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis and catabolism observed in Lotus japonicus makes it a very suitable model system to study the......Plants are sessile organisms well-known to produce a vast array of chemical compounds of which many are used in chemical defence against herbivores and pathogens. The biosynthesis of these plant chemical defence compounds poses a considerable risk of self-toxicity for the plant itself. Several...... types of adaptations enable plants to avoid the potential lethal effects of their own defence compounds. These adaptations include detoxification and stabilization by glycosylation and the genomic clustering of biosynthetic pathway genes. These two types are the main focus of this PhD thesis on...

  8. Chemical differentiation, thermal evolution, and catastrophic overturn on Venus: Predictions and geologic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W.; Parmentier, E. M.; Hess, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    Observations from Magellan show that: (1) the surface of Venus is generally geologically young, (2) there is no evidence for widespread recent crustal spreading or subduction, (3) the crater population permits the hypothesis that the surface is in production, and (4) relatively few impact craters appear to be embayed by volcanic deposits suggesting that the volcanic flux has drastically decreased as a function of time. These observations have led to consideration of hypotheses suggesting that the geological history of Venus may have changed dramatically as a function of time due to general thermal evolution, and/or thermal and chemical evolution of a depleted mantle layer, perhaps punctuated by catastrophic overturn of upper layers or episodic plate tectonics. We have previously examined the geological implications of some of these models, and here we review the predictions associated with two periods of Venus history. Stationary thick lithosphere and depleted mantle layer, and development of regional to global development of regional to global instabilities, and compare these predictions to the geological characteristics of Venus revealed by Magellan.

  9. Nematode model systems in evolution and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ralf J; Bumbarger, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most important model organisms in all areas of modern biology. Using the knowledge about C. elegans as a baseline, nematodes are now intensively studied in evolution and development. Evolutionary developmental biology or for short, 'evo-devo' has been developed as a new research discipline during the last two decades to investigate how changes in developmental processes and mechanisms result in the modification of morphological structures and phenotypic novelty. In this article, we review the concepts that make nematode evo-devo a successful approach to evolutionary biology. We introduce selected model systems for nematode evo-devo and provide a detailed discussion of four selected case studies. The most striking finding of nematode evo-devo is the magnitude of developmental variation in the context of a conserved body plan. Detailed investigation of early embryogenesis, gonad formation, vulva development, and sex determination revealed that molecular mechanisms evolve rapidly, often in the context of a conserved body plan. These studies highlight the importance of developmental systems drift and neutrality in evolution. PMID:23801489

  10. Recent advances in chemical evolution and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, John; Lazcano, Antonio

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the ideas of Oparin and Haldane who independently suggested more than 60 years ago that the first forms of life were anaerobic, heterotrophic bacteria that emerged as the result of a long period of chemical abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. It is suggested that at least some requirements for life are met in the Galaxy due to the cosmic abundance of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other biogenic elements; the existence of extraterrestrial organic compounds; and the processes of stellar and interstellar planetary formation.

  11. PEM fuel cell modeling using differential evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper develops a differential-evolution-based solution for the problem of proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack modeling. The problem is analytically intractable and computationally hard. The present paper produces results that outperform state-of-the-art approaches on three performance metrics: solution quality corresponding to a given cost, cost of finding a solution of a given quality, and frequency of producing an optimal or near-optimal solution. -- Highlights: ► Provides a new solution approach to the PEMFC modeling problem which is an optimization problem of great practical importance. ► The present method provides solutions that are better than those produced by the best-known approaches in the literature. ► The present method outperforms the state-of-the-art approach on three performance metrics.

  12. Using Transiting Planets to Model Starspot Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Hawley, Suzanne L

    2014-01-01

    Photometry from Kepler has revealed the presence of cool starspots on the surfaces of thousands of stars, presenting a wide range of spot morphologies and lifetimes. Understanding the lifetime and evolution of starspots across the main sequence reveals critical information about the strength and nature of stellar dynamos. We probe the dynamo by modeling the starspot properties over time using Kepler light curves. In particular, we use planetary systems like Kepler 17 that show in-transit starspot crossing features. Spot-occulting transits probe smaller-scale starspot features on the stellar surface along a fixed latitude region. Our approach is novel in modeling both the in- and out-of transit light curve features, allowing us to break fundamental degeneracies between spot size, latitude, and contrast. With continuous monitoring from Kepler we are able to observe small changes in the positions and sizes of spots from many transits, spanning 4 years of data. Additionally, for stars without transiting planets l...

  13. Genealogies in simple models of evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the statistical properties of the genealogies of a few models of evolution. In the asexual case, selection leads to coalescence times which grow logarithmically with the size of the population, in contrast with the linear growth of the neutral case. Moreover for a whole class of models, the statistics of the genealogies are those of the Bolthausen–Sznitman coalescent rather than the Kingman coalescent in the neutral case. For sexual reproduction in the neutral case, the time to reach the first common ancestors for the whole population and the time for all individuals to have all their ancestors in common are also logarithmic in the population size, as predicted by Chang in 1999. We discuss how these times are modified by introducing selection in a simple way. (paper)

  14. Rheological, structural and chemical evolution of bitumen under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitumen derived from crude oil by fractional distillation has been used in the nuclear industry as a radioactive waste encapsulation matrix. When subjected to α, β and γ self-irradiation, this organic matrix undergoes radiolysis, generating hydrogen bubbles and modifying the physical and chemical properties of the material. In this paper, the effects of irradiation on bitumen materials, especially in terms of its physical, chemical, structural and rheological properties, were characterized at radiation doses ranging from 1 to 7 MGy. An increase in the shear viscosity and melt yield stress was observed with increasing doses. Similarly, the elastic and viscous moduli (G' and G'') increase with the dose, with a more pronounced increase for G' that reflects enhanced elasticity arising from radiation-induced cross-linking. In addition, a low-frequency plateau is observed for G', reflecting pseudo-solid behavior and leading to an increase of the complex viscosity. This behavior is due to increased interactions between asphaltene particles, and to aromatization of the bitumen by γ-radiations. Cross-linking of bitumen enhances its strength, as confirmed by various techniques (modulated DSC, DTA/TGA, SEC, FTIR and XRD). (authors)

  15. Chemical Evolution of Strongly Interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At very initial stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions a wave of quark-gluon matter is produced from the break-up of the strong color electric field and then thermalizes at a short time scale (~1 fm/c). However, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) system is far out of chemical equilibrium, especially for the heavy quarks which are supposed to reach chemical equilibrium much late. In this paper a continuing quark production picture for strongly interacting QGP system is derived, using the quark number susceptibilities and the equation of state; both of them are from the results calculated by the Wuppertal-Budapest lattice QCD collaboration. We find that the densities of light quarks increase by 75% from the temperature T=400 MeV to T=150 MeV, while the density of strange quark annihilates by 18% in the temperature region. We also offer a discussion on how this late production of quarks affects the final charge-charge correlations

  16. Merging binary black holes formed through chemically homogeneous evolution in short-period stellar binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Ilya; de Mink, Selma E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore a newly proposed channel to create binary black holes of stellar origin. This scenario applies to massive, tight binaries where mixing induced by rotation and tides transports the products of hydrogen burning throughout the stellar envelopes. This slowly enriches the entire star with helium, preventing the build-up of an internal chemical gradient. The stars remain compact as they evolve nearly chemically homogeneously, eventually forming two black holes, which we estimate typically merge 4-11 Gyr after formation. Like other proposed channels, this evolutionary pathway suffers from significant theoretical uncertainties, but could be constrained in the near future by data from advanced ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected merger rate over cosmic time to explore the implications and uncertainties. Our default model for this channel yields a local binary black hole merger rate of about 10 Gpc-3 yr-1 at redshift z = 0, peaking at twice this rate at z = 0.5. This means that this channel is competitive, in terms of expected rates, with the conventional formation scenarios that involve a common-envelope phase during isolated binary evolution or dynamical interaction in a dense cluster. The events from this channel may be distinguished by the preference for nearly equal-mass components and high masses, with typical total masses between 50 and 110 M⊙. Unlike the conventional isolated binary evolution scenario that involves shrinkage of the orbit during a common-envelope phase, short time delays are unlikely for this channel, implying that we do not expect mergers at high redshift.

  17. Evolution of species from Darwin theory: A simple model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, M. A.; Pereira, H. B. B.; Monteiro, S. L.; Galeão, A. C.

    2012-04-01

    Evolution of species is a complex phenomenon. Some theoretical models take into account evolution of species, like the Bak-Sneppen model that obtain punctuated equilibrium from self-organized criticality and the Penna model for biological aging that consists in a bit-string model subjected to aging, reproduction and death. In this work we propose a simple model to study different scenarios used to simulate the evolution of species. This model is based on Darwin's ideas of evolution. The present findings show that punctuated equilibria and stasis seem to be obtained directly from the mutation, selection of parents and the genetic crossover, and are very close to the fossil data analysis.

  18. THE GALACTIC STRUCTURE AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION TRACED BY THE POPULATION OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) derive from the evolution of ∼1-8 Msun mass stars, corresponding to a wide range of progenitor ages, and thus are essential probes of the chemical evolution of galaxies, and indispensable to constrain the results from chemical models. We use an extended and homogeneous data set of Galactic PNe to study the metallicity gradients and the Galactic structure and evolution. The most up-to-date abundances, distances (calibrated with Magellanic Cloud PNe), and other parameters have been employed, together with a novel homogeneous morphological classification, to characterize the different PN populations. We confirm that morphological classes have a strong correlation with Peimbert's type PN, and also with their distribution on the Galactic landscape. We studied the α-element distribution within the Galactic disk, and found that the best selected disk population (i.e., excluding bulge and halo component), together with the most reliable PN distance scale yields to a radial oxygen gradient of Δlog(O/H)/ΔRG = -0.023 ± 0.006 dex kpc-1 for the whole disk sample, and of Δlog(O/H)/ΔRG = -0.035 ± 0.024, -0.023 ± 0.005, and -0.011 ± 0.013 dex kpc-1, respectively for Type I, II, and III PNe, i.e., for high-, intermediate-, and low-mass progenitors. Neon gradients for the same PN types confirm the trend. Accurate statistical analysis shows moderately high uncertainties in the slopes, but also confirms the trend of steeper gradient for PNe with more massive progenitors, indicating a possible steepening with time of the Galactic disk metallicity gradient for what the α-elements are concerned. We found that the metallicity gradients are almost independent on the distance scale model used, as long as these scales are equally well calibrated with the Magellanic Clouds. The PN metallicity gradients presented here are consistent with the local metallicity distribution; furthermore, oxygen gradients determined with young and intermediate age PNe show good

  19. The 1st Symposium on Chemical Evolution and the Origin and Evolution of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincenzi, D. L. (Editor); Pleasant, L. G. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    This symposium provided an opportunity for all NASA Exobiology principal investigators to present their most recent research in a scientific meeting forum. Papers were presented in the following exobiology areas: extraterrestrial chemistry primitive earth, information transfer, solar system exploration, planetary protection, geological record, and early biological evolution.

  20. Modeling Co-evolution of Speech and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Two computer simulations are investigated that model interaction of cultural evolution of language and biological evolution of adaptations to language. Both are agent-based models in which a population of agents imitates each other using realistic vowels. The agents evolve under selective pressure for good imitation. In one model, the evolution of the vocal tract is modeled; in the other, a cognitive mechanism for perceiving speech accurately is modeled. In both cases, biological adaptations to using and learning speech evolve, even though the system of speech sounds itself changes at a more rapid time scale than biological evolution. However, the fact that the available acoustic space is used maximally (a self-organized result of cultural evolution) is constant, and therefore biological evolution does have a stable target. This work shows that when cultural and biological traits are continuous, their co-evolution may lead to cognitive adaptations that are strong enough to detect empirically. PMID:26936622

  1. Plant chemical defence allocation constrains evolution of local range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, David H; Haugen, Riston; Matzner, Steven; Vanasma, Nicholas

    2009-12-01

    Many species of plants in the wild are distributed spatially in patches, the boundaries of which may occur and change because of a complicated interplay between myriad environmental stressors and limitations of, or constraints on, plant coping mechanisms. By examining genetic variation and co-variation among marker-inferred inbred lines and sib-families of an upland wild mustard species within and just a few meters across a natural patch boundary, we show that the evolution of tolerance to the stressful environment outside the patch may be constrained by allocation to glucosinolate compounds (GS) that are defensive against generalist insect herbivores. Several potential stressors were associated with the patch boundary, but carbon isotope ratios indicated that sib-families with smaller stomatal apertures maintained performance better in response to late season dry conditions, suggesting that drought was an important stressor. The presence of GS may help explain the characteristic patchy distribution of mustards, a relatively diverse and important plant family. This result challenges one end of the continuum of the long-standing Plant Apparency hypothesis, which essentially states the opposite causation, that low molecular weight toxins like GS are evolutionary responses of patchy distributions and correlated life-history traits. PMID:19863716

  2. Learning and Evolution in Games and Oligopoly Models.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic models of adjustment, as well as static models of equilibrium, are important to understand economic reality. This thesis considers such dynamic models applied to economic games. The models can broadly be divided into two categories: learning and evolution. This thesis analyzes reinforcement learning and imitation dynamic on the learning side and the indirect evolution approach on the evolution side. It demonstrates the relation between the concept of Nash equilibrium and the long run ...

  3. Learning and evolution in games and oligopoly models

    OpenAIRE

    Possajennikov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic models of adjustment, as well as static models of equilibrium, are important to understand economic reality. This thesis considers such dynamic models applied to economic games. The models can broadly be divided into two categories: learning and evolution. This thesis analyzes reinforcement learning and imitation dynamic on the learning side and the indirect evolution approach on the evolution side. It demonstrates the relation between the concept of Nash equilibrium and the long run ...

  4. CYANAMIDE: A POSSIBLE KEY COMPOUND IN CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinman, Gary; Lemmon, Richard M.; Calvin, Melvin

    1964-05-01

    The prebiotic synthesis of phosphorus-containing compounds--such as nucleotides and polynucleotides--would require both a geologically plausible source of the element and pathways for its incorporation into chemical systems on the primitive Earth. The mineral apatite, which is the only significant source of phosphate on Earth, has long been thought to be problematical in this respect due to its low solubility and reactivity. However, in the last decade or so, at least two pathways have been demonstrated which would circumvent these perceived problems. In addition, recent results would seem to suggest an additional, extraterrestrial source of reactive phosphorus. It appears that the 'phosphorus problem' is no longer the stumbling block which it was once thought to be.

  5. Natural Pyrrhotite as a Catalyst in Prebiotic Chemical Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Menor-Salván

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The idea of an autotrophic organism as the first living being on Earth leads to the hypothesis of a protometabolic, complex chemical system. In one of the main hypotheses, the first metabolic systems emerged from the interaction between sulfide minerals and/or soluble iron-sulfide complexes and fluids rich in inorganic precursors, which are reduced and derived from crustal or mantle activity. Within this context, the possible catalytic role of pyrrhotite, one of the most abundant sulfide minerals, in biomimetic redox and carbon fixation reactions was studied. Our results showed that pyrrhotite, under simulated hydrothermal conditions, could catalyze the pyruvate synthesis from lactate and that a dynamic system formed by coupling iron metal and iron-sulfur species in an electrochemical cell could promote carbon fixation from thioacetate esters.

  6. Natural pyrrhotite as a catalyst in prebiotic chemical evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aldecoa, Alejandra López Ibáñez; Roldán, Francisco Velasco; Menor-Salván, César

    2013-01-01

    The idea of an autotrophic organism as the first living being on Earth leads to the hypothesis of a protometabolic, complex chemical system. In one of the main hypotheses, the first metabolic systems emerged from the interaction between sulfide minerals and/or soluble iron-sulfide complexes and fluids rich in inorganic precursors, which are reduced and derived from crustal or mantle activity. Within this context, the possible catalytic role of pyrrhotite, one of the most abundant sulfide minerals, in biomimetic redox and carbon fixation reactions was studied. Our results showed that pyrrhotite, under simulated hydrothermal conditions, could catalyze the pyruvate synthesis from lactate and that a dynamic system formed by coupling iron metal and iron-sulfur species in an electrochemical cell could promote carbon fixation from thioacetate esters. PMID:25369819

  7. THE CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE URSA MINOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of 10 stars selected to span the full range in metallicity in the Ursa Minor (UMi) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy. We find that [Fe/H] for the sample stars ranges from -1.35 to -3.10 dex. Combining our sample with previously published work for a total of 16 luminous UMi giants, we establish the trends of abundance ratios [X/Fe] as functions of [Fe/H] for 15 elements. In key cases, particularly for the α-elements, these trends resemble those for stars in the outer part of the Galactic halo, especially at the lowest metallicities probed. The neutron-capture elements show an r-process distribution over the full range of Fe metallicity reached in this dSph galaxy. This suggests that the duration of star formation in the UMi dSph was shorter than in other dSph galaxies. The derived ages for a larger sample of UMi stars with more uncertain metallicities also suggest a population dominated by uniformly old (∼13 Gyr) stars, with a hint of an age-metallicity relationship. Upon comparing our results for UMi, our earlier work in Draco, and published studies of more metal-rich dSph Galactic satellites, there appears to be a pattern of moving from a chemical inventory for dSph giants with [Fe/H] ∼ - 1.5 dex leads to a chemical inventory wildly discrepant from that of any component of the Milky Way. We note the presence of two UMi giants with [Fe/H] <-3.0 dex in our sample and reaffirm that the inner Galactic halo could have been formed by early accretion of Galactic satellite galaxies and dissolution of young globular clusters, while the outer halo could have formed from those satellite galaxies that accreted somewhat later.

  8. Analyzing the Distribution and Chemical Evolution of Major Nitrogen Carriers within Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegues, Jamila; Oberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is an important component in many of the world's known organic and inorganic compounds, and its presence is crucial for the existence and survival of life as we know it on Earth today. And yet, in comparison to the total amount of nitrogen available, nitrogen exists as a depleted resource throughout the Solar System, with Earth and unearthed meteorites featuring nitrogen levels depleted from 1 to 5 orders of magnitude relative to the Sun. Additionally, comets have been discovered that contain depleted levels of N2 in comparison to CO, despite the similar binding strengths of both N2 and CO to ices, with ices functioning as the main component in comets.Mechanisms that are likely to play a major part in the distribution of nitrogen throughout the Solar System, and other extra-solar systems, are condensation fronts, such as snowlines and snowsurfaces. Here, condensation fronts refer to the locations at which 50% of a given volatile is contained in gaseous form, while the other 50% is contained within grain form. During formation, astronomical bodies will accumulate different chemical compositions, depending upon where they form with respect to the locations of the condensation fronts within the system. In addition, a system's initial chemistry, as well as how that chemistry evolves, will ultimately alter how the volatiles in the system are distributed over time.Thus, the locations of these condensation fronts, coupled with a protoplanetary disk's initial chemistry and chemical evolution, are mechanisms that affect the eventual distribution and evolution of the disk's volatiles. In this project, we characterize and interpret these mechanisms within disk models. We vary the disk's time dependence and initial chemical conditions, and then analyze the effects of those variations upon the main carriers of nitrogen in both gaseous and grain form. From observed patterns and characteristics of these varied models, we evolve our understanding of curious nitrogen

  9. The Migrating Embryo Model for Disk Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Shantanu

    2012-01-01

    A new view of disk evolution is emerging from self-consistent numerical simulation modeling of the formation of circumstellar disks from the direct collapse of prestellar cloud cores. This has implications for many aspects of star and planet formation, including the growth of dust and high-temperature processing of materials. A defining result is that the early evolution of a disk is crucially affected by the continuing mass loading from the core envelope, and is driven into recurrent phases of gravitational instability. Nonlinear spiral arms formed during these episodes fragment to form gaseous clumps in the disk. These clumps generally migrate inward due to gravitational torques arising from their interaction with a trailing spiral arm. Occasionally, a clump can open up a gap in the disk and settle into a stable orbit, revealing a direct pathway to the formation of companion stars, brown dwarfs, or giant planets. At other times, when multiple clumps are present, a low mass clump may even be ejected from the...

  10. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah Y.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important for investigating the combustion behavior of diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values and rate rules. These update provides a better agreement with rapid compression machine measurements of ignition delay time, while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  11. Chemical evolution of rapidly recharging groundwaters in shield environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes results of a multidisciplinary study of the geochemical and microbiological evolution of groundwaters that are recharged into two overburden/surface-bedrock environments in the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) lease area, Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. Sampling of groundwaters in overburden and shallow bedrock piezometers in the East Swamp area and in packer-isolated bedrock borehole zones in the main shaft of the URL facility was performed during consecutive winter, spring, summer and fall seasons over a one-year period in 1995/1996. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the hydrochemical, isotopic and microbiological responses to seasonal variations in the groundwater flow regime in the upper ∼200 m of granitic bedrock and overburden sediments in the URL lease area. The study showed that small amounts of oxygenated, 18O-depleted spring-melt water penetrated the bedrock at the URL, to depths of ∼200 m, under the influence of the pronounced water-table drawdown surrounding the URL. The travel times of recharge to this depth were less than two months. A similar pulse was not seen in the outcrop recharge area of the East Swamp where only natural gradients exist. No significant seasonal variations in groundwater chemistry were observed in either environment. Variations in 3 H content between borehole zones indicates mixing between deeper (older) groundwater and shallow (recent) recharge. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) showed seasonal variations in groundwaters at both study areas whereas only a limited seasonal relationship was seen in micro-organism concentrations. However, the general observation that micro-organism content is highest in groundwaters containing high levels of DOC and dissolved 02, and lower concentrations are found in low-DOC and O2-deficient groundwaters, indicates that microbially mediated oxidation of DOC may be occurring to cause the trend towards reducing conditions along the flow

  12. Life from the stars?. [extraterrestrial sources contributing to chemical evolution on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists are now seriously considering the possibility that organic matter from interstellar space could have influenced, or even spurred, the origin of life on Earth. Various aspects of chemical evolution are discussed along with possible extraterrestrial sources responsible for contributing to Earth's life-producing, chemical composition. Specific topics covered include the following: interstellar matter, molecular clouds, asteroid dust, organic molecules in our solar system, interplanetary dust and comets, meteoritic composition, and organic-rich solar-system bodies.

  13. Gpgpu Accelerated Landscape-Evolution Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddy, D.; McGough, A. S.; Wainwright, J.; Trueman, A.

    2011-12-01

    Existing Landscape-Evolution Models (LEMs) have tended to be applied at relatively coarse spatial resolution and over comparatively short timescales (years-centuries). Extending these models to encompass landscape evolution at the scale of, for example, an entire river basin and over important landscape-forming timescales (i.e. tens of thousands of years) is computationally challenging. In order to address this challenge we are currently reformulating and extending an existing LEM, CybErosion, in order to create a new, highly optimised model, called CUDAscape. CUDAscape is being coded for parallel processing in order to exploit CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture), the parallel programming architecture developed by NVIDIA. CybErosion, a cellular erosion model written in C++, implements erosion, sediment transport and deposition processes at individual cell level, with each cell storing the cumulative changes in cell value (height) over the duration of the model run. Using a 5,000 cell DEM, and a simulated annual time step over 800k years, the original CybErosion code has an execution time of approximately 22 hours on an Intel 980X hexacore processor. Sequential code optimization has reduced this to ~4.5 hours but to achieve the modelling of grids comprising millions of cells requires orders of magnitude improvements in performance, an objective unlikely to be reached via advances in conventional CPU architectures within the foreseeable future. In this paper we will present our initial results for the CUDA implementation of a number of key methods including sink filling, flat routing, flow direction (D8, steepest descent) and flow accumulation (kernels that potentially have widespread application in a whole range of Earth System Models), the key bottlenecks in the current generation of LEMs (taking >75% of the execution time of the sequential execution of CybErosion). Using a single NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPGPU we have seen speedup in excess of x100 on both flow

  14. Modelling stratospheric chemistry in a global three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummukainen, M. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1995-12-31

    Numerical modelling of atmospheric chemistry aims to increase the understanding of the characteristics, the behavior and the evolution of atmospheric composition. These topics are of utmost importance in the study of climate change. The multitude of gases and particulates making up the atmosphere and the complicated interactions between them affect radiation transfer, atmospheric dynamics, and the impacts of anthropogenic and natural emissions. Chemical processes are fundamental factors in global warming, ozone depletion and atmospheric pollution problems in general. Much of the prevailing work on modelling stratospheric chemistry has so far been done with 1- and 2-dimensional models. Carrying an extensive chemistry parameterisation in a model with high spatial and temporal resolution is computationally heavy. Today, computers are becoming powerful enough to allow going over to 3-dimensional models. In order to concentrate on the chemistry, many Chemical Transport Models (CTM) are still run off-line, i.e. with precalculated and archived meteorology and radiation. In chemistry simulations, the archived values drive the model forward in time, without interacting with the chemical evolution. This is an approach that has been adopted in stratospheric chemistry modelling studies at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. In collaboration with the University of Oslo, a development project was initiated in 1993 to prepare a stratospheric chemistry parameterisation, fit for global 3-dimensional modelling. This article presents the parameterisation approach. Selected results are shown from basic photochemical simulations

  15. Chemical uncertainties in modeling hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebrard, Eric; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Most predictions and interpretations of observations in beyond our Solar System have occurred through the use of 1D photo-thermo-chemical models. Their predicted atmospheric compositions are highly dependent on model parameters. Chemical reactions are based on empirical parameters that must be known at temperatures ranging from 100 K to above 2500 K and at pressures from millibars to hundreds of bars. Obtained from experiments, calculations and educated-guessed estimations, these parameters are always evaluated with substantial uncertainties. However, although of practical use, few models of exoplanetary atmospheres have considered these underlying chemical uncertainties and their consequences. Recent progress has been made recently that allow us to (1) evaluate the accuracy and precision of 1D models of planetary atmospheres, with quantifiable uncertainties on their predictions for the atmospheric composition and associated spectral features, (2) identify the ‘key parameters’ that contribute the most to the models predictivity and should therefore require further experimental or theoretical analysis, (3) reduce and optimize complex chemical networks for their inclusion in multidimensional atmospheric models.First, a global sampling approach based on low discrepancy sequences has been applied in order to propose error bars on simulations of the atmospheres HD 209458b and HD 189733b, using a detailed kinetic model derived from applied combustion models that was methodically validated over a range of temperatures and pressures typical for these hot Jupiters. A two-parameters temperature-dependent uncertainty factor has been assigned to each considered rate constant. Second, a global sensitivity approach based on high dimensional model representations (HDMR) has been applied in order to identify those reactions which make the largest contributions to the overall uncertainty of the simulated results. The HDMR analysis has been restricted to the most important

  16. Modeling texture evolution during recrystallization in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this work was to develop a model with predictive capability for microstructural evolution during recrystallization and to identify factors that exert the greatest effect on the development of texture. To achieve this aim, geometric and crystallographic observations from two orthogonal sections through a polycrystal were used as input to the computer simulations, to create a statistically representative three-dimensional model. Assignment of orientations to the grains was performed so as to optimize agreement between the orientation and misorientation distributions of assigned and observed orientations. The microstructures thus created were allowed to evolve using a Monte Carlo simulation. As a demonstration of the model the effects of anisotropy, both in energy and in mobility, stored energy and oriented nucleation (ON) on overall texture development were studied. The results were analyzed with reference to the various established competing theories of ON and oriented growth. The results suggested that all of ON, mobility anisotropy, stored energy and energy anisotropy (listed in order of their relative importance) influence texture development. It was also determined that comparison of simulated and measured textures throughout the recrystallization process is a more severe test of a model than the typical comparison of textures only at the end of the process

  17. Outgassing and chemical evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Vervack, Ronald J.; Kawakita, Hideyo; Cochran, Anita; McKay, Adam J.; Harris, Walter M.; Weaver, Harold A.; Lisse, Carey M.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Biver, Nicolas; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Crovisier, Jacques; Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ~ 25,000) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H2O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing by about a factor of 40 between October 26 (Rh = 1.12 AU) and November 20 (Rh = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H2O was also seen as the production rate increased by nearly a factor of two during observations obtained over a period of about six hours on November 19. C2H6, CH3OH and CH4 abundances were slightly depleted relative to H2O in ISON compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C2H2, HCN and OCS abundances relative to H2O appear to be close to the range of mean values, whereas H2CO and NH3 were significantly enhanced. We will compare derived chemical abundances in ISON to other comets measured with infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Evolution and chemical and dynamical effects of high-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Meynet, Georges; Georgy, Cyril; Pignatari, Marco; Hirschi, Raphael; Ekstrom, Sylvia; Maeder, Andre

    2008-01-01

    We review general characteristics of massive stars, present the main observable constraints that stellar models should reproduce. We discuss the impact of massive star nucleosynthesis on the early phases of the chemical evolution of the Milky Way (MW). We show that rotating models can account for the important primary nitrogen production needed at low metallicity. Interestingly such rotating models can also better account for other features as the variation with the metallicity of the C/O ratio. Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) systems present similar characteristics as the halo of the MW for what concern the N/O and C/O ratios. Although in DLAs, the star formation history might be quite different from that of the halo, in these systems also, rotating stars (both massive and intermediate) probably play an important role for explaining these features. The production of primary nitrogen is accompanied by an overproduction of other elements as $^{13}$C, $^{22}$Ne and s-process elements. We show also how the observed var...

  19. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, Michael P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystem. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  20. Big-bang cosmology and cosmic chemical evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We first discuss both success and defects of the standard cosmological model for primordial nucleosynthesis, and critically discuss the uncertainties in particle and nuclear physics which may resolve partly the discrepancies on universal baryon budget. We discuss an important consequence of newly measured weak coupling constant in terms of neutron life, poorly known or unmeasured nuclear reaction rates, broken universal neutrino-lepton symmetry, and their effects on nucleosynthesis. We here propose a theoretical model of disappearing cold dark matter of SUSY particles in brane world cosmology, and discuss how the BBN constraints allow this model, satisfying many other observational constraints from CMB anisotropies, Type la supernova (SN) magnitude-redshift relation, galaxy M/L ratios, and galaxy gas-fractions. We also discuss quintessential inflation model which partly resolves the fine tuning problem of dark energy. We discuss similarity and difference of the nucleosynthesis between SN r-process and BBN, and also discuss p-process nucleosynthesis and neutrino-processes in supernova explosions. (author)

  1. A 'Turing' Test for Landscape Evolution Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A. J.; Wise, S. M.; Wainwright, J.; Swift, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Resolving the interactions among tectonics, climate and surface processes at long timescales has benefited from the development of computer models of landscape evolution. However, testing these Landscape Evolution Models (LEMs) has been piecemeal and partial. We argue that a more systematic approach is required. What is needed is a test that will establish how 'realistic' an LEM is and thus the extent to which its predictions may be trusted. We propose a test based upon the Turing Test of artificial intelligence as a way forward. In 1950 Alan Turing posed the question of whether a machine could think. Rather than attempt to address the question directly he proposed a test in which an interrogator asked questions of a person and a machine, with no means of telling which was which. If the machine's answer could not be distinguished from those of the human, the machine could be said to demonstrate artificial intelligence. By analogy, if an LEM cannot be distinguished from a real landscape it can be deemed to be realistic. The Turing test of intelligence is a test of the way in which a computer behaves. The analogy in the case of an LEM is that it should show realistic behaviour in terms of form and process, both at a given moment in time (punctual) and in the way both form and process evolve over time (dynamic). For some of these behaviours, tests already exist. For example there are numerous morphometric tests of punctual form and measurements of punctual process. The test discussed in this paper provides new ways of assessing dynamic behaviour of an LEM over realistically long timescales. However challenges remain in developing an appropriate suite of challenging tests, in applying these tests to current LEMs and in developing LEMs that pass them.

  2. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Segler, Marwin H S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows Organic Chemists to solve synthetic problems and to invent novel transformations. Here, we propose a model which mimics chemical reasoning and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180,000 randomly selected binary reactions. We show that our data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-) discovering novel transformations (even including transition-metal catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph, and because each single reaction prediction is typically ac...

  3. Chemical and Hydrodynamical Models of Cometary Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Multi-fluid modelling of the outflowing gases which sublimate from cometary nuclei as they approach the Sun is necessary for understanding the important physical and chemical processes occurring in this complex plasma. Coma chemistry models can be employed to interpret observational data and to ultimately determine chemical composition and structure of the nuclear ices and dust. We describe a combined chemical and hydrodynamical model [1] in which differential equations for the chemical abundances and the energy balance are solved as a function of distance from the cometary nucleus. The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of 1P/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [2]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions and calculate the impact of these anions on the coma physics and chemistry af the coma.

  4. Using chemical organization theory for model checking

    OpenAIRE

    Kaleta, Christoph; Richter, Stephan; Dittrich, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The increasing number and complexity of biomodels makes automatic procedures for checking the models' properties and quality necessary. Approaches like elementary mode analysis, flux balance analysis, deficiency analysis and chemical organization theory (OT) require only the stoichiometric structure of the reaction network for derivation of valuable information. In formalisms like Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML), however, information about the stoichiometric coefficients re...

  5. The dynamical and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies with GEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revaz, Y.; Jablonka, P.

    2012-02-01

    We present the fully parallel chemo-dynamical Tree/SPH code GEAR, which allows us to perform high resolution simulations with detailed chemical diagnostics. Starting from the public version of Gadget-2, we included the complex treatment of the baryon physics: gas cooling, star formation law, chemical evolution, and supernova feedback. We qualified the performances of GEAR in the case of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) galaxies. Our code GEAR conserves the total energy budget of the systems to better than 5% over 14 Gyr and provides an excellent convergence of the results with numerical resolution. We showed that models of dSphs in a static Euclidean space, where the expansion of the universe is neglected are valid. In addition, we tackled some existing open questions in the field, such as the stellar mass fraction of dSphs and its link to the predicted dark matter halo mass function, the effect of supernova feedback, the spatial distribution of the stellar populations, and the origin of the diversity in star formation histories and chemical abundance patterns. Strong supernova-driven winds seem incompatible with the observed metallicities and luminosities. Despite newly formed stars being preferentially found in the galaxy central parts, turbulent motions in the gas can quickly erase any metallicity gradient. The diversity in properties of dSph are related to a range of total masses, as well as a range of dispersion in the central densities, which is also seen in the halos emerging from a ΛCDM cosmogony. Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Impact constraints on the environment for chemical evolution and the continuity of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Fogleman, Guy

    1990-01-01

    The moon and the earth were bombarded heavily by planetesimals and asteroids that were capable of interfering with chemical evolution and the origin of life. This paper explores the frequency of giant terrestrial impacts able to stop prebiotic chemistry in the probable regions of chemical evolution. The limited time available between impacts disruptive to prebiotic chemistry at the time of the oldest evidence of life suggests the need for a rapid process for chemical evolution of life. On the other hand, rapid chemical evolution in cloud systems and lakes or other shallow evaporating water bodies would have been possible because reactants could have been concentrated and polymerized rapidly in this environment. Thus life probably could have originated near the surface between frequent surface-sterilizing impacts. There may not have been continuity of life depending on sunlight because there is evidence that life, existing as early as 3.8 Gyr ago, may have been destroyed by giant impacts. The first such organisms on earth were probably not the ancestors of present life.

  7. A Comparison of Manual and Computer Searches of the Chemical Evolution and Origin of Life Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Elizabeth Deas

    Parallel machine and manual literature searches on the subject of chemical evolution and the origin of life were compared on six characteristics: (1) precision, (2) recall, (3) novelty, (4) uniqueness, (5) time cost per citation, and (6) dollar cost per citation. The manual search outperformed the machine on precision, novelty, uniqueness, and…

  8. The search for life's origins: Progress and future directions in planetary biology and chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The current state is reviewed of the study of chemical evolution and planetary biology and the probable future is discussed of the field, at least for the near term. To this end, the report lists the goals and objectives of future research and makes detailed, comprehensive recommendations for accomplishing them, emphasizing those issues that were inadequately discussed in earlier Space Studies Board reports.

  9. Impact of solar system exploration on theories of chemical evolution and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devincenzi, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of solar system exploration on theories regarding chemical evolution and the origin of life is examined in detail. Major findings from missions to Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan are reviewed and implications for prebiotic chemistry are discussed. Among the major conclusions are: prebiotic chemistry is widespread throughout the solar system and universe; chemical evolution and the origin of life are intimately associated with the origin and evolution of the solar system; the rate, direction, and extent of prebiotic chemistry is highly dependent upon planetary characteristics; and continued exploration will increase understanding of how life originated on earth and allow better estimates of the likelihood of similar processes occurring elsewhere.

  10. About evolution of alive orgamisms in conditions of radioactive and chemical stress (biophysical aspect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of evolution of living organisms in conditions of radioactive and chemical stress are considered. Tendencies of development of the world community are evidence of global anthropogenic influence increase on biosphere, which is caused by many components, the main of them being radiation contamination and chemical pollution. The possible mechanisms of new species appearance are discussed on molecular level taking into account mutagenic factors caused by radiation and chemical stress. The quantum field hypothesis on the basis of Landau-Ginzburg equation of molecular mechanisms of mutations connected with new species appearance is presented.(A.A.D.)

  11. Sole-Manrubia model of biological evolution: some new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Debashish; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    The Sole-Manrubia model of ``macro''-evolution describes the origination, evolution and extinction of species on geological time scales. We report some properties of this model which provide deep insight into this simple model which captures several realistic features.

  12. Surface and Lightning Sources of Nitrogen Oxides over the United States: Magnitudes, Chemical Evolution, and Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudman, Rynda C.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Turquety, Solene; Leinbensperger, E. M.; Murray, L. T.; Wu, Samuel; Gilliland, A. B.; Avery, Melody A.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Brune, W. H.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Dibb, Jack E.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, Alan; Holloway, J.; Neuman, J. A.; Orville, R.; Perring, Anne; Ren, Xinrong; Ryerson, T. B.; Sachse, Glen W.; Singh, H. B.; Swanson, Aaron; Wooldridge, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    We use observations from two aircraft during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign over the eastern United States and North Atlantic during summer 2004, interpreted with a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem) to test current understanding of the regional sources, chemical evolution, and export of nitrogen oxides. The boundary layer NO(x) data provide top-down verification of a 50% decrease in power plant and industry NO(x) emissions over the eastern United States between 1999 and 2004. Observed 8-12 8 km NO(x) concentrations in ICARTT were 0.55 +/- 36 ppbv, much larger than in previous United States aircraft campaigns (ELCHEM, SUCCESS, SONEX). We show that regional lightning was the dominant source of this NO(x) and increased upper tropospheric ozone by 10 ppbv. Simulating the ICARTT upper tropospheric NO(x) observations with GEOS-Chem require a factor of 4 increase in the model NO(x) yield per flash (to 500 mol/flash). Observed OH concentrations were a factor of 2 lower than can be explained from current photochemical models, and if correct would imply a broader lightning influence in the upper troposphere than presently thought.An NO(y)-CO correlation analysis of the fraction f of North American NO(x) emissions vented to the free troposphere as NO(y) (sum of NO(x) and its oxidation products PAN and HNO3) s shows observed f=16+/-10 percent and modeled f=14 +/- 8 percent, consistent with previous studies. Export to the lower free troposphere is mostly HNO3 but at higher altitudes is mostly PAN. The model successfully simulates NO(y) export efficiency and speciation, supporting previous model estimates of a large U.S. contribution to tropospheric ozone through NO(x) and PAN export.

  13. Model abstraction addressing long-term simulations of chemical degradation of large-scale concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a methodology to assess the spatial-temporal evolution of chemical degradation fronts in real-size concrete structures typical of a near-surface radioactive waste disposal facility. The methodology consists of the abstraction of a so-called full (complicated) model accounting for the multicomponent - multi-scale nature of concrete to an abstracted (simplified) model which simulates chemical concrete degradation based on a single component in the aqueous and solid phase. The abstracted model is verified against chemical degradation fronts simulated with the full model under both diffusive and advective transport conditions. Implementation in the multi-physics simulation tool COMSOL allows simulation of the spatial-temporal evolution of chemical degradation fronts in large-scale concrete structures. (authors)

  14. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM of galaxy clusters to outer regions observed with Suzaku. The observed temperature dropped by about ~30% from the central region to the virial radius of the clusters. The derived entropy profile agreed with the expectation from simulations within r500, while the entropy profile in r > r500 indicated a flatter slope than the simulations. This would suggest that the cluster outskirts were out of hydrostatic equilibrium. As for the metallicity, we studied the metal abundances from O to Fe up to ~0.5 times the virial radius of galaxy groups and clusters. Comparing the results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II to Ia supernovae is estimated to be ~3.5. We also calculated not only Fe, but also O and Mg mass-to-light ratios (MLRs with K-band luminosity. The MLRs in the clusters had a similar feature.

  15. Multidimensional chemical modelling, II. Irradiated outflow walls

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Doty, Steven D; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bourke, Tyler L

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO+, a molecule known to be enhanced by far UV (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO+ is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first 2D axi-symmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star forming region to explain the CO+ observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axi-symmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to ...

  16. Chemical evolution and the origin of life: cumulative keyword subject index 1970-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A. C.; Powers, J. V.; Rummel, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    This cumulative subject index encompasses the subject indexes of the bibliographies on Chemical Evolution and the Origin of Life that were first published in 1970 and have continued through publication of the 1986 bibliography supplement. Early bibliographies focused on experimental and theoretical material dealing directly with the concepts of chemical evolution and the origin of life, excluding the broader areas of exobiology, biological evolution, and geochemistry. In recent years, these broader subject areas have also been incorporated as they appear in literature searches relating to chemical evolution and the origin of life, although direct attempts have not been made to compile all of the citations in these broad areas. The keyword subject indexes have also undergone an analogous change in scope. Compilers of earlier bibliographies used the most specific term available in producing the subject index. Compilers of recent bibliographies have used a number of broad terms relating to the overall subject content of each citation and specific terms where appropriate. The subject indexes of these 17 bibliographies have, in general, been cumulatively compiled exactly as they originally appeared. However, some changes have been made in an attempt to correct errors, combine terms, and provide more meaningful terms.

  17. Integrated near-field evolution model for a KBS-3 repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the integrated treatment of a number of processes determining the long-term evolution of a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel is presented. The integrated system model reproduces several important results obtained with a number of different process level models in SKB's latest safety assessment. Examples include the evolutions of the temperature in the fuel rods, the canister, the buffer and the host rock, of the buffer chemical composition, of canister corrosion and of the interior of an assumed defective canister. The mechanistic understanding and mathematical description of the processes underlying the evolution is the same as for the process models but the methods for quantifying the processes have been adapted to the particular problems at hand to increase calculation speed and all sub-models are handled in a common framework. The model executes in around one second, making it a potentially useful tool for comprehensive evaluations in coming safety assessments

  18. Chemical spots and their dynamical evolution on HgMn stars

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, Heidi; Hubrig, Swetlana; Briquet, Maryline; González, Federico; Savanov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies of late B-type stars with HgMn peculiarity revealed for the first time the presence of fast dynamical evolution of chemical spots on their surfaces. These observations suggest a hitherto unknown physical process operating in the stars with radiative outer envelopes. Furthermore, we have also discovered existence of magnetic fields on these stars that have up to now been thought to be non-magnetic. Here we will discuss the dynamical spot evolution on HD 11753 and our new res...

  19. Irradiated solutions of citric acid in the context of chemical evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of citric acid in an aqueous solution and its connection with chemical evolution has been investigated. The importance of this compound which, probably had a double role during the evolutive period, first as a precursor in the synthesis of some pyrimidines and second as metabolic intermediary in the carboxilic acids cycle. The decomposition of the citric acid, the identification of the products obtained from the radiolysis and the distributions of these products were investigated with relation to the different doses used. (author) 9 refs.; 1 fig

  20. Chemical spots and their dynamical evolution on HgMn stars

    CERN Document Server

    Korhonen, Heidi; Briquet, Maryline; Gonzalez, Federico; Savanov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies of late B-type stars with HgMn peculiarity revealed for the first time the presence of fast dynamical evolution of chemical spots on their surfaces. These observations suggest a hitherto unknown physical process operating in the stars with radiative outer envelopes. Furthermore, we have also discovered existence of magnetic fields on these stars that have up to now been thought to be non-magnetic. Here we will discuss the dynamical spot evolution on HD 11753 and our new results on magnetic fields on AR Aur.

  1. Limited Influence of Oxygen on the Evolution of Chemical Diversity in Metabolic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Takemoto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is thought to promote species and biomolecule diversity. Previous studies have suggested that oxygen expands metabolic networks by acquiring metabolites with different chemical properties (higher hydrophobicity, for example. However, such conclusions are typically based on biased evaluation, and are therefore non-conclusive. Thus, we re-investigated the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution using a phylogenetic comparative method and metadata analysis to reduce the bias as much as possible. Notably, we found no difference in metabolic network expansion between aerobes and anaerobes when evaluating phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, we showed that previous studies have overestimated or underestimated the degrees of differences in the chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity between oxic and anoxic metabolites in metabolic networks of unicellular organisms; however, such overestimation was not observed when considering the metabolic networks of multicellular organisms. These findings indicate that the contribution of oxygen to increased chemical diversity in metabolic networks is lower than previously thought; rather, phylogenetic signals and cell-cell communication result in increased chemical diversity. However, this conclusion does not contradict the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution; instead, it provides a deeper understanding of how oxygen contributes to metabolic evolution despite several limitations in data analysis methods.

  2. Modeling the evolution of infrared galaxies: A Parametric backwards evolution model

    CERN Document Server

    Béthermin, Matthieu; Lagache, Guilaine; Borgne, Damien Le; Pénin, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    We aim at modeling the infrared galaxy evolution in an as simple as possible way and reproduce statistical properties among which the number counts between 15 microns and 1.1 mm, the luminosity functions, and the redshift distributions. We then aim at using this model to interpret the recent observations (Spitzer, Akari, BLAST, LABOCA, AzTEC, SPT and Herschel), and make predictions for future experiments like CCAT or SPICA. This model uses an evolution in density and luminosity of the luminosity function with two breaks at redshift ~0.9 and 2 and contains the two populations of the Lagache et al. (2004) model: normal and starburst galaxies. We also take into account the effect of the strong lensing of high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies. It has 13 free parameters and 8 additional calibration parameters. We fit the parameters to the IRAS, Spitzer, Herschel and AzTEC measurements with a Monte-Carlo Markov chain. The model ajusted on deep counts at key wavelengths reproduces the counts from the mid-infrared to...

  3. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Models of protocellular structures, functions and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael H.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The central step in the origin of life was the emergence of organized structures from organic molecules available on the early earth. These predecessors to modern cells, called 'proto-cells,' were simple, membrane bounded structures able to maintain themselves, grow, divide, and evolve. Since there is no fossil record of these earliest of life forms, it is a scientific challenge to discover plausible mechanisms for how these entities formed and functioned. To meet this challenge, it is essential to create laboratory models of protocells that capture the main attributes associated with living systems, while remaining consistent with known, or inferred, protobiological conditions. This report provides an overview of a project which has focused on protocellular metabolism and the coupling of metabolism to energy transduction. We have assumed that the emergence of systems endowed with genomes and capable of Darwinian evolution was preceded by a pre-genomic phase, in which protocells functioned and evolved using mostly proteins, without self-replicating nucleic acids such as RNA.

  5. Modeling rocky coastline evolution and equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, P. W.; Murray, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    Many of the world’s rocky coastlines exhibit planform roughness in the form of alternating headlands and embayments. Along cliffed coasts, it is often assumed that headlands consist of rock that is more resistant to wave attack than in neighboring bays, because of either structural or lithologic variations. Bays would then retreat landward faster than headlands, creating the undulating planform profiles characteristic of a rocky coastal landscape. While the interplay between alongshore rock strength and nearshore wave energy is, in some circumstances, a fundamental control on coastline shape, beach sediment is also important. Laboratory experiments and field observations have shown that beach sediment, in small volumes, can act as an abrasive tool to encourage sea cliff retreat. In large volumes, though, sediment discourages wave attack on the cliff face, acting as a protective barrier. This nonlinearity suggests a means for headland persistence, even without alongshore variations in rock strength: bare-rock headlands could retreat more slowly than, or at the same rate as, neighboring sediment-filled embayments because of alongshore variations in the availability of beach sediment. Accordingly, nearshore sediment dynamics (i.e. sediment production from sea cliff retreat and alongshore sediment transport) could promote the development of autogenic planform geometry. To explore these ideas, we present numerical and analytical modeling of large-scale (> one kilometer) and long-term (millennial-scale) planform rocky coastline evolution, in which sediment is supplied by both sea cliff erosion and coastal rivers and is distributed by alongshore sediment transport. We also compare model predictions with real landscapes. Previously, our modeling exercises focused on a basic rocky coastline configuration where lithologically-homogeneous sea cliffs supplied all beach sediment and maintained a constant alongshore height. Results showed that 1) an equilibrium alongshore

  6. Integrating Geochemical and Geodynamic Numerical Models of Mantle Evolution and Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Xie, S.

    2001-12-01

    The thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's mantle and plates are inextricably coupled by the plate tectonic - mantle convective system. Convection causes chemical differentiation, recycling and mixing, while chemical variations affect the convection through physical properties such as density and viscosity which depend on composition. It is now possible to construct numerical mantle convection models that track the thermo-chemical evolution of major and minor elements, and which can be used to test prospective models and hypotheses regarding Earth's chemical and thermal evolution. Model thermal and chemical structures can be compared to results from seismic tomography, while geochemical signatures (e.g., trace element ratios) can be compared to geochemical observations. The presented, two-dimensional model combines a simplified 2-component major element model with tracking of the most important trace elements, using a tracer method. Melting is self-consistently treated using a solidus, with melt placed on the surface as crust. Partitioning of trace elements occurs between melt and residue. Decaying heat-producing elements and secular cooling of the mantle and core provide the driving heat sources. Pseudo-plastic yielding of the lithosphere gives a first-order approximation of plate tectonics, and also allows planets with a rigid lid or intermittent plate tectonics to be modeled simply by increasing the yield strength. Preliminary models with an initially homogeneous mantle show that regions with a HIMU-like signature can be generated by crustal recycling, and regions with high 3He/4He ratios can be generated by residuum recycling. Outgassing of Argon is within the observed range. Models with initially layered mantles will also be investigated. In future it will be important to include a more realistic bulk compositional model that allows continental crust as well as oceanic crust to form, and to extend the model to three dimensions since toroidal flow may alter

  7. Exploring Contextual Models in Chemical Patent Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Jay; Frieder, Ophir

    We explore the development of probabilistic retrieval models for integrating term statistics with entity search using multiple levels of document context to improve the performance of chemical patent search. A distributed indexing model was developed to enable efficient named entity search and aggregation of term statistics at multiple levels of patent structure including individual words, sentences, claims, descriptions, abstracts, and titles. The system can be scaled to an arbitrary number of compute instances in a cloud computing environment to support concurrent indexing and query processing operations on large patent collections.

  8. Ultrafaint dwarfs—star formation and chemical evolution in the smallest galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In earlier work, we showed that a dark matter halo with a virial mass of 107 M ☉ can retain a major part of its baryons in the face of the pre-ionization phase and supernova (SN) explosion from a 25 M ☉ star. Here, we expand on the results of that work, investigating the star formation and chemical evolution of the system beyond the first SN. In a galaxy with a mass M vir = 107 M ☉, sufficient gas is retained by the potential for a second period of star formation to occur. The impact of a central explosion is found to be much stronger than that of an off-center explosion both in blowing out the gas and in enriching it, as in the off-center case most of the SN energy and metals escape into the intergalactic medium. We model the star formation and metallicity, given the assumption that stars form for 100, 200, 400, and 600 Myr, and discuss the results in the context of recent observations of very low-mass galaxies. We show that we can account for most features of the observed relationship between [α/Fe] and [Fe/H] in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies with the assumption that the systems formed at a low mass, rather than being remnants of much larger systems.

  9. Ultrafaint dwarfs—star formation and chemical evolution in the smallest galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Sutherland, Ralph, E-mail: d.webster@physics.usyd.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-11-20

    In earlier work, we showed that a dark matter halo with a virial mass of 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} can retain a major part of its baryons in the face of the pre-ionization phase and supernova (SN) explosion from a 25 M {sub ☉} star. Here, we expand on the results of that work, investigating the star formation and chemical evolution of the system beyond the first SN. In a galaxy with a mass M {sub vir} = 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, sufficient gas is retained by the potential for a second period of star formation to occur. The impact of a central explosion is found to be much stronger than that of an off-center explosion both in blowing out the gas and in enriching it, as in the off-center case most of the SN energy and metals escape into the intergalactic medium. We model the star formation and metallicity, given the assumption that stars form for 100, 200, 400, and 600 Myr, and discuss the results in the context of recent observations of very low-mass galaxies. We show that we can account for most features of the observed relationship between [α/Fe] and [Fe/H] in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies with the assumption that the systems formed at a low mass, rather than being remnants of much larger systems.

  10. Chemical abundances in low surface brightness galaxies: Implications for their evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies are an important but often neglected part of the galaxy content of the universe. Their importance stems both from the selection effects which cause them to be under-represented in galaxy catalogs, and from what they can tell us about the physical processes of galaxy evolution that has resulted in something other than the traditional Hubble sequence of spirals. An important constraint for any evolutionary model is the present day chemical abundances of LSB disks. Towards this end, spectra for a sample of 75 H 2 regions distributed in 20 LSB disks galaxies were obtained. Structurally, this sample is defined as having B(0) fainter than 23.0 mag arcsec(sup -2) and scale lengths that cluster either around 3 kpc or 10 kpc. In fact, structurally, these galaxies are very similar to the high surface brightness spirals which define the Hubble sequence. Thus, our sample galaxies are not dwarf galaxies but instead have masses comparable to or in excess of the Milky Way. The basic results from these observations are summarized.

  11. The Role of the IGIMF in the chemical evolution of the solar neighbourhood

    CERN Document Server

    Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca; Kroupa, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    The integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) is computed from the combination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) and the embedded cluster mass function, described by a power law with index beta. The result of the combination is a time-varying IMF which depends on the star formation rate. We applied the IGIMF formalism to a chemical evolution model for the solar neighbourhood and compared the results obtained by assuming three possible values for beta with the ones obtained by means of a standard, well-tested, constant IMF. In general, a lower absolute value of beta implies a flatter IGIMF, hence a larger number of massive stars, higher Type Ia and II supernova rates, higher mass ejection rates and higher [alpha/Fe] values at a given metallicity. Our suggested fiducial value for beta is 2, since with this value we can account for most of the local observables. We discuss our results in a broader perspective, with some implications regarding the possible universality of the IMF and the importan...

  12. Oxygen Gas Abundances at z~1.4: Implications for the Chemical Evolution History of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, C; Carollo, C M; Meisenheimer, K; Hippelein, H; Stockton, A

    2006-01-01

    The 1chemical evolution models are used to relate t...

  13. Chemical evolution of bentonite buffer in a KBS-3 type spent fuel repository from thermal to post glacial phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The very long-term interaction between the bentonite buffer and ground waters present in a KBS-3 spent fuel repository has not been studied systematically, although this evolution is the base scenario in safety-case studies. In long-term safety considerations one must take into account all successive disturbances a bentonite buffer may have experienced (even short-term ones), as the effects of these are often irreversible. The interaction starts soon after the installation of bentonite blocks, when water is intruding into a deposition hole. The initially partially dry compacted bentonite starts to saturate and swell under the temperature gradient resulting from the heat formed by decaying radionuclides inside a copper canister. However, heat formation will decrease with time and bentonite will achieve full saturation after about one thousand years. The groundwater composition is estimated to change during the first 100,000 years from saline to extremely dilute, the latter likely encountered during the post-glacial phase. The bentonite is in contact with groundwater through a water-conducting fracture and possibly through excavation damaged and spalling zones formed around the deposition hole. An interesting question is the extent to which this coupling can slow down chemical changes in bentonite. Another important process affecting the evolution is the chemical alteration of the primary minerals in bentonite (i.e. montmorillonite and the accessory minerals). Swelling and other mechanical phenomena are important during the saturation of the buffer, but implementing these to our reactive transport models is beyond the scope of this paper. The implementing remains, however, the final aim. In this work, 2D reactive transport (TOUGHREACT v. 1.0) and some 3D COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL 2008) model calculations have been carried out on the chemical evolution of bentonite buffer from the operational phase of the repository

  14. Recent Advances in Shell Evolution with Shell-Model Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Utsuno, Yutaka; Tsunoda, Yusuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Honma, Michio; Togashi, Tomoaki; Mizusaki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Shell evolution in exotic nuclei is investigated with large-scale shell-model calculations. After presenting that the central and tensor forces produce distinctive ways of shell evolution, we show several recent results: (i) evolution of single-particle-like levels in antimony and cupper isotopes, (ii) shape coexistence in nickel isotopes understood in terms of configuration-dependent shell structure, and (iii) prediction of the evolution of the recently established $N=34$ magic number towards smaller proton numbers. In any case, large-scale shell-model calculations play indispensable roles in describing the interplay between single-particle character and correlation.

  15. GRB Redshift Evolution Within the Unified Jet Model

    OpenAIRE

    Donaghy, T. Q.; Lamb, D. Q.; Graziani, C.

    2003-01-01

    HETE-2 has provided new evidence that gamma-ray bursts may evolve with redshift. We investigate the consequences of this possibility for the unified jet model of XRFs and GRBs. We find that burst evolution with redshift can be naturally explained within the unified jet model, and the resulting model provides excellent agreement with existing HETE-2 and BeppoSAX data sets. In addition, this evolution model produces reasonable fits to the BATSE peak photon number flux distribution -- something ...

  16. A chemical model for the interstellar medium in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Capelo, Pedro R.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Banerjee, R.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present and test chemical models for three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. We explore the effect of changing key parameters such as metallicity, radiation, and non-equilibrium versus equilibrium metal cooling approximations on the transition between the gas phases in the interstellar medium. Methods: The microphysics was modelled by employing the public chemistry package KROME, and the chemical networks were tested to work in a wide range of densities and temperatures. We describe a simple H/He network following the formation of H2 and a more sophisticated network that includes metals. Photochemistry, thermal processes, and different prescriptions for the H2 catalysis on dust are presented and tested within a one-zone framework. The resulting network is made publicly available on the KROME webpage. Results: We find that employing an accurate treatment of the dust-related processes induces a faster HI-H2 transition. In addition, we show when the equilibrium assumption for metal cooling holds and how a non-equilibrium approach affects the thermal evolution of the gas and the HII-HI transition. Conclusions: These models can be employed in any hydrodynamical code via an interface to KROME and can be applied to different problems including isolated galaxies, cosmological simulations of galaxy formation and evolution, supernova explosions in molecular clouds, and the modelling of star-forming regions. The metal network can be used for a comparison with observational data of CII 158 μm emission both for high-redshift and for local galaxies.

  17. Application of INAA to reveal the chemical evolution of selected volcanic eruptiva from Santorini, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pumiceous products of the large-scale explosive eruptions at Santorini show a high grade of similarity in their optical appearance as well as in their chemical composition. The demand for a clear classification of these eruption products was raised from archaeological research, where pumice can be interpreted as a 'post-eruption' time marker. Elements that underwent significant changes because of geochemical processes and that could be indicative for a distinction of pumice produced by the five major explosive eruptions were looked for. INAA of 25 elements allows a clear classification and contributes new information to the chemical evolution of Santorini volcano. (author)

  18. The chemical evolution of a travertine-depositing stream: geochemical processes and mass transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on quantiatively defining the chemical changes occurring in Falling Spring Creek, a travertine-depositing stream located in Alleghany County, Virgina. The processes of CO2 outgassing and calcite precipitation or dissolution control the chemical evolution of the stream. Physical evidence for calcite precipitation exists in the travertine deposits which are first observed immediately above the waterfall and extend for at least 1.0 km below the falls. Net calcite precipitation occurs at all times of the year but is greatest during low-flow conditions in the summer and early fall. -from Authors

  19. The Chemical Evolution of Narrow Emission Line Galaxies: the Key to their Formation Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Torres-Papaqui, J P; Ortega-Minakata, R A

    2011-01-01

    Using the largest sample of narrow emission line galaxies available so far, we show that their spectral characteristics are correlated with different physical parameters, like the chemical abundances, the morphologies, the masses of the bulge and the mean stellar age of the stellar populations of the host galaxies. It suggests that the spectral variations observed in standard spectroscopic diagnostic diagrams are not due solely to variations of ionization parameters or structures but reflect also the chemical evolution of the galaxies, which in turn can be explained by different galaxy formation processes.

  20. The possible roles of water in the prebiotic chemical evolution of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuxun

    2010-09-21

    There is no doubt that water is pivotal to life. Yet, as the emergence of life is still a big challenge in science, the detailed involvement of water in that process is not well recognized. Following the clues provided by recent single-molecule studies on DNA, we attempt to elucidate the possible roles of water in the prebiotic chemical evolution. Water has long been recognized as an important reactant in the Miller-Urey experiment and then as the only solvent of the primitive soup. Besides that, water also played a vital role in the prebiotic chemical evolution: water is the important criterion in the combinatorial library screening for self-assembling macromolecules. With this notion, the uniformity of biochemistry for all terrestrial life may be explained. A possible roadmap from the inorganic world to the origin of life is also discussed. PMID:20577681

  1. Mutagens and carcinogens - Occurrence and role during chemical and biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Sorolla, A.; Oro, J.

    1981-01-01

    The roles of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances in early biologic evolution is examined, along with terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources of mutagens and carcinogens. UV solar radiation is noted to have served to stimulate prebiotic life while also causing harmful effects in plants and animals. Aromatic compounds have been found in meteorites, and comprise leukemogens, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and nitrasamine precursors. Other mutagenic sources are volcanoes, and the beginning of evolution with mutagenic substances is complicated by the appearance of malignancies due to the presence of carcinogens. The atmosphere of the Precambrian period contained both mutagens and early carcinogens and, combined with volcanic activity discharges, formed an atmospheric chemical background analogous to the background ionizing radiation. Carcinogenesis is concluded to be intrinsic to nature, having initiated evolution and, eventually, cancer cells.

  2. An Appreciative Model of Schumpeterian Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pol, Eduardo-Fernandez

    2007-01-01

    Schumpeter persistently sought to reconcile innovation with general equilibrium to explain economic evolution. In essence, he was interested in innovatory discontinuities that upset equilibrium and generate a transitional dynamics converging to a different state of technology. There are two central approaches to the analysis of economic evolution which revolve around the Schumpeterian vision: the evolutionary approach as originated in the landmark book by Nelson and Winter An Evolutionary The...

  3. Modelling Software Evolution using Algebraic Graph Rewriting

    OpenAIRE

    Ciraci, Selim; Broek, van den, PR Peter; Avgeriou, P.; Zdun, U.; Borne, I

    2006-01-01

    We show how evolution requests can be formalized using algebraic graph rewriting. In particular, we present a way to convert the UML class diagrams to colored graphs. Since changes in software may effect the relation between the methods of classes, our colored graph representation also employs the relations in UML interaction diagrams. Then, we provide a set of algebraic graph rewrite rules that formalizes the changes that may be caused by an evolution request, using the pushout construction ...

  4. Chemical evolution of groundwater in a drainage basin of Holocene age, east-central Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallick, E. I.

    1981-12-01

    Chemical evolution of groundwater in a small drainage basin of glacial origin (10,250 yr. B.P., based on radiocarbon age dating of gyttja from a closed saline lake in the basin) was studied in order to understand the generation of salts in surface-mined areas on the interior plains of Alberta. The basin was considered to be a natural analogue of a surface-disturbed area because of the large volumes of rock that had been redistributed by glaciers with the resulting change in topography and drainage. The distributions of hydraulic head, total dissolved solids (TDS), and environmental isotopes essentially reflect the superimposition of groundwater flow systems associated with the post-glacial topography upon a regional bedrock flow system of older but undertermined age. In the glacial drift aquifers and aquitards (sands and till), the groundwater composition was typically Ca-Mg-bicarbonate type at depths less than 30 m, but at depths of 30-100 m, the composition was Na-bicarbonate-sulfate type. In the deeper bedrock aquifers (> 100 m), Nabicarbonate-sulfate and Na-bicarbonate-chloride types were present. TDS was as low as 400 mg/l in the shallow drift aquifer, generally constant at ˜1000 mg/l in the deep drift and shallow bedrock aquifer, and over 1700 mg/l in the deep bedrock aquifer system. Chemical evolution of groundwater in the area appears to be dominated by two depth zones having different types of water-rock interaction. In the shallow drift zone, the dissolution of soil CO 2 in infiltrating groundwater, oxidation of organic carbon, sulfur and pyrite result in the formation of carbonic and sulfuric acids that attack carbonate and silicate minerals. On the basis of X-ray diffraction analysis, these minerals were calcite, dolomite, plagioclase feldspar, and smectite clays. However, in the deep regional bedrock aquifer, conditions are reducing (presence of methane), groundwater is alkaline (pH 8.6-10.3), and the Na-bicarbonate-chloride composition of groundwater

  5. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change......-point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights into the...

  6. Nonlocal PNJL model and imaginary chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to get constraints for the modeling of the QCD phase diagram at real chemical potential (μR), we investigate the phase structure of two-flavor QCD at finite imaginary chemical potential (μI) and temperature (T) using the nonlocal Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model including quark wave function renormalization. We show that this nonlocal PNJL model reproduces characteristic properties of QCD such as the Roberge-Weiss (RW) periodicity and the RW transition at finite θ=μI/T. To reproduce lattice QCD data of crossover lines for the chiral and deconfinement transitions near θ=π/3, we introduce additional local and nonlocal vector-type four-quark interactions in this model. These interactions have strong influences on the thermodynamics at moderate and high μR. Details of wave function renormalization do not affect the crossover lines, but have a significant impact on the determination of the strength of the nonlocal vector-type four-quark interaction.

  7. New trajectory driven aerosol and chemical process model: chemical and aerosol Lagrangian model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) have been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61°51' N, 24°17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements thro...

  8. Chemical and biological evolution of (U-14C)phenol sorbed on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods describing the chemical and biological evolution of (U-14C)phenol adsorbed on activated carbon are given with or without the use of bacteria. Without bacteria, the (U-14C)phenol initially adsorbed is not removed from the carbon after adding a solution of unlabelled phenol through the column for eight days. With bacteria, the (U-14C)phenol initially present, is removed (60-70%) from activated carbon with a solution containing unlabelled phenol, nitrogen and phosphorus. (author)

  9. Galactic evolution. I - Single-zone models. [encompassing stellar evolution and gas-star dynamic theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, T. X.; Hart, M. H.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The two basic approaches of physical theory required to calculate the evolution of a galactic system are considered, taking into account stellar evolution theory and the dynamics of a gas-star system. Attention is given to intrinsic (stellar) physics, extrinsic (dynamical) physics, and computations concerning the fractionation of an initial mass of gas into stars. The characteristics of a 'standard' model and its variants are discussed along with the results obtained with the aid of these models.

  10. Bacterial Evolution and the Bak-Sneppen Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Indrani; Chaudhuri, Indranath

    Recently, Lenski et al.1-3 have carried out several experiments on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. They have further quantified the relative contributions of adaptation, chance and history to bacterial evolution. In this paper, we show that a modified M-trait Bak-Sneppen model can explain many of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  11. Bacterial evolution and the Bak-Sneppen model

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Indrani; Chaudhuri, Indranath

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Lenski et al \\cite{Elena,Lenski,Travisano} have carried out several experiments on bacterial evolution. Their findings support the theory of punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution. They have further quantified the relative contributions of adaptation, chance and history to bacterial evolution. In this Brief Report, we show that a modified M-trait Bak-Sneppen model can explain many of the experimental results in a qualitative manner.

  12. Cumulus parameterizations in chemical transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Natalie M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1995-12-01

    Global three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs) are valuable tools for studying processes controlling the distribution of trace constituents in the atmosphere. A major uncertainty in these models is the subgrid-scale parametrization of transport by cumulus convection. This study seeks to define the range of behavior of moist convective schemes and point toward more reliable formulations for inclusion in chemical transport models. The emphasis is on deriving convective transport from meteorological data sets (such as those from the forecast centers) which do not routinely include convective mass fluxes. Seven moist convective parameterizations are compared in a column model to examine the sensitivity of the vertical profile of trace gases to the parameterization used in a global chemical transport model. The moist convective schemes examined are the Emanuel scheme [Emanuel, 1991], the Feichter-Crutzen scheme [Feichter and Crutzen, 1990], the inverse thermodynamic scheme (described in this paper), two versions of a scheme suggested by Hack [Hack, 1994], and two versions of a scheme suggested by Tiedtke (one following the formulation used in the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting) and ECHAM3 (European Centre and Hamburg Max-Planck-Institut) models [Tiedtke, 1989], and one formulated as in the TM2 (Transport Model-2) model (M. Heimann, personal communication, 1992). These convective schemes vary in the closure used to derive the mass fluxes, as well as the cloud model formulation, giving a broad range of results. In addition, two boundary layer schemes are compared: a state-of-the-art nonlocal boundary layer scheme [Holtslag and Boville, 1993] and a simple adiabatic mixing scheme described in this paper. Three tests are used to compare the moist convective schemes against observations. Although the tests conducted here cannot conclusively show that one parameterization is better than the others, the tests are a good measure of the

  13. Modeling the evolution of infrared galaxies: a parametric backward evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béthermin, M.; Dole, H.; Lagache, G.; Le Borgne, D.; Penin, A.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We attempt to model the infrared galaxy evolution in as simple a way as possible and reproduce statistical properties such as the number counts between 15 μm and 1.1 mm, the luminosity functions, and the redshift distributions. We then use the fitted model to interpret observations from Spitzer, AKARI, BLAST, LABOCA, AzTEC, SPT, and Herschel, and make predictions for Planck and future experiments such as CCAT or SPICA. Methods: This model uses an evolution in density and luminosity of the luminosity function parametrized by broken power-laws with two breaks at redshift ~0.9 and 2, and contains the two populations of the Lagache model: normal and starburst galaxies. We also take into account the effect of the strong lensing of high-redshift sub-millimeter galaxies. This effect is significant in the sub-mm and mm range near 50 mJy. It has 13 free parameters and eight additional calibration parameters. We fit the parameters to the IRAS, Spitzer, Herschel, and AzTEC measurements with a Monte Carlo Markov chain. Results: The model adjusted to deep counts at key wavelengths reproduces the counts from mid-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, as well as the mid-infrared luminosity functions. We discuss the contribution to both the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and the infrared luminosity density of the different populations. We also estimate the effect of the lensing on the number counts, and discuss the discovery by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) of a very bright population lying at high redshift. We predict the contribution of the lensed sources to the Planck number counts, the confusion level for future missions using a P(D) formalism, and the Universe opacity to TeV photons caused by the CIB. Material of the model (software, tables and predictions) is available online.

  14. Thermodynamic performance for a chemical reactions model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the analysis efficiency of a chemical reaction model of four states, such that their activated states can occur at any point (fixed but arbitrary) of the transition from one state to another. This mechanism operates under a single heat reservoir temperature, unlike the internal combustion engines where there are two thermal sources. Different efficiencies are compared to this model, which operate at different optimum engine regimes. Thus, some analytical methods are used to give an approximate expression, facilitating the comparison between them. Finally, the result is compared with that obtained by other authors considered a general model of an isothermal molecular machine. Taking into account the above, the results seems to follow a similar behaviour for all the optimized engines, which resemble that observed in the case of heat engine efficiencies

  15. Modelling Long-Term Evolution of Cementitious Materials Used in Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the latest developments at SCK-CEN in modelling long-term evolution of cementitious materials used as engineered barriers in waste disposal. In a first section chemical degradation of concrete during leaching with rain and soil water types is discussed. The geochemical evolution of concrete thus obtained forms the basis for all further modelling. Next we show how the leaching model is coupled with a reactive transport module to determine leaching of cement minerals under diffusive or advective boundary conditions. The module also contains a simplified microstructural model from which hydraulic and transport properties of concrete may be calculated dynamically. This coupled model is simplified, i.e. abstracted prior to being applied to large-scale concrete structures typical of a near-surface repository. Both the original and simplified models are then used to calculate the evolution of hydraulic, transport, and chemical properties of concrete. Characteristic degradation states of concrete are further linked to distribution ratios that describe sorption onto hardened cement via a linear and reversible sorption process. As concrete degrades and pH drops the distribution ratios are continuously updated. We have thus integrated all major chemical and physical concrete degradation processes into one simulator for a particular scale of interest. Two simulators are used: one that can operate at relatively small spatial scales using all process details and another one which simulates concrete degradation at the scale of the repository but with a simplified cement model representation. (author)

  16. Chemical Evolution in Sersic 159-03 Observed with Xmm-Newton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Plaa, Jelle; Werner, N.; Bykov, A.M.; Kaastra, J.S.; Mendez, M.; Vink, J.; Bleeker, J.A.M.; Bonamente, M.; Peterson, J.R.; /SRON, Utrecht /Utrecht, Astron. Inst.

    2006-03-10

    Using a new long X-ray observation of the cluster of galaxies Sersic 159-03 with XMM-Newton, we derive radial temperature and abundance profiles using single- and multi-temperature models. The fits to the EPIC and RGS spectra prefer multi-temperature models especially in the core. The radial profiles of oxygen and iron measured with EPIC/RGS and the line profiles in RGS suggest that there is a dip in the O/Fe ratio in the centre of the cluster compared to its immediate surroundings. A possible explanation for the large scale metallicity distribution is that SNIa and SNII products are released in the ICM through ram-pressure stripping of in-falling galaxies. This causes a peaked metallicity distribution. In addition, SNIa in the central cD galaxy enrich mainly the centre of the cluster with iron. This excess of SNIa products is consistent with the low O/Fe ratio we detect in the centre of the cluster. We fit the abundances we obtain with yields from SNIa, SNII and Population-III stars to derive the clusters chemical evolution. We find that the measured abundance pattern does not require a Population-III star contribution. The relative contribution of the number of SNIa with respect to the total number of SNe which enrich the ICM is about 25-50%. Furthermore, we discuss the possible presence of a non-thermal component in the EPIC spectra. A potential source of this non-thermal emission can be inverse-Compton scattering between Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons and relativistic electrons, which are accelerated in bow shocks associated with ram-pressure stripping of in-falling galaxies.

  17. Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P)Aircraft Mission: Design, Execution, and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Crawford, James H.; Kleb, Mary M.; Connors, Vickie S.; Bendura, Richard J.; Raper, James L.; Sachse, Glen W.; Gille, John C.; Emmons, Louisa; Heald, Colette L.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) aircraft mission was conducted in February-April 2001 over the NW Pacific (1) to characterize the Asian chemical outflow and relate it quantitatively to its sources and (2) to determine its chemical evolution. It used two aircraft, a DC-8 and a P-3B, operating out of Hong Kong and Yokota Air Force Base (near Tokyo), with secondary sites in Hawaii, Wake Island, Guam, Okinawa, and Midway. The aircraft carried instrumentation for measurements of long-lived greenhouse gases, ozone and its precursors, aerosols and their precursors, related species, and chemical tracers. Five chemical transport models (CTMs) were used for chemical forecasting. Customized bottom-up emission inventories for East Asia were generated prior to the mission to support chemical forecasting and to serve as a priori for evaluation with the aircraft data. Validation flights were conducted for the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument and revealed little bias (6 plus or minus 2%) in the MOPITT measurements of CO columns. A major event of transpacific Asian pollution was characterized through combined analysis of TRACE-P and MOPITT data. The TRACE-P observations showed that cold fronts sweeping across East Asia and the associated warm conveyor belts (WCBs) are the dominant pathway for Asian outflow to the Pacific in spring. The WCBs lift both anthropogenic and biomass burning (SE Asia) effluents to the free troposphere, resulting in complex chemical signatures. The TRACE-P data are in general consistent with a priori emission inventories, lending confidence in our ability to quantify Asian emissions from socioeconomic data and emission factors. However, the residential combustion source in rural China was found to be much larger than the a priori, and there were also unexplained chemical enhancements (HCN, CH3Cl, OCS, alkylnitrates) in Chinese urban plumes. The Asian source of CCl4 was found to

  18. Self-organized Critical Model Of Biological Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, H. F.; Mak, L; Kwok, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    A punctuated equilibrium model of biological evolution with relative fitness between different species being the fundamental driving force of evolution is introduced. Mutation is modeled as a fitness updating cellular automaton process where the change in fitness after mutation follows a Gaussian distribution with mean $x>0$ and standard deviation $\\sigma$. Scaling behaviors are observed in our numerical simulation, indicating that the model is self-organized critical. Besides, the numerical ...

  19. Habitability of Super-Earth Planets around Other Suns: Models including Red Giant Branch Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    von Bloh, W.; Cuntz, M.; Schroeder, K. -P.; C. Bounama; Franck, S.

    2008-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super- Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production taking into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical p...

  20. One-scale model for domain wall network evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a new phenomenological one-scale model for the evolution of domain wall networks, and test it against high-resolution field theory numerical simulations. We argue that previous numerical estimates of wall velocities are inaccurate, and suggest a more accurate method of measurement. We show that the model provides an adequate approximation to the evolution of key parameters characterizing the evolution of the network. We use the model to study possible scaling solutions for domain wall networks, and discuss some of their cosmological consequences

  1. Photoionization models of the evolution of Nova DQ Her 1934

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the optical evolution of a single nova Nova DQ Her 1934 is presented. The evolution of the nova remnant and the physical conditions which influence the appearance and the evolution of the ejecta are determined from these data quantatively where possible. Through modeling a nova it is hoped to be able to learn the evolution of To photospheric temperature and Lbol (bolometric luminosity) of the remnant, the evolution of Ne (electron number density) and Te (electron temperature) in the ejecta, the physical conditions in the dust-forming region, the total mass of the ejecta and the relative abundances of the elements. This would also allow the discovery of the physical processes which influence the evolution and the appearance of the ejecta. (U.K.)

  2. Evolution of the morphology of diamond particles and mechanism of their growth during the synthesis by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoktistov, N. A.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Golubev, V. G.; Baranov, M. A.; Bogdanov, K. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the surface morphology of diamond particles synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on silicon substrates has been investigated. It has been found that, when the diamond particles reach a critical size of less than 800 nm, the surface of the diamond faces is transformed. Particles with sizes of no more than 100-300 nm have a well-faceted surface covered by the {100} and {111} faces. An increase in the size of diamond particles leads to a change in the structure of their surface. The surface is covered by the {100} faces surrounded by a disordered phase. With a further increase in the particle size (up to ˜2000 nm), the {100} faces disappear and the diamond particles are covered by high-index faces. A model explaining the evolution of the surface morphology of diamond particles has been proposed. According to this model, during the evolution of diamond particles with an increase in their size, the mechanism of layer-bylayer growth changes to normal growth, which leads to a significant transformation of the entire surface of the diamond particles. The critical size of a two-dimensional nucleus formed on the {100} and {111} faces, at which the change in the growth mechanism begins to occur, has been calculated. A method has been proposed for controlling the morphology of diamond particles during their synthesis.

  3. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  4. Modeling of the chemical behavior of sodium fire aerosols during atmospheric dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusions: • Development of a preliminary kinetic model of NaOH aerosols carbonation based on the shrinking core model for chemical and physical evolutions with transfer time during atmospheric dispersion -> These kinetic models can be implemented in atmospheric dispersion code to calculate mass concentration evolution of each compound. • Validation of kinetic control by internal diffusion of CO2 into solid Na2CO3 external layer by non-dimensional criteria analysis. • First validation of theoretical calculations with available experimental results -> correct results for small aerosols sizes (< 1 μm) but further improvements and validations are required to describe larger particles behavior

  5. Chemical Pollution and Evolution of Massive Starbursts: Cleaning up the Environment in Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, C.

    1996-12-01

    I present the results of a research program seeking to characterize the impact of massive star-clusters on the chemical and dynamical evolution of metal-poor, irregular and blue compact galaxies. The evolution of high mass stars is thought to contribute the bulk of heavy element enrichment in the interstellar medium, especially alpha -process elements like O, Si, etc. Yet, in actively star-forming galaxies, localized chemical inhomogeneities are seldom observed. Spatially-resolved optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observatories is used to search for chemical enrichment in the vicinity of young star clusters in nearby galaxies. VLA aperture synthesis maps are used to examine the neutral hydrogen content, dynamics, and local environment of the sample galaxies. Despite the spread in evolutionary state of the starbursts determined by the EW of Balmer emission lines and the radio continuum spectral index, few instances of localized enrichment are found. In light of these data, the ``instantaneous enrichment'' scenario for extragalactic HII regions appears less probable than one which operates on long timescales and global spatial scales. The results are consistent with the idea that starburst driven winds expel freshly synthesized metals in a hot 10(6) K phase into the halos of galaxies where they cool, condense into globules, and mix homogeneously with the rest of the galaxy on long (dynamical) timescales. The C/O and N/O ratios of the galaxies are used as new tools for measuring the recent star formation history. Implications for chemical evolution of galaxies both locally and cosmologically are developed.

  6. Dust-regulated galaxy formation and evolution: a new chemodynamical model with live dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    Interstellar dust plays decisive roles in the conversion of neutral to molecular hydrogen (H2), the thermodynamical evolution of interstellar medium (ISM), and the modification of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. These important roles of dust have not been self-consistently included in previous numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. We have therefore developed a new model by which one can investigate whether and how galaxy formation and evolution can be influenced by dust-related physical processes such as photoelectric heating, H2 formation on dust, and stellar radiation pressure on dust in detail. A novel point of the model is that different dust species in a galaxy are represented by `live dust' particles (i.e. not test particles). Therefore, dust particles in a galaxy not only interact gravitationally with all four components of the galaxy (i.e. dark matter, stars, gas, and dust) but also are grown and destroyed through physical processes of ISM. First, we describe a way to include dust-related physical processes in N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution in detail. Then, we show some preliminary results of dust-regulated galaxy evolution. The preliminary results suggest that the evolution of dust distributions driven by radiation pressure of stars is very important for the evolution of star formation rates, chemical abundances, H2 fractions, and gas distributions in galaxies.

  7. Evolution of the stratospheric temperature and chemical composition over one Titanian year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coustenis, Athena; Bampasidis, G.; Vinatier, S. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Spatiales et d' Instrumentation en Astrophysique (LESIA), Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, 5, place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Achterberg, R. K.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Carlson, R. C.; Romani, P. N.; Guandique, E. A. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lavvas, P. [GSMA, Université Reims Champagne-Ardenne, F-51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Teanby, N. A. [School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Orton, G. [MS 183-501, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Stamogiorgos, S., E-mail: athena.coustenis@obspm.fr [Faculty of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, GR 15783 Zographos, Athens (Greece)

    2013-12-20

    Since the Voyager 1 (V1) flyby in 1980, Titan's exploration from space and the ground has been ongoing for more than a full revolution of Saturn around the Sun (one Titanian year or 29.5 Earth years had elapsed in 2010 May). In this study, we search for temporal variations affecting Titan's atmospheric thermal and chemical structure within that year. We process Cassini/CIRS data taken during the Titan flybys from 2006-2013 and find a rather uneventful equatorial evolution. Conversely, at northern latitudes, we found enhanced abundances around the period of the northern spring equinox in mid-2009, which subsequently decreased (from 2010 to 2012), returning to values similar to those found in the V1 epoch, one Titanian year before. In the southern latitudes, since 2012, we see a trend for an increase of several trace gases (C{sub 4}H{sub 2}, C{sub 3}H{sub 4}, and HCN), indicative of a seasonal atmospheric reversal setting in. When we compare the CIRS 2010 and the 1980 V1/IRIS spectra (reanalyzed here), we find limited inter-annual variations. A return to the 1980 stratospheric temperatures and abundances is generally achieved from 50°N to 50°S, indicative of the solar radiation being the dominating energy source at 10 AU, as for the Earth, as predicted by general circulation and photochemical models. Exceptions concern the most complex hydrocarbons (C{sub 4}H{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 4}). We also consider data from ground-based and Earth-orbiting observatories (such as from the Infrared Space Observatory, revisited here) and discuss possible atmospheric composition trends during a Titanian year.

  8. Evolution of the stratospheric temperature and chemical composition over one Titanian year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Voyager 1 (V1) flyby in 1980, Titan's exploration from space and the ground has been ongoing for more than a full revolution of Saturn around the Sun (one Titanian year or 29.5 Earth years had elapsed in 2010 May). In this study, we search for temporal variations affecting Titan's atmospheric thermal and chemical structure within that year. We process Cassini/CIRS data taken during the Titan flybys from 2006-2013 and find a rather uneventful equatorial evolution. Conversely, at northern latitudes, we found enhanced abundances around the period of the northern spring equinox in mid-2009, which subsequently decreased (from 2010 to 2012), returning to values similar to those found in the V1 epoch, one Titanian year before. In the southern latitudes, since 2012, we see a trend for an increase of several trace gases (C4H2, C3H4, and HCN), indicative of a seasonal atmospheric reversal setting in. When we compare the CIRS 2010 and the 1980 V1/IRIS spectra (reanalyzed here), we find limited inter-annual variations. A return to the 1980 stratospheric temperatures and abundances is generally achieved from 50°N to 50°S, indicative of the solar radiation being the dominating energy source at 10 AU, as for the Earth, as predicted by general circulation and photochemical models. Exceptions concern the most complex hydrocarbons (C4H2 and C3H4). We also consider data from ground-based and Earth-orbiting observatories (such as from the Infrared Space Observatory, revisited here) and discuss possible atmospheric composition trends during a Titanian year.

  9. Modelling the evolution and diversity of cumulative culture

    OpenAIRE

    Enquist, Magnus; Ghirlanda, Stefano; Eriksson, Kimmo

    2011-01-01

    Previous work on mathematical models of cultural evolution has mainly focused on the diffusion of simple cultural elements. However, a characteristic feature of human cultural evolution is the seemingly limitless appearance of new and increasingly complex cultural elements. Here, we develop a general modelling framework to study such cumulative processes, in which we assume that the appearance and disappearance of cultural elements are stochastic events that depend on the current state of cul...

  10. BAK-SNEPPEN MODELS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF STRUCTURED KNOWLEDGE

    OpenAIRE

    Piccinini, Livio Clemente; Chang, Ting Fa Margherita; Lepellere, Maria Antonietta; Taverna, Mario; Tubaro, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Scientific knowledge is subject to a twin evolution, since its development towards novelty creates disconnections and inconsistencies, while the need of structure requires order and method so that transmission and comprehension can be ensured. Models of biological evolution can help to understand many social and economical phenomena where the search for optimality is hindered by voluntary or random competition. Bak-Sneppen is one of the most significant models because it balances at best expl...

  11. Synthetic clusters of massive stars to test stellar evolution models

    CERN Document Server

    Georgy, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years, the Geneva stellar evolution group has released new grids of stellar models, including the effect of rotation and with updated physical inputs (Ekstr\\"om et al. 2012; Georgy et al. 2013a,b). To ease the comparison between the outputs of the stellar evolution computations and the observations, a dedicated tool was developed: the Syclist toolbox (Georgy et al. 2014). It allows to compute interpolated stellar models, isochrones, synthetic clusters, and to simulate the time-evolution of stellar populations.

  12. An Inherited Efficiencies Model of Non-Genomic Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    A model for the evolution of biological systems in the absence of a nucleic acid-like genome is proposed and applied to model the earliest living organisms -- protocells composed of membrane encapsulated peptides. Assuming that the peptides can make and break bonds between amino acids, and bonds in non-functional peptides are more likely to be destroyed than in functional peptides, it is demonstrated that the catalytic capabilities of the system as a whole can increase. This increase is defined to be non-genomic evolution. The relationship between the proposed mechanism for evolution and recent experiments on self-replicating peptides is discussed.

  13. Hydro-chemical study of the evolution of interstellar pre-biotic molecules during the collapse of molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the stumbling blocks for studying the evolution of interstellar molecules is the lack of adequate knowledge about the rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds. Some theoretical models of rate coefficients do exist in the literature for computing abundances of complex pre-biotic molecules. So far these have been used to study the abundances of these molecules in space. However, in order to obtain more accurate final compositions in these media, we have calculated the rate coefficients for the formation of some of the most important interstellar pre-biotic molecules by using quantum chemical theory. We use these rates inside our hydro-chemical model to examine the chemical evolution and final abundances of pre-biotic species during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. We find that a significant amount of various pre-biotic molecules could be produced during the collapse phase of a proto-star. We thoroughly study the formation of these molecules via successive neutral-neutral and radical-radical/radical-molecular reactions. We present the time evolution of the chemical species with an emphasis on how the production of these molecules varies with the depth of a cloud. We compare the formation of adenine in interstellar space using our rate-coefficients and using those obtained from existing theoretical models. Formation routes of the pre-biotic molecules are found to be highly dependent on the abundances of the reactive species and the rate coefficients involved in the reactions. The presence of grains strongly affects the abundances of the gas phase species. We also carry out a comparative study between different pathways available for the synthesis of adenine, alanine, glycine and other molecules considered in our network. Despite the huge abundances of the neutral reactive species, production of adenine is found to be strongly dominated by the radical-radical/radical-molecular reaction pathways

  14. Hydro-chemical study of the evolution of interstellar pre-biotic molecules during the collapse of molecular clouds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liton Majumdar; Ankan Das; Sandip K. Chakrabarti; Sonali Chakrabarti

    2012-01-01

    One of the stumbling blocks for studying the evolution of interstellar molecules is the lack of adequate knowledge about the rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in the interstellar medium and molecular clouds.Some theoretical models of rate coefficients do exist in the literature for computing abundances of complex pre-biotic molecules.So far these have been used to study the abundances of these molecules in space.However,in order to obtain more accurate final compositions in these media,we have calculated the rate coefficients for the formation of some of the most important interstellar pre-biotic molecules by using quantum chemical theory.We use these rates inside our hydro-chemical model to examine the chemical evolution and final abundances of pre-biotic species during the collapsing phase of a proto-star.We find that a significant amount of various pre-biotic molecules could be produced during the collapse phase of a proto-star.We thoroughly study the formation of these molecules via successive neutral-neutral and radical-radical/radicalmolecular reactions.We present the time evolution of the chemical species with an emphasis on how the production of these molecules varies with the depth of a cloud.We compare the formation of adenine in interstellar space using our rate-coefficients and using those obtained from existing theoretical models.Formation routes of the pre-biotic molecules are found to be highly dependent on the abundances of the reactive species and the rate coefficients involved in the reactions.The presence of grains strongly affects the abundances of the gas phase species.We also carry out a comparative study between different pathways available for the synthesis of adenine,alanine,glycine and other molecules considered in our network.Despite the huge abundances of the neutral reactive species,production of adenine is found to be strongly dominated by the radical-radical/radical-molecular reaction pathways.If all the

  15. Open Educational Resources: evolution and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Paz Trillo Miravalles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With the revolution in Information Technologies and Communication, a new thinking emerges about the use of these means from different fields.This article presents the evolution and prospect of technologies from the socioeducational field, it shows different movements emerged on European and international level. It analyses the Open Educational Resources (OER understood as new resources owing to the fact that they are offered free of charge to the whole society, they manage to share, adapt and use the knowledge.

  16. Conference on chemical evolution and the origin of life: Self-organization of the macromolecules of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of biomolecules was a necessary step in the evolution of life on earth. This interdisciplinary conference emphasized the role of replication in processes of self-organization of biological macromolecules. The present document contains abstracts of the 26 contributions to the conference on chemical evolution. The individual contributions have been indexed separately for the database

  17. Temporal evolution of the chemical structure during the pattern transfer by ion-beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, N.-B.; Jeong, S.; Yu, S.; Ihm, H.-I.; Kim, J.-S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution were performed. • Degradation of the transferred pattern starts before the overlayer is fully removed. • The chemical analysis reveals the severe reduction of the sputter yield of the material forming the overlayer near the interface due to the compound formation, requesting caution in the practice of the pattern transfer. - Abstract: Ru films patterned by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) serve as sacrificial masks for the transfer of the patterns to Si(1 0 0) and metallic glass substrates by continued IBS. Under the same sputter condition, however, both bare substrates remain featureless. Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution reveal that the pattern transfer, despite its apparent success, suffers from premature degradation before the mask is fully removed by IBS. Moreover, the residue of the mask or Ru atoms stubbornly remains near the surface, resulting in unintended doping or alloying of both patterned substrates.

  18. Temporal evolution of the chemical structure during the pattern transfer by ion-beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution were performed. • Degradation of the transferred pattern starts before the overlayer is fully removed. • The chemical analysis reveals the severe reduction of the sputter yield of the material forming the overlayer near the interface due to the compound formation, requesting caution in the practice of the pattern transfer. - Abstract: Ru films patterned by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) serve as sacrificial masks for the transfer of the patterns to Si(1 0 0) and metallic glass substrates by continued IBS. Under the same sputter condition, however, both bare substrates remain featureless. Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution reveal that the pattern transfer, despite its apparent success, suffers from premature degradation before the mask is fully removed by IBS. Moreover, the residue of the mask or Ru atoms stubbornly remains near the surface, resulting in unintended doping or alloying of both patterned substrates

  19. Planet signatures and effect of the chemical evolution of the Galactic thin-disk stars

    CERN Document Server

    Spina, Lorenzo; Ramírez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Studies based on high-precision abundance determinations revealed that chemical patterns of solar twins are characterised by the correlation between the differential abundances relative to the Sun and the condensation temperatures (Tc) of the elements. It has been suggested that the origin of this relation is related to the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk, but other processes, associated with the presence of planets around stars, might also be involved. Aims: We analyse HIRES spectra of 14 solar twins and the Sun to provide new insights on the mechanisms that can determine the relation between [X/H] and Tc. Methods: Our spectroscopic analysis produced stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and $\\xi$), ages, masses, and abundances of 22 elements (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, and Ba). We used these determinations to place new constraints on the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk and to verify whether this process alone can explain the diff...

  20. Surfactant-controlled damage evolution during chemical mechanical planarization of nanoporous films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integration of nanoporous organosilicate thin films involving chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a significant challenge due the evolution of defects in the films during CMP in the form of cracking and delamination. This study shows that small changes in CMP electrolyte chemistry and surfactant additions can have dramatic effects on crack growth rates in the films. Crack growth rates were sensitive to the type of electrolyte and decreased in the presence of electrolytes that caused crack tip blunting. Growth rates were also sensitive to nonionic surfactant additions where molecular structure and weight were demonstrated to be important variables. An optimized blend of surfactants and electrolytes can significantly retard defect evolution due to molecular bridging. Surfactant self-assembly and resulting molecular bridging were characterized by in situ atomic force microscopy and used to quantify the molecular bridging observed.

  1. New trajectory-driven aerosol and chemical process model Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM)

    OpenAIRE

    Tunved, P.; D. G. Partridge; Korhonen, H.

    2010-01-01

    A new Chemical and Aerosol Lagrangian Model (CALM) has been developed and tested. The model incorporates all central aerosol dynamical processes, from nucleation, condensation, coagulation and deposition to cloud formation and in-cloud processing. The model is tested and evaluated against observations performed at the SMEAR II station located at Hyytiälä (61° 51' N, 24° 17' E) over a time period of two years, 2000–2001. The model shows good agreement with measurements throughout mos...

  2. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Sodium and aluminium abundances in giants and dwarfs. Implications for stellar and Galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, R.; Romano, D.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Magrini, L.; Friel, E.; Jacobson, H.; Randich, S.; Ventura, P.; Lind, K.; Bergemann, M.; Nordlander, T.; Morel, T.; Pancino, E.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Adibekyan, V.; Tosi, M.; Vallenari, A.; Gilmore, G.; Bensby, T.; François, P.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Heiter, U.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Stellar evolution models predict that internal mixing should cause some sodium overabundance at the surface of red giants more massive than ~1.5-2.0 M⊙. The surface aluminium abundance should not be affected. Nevertheless, observational results disagree about the presence and/or the degree of Na and Al overabundances. In addition, Galactic chemical evolution models adopting different stellar yields lead to very different predictions for the behavior of [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. Overall, the observed trends of these abundances with metallicity are not well reproduced. Aims: We readdress both issues, using new Na and Al abundances determined within the Gaia-ESO Survey. Our aim is to obtain better observational constraints on the behavior of these elements using two samples: i) more than 600 dwarfs of the solar neighborhood and of open clusters and ii) low- and intermediate-mass clump giants in six open clusters. Methods: Abundances were determined using high-resolution UVES spectra. The individual Na abundances were corrected for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium effects. For the Al abundances, the order of magnitude of the corrections was estimated for a few representative cases. For giants, the abundance trends with stellar mass are compared to stellar evolution models. For dwarfs, the abundance trends with metallicity and age are compared to detailed chemical evolution models. Results: Abundances of Na in stars with mass below ~2.0 M⊙, and of Al in stars below ~3.0 M⊙, seem to be unaffected by internal mixing processes. For more massive stars, the Na overabundance increases with stellar mass. This trend agrees well with predictions of stellar evolutionary models. For Al, our only cluster with giants more massive than 3.0 M⊙, NGC 6705, is Al enriched. However, this might be related to the environment where the cluster was formed. Chemical evolution models that well fit the observed [Na/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] trend in solar neighborhood dwarfs

  3. Development of a numerical 2-dimensional beach evolution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baykal, Cüneyt

    2014-01-01

    to compute the nearshore depth-averaged wave-induced current velocities and mean water level changes, a sediment transport model to compute the local total sediment transport rates occurring under the action of wind waves, and a bottom evolution model to compute the bed level changes in time based on......This paper presents the description of a 2-dimensional numerical model constructed for the simulation of beach evolution under the action of wind waves only over the arbitrary land and sea topographies around existing coastal structures and formations. The developed beach evolution numerical model...... is composed of 4 submodels: a nearshore spectral wave transformation model based on an energy balance equation including random wave breaking and diffraction terms to compute the nearshore wave characteristics, a nearshore wave-induced circulation model based on the nonlinear shallow water equations...

  4. Hydro-chemical evolution of groundwater and mixing between aquifers: a statistical approach based on major ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linhua; Gui, Herong

    2015-03-01

    Geochemical analysis is a useful tool in hydrogeological assessment, particularly in constructing a conceptual model of a hydrogeological system. In this study, major ion concentrations of 53 groundwater samples from the coal-bearing aquifer in the Qidong coal mine, northern Anhui Province of China have been processed by statistical analysis for understanding either hydro-chemical characteristics or hydrological evolution, which will be useful for the safety of coal mining. The results suggest that most of the samples are Na-SO4 and Na-HCO3 types, and their hydro-chemical compositions are mainly controlled by dissolution of more soluble minerals (e.g. calcite) and weathering of silicate minerals (e.g. plagioclase). Two groups of samples have been subdivided by quantile and scatter plots of factor scores, one is related to different degrees of water-rock interactions and another is related to groundwater mixing. Moreover, four end members have been identified and the mixing calculation suggests that the groundwater samples affected by mixing have 20-100 % contribution from the loose layer aquifer (LA), and therefore, groundwater from the LA in the coal mine should be taken seriously during coal mining. The study demonstrated that statistical analysis is useful for connecting the hydrochemistry of groundwater with hydrological evolution of the aquifer.

  5. Contribution of Neutron Star Mergers to the R-process Chemical Evolution in the Hierarchical Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Komiya, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The main astronomical source of r-process elements has not yet been identified. One plausible site is neutron star mergers (NSMs), but from perspective of the Galactic chemical evolution, it has been pointed out that NSMs cannot reproduce the observed r-process abundance distribution of metal-poor stars at [Fe/H] $< -3$. Recently, Tsujimoto & Shigeyama (2014) pointed out that NSM ejecta can spread into much larger volume than ejecta from a supernova. We re-examine the enrichment of r-process elements by NSMs considering this difference in propagation using the chemical evolution model under the hierarchical galaxy formation. The observed r-process enhanced stars around [Fe/H] $\\sim -3$ are reproduced if the star formation efficiency is lower for low-mass galaxies under a realistic delay time distribution for NSMs. We show that a significant fraction of NSM ejecta escape from its host proto-galaxy to pollute intergalactic matter and other proto-galaxies. The propagation of r-process elements over proto-...

  6. Early time evolution of negative ion clouds and electron density depletions produced during electron attachment chemical release experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Ganguli, G.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the early time evolution of electron depletions and negative ion clouds produced during electron attachment chemical releases in the ionosphere. The simulation model considers the evolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and a three-species plasma that contains electrons, positive ions, and also heavy negative ions that result as a by-product of the electron attachment reaction. The early time evolution (less than the negative ion cyclotron period) of the system shows that a negative charge surplus initially develops outside of the depletion boundary as the heavy negative ions move across the boundary. The electrons are initially restricted from moving into the depletion due to the magnetic field. An inhomogenous electric field develops across the boundary layer due to this charge separation. A highly sheared electron flow velocity develops in the depletion boundary due to E x B and Delta-N x B drifts that result from electron density gradients and this inhomogenous electric field. Structure eventually develops in the depletion boundary layer due to low-frequency electrostatic waves that have growth times shorter than the negative ion cyclotron period. It is proposed that these waves are most likely produced by the electron-ion hybrid instability that results from sufficiently large shears in the electron flow velocity.

  7. The Galactic chemical evolution of oxygen inferred from 3D non-LTE spectral line formation calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Amarsi, A M; Collet, R; Leenaarts, J

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the Galactic chemical evolution of oxygen, addressing the systematic errors inherent in classical determinations of the oxygen abundance that arise from the use of one dimensional hydrostatic (1D) model atmospheres and from the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We perform detailed 3D non-LTE radiative transfer calculations for atomic oxygen lines across a grid of 3D hydrodynamic stag- ger model atmospheres for dwarfs and subgiants. We apply our grid of predicted line strengths of the [OI] 630 nm and OI 777 nm lines using accurate stellar parameters from the literature. We infer a steep decay in [O/Fe] for [Fe/H] $\\gtrsim$ -1.0, a plateau [O/Fe] $\\approx$ 0.5 down to [Fe/H] $\\approx$ -2.5 and an increasing trend for [Fe/H] $\\lesssim$ -2.5. Our 3D non-LTE calculations yield overall concordant results from the two oxygen abundance diagnostics.

  8. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  9. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  10. Lithospheric evolution of the Northern Arabian Shield: Chemical and isotopic evidence from basalts, xenoliths and granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, M.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of the upper-mantle and the lower-crust (the conteinental lithosphere), is the area of Israel and Sinai was studied, using the chemical composition and the Nd-Sr isotopic systematics from mantle and crustal nodules, their host basalts, and granites. The magmatism and the metasomatism making the lithosphere are related to uprise of mantle diapirs in the uppermost mantle of the area. These diapirs heated the base of the lithosphere, eroded, and replaced it with new hot material. It caused a domal uplift of the lithosphere (and the crust). The doming resulted in tensional stresses that in turn might develop transport channels for the basalt.

  11. The Star Formation & Chemical Evolution History of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, T J L; Hill, V; Saha, A; Olszewski, E W; Mateo, M; Starkenburg, E; Battaglia, G; Walker, M G

    2012-01-01

    We present deep photometry in the B,V and I filters from CTIO/MOSAIC for about 270.000 stars in the Fornax dwarf Spheroidal galaxy, out to a radius of r_ell\\sim0.8 degrees. By combining the accurately calibrated photometry with the spectroscopic metallicity distributions of individual Red Giant Branch stars we obtain the detailed star formation and chemical evolution history of Fornax. Fornax is dominated by intermediate age (1-10 Gyr) stellar populations, but also includes ancient (10-14 Gyr), and young (-1.5 dex, with a clear trend in age.

  12. Chemical cleaning specification: few tube test model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specification is for the waterside chemical cleaning of the 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steel steam generator tubes. It describes the reagents and conditions for post-chemical cleaning passivation of the evaporator tubes

  13. Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel Hanna

    2008-10-16

    The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and

  14. Stellar Evolution Models of Young Stars: Progress and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Feiden, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Stellar evolution models are a cornerstone of young star astrophysics, which necessitates that they yield accurate and reliable predictions of stellar properties. Here, I review the current performance of stellar evolution models against young astrophysical benchmarks and highlight recent progress incorporating non-standard physics, such as magnetic field and starspots, to explain observed deficiencies. While addition of these physical processes leads to improved agreement between models and observations, there are several fundamental limitations in our understanding about how these physical processes operate. These limitations inhibit our ability to form a coherent picture of the essential physics needed to accurately compute young stellar models, but provide rich avenues for further exploration.

  15. A mesoscale chemical transport model (MEDIUM) nested in a global chemical transport model (MEDIANTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claveau, J.; Ramaroson, R. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    1997-12-31

    The lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (UT-LS) are frequently subject to mesoscale or local scale exchange of air masses occurring along discontinuities. This exchange (e.g. downward) can constitute one of the most important source of ozone from the stratosphere down to the middle troposphere where strong mixing dilutes the air mass and competing the non-linear chemistry. The distribution of the chemical species in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere depends upon various source emissions, e.g. from polluted boundary layer or from aircraft emissions. Global models, as well as chemical transport models describe the climatological state of the atmosphere and are not able to describe correctly the stratosphere and troposphere exchange. Mesoscale models go further in the description of smaller scales and can reasonably include a rather detailed chemistry. They can be used to assess the budget of NO{sub x} from aircraft emissions in a mesoscale domain. (author) 4 refs.

  16. Structural Evolution of SiC Films During Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolution of chemical bonding configurations for the films deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) diluted with H2 during plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition is investigated. In the experiment a small amount of CH4 was added to adjust the plasma environment and modify the structure of the deposited films. The measurements of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the production of 6H-SiC embedded in the amorphous matrix without the input of CH4. As CH4 was introduced into the deposition reaction, the transition of 6H-SiC to cubic SiC in the films took place, and also the film surfaces changed from a structure of ellipsoids to cauliflower-like shapes. With a further increase of CH4 in the flow ratio, the obtained films varied from Si-C bonding dominant to a sp2/sp3 carbon-rich composition. (low temperature plasma)

  17. Present state and chemical evolution of the atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Pluto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation is made of the current understanding of the atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Pluto, as well as of theoretical models for their origin and evolution. All three atmospheres contain methane, while Titan, and probably Triton, have nitrogen. The primary driver in the evolution of the Titan atmosphere has been the irreversible photolysis of methane. If a surface reservoir of liquid methane exists to resupply the atmosphere, it is subject to enrichment in ethane due to the long-term photolysis of methane. The key issue in the origin and early evolution of Titan's atmosphere is the source of molecular nitrogen; two schemes for the conversion of ammonia to nitrogen have been considered

  18. Present state and chemical evolution of the atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Atreya, S. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the current understanding of the atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Pluto, as well as of theoretical models for their origin and evolution. All three atmospheres contain methane, while Titan, and probably Triton, have nitrogen. The primary driver in the evolution of the Titan atmosphere has been the irreversible photolysis of methane. If a surface reservoir of liquid methane exists to resupply the atmosphere, it is subject to enrichment in ethane due to the long-term photolysis of methane. The key issue in the origin and early evolution of Titan's atmosphere is the source of molecular nitrogen; two schemes for the conversion of ammonia to nitrogen have been considered.

  19. Abstraction, visualization, and evolution of process models

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The increasing adoption of process orientation in companies has resulted in large process model collections. Each process model of such a collection may comprise dozens of elements and captures various perspectives of a business process. Domain experts having only limited modeling knowledge hardly comprehend such complex process models. Therefore, they demand for a customized view on business processes enabling them to optimize and evolve process models effectively. This thesis contribute...

  20. Hierarchical Model for the Evolution of Cloud Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, N; Sanchez, Nestor; Parravano, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    The structure of cloud complexes appears to be well described by a "tree structure" representation when the image is partitioned into "clouds". In this representation, the parent-child relationships are assigned according to containment. Based on this picture, a hierarchical model for the evolution of Cloud Complexes, including star formation, is constructed, that follows the mass evolution of each sub-structure by computing its mass exchange (evaporation or condensation) with its parent and children, which depends on the radiation density at the interphase. For the set of parameters used as a reference model, the system produces IMFs with a maximum at too high mass (~2 M_sun) and the characteristic times for evolution seem too long. We show that these properties can be improved by adjusting model parameters. However, the emphasis here is to illustrate some general properties of this nonlinear model for the star formation process. Notwithstanding the simplifications involved, the model reveals an essential fe...

  1. Chemical leasing business models: a contribution to the effective risk management of chemical substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Cornelia; Moser, Frank

    2007-08-01

    Chemicals indisputably contribute greatly to the well-being of modern societies. Apart from such benefits, however, chemicals often pose serious threats to human health and the environment when improperly handled. Therefore, the European Commission has proposed a regulatory framework for the Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH) that requires companies using chemicals to gather pertinent information on the properties of these substances. In this article, we argue that the crucial aspect of this information management may be the honesty and accuracy of the transfer of relevant knowledge from the producer of a chemical to its user. This may be particularly true if the application of potentially hazardous chemicals is not part of the user's core competency. Against this background, we maintain that the traditional sales concept provides no incentives for transferring this knowledge. The reason is that increased user knowledge of a chemical's properties may raise the efficiency of its application. That is, excessive and unnecessary usage will be eliminated. This, in turn, would lower the amount of chemicals sold and in competitive markets directly decrease profits of the producer. Through the introduction of chemical leasing business models, we attempt to present a strategy to overcome the incentive structure of classical sales models, which is counterproductive for the transfer of knowledge. By introducing two models (a Model A that differs least and a Model B that differs most from traditional sales concepts), we demonstrate that chemical leasing business models are capable of accomplishing the goal of Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals: to effectively manage the risk of chemicals by reducing the total quantity of chemicals used, either by a transfer of applicable knowledge from the lessor to the lessee (Model A) or by efficient application of the chemical by the lessor him/herself (Model B). PMID:17958507

  2. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Biofuel Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathy, Subram Maniam

    Bioalcohols, such as bioethanol and biobutanol, are suitable replacements for gasoline, while biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This study's contribution is experimentally validated chemical kinetic combustion mechanisms for biobutanol and biodiesel. Fundamental combustion data and chemical kinetic mechanisms are presented and discussed to improve our understanding of biofuel combustion. The net environmental impact of biobutanol (i.e., n-butanol) has not been studied extensively, so this study first assesses the sustainability of n-butanol derived from corn. The results indicate that technical advances in fuel production are required before commercializing biobutanol. The primary contribution of this research is new experimental data and a novel chemical kinetic mechanism for n-butanol combustion. The results indicate that under the given experimental conditions, n-butanol is consumed primarily via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radical molecules, which subsequently decompose to smaller hydrocarbon and oxygenated species. The hydroxyl moiety in n-butanol results in the direct production of the oxygenated species such as butanal, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde. The formation of these compounds sequesters carbon from forming soot precursors, but they may introduce other adverse environmental and health effects. Biodiesel is a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters derived from fats and oils. This research study presents high quality experimental data for one large fatty acid methyl ester, methyl decanoate, and models its combustion using an improved skeletal mechanism. The results indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which ultimately lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular

  3. Molybdenum and technetium cycle in the environment. Physical chemical evolution and mobility in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum 99 and technetium 99 from liquid discharges of base nuclear installations (reactors, reprocessing plants, UF6 treatment, etc.) can reach the environment via irrigation waters and atmospheric deposits. The contribution to the soil by irrigation results in a physical-chemical transformation, the results of which, in the case of technetium 99, could be volatilization via microbes. The changes in the physical-chemical forms of technetium in different soils reveals the preponderant effect of the initial amount deposited. The determination of the rate of technetium and molybdenum assimilation shows a certain similarity in behaviour; yet the localization of these isotopes is not the same. The transfer of molybdenum and technetium via the root system is different in its intensity; this is mainly due to different physical-chemical forms. Finally, each isotope has an optimum assimilation threshold and a toxicity threshold. The study of the physical-chemical evolution and the mobility in the soil-plant-water table system of these two isotopes shows a new aspect with respect to certain transfer channels to the human being

  4. Coupled thermo-hydro-chemical models of swelling bentonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, Javier; Mon, Alba; Zheng, Liange; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Pisani, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories is based on the multibarrier concept of retention of the waste by a combination of engineered and geological barriers. The engineered barrier system (EBS) includes the solid conditioned waste-form, the waste container, the buffer made of materials such as clay, grout or crushed rock that separate the waste package from the host rock and the tunnel linings and supports. The geological barrier supports the engineered system and provides stability over the long term during which time radioactive decay reduces the levels of radioactivity. The strong interplays among thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration, thermal and solute transport stages of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository call for coupled THMC models for the metallic overpack, the unsaturated compacted bentonite and the concrete liner. Conceptual and numerical coupled THMC models of the EBS have been developed, which have been implemented in INVERSE-FADES-CORE. Chemical reactions are coupled to the hydrodynamic processes through chemical osmosis (C-H coupling) while bentonite swelling affects solute transport via changes in bentonite porosity changes (M-H coupling). Here we present THMC models of heating and hydration laboratory experiments performed by CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) on compacted FEBEX bentonite and numerical models for the long-term evolution of the EBS for 1 Ma. The changes in porosity caused by swelling are more important than those produced by the chemical reactions during the early evolution of the EBS (t < 100 years). For longer times, however, the changes in porosity induced by the dissolution/precipitation reactions are more relevant due to: 1) The effect of iron mineral phases (corrosion products) released by the corrosion of the carbon steel canister; and 2) The hyper alkaline plume produced by the concrete liner. Numerical results show that

  5. A psychosocial model for the evolution of aesthetic patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, T.; Kalganova, T

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an original attempt to evolve aesthetic patterns by integrating the rules of colour psychology into a multi-agent evolutionary model. The system uses the principles of evolution to determine social relationships between agents. Communication plays an important role in the evolution of social behaviour. In our case the exchange of information between agents determines their behavioural characteristics. The interaction between agents and their social behaviour may be contro...

  6. Multiobjective optimization of an extremal evolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a two-dimensional model for a co-evolving ecosystem that generalizes the extremal coupled map lattice model. The model takes into account the concept of multiobjective optimization. We find that the system self-organizes into a critical state. The distributions of the distances between subsequent mutations as well as the distribution of avalanches sizes follow power law. (author)

  7. Analysis of the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk via dynamical simulations of the open cluster system

    OpenAIRE

    Tecce, T. E.; Pellizza, L. J.; Piatti, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    For several decades now, open clusters have been used to study the structure and chemical evolution of the disk of our Galaxy. Due to the fact that their ages and metallicities can be determined with relatively good precision, and since they can be observed even at great distances, they are excellent tracers of the variations in the abundance of heavy chemical elements with age and position in the Galactic disk. In the present work we analyze the star formation history and the chemical evolut...

  8. Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) aircraft mission: Design, execution, and first results

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Daniel James; Crawford, James; Kleb, Mary; Connors, VIckie; Bendura, Richard; Raper, James; Sachse, Glen; Gille, John; Emmons, Louisa; Heald, Colette

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) aircraft mission was conducted in February–April 2001 over the NW Pacific (1) to characterize the Asian chemical outflow and relate it quantitatively to its sources and (2) to determine its chemical evolution. It used two aircraft, a DC-8 and a P-3B, operating out of Hong Kong and Yokota Air Force Base (near Tokyo), with secondary sites in Hawaii, Wake Island, Guam, Okinawa, and Midway. The aircraft carried instrumentation f...

  9. Surface reconstruction and chemical evolution of stoichiometric layered cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Asta, Mark D; Xin, Huolin L; Doeff, Marca M

    2014-01-01

    The present study sheds light on the long-standing challenges associated with high-voltage operation of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Using correlated ensemble-averaged high-throughput X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially resolved electron microscopy and spectroscopy, here we report structural reconstruction (formation of a surface reduced layer, to transition) and chemical evolution (formation of a surface reaction layer) at the surface of LiNi(x)Mn(x)Co(1-2x)O2 particles. These are primarily responsible for the prevailing capacity fading and impedance buildup under high-voltage cycling conditions, as well as the first-cycle coulombic inefficiency. It was found that the surface reconstruction exhibits a strong anisotropic characteristic, which predominantly occurs along lithium diffusion channels. Furthermore, the surface reaction layer is composed of lithium fluoride embedded in a complex organic matrix. This work sets a refined example for the study of surface reconstruction and chemical evolution in battery materials using combined diagnostic tools at complementary length scales. PMID:24670975

  10. A last updating evolution model for online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Zhan; Xia, Zhengyou; Wang, Jiandong; Zhang, Chengcui

    2013-05-01

    As information technology has advanced, people are turning to electronic media more frequently for communication, and social relationships are increasingly found on online channels. However, there is very limited knowledge about the actual evolution of the online social networks. In this paper, we propose and study a novel evolution network model with the new concept of “last updating time”, which exists in many real-life online social networks. The last updating evolution network model can maintain the robustness of scale-free networks and can improve the network reliance against intentional attacks. What is more, we also found that it has the “small-world effect”, which is the inherent property of most social networks. Simulation experiment based on this model show that the results and the real-life data are consistent, which means that our model is valid.

  11. Why Ontology Evolution is Essential in Modelling Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Bundy, Alan

    2008-01-01

    We can model scientific discovery as automated reasoning and learning, e.g., using a logic-based representation of knowledge, which we will here call an ontology. Much of what Kuhn calls “normal science” may be modelled as problem solving within the shared ontology of a scientific community (Kuhn 1970). However, to model what Kuhn calls a “paradigm shift”, we need mechanisms for changing this ontology. This is what W3C call ontology evolution1. As we will see, ontology evolution can also happ...

  12. Comment on "Avalanche dynamics in evolution, growth and depinning models"

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlbom, M; Dahlbom, Mats; Irback, Anders

    1996-01-01

    In a recent paper Paczuski, Maslov and Bak present a comprehensive theory of avalanche dynamics in models of growth, interface depinning and evolution. One of their main results is the so-called gamma equation, which is claimed to be exact. In this note it is shown that this equation requires a numerical correction factor in order to become exact. The exactness is needed when using the equation to determine the exponent \\gamma. The correct equation is tested against numerical results for the Bak-Sneppen evolution model and two closely related models, and it turns out that it improves the description of data in a statistically significant way.

  13. Prediction of long-term chemical evolution of a low-pH cement designed for underground radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pH cements, also referred as low-alkalinity cements, are binders with a pore solution pH ≤ 11. They can be designed by replacing significant amounts of Portland cement (OPC) (>40%) by silica fume, which can be associated in some cases to low-CaO fly ash and/or ground granulated blast furnace slag to decrease the heat output during hydration by dilution of OPC and improve the mechanical strength of the final material. With the prospect of using these materials in a geological repository, it is of main importance to estimate their long-term properties and the influence of external and internal factors (chemical composition of the binder, storage temperature) on their characteristics. For this purpose, a three-way original approach was adopted. First, the hydration of low-pH cements was accelerated by milling cement slurries with zirconia beads. Secondly, the low-pH cement pastes were mimicked from mixtures of appropriate highly reactive oxides (lime, silica, calcium aluminate and calcium sulphate) in diluted suspensions. Thirdly, thermodynamic modelling was carried out to predict the mineral assemblage and composition of the solution at equilibrium, starting from the composition of the initial low-pH cement studied. Comparing the different results showed that this three-way approach is suitable to understand and predict the long-term chemical evolution of the cements since the final states obtained in all cases were equivalent. This method was then used to investigate the influence of temperature in the range 20-80 C on the chemical evolution of a low-pH cement. (authors)

  14. Chemical Mechanism Solvers in Air Quality Models

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John C.; Adrian Sandu; Rolf Sander; Hong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The solution of chemical kinetics is one of the most computationally intensive tasks in atmospheric chemical transport simulations. Due to the stiff nature of the system, implicit time stepping algorithms which repeatedly solve linear systems of equations are necessary. This paper reviews the issues and challenges associated with the construction of efficient chemical solvers, discusses several families of algorithms, presents strategies for increasing computational efficiency, and gives insi...

  15. The Evolution of Galaxy Clustering in Hierarchical Models

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Shaun; Benson, Andrew; Baugh, Carlton,; Lacey, Cedric; Frenk, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The main ingredients of recent semi-analytic models of galaxy formation are summarised. We present predictions for the galaxy clustering properties of a well specified LCDM model whose parameters are constrained by observed local galaxy properties. We present preliminary predictions for evolution of clustering that can be probed with deep pencil beam surveys.

  16. Acquisition of Complex Systemic Thinking: Mental Models of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Apollonia, Sylvia T.; Charles, Elizabeth S.; Boyd, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the impact of introducing college students to complex adaptive systems on their subsequent mental models of evolution compared to those of students taught in the same manner but with no reference to complex systems. The students' mental models (derived from similarity ratings of 12 evolutionary terms using the pathfinder algorithm)…

  17. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Sodium and aluminium abundances in giants and dwarfs - Implications for stellar and Galactic chemical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanic, R; Bragaglia, A; Donati, P; Magrini, L; Friel, E; Jacobson, H; Randich, S; Ventura, P; Lind, K; Bergemann, M; Nordlander, T; Morel, T; Pancino, E; Tautvaisiene, G; Adibekyan, V; Tosi, M; Vallenari, A; Gilmore, G; Bensby, T; Francois, P; Koposov, S; Lanzafame, A C; Recio-Blanco, A; Bayo, A; Carraro, G; Casey, A R; Costado, M T; Franciosini, E; Heiter, U; Hill, V; Hourihane, A; Jofre, P; Lardo, C; de Laverny, P; Lewis, J; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Sacco, G G; Sbordone, L; Sousa, S G; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S

    2016-01-01

    Stellar evolution models predict that internal mixing should cause some sodium overabundance at the surface of red giants more massive than ~ 1.5--2.0 Msun. The surface aluminium abundance should not be affected. Nevertheless, observational results disagree about the presence and/or the degree of the Na and Al overabundances. In addition, Galactic chemical evolution models adopting different stellar yields lead to quite different predictions for the behavior of [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. Overall, the observed trends of these abundances with metallicity are not well reproduced. We readdress both issues, using new Na and Al abundances determined within the Gaia-ESO Survey, using two samples: i) more than 600 dwarfs of the solar neighborhood and of open clusters and ii) low- and intermediate-mass clump giants in six open clusters. Abundances of Na in giants with mass below ~2.0 Msun, and of Al in giants below ~3.0 Msun, seem to be unaffected by internal mixing processes. For more massive giants, the Na o...

  18. Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Vaughn Kohl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prenatal migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurosecretory neurons allows nutrients and human pheromones to alter GnRH pulsatility, which modulates the concurrent maturation of the neuroendocrine, reproductive, and central nervous systems, thus influencing the development of ingestive behavior, reproductive sexual behavior, and other behaviors. Methods: This model details how chemical ecology drives adaptive evolution via: (1 ecological niche construction, (2 social niche construction, (3 neurogenic niche construction, and (4 socio-cognitive niche construction. This model exemplifies the epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal conditioning, which alters genetically predisposed, nutrient-dependent, hormone-driven mammalian behavior and choices for pheromones that control reproduction via their effects on luteinizing hormone (LH and systems biology. Results: Nutrients are metabolized to pheromones that condition behavior in the same way that food odors condition behavior associated with food preferences. The epigenetic effects of olfactory/pheromonal input calibrate and standardize molecular mechanisms for genetically predisposed receptor-mediated changes in intracellular signaling and stochastic gene expression in GnRH neurosecretory neurons of brain tissue. For example, glucose and pheromones alter the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH and LH. A form of GnRH associated with sexual orientation in yeasts links control of the feedback loops and developmental processes required for nutrient acquisition, movement, reproduction, and the diversification of species from microbes to man. Conclusion: An environmental drive evolved from that of nutrient ingestion in unicellular organisms to that of pheromone-controlled socialization in insects. In mammals, food odors and pheromones cause changes in hormones such as LH, which has developmental affects on pheromone-controlled sexual behavior in nutrient-dependent reproductively

  19. Contamination weeping: A chemical ion exchange model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of a chemical ion-exchange model to characterize the problem of nuclear fuel transportation cask contamination and release (''weeping''). Surface charge characteristics of Cr2O3 and stainless steel (304) powders have been measured to determine the potential for ion exchange at metal oxide -- aqueous interfaces. The solubility of pool contaminant Co and Cs electrolytes at varying pH and the adsorption characteristics of these ions on Cr2O3 and stainless steel powders in aqueous slurries have been studied. Experiments show that Co ions do reversibly adsorb on these powder surfaces and, more specifically, that adsorption occurs in the nominal pH range (pH = 4--6) of a boric acid-moderated spent fuel pool. Desorption has been demonstrated to occur at pH ≤ 3. Cs ions also have been shown to have an affinity for these surfaces although the reversibility of Cs+ bonding by H+ ion exchange has not been fully demonstrated. These results have significant implications for effective decontamination and coating processes used on nuclear fuel transportation casks. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. The chemical transport model Oslo CTM3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Søvde

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present here the global chemical transport model Oslo CTM3, an update of the Oslo CTM2. The update comprises a faster transport scheme, an improved wet scavenging scheme for large scale rain, updated photolysis rates and a new lightning parameterization. Oslo CTM3 is better parallelized and allows for stable, large time steps for advection, enabling more complex or high resolution simulations. Thorough comparisons between the Oslo CTM3, Oslo CTM2 and measurements are performed, and in general the Oslo CTM3 is found to reproduce measurements well. Inclusion of tropospheric sulfur chemistry and nitrate aerosols in CTM3 is shown to be important to reproduce tropospheric O3, OH and the CH4 lifetime well. Using the same meteorology to drive the two models, shows that some features related to transport are better resolved by the CTM3, such as polar cap transport, while features like transport close to the vortex edge are resolved better in the Oslo CTM2 due to its required shorter transport time step. The longer transport time steps in CTM3 result in larger errors e.g. near the jets, and when necessary, this can be remedied by using a shorter time step. An additional, more accurate and time consuming, treatment of polar cap transport is presented, however, both perform acceptably. A new treatment of the horizontal distribution of lightning is presented and found to compare well with measurements. Vertical distributions of lighting are updated, and tested against the old vertical distribution. The new profiles are found to produce more NOx in the tropical middle troposphere, and less at the surface and at high altitudes.

  1. Synoptic and chemical evolution of the Antarctic vortex in winter and spring, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, A. F.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the vortex at least up to 50 mb is dominated by synoptic scales in the troposphere. In particular, there is a clear response when poleward extension of tropospheric anticyclones from latitudes of 40 and 50 S to 70 and 80 S occurs. This response is evident in isentropic potential vorticity maps, TOMS ozone fields and SAM II polar stratospheric clouds. An important feature of the high latitude Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere is a transition at potential temperatures in the 390 to 400 K range. This transition, the vortopause, is clearly marked in aircraft profiles of O3, H2O, N2O and ClO at latitudes 68 to 72 S near the Antarctic peninsula, and also cross-sections of potential vorticity and potential temperature; above it, the isopleths are more closely spaced than below it. The aircraft measurements of H2O, O3, NO sub y, N2O, ClO, and whole air data are examined in material coordinates, theta and P sub theta, backed up by trajectory analysis. The evolution of the chemical mixing ratios is examined in these coordinates as a function of time from mid-August to late September. Conclusions are drawn about the rates of change and their causes. The meteorological and aircraft data are examined for evidence of the following kinds of motion with respect to the vortex: ingress of air aloft, subsidence, peeling off of air to lower latitudes, and folding of the vortopause. Conclusions are presented regarding the evidence for a chemical sink of ozone above and below theta = 400 K, and whether the vortex has a mass flow through it, or if the chemical sink operates on a fixed mass of air. Implications for mid-latitudes are briefly considered in the light of the conclusions.

  2. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Adler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS. The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m=1.53(±0.03+0.07i(±0.03, during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m=1.54(±0.01+0.04i(±0.01 compared to m=1.49(±0.01+0.02i(±0.01 of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  3. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  4. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Adler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS. The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03 + 0.07i(±0.03, during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01 + 0.04i(±0.01 compared to m = 1.49(±0.01 + 0.02i(±0.01 of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  5. Modeling the connection between development and evolution: Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mjolsness, E.; Reinitz, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Garrett, C.D. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Sharp, D.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-07-29

    In this paper we outline a model which incorporates development processes into an evolutionary frame work. The model consists of three sectors describing development, genetics, and the selective environment. The formulation of models governing each sector uses dynamical grammars to describe processes in which state variables evolve in a quantitative fashion, and the number and type of participating biological entities can change. This program has previously been elaborated for development. Its extension to the other sectors of the model is discussed here and forms the basis for further approximations. A specific implementation of these ideas is described for an idealized model of the evolution of a multicellular organism. While this model doe not describe an actual biological system, it illustrates the interplay of development and evolution. Preliminary results of numerical simulations of this idealized model are presented.

  6. Evolution of metastasis revealed by mutational landscapes of chemically induced skin cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human tumors show a high level of genetic heterogeneity, but the processes that influence the timing and route of metastatic dissemination of the subclones are unknown. Here we have used whole-exome sequencing of 103 matched benign, malignant and metastatic skin tumors from genetically heterogeneous mice to demonstrate that most metastases disseminate synchronously from the primary tumor, supporting parallel rather than linear evolution as the predominant model of metastasis.

  7. Modeling release of chemicals from multilayer materials into food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The migration of chemicals from materials into food is predictable by various mathematical models. In this article, a general mathematical model is developed to quantify the release of chemicals through multilayer packaging films based on Fick's diffusion. The model is solved numerically to elucidate the effects of different diffusivity values of different layers, distribution of chemical between two adjacent layers and between material and food, mass transfer at the interface of material and food on the migration process.

  8. Evolution models from the AGB to the PNe and the rapid evolution of SAO 244567

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Timothy M.; Sebzda, Steven; Peterson, Zach

    2015-08-01

    We present evolution calculations from the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) to the Planetary Nebula (PNe) phase for models of mass 1 M⊙ over a range of metallicities from primordial, Z = 10-14, through near solar, Z = 0.02. Using our grid of models, we determine a central star mass dependence on initial metallicity. We also present a range of low masses for our low to very low metal models. The understanding of these objects is an important part of galactic evolution and the evolution of the composition of the universe over a broad range of red shits. For our low Z models, we find key differences in how they cross the HR diagram to the PNe phase, compared with models with higher initial Z. Some of our models experience the so called AGB Final Thermal Pulse (AFTP), which is a helium pulse that occurs while leaving the AGB and causes a rapid looping evolution while evolving between the AGB and PN phase. We use these models to make comparisons to the central star of the Stingray Nebula, SAO 244567. This object has been observed to be rapidly evolving (heating) over more than the last 50 years and is the central star of the youngest known planetary nebula. These two characteristics are similar to what is expected for AFTP models. It is a short lived phase that is related to, but different than, very late thermal pulse objects such as Sakurai’s Object, FG Sge, and V605 Aql. These objects experienced a similar thermal pulse, but later on the white dwarf cooling track.

  9. Evolution of the Dynamic Symptoms Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jeannine M; Dudley, William N; Beck, Susan; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Theories and conceptual models can be thought of as broad nets that attempt to rationalize, explain, and master a phenomenon within clinical nursing and interdisciplinary care. They can be used to guide a review of the literature and to formulate and organize research variables and relationships. Gaps in the literature can be identified and opportunities for additional research revealed (Fawcett, 2005). A variety of symptom models or theories exist, including the Theory of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz, Pugh, Milligan, Gift, & Suppe, 1997), Symptoms Experience Model (Armstrong, 2003), and Symptom Experiences in Time Theory (Henly, Kallas, Klatt, & Swenson, 2003). Most recently, the National Institute of Nursing Research identified a new National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model to guide symptom science research (Cashion & Grady, 2015).
. PMID:27541557

  10. The Composition of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy and Implications for Nucleosynthesis and Chemical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliam, A; William, Andrew Mc; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2004-01-01

    We outline the results of a study of the chemical composition of 14 stars in the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph). For the Sgr dSph stars with [Fe/H]>-1 the abundances are highly unusual, showing a striking enhancement in heavy s-process elements, increasing with [Fe/H], deficiencies of the alpha- elements (O, Si, Ca, and Ti), deficiencies of Al and Na, and deficiencies of the iron-peak elements Mn and Cu. Our abundances suggest that the composition of the metal-rich Sgr dSph stars is dominated by the ejecta of an old, metal-poor population, including products of AGB stars and type Ia supernovae (SN). We suggest two scenarios to explain the observations: Prolonged chemical evolution in a galaxy experiencing significant mass-loss, and chemical enrichment with episodic bursts of star formation. The Galactic globular cluster Omega Cen, and the Fornax dwarf galaxy show similar abundance patterns, which suggests that those systems evolved similar to the Sgr dSph.

  11. Detecting Character Dependencies in Stochastic Models of Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Deeparnab; Kannan, Sampath; Tian, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic models of biological evolution generally assume that different characters (runs of the stochastic process) are independent and identically distributed. In this article we determine the asymptotic complexity of detecting dependence for some fairly general models of evolution, but simple models of dependence. A key difference from much of the previous work is that our algorithms work without knowledge of the tree topology. Specifically, we consider various stochastic models of evolution ranging from the common ones used by biologists (such as Cavender-Farris-Neyman and Jukes-Cantor models) to very general ones where evolution of different characters can be governed by different transition matrices on each edge of the evolutionary tree (phylogeny). We also consider several models of dependence between two characters. In the most specific model, on each edge of the phylogeny the joint distribution of the dependent characters undergoes a perturbation of a fixed magnitude, in a fixed direction from what it would be if the characters were evolving independently. More general dependence models don't require such a strong "signal." Instead they only require that on each edge, the perturbation of the joint distribution has a significant component in a specific direction. Our main results are nearly tight bounds on the induced or operator norm of the transition matrices that would allow us to detect dependence efficiently for most models of evolution and dependence that we consider. We make essential use of a new concentration result for multistate random variables of a Markov random field on arbitrary trivalent trees: We show that the random variable counting the number of leaves in any particular state has variance that is subquadratic in the number of leaves. PMID:26744770

  12. Continuous "in vitro" Evolution of a Ribozyme Ligase: A Model Experiment for the Evolution of a Biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Michael P.; Hwang, Tony W.; Stovall, Gwendolyn M.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution is a defining criterion of life and is central to understanding biological systems. However, the timescale of evolutionary shifts in phenotype limits most classroom evolution experiments to simple probability simulations. "In vitro" directed evolution (IVDE) frequently serves as a model system for the study of Darwinian…

  13. Avalanche dynamics in evolution, growth, and depinning models

    CERN Document Server

    Paczuski, M; Bak, P

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of complex systems in nature often occurs in terms of punctuations, or avalanches, rather than following a smooth, gradual path. A comprehensive theory of avalanche dynamics in models of growth, interface depinning, and evolution is presented. Specifically, we include the Bak-Sneppen evolution model, the Sneppen interface depinning model, the Zaitsev flux creep model, invasion percolation, and several other depinning models into a unified treatment encompassing a large class of far from equilibrium processes. The formation of fractal structures, the appearance of 1/f noise, diffusion with anomalous Hurst exponents, Levy flights, and punctuated equilibria can all be related to the same underlying avalanche dynamics. This dynamics can be represented as a fractal in d spatial plus one temporal dimension. We develop a scaling theory that relates many of the critical exponents in this broad category of extremal models, representing different universality classes, to two basic exponents characterizing ...

  14. Model development to evaluate evolution of redox conditions in the near field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep underground is thought to be a potential place for high level radioactive waste repository. It is believed that the chemical condition of deep groundwater is generally anoxic and reducing. However, during construction and operation phase of repository, oxygen will diffuse some distance into the surrounding rock mass, and diffused oxygen may remain in the surrounding rock mass even after repository closure. In such a case, the transitional redox condition around the drift is not preferable in view point of safety assessment for HLW disposal. Hence, it is very important to evaluate evolution of redox conditions in the near field. This report describes the status of model development to evaluate evolution of redox conditions in the near field. We use the commercial solver to equate the mathematical equations which mean evolution of redox condition in the near field. The target area modeled in this report are near field rock mass and engineered barrier (buffer). In case of near field rock mass, we consider the following two geological media: (1) porous media for sedimentary rock, (2) fractured media for crystalline rock. In case of the engineered barrier, we regard the buffer as porous media. We simulate the behavior of dissolved oxygen and Fe2+ in groundwater during evolution of redox condition in the near field rock mass and the buffer. In case of the porous media, we consider diffusion of chemical species as dominant transport mechanism. On the other hand, in case of the fractured media, we consider diffusion of chemical species in rock matrix and advection of that (only dissolved oxygen considered in this model) in fracture as transport mechanism. We also use the rate law of iron oxidation reaction and dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals in this model besides. (author)

  15. Chemical evolution of bentonite buffer in a final repository of spent nuclear fuel during the thermal phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnish spent nuclear fuel disposal is planned to be based on the KBS-3V concept. Within this concept, the role of the bentonite buffer has been considered to be central. The aim was to model the evolution of a final repository during the thermal phase (heat-generating period of spent fuel), when the bentonite is partially saturated at the beginning, and the rock matrix surrounding it is fully saturated. It is essential to study how temperature affects saturation and how both of these affect the chemistry of bentonite. In order to make the modelling more concrete, an experimental case was adopted: the Long Term Test of Buffer Materials (LOT) A2-parcel test at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. In the A2-parcel the MX-80 bentonite was exposed to adverse (120-150 deg C) temperature conditions and high-temperature gradients. The test parcel diameter was smaller than in the KBS- 3V concept to speed up the saturation. Different kinds of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of minerals cause a redistribution of phases inside the bentonite. For example, according to laboratory tests, gypsum seems to dissolve and anhydrite seems to precipitate near the heater-bentonite interface. Also incoming groundwater affects the bentonite porewater and its properties. These changes may affect the mechanical properties of bentonite and it has to be clarified if these phenomena have to be taken into account in safety assessment. The applied model is a coupled thermo-hydro-chemical model, which means that all the mechanical alterations and effects are not considered. The purpose of the model was first to obtain similarity to the results compared to the experiment, and thus, the time frame was limited to 10 years (the LOT A-2 parcel test lasted approximately 6 years). The system is simplified to 1-D in order to reduce the computational work, which is significant mostly due to complex chemical calculations. TOUGH and TOUGHREACT was applied to model the reactive unsaturated

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODELS FOR MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION IN THE SEAMLESS TUBE ROLLING

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Nolasco de Carvalho; Marcelo Almeida Cunha Ferreira; Dagoberto Brandão Santos; Ronaldo Antônio Neves Marques Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work is to present recent developments on mathematical modeling for microstructure evolution in different steel types, applied to a continuous rolling of seamless tubes. The development of these models depends on careful characterization of the thermomechanical cycle and/on correct selection and adjustment of equations which describes the several metallurgical phenomena involved on this process. The adjustments of these models are done using the results obtained i...

  17. Modeling the summertime evolution of sea-ice melt ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Lüthje, M.; D. L. Feltham; Taylor, P D; Worster, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    1] We present a mathematical model describing the summer melting of sea ice. We simulate the evolution of melt ponds and determine area coverage and total surface ablation. The model predictions are tested for sensitivity to the melt rate of unponded ice, enhanced melt rate beneath the melt ponds, vertical seepage, and horizontal permeability. The model is initialized with surface topographies derived from laser altimetry corresponding to first-year sea ice and multiyear sea ice. We predict t...

  18. Individual-Based Modelling of Bacterial Ecologies and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, J R; Q. H. Wu; Paton, R. C.; Vlachos, C.; Gregory, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents two approaches to the individual-based modelling of bacterial ecologies and evolution using computational tools. The first approach is a fine-grained model that is based on networks of interactivity between computational objects representing genes and proteins. The second approach is a coarser-grained, agent-based model, which is designed to explore the evolvability of adaptive behavioural strategies in artificial bacteria represented by learning classifier systems. The st...

  19. Uranus evolution models with simple thermal boundary layers

    OpenAIRE

    Nettelmann, N.; Wang, K.; Fortney, J. J.; Hamel, S; Yellamilli, S.; Bethkenhagen, M.; Redmer, R.

    2016-01-01

    The strikingly low luminosity of Uranus (Teff ~ Teq) constitutes a long-standing challenge to our understanding of Ice Giant planets. Here we present the first Uranus structure and evolution models that are constructed to agree with both the observed low luminosity and the gravity field data. Our models make use of modern ab initio equations of state at high pressures for the icy components water, methane, and ammonia. Proceeding step by step, we confirm that adiabatic models yield cooling ti...

  20. Evolution analysis of the states of the EZ model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on suitable choice of states, this paper studies the stability of the equilibrium state of the EZ model by regarding the evolution of the EZ model as a Markov chain and by showing that the Markov chain is ergodic. The Markov analysis is applied to the EZ model with small number of agents, the exact equilibrium state for N = 5 and numerical results for N = 18 are obtained. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)