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Sample records for chemical effects head-loss

  1. Chemical effects head-loss research in support of generic safety issue 191.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Kasza, K.; Fisher, B.; Oras, J.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-10-31

    This summary report describes studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the potential for chemical effects on head loss across sump screens. Three different buffering solutions were used for these tests: trisodium phosphate (TSP), sodium hydroxide, and sodium tetraborate. These pH control agents used following a LOCA at a nuclear power plant show various degrees of interaction with the insulating materials Cal-Sil and NUKON. Results for Cal-Sil dissolution tests in TSP solutions, settling rate tests of calcium phosphate precipitates, and benchmark tests in chemically inactive environments are also presented. The dissolution tests were intended to identify important environmental variables governing both calcium dissolution and subsequent calcium phosphate formation over a range of simulated sump pool conditions. The results from the dissolution testing were used to inform both the head loss and settling test series. The objective of the head loss tests was to assess the head loss produced by debris beds created by Cal-Sil, fibrous debris, and calcium phosphate precipitates. The effects of both the relative arrival time of the precipitates and insulation debris and the calcium phosphate formation process were specifically evaluated. The debris loadings, test loop flow rates, and test temperature were chosen to be reasonably representative of those expected in plants with updated sump screen configurations, although the approach velocity of 0.1 ft/s used for most of the tests is 3-10 times that expected in plants with large screens . Other variables were selected with the intent to reasonably bound the head loss variability due to arrival time and calcium phosphate formation uncertainty. Settling tests were conducted to measure the settling rates of calcium phosphate precipitates (formed by adding dissolved Ca to boric acid and TSP solutions) in water columns having no bulk directional flow. For PWRs where NaOH and sodium tetraborate are used to control

  2. Effects of debris generated by chemical reactions on head loss through emergency-core cooling-system strainers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, K.; Ghosh, A.; Maji, A.K.; Letellier, B.C.; Johns, R.; Chang, T.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of debris generated during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) on the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) strainers has been studied via numerous avenues over the last several years. The research described in this manuscript examines the generation and effect of secondary materials -- not debris generated in the LOCA itself, but materials created by chemical reactions between exposed surfaces/debris and cooling system water. The secondary materials studied in the research were corrosion products from exposed metallic surfaces and paint chips that may precipitate out of solution, with a focus on the corrosion products of aluminium, iron, and zinc. The processes of corrosion and leaching of metals with subsequent precipitation is important because: (1) the surface area of exposed metal inside containment represents a large potential source term, even for slow chemical reactions; the chemical composition of the cooling system water (boric acid, lithium, etc.) may affect corrosion or precipitation in ways that have not been studied thoroughly in the past; and (3) an eyewitness report of the presence of gelatinous material in the Three Mile Island containment pool after the 1979 accident suggests the formation of a secondary material that has not been examined under the generic safety issue (GSI)-191 research program. This research was limited in scope and consisted only of small-scale tests. Several key questions were investigated: (1) do credible corrosion mechanisms exist for leaching metal ions from bulk solid surfaces or from zinc-based paint chips, and if so, what are the typical rate constants? (2) can corrosion products accumulate in the containment pool water to the extent that they might precipitate as new chemical species at pH and temperatures levels that are relevant to the LOCA accident sequence? and (3) how do chemical precipitants affect the head loss across an existing fibrous debris bed? A full report of the research is available. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing. Part I. Chemically generated precipitates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the current program was to evaluate the properties of chemical precipitates proposed by industry that have been used in sump strainer head loss testing. Specific precipitates that were evaluated included aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) and sodium aluminum silicate (SAS) prepared according to the procedures in WCAP-16530-NP, along with precipitates formed from injecting chemicals into the test loop according to the procedure used by one sump strainer test vendor for U.S. pressurized water reactors. The settling rates of the surrogate precipitates are strongly dependent on their particle size and are reasonably consistent with those expected from Stokes' Law or colloid aggregation models. Head loss tests showed that AlOOH and SAS surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across a perforated pump inlet strainer that has an accumulated fibrous debris bed. The characteristics of aluminum hydroxide precipitate using sodium aluminate were dependent on whether it was formed in high-purity or ordinary tap water and whether excess silicate was present or not.

  4. Study of Head-loss effect for ECCS Strainer Design Variables with Debris Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Myung; Lee, Jong Wook; Kim, Won Seok; Lee, Sang Il; Kim, Chang Hyun; Kim, Sang Yeol

    2011-01-01

    LOCA(Loss Of Coolant Accident) due to station damage such as pipe break in NPP generates various debris fragments. Debris moves into recirculation sump at the bottom of NPP with accompanying blow-down, wash-down, pool-fill and recirculation. If strainers at the sump have not enough performance of filtering, it will generate higher pressure drop inside perforated plate of strainer and affect safety issue. Especially as strainers installed do not satisfy design requirements and performance against NPP LOCA, it is necessary to install new strainer with low head-loss, higher safety requirements compared to the existing strainer. In this study, considering the different situations in each NPP station and design parameters of strainers, we study the optimized design of new strainer

  5. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part II. Precipitates by in situ aluminum alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Sump strainer head loss testing to evaluate chemical effects. → Aluminum hydroxide precipitates by in situ Al alloy corrosion caused head loss. → Intermetallic particles released from Al alloy can also cause significant head loss. → When evaluating Al effect on head loss, intermetallics should be considered. - Abstract: Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 o C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH) 3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH) 3 when intermetallic particles are present.

  6. Efeito da qualidade da água na perda de carga em filtros utilizados na irrigação localizada Effect of water quality on head loss in filters utilized in trickle irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio A. P. Ribeiro

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar a investigação experimental de uma fonte hídrica superficial utilizada em um sistema de irrigação por gotejamento e sua influência na evolução da perda de carga de dois filtros, um de disco e outro de manta sintética não-tecida, na filtragem da água. Analisou-se a variação temporal dos principais parâmetros físicos, químicos e biológicos da água de irrigação que causam problemas de entupimento nos emissores. Os critérios para avaliação das impurezas presentes na água de irrigação basearam-se em estudos realizados nos sistemas de irrigação localizada. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida em quatro etapas de 30 dias, em diferentes estações do ano. Os resultados mostraram que os parâmetros químicos que apresentaram médio risco de obstrução aos emissores, foram: pH, ferro e sulfetos. Os parâmetros físicos e biológicos analisados apresentaram baixo risco de entupimento dos emissores. Fez-se o acompanhamento da evolução da perda de carga em função do volume filtrado, objetivando uma análise comparativa. No filtro de manta sintética não-tecida a evolução da perda de carga foi mais acentuada e mais rápida em relação à de disco.This study had the objective to conduct an experimental enquiry on a surface water source utilized in a trickle irrigation system and its influence on the head loss evolution in two filters - a disc filter (130 micra and a non-woven synthetic fabric in filtration of water. The temporal variation of physical, chemical and biological parameters of the irrigation water causing problem of obstruction in drippers were analysed. The evaluation criterion of the impurities present in the irrigation water were based on the studies of the trickle irrigation systems. The research was executed in four phases of 30 days each, in different seasons. The results showed that the chemical factors, which presented medium risk of clogging for emitters, were p

  7. Experimental study of plant specific head loss induced by LOCA-generated debris at containment sump of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young Wook, Chung; Young Mook, Hwang; Jong Uk, Kim; Byung Gi, Park; Byung Chul, Lee; Jong Woon, Park

    2007-01-01

    A LOCA in PWR would generate debris from thermal insulation and other materials in the vicinity of the break. A fraction of the LOCA-generated debris and pre-LOCA debris will be transported into the sump and accumulated on the sump screens resulting in adverse blockage effects that are degradation or loss of NPSH (Net Positive Suction Head) margin. To assess debris-induced head loss in the sump screen, experimental studies have been widely conducted and the results have exhibited that head loss depends on amount of debris, specific surface area, mixture porosity of debris bed, debris types, and so on. Based on the experimental results, empirical correlations have been developed. NUREG/CR-6224 head loss correlation among them has been widely used to estimate the debris-induced head loss for PWR sump performance evaluation. However, in order to apply this correlation for estimating head loss in specific PWR plant, plant-specific head loss data are required because of a different composition of debris sources between PWRs. Plant specific head loss data were obtained with a test facility that is a closed-loop types. A vertical test section of test facility was fabricated with 6 inch CPVC (Chlorinated Polyvinyl Chloride) pipe. A ratio of length to diameter at the vertical test section was about 30. Experimental results exhibited that the head loss across NUKON debris bed with theoretical thickness greater than 4 inch was predicted conservatively by NUREG/CR-6224 correlation. Head loss test with debris composition of Westinghouse two loop plant showed that NUREG/CR-6224 correlation predicted higher head loss than experimentally measured head loss. (authors)

  8. Intra-Wellbore Head Losses in a Horizontal Well with both Kinematic and Frictional Effects in an Anisotropic Confined Aquifer between Two Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Zhan, H.

    2017-12-01

    Horizontal drilling becomes an appealing technology for water exploration or aquifer remediation in recent decades, due to the decreasing operational cost and many technical advantages over the vertical wells. However, many previous studies on the flow into horizontal wells were based on the uniform flux boundary condition (UFBC) for treating horizontal wells, which could not reflect the physical processes of flow inside the well accurately. In this study, we investigated transient flow into a horizontal well in an anisotropic confined aquifer between two streams for three types of boundary conditions of treating the horizontal well, including UFBC, uniform head boundary condition (UHBC), and mixed-type boundary condition (MTBC). The MTBC model considered both kinematic and frictional effects inside the horizontal well, in which the kinematic effect referred to the accelerational and fluid inflow effects. The new solution of UFBC was derived by superimposing the point sink/source solutions along the axis of the horizontal well with a uniform strength. The solutions of UHBC and MTBC were obtained by a hybrid analytical-numerical method, and an iterative method was proposed to determine the minimum well segment number required to yield sufficiently accurate answer. The results showed that the differences among the UFBC, UHBC, MTBCFriction and MTBC solutions were obvious, in which MTBCFriction represented the solutions considering the frictional effect but ignoring the kinematic effect. The MTBCFriction and MTBC solutions were sensitive to the flow rate, and the difference of these two solutions increases with the flow rate, suggesting that the kinematic effect could not be ignored for studying flow to a horizontal well, especially when the flow rate is great. The well specific inflow (WSI) (which is the inflow per unit screen length at a specified location of the horizontal well) increased with the distance along the wellbore for the MTBC model at early stage, while

  9. Head losses in small hydropower plant trash racks (SHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Walczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small hydropower plants (SHP are technical facilities that are part of alternative energy sources [Paish 2002]. They are primarily characterised by low unit power (in Poland below 5 MW and are often constructed on existing barrages. Electrical current produced by these plants is used to meet local demand. Considering the exploitation of SHPs, it is important to ensure a stable flow through turbines. Aggidis et al. [2010] analysed SHP equipment costs depending on the turbine set. The turbines are protected against damage with trash racks applied for capturing water-borne detritus, such as plant debris carried by water. However, trash racks as solid equipment of SHPs cause head losses, and as a consequence reduce the efficiency of the system. These losses result not only from the spacing of bars, their shape and the technical condition of the inlet chamber, but also from plant debris, its nature, and the quantity of accumulated material that effectively limits the flow. The plant debris captured on trash racks is characterised by diversity in terms of species composition related to the vegetation period and the area where hydraulic facilities are located. Therefore, it is important to maintain trash racks clean by regular removal of the accumulated material. In this context, modernised and newly built power plants are fitted with mechanical cleaners. In older facilities, manual intervention for regular cleaning is required. The present study analyses how the bar shape and the orientation angle of trash racks as well as the accumulated plant debris affect head losses. The results were obtained from laboratory tests. The research examined the impact the inclination angle of trash racks (30°, 60° and 80° has on head loss values for three different shapes of bars (cylindrical, angled and flat rectangular and various weight portions of plant debris (0.25, 0.375 and 0.5 kg. The summarised losses were determined by measuring the difference in water

  10. Experimental investigation of material chemical effects on emergency core cooling pump suction filter performance after loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon; Park, Byung Gi; Kim, Chang Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Integral tests of head loss through an emergency core cooling filter screen are conducted, simulating reactor building environmental conditions for 30 days after a loss of coolant accident. A test rig with five individual loops each of whose chamber is established to test chemical product formation and measure the head loss through a sample filter. The screen area at each chamber and the amounts of reactor building materials are scaled down according to specific plant condition. A series of tests have been performed to investigate the effects of calcium-silicate, reactor building spray, existence of calcium-silicate with tri-sodium phosphate (TSP), and composition of materials. The results showed that head loss across the chemical bed with even a small amount of calcium-silicate insulation instantaneously increased as soon as TSP was added to the test solution. Also, the head loss across the filter screen is strongly affected by spray duration and the head loss increase is rapid at the early stage, because of high dissolution and precipitation of aluminum and zinc. After passivation of aluminum and zinc by corrosion, the head loss increase is much slowed down and is mainly induced by materials such as calcium, silicon, and magnesium leached from NUKON TM and concrete. Furthermore, it is newly found that the spay buffer agent, tri-sodium phosphate, to form protective coating on the aluminum surface and reduce aluminum leaching is not effective for a large amount of aluminum and a long spray.

  11. An experimental investigation of head loss through a triangular “V- shaped” screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Zayed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Common traditional screens (screens perpendicular and vertical to the flow direction face extensive problems with screen blockage, which can result in adverse hydraulic, environmental, and economic consequences. Experimentally, this paper presents an advanced trash screen concept to reduce traditional screen problems and improve the hydraulic performance of screens. The traditional screen is re-developed using a triangular V shape with circular bars in the flow direction. Triangular V-shaped screen models with different angles, blockage ratios, circular bar designs, and flow discharges were tested in a scaled physical model. The analyses provide promising results. The findings showed that the head loss coefficients were effectively reduced by using the triangular V-shaped screens with circular bars (α < 90° in comparison with the traditional trash screen (α = 90. Additionally, the results indicated that the head loss across the screen increased with increasing flow discharge and blockage ratio. The losses considerably increase by large percentages when the screen becomes blocked by 40%. Low head losses were recorded at low screen angles for the circular bars. A new head loss equation is recommended for triangular screens with circular bars.

  12. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J.

    1996-02-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON trademark fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors

  13. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

  14. Kajian eksperimental head losses katup limbah pompa hydram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Suarda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Disain katup limbah yang baik dan penyetelan panjang langkah (stroke yang tepat merupakan faktor penting untuk operasi pompa hydram yang halus dan efisien. Katup limbah harus mampu menutup dengan cepat untuk menghasilkan tekanan tinggi pada saat terjadi water hammer. Disain detail katup limbah meliputi luas lubang katup limbah, luas penampang piringan katup, dan panjang langkah katup. Penelitian sebelumnya menyarankan bahwa diameter lubang katup limbah harus sama atau lebih besar dengan diameter pipa penggerak untuk menghindari terhambatnya aliran air keluar katup limbah. Namun diameter optimal katup limbah belum diketahui. Katup limbah tertutup akibat gaya drag yang terjadi karena aliran air melewati katup tersebut. Jadi geometri katup limbah adalah sedemikian rupa sehingga gaya seret tersebut meningkat dengan cepat sesuai arah pergerakan katup tersebut menuju posisi tertutupnya. Friction drag mengakibatkan kehilangan energi atau head losses aliran air melewati katup limbah yang merupakan besarnya perubahan energi aliran sebelum dan sesudah katup limbah tersebut. Head losses tersebut dapat diinvestigasi dengan mengukur tekanan di bawah katup limbah dan debit aliran yang mengalir melewati katup limbah tersebut pada posisi kesetimbangannya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa rasio diameter lubang katup limbah terhadap diameter pipa penggerak yang mengakibatkan head losses terendah adalah sekitar 130 persen atau pada rasio luas penampangnya sekitar 172 persen. Kata kunci: Pompa hydram, katup limbah, head losses, rasio diameter Abstract Suitable design and appropriate stroke adjustment of a waste valve are important factors for smooth and efficient hydram pump operation. The waste valve must be able to close quickly to produce high pressure during a water hammer take placed. In addition, detailed design of the waste valve comprises of the hole-diameter of the valve, the cross-sectional area of valve disc, and the valve step stroke. Prior

  15. CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON PWR SUMP STRAINER BLOCKAGE AFTER A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT: REVIEW ON U.S. RESEARCH EFFORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHI BUM BAHN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Industry- or regulatory-sponsored research activities on the resolution of Generic Safety Issue (GSI-191 were reviewed, especially on the chemical effects. Potential chemical effects on the head loss across the debris-loaded sump strainer under a post-accident condition were experimentally evidenced by small-scale bench tests, integrated chemical effects test (ICET, and vertical loop head loss tests. Three main chemical precipitates were identified by WCAP-16530-NP: calcium phosphate, aluminum oxyhydroxide, and sodium aluminum silicate. The former two precipitates were also identified as major chemical precipitates by the ICETs. The assumption that all released calcium would form precipitates is reasonable. CalSil insulation needs to be minimized especially in a plant using trisodium phosphate buffer. The assumption that all released aluminum would form precipitates appears highly conservative because ICETs and other studies suggest substantial solubility of aluminum at high temperature and inhibition of aluminum corrosion by silicate or phosphate. The industry-proposed chemical surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across the debris-loaded bed and more effective than the prototypical aluminum hydroxide precipitates generated by in-situ aluminum corrosion. There appears to be some unresolved potential issues related to GSI-191 chemical effects as identified in NUREG/CR-6988. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, however, concluded that the implications of these issues are either not generically significant or are appropriately addressed, although several issues associated with downstream in-vessel effects remain.

  16. Quadratic head loss approximations for optimisation problems in water supply networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecci, Filippo; Abraham, E.; I, Stoianov

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel analysis of the accuracy of quadratic approximations for the Hazen–Williams (HW) head loss formula, which enables the control of constraint violations in optimisation problems for water supply networks. The two smooth polynomial approximations considered here minimise the

  17. Evaluate of head loss, sediment value and copper removal in sand media (rapid sand filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshi Navab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with the technology development and increasing consumption of water resources, we are experiencing low qualities in the mentioned resources. Copper brings about serious environment al pollution, threatening human health and ecosystem. This metal found variously in water resources and industrial activities. Therefore, it needs to treat the water resources from these excessive amounts. Different methods have used for this reason but the most used method during recent years has been the absorption by economic absorbers such as sand. Rapid sand filters usually used in water and wastewater treatment plants for water clarification. In this research, a single layer gravity rapid sand filter has used to reduce different concentrations of copper. sediment value and head loss arising in filter media is simulated by using combination of Carman-Kozeny, Rose and Gregory models in different discharges of rapid sand filter. Results have shown that with increasing in discharge and decreasing in input copper concentration, arriving time to given head loss, is increasing. In addition, results demonstrated that with increasing in copper concentration in influent, removal efficiency is decreasing somewhat. Results of this research can applied in an appropriate design of rapid sand filter to copper removal, a prediction of rapid sand filter ability to copper removal and an estimation of arising head loss during filter work thus evaluating of time interval backwash. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10641 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 276-286

  18. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips, G.O.

    1986-01-01

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  19. EFFECTIVE CHEMICALLY BONDED BUILDING MATERIALS

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    Сергей Николаевич Золотухин

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical and physical-and-chemical preconditions for creation of the production technology of chemically bonded building materials and products based on phosphogypsum are presented. The methodology and production technology of chemically bonded lime-and-sandy phosphogypsum material (LSPM with the use of modern computerized differential scanning calorimetry are developed and offered. The structure of LSPM is examined. The conceptions of making building composites on the basis of dispersed materials are proved and updated. It was found out that at the definite thickness of water film on the surface of disperse materials, in the thermodynamically unstable state, in the presence of external fields, heightened temperatures and definite pH, cheap water-resistant chemically bonded building composites on the basis of dispersed materials can be made. The results of the LSPM studies showed that such material is effective for forming of low- and middle-quality wall small-piece blocks, partition slabs and bulkheads.

  20. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel; Blandford, Edward; Howe, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  1. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert...... thyroid effects through a variety of mechanisms of action, and some animal experiments and in vitro studies have focused on elucidating the mode of action of specific chemical compounds. Long-term human studies on effects of environmental chemicals on thyroid related outcomes such as growth...... and development are still lacking. The human exposure scenario with life long exposure to a vast mixture of chemicals in low doses and the large physiological variation in thyroid hormone levels between individuals render human studies very difficult. However, there is now reasonably firm evidence that PCBs have...

  2. Perda de carga em microtubos e conectores utilizados em microaspersão Head loss in microtubes and connectors used in microsprinkler systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli B. Zitterell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de ajustar equações que estimam a perda distribuída de carga em microtubos utilizados em microaspersão e a perda localizada de carga na passagem lateral do fluxo por meio dos conectores na linha lateral. A perda distribuída de carga foi determinada em quatro diâmetros de microtubos com nove a dez repetições para 15 vazões, por meio da aplicação do teorema de Bernoulli. O fator de atrito (f foi estimado fixando-se o valor de m = 0,25 e calibrando-se o valor do parâmetro c (0,290. A perda localizada de carga foi determinada por diferença entre perda de carga no microtubo mais conector e perda de carga no microtubo. Dois modelos de conectores foram utilizados e caracterizados quanto ao diâmetro interno e dimensões. Uma aproximação matemática foi proposta para calcular a perda localizada de carga com base em coeficiente de carga cinética do conector (K', que leva em consideração as dimensões do conector e do microtubo e independência das forças viscosas para Re > 5.000. As variações de vazão e de pressão entre os emissores situados nos extremos da linha lateral mostraram-se sensíveis à perda de carga na passagem lateral pelo conector mais a perda de carga no microtubo.This work was carried out aimed at presenting equations to estimate the continuous head loss in microtubes and the local head loss in the connector used on microsprinklers lateral lines. The continuous head loss was determined using Bernoulli's theorem for four microtubes diameters, each one with nine to ten replications for 15 flowrates. The Darcy-Weisbach friction factor was estimated by setting m to 0.25 and by calibrating the parameter value c to 0.290. The local head loss was determined by subtracting the head loss on the connector and microtube from the head loss on the microtube. Two types of connectors were used and characterized by its internal diameters and its dimensions. A mathematical approach to

  3. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  4. Water quality and head loss in irrigation filters Qualidade da água e perda de carga em filtros de irrigação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Túlio Assunção Pires Ribeiro

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the irrigation systems used today, trickle irrigation is one of the most efficient methods. This research, conducted by means of field tests, had the objective of comparing head loss evolution on water filtration with a disc filter (130 mum and a non-woven synthetic fabric filter used in a drip irrigation system. The test consisted of fertirrigation with organic fertilizer, and chemical treatment of the water with sodium hypochlorite. Physical, chemical, and biological parameters were analyzed, such as: pH, turbidity, suspended solids, dissolved solids, EC, hardness, Langelier index, total iron, manganese, sulfides, algae, and bacteria. The water source used in this experiment was from an open reservoir, where an experimental trickle irrigation system had been installed. The research was developed in four steps lasting 30 days each, during different seasons. The chemical factors pH, total iron, and concentration of sulfides presented a medium risk of clogging the emitters. All other physical and biological water quality parameters analyzed resulted in values that did not present an emitter-clogging risk. There was a correlation of results between physical parameters turbidity, suspended solids, and algae, and suspended solids. Fertirrigation influenced water quality. The concentration of free chlorine was higher in the effluent from the disc filter. Head loss evolution in the non-woven synthetic fabric filter was more striking and faster than in the disc filter.Dentre os sistemas de irrigação atualmente utilizados, a irrigação por gotejamento é um dos métodos mais eficientes. Este trabalho teve como objetivo fazer uma investigação experimental para comparar a evolução da perda de carga dos meios filtrantes disco (130 mim e manta sintética não tecida na filtragem da água, utilizados em um sistema de irrigação por gotejamento. Nesta comparação utilizou-se a técnica da fertirrigação com fertilizante orgânico e um

  5. Chemical effects in the mine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The main objective of the workshop was to bring together, and get talking to each other, long-term safety modellers, geochemical modellers and experimenters working in the field of chemical effects, and to give an insight into their respective activity areas and problem constellations. Lectures on the following subjects were given: modelling of chemical effects in long-term safety analysis; influence of brines; corrosion experiments; sorption experiments; actinide chemistry experiments; geochemical modelling; requirements of safety analyses and geochemical modelling. The workshop concluded with a detailed discussion of the subjects raised and of interdisciplinary aspects. (orig./DG) [de

  6. Chemical composition, antioxidant effects and antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thymus vulgaris, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Ocimum gratissimum are spices widely used as aroma enhancers and food preservatives. This work assessed the chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial effect of their essential oils on some food pathogenic bacteria, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Citrobacter ...

  7. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part III. Long-term aluminum hydroxide precipitation tests in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Aluminum hydroxide precipitation boundary is similar to that for amorphous phase. → Various precipitation tests are combined into one map in temperature-'pH + p[Al] T '. → Flocculation tendency of precipitates depend on pH and total Al concentration. → DLVO theory explains qualitatively the dependency of flocculation tendency on pH. - Abstract: Long-term aluminum (Al) hydroxide precipitation tests were conducted in slightly alkaline solutions containing 2500 ppm boron. The solution temperature was cycled to obtain a temperature history more representative of emergency core cooling system temperatures after a loss-of-coolant accident. The observed Al precipitation boundary was close to predicted results for amorphous precipitates, which are higher than the solubility expected for crystalline forms. Bench-scale and loop head loss test results under various conditions were successfully combined into single map in a temperature - 'pH + p[Al] T ' domain, which yielded two bounding lines for Al hydroxide solubility in borated alkaline water that depend on whether or not loop head loss tests with Al alloy coupons are included. Precipitates were observed to form either as fine, cloudy suspensions, which showed very little tendency to settle, or as flocculated precipitates. The flocculation tendency of the precipitates can be qualitatively explained by a colloid stability theory or a phase diagram for protein solutions.

  8. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, T. [National Institute of Genetics, Mishima (Japan); Inoue, T. [National Institute of Genetics, Mishima (Japan); Yokoiyama, A. [National Institute of Genetics, Mishima (Japan); Russel, L. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1979-05-01

    Interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex and there may exist other unexpected patterns that are not mentioned. We show some examples. Photodynamic mutation induction by fluorescein dyes and Radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as Interactions of chemicals and radiation outside of the cell. On the other hand, the Antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with events taking place in cells that had already been exposed to a mutagenic agent. It is likely that the action of a mutagenic agent is not direct and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agent. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, the two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germcells) which subsequently fuse. Interaction effects of all types will be useful in future research in shedding light on the main pathways of mutagenesis.

  9. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.; Inoue, T.; Yokoiyama, A.; Russel, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex and there may exist other unexpected patterns that are not mentioned. We show some examples. Photodynamic mutation induction by fluorescein dyes and Radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as Interactions of chemicals and radiation outside of the cell. On the other hand, the Antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with events taking place in cells that had already been exposed to a mutagenic agent. It is likely that the action of a mutagenic agent is not direct and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agent. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, the two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germcells) which subsequently fuse. Interaction effects of all types will be useful in future research in shedding light on the main pathways of mutagenesis

  10. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lewicka, Kamila; Siemion, Przemysław; Kurcok, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation ...

  11. Combined genetic effects of chemicals and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kada, T.; Inoue, T.; Yokoiyama, A.; Russell, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    The interactions of chemicals and radiation are complex, and there may exist other unexpected patterns. The photodynamic induction of mutation by fluorescein dyes, and the radiosensitization with iodine compounds are classified as the interactions of chemicals and radiation outside cells. On the other hand, the antimutagenic effects of cobaltous chloride is concerned with the events taking place in the cells that had already been exposed to mutagenic agents. It is likely that the action of mutagenic agents is not direct, and that cellular functions, such as mutators or repair systems, are involved in the mutagenesis initiated by the agents. Such cellular functions can be affected by a second agent. In sexually reproducing organisms, two agents can also act on separate cells (male and female germ cells) which subsequently fuse. In mice, the experiments combining the radiation applied to one sex with the chemicals given to the other sex are only in early stages. Males were irradiated with X-ray (spermatozoa and spermatids sampled) and females (mature oocytes) were treated with caffeine. When the endpoint was dominant lethal, the level of X-ray effect induced in the male genome was independent of the caffeine treatment of the female. However, when the endpoint was sex-chromosome-loss, and a different strain of female was used, the caffeine potentiation was statistically significant at 5% level. (Yamashita, S.)

  12. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Lewicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation are discussed. Properties of microwave radiation and its impact on starch (with particular regard to modifications described in literature are characterized.

  13. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Effects of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Saei Dehkordi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Rosmarinus officinalis L. as a member of the Lamiaceae family and lysozyme as a natural antibacterial agent is important in food microbiology, because of its characteristics. The aim of the present study was to determine the chemical composition and anti-listerial activity of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oil (REO alone and in combination with lysozyme for enhancement of anti-listerial activity of both substances. Materials & Methods: Rosmarinus officinalis L. was purchased from a local grocery store at Shahrekord and was identified by the Institute of Medicinal Plants, ACECR. The air-dried aerial parts were subjected to hydrodistillation using a Clevenger apparatus to obtain essential oil and yielded oil was analyzed by GC/MS. Antibacterial activity (on basis of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of REO was studied separately and in combination with unheated lysozyme (L and heat-treated lysozyme (HTL on Listeria monocytogenes at different pH (5, 6 and 7 by a micro-broth dilution assay. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: In the current study, 98.05% of constituents of the essential oil were identified. The major components were α-pinene (14.06%, 1,8-cineole (13.62%, verbenone (11.2%, camphor (10.51%, borneol (7.3%, 3-octanone (7.02%, camphene (5.46% and linalool (5.07%. The inhibitory action of REO was stronger at lower pH especially 5 (MIC=225 μg/mL. Inhibition by L at pH 5 was 640 μg/mL but no inhibition was seen at pH 7. HTL resulted in more effective inhibition than L, especially at pH 5 and heat-treatment 80˚C (MIC: 160 μg/mL. Conclusion: Combination of L + REO and particularly HTL + REO was led to enhancement of bacterial inhibition. It was concluded that REO by the identified chemical composition was effective alone or in combination with L or HTL on Listeria monocytogenes as a food-borne pathogen.

  14. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Weyman, G.D.

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  15. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  16. Immune effects of respiratory exposure to fragrance chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Ezendam J; Klerk A de; Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Park MVDZ; Loveren H van; Jong WH de; GBO

    2007-01-01

    Inhalation of the fragrance chemicals, isoeugenol and cinnamal, by mice resulted in immune reactions in the respiratory tract. This was observed in experiments performed by the RIVM (National Institute for Public Health and the Enviroment) of which results indicate that inhalation of some fragrance chemicals could induce unwanted effects on the immune system. Fragrance chemicals are common ingredients in such consumer products as cosmetics and scented products. Several fragrance chemicals are...

  17. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals. Mutagenic effectiveness ...

  18. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals.

  19. Perda de carga em filtros orgânicos utilizados no tratamento de água residuária de suinoculturas Head-loss evolution in organic filters for swine wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio T. de Matos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Com a realização deste trabalho, objetivou-se parametrizar a equação de evolução da perda de carga, para descrição do processo de filtração de água residuária da suinocultura. No preenchimento das colunas filtrantes, foram utilizados bagaço de cana-de-açúcar triturado, serragem de madeira e pergaminho de grãos de café. Dados de perda de carga em diferentes profundidades e tempos de operação dos filtros orgânicos foram coletados para ajuste das equações de perda de carga. Para as equações ajustadas, foram obtidos altos coeficientes de determinação, sendo que a significância dos coeficientes da regressão foi, na sua quase totalidade, de 1% de probabilidade, podendo ser utilizada na predição do comportamento dos filtros. As variáveis tempo de operação e profundidade das colunas filtrantes, constituídas pelos três materiais filtrantes, apresentaram comportamento quadrático na estimativa da perda de carga total. O tempo ideal de operação ininterrupta dos filtros, sem troca de material filtrante, foi de, aproximadamente, 1,5 h e, depois de corrido esse tempo, o material filtrante deverá ser substituído.This work was developed to adjust the equation of head-loss, describing the head-loss process with the depth and operation time of organic filter utilized in treatment of swine wastewater. Sugarcane bagasse, sawdust and coffee husk, by-products of agricultural and agro-industrial activities, were used to fill the filter columns. Data on head-loss in different depths with the time of organic filters operation were collected to analyze the head-loss evolution. In head-loss equations as function of depth and filter operation time high values were obtained for the coefficients of determination and the regression coefficients presented, in almost, significant at 1% probability, predicting the behavior of the filters, constituted of sawdust, sugarcane bagasse and coffee husk. The variables, operation time and the filter

  20. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A

  1. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  2. Modelação da perda de carga na filtração direta ascendente em meio granular de areia grossa e pedregulho Modeling of the head loss in up flow coarse sand and gravel direct filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Botari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Compreender e quantificar os mecanismos relacionados à perda de carga e à remoção de partículas em um meio filtrante granular é de importância fundamental para o estudo do processo da filtração. Este trabalho apresenta o desenvolvimento dos modelos de perda de carga na filtração em meios porosos e a proposição da modelação matemática semiempírica da perda de carga para meios filtrantes limpos e do desenvolvimento do perfil de perda de carga ao longo do tempo de filtração a partir da equação de Ergun. Objetivou-se a determinação dos valores das constantes da equação de Ergun para meio granular de areia grossa e pedregulho. Alguns exemplos de aplicação dessa modelação matemática são também apresentados e discutidos pelos autores com base em dados experimentais obtidos em uma estação piloto de dupla filtração.To understand and to quantify the head loss due to the particles removal in a porous medium has primary importance to filtration process study. This paper presents the development of the models of head loss used in the filtration in porous media and proposes a mathematical semi-empiric model for head loss in clean beds and head loss increasing profile during the filtration run length, by means of the Ergun equation. The goal was the determination of Ergun’s equation coefficients for granular material constituted of coarse sand and gravel. Examples of application of these mathematical modeling are also presented and discussed by the authors based on experimental data obtained in a double filtration pilot plant.

  3. Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Chemical Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the work that has been done on the project “Design and optimization of silicon nanowire for chemical sensing‿, including Si-NW fabrication, electrical/electrochemical modeling, the application as ISFET, and the build-up of Si- NW/LOC system for automatic sample delivery. A novel top-down fabrication technique was presented for single-crystal Si-NW fabrication realized with conventional microfabrication technique. High quality triangular Si-NWs were made with high wafer-s...

  4. Effect of ozone gas processing on physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of ozone treatment on chemical and physical properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) gluten, glutenin and gliadin. Methods: Wheat proteins isolated from wheat flour were treated with ozone gas. The physical and chemical properties of gluten proteins were investigated after treatment ...

  5. Effect of chemical reaction on unsteady MHD free convective two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of flow parameters on the coefficient of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also tabulated and discussed appropriately. It was observed that the increase in chemical reaction coefficient/parameter suppresses both velocity and concentration profiles. Keywords: Chemical Reaction, MHD, ...

  6. effects of heat input on the chemical composition and hardness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... generation rate, G is the electrical resistance heating. Table 1 shows the spectrometric ... Where Y is the dependent variable, in this case Y is BHN. 3. Discussion of Results. This study examines the effect of heat input and thermo chemical reactions on the chemical composi- tion and hardness of mild steel ...

  7. Effects of Groundnut Husk Ash-blended Cement on Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The empirical investigation reported the effects of chemicals on the properties of concrete with cement partially replaced with Groundnut Husk Ash (GHA). The principal characteristic measured was the compressive strength of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete and OPC/GHA concrete after curing in three chemical ...

  8. Chemical warfare in freshwater. Allelpathic effects of macrophytes on phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field

  9. Effects of Irradiation on Albite's Chemical Durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; La Plante, Erika Callagon; Krishnan, N M Anoop; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2017-10-19

    Albite (NaAlSi 3 O 8 ), a framework silicate of the plagioclase feldspar family and a common constituent of felsic rocks, is often present in the siliceous mineral aggregates that compose concrete. When exposed to radiation (e.g., in the form of neutrons) in nuclear power plants, the crystal structure of albite can undergo significant alterations. These alterations may degrade its chemical durability. Indeed, careful examinations of Ar + -implanted albite carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and molecular dynamics simulations show that albite's crystal structure, upon irradiation, undergoes progressive disordering, resulting in an expansion in its molar volume (i.e., a reduction of density) and a reduction in the connectivity of its atomic network. This loss of network connectivity (i.e., rigidity) results in an enhancement of the aqueous dissolution rate of albite-measured using vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) in alkaline environments-by a factor of 20. This enhancement in the dissolution rate (i.e., reduction in chemical durability) of albite following irradiation has significant impacts on the durability of felsic rocks and of concrete containing them upon their exposure to radiation in nuclear power plant (NPP) environments.

  10. [Chemical contamination of the child: bioacumulation and potential effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río Paredes, Sara

    2005-01-01

    In early 2003, Greenpeace exposed the presence of persistent, bioaccumulative chemical pollutants in samples of house dust taken from homes across europe. Greenpeace further researches revealed that these same chemicals can be found in many daily consumer products. This report completes the loop by illustrating two disturbing developments. Firstly, that many of the same chemicals used routinely in consumer products and present in house dust, are also present in the human body, including in prenatal and newborn children. Secondly, that these chemicals are likely to be having a detrimental effect on the health of children and the human population at large. Dorey draws together the available evidence that illustrates how and why prenatal and newly born children are particularly at risk from chemical pollutants. The evidence presented here, from academics, governments and international institutions is not easily dismissed, contributing as it does to a growing bank of international research that reinforces the conclusion of this report--that current chemical legislation is failing to protect children from a harmful chemical assault that begins from a child's conception. The study focuses on seven key chemicals: alkylphenols, bisphenol A, brominated flame retardants, organotins, phthalates, chlorinated paraffins and artificial musks, and demonstrates: the presence of these substances in children, the ways in which children are particularly exposed, how this increased exposure increases the potential for detrimental health impacts, the different illnesses and diseases that are now being linked to this chemical exposure and the specific health impacts of the key chemicals listed above.

  11. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of chemical modification on properties of hybrid fibre biocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical modification of fiber surface in sisal–oil palm reinforced natural rubber green composites have been studied. Composites were prepared using fibers treated with varying concentrations of sodium hydroxide solution...

  13. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  14. Chemical composition and pharmacological effect of carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaydarov, K.Kh.; Khaydarov, A.K.; Gafurov, B.G.

    2002-01-01

    The article deals with results of effect of eight types of carbonates (half aliphatic, half heterocyclic derivates of carbonates) under the cramp condition caused by simulated electric shock together with ko razol and strychnine. Experience has shown that from all studied types of carbonates carbation proved the most effective one eliminating three types of cramp symptoms. The most active were the aliphatic carbonates

  15. Effects of industrial chemicals and radioactive materials in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangopadhyay, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-01-01

    Much has been written on the effects of radiation and toxic chemicals on biological systems. In this communication general considerations regarding these topics will be discussed very briefly; the major emphasis will be focused on the effects of chemicals, namely ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) on Amoeba, Advantages to the use of amoeba for studying the effects of radiation and chemicals include the following: large mononucleate unicellular organisms having a long generation time; opportunity to study cellular organelles and biochemical and genetic alterations in a single cell system; and a long cell cycle, the stages of which can be synchronized without resorting to chemical treatment or temperature shock and thereby readily permitting study at defined stages of the cell's life cycle. This, in turn, is discussed in light of current disposal methods for this type of waste and how it might be safely disposed of

  16. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  17. Molecular effects: interactions with chemicals and viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research focused upon an understanding of the cellular responses to the molecular effects of ionizing radiation should be an essential program component in the Federal Strategy for Research into the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Although we know that DNA is a principal target molecule for some highly significant biological effects of ionizing radiation, we need to learn which other target substances such as membrane components may also be important. Most of the emphasis should continue to be on DNA effects and highest priority should be assigned to the identification of the complete spectrum of products produced in DNA. Once the lesions are known we can proceed to determine how these behave as blocks to replication and transcription or as modulators on the fidelity of these crucial processes. Considerable work should be done on the repair of these lesions. High priority should be given to the search for mutants in mammalian cell systems with evident defects in the processing of specific lesions. Viruses should provide important tools for the research in this area, as probes for host cell repair responses and also for the isolation of mutants. Furthermore, it is important to consider the interaction of viruses and ionizing radiation with regard to possible modulating effects on repair processes and tumorigenesis. Finally we must consider the important problem of the modification of repair responses by environmental factors

  18. Effects of oral chemical irritation on taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, H; Stevens, D A

    1984-06-01

    Oral irritation was induced by rinses with capsicum oleoresin and with piperine, constituents of red and black pepper, respectively. The perceived intensities of two concentrations of each of four tastants representing the four classical taste qualities were evaluated after rinsing with these irritants. Comparing taste intensity after rinses with capsicum and after control rinses with emulsifying agents or water, there were significant decrements in taste intensity of citric acid and quinine, and on one concentration of sucrose, but no effect on salt. The effects of piperine were more broad, with significant decrements in perceived intensity relative to emulsion controls for all substances.

  19. Effect of potassium on micromorphological and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Euglena gracilis together with a monogram for the determination of chlorophyll concentration. Planta, 78: 200-207. Liang DY, Xu MD, Wang S, Chen PS, Lin FQ, Wen RT, Zhang YJ. (1992). Effects of potassium application on nutrient uptake and dry matter accumulation in cotton. Scientia Agricultura Sinica ...

  20. Chemical composition and prophylactic effects of Saturja ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The main components of SKEO were carvacrol (78.8%), thymol (7.5%), and beta-Bisabolene (1.2%). Findings of prophylactic effects revealed that mortality rate of infected mice was 8 days after oral administration of SKEO at the concentration of 0.2 and 0.3ml/kg (P<0.05). In contrast, this value for control group was ...

  1. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physico-chemical analyses and corrosion effect of produced water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physico-chemical analyses and corrosion effect of produced water on low carbon steel. Akpofure Rim-Rukeh. Abstract. The corrosion effect of produced water on low carbon has been investigated using the weight loss technique. The composite produced water sample was found to contain pH (5.3), turbidity (82 NTU), ...

  3. Tillage and manure effect on soil physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to study the effects of tillage and liquid manure applications on some physical and chemical properties and also on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization potential from a meadow soil. Our results indicated that tillage and manure applications had no effect on the concentration of Cu, Mn, total ...

  4. Health effects assessment of chemical exposures: ARIES methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, L; Montero, M.; Rabago, I.; Vidania, R.

    1995-07-01

    In this work, we present ARIES* update: a system designed in order to facilitate the human health effects assessment produced by accidental release of toxic chemicals. The first version of ARIES was developed in relation to 82/501/EEC Directive about mayor accidents in the chemical industry. So, the first aim was the support of the effects assessment derived for the chemicals included into this directive. From this establishment, it was considered acute exposures for high concentrations. In this report, we present the actual methodology for considering other type of exposures, such as environmental and occupational. Likewise other versions, the methodology comprises two approaches: quantitative and qualitative assessments. Quantitative assessment incorporates the mathematical algorithms useful to evaluate the effects produced by the most important routes of exposure: inhalation, ingestion, eye contact and skin absorption, in a short, medium and long term. It has been included models that realizes an accurate quantification of doses, effects,... and so on, such as simple approaches when the available information is not enough. Qualitative assessment, designed in order to complement or replace the previous one, is incorporated into an informatics system, developed in Clipper. It executes and displays outstanding and important toxicological information of about 100 chemicals. This information comes from ECDIN (Environmental Chemicals Data and Information Network) database through a collaboration with JRC-ISPRA working group. (Author) 24 refs.

  5. Health effects assessment of chemical exposures: ARIES methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, L; Montero, M.; Rabago, I.; Vidania, R.

    1995-01-01

    In this work, we present ARIES* update: a system designed in order to facilitate the human health effects assessment produced by accidental release of toxic chemicals. The first version of ARIES was developed in relation to 82/501/EEC Directive about mayor accidents in the chemical industry. So, the first aim was the support of the effects assessment derived for the chemicals included into this directive. From this establishment, it was considered acute exposures for high concentrations. In this report, we present the actual methodology for considering other type of exposures, such as environmental and occupational. Likewise other versions, the methodology comprises two approaches: quantitative and qualitative assessments. Quantitative assessment incorporates the mathematical algorithms useful to evaluate the effects produced by the most important routes of exposure: inhalation, ingestion, eye contact and skin absorption, in a short, medium and long term. It has been included models that realizes an accurate quantification of doses, effects,... and so on, such as simple approaches when the available information is not enough. Qualitative assessment, designed in order to complement or replace the previous one, is incorporated into an informatics system, developed in Clipper. It executes and displays outstanding and important toxicological information of about 100 chemicals. This information comes from ECDIN (Environmental Chemicals Data and Information Network) database through a collaboration with JRC-ISPRA working group. (Author) 24 refs

  6. Health and environmental effects of complex chemical mixtures: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the Department of Energy supports a broad long-term research program on human health and environmental effects from potential exposure to energy-related complex chemical mixtures. The program seeks basic mechanistic data on the effects of complex mixtures at the cellular, molecular, and whole animal levels to aid in predicting human health effects and seeks ecological data on biological and physical transformations in the mixtures, concentrations of the mixtures in various compartments of the environment, and potential routes for human exposure to these mixtures (e.g., food chain). On June 17-18, 1985, OHER held its First Annual Technical Meeting on the Complex Chemical Mixtures Program in Chicago, IL. The primary purpose of the meeting was to enable principal investigators to report the research status and accomplishments of ongoing complex chemical mixture studies supported by OHER. To help focus future research directions round table discussions were conducted.

  7. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  8. Radiation chemical effects of X-rays on liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holroyd, R.A.; Preses, J.M.

    1998-11-01

    This review describes some of the chemical changes induced by photoelectrons which are released in liquids when X-rays are absorbed. Both experimental studies and theory are discussed. In part 1, the basic processes occurring upon absorption of X-rays are described. Parts 2 and 3 deal with hydrocarbon liquids; in part 2 the ion yields, including effects at K-edges, and in part 3, the yields of excited states. Part 4 discusses chemical effects of X-rays in aqueous solutions. The authors end with a summary of future needs and directions.

  9. Radiation chemical effects of X-rays on liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.A.; Preses, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes some of the chemical changes induced by photoelectrons which are released in liquids when X-rays are absorbed. Both experimental studies and theory are discussed. In part 1, the basic processes occurring upon absorption of X-rays are described. Parts 2 and 3 deal with hydrocarbon liquids; in part 2 the ion yields, including effects at K-edges, and in part 3, the yields of excited states. Part 4 discusses chemical effects of X-rays in aqueous solutions. The authors end with a summary of future needs and directions

  10. National Prevalence and Effects of Multiple Chemical Sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinemann, Anne

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS), its co-occurrence with asthma and fragrance sensitivity, and effects from exposure to fragranced consumer products. A nationally representative cross-sectional population-based sample of adult Americans (n = 1137) was surveyed in June 2016. Among the population, 12.8% report medically diagnosed MCS and 25.9% report chemical sensitivity. Of those with MCS, 86.2% experience health problems, such as migraine headaches, when exposed to fragranced consumer products; 71.0% are asthmatic; 70.3% cannot access places that use fragranced products such as air fresheners; and 60.7% lost workdays or a job in the past year due to fragranced products in the workplace. Prevalence of diagnosed MCS has increased over 300%, and self-reported chemical sensitivity over 200%, in the past decade. Reducing exposure to fragranced products could help reduce adverse health and societal effects.

  11. Assessment of apparent effectiveness of chemical egg disinfectants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, seed production of O.karongae in artificial hatcheries has registered little success due to high egg and fry mortalities. Therefore, a study was conducted to compare the apparent effectiveness of three chemical egg disinfectants in an attempt to improve hatching success and reduce fry mortality in O. karongae in an ...

  12. Effects of processing methods on the chemical composition of flour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of processing methods on the chemical composition of flour, moinmoin and akara from mucuna pruriens. ... that the parboiling and dehulling caused significant increase in the protein content of the bean flours (31.69% – 31.77%) relative to the control (29.87%). The dried akara (MA) balls however had significantly ...

  13. Tillage and manure effect on soil physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tillage and liquid manure applications on some physical and chemical properties and also on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization potential from a meadow soil. Our results indicated that tillage and manure applications had no effect on the concentration of Cu, Mn, total N and organic C in the 0 - 15 cm layer of soil after ...

  14. Effect of accessions on the chemical quality of fresh pumpkin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-12-18

    Dec 18, 2013 ... Effect of accessions on the chemical quality of fresh pumpkin ... weight, shape and rind color, vine length and branching, leaf size, quality ..... State. Hortic. Soc. 108:312-316. Davies JN, Hobson GE (1981). The constituents of tomato fruit-the influence of environment, nutrition, and genotype. Food Sci. Nutr.

  15. Effect of Phosphorus Fertilizer Application on Some Soil Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research was conducted during the 2004, 2005 and 2006 cropping seasons to study the effect of phosphorus fertilizer on some soil chemical properties and nitrogen fixation of legumes at Bauchi, northeastern Nigeria. Composite soil samples were collected from sites before planting and after harvesting at the depths of ...

  16. Effect of maturity stage and processing on chemical composition, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of maturity stage and processing on chemical composition, in vitro gas production and preference of Panicum maximum and Pennisetum purpureum. ... It is concluded that in order to optimize DM intake farmers should consider the type of grasses and their age at harvest particularly for Muturu. Pelleting improves ...

  17. Effect of integration of cultural, botanical, and chemical methods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted from November 2011 to June 2013 to evaluate the effects of botanical, cultural, and chemical methods on termite colony survival, crop and wooden damage, and other biological activities in Ghimbi district of western Ethiopia. The termite mounds were dug and the following treatments were ...

  18. Effect of natural and chemical insecticides on Hyalopterus pruni and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of water extracts of Fagonia arabica, Salix alba and Anthmis pseudocotula and their mixtures with chemical insecticide (Malathion) on growth of. Hyalopterus pruni and characters of Armeniaca vulgaris plants and their soils. The data revealed that F.arabica extract at 20% ...

  19. Bioprocess intensification for the effective production of chemical products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    The further implementation of new bioprocesses, using biocatalysts in various formats, for the synthesis of chemicals is highly dependent upon effective process intensification. The need for process intensification reflects the fact that the conditions under which a biocatalyst carries out a reac...

  20. Chemical Sciences Antisickling activity of phenylalanine: effect on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical Sciences Antisickling activity of phenylalanine: effect on erythrocyte membrane atpases. G O IBEH, G I EKEKE. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  1. Protective effect of alcohol extract of Yulangsan leaf on chemically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: YLSL has protective effect against chemically-induced liver injury in mice. The mechanism may be related to attenuation of ... inflammatory, sedative memory-enhancing, immunity-boosting and anti-stress agent. The ... GSY-ⅱ was from Beijing Medical Equipment factory (Beijing, China); while color pathological.

  2. Effects of different organic materials and chemical fertilizers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted under greenhouse conditions to investigate the effects of applied nutrients such as six organic materials (gyttja, alsil, humic acid, sea moss, straw and peat) and two chemical fertilizers (15-15-15, and 20-20-0) with different dosages on nutrient uptaking ability of one-year old and 7 cm long ...

  3. Effect of Chemical and Mineralogical Composition of Rocks on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in Hewanie and its surrounding areas of 169.82 km2 with a major objective of identifying the effect of chemical and mineralogical composition of rocks on the chemistry of the groundwater quality. This was conducted by taking 11 groundwater and 5 rock samples from the main geological units of ...

  4. Green manuring and nitrogen fertilization effects on soil chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of these treatments on agronomic trait and yield of upland rice and soil chemical properties were then investigated at UNAAB and Olowo-Papa village (OP). In the first experiment three green manure crops, namely, Mucuna utilis, Canavalia ensiformis and Lablab purpureus were screened for biomass production ...

  5. Effect of packaging and chemical treatment on storage life and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are inherently more liable to deterioration under tropical conditions characterized by high ambient temperatures and humidity. In determining the effects of chemical treatment on tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma), fruits purchased at turning stage of ripening were packaged in low ...

  6. Effect of frozen period on the chemical, microbiological and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to investigate the effect of duration of frozen storage on the chemical, microbiological and sensory profile of Tilapia fish (Sarotherodun galiaenus) collected from a research pond of the Agricultural Development Project, Akure, Nigeria and were subjected to sixty days of frozen storage and analyzed ...

  7. The effects of hair dressing effluent irrigation on soil chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of hair dressing effluent on soil chemical properties, germination and growth of maize and cowpea were investigated in pot experiment. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized design of 3 effluent treatments (100 ml, 200 ml and 400 ml) and control with 5 replications at University of Port Harcourt ...

  8. Differential effects of thermal and chemical stressors on tissue balls ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coral cell aggregates (tissue balls) from four species (Acropora muricata, Fungia repanda, Pavona cactus and Pocillopora damicornis) were used as an indicator to investigate the effects on the corals of thermal stress and of chemical extracts from three sponges (Adocia sp., Haliclona sp. and Lissodendoryx sp.) and one ...

  9. Residual effects of animal manures on physical and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted to investigate effects of animal manures on chemical composition of silage produced from Panicum maximum (Ntchisi) two - years post application. The plots were established in June 2010 during this period, animal manures from cattle dung, swine waste, poultry droppings and small ...

  10. Effect of biosolids application on soil chemical properties and uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of biosolids application on soil chemical properties and uptake of some heavy metals by Cercis siliquastrum. ... and municipal solid waste compost (50% CM + 50% MC) at three levels of 0, 2.5 and 5 kg/shrub and three replicates in calcareous sandy loam soil at the botanical garden of Mobarekeh steel company.

  11. Effect of packaging and chemical treatment on storage life and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tonna Anyasi

    2016-08-31

    Aug 31, 2016 ... Fresh fruits and vegetables are inherently more liable to deterioration under tropical conditions characterized by high ambient temperatures and humidity. In determining the effects of chemical treatment on tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cv. Roma), fruits purchased at turning stage of ripening were ...

  12. effects of heat input on the chemical composition and hardness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... prolonged welding process. In this study the relationship between thermal effect and weld metal chemistry has been adequately treated. Keywords: alloying element, brinell hardness number (BHN), chemical composition, heat input, thermochemical reaction, weldmetal. 1. Introduction. The application of arc ...

  13. Effects of Molasses and Storage Period on the Chemical, Microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of molasses and storage periods on the chemical composition, microbial and fermentation characteristics of silage produced from guinea grass and cassava leaves mixture. Guinea grass was harvested at 2 months regrowth from an established pasture and cassava tops ...

  14. Effects of thermal treatments and germination on physico-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certain physico-chemical properties including viscoelasticity, crystallinity and maltose content of corn depends on the gelatinization of starch under different treatments. Three different treatments were performed; boiling in water, steam heating, and germination. The effects of gelatinization on viscoelastic property of corn ...

  15. The effects of environmental chemicals on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Anglina; Trasande, Leonardo; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-10-01

    The global incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing among individuals of all ages. Despite advances in proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there remains a lack of safe and effective drugs to reverse or stabilize renal function in patients with glomerular or tubulointerstitial causes of CKD. Consequently, modifiable risk factors that are associated with a progressive decline in kidney function need to be identified. Numerous reports have documented the adverse effects that occur in response to graded exposure to a wide range of environmental chemicals. This Review summarizes the effects of such chemicals on four aspects of cardiorenal function: albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure and serum uric acid concentration. We focus on compounds that individuals are likely to be exposed to as a consequence of normal consumer activities or medical treatment, namely phthalates, bisphenol A, polyfluorinated alkyl acids, dioxins and furans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. Environmental exposure to these chemicals during everyday life could have adverse consequences on renal function and might contribute to progressive cumulative renal injury over a lifetime. Regulatory efforts should be made to limit individual exposure to environmental chemicals in an attempt to reduce the incidence of cardiorenal disease.

  16. Chemical Decellularization Methods and Its Effects on Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Akbari Zahmati

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Extracellular matrix (ECM produced by tissue decellularization processes as a biological scaffold due to its unique properties compared to other scaffolds for migration and implantation of stem cells have been used successfully in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the last years. The objective of this manuscript was to provide an overview of the chemical decellularization methods, evaluation of decellularized ECM and the potential effect of the chemical decellularization agents on the biochemical composition. Methods: We searched in Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct. The literature search was done by using the following keywords: “ECM, biologic scaffold, decellularization, chemical methods, tissue engineering.” We selected articles have been published from 2000 to 2016, and 15 full texts and 97 abstracts were reviewed. Results:Employing an optimization method to minimize damage to the ECM ultrastructure as for a result of the lack of reduction in mechanical properties and also the preservation of essential proteins such as laminin, fibronectin, Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, growth factor is required. Various methods include chemical, physical and enzymatic technics were studied. However, on each of these methods can have undesirable effects on ECM. Conclusion: It is suggested that instead of the Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS which have high strength degradation, we can use zwitterionic separately or in combination with SDS. Tributyl phosphate (TBP due to its unique properties can be used in decellularization process.

  17. Physico-chemical evaluation of radiation effects on apple juice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, Lucimara; Domarco, Rachel E.; Spoto, Maria H.F.; Walder, Julio M.M.; Matraia, Clarice

    1997-01-01

    Gala and Fuji varieties apple's juice were clarified with enzyme and irradiated aiming to extend the shelf-life without conservants and chemical additives. The juices were analysed for soluble solids, titrable acidity, pH and color. Results showed effect of storage periods in soluble solids, pH and color. The variety and storage period modified the titrable acidity. The pH was altered by irradiation dose and the storage period. (author). 9 refs., 6 figs

  18. Negative chemical pressure effects induced by Y substitution for Ca ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Negative chemical pressure effects on Ca3Co2O6. Figure 3. Inverse of magnetic susceptibility (χ) as a function of tempera- ture (30–300 K) for Ca3−xYxCo2O6, obtained in a field of 5 kOe. A straight line is drawn through the high-temperature linear region to highlight the x-dependence of θp. The low-temperature data ...

  19. Effect of chemical stimuli on nerves supplying upper airway muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, D; Mitra, J; Salamone, J; Cherniack, N S

    1982-03-01

    Studies of upper airway resistance suggest that the activity of cranial nerves supplying upper airway muscles changes with chemical drive and that imbalances in the activation of these nerves as compared to the phrenic play a role in causing upper airway obstruction. We assessed the effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on the activity of the hypoglossal nerve, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and phrenic nerve in paralyzed anesthetized artificially ventilated dogs. Comparison of hypoglossal and phrenic nerves were also repeated after vagotomy. Both hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerves exhibited increased activity with inspiration. Hypoxia and hypercapnia increased phrenic nerve activity as well as the activity of the two cranial nerves. While linear increases occurred in phrenic and recurrent laryngeal nerve activity with both chemical stimuli, the relationship between hypoglossal and phrenic nerve activity was curvilinear. At lower levels of chemical drive, changes in hypoglossal nerve were less than in the phrenic, and the reverse was true at higher levels of chemical stimulation. There were also differences in the response of both cranial nerves and the phrenic to changing vagal stimulation. The dissimilarities observed in the cranial response of the nerves (versus the phrenic) could potentially affect the forces developed during inspiration and lead to obstruction in the upper airway.

  20. Irradiation of starches for industrial uses: Chemical and physical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Maria E.

    1999-01-01

    Corn and cassava starches have been irradiated with gamma doses from 10 to 180 kGy and pastes have been prepared by boiling the starches in water. The rheological properties of the pastes have been determined showing that the 10 kGy dose reduces sharply the viscosity of the aqueous pastes. The solubility of the irradiated starches has been also studied. The cassava starch irradiated with 180 kGy is soluble in boiling water and remains soluble at room temperature. After some considerations on the chemical effects of the irradiation it is concluded that the irradiation technique is suitable to replace the chemical treatment in many industrial applications of the starch. (author)

  1. Investigating the effect of chemical stress and resource ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling exposure and recovery of fish and wildlife populations after stressor mitigation serves as a basis for evaluating population status and remediation success. The Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an important and well-studied model organism for understanding the effects of pollutants and other stressors in estuarine and marine ecosystems. Herein, we develop a density dependent matrix population model for Atlantic killifish that analyzes both size-structure and age class-structure of the population so that we could readily incorporate output from a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model currently under development. This population modeling approach emphasizes application in conjunction with field monitoring efforts (e.g., through effects-based monitoring programs) and/or laboratory analysis to link effects due to chemical stress to adverse outcomes in whole organisms and populations. We applied the model using data for killifish exposed to dioxin-like compounds, taken from a previously published study. Specifically, the model was used to investigate population trajectories for Atlantic killifish with dietary exposures to 112, 296, and 875 pg/g of dioxin with effects on fertility and survival rates. All effects were expressed relative to control fish. Further, the population model was employed to examine age and size distributions of a population exposed to resource limitation in addition to chemical stress. For each dietary exposure concentration o

  2. Perda de carga em tubulação de polietileno, conduzindo água residuária de suinocultura Head loss in polyethylene pipelines carrying swine wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Tagliaferre

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de se ajustar equações para cálculo da perda de carga contínua em tubulações de polietileno, conduzindo água residuária de suinocultura com concentrações iguais a 1,15; 1,24; 1,43; e 1,75 g L-1 de sólidos totais. A perda de carga foi determinada em tubulações de polietileno, com diâmetros internos de 12,62; 15,47; 19,79 e 25,76 mm, por meio de quatro piezômetros, distanciados 4 m ao longo da tubulação. Os resultados indicaram que as equações empíricas ajustadas com a aplicação das metodologias de Duffy & Titchener e Hazen-Williams modificada, apresentaram bons ajustes, com coeficiente de determinação igual a 0,99. Desta maneira, recomenda-se a sua aplicação no dimensionamento de projetos com tubulações de polietileno.The objective of this work was to adjust equations to calculate continuous head loss in polyethylene pipelines carrying swine wastewater with concentrations of 1.15; 1.24; 1.43 and 1.75 g L-1 of total solids. The head loss was determined in polyethylene pipelines, with internal diameters of 12.62; 15.47; 19.79 and 25.76 mm, by means of four piezometers, 4 m apart along the pipelines. The results indicated that the empirical equations adjusted with the methodologies of Duffy & Titchener and Hazen-Williams modified gave good results with coefficient of determination equivalent to 0.99, therefore, its application is recommended to design of projects with polyethylene pipelines.

  3. Evidence of Non-local Chemical, Thermal and Gravitational Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu H.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum entanglement is ubiquitous in the microscopic world and manifests itself macroscopically under some circumstances. But common belief is that it alone cannot be used to transmit information nor could it be used to produce macroscopic non- local effects. Yet we have recently found evidence of non-local effects of chemical substances on the brain produced through it. While our reported results are under independent verifications by other groups, we report here our experimental findings of non-local chemical, thermal and gravitational effects in simple physical systems such as reservoirs of water quantum-entangled with water being manipulated in a remote reservoir. With the aids of high-precision instruments, we have found that the pH value, temperature and gravity of water in the detecting reservoirs can be non-locally affected through manipulating water in the remote reservoir. In particular, the pH value changes in the same direction as that being manipulated; the temperature can change against that of local environment; and the gravity apparently can also change against local gravity. These non-local effects are all reproducible and can be used for non-local signalling and many other purposes. We suggest that they are mediated by quantum entanglement between nuclear and/or electron spins in treated water and discuss the implications of these results.

  4. Effect of Chemical Stabilizers in Silver Nanoparticle Suspensions on Nanotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Eun Joo; Park, Hee Jin; Park, Jun Su; Yoon, Je Yong; Yi, Jong Heop; Kim, Young Hun; Choi, Kyung Hee

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been commercialized as the typically stabilized form via the addition of a variety of surfactants or polymers. Herein, to examine the effects of stabilizing AgNPs in suspension, we modified the surface of bare AgNPs with four type of surfactants (NaDDBS, SDS, TW80, CTAB) and polymers (PVP, PAA, PAH, CMC). The modified AgNPs was applied to compare suspension stability and nanotoxicity test using Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a model organism. Modification of AgNPs surface using chemical stabilizer may be not related with molecular weight, but chemical structure such as ionic state and functional group of stabilizer. In this study, it is noteworthy that AgNPs modified with a cationic stabilizer (CTAB, PAH) were importantly toxic to E. coli, rather than anionic stabilizers (NaDDBS, SDS). Comparing similar anionic stabilizer, i.e., NaDDBS and SDS, the result showed that lipophilicity of chemical structure can affect on E. coli, because NaDDBS, which contains a lipophilic benzene ring, accelerated the cytotoxicity of AgNPs. Interestingly, none of the stabilizers tested, including biocompatible nonionic stabilizers (i.e., TW80 and cellulose) caused a reduction in AgNP toxicity. This showed that toxicity of AgNPs cannot be reduced using stabilizers

  5. Effect of Chemical Stabilizers in Silver Nanoparticle Suspensions on Nanotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Eun Joo; Park, Hee Jin; Park, Jun Su; Yoon, Je Yong; Yi, Jong Heop [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hee [National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been commercialized as the typically stabilized form via the addition of a variety of surfactants or polymers. Herein, to examine the effects of stabilizing AgNPs in suspension, we modified the surface of bare AgNPs with four type of surfactants (NaDDBS, SDS, TW80, CTAB) and polymers (PVP, PAA, PAH, CMC). The modified AgNPs was applied to compare suspension stability and nanotoxicity test using Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a model organism. Modification of AgNPs surface using chemical stabilizer may be not related with molecular weight, but chemical structure such as ionic state and functional group of stabilizer. In this study, it is noteworthy that AgNPs modified with a cationic stabilizer (CTAB, PAH) were importantly toxic to E. coli, rather than anionic stabilizers (NaDDBS, SDS). Comparing similar anionic stabilizer, i.e., NaDDBS and SDS, the result showed that lipophilicity of chemical structure can affect on E. coli, because NaDDBS, which contains a lipophilic benzene ring, accelerated the cytotoxicity of AgNPs. Interestingly, none of the stabilizers tested, including biocompatible nonionic stabilizers (i.e., TW80 and cellulose) caused a reduction in AgNP toxicity. This showed that toxicity of AgNPs cannot be reduced using stabilizers.

  6. Effect of Chemical Additives in Sump on Boric Acid Solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hu; Kim, Young Soo; No, Hee Cheon

    2007-01-01

    Boric acid precipitation, which happens in the pressurized water reactor core during post-LOCA long-term cooling period, could adhere to fuel rod surfaces and, as a result, block the fuel assembly cooling channels. Deposition of boric acid and other impurities on the fuel rods will increase thermal resistance, and then induce fuel temperature to exceed its safety limit, finally causes reactor core damage or meltdown. Therefore, recently, the boric acid precipitation issue was raised by NRC when nuclear power plants in USA, for example, Waterford EPU, applied for power uprate licenses. NRC highlighted boric acid precipitation as a generic issue due to non-conservatism in vendor's model in 2005. Also the Westinghouse Owners Group held meetings to discuss the methodology to avoid boric acid precipitation in the current PWR nuclear power plants. Until now there is no database for evaluating the properties of a boric acid-water mixture, together with chemical additives, such as Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH), Tri-sodium Phosphate (Na 3 PO 4 ) and fiberglass, being added from the containment sump, when the concentration is close to the solubility limit. Therefore, this study investigated boric acid solubility when boric acid is mixed with NaOH, Na 3 PO 4 and other chemical additives. Another purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between boric acid solubility and the effects of chemical additives, boric acid volatility, boiling phenomenon, etc. The empirical equation of boric acid solubility in the mixture solution is deduced from experiment results and chemical dynamics theories

  7. The chemical and radiative effects of the Mount Pinatubo eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinneson, Douglas E.; Grant, Keith E.; Connell, Peter S.; Rotman, Douglas A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    To clarify the mechanisms leading to effects on stratospheric ozone, time-dependent stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment II (SAGE II) and cryogenic limb array elaton spectrometer (CLAES) aerosol optical extinction data and SAGE II surface area density are used as parameters in a two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged chemical radiative transport model. The model was integrated with time from before the eruption through December 1993. The modeled impact on global ozone results from increased rates of heterogeneous reactions on sulfate aerosols and from the increased radiative heating and scattering caused by these aerosols. When the aerosol heating is allowed to modify the temperature distribution, the maximum change calculated in equatorial column ozone is -1.6%. The calculated equatorial temperature change and peak local ozone change in October 1991 are +6K and -4%, respectively. When aerosol heating perturbs the circulation in the model, the maximum change in equatorial column ozone is -6%. Increased heterogeneous processing on sulfate aerosols is calculated to have changed equatorial column ozone in late 1991 by -1.5%. Global column ozone in the model in 1992 and 1993 changed by -2.8% and -2.4%, respectively. The relationship of ozone-controlling processes in the lower stratosphere is altered as well; HO(x) becomes the most important catalytic cycle, followed by ClO(x) and NO(x). This is driven by significant changes in trace gas concentrations. In October 1991, lower stratospheric, equatorial NO(x) decreased by 40%, ClO(x) increased by 60%, and HO(x) increased by 25%. When the effect of heterogeneous chemical processing on sulfate aerosols is combined with aerosol heating, modifying either circulation or temperature, dramatically different ozone fingerprints with time and latitude are predicted. Model-derived changes in the equatorial region in column ozone best represented the observed data when perturbed circulation was combined with heterogeneous

  8. Protective effect of silymarin against chemical-induced cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Marjan Razavi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac disorders remain one of the most important causes of death in the world. Oxidative stress has been suggested as one of the molecular mechanisms involved in drug-induced cardiac toxicity. Recently, several natural products have been utilized in different studies with the aim to protect the progression of oxidative stress-induced cardiac disorders. There is a large body of evidence that administration of antioxidants may be useful in ameliorating cardiac toxicity. Silymarin, a polyphenolic flavonoid has been shown to have utility in several cardiovascular disorders. In this review, various studies in scientific databases regarding the preventive effects of silymarin against cardiotoxicity induced by chemicals were introduced. Although there are many studies representing the valuable effects of silymarin in different diseases, the number of researches relating to the possible cardiac protective effects of silymarin against drugs induced toxicity is rather limited. Results of these studies show that silymarin has a broad spectrum of cardiac protective activity against toxicity induced by some chemicals including metals, environmental pollutants, oxidative agents and anticancer drugs. Further studies are needed to establish the utility of silymarin in protection against cardiac toxicity.

  9. Effects of Biofertilizer Application Method with Integrated Chemical Fertilizers on Maize Production and Some Chemical Characteristics of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ebrahimpour

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of integrated application of bio-fertilizer and chemical fertilizers on yield and yield components of corn, an experiment was conducted in 2008 in Dezful city, (Khoozestan province in a factorial arrangement based on complete randomized block design with four replications. Treatments were integrated application of biological and chemical fertilizers in four levels (100% chemical fertilizer, 50% chemical fertilizer+ bio-fertilizer, 25% chemical fertilizer + bio-fertilizer and bio-fertilizer and bio-fertilizer application method in three levels (seed inoculation, fertigation, seed inoculation+fertigation. The results showed that highest and the lowest grain yield was obtained by application of 50% chemical fertilizer+ bio-fertilizer (10.7 t/ha and bio-fertilizer (5.2 t/ha, respectively. The greatest and the lowest harvest indices were recorded in chemical (0.59 and bio-fertilizer (0.45 treatments, respectively. Number of grain per row and row in ear had not significant differences in integrated and chemical treatments. Methods of bio-fertilizer application had not significant effect on maize yield and yield components. The results of soil analysis showed that bio-fertilizers increased P, K as well as other macro elements availability rather than N. The results revealed that although replacing chemical fertilizers by bio-fertilizers reduced maize growth, but integrated application of these sources produced highest grain yield, nitration elements availability and reduced substantially consumption of fertilizer. The results also indicated that non-chemical sources of crop nutrients can be considered as a reliable alternative for chemical fertilization in ecological production of crops in agro-ecosystems of Iran.

  10. Chemical Composition and Hypotensive Effect of Campomanesia xanthocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Santariano Sant’Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Campomanesia xanthocarpa is known in Brazil as Guabiroba and is popularly used for various diseases, such as inflammatory, renal, and digestive diseases and dyslipidemia. The aim of the study was to analyze the chemical composition and investigate the effects of aqueous extract of C. xanthocarpa on the blood pressure of normotensive rats, analyzing the possible action mechanism using experimental and in silico procedures. The extract was evaluated for total phenolic compounds and total flavonoid content. The chemical components were determined by HPLC analyses. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured with extract and drugs administration. The leaves of C. xanthocarpa presented the relevant content of phenolics and flavonoids, and we suggested the presence of chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, and theobromine. The acute administration of aqueous extract of C. xanthocarpa has a dose-dependent hypotensive effect in normotensive rats, suggesting that the action mechanism may be mediated through the renin-angiotensin system by AT1 receptor blockade and sympathetic autonomic response. Docking studies showed models that indicated an interaction between chlorogenic acid and quercetin with the AT1 receptor (AT1R active site. The findings of these docking studies suggest the potential of C. xanthocarpa constituents for use as preventive agents for blood pressure.

  11. Multiplied effect of heat and radiation in chemical stress relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    1981-01-01

    About the deterioration of rubber due to radiation, useful knowledge can be obtained by the measurement of chemical stress relaxation. As an example, the rubber coating of cables in a reactor containment vessel is estimated to be irradiated by weak radiation at the temperature between 60 and 90 deg C for about 40 years. In such case, it is desirable to establish the method of accelerated test of the deterioration. The author showed previously that the law of time-dose rate conversion holds in the case of radiation. In this study, the chemical stress relaxation to rubber was measured by the simultaneous application of heat and radiation, and it was found that there was the multiplied effect of heat and radiation in the stress relaxation speed. Therefore the factor of multiplication of heat and radiation was proposed to describe quantitatively the degree of the multiplied effect. The chloroprene rubber used was offered by Hitachi Cable Co., Ltd. The experimental method and the results are reported. The multiplication of heat and radiation is not caused by the direct cut of molecular chains by radiation, instead, it is based on the temperature dependence of various reaction rates at which the activated species reached the cut of molecular chains through complex reaction mechanism and the temperature dependence of the diffusion rate of oxygen in rubber. (Kako, I.)

  12. Additive mixture effects of estrogenic chemicals in human cell-based assays can be influenced by inclusion of chemicals with differing effect profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mark Evans

    Full Text Available A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the in vitro effects of mixtures of estrogenic chemicals can be well predicted from the estrogenicity of their components by the concentration addition (CA concept. However, some studies have observed small deviations from CA. Factors affecting the presence or observation of deviations could include: the type of chemical tested; number of mixture components; mixture design; and assay choice. We designed mixture experiments that address these factors, using mixtures with high numbers of components, chemicals from diverse chemical groups, assays with different in vitro endpoints and different mixture designs and ratios. Firstly, the effects of mixtures composed of up to 17 estrogenic chemicals were examined using estrogenicity assays with reporter-gene (ERLUX and cell proliferation (ESCREEN endpoints. Two mixture designs were used: 1 a 'balanced' design with components present in proportion to a common effect concentration (e.g. an EC(10 and 2 a 'non-balanced' design with components in proportion to potential human tissue concentrations. Secondly, the individual and simultaneous ability of 16 potential modulator chemicals (each with minimal estrogenicity to influence the assay outcome produced by a reference mixture of estrogenic chemicals was examined. Test chemicals included plasticizers, phthalates, metals, PCBs, phytoestrogens, PAHs, heterocyclic amines, antioxidants, UV filters, musks, PBDEs and parabens. In all the scenarios tested, the CA concept provided a good prediction of mixture effects. Modulation studies revealed that chemicals possessing minimal estrogenicity themselves could reduce (negatively modulate the effect of a mixture of estrogenic chemicals. Whether the type of modulation we observed occurs in practice most likely depends on the chemical concentrations involved, and better information is required on likely human tissue concentrations of estrogens and of potential

  13. EFFECT OF ALTERNATIVE MULTINUTRIENT SOURCES ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Martins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current high price of potassium chloride and the dependence of Brazil on imported materials to supply the domestic demand call for studies evaluating the efficiency of alternative sources of nutrients. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of silicate rock powder and a manganese mining by-product, and secondary materials originated from these two materials, on soil chemical properties and on brachiaria production. This greenhouse experiment was conducted in pots with 5 kg of soil (Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico - Oxisol. The alternative nutrient sources were: verdete, verdete treated with NH4OH, phonolite, ultramafic rock, mining waste and the proportion of 75 % of these K fertilizers and 25 % lime. Mixtures containing 25 % of lime were heated at 800 ºC for 1 h. These sources were applied at rates of 0, 150, 300, 450 and 600 kg ha-1 K2O, and incubated for 45 days. The mixtures of heated silicate rocks with lime promoted higher increases in soil pH in decreasing order: ultramafic rock>verdete>phonolite>mining waste. Applying the mining waste-lime mixture increased soil exchangeable K, and available P when ultramafic rock was incorporated. When ultramafic rock was applied, the release of Ca2+ increased significantly. Mining subproduct released the highest amount of Zn2+ and Mn2+ to the soil. The application of alternative sources of K, with variable chemical composition, altered the nutrient availability and soil chemical properties, improving mainly plant development and K plant uptake, and are important nutrient sources.

  14. Effects of scalp dermatitis on chemical property of hair keratin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    The effects of scalp dermatitis (seborrheic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD)) on chemical properties of hair keratin were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hairs were collected from lesional regions affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD and non-lesional regions separately. The hairs with SD were taken from patients with ages of 16-80 years. The ages of patients with psoriasis ranged from 8 to 67 years, and all patients exhibited moderate disease. Hairs with AD were taken from the patients with ages of 24-45 years and the average SCORing atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was 48.75. Hairs from 20 normal adults were collected as a control. The FT-IR absorbance bands were analyzed by the Gaussian model to obtain the center frequency, half width, height, and area of each band. The height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652 cm-1 to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of keratin. The spectra of hair with scalp dermatitis were different with that of control, the amide A components centered at 3278 cm-1 were smaller than those of the control. The psoriasis hair showed a large difference in the IR absorbance band between lesional and non-lesional hairs indicating good agreement with the morphological changes. The hairs with diseases did not show differences in the content of cystine, which was centered at 1054 cm-1, from the control. The chemical properties of keratin were not significantly different between the hairs affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD. However, the changes induced by scalp dermatitis were different with weathering. Therefore, FT-IR analysis could be used to screen differences between the physiological and pathological conditions of scalp hair.

  15. Bonding effectiveness to different chemically pre-treated dental zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokoshi, Masanao; Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different chemical pre-treatments on the bond durability to dental zirconia. Fully sintered IPS e.max ZirCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent) blocks were subjected to tribochemical silica sandblasting (CoJet, 3M ESPE). The zirconia samples were additionally pre-treated using one of four zirconia primers/adhesives (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, Kuraray Noritake; Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE; Z-PRIME Plus, Bisco). Finally, two identically pre-treated zirconia blocks were bonded together using composite cement (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE). The specimens were trimmed at the interface to a cylindrical hourglass and stored in distilled water (7 days, 37 °C), after which they were randomly tested as is or subjected to mechanical ageing involving cyclic tensile stress (10 N, 10 Hz, 10,000 cycles). Subsequently, the micro-tensile bond strength was determined, and SEM fractographic analysis performed. Weibull analysis revealed the highest Weibull scale and shape parameters for the 'Clearfil Ceramic Primer/mechanical ageing' combination. Chemical pre-treatment of CoJet (3M ESPE) sandblasted zirconia using Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) and Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent) revealed a significantly higher bond strength than when Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) and Z-PRIME Plus (Bisco) were used. After ageing, Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) revealed the most stable bond durability. Combined mechanical/chemical pre-treatment, the latter with either Clearfil Ceramic Primer (Kuraray Noritake) or Monobond Plus (Ivoclar Vivadent), resulted in the most durable bond to zirconia. As a standard procedure to durably bond zirconia to tooth tissue, the application of a combined 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate/silane ceramic primer to zirconia is clinically highly recommended.

  16. Cover Crops Effects on Soil Chemical Properties and Onion Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Assis de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops contribute to nutrient cycling and may improve soil chemical properties and, consequently, increase crop yield. The aim of this study was to evaluate cover crop residue decomposition and nutrient release, and the effects of these plants on soil chemical properties and on onion (Allium cepa L. yield in a no-tillage system. The experiment was carried out in an Inceptisol in southern Brazil, where cover crops were sown in April 2012 and 2013. In July 2013, shoots of weeds (WD, black oats (BO, rye (RY, oilseed radish (RD, oilseed radish + black oats (RD + BO, and oilseed radish + rye (RD + RY were cut at ground level and part of these material from each treatment was placed in litter bags. The litter bags were distributed on the soil surface and were collected at 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 days after distribution (DAD. The residues in the litter bags were dried, weighed, and ground, and then analyzed to quantify lignin, cellulose, non-structural biomass, total organic carbon (TOC, N, P, K, Ca, and Mg. In November 2012 and 2013, onion crops were harvested to quantify yield, and bulbs were classified according to diameter, and the number of rotted and flowering bulbs was determined. Soil in the 0.00-0.10 m layer was collected for chemical analysis before transplanting and after harvesting onion in December 2012 and 2013. The rye plant residues presented the highest half-life and they released less nutrients until 90 DAD. The great permanence of rye residue was considered a protection to soil surface, the opposite was observed with spontaneous vegetation. The cultivation and addition of dry residue of cover crops increased the onion yield at 2.5 Mg ha-1.

  17. Applicability of chemical cleaning process to steam generator secondary side, (3). Effect of chemical cleaning on long term integrity of steam generator tube after chemical cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Kanbe, Hiromi; Hirano, Hideo; Takiguchi, Hideki; Yoshino, Kouji; Yamamoto, Shuuichi; Shibata, Toshio; Ishigure, Kenkichi

    2006-01-01

    The application of the chemical cleaning process to dissolve and remove scales and sludge by chemicals is being planned at the Japanese pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant in order to maintain a designed heat transfer condition and to prevent the steam generator (SG) tube degradation. In this paper, the affects of the EPRI process and the KWU process on the long term integrity of SG tubing were investigated under the simulated SG condition using a SG model boiler test facility. No adverse effect of the both chemical cleaning processes on the long term integrity of SG tubing were observed. (author)

  18. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  19. Antifoaming effect of chemical compounds in manure biogas reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougias, P G; Tsapekos, P; Boe, K; Angelidaki, I

    2013-10-15

    A precise and efficient antifoaming control strategy in bioprocesses is a challenging task as foaming is a very complex phenomenon. Nevertheless, foam control is necessary, as foam is a major operational problem in biogas reactors. In the present study, the effect of 14 chemical compounds on foam reduction was evaluated at concentration of 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.5% v/v(sample), in raw and digested manure. Moreover, two antifoam injection methods were compared for foam reduction efficiency. Natural oils (rapeseed and sunflower oil), fatty acids (oleic, octanoic and derivative of natural fatty acids), siloxanes (polydimethylsiloxane) and ester (tributylphosphate) were found to be the most efficient compounds to suppress foam. The efficiency of antifoamers was dependant on their physicochemical properties and greatly correlated to their chemical characteristics for dissolving foam. The antifoamers were more efficient in reducing foam when added directly into the liquid phase rather than added in the headspace of the reactor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Polyoxometalates in Oxidative Delignification of Chemical Pulps: Effect on Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolby Hirth

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical pulps are produced by chemical delignification of lignocelluloses such as wood or annual non-woody plants. After pulping (e.g., kraft pulping, the remaining lignin is removed by bleaching to produce a high quality, bright paper. The goal of bleaching is to remove lignin from the pulp without a negative effect on the cellulose; for this reason, delignification should be performed in a highly selective manner. New environmentally-friendly alternatives to conventional chlorine-based bleaching technologies (e.g., oxygen, ozone, or peroxide bleaching have been suggested or implemented. In an attempt to find inorganic agents that mimic the action of highly selective lignin-degrading enzymes and that can be applicable in industrial conditions, the researchers have focused on polyoxometalates (POMs, used either as regenerable redox reagents (in anaerobic conditions or as catalysts (in aerobic conditions of oxidative delignification. The aim of this paper is to review the basic concepts of POM delignification in these two processes.

  1. Review of Wildfire Effects on Chemical Water Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly Bitner; Bruce Gallaher; Ken Mullen

    2001-05-01

    The Cerro Grande Fire of May 2000 burned almost 43,000 acres of forested land within the Pajarito Plateau watershed in northern New Mexico. Runoff events after the fire were monitored and sampled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Changes in the composition of runoff water were noted when compared to runoff water composition of the previous 20 years. In order to understand the chemical water quality changes noted in runoff water after the Cerro Grande Fire, a summary of the reported effects of fire on runoff water chemistry and on soils that contribute to runoff water chemistry was compiled. The focus of this report is chemical water quality, so it does not address changes in sediment transport or water quantity associated with fires. Within the general inorganic parameters, increases of dissolved calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and pH in runoff water have been observed as a result of fire. However, the dissolved sodium, carbon, and sulfate have been observed to increase and decrease as a result of fire. Metals have been much less studied, but manganese, copper, zinc, and cesium-137 have been observed to increase as a result of fire.

  2. effect of chemical reaction on unsteady mhd free convective two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Joseph et al.

    coefficient of skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are also tabulated and discussed appropriately. It was observed that the increase in chemical reaction coefficient/parameter suppresses both velocity and concentration profiles. Keywords: Chemical Reaction, MHD, Convective, Immiscible,. Unsteady.

  3. Managing major chemical accidents in China: Towards effective risk information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical industries, from their very inception, have been controversial due to the high risks they impose on safety of human beings and the environment. Recent decades have witnessed increasing impacts of the accelerating expansion of chemical industries and chemical accidents have become a major

  4. Perda de carga em tubos de PVC conduzindo água residuária do processamento de café Head loss for PVC pipes conducting wasterwater of coffee processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto de A. Carvalho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Visando determinar a perda de carga distribuída e avaliar a variação dos coeficientes de atrito das equações Universal e de Hazen-Williams em tubulações comerciais de PVC, conduzindo águas residuárias do processamento do café (descascamento e demucilagem, ensaios foram conduzidos no Laboratório de Hidráulica do Departamento de Engenharia da Universidade Federal de Lavras, em que os resultados apontaram aumento do fator de atrito "f" e, conseqüentemente, da perda de carga, de 5 a 35% para águas residuárias da demucilagem e de 2 a 11% para água de descascamento, em relação à água pura, para tubulações de 75 e 25 mm, respectivamente. Ocorreu redução na perda de carga com a diluição das águas residuárias. O coeficiente "C", da equação de Hazen-Williams, variou de 125 (água de demucilagem e diâmetro 25 mm a 148 (água residuária do descascamento e diâmetro 75 mm.Experiments were conducted in the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Federal University of Lavras to determine the head loss and the friction coefficients of the Universal and Hazen-Williams equations in PVC commercials pipes conducting wastewater of coffee processing. The results indicated an increase of the attrition " factor f " and, consequently, of the head loss, from 5 to 35% for despulping wastewater, and from 2 to 11% for peeling wastewater in relation to water, for pipes of 75 and 25 mm respectively; the load loss decreased with the dilution of the wastewaters; the coefficient "C" of the Hazen-Williams equation varied from 125 (despulping wastewater and diameter 25 mm to 148 (peeling wastewater and diameter 75 mm.

  5. Epigenetic Effects of Environmental Chemicals Bisphenol A and Phthalates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Shoei-Lung Li

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The epigenetic effects on DNA methylation, histone modification, and expression of non-coding RNAs (including microRNAs of environmental chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA and phthalates have expanded our understanding of the etiology of human complex diseases such as cancers and diabetes. Multiple lines of evidence from in vitro and in vivo models have established that epigenetic modifications caused by in utero exposure to environmental toxicants can induce alterations in gene expression that may persist throughout life. Epigenetics is an important mechanism in the ability of environmental chemicals to influence health and disease, and BPA and phthalates are epigenetically toxic. The epigenetic effect of BPA was clearly demonstrated in viable yellow mice by decreasing CpG methylation upstream of the Agouti gene, and the hypomethylating effect of BPA was prevented by maternal dietary supplementation with a methyl donor like folic acid or the phytoestrogen genistein. Histone H3 was found to be trimethylated at lysine 27 by BPA effect on EZH2 in a human breast cancer cell line and mice. BPA exposure of human placental cell lines has been shown to alter microRNA expression levels, and specifically, miR-146a was strongly induced by BPA treatment. In human breast cancer MCF7 cells, treatment with the phthalate BBP led to demethylation of estrogen receptor (ESR1 promoter-associated CpG islands, indicating that altered ESR1 mRNA expression by BBP is due to aberrant DNA methylation. Maternal exposure to phthalate DEHP was also shown to increase DNA methylation and expression levels of DNA methyltransferases in mouse testis. Further, some epigenetic effects of BPA and phthalates in female rats were found to be transgenerational. Finally, the available new technologies for global analysis of epigenetic alterations will provide insight into the extent and patterns of alterations between human normal and diseased tissues.

  6. Organizational and activational effects of estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silbergeld Ellen K.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruption is a hypothesis of common mode of action that may define a set of structurally varied chemicals, both natural and synthetic. Their common mode of action may suggest that they produce or contribute to similar toxic effects, although this has been difficult to demonstrate. Insights from developmental biology suggest that development of hormone sensitive systems, such as the brain and the genitourinary tract, may be particularly sensitive to EDCs. Because these systems are both organized and later activated by hormones, the brain and vagina may be valuable model systems to study the toxicity of EDCs in females and to elucidate mechanisms whereby early exposures appear to affect long term function.

  7. Effect of prolonged chemical challenges on selected properties of silorane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jesus, Vivian CBR; Martinelli, Natan Luiz; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged chemical challenges on water sorption, solubility, and roughness of a silorane-based material when compared to methacrylate-based composites. Methods: Initial roughness and mass were registered for specimens (n=24...... phosphoric acid, 75% ethanol or distilled water for 7, 14, 21, and 180 days, when new measurements were performed. Subsequently, specimens were dehydrated until a constant mass was obtained. Water sorption and solubility were calculated after 180 days of immersion in the different solutions. Data were...... differences in water sorption and solubility were detected amongst the investigated composites (pwater sorption (with similar values to Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z350XT) and low solubility (with similar values to Filtek Z250) after prolonged immersion...

  8. Noodle based analytical devices for cost effective green chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwfo, Kanokwan; Wongwilai, Wasin; Paengnakorn, Pathinan; Boonmapa, Sasithorn; Sateanchok, Suphasinee; Grudpan, Kate

    2018-05-01

    Noodle based analytical devices are proposed for cost effective green chemical analysis. Two noodle based analytical platforms have been examined. Conditions for flow with laminar behaviors could be established. Detection may be via a webcam camera or a flatbed scanner. Acid-base reactions were chosen as a model study. The assays of acetic acid and sodium hydroxide were investigated. Apart from bromothymol blue, simple aqueous extract of butterfly pea flower was used as a natural reagent. Another model was the assay of copper (Cu 2+ ) which was based on the redox reaction of copper (Cu 2+ ) with iodide to produce tri-iodide forming brown/black product with starch which already exists in the noodle platform. Demonstration to apply the noodle platforms for real samples was made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical release and radiation effects (CRRES) data directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, George P.

    1993-01-01

    The following tasks were completed under this contract: a revision and update of the Chemical Release and Radiation Effects (CRRES) data directory was performed taking into account the corrections and suggests for improvements obtained from the participants at the final CRRES IWG meeting held at SAIC on 14-16 Dec. 1992. A draft copy of the report was then circulated to as many as possible of the relevant CRRES Principal Investigators, co-Investigators, and technicians with a request for a final check on accuracy and completion. A copy of the mailing list is given in Appendix A. All corrections and updates received were implemented. A hard copy together with a floppy disk version was forwarded to Richard Howard, NASA Headquarters, who is arranging for the archiving of the CRRES Data Summary at NSSDC. Final copies were sent where possible.

  10. Designing Intelligent Secure Android Application for Effective Chemical Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukran, Mohd Afizi Mohd; Naim Abdullah, Muhammad; Nazri Ismail, Mohd; Maskat, Kamaruzaman; Isa, Mohd Rizal Mohd; Shahfee Ishak, Muhammad; Adib Khairuddin, Muhamad

    2017-08-01

    Mobile services support various situations in everyday life and with the increasing sophistication of phone functions, the daily life is much more easier and better especially in term of managing tools and apparatus. Since chemical inventory management system has been experiencing a new revolution from antiquated to an automated inventory management system, some additional features should be added in current chemical inventory system. Parallel with the modern technologies, chemical inventory application using smart phone has been developed. Several studies about current related chemical inventory management using smart phone application has been done in this paper in order to obtain an overview on recent studies in smartphone application for chemical inventory system which are needed in schools, universities or other education institutions. This paper also discuss about designing the proposed secure mobile chemical inventory system. The study of this paper can provide forceful review analysis support for the chemical inventory management system related research.

  11. Effective Message Elements for Disclosures about Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dannielle E; Boynton, Marcella H; Noar, Seth M; Morgan, Jennifer C; Mendel, Jennifer R; Ribisl, Kurt M; Stepanov, Irina; Nylander-French, Leena A; Brewer, Noel T

    2017-05-17

    Cigarette smoke contains at least 93 chemicals or "constituents" that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified as harmful or potentially harmful to human health. Our study sought to identify which constituent disclosure message elements are most effective in discouraging people from smoking. Three hundred eighty-eight current smokers ages 18 and older completed an online survey in February 2015. We randomized participants to respond to one of two sets of 13 toxic products that contain cigarette constituents and 25 health effects associated with cigarette constituents. Products that elicited the most discouragement were those with lower chances of exposure (e.g., explosives), followed by products with possible exposure (e.g., rat poison) and products with a high likelihood of exposure (e.g., floor cleaner). Awareness of toxic products that constituents are found in (pelements. Our study identified health effects and toxic products, especially cancers and rarely encountered toxic products, that may discourage smoking when included in disclosure messages. By constructing messages that communicate the harms associated with tobacco use by contextualizing those harms in terms of specific constituents, tobacco education messaging efforts may be increasingly successful.

  12. Mechanical properties of uniaxial natural fabric Grewia tilifolia reinforced epoxy based composites: Effects of chemical treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical treatment on the mechanical, morphological, and chemical resistance properties of uniaxial natural fabrics, Grewia tilifolia/epoxy composites, were studied. In order to enhance the interfacial bonding between the epoxy matrix...

  13. Effects of incomplete mixing on chemical reactions under flow heterogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Lazaro; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of the mixing process in aquifers is of primary importance when assessing attenuation of pollutants. In aquifers different hydraulic and chemical properties can increase mixing and spreading of the transported species. Mixing processes control biogeochemical transformations such as precipitation/dissolution reactions or degradation reactions that are fast compared to mass transfer processes. Reactions are local phenomena that fluctuate at the pore scale, but predictions are often made at much larger scales. However, aquifer heterogeities are found at all scales and generates flow heterogeneities which creates complex concentration distributions that enhances mixing. In order to assess the impact of spatial flow heterogeneities at pore scale we study concentration profiles, gradients and reaction rates using a random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method and kernel density estimators to reconstruct concentrations and gradients in two setups. First, we focus on a irreversible bimolecular reaction A+B → C under homogeneous flow to distinguish phenomena of incomplete mixing of reactants from finite-size sampling effects. Second, we analise a fast reversible bimolecular chemical reaction A+B rightleftharpoons C in a laminar Poiseuille flow reactor to determine the difference between local and global reaction rates caused by the incomplete mixing under flow heterogeneities. Simulation results for the first setup differ from the analytical solution of the continuum scale advection-dispersion-reaction equation studied by Gramling et al. (2002), which results in an overstimation quantity of reaction product (C). In the second setup, results show that actual reaction rates are bigger than the obtained from artificially mixing the system by averaging the concentration vertically. - LITERATURE Gramling, C. M.,Harvey, C. F., Meigs, and L. C., (2002). Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci

  14. Thermodynamic stabilization of precipitates through interface segregation: Chemical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadambi, Sourabh B.; Patala, Srikanth

    2017-09-01

    Precipitation hardening, which relies on a high density of intermetallic precipitates, is a commonly utilized technique for strengthening structural alloys. At high temperatures, however, the precipitates often coarsen to reduce the excess energy of the interface, resulting in a significant reduction in the strengthening achieved. In certain ternary alloys, secondary solute segregation to the interface has been observed to result in the formation of a high density of nanosized precipitates that provide enhanced strength and are resistant to coarsening. To understand the chemical effects involved, and to identify such segregating systems, we develop a thermodynamic model using the framework of the regular nanocrystalline solution model. For various global compositions, temperatures, and thermodynamic parameters, we evaluate equilibrium configurations of a Mg-Sn-Zn alloy by minimizing the Gibbs free energy function with respect to region-specific (bulk solid solution, interface, and precipitate) concentrations and sizes. The results show that Mg2Sn precipitates can be stabilized to nanoscale sizes through Zn segregation to the Mg /Mg2Sn interface, and the precipitates can be stabilized against coarsening at high temperatures through strong Mg-Zn interface interaction. Together with the inclusion of elastic strain energy effects, kinetic contributions, and the input of computationally informed interface parameters in the future, the model is expected to provide a more realistic prediction of segregation and precipitate stabilization in ternary alloys of structural importance.

  15. Sensitivity of men and women to effect of chemical factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliyev, V.A.

    1985-05-01

    The activity of enzymes performing energy metabolism and electron transport in the respiratory chain and anabolism and catabolism processes in cells of the blood system of men and women petroleum processing workers is described and discussed. Enzymic activity was studied by cytochemical methods. Subjects included basic petroleum processing device operators (96 women and 74 men ranging in age from 19-30 years with work experience ranging from 4 months to 10 years). The control group included 133 persons of corresponding age-sex groups who were not involved in petroleum processing work. The cytoenzymic studies refuted the assumption that women workers are more sensitive than men workers to the effect of toxic substances. On the whole, the men in the study were found to be less resistant to the effect of chemical factors encountered in petroleum processing work. It was assumed that specific features of functioning of the female body (menstruation, pregnancy and birth), causing stress and reconstruction of homeostasis systems, promoted improvement of adaptational mechanisms in the process of evolution, which mechanisms were coded in the gene pool. It is speculated that sexual differences may cause differences in cell metabolism. 12 refs.

  16. Chemicals and lemon essential oil effect on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Maldonado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is considered to be one of the important target microorganisms in the quality control of acidic canned foods. There is an urgent need to develop a suitable method for inhibiting or controlling the germination and outgrowth of A.acidoterrestris in acidic drinks. The aim of this work was to evaluate the chemicals used in the lemon industry (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and lemon essential oil as a natural compound, against a strain of A.acidoterrestris in MEB medium and in lemon juice concentrate. The results pointed out that sodium benzoate (500-1000-2000 ppm and lemon essential oil (0.08- 0.12- 0.16% completely inhibited the germination of A. acidoterrestris spores in MEB medium and LJC for 11 days. Potassium sorbate (600-1200 ppm was more effective to inhibit the growth of the microbial target in lemon juice than in MEB medium. The effect of sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and essential oil was sporostatic in MEB and LJC as they did not affect spore viability.

  17. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  18. Effect of Natural Fermentation on the Chemical and Nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in the chemical and nutritional composition of naturally fermented soy nono were studied at ambient temperature (27 ± 2oC) for 72 h. The differently fermented soy nono samples were collected at 6 h intervals and analysed for chemical, proximate and mineral composition using standard laboratory procedures.

  19. The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects database (CAFE), a tool that supports assessments of chemical spills in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Farr, James K; Jenne, Polly; Chu, Valerie; Hielscher, Al

    2016-06-01

    The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) database is a centralized repository that allows for rapid and unrestricted access to data. Information in CAFE is integrated into a user-friendly tool with modules containing fate and effects data for 32 377 and 4498 chemicals, respectively. Toxicity data are summarized in the form of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) with associated 1st and 5th percentile hazard concentrations (HCs). An assessment of data availability relative to reported chemical incidents showed that CAFE had fate and toxicity data for 32 and 20 chemicals, respectively, of 55 chemicals reported in the US National Response Center database (2000-2014), and fate and toxicity data for 86 and 103, respectively, of 205 chemicals reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (2003-2014). Modeled environmental concentrations of 2 hypothetical spills (acrylonitrile, 625 barrels; and denatured ethanol, 857 barrels) were used to demonstrate CAFE's practical application. Most species in the 24-h SSD could be potentially impacted by acrylonitrile and denatured ethanol during the first 35 min and 15 h post spill, respectively, with concentrations falling below their HC5s (17 mg/L and 2676 mg/L) at 45 min and 60 h post spill, respectively. Comparisons of CAFE-based versus published HC5 values for 100 chemicals showed that nearly half of values were within a 2-fold difference, with a relatively small number of comparisons exceeding a 10-fold difference. The development of CAFE facilitates access to relevant environmental information, with potential uses likely expanding beyond those related to assessment of spills in aquatic environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1576-1586. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  20. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations symposium in Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Symposium on Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transformations showed that interest in the subject matter is far from being exclusively academic. Though a large number of the papers dealt with theoretical aspects, it was felt that hot atom reactions provided a valuable means by which a large number of radioactive isotopes and labelled compounds could be prepared practically free from their inactive counterparts. Such so-called carrier-free preparations are in great demand for industrial, medical and scientific applications. Discussions showed that a detailed knowledge o: the characteristics of radiation damage was essential to the successful development of nuclear power Nuclear transformations in solids provide a method of generating such damage and at the same time leave radioactive products that permit the study of the subsequent repair. This technique permits studies a' levels of damage much below those that are necessary with the less sensitive purely physical procedures. A number of papers emphasized the theoretical importance of the insight which hot atom chemistry gives into the mechanism of reactions occurring at abnormal temperatures

  1. Natural mineral waters: chemical characteristics and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrini, Sara; Pampaloni, Barbara; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Water contributes significantly to health and a daily intake of 1.5 to 2 liters of water should be guaranteed, because a good hydration is essential to maintain the body water equilibrium, although needs may vary among people. However, worldwide population is far from the Recommended Allowance for water intake. Among the waters for human uses, there are ‘waters (treated or not), intended for drinking, used for the food and beverages preparation or for other domestic purposes’ and natural mineral waters, that are ‘originated from an aquifer or underground reservoir, spring from one or more natural or bore sources and have specific hygienic features and, eventually, healthy properties’. According to the European Legislation (2009/54/EC Directive), physical and chemical characterization is used to make a classification of the different mineral waters, basing on the analysis of main parameters. Mineral composition enables to classify natural mineral waters as bicarbonate mineral waters, sulphate mineral waters, chloride mineral waters, calcic mineral waters, magnesiac mineral waters, fluorurate mineral waters, ferrous mineral waters and sodium-rich mineral waters. Although the concerns about bottled mineral waters (due to plasticizers and endocrine disruptors), many are the health effects of natural mineral waters and several studies explored their properties and their role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28228777

  2. Chemical constituents and health effects of sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sunan; Nie, Shaoping; Zhu, Fan

    2016-11-01

    Sweet potatoes are becoming a research focus in recent years due to their unique nutritional and functional properties. Bioactive carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, carotenoids, anthocyanins, conjugated phenolic acids, and minerals represent versatile nutrients in different parts (tubers, leaves, stems, and stalks) of sweet potato. The unique composition of sweet potato contributes to their various health benefits, such as antioxidative, hepatoprotective, antiinflammatory, antitumor, antidiabetic, antimicrobial, antiobesity, antiaging effects. Factors affecting the nutritional composition and bio-functions of sweet potato include the varieties, plant parts, extraction time and solvents, postharvest storage, and processing. The assays for bio-function evaluation also contribute to the variations among different studies. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the chemical composition of sweet potato, and their bio-functions studied in vitro and in vivo. Leaves, stems, and stalks of sweet potato remain much underutilized on commercial levels. Sweet potato can be further developed as a sustainable crop for diverse nutritionally enhanced and value-added food products to promote human health. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancement of developmental toxicity effects of chemicals by gestational stress. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin S; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2007-01-01

    often enhanced chemical developmental toxicity at dose levels associated with severe maternal toxicity or where test agents were already above threshold for effect. Thus, LOAEL(chemical) was generally similar to LOAEL(chemical+stress), although not necessarily for the same endpoint. It should be noted...

  4. Environmental chemicals and their effects on female reproductive health: Searching for molecular mechanisms and effect biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith

    lead to combination or mixture effects, where chemicals present at doses that would not cause effects on their own, can add up and cause an effect. The aim of the PhD project was to identify early biomarkers and sensitive windows for late life effects on the ovary after chemical exposure to mixtures...... dams were exposed to a mixture of phthalates, pesticides, UV-filters, bisphenol A, butyl-paraben, as well as the mild analgesic paracetamol (PM). The compounds were tested all together (Totalmix) or in subgroups with anti-androgenic (AAmix) or estrogenic (Emix) properties. PM was tested separately...... explanted neonatal ovaries to AAmix, submixtures (pesticide mix (PEmix), phthtalate mix (PHmix)), and mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP), was conducted. No significant effects were seen on gene expression, but histological evaluation showed that primordial follicles were reduced in the PEmix exposed ovaries...

  5. Effect of plant chemicals on the behavior of the Mediterranean fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, N.T.; Kouloussis, N.A.; Katsoyannos, B.I.

    2006-01-01

    A review of current information on the relation between plant chemicals and the Mediterranean fruit fly is presented. The influence of age and adult physiology on the response of med flies to plant chemicals is studied. The effect of plant chemicals on med fly behavior during host finding, mating and oviposition is analysed. The possible influence of plant chemicals on the dispersion patterns and spatial distribution of the fly is also addressed. (MAC)

  6. Effect of plant chemicals on the behavior of the Mediterranean fruit fly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, N.T., E-mail: nikopap@uth.g [University of Thessaly (Greece). Dept. of Crop Production and Rural Environment. Lab. of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology; Kouloussis, N.A.; Katsoyannos, B.I. [University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). School of Agriculture

    2006-07-01

    A review of current information on the relation between plant chemicals and the Mediterranean fruit fly is presented. The influence of age and adult physiology on the response of med flies to plant chemicals is studied. The effect of plant chemicals on med fly behavior during host finding, mating and oviposition is analysed. The possible influence of plant chemicals on the dispersion patterns and spatial distribution of the fly is also addressed. (MAC)

  7. Effect of chemical disinfectants on the transverse strength of heat-polymerized acrylic resins submitted to mechanical and chemical polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Iara Augusta; Andrade, Vanessa Gomes

    2004-10-01

    Immersion in chemical solutions used for cleansing and disinfecting prostheses can decrease the strength of denture base resins, making them more prone to fracture during use. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of immersion in different chemical disinfectants for varying time periods on the transverse strength of 3 mechanically or chemically polished heat-polymerized acrylic resins. A total of 630 rectangular specimens (65 x 10 x 3 mm), 210 per resin (Classico, Lucitone 550, and QC-20), were fabricated. One side of each specimen was not polished and the other was either mechanically (n=300) or chemically (n=300) polished, and immersed for 10, 20, 30, 45, or 60 minutes in either 1%, 2.5%, or 5.25% sodium hypochlorite or 2% glutaraldehyde. Mechanically polished (n=15) and chemically polished (n=15) control specimens were immersed only in distilled water. The transverse strength (N/mm 2 ) was tested for failure in a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Student t test. Multiple comparisons were performed using Tukey and Scheffe tests (alpha=.05). There was significant difference (P resins. No significant differences were observed between resins submitted to both types of polishing or between different immersion periods (10 to 60 minutes), disinfectants, or interaction. Lucitone 550 resin presented the greatest transverse strength values with both types of polishing. Among the mechanically and chemically polished specimens, transverse strength was not affected after immersion in the disinfectants for the immersion periods tested (10 to 60 minutes). Chemically polished control and experimental (immersed in all solutions) QC-20 specimens showed significant differences in transverse strength values.

  8. The effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on the human organism

    OpenAIRE

    Karolina Kulik-Kupka; Justyna Nowak; Ilona Korzonek-Szlacheta; Barbara Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska

    2017-01-01

    The development of civilization has not only improved the quality of life, but it is also responsible for increasing environmental pollution. Between 80000-100000 previously unknown chemicals have been estimated to circulate in the air. They include substances known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). These substances can naturally be found in the environment and food, or are classified as pollutants. EDCs are said to change the functionality of the endocrine system and, in this way, exe...

  9. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  10. A new index to assess chemicals increasing the greenhouse effect based on their toxicity to algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Tian, Dayong; Gao, Ya; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying; Kong, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    CO2, as the typical greenhouse gas causing the greenhouse effect, is a major global environmental problem and has attracted increasing attention from governments. Using algae to eliminate CO2, which has been proposed as an effective way to reduce the greenhouse effect in the past decades, can be disturbed by a growing number of artificial chemicals. Thus, seven types of chemicals and Selenastrum capricornutum (algae) were examined in this study, and the good consistency between the toxicity of artificial chemicals to algae and the disturbance of carbon fixation by the chemicals was revealed. This consistency showed that the disturbance of an increasing number of artificial chemicals to the carbon fixation of algae might be a "malware" worsening the global greenhouse effect. Therefore, this study proposes an original, promising index to assess the risk of deepening the greenhouse effect by artificial chemicals before they are produced and marketed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of some chemical surface modifications on resin zirconia adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Wong, Hai Ming

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of various chemical surface modifications on adhesion between zirconia and resin adhesive. Pre-sintered zirconia discs were sectioned from commercial cylindrical blocks and polished with abrasive papers under running tap water. All the discs were randomly divided into five study groups according to the methods of surface treatment, including: the control group (fully sintered, without any modification), group S (fully sintered and sandblasted with silica coated alumina particles), group HN (fully sintered and etched with a blend of mineral acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), group HF (fully sintered and etched with 48% hydrofluoric acid solution at 100 °C for 25 min), and group Si (coated with silica particles and then fully sintered). The mean value of surface roughness was evaluated before further treatment. Resin stubs (3.6mm in diameter and 3mm in height) were adhered and light cured on each zirconia disc after the application of a silane coupling agent. In each group, all the samples were further divided into three subgroups with each n=12, one for the measurement of initial adhesion strength (shear bond) value and the other two were tested after thermal cycling for 10,000 and 20,000 cycles, respectively. The results were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Turkey HSD (pzirconia surface crystallinity. The morphological appearance of zirconia surface after surface treatment was observed with SEM. The control group showed the lowest initial shear bond strength (SBS) value (16.8 ± 2.4 MPa) and did not survive the aging treatments. All the investigated surface treatments improved resin zirconia bond strength significantly, the group S displaying the highest initial value of 25.1 ± 2.7 MPa. However, the highest resistance to the aging effects of thermal cycling was found in group Si. It was further shown in the XRD examination that only the grit-blasting caused the crystalline transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase (T

  12. Chemical-state effects in Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.R.; Madey, T.E.; Houston, J.E.; Holloway, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    We have used Auger spectroscopy as a probe of local chemical environment both in the gas and condensed phases using a systematically chosen series of molecules [H 2 O, CH 3 OH, (CH 3 ) 2 O, CH 4 , C 2 H 4 , and C 2 H 2 ]. For the series of gas phase molecules, H 2 O, CH 3 OH, (CH 3 ) 2 O, and CH 4 , where oxygen and carbon are, respectively, in similar bonding arrangements, characteristic fingerprint spectra (methanelike for C and waterlike for O) are shown to result. Additional fine structure, which is dependent on the specific molecular environment, appears on the spectra. In contrast, dramatic differences are observed for the series CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , and C 2 H 4 in which major differences in hybridization exist at the carbon site. H 2 O, CH 3 OH, and (CH 3 ) 2 O were studied both in the gas phase (electron excited) and in the condensed phase (x-ray excited). The O(KVV) (K level--valence--valence transition) and C(KVV) spectra are shown to be similar when comparing the gas--solid results only if the multilayer spectra are properly corrected for electron-loss effects. Some ''solid-state'' broadening is observed in the multilayer case. The degree of this broadening is found to be greater in the O(KVV) than for the C(KVV) and a new peak appears in the case of solid H 2 O which is not present in the gas phase. This is consistent with intermolecular bonding primarily at the oxygen site. These results demonstrate, along with the fingerprint correlations given above, that AES is sensitive to changes in the local environment

  13. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method

  14. Challenges to studying the health effects of early life environmental chemical exposures on children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Joseph M; Gray, Kimberly

    2017-12-01

    Epidemiological studies play an important role in quantifying how early life environmental chemical exposures influence the risk of childhood diseases. These studies face at least four major challenges that can produce noise when trying to identify signals of associations between chemical exposure and childhood health. Challenges include accurately estimating chemical exposure, confounding from causes of both exposure and disease, identifying periods of heightened vulnerability to chemical exposures, and determining the effects of chemical mixtures. We provide recommendations that will aid in identifying these signals with more precision.

  15. The effect of chemical ordering and lattice mismatch on structural transitions in phase segregating nanoalloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Kevin; Baletto, Francesca

    2017-05-10

    We elucidate the effect of lattice mismatch and chemical ordering on structural transitions in bimetallic nanoalloys of ∼1.5 nm. We show that collective screw dislocation motions happen in small mismatch shell@core systems while strongly mismatched ones favour incomplete outer shell rearrangements. Cooperative transitions can also become hindered when the chemical ordering breaks the geometrical symmetry. Escaping from an unfavourable morphological basin occurs first via re-arrangements of the geometry and then changes towards a better chemical pattern. We observe that the chemical re-ordering mechanisms are independent of system composition and stoichiometry but hinge on the initial and final chemical arrangements.

  16. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  17. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Junghans, Marion [Swiss Center for Applied Ecotoxicology Eawag-EPFL, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600, Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  18. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii – Toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B.; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I.L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Systematic study of multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals in C. reinhardtii. • UVR and chemicals did not act independently on algal photosynthesis and reproduction. • Multiple stressor effects of UVR and chemicals depended on chemical MOA. • Synergistic effect interactions not limited to oxidative stress inducing chemicals. • Multiple MOAs of UVR may limit applicability of current prediction models. - Abstract: The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are

  19. Chemical effect on the K shell fluorescence yield of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical effects on the K shell fluorescence yields. (ωK) for Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Cu compounds were observed. The values are compared with theoretical, semiempirical fit and experimental ones for the pure elements. Keywords. Fluorescence yield; 3d elements; chemical effect. PACS Nos 32.10.-f; 32.80.-t; 32.80.Fb. 1.

  20. Teratogenic effects of 17β-estradiol and other environmental chemicals in eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthorst, Jane Ebsen; Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Korsgaard, Bodil

    -offspring interactions and effects in the offspring upon maternal exposure to various chemicals. In oviparous fish species malformations can be induced by exposure to chemicals, including endocrine disrupting substances. Hence the malformations observed in wild eelpout could be due to anthropogenic chemicals....... The specific chemicals or group of chemicals causing the malformations observed in nature are not known, but similar malformations upon exposure of pregnant eelpout to octylphenol (OP) and 17β-estradiol (E2) in high concentrations have recently been observed in the laboratory. In the current two experiments...... if two environmental chemicals with known endocrine disrupting effects, the PAH pyrene and the synthetic hormone 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), could induce similar teratogenic effects. Exposure of female eelpouts to environmentally realistic concentrations of E2 during early pregnancy increased...

  1. Effect of enzyme addition to forage at ensiling on silage chemical composition and NDF degradation characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Hvelplund, Torben

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different exogenous fibrolytic enzymes added to forages at ensiling was examined for effect on chemical composition and in vitro NDF degradability characteristics of the resulting silage. Maize stover and lucerne were used to study effect on chemical composition in experiment 1, and......; NDF, neutral detergent fibre; iNDF, indigestible NDF; CP, crude protein; OM, organic matter; ED, effective degradability; c, fractional rate of degradation......The effect of different exogenous fibrolytic enzymes added to forages at ensiling was examined for effect on chemical composition and in vitro NDF degradability characteristics of the resulting silage. Maize stover and lucerne were used to study effect on chemical composition in experiment 1...... with treatment with individual enzymes. Enzyme mix with xylanase, glucanase and β-glucanase activities was effective for maize stover, whereas a mix containing pectinase activity was most effective for reducing pH in lucerne. Data from this study suggest that adding fibrolytic enzymes to forages at ensiling can...

  2. Effects of different autotoxins on antioxidant enzymes and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous cropping obstacle is a serious problem in tea (Camellia sinensis L.) planting. In order to understand the mechanism of this phenomenon, SOD, POD, CAT and MDA in the roots of tea tree and chemical compounds in leaf of tea were analyzed. The results showed that the autotoxins had both inhibitory and ...

  3. Effects of Chemical Peeling and Cultivars on the Antinutritional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2205, TMS30572) roots were peeled using three different methods: manual peeling, chemical peeling with either 10% NaOH followed by treatment with 3% citric acid, or 10% NaOH solution followed by treatment with 15% NaCl. Peeled roots ...

  4. Effect of drying methods on the chemical composition of three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three methods of drying (oven, sun and smoke) were used to dry Bonga spp., Sardinella spp. and Heterotis niloticus. The physico-chemical and minerals contents of the sample were determined using standard methods. Oven dried H. niloticus recorded the highest (16.42%) moisture content while the least moisture content ...

  5. Effects of Chemical Surface Treatment on Mechanical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The morphology of the materials was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fibre chemical modification improves its adhesion to the matrix as well as the mechanical properties of the composites. Keywords: Scanning Electron Microscopy, Sisal fiber, Tensile test, Unsaturated polyester resin ...

  6. Effect of fermentation on the chemical composition of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Carotene, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, ascorbic acid, tryptophan, lysine and minerals are also present in the fruit (Goldsmith, 1976). Mango peel fibre is a good source of dietary fibre and its chemical composition may be compared to that of citrus fibre. The peel fibre also shows higher values of antioxidant ...

  7. Effects of sodium lactate and lactic acid on chemical, microbiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overall, the findings demonstrate that the addition of 1% LA in marinated chicken can delay the proliferation of spoilage microorganisms and the appearance of undesirable chemical. This LA concentration improves the sensory attributes and extends the shelf life of the product during refrigerated storage. The LA additive ...

  8. Effect of ozone gas processing on physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the physiochemical properties of proteins. (i.e., gluten, glutenin, and gliadin) isolated from non-ozone-treated flour were examined by studying chemical characteristics using SDS-. PAGE, free SH groups, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) parameters, secondary structure, and rheological measurements.

  9. Immune effects of respiratory exposure to fragrance chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam J; Klerk A de; Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Park MVDZ; Loveren H van; Jong WH de; GBO

    2007-01-01

    Inhalation of the fragrance chemicals, isoeugenol and cinnamal, by mice resulted in immune reactions in the respiratory tract. This was observed in experiments performed by the RIVM (National Institute for Public Health and the Enviroment) of which results indicate that inhalation of some fragrance

  10. Effect of vegetation switch on soil chemical properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Iwashima, N.; Masunaga, T.; Fujimaki, R.; Toyota, Ayu; Tayasu, I.; Hiura, T.; Kaneko, N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2012), s. 783-792 ISSN 0038-0768 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : earthworm * litter * nutrient cycling * soil chemical properties * vegetation switch Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.889, year: 2012

  11. Effects of different autotoxins on antioxidant enzymes and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Continuous cropping obstacle is a serious problem in tea (Camellia sinensis L.) planting. In order to understand the mechanism of this phenomenon, SOD, POD, CAT and MDA in the roots of tea tree and chemical compounds in leaf of tea were analyzed. The results showed that the autotoxins had both.

  12. The effects of continuous cropping and fallowing on the chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, soil chemical properties were determined in a cleared forestland continuously grown to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz), pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan), maize (Zea mays) and their combination for seven years and from then was fallowed for ten years. Soil samples were also collected from the adjacent ...

  13. Chemical effects in x-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, N.G.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical bond influence in X-ray emission spectra of hafnium, iodine, iron, sulphur, aluminium and magnesium is detected. The position of one X-ray emission line is determined by three methods: parabolic profile; Gaussian distribution and extra-heavy maximum. (author)

  14. Effect of enzyme clarification on chemical , physical and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , 0.075% and 0.10%) and fined using bentonite and gelatin were evaluated for yield, chemical, physical and sensory characteristics. Enzyme concentration of 0.05% was found to give the highest yield (65.6%) of juice at 3h incubation time with ...

  15. The Effect of Chemical and Physical Enhancers on Trolamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Trolamine salicylate permeability parameters through rat skin were evaluated with and without chemical enhancers - Transcutol, eucalyptus oil, oleic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate – using the permeability cell technique. Results: The main barrier for trolamine salicylate permeability was the epidermis layer of the ...

  16. The effect of storage on Physical, Chemical and Bacteriological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the changes in physical, chemical and bacteriological quality of drinking water stored for a period of three months. Ten (10) different companies' water samples each of bottled water (B) and sachet water (S) were randomly selected for the study around Ibadan Metropolis. Experimental method was used ...

  17. Combined effects of radiation and chemical reaction on MHD flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of radiation and chemical reaction on MHD flow past a moving plate with Hall current is studied here. Earlier, we (2016) have studied unsteady MHD flow in porous media over exponentially accelerated plate with variable wall temperature and mass transfer along with Hall current. To study further, we are changing ...

  18. The effects of physical and chemical changes on the optimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine physical and chemical changes during fruit development and their relationship with optimum harvest maturity for Bacon, Fuerte and Zutano avocado cultivars grown under Dörtyol ecological condition. Fruits cv. Bacon, Fuerte and Zutano were obtained trees grafted on seedlings and ...

  19. Effects of Meditation on Anxiety and Chemical Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Studied a non-self-selected sample of chemically dependent people instructed in meditation techniques. Differences established upon training termination were no longer evident in the instructed group after six months. Subjects who reported continuing at least minimal meditative practices, however, showed differences in social adjustment, work…

  20. Random coil chemical shift for intrinsically disordered proteins: effects of temperature and pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Brander, Søren; Poulsen, Flemming M.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary chemical shift analysis is the main NMR method for detection of transiently formed secondary structure in intrinsically disordered proteins. The quality of the secondary chemical shifts is dependent on an appropriate choice of random coil chemical shifts. We report random coil chemical shifts and sequence correction factors determined for a GGXGG peptide series following the approach of Schwarzinger et al. (J Am Chem Soc 123(13):2970–2978, 2001). The chemical shifts are determined at neutral pH in order to match the conditions of most studies of intrinsically disordered proteins. Temperature has a non-negligible effect on the 13 C random coil chemical shifts, so temperature coefficients are reported for the random coil chemical shifts to allow extrapolation to other temperatures. The pH dependence of the histidine random coil chemical shifts is investigated in a titration series, which allows the accurate random coil chemical shifts to be obtained at any pH. By correcting the random coil chemical shifts for the effects of temperature and pH, systematic biases of the secondary chemical shifts are minimized, which will improve the reliability of detection of transient secondary structure in disordered proteins.

  1. Comparative enhancing effects of electret with chemical enhancers on transdermal delivery of meloxicam in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, L L; Hou, X M; Li, G D; Jiang, J; Liang, Y Y; Xin, X

    2008-01-01

    Electret offers enhancing effect in transdermal drug delivery for altering of the arrangement of lipid molecules in the stratum corneum, forming many transient permeable apertures and enhancing the transdermal drug delivery. In this paper, meloxicam patch formulations were developed to make the comparative study of transdermal drug delivery between electret and chemical enhancers. Patches were made into control, electret, chemical enhancer and electret with chemical enhancer ones, according to the preparation procedure. The electret combined with chemical enhancer patch was designed to probe the incorporation between electret and chemical enhancer in transdermal drug delivery. The meloxicam release from the patch was found to increase in order of blank, chemical enhancer, electret and electret with chemical enhancer patch, in general.

  2. Effects of chemical treatments on hemp fibre structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.M.; Wang, H.; Lau, K.T.; Cardona, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, hemp fibres were treated with alkali, acetyl and silane chemicals. Fibre constituents such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents were separated from treated fibres. The chemical and thermal influences of these constituents on the treated fibres were examined by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experimental results revealed that, hemicellulose was degraded faster than that of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose exhibited better thermal stability and lignin was degraded in a wide range of temperatures. The hydrophilic nature of the fibres was predominantly caused by the presence of hemicellulose and then lignin constituents. Hemicellulose and lignin were mostly removed by the alkalisation with higher concentrations of NaOH, followed by acetylation. Silane treatment could not remove the hemicellulose and lignin, rather this treatment facilitated coupling with the fibre constituents.

  3. Effects of chemical treatments on hemp fibre structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, M.M., E-mail: kabirm@usq.edu.au [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Wang, H. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Lau, K.T. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Cardona, F. [Centre of Excellence in Engineered Fibre Composite (CEEFC), Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, hemp fibres were treated with alkali, acetyl and silane chemicals. Fibre constituents such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents were separated from treated fibres. The chemical and thermal influences of these constituents on the treated fibres were examined by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experimental results revealed that, hemicellulose was degraded faster than that of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose exhibited better thermal stability and lignin was degraded in a wide range of temperatures. The hydrophilic nature of the fibres was predominantly caused by the presence of hemicellulose and then lignin constituents. Hemicellulose and lignin were mostly removed by the alkalisation with higher concentrations of NaOH, followed by acetylation. Silane treatment could not remove the hemicellulose and lignin, rather this treatment facilitated coupling with the fibre constituents.

  4. Medición de caída de presión en túneles de viento por método alternativo; Head Loss Measurement in WindTunnel, an Alternative Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Borrajo Pérez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available La caracterización de modelos de intercambiadores de calor es de vital importancia en el diseño de estosequipos y no se encuentran fácilmente en la bibliografía, correlaciones que permitan predecir su comportamientotérmico e hidráulico, mas aún, si se trata de intercambiadores con alguna técnica de intensificación de latransferencia de calor aplicada. La caracterización, desde el punto de vista hidráulico, permite obtenercorrelaciones útiles para calcular el trabajo de bombeo o caída de presión necesaria para hacer circular losfluidos en las magnitudes requeridas por el cálculo térmico. Cuando se trata con intercambiadores de calorcompactos, que trabajan en régimen laminar, los valores de pérdidas de presión que el fluido experimenta alcircular a través de este son en extremo pequeños. La no existencia de medios para la realización de medicionesde caída de presión de pequeño orden en los laboratorios, llevó a los autores a desarrollar un método demedición que satisficiera las expectativas en lo que a medición de presión se refiere. A partir de esta motivación,fue implementado el método que es descrito y validado en este artículo.  Compact heat exchangers are used in many technical applications. Experimental characterization of compactheat exchangers is a very important issue at present. This kind of results is not found frequently in the bibliographybecause of the quantity and diversity of parameters involving the heat exchangers design. The hydrauliccharacterization is conducted to obtain the correlation of head loss suffered by the mass flowing across the heatexchangers. This correlation is a useful tool for finally calculate the power of pumping. At laminar regimen thehead loss are very small. The method of measurement described in this paper was developed for measurementof small pressure differences using a balance and the appropriate hydrostatic principles. The results were comparedto limited values of the

  5. Perda de carga contínua em tubulações conduzindo água residuária da suinocultura Continuous head loss in tubes carrying swine wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio C. Sampaio

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de definir e avaliar modelos matemáticos que estimem a perda de carga contínua em tubulações de aço zincado, ferro galvanizado e PVC, nos diâmetros comerciais 2 a 6 polegadas. Utilizou-se como fluido escoante a água e água residuária proveniente da suinocultura, nas concentrações de 0,98; 2,08; 4,73; 7,69 e 8,56%. Os resultados mostraram que os métodos que estimam a perda de carga baseados na equação Universal e relacionam o fator de atrito às características de escoamento, não apresentaram bons ajustes, principalmente quando se utilizou o Número de Reynolds Generalizado. As equações empíricas, propostas neste trabalho, em que se utilizam as metodologias de Duffy & Titchener e Hazen-Williams Modificada, que relacionam a perda de carga com a vazão, diâmetro, coeficiente de rugosidade e concentração de sólidos totais, apresentaram bons resultados, com coeficientes de determinação acima de 0,98. Desta maneira, recomenda-se a sua utilização para dimensionamento de projetos, por serem equações simples e confiáveis.This research was performed to evaluate and introduce mathematical models to estimate head losses in zinc steel, galvanized iron and PVC tubes and diameters ranging from 2 to 6 inches. The total solid concentration of swine liquid manure was: 0.98, 2.08, 4.73, 7.69 and 8.56%. The methods based on the Universal equation using the Generalized Reynolds Number showed an adjustment worse than the ones obtained through the empirical equations proposed in this work. Those equations were established from Duff & Titchener and Modified Hazen-Williams methodologies and showed a better adjustment with coefficients of determinations above 0.98 and thus may be recommended for pumping projects.

  6. Effect of Soybean Addition on the Chemical Composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maize grains were soaked in water (30±2°C, 12h); oven dried (60°C, 3h), toasted (110°C, 3min), milled and sieved through a 60mesh sieve. The toasted soybean flour (TSBF) was used to substitute 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70% toasted maize flour (apula) and the blends were analyzed for their chemical composition and ...

  7. Effects of Confinement on Chemical Reaction Equilibrium in Nanoporous Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Lísal, Martin; Brennan, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3984, - (2006), s. 743-751 ISSN 0302-9743 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507 Grant - others:NRCC(CA) OGP 1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nanoporous materials * chemical reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  8. Uptake of chemicals from indoor air: Pathways and health effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Building occupants are exposed to manufactured chemicals. Exposure in the indoor environment can occur via non-dietary ingestion (e.g. indoor dust), inhalation and dermal absorption including dermal uptake directly from air. The extent of dermal uptake from air has been previously studied for vol...... depend on the pathway of exposure. However, studies that investigate the health consequences of dermal uptake of SVOCs from air are lacking....

  9. Negative chemical pressure effects induced by Y substitution for Ca ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the magnetic chain may be useful to the overall understanding of the novel magnetism of the parent compound. Keywords. Spin-chains; Ca3Co2O6; chemical pressure; magnetic order; quantum tun- neling. PACS Nos 75.50.-y; 75.30.Cr; 75.40.Cx. 1. Introduction. Among spin-chain systems, the compound, Ca3Co2O6 [1,2], ...

  10. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Steven B.; Miller, David J.; Yang, Yu; Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

  11. Chemical Modification Effect on the Mechanical Properties of Coir Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Sultana Mir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber has a vital role as a reinforcing agent due to its renewable, low cost, biodegradable, less abrasive and eco-friendly nature. Whereas synthetic fibers like glass, boron, carbon, metallic, ceramic and inorganic fibers are expensive and not eco-friendly. Coir is one of the natural fibers easily available in Bangladesh and cheap. It is derived from the husk of the coconut (Cocos nucifera. Coir has one of the highest concentrations of lignin, which makes it stronger. In recent years, wide range of research has been carried out on fiber reinforced polymer composites [4-13].The aim of the present research is to characterize brown single coir fiber for manufacturing polymer composites reinforced with characterized fibers. Adhesion between the fiber and polymer is one of factors affecting the strength of manufactured composites. In order to increase the adhesion, the coir fiber was chemically treated separately in single stage (with Cr2(SO43•12(H2O and double stages (with CrSO4 and NaHCO3. Both the raw and treated fibers were characterized by tensile testing, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis, scanning electron microscopic analysis. The result showed that the Young’s modulus increased, while tensile strength and strain to failure decreased with increase in span length. Tensile properties of chemically treated coir fiber was found higher than raw coir fiber, while the double stage treated coir fiber had better mechanical properties compared to the single stage treated coir fiber. Scanning electron micrographs showed rougher surface in case of the raw coir fiber. The surface was found clean and smooth in case of the treated coir fiber. Thus the performance of coir fiber composites in industrial application can be improved by chemical treatment.

  12. The effect on biological and moisture resistance of epichlorohydrin chemically modified wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Beom-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Southern pine solid wood and fiber were chemically modified with epichlorohydrin to help in understanding the role of moisture in the mechanism of biological effectiveness of chemically modified wood. The solid wood had weight gains from 11% to 34%, while the fiber had weight gains from 9% to 75%. After modification, part of the specimens were water leached for 2 weeks...

  13. Effects of Some Chemical Food Additives on the Shelf-Life Stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Some Chemical Food Additives on the Shelf-Life Stability of Plantain Chips Stored at Ambient Temperature. ... Conclusion: The chemical additives conferred antimicrobial, antioxidant and preservative properties on the plantain chips and therefore prolonged the shelf life up to four weeks. Keywords: Plantain chips ...

  14. Effects of Processing on Some Chemical Properties of the Leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of boiling and drying on some chemical properties of the drumstick tree (Moringa oleifera) were determined. One batch of fresh Moringa leaves was boiled in distilled water, while another batch was dried in the shade, at a temperature of 30 – 34oC. Both batches were milled and some chemical properties ...

  15. Effectiveness of Instruction Based on the Constructivist Approach on Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki; Atasoy, Basri; Geban, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify misconceptions concerning chemical equilibrium concepts and to investigate the effectiveness of instruction based on the constructivist approach over traditional instruction on 10th grade students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts. The subjects of this study consisted of 71 10th grade…

  16. Effect of chemical and time of cutting of milked yam Minisetts on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Processing and Storage house of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi to test the effect of chemicals and time of cutting of milked yam minisetts on storability and performance of setts in the field. The setts were milked in September and October 2006 and same time in 2007, treated with chemicals and reburied. They were ...

  17. Effects of rumen digesta on the physico-chemical properties of soil in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In tropical and subtropical areas, the importance of organic manure in improving soil physico-chemical properties and crop production for food security cannot be overemphasized. A study was conducted during 2012/2013 crop years, to investigate the effects of rumen digesta on the physical and chemical properties of soil ...

  18. Teachers' Misconceptions about the Effects of Addition of More Reactants or Products on Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek; Ma, Hong-jia; Yang, Jie

    2009-01-01

    The importance of research on misconceptions about chemical equilibrium is well recognized by educators, but in the past, researchers' interest has centered on student misconceptions and has neglected teacher misconceptions. Focusing on the effects of adding more reactants or products on chemical equilibrium, this article discusses the various…

  19. Effect of Deep-Fat Frying on Chemical Properties of Edible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Deep-Fat Frying on Chemical Properties of Edible Vegetable Oils Used By Senegalese Households. ... African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development ... This operation can lead to deterioration of physical, chemical, nutritional and sensory properties of oil, which affects its frying performance.

  20. Stochastic effects in the chemical evolution of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, S.D.M. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Space Sciences Lab.; California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Dept. of Astronomy); Audouze, J. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 75 - Paris (France). Inst. d' Astrophysique)

    1983-05-01

    We use a simple of mixing processes to investigate how fluctuations in element abundance in the interstellar medium may affect the chemical evolution of galaxies. We present a complete solution for the abundance distribution in a schematic inhomogeneous steady-state model in which infalling gas replaces material consumed by star formation. In addition, we give differential equations which describe the evolution of certain moments of the abundance distribution in more general models, together with a Monte Carlo scheme which can be used to simulate this evolution. We compare results for inhomogeneous generalizations of the infall model of Lynden-Bell with data on the abundance distribution of stars and gas in the solar neighbourhood. The relatively small dispersion about the age metallicity relation presented by Twarog constrains mixing of infalling gas and stellar ejecta to be quite efficient. A major difference between homogeneous and moderately inhomogeneous chemical evolution models lies in the relative abundance distributions they predict for primary and secondary nucleosynthesis products. Provided the coherence length for metallicity variations in the interstellar medium is small, inhomogeneous models lead to secondary to primary abundance ratios which are weakly and only statistically related to absolute primary abundance.

  1. The effect of biological and chemical additives on the chemical composition and fermentation process of Dactylis glomerata silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhonny E. Alba-Mejía

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the chemical composition, silage quality and ensilability of ten cocksfoot cultivars using biological and chemical silage additives. The plant material was harvested from the first and second cut, cultivated at the Research Station of Fodder Crops in Vatín, Czech Republic. Wilted forage was chopped and ensiled in mini-silos with 3 replicates per treatment. The treatments were: 1 without additives, used as a control; 2 with bacterial inoculants; and 3 with chemical preservatives. The results indicated that the year factor (2012-2013 influenced significantly the chemical composition of the silage in both cuts. The use of biological inoculants reduced the content of crude fibre and acid detergent fibre; but it did not influence the content of neutral detergent fibre, in comparison with the control silage in both cuts. Furthermore, the application of biological inoculants reduced the concentration of lactic acid (LA and acetic acid (AA in contrast to the control silage in the first cut. Moreover, in the second cut the same values tended to be the opposite. Interestingly, ‘Amera’ was the unique variety that presented a high concentration of butyric acid (0.2% in comparison with other varieties in the first cut. In conclusion, the biological inoculants had a favourable effect on silage fermentation. Notably, only ‘Greenly’ and ‘Starly’ varieties from the first cut; and ‘Greenly’, ‘Sw-Luxor’, and ‘Otello’ varieties from the second cut were appropriate for ensiling because their pH-values; LA and AA concentrations were ideal according to the parameters of the fermentation process.

  2. The effect of biological and chemical additives on the chemical composition and fermentation process of Dactylis glomerata silage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba-Mejía, J.E.; Skladanka, J.; Hilger-Delgado, A.; Klíma, M.; Knot, P.; Doležal, P.; Horky, P.

    2016-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the chemical composition, silage quality and ensilability of ten cocksfoot cultivars using biological and chemical silage additives. The plant material was harvested from the first and second cut, cultivated at the Research Station of Fodder Crops in Vatín, Czech Republic. Wilted forage was chopped and ensiled in mini-silos with 3 replicates per treatment. The treatments were: 1) without additives, used as a control; 2) with bacterial inoculants; and 3) with chemical preservatives. The results indicated that the year factor (2012-2013) influenced significantly the chemical composition of the silage in both cuts. The use of biological inoculants reduced the content of crude fibre and acid detergent fibre; but it did not influence the content of neutral detergent fibre, in comparison with the control silage in both cuts. Furthermore, the application of biological inoculants reduced the concentration of lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) in contrast to the control silage in the first cut. Moreover, in the second cut the same values tended to be the opposite. Interestingly, ‘Amera’ was the unique variety that presented a high concentration of butyric acid (0.2%) in comparison with other varieties in the first cut. In conclusion, the biological inoculants had a favourable effect on silage fermentation. Notably, only ‘Greenly’ and ‘Starly’ varieties from the first cut; and ‘Greenly’, ‘Sw-Luxor’, and ‘Otello’ varieties from the second cut were appropriate for ensiling because their pH-values; LA and AA concentrations were ideal according to the parameters of the fermentation process. (Author)

  3. Chemical effects in materials studies using Auger analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Core-valence-valence Auger spectra (AES) afford a unique local view of valence electron structure. The direct involvement in the Auger process of both core and valence states means that the transition matrix element will have a large value only for that portion of the valence electron density which covers the same spatial extent as the core wave function. Thus, the information content of AES is local to the atomic site containing the initial core hole. Our approach in understanding the local information content of AES has been mainly experimental through the intercomparison of model systems, both molecular and solid. The use of molecules in this regard is particularly useful since the vast array of molecular species of known geometric and electronic structures allows one to both vary these properties in a systematic fashion to observe trends and to choose a molecule to probe a specific chemical question

  4. Chemical and microbiological effects in the near field: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Pugh, S.Y.R.; Wisbey, S.J.; Woodwark, D.R.

    1988-12-01

    The radionuclide inventory of a radioactive waste repository, influenced by the chemical conditions in the near-field, determines the source term for radionuclides entering the geosphere. The research described in this report is focussed on providing the information necessary to quantify this source term. The processes which interact to determine near field behaviour over a long period of time are complex and a simplified representation is required for radiological assessment modelling. The assumptions made in formulating the near field assessment methodology are discussed and justified in this report. The techniques for acquiring the necessary large body of data for a wide range of relevant radionuclides are also described and the values used in the CASCADE I exercise are given. (author)

  5. On the effect of nuclear motion on chemical binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnert, A.

    1985-05-01

    The surfaces defined by Berlin (1951) to characterize the role of intramolecular forces in chemical binding are obtained analytically for the case in which the atomic nuclei are in motion. The generalized equation for the force function is derived from the hypervirial theorem rather than by the method of coordinate scaling as reported by Garcia-Sucre et al. (1984). Numerical results for the lowest vibrational level of the ground state of the H2 molecule are presented in a graph, and the inclusion of nuclear motion is shown to reduce the volume of the spatial 'binding region' and hence to localize the bond and reduce the degree of binding (relative to the fixed-nucleus model).

  6. Effects of air pollutants on epicuticular wax chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percy, K.E.; McQuattie, C.J.; Rebbeck, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of modifications to epicuticular wax structure as a consequence of exposure to air pollutants. Most authors have used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to describe changes in wax crystallite morphology or distribution. ''Erosion'' or ''weathering'' of crystalline structure into an amorphous state is the most common observation, particularly in the case of conifer needles having the characteristic tube crystallites comprised of nonacosan-10-ol. Wax structure is largely determined by its chemical composition. Therefore, many of the reported changes in wax structure due to air pollutants probably arise from direct interactions between pollutants such as ozone and wax biosynthesis. The literature describing changes in wax composition due to pollutants is briefly reviewed. New evidence is introduced in support of the hypothesis for a direct interaction between air pollutants and epicuticular wax Biosynthesis. (orig.)

  7. Genotoxic effects and chemical compositions of four creosotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, L; Heikkilä, P; Hämeilä, M; Pyy, L; Linnainmaa, K; Sorsa, M

    1992-02-01

    Four creosotes used in Finland for impregnating wood were tested in the Ames Salmonella test, the SCE test and the SOS chromotest. Compounds volatile at 37 degrees C were assayed using the taped plate testing protocol. The creosotes were fractionated according to their natural boiling ranges and the fractions were tested in the Ames Salmonella assay. Chemical compositions of creosotes and fractions were determined by high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometry techniques and by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Mutagenic activities were shown to reside in fractions having the highest boiling point ranges (greater than 290 degrees C). The concentrations of mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in creosotes and in some of their corresponding distillation fractions, when compared with mutagenic activities, indicated synergistic or antagonistic interactions.

  8. Genetic variation, inbreeding and chemical exposure—combined effects in wildlife and critical considerations for ecotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. Ross; Hosken, David J.; Balloux, François; Bickley, Lisa K.; LePage, Gareth; Owen, Stewart F.; Hetheridge, Malcolm J.; Tyler, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals can have negative consequences for wildlife and even cause localized population extinctions. Resistance to chemical stress, however, can evolve and the mechanisms include desensitized target sites, reduced chemical uptake and increased metabolic detoxification and sequestration. Chemical resistance in wildlife populations can also arise independently of exposure and may be spread by gene flow between populations. Inbreeding—matings between closely related individuals—can have negative fitness consequences for natural populations, and there is evidence of inbreeding depression in many wildlife populations. In some cases, reduced fitness in inbred populations has been shown to be exacerbated under chemical stress. In chemical testing, both inbred and outbred laboratory animals are used and for human safety assessments, iso-genic strains (virtual clones) of mice and rats are often employed that reduce response variation, the number of animals used and associated costs. In contrast, for environmental risk assessment, strains of animals are often used that have been selectively bred to maintain heterozygosity, with the assumption that they are better able to predict adverse effects in wild, genetically variable, animals. This may not necessarily be the case however, as one outbred strain may not be representative of another or of a wild population. In this paper, we critically discuss relationships between genetic variation, inbreeding and chemical effects with the intention of seeking to support more effective chemical testing for the protection of wildlife. PMID:19833649

  9. Co-exposure with fullerene may strengthen health effects of organic industrial chemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maili Lehto

    Full Text Available In vitro toxicological studies together with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that occupational co-exposure with C60 fullerene may strengthen the health effects of organic industrial chemicals. The chemicals studied are acetophenone, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, m-cresol, and toluene which can be used with fullerene as reagents or solvents in industrial processes. Potential co-exposure scenarios include a fullerene dust and organic chemical vapor, or a fullerene solution aerosolized in workplace air. Unfiltered and filtered mixtures of C60 and organic chemicals represent different co-exposure scenarios in in vitro studies where acute cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of C60 and organic chemicals are tested together and alone by using human THP-1-derived macrophages. Statistically significant co-effects are observed for an unfiltered mixture of benzaldehyde and C60 that is more cytotoxic than benzaldehyde alone, and for a filtered mixture of m-cresol and C60 that is slightly less cytotoxic than m-cresol. Hydrophobicity of chemicals correlates with co-effects when secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α is considered. Complementary atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal that C60 co-aggregates with all chemicals in aqueous environment. Stable aggregates have a fullerene-rich core and a chemical-rich surface layer, and while essentially all C60 molecules aggregate together, a portion of organic molecules remains in water.

  10. Effect of Trichoderma spp. inoculation on the chemical composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in this study was complete randomized design (CRD) through factorial experiment with 2 factors (factor A = effects of sterilization, factor B = effects of Trichoderma spp.) in three replicates for each treatment. Effects of the Trichoderma isolates on the substrate neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and pH as ...

  11. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii--toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I L

    2015-05-01

    The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CHEMICALLY MODIFIED FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS - POTENTIOMETRIC AG+ SELECTIVITY OF PVC MEMBRANES BASED ON MACROCYCLIC THIOETHERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRZOZKA, Z; COBBEN, PLHM; REINHOUDT, DN; EDEMA, JJH; KELLOGG, RM

    1993-01-01

    A chemically modified field-effect transistor (CHEMFET) with satisfactory Ag+ selectivity is described. The potentiometric Ag+ selectivities of CHEMFETs with plasticized PVC membranes based on macrocyclic thioethers have been determined. All the macrocyclic thioethers tested showed silver response

  13. Graphical Arrays of Chemical-Specific Health Effect Reference Values for Inhalation Exposures (2009 Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides graphical arrays and tables of key information on the derivation of human inhalation health effect reference values for specific chemicals, allowing comparisons across durations, populations, and intended use. A number of program offices within the Agency, ...

  14. On the combined effect of the chemical reaction and a higher order ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the combined effect of the chemical reaction and a higher order temparature profile on the velocity of a stretched vertical permeable surface in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow in the presence of heat generation and absorption.

  15. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  16. Species interactions and chemical stress combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene n Daphnia magna populations dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viaene, K.P.J.; Laender, de F.; Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.; Guardo, Di A.; Morselli, M.; Janssen, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present

  17. Final Technical Report for GO15052 Intematix: Combinatorial Synthesis and High Throughput Screening of Effective Catalysts for Chemical Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melman, Jonathan [Intematix Corporation, Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are: to discover cost-effective catalysts for release of hydrogen from chemical hydrogen storage systems; and to discover cost-effective catalysts for the regeneration of spent chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  18. Theoretically exploring direct and indirect chemical effects across ecological and exposure scenarios using mechanistic fate and effects modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laender, de F.; Morselli, M.; Baveco, H.; Brink, van den P.J.; Guardo, Di A.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting ecosystem response to chemicals is a complex problem in ecotoxicology and a challenge for risk assessors. The variables potentially influencing chemical fate and exposure define the exposure scenario while the variables determining effects at the ecosystem level define the ecological

  19. Chemical effect on the K shell fluorescence yield of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical effects on the K shell fluorescence yields of Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Cu compounds were investigated. Samples were excited using 59.5 keV energy photons from a 241Am radioisotope source. K X-rays emitted by samples were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Chemical effects on the K ...

  20. effects of preharvest treatments on yield and chemical composition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    quantity and quality of tomato fruits in the market. Options to avert these losses ... conducted to study effects of preharvest treatment of ComCat® spray, manure, NP fertilisation and the combi- nations of ..... TABLE 3. The effect of ComCat®, manure, nitrogen and phosphorous fertiliser on the yield components of fresh market.

  1. Biological effects under combined action of radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenchenko, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    The paper considers the manifoild factors of environmental pollution effect upon living organisms and their possible response manifested in additivity, synergism and anthogonism. Consideration is also given to the possible practical measures for improving ecological situation and decreasing the risk of anthropogenesis negative after-effects

  2. The Effects of Smartphone Use on Organic Chemical Compound Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Nuray

    2015-01-01

    As a result of rapid technological advances, smartphones have recently enjoyed widespread use. The basic purpose of this study is to examine the effects of smartphones when they are used as educational tools in learning environments. To assess the effects of smartphone use on learning, this study uses smartphones as educational tools in a…

  3. Chemical effects of nuclear transformations in molybdenum complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millan S, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Szilard-Chalmers effect was studied in the complexes: tetraacetatedimolybdenum(II), tetrabenzoatedimolybdenum(II), benzenetricarbonylmolybdenym(0). The results we obtained in the measurement of the Szilard-Chalmers effect on the studied complexes imply some influence of the structure in the molecular fragmentation, or the conservation of the links molybdenum-ligands. (author)

  4. effects of preharvest treatments on yield and chemical composition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Postharvest losses in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) are among others, the prime factor affecting the quantity and quality of tomato fruits in the ... their effects can be greater than the effects of adjustment of storage environment. To ... each plant (HBP) of each treatment at blooming stage was recorded. The average ...

  5. Effects Of Physical And Chemical Modifications On The Disintegrant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regardless of the mode of incorporation, Tacca starch was most efficient in effecting the disintegration of the tablets and releasing their riboflavin contents in its unmodified form. In this regard, pregelatinized Tacca starch was more effective as a disintegrant than the acid hydrolysed form of the starch. Generally, fastest ...

  6. Monitoring the effects of toxic chemicals on protein expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giometti, C.S.; Taylor, J.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with computer-assisted image and data analysis was used to monitor protein populations for both qualitative and quantitative changes induced by exposure to chemicals. For mutagenesis studies designed to screen for heritable mutations, a computer-assisted search of the optical density data from 2DE patterns was used to look for (a) new protein spots, (b) missing protein spots and/or (c) altered expression of normal protein spots. Using this approach, 320 mice were screened for mutations induced by treatment of sires with 150 mg/kg body weight of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) and four different mutations were identified. Protein patterns from 105 offspring from untreated male mice (controls) and 369 offspring from irradiated male mice (3 Gy gamma) were also screened. No heritable mutations were found in those data sets, however. In addition, protein changes were observed in livers of animals exposed to the hepatocellular peroxisomal proliferation agents (and carcinogens) Wy-14,643 and DEHP. The de novo synthesis of a new protein by these agents was demonstrated and quantitated

  7. Media formulation influences chemical effects on neuronal growth and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Screening for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) using in vitro, cell-based test systems has been proposed as an efficient and cost-effective alternative to performing in vivo DNT studies. One of the pri...

  8. The effect of environmental chemicals on the tumor microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Vaccari, Monica; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Brown, Dustin G.; Chapellier, Marion; Christopher, Joseph; Curran, Colleen S.; Forte, Stefano; Hamid, Roslida A.; Heneberg, Petr; Koch, Daniel C.; Krishnakumar, P. K.; Laconi, Ezio; Maguer-Satta, Veronique; Marongiu, Fabio; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Raju, Jayadev; Roman, Jesse; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Ryeom, Sandra; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Soucek, Laura; Vermeulen, Louis; Whitfield, Jonathan R.; Woodrick, Jordan; Colacci, Annamaria; Bisson, William H.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    Potentially carcinogenic compounds may cause cancer through direct DNA damage or through indirect cellular or physiological effects. To study possible carcinogens, the fields of endocrinology, genetics, epigenetics, medicine, environmental health, toxicology, pharmacology and oncology must be

  9. Relations between chemical composition of eggshells and environmental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, B.

    1981-10-30

    Egg shells from areas of varying environmental conditions were analysed for the trace elements Sr, Cd and Hg, and also C and O. In selecting samples, care was taken that the animals were mainly fed on natural feed. In addition laying hens were administered daily doses of 10 mg Cd, 10 mg Sr and 1 mg Hg and the eggs subsequently analysed. Broiler chickens were also given a daily dose of 10 mg Cd for 15 days' duration. Only a small proportion of the administered 10 mg Sr per day was found to be incorporated in the egg shells. Similarly Cd was only taken up in the calcium lattice to a very small extent. A clear relationship between a Cd-contaminated environment and measured Cd content could not be established. Tissue analyses of broiler chickens show that for a daily dose of 10 mg Cd, the Cd-content of internal organs (in particular the liver and kidneys) exceed the permissible level for food after 15 days. For Hg, in contrast to Cd, a clear relationship can be seen between environmental load and content found in egg shells. Of note is the differentiated physiological behaviour of the various bound forms of Hg (inorganic, organic) Hg-incorporation in the calcium lattice speaks for the use of egg shells as an environmental receptor. However a considerable concentration in the environment would be necessary before significant increases in Hg content in the shells could be established. The carbon isotope composition of the majority of samples is indicative of a high isotope feedstuff such as grass and wheat. The oxygen isotope composition reflects, in reduced form, the seasonal trends for precipitation. All studies undertaken reveal a recognizable relationship between chemical composition of the egg shells and the environment. Physiological factors can however reduce environmental influence.

  10. Application of Photoacoustic Effect to Chemical Kinetics in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huy-Zu.

    The application of the pulsed photoacoustic technique (PA) to the study of chemical kinetics in very dilute solutions is demonstrated with three different reactions: A bidental ligand substitution of 1,2-bi(diphenylphosphino) ethane on the five-coordinate cobalt dithiolene complex, a nucleophilic addition of tributyl phosphite to (p-(dimethylamino)triphenyl)methyl cation, and an enzyme catalyzed reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by glucose-6-phosphate. Photoacoustic detection is shown to be 100 times more sensitive than spectrophotometric detection. As a consequence, it allows one to use lower reactant concentrations so that the time scale for the corresponding fast reactions can be lengthened. The pulsed PA technique also provides an alternative method for the direct determination of reverse rate constants and equilibrium constants of reactions. Moreover, Michaelis constants of biochemical reactions, especially for enzymes whose K_{rm m} values is below 1.0 muM, can be measured more accurately using photoacoustic detection than using spectrophotometric detection. Additionally, the pulsed PA method can be very valuable for the study of reactions that are restricted by the low solubility, availability, or high cost of reactants. The sensitivity of the PA method is found to be limited by the background signal resulting from solvents. Photoacoustic signals generated in strongly absorbing media are also studied and results are in agreement with the theory developed by G. J. Diebold. From the time profile of the acoustic signal, the absorption coefficient of strongly absorbing medium can be determined provided the sound speed is known. Since the pulse shape of the acoustic transient depends upon the relative density and the acoustic velocity of the transparent and the strongly absorbing media, the physical properties of the transparent medium can also be determined with the use of the PA technique.

  11. Chemical Immobilization Effect on Lithium Polysulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Xi, Zhucong; Guo, Dexiang; Chen, Xiangju; Yin, Longwei

    2018-01-01

    Despite great progress in lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs), great obstacles still exist to achieve high loading content of sulfur and avoid the loss of active materials due to the dissolution of the intermediate polysulfide products in the electrolyte. Relationships between the intrinsic properties of nanostructured hosts and electrochemical performance of LSBs, especially, the chemical interaction effects on immobilizing polysulfides for LSB cathodes, are discussed in this Review. Moreover, the principle of rational microstructure design for LSB cathode materials with strong chemical interaction adsorbent effects on polysulfides, such as metallic compounds, metal particles, organic polymers, and heteroatom-doped carbon, is mainly described. According to the chemical immobilizing mechanism of polysulfide on LSB cathodes, three kinds of chemical immobilizing effects, including the strong chemical affinity between polar host and polar polysulfides, the chemical bonding effect between sulfur and the special function groups/atoms, and the catalytic effect on electrochemical reaction kinetics, are thoroughly reviewed. To improve the electrochemical performance and long cycling life-cycle stability of LSBs, possible solutions and strategies with respect to the rational design of the microstructure of LSB cathodes are comprehensively analyzed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil-brine interfacial tension and droplet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; So, L.L.C.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion of oil spilled in water is influenced by chemical dispersants via the modification of the interfacial properties of the oil, such as oil-brine interfacial tension (IFT). In this study, the physical properties and dispersion of oil were measured in order to determine the effects of chemical dispersants on IFT and oil viscosity and the effects on oil droplet formation. In theory, the maximum size of oil droplet that forms under turbulent mixing increases with IFT. Therefore, a reduction in IFT reduces the size distribution of oil droplets. This paper presented the results of an ongoing project aimed at providing quantitative understanding the influence that chemical dispersants have on the size distribution of oil droplets and oil dispersion. Findings showed that a valid approach is to separate the direct effects of chemical dispersants on oil properties, specifically oil-brine IFT and the effects of mixing on dispersion of chemically treated oil. Under constant mixing conditions, the reduction of the maximum oil droplet size that overcomes the breakage process is determined by the effects of chemical dispersant on oil properties. This correlates well with the dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR) up to the critical micelle concentration (CMC). This good agreement can be attributed to the reduction of IFT with DOR. It was concluded that the reduction of IFT with dispersant concentration is an additional signature of oil composition on droplet formation, while mixing energy is an external parameter that is independent of oil properties. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  13. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...

  14. Reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of chemical compositions and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashori, Alireza; Nourbakhsh, Amir

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the effects of wood species, particle sizes and hot-water treatment on some physical and mechanical properties of wood-plastic composites were studied. Composites of thermoplastic reinforced with oak (Quercus castaneifolia) and pine (Pinus eldarica) wood were prepared. Polypropylene (PP) and maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene (MAPP) were used as the polymer matrix and coupling agent, respectively. The results showed that pine fiber had significant effect on the mechanical properties considered in this study. This effect is explained by the higher fiber length and aspect ratio of pine compared to the oak fiber. The hot-water treated (extractive-free) samples, in both wood species, improved the tensile, flexural and impact properties, but increased the water absorption for 24h. This work clearly showed that lignocellulosic materials in both forms of fiber and flour could be effectively used as reinforcing elements in PP matrix. Furthermore, extractives have marked effects on the mechanical and physical properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation. This me......Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation...

  16. Investigating the effects of different physical and chemical stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-09

    Apr 9, 2018 ... Biofilms protect bacteria from changing environmental conditions such as starvation, antibiotics, disinfectants, pH and ... loss of efficiency, increase in fluid frictional resistance, corrosion of equipment and decrease of water ..... biofilm, monochloramine is more effective than free chlorine over long distribution ...

  17. Effective chemical control of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) pests in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fruit flies are major pest in West Africa. In Côte-d'Ivoire, they caused heavy losses. Thus, preventive measures are taken to reduce their damage. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Success Appat® and Proteus 170 O-TEQ against fruit. Traps baited with sexual attractants were set in mango orchards and their ...

  18. Physiological Effects of Trace Elements and Chemicals in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, M. M.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The physiological effects on humans and animals of trace amounts of organic and unorganic pollutants in natural and waste waters are examined. The sensitivity of particular organs and species is emphasized. Substances reviewed include mercury, arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, fluorides, nitrates and organics, including polychlounated biphenyls.…

  19. Effects of cassava mill effluent on some chemical and micro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines the effects of cassava mill effluent on the Physicochemical and biological properties of soils of Obubra and Odukpani Local Areas in Cross River State after long time of pollution by the effluent. The soil samples were collected with an auger at the depths of 0-15cm and 15-30cm in each of the polluted ...

  20. Effect of certain chemical attributes of vegetation on forest inflammability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon W. Richards

    1940-01-01

    Forest Service administrators and fire-research men have long felt the need of information concerning the effect of vegetation such as shrubs, grasses, and forbs (nongrasslike herbs) on the rate of spread of fires. To date, all knowledge of the subject has been acquired empirically in the field, or deduced from knowledge of fire behavior as influenced by the condition...

  1. Evaluation of the effects of microscale chemical and isotopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reconstruction. Conventional Sr/Ca and δ18O paleothermometers are, however, based on the analysis of the mixture of the COC and SFS, and thus may be significantly ... the effects may yield significant or serious errors in paleotemperature reconstruction. 1. ..... tal geochemistry and paleoenvironmental reconstruction;.

  2. Effect of fermentation containers on the chemical composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effects of using banana leaf and plastic (high density polyethylene) bowl as containers for fermentation on the nutrients and anti nutritional factors of sesame seed. Samples were fermented separately using banana leaf and plastic bowl for seven days at temperature of 35 ± 2°C. Samples were drawn at intervals during ...

  3. Discerning Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exhaust particles from the combustion of traditional diesel fuel have been shown to lead to increases in adverse health effects such as impaired lung function, respiratory distress, and cardiovascular disease. This has resulted in an effort to find alternative fuels, such as soy...

  4. Competition between elastic and chemical effects in the intermixing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. We have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the forma- tion energy and the effects of low dimensionality and reduced coordination on the magnetic properties of pseudomorphically grown monolayers of Co–Ag surface alloys on a Rh(111) substrate. We find that if such an alloy ...

  5. Chemical effects on controlling of Rhododendron ponticum L. in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... control. Rhododendron roots and stem pieces are widely distributed by the mechanical tools such as the blades of bulldozers and in fact, may enhance the proliferation of this aggressive shrub. Environmentally friendly herbi- cides, when used appropriately, provide the safest, most effective, and most ...

  6. Chemical composition and antinociceptive effects of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia. tournefortii (EOGT) in ... activity, which appeared to involve the participation of K+ channels sensitive to ATP and adrenergic receptors. These findings justify .... protocols and procedures were approved by. Research Ethics ...

  7. Effects of extracts from three indigenous spices on the chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fishes are the cheapest source of animal protein and it plays an important role in the diet of many people in both developed and developing countries. It is an important ... Among the three spices, Piper guinensis (uziza) was found to have the most effective preservation potential of smoked-dried fish during storage. This new ...

  8. Effect of animal manures on selected soil chemical properties (1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of animal manures on selected soil properties were studied in the laboratory. Manures of Rabbit (RBM), Swine (SWM), Poultry (POM), Goat, (GTM) and Cow (COM) were added at 10, 20, 30 and 40 t/ha to an acidic Ultisol. The amended soils were incubated at 70% water holding capacity for 3 weeks.

  9. Chemical composition and antinociceptive effects of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia. tournefortii (EOGT) in various experimental models. Methods: The essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia tournefortii was extracted using steam distillation method median lethal dose (LD50) of EOGT was evaluated ...

  10. Effect of Trichoderma spp. inoculation on the chemical composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... ruminant diet is a technology still in the developmental stage and positive effects have been recently reported. However, enzyme supplementation appears to depend on such factors as enzyme activities, type and dose of enzyme, enzyme application method, diet and animal ... feed (Akin et al., 1993). In this ...

  11. Effect of temperature on shelf life, chemical and microbial properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cream cheese samples were analyzed to find out the effect of recommended storage temperature (4±1°C) and ambient room temperature (21±1°C) on pH, titratable acidity (% lactic acid), moisture content and microbial growth. Percent reduction in moisture content and increase in titratable acidity of cheeses were found to ...

  12. Effects of different chemical materials and cultural methods on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 6

    2011-10-27

    Oct 27, 2011 ... dry matter accumulation at different growing stages in 2004-2005, yield and yield components in harvest in both years were deter- mined. The data were subjected to analyses of variance (ANOVA) to determine the effects of treatments, and the mean differences were adjudged by Duncan multiple range test ...

  13. Time-dependent effect of composted tannery sludge on the chemical and microbial properties of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Ricardo Silva; Santos, Vilma Maria; de Melo, Wanderley Jose; Nunes, Luis Alfredo Pinheiro Leal; van den Brink, Paul J; Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira

    2017-12-01

    Composting has been suggested as an efficient method for tannery sludge recycling before its application to the soil. However, the application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) should be monitored to evaluate its effect on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. This study evaluated the time-dependent effect of CTS on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. CTS was applied at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 Mg ha -1 and the soil chemical and microbial properties were evaluated at 0, 45, 75, 150, and 180 days. Increased CTS rates increased the levels of Ca, Cr, and Mg. While Soil pH, organic C, and P increased with the CTS rates initially, this effect decreased over time. Soil microbial biomass, respiration, metabolic quotient, and dehydrogenase increased with the application of CTS, but decreased over time. Analysis of the Principal Response Curve showed a significant effect of CTS rate on the chemical and microbial properties of the soil over time. The weight of each variable indicated that all soil properties, except β-glucosidase, dehydrogenase and microbial quotient, increased due to the CTS application. However, the highest weights were found for Cr, pH, Ca, P, phosphatase and total organic C. The application of CTS in the soil changed the chemical and microbial properties over time, indicating Cr, pH, Ca, phosphatase, and soil respiration as the more responsive chemical and microbial variables by CTS application.

  14. Effects of chemical contamination on HDPE - thermo-mechanical and characterisation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, G.

    2002-01-01

    Studying the effects of chemical contamination on HDPE is an important precursor in recycling of plastic packaging and polymer reprocessing. This research involves and discusses the results of an in-depth investigation into the effects of chemically contaminating, using various acids, commercial grade high density polyethylene (HDPE) used commonly in packaging applications. An extensive formulation study was conducted and it became obvious that in some cases degradation had occurred to HDPE when chemically contaminated with particular functional group types. The functional groups in contaminated HDPE were successfully identified. A variety of analytical techniques such as Fourier transform Infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray Florescence, x-ray photo electron spectroscopy could identify compounds such as HCl acid, HNO/sub 3/ acid and other related contaminants. Some chemical additives had effects on the mechanical and thermal properties when added in the most appropriate concentration. The results have shown lower tensile modulus and strength tensile elongation, lower modular weight, melt flow index and crystallinity. The amount of contaminant concentration, the type of chemical functional groups used and the type of test selected to affect degradation are important factors in proving the effects of chemical contamination on HDPE in the melt state. (author)

  15. Effect of channel aspect ratio on chemical recuperation process in advanced aeroengines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Silong; Cui, Naigang; Xiong, Yuefei; Feng, Yu; Qin, Jiang; Bao, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The working process of an advanced aeroengine such as scramjet with endothermic hydrocarbon fuel cooling is a chemical recuperative cycle. The design of cooling channel in terms of engine real working conditions is very important for the chemical recuperation process. To study the effects of channel aspect ratio (AR) on chemical recuperation process of advanced aeroengines, three dimensional model of pyrolysis coolant flow inside asymmetrical rectangular cooling channels with fins is introduced and validated through experiments. Cases when AR varies from 1 to 8 are carried out. In the pyrolysis zone of the cooling channel, decreasing the channel aspect ratio can reduce the temperature difference and non-uniformity of fuel conversion in the channel cross section, and it can also increase the final conversion and corresponding chemical heat absorption. A small channel aspect ratio is beneficial for the chemical recuperation process and can guarantee the engine cooling performance in the pyrolysis zone of the cooling channel. - Highlights: • Large non-uniformity of conversion is bad for the chemical recuperation. • Small channel aspect ratio is beneficial for improving the chemical recuperation effectiveness. • Small channel aspect ratio is also beneficial for reducing the engine wall temperature.

  16. A hypothesis on chemical mechanism of the effect of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Penghui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies have shown that hydrogen can play important roles on the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and other protective effects. Ohsawa et al have proved that hydrogen can electively and directly scavenge hydroxyl radical. But this mechanism cannot explain more new experimental results. In this article, the hypothesis, which is inspired by H2 could bind to the metal as a ligand, come up to explain its extensive biology effect: Hydrogen could regulate particular metalloproteins by bonding (M–H2 interaction it. And then it could affect the metabolization of ROS and signal transduction. Metalloproteins may be ones of the target molecules of H2 action. Metal ions may be appropriate role sites for H2 molecules. The hypothesis pointed out a new direction to clarify its mechanisms.

  17. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  18. Effects of different organic materials and chemical fertilizers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... nsNot significant (LSD test), *significant at p = 0.05 level (LSD test), **significant at p = 0.01 level (LSD test). Table 4. The effect of fertilizer 20-20-0 on leaf nutrient contents of the pistachio seedlings leaves. Pns. Kns. Cans. Mgns. Na*. Znns. Mnns. Cu*. Fens. 20-20-0 application ppm. 0.00. 135.51. 12.75.

  19. Effect of irrigation intervals on growth and chemical composition of some Curcuma spp. plants

    OpenAIRE

    MAKARIM A. MOHAMED; HEND E. WAHBA,; MOHAMED E. IBRAHIM; ABD-ELGHANI A. YOUSEF

    2014-01-01

    Mohamed MA, Wahba HE, Ibrahim ME, Yousef AA. 2014. Effect of irrigation intervals on growth and chemical composition of some Curcuma spp. plants. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 140-145. The Influence of irrigation intervals on the growth, yield of rhizomes and chemical composition of both Curcuma aromatica and Curcuma domestica plants was investigated. Three irrigation treatments were used in this experiment. The first treatment was irrigated every one week. The second and third treatments were irri...

  20. Chemical Composition and Vasorelaxant and Antispasmodic Effects of Essential Oil from Rosa indica L. Petals

    OpenAIRE

    Rasheed, Hafiz Majid; Khan, Taous; Wahid, Fazli; Khan, Rasool; Shah, Abdul Jabbar

    2015-01-01

    Rosa indica L. belongs to the family Rosaceae and is locally known as gulaab. It has different traditional uses in cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders but there is no scientific data available in this regard. Therefore, the basic aim of this study was to explore the chemical composition and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of the essential oil obtained from R. indica. The chemical composition of the essential oil was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry...

  1. Effect of Microwave Radiation on Enzymatic and Chemical Peptide Bond Synthesis on Solid Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Basso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide bond synthesis was performed on PEGA beads under microwave radiations. Classical chemical coupling as well as thermolysin catalyzed synthesis was studied, and the effect of microwave radiations on reaction kinetics, beads' integrity, and enzyme activity was assessed. Results demonstrate that microwave radiations can be profitably exploited to improve reaction kinetics in solid phase peptide synthesis when both chemical and biocatalytic strategies are used.

  2. Direct and residual effects of manure on soil chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastri, A.; Triberti, L.; Giordani, G.; Comellini, F.; Baldoni, G.

    2009-04-01

    The beneficial effects of manure recycling in cropland on soil fertility are well documented. Nowadays it can help sequestrate C in the soil organic matter, advocated to mitigate the atmospheric CO2 increase. Because of the gradual disappearance of conventional livestock farming in Western Europe, the study of the persistence of the positive effects of manuring after its interruption can be interesting. Any research on soil fertility dynamic, however, requires long-term experiments because it is quite slow and greatly influenced by weather. A field trial, started in 1966 and still in progress in the Experimental Farm of Bologna University, compares 5 crop rotations (a 9-year course: corn-wheat-corn-wheat-corn-wheat-alfalfa-alfalfa-alfalfa, corn-wheat and sugarbeet-wheat, continuous corn and continuous wheat), at 3 levels of cattle manure supply combined with 3 inorganic NP fertilizers rates in a split-split plot replicated twice. The soil is an alluvial silty loam, fertile but low in organic matter (13.3 g kg-1). Manure is spread before corn, sugarbeet and alfalfa, at a mean yearly rate of 0 (M0), 20 (M1) and 40 (M2) t ha-1 of fresh material. Since 1984 M2 has been interrupted to evaluate residual effects. Regarding mineral fertilizer rates, for this study we considered only the unfertilized control (N0P0) and N1P1 level, corresponding to a mean yearly application of 220 kg N ha-1 and 75 kg P2O5 ha-1. Each year, since 1972 till now, we have sampled soil in the ploughed layer (0-0.4 m) to assess its pH (in water) and its content of organic carbon (SOC, Lotti method), total nitrogen (TN, Kjeldahl) and available phosphorus (P2O5, Olsen). To reduce the influence of crops and weather, statistical analyses were conducted on the averages of data obtained in the 4-year periods at the end of four 9-year cycles (1972-75, 81-84, 90-93 and 99-02). In 30 years, the continuous M1 supply without any inorganic integration increased SOC, TN and P2O5 by +3.6 t ha-1 (+11%), +1.09 t

  3. Effects of aluminium surface morphology and chemical modification on wettability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Maral; Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    of a monolayer of fluorinated silane, and a combination of those. The effect of these surface modification techniques on roughness and wettability of the aluminium surfaces was elucidated by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrated that by employing different types...... of surface modifications the contact angle of water droplets on aluminium samples can be varied from 12° to more than 120°. A crossover from Cassie–Baxter to Wenzel regime upon changing the surface roughness was also observed....

  4. Chemical effects of heavy ion beams on organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Namba, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    Effects of ion beam irradiation on α-alanine, adipic acid and polydimethylsiloxane were examined. Stable radicals were generated in the radiolysis of solids of α-alanine and adipic acid by γ-ray, 220 MeV C ions, 350 MeV Ne ions and 175 MeV Ar ions. The G-value decreases in this order. The G-value for adipic acid decreases more than that for α-alanine. The decreases in the G-value are ascribed to high local dose in the ion tracks. Effective G-value of the radicals for γ-irradiations decreases at high doses. The local dose in the ion tracks exceeds those doses, and the G-values for the ion irradiation are hence smaller than the G-value for γ-irradiations. The difference in the dependence of the G-values for α-alanine and adipic acid on the ion beams is due to difference in the dose-yield relationship for radical formation. The high local dose in the ion tracks exceeds the gelation dose of some of polymers. Formation of gel strings of polydimethylsiloxanes generated in heavy ion tracks was observed by atomic force microscopy

  5. Chemical-disorder effects in half-metallic Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, Ralph; Jin, Yunlong; Waybright, Jace; Kharel, Parashu; Pathak, Rohit; Choudhary, Renu; Kashyap, Arti; Sellmyer, D. J.

    The electronic structure, magnetism, and conductivity of disordered Heusler alloys are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Emphasis is on Heuslers that are predicted to be half-metallic or spin-gapless semiconducting in their fully ordered states, such as CoFeCrAl. Experimental alloys often exhibit resistivities of the order of 200 μΩ cm, which is consistent with both dirty-metal and spin-gapless semiconducting behaviors, but a distinction can be made by comparing the residual resistivities of samples having different degrees of order. The corresponding analysis shows that careful processing is necessary to keep the alloys in the spin-gapless semiconducting regime. Several types of disorder occur in Y-type Heusler alloys, with different negative effects on half-metallicity and spin-gapless semiconductivity. A2 (or bcc) disorder is most harmful but can be limited experimentally in CoFeCrAl thin films. B2 (or CsCl) disorder is less harmful, whereas L21 (normal Heusler) disorder, corresponding to Fe-Co solid solubility is least harmful. The residual resistivity of the partially diorderd alluys is discussed as a carrier-localization effect. This work is supported by DOE BES (DE-FG02-04ER46152, R.S.) and NSF DMREF (SusChEM 1436385, D.J.S.).

  6. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    ” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static...... indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition, unusual long range effects are seen. Structures, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using density functional theory methods...

  7. Modeling free convective gravitational effects in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Annen, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a combined fluid-mechanics, mass-transport, and chemistry model describing CVD in an open-tube atmospheric-pressure flow reactor is developed. The model allows gas-phase reactions to proceed to equilibrium and accounts for finite reaction rates at the surface of the deposition substrate. This model is a useful intermediate step toward a model employing fully rate-limited chemistry. The model is used to predict the effects of free convection on flow patterns, temperature and species-concentration profiles, and local deposition rates for silicon deposited by silane pyrolysis. These results are discussed in terms of implications for CVD of silicon and other compounds, microgravity studies, and techniques for testing and validating the model.

  8. Marijuana extracts possess the effects like the endocrine disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kazuhito; Motoya, Erina; Matsuzawa, Naoki; Funahashi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Arizono, Koji; Yamamoto, Ikuo

    2005-01-01

    The progesterone 17α-hydroxylase activity, which is one of the steroidogenic enzymes in rat testis microsomes, was significantly inhibited by crude marijuana extracts from Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)- and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA)-strains. Δ 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol also inhibited the enzymatic activitiy with relatively higher concentration (100-1000 μM). Testosterone 6β- and 16α-hydroxylase activities together with androstenedione formation from testosterone in rat liver microsomes were also significantly inhibited by the crude marijuana extracts and the cannabinoids. Crude marijuana extracts (1 and 10 μg/ml) of THCA strain stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells, although the purified cannabinoids (THC, CBD and CBN) did not show significant effects, such as the extract at the concentration of 0.01-1000 nM. These results indicate that there are some metabolic interactions between cannabinoid and steroid metabolism and that the constituents showing estrogen-like activity exist in marijuana

  9. Chemical composition and effective temperatures of metallic line white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    Model atmosphere techniques have been employed to determine the composition, effective temperatures, radii, masses and surface gravities of white dwarfs Ross 640 and van Maanen 2. The non-gray, LTE, convective, constant flux models employed collisional damping constants for the Ca II H and K lines that were measured in a laboratory device that simulated white dwarf atmospheric conditions. Ross 640 was found to have an extremely helium-rich composition and T/sub eff/ = 8500K, while the observed properties of van Maanen 2 were fitted best by a model with 91 percent helium, 9 percent hydrogen and T/sub eff/ = 6100K. The laboratory measurements of pressure shifts for the Ca II lines casts some doubt on the interpretation of recent radial velocity determinations for van Maanen 2. (U.S.)

  10. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  11. Essential Oils from Thyme (Thymus vulgaris): Chemical Composition and Biological Effects in Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvicka, Vaclav; Vetvickova, Jana

    2016-12-01

    Thymus species are popular spices and contain volatile oils as main chemical constituents. Recently, plant-derived essential oils are gaining significant attention due to their significant biological activities. Seven different thymus-derived essential oils were compared in our study. First, we focused on their chemical composition, which was followed up by testing their effects on phagocytosis, cytokine production, chemotaxis, edema inhibition, and liver protection. We found limited biological activities among tested oils, with no correlation between composition and biological effects. Similarly, no oils were effective in every reaction. Based on our data, the tested biological use of these essential oils is questionable.

  12. The Effects of CW-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-15

    work wi’:h rhesus monkeys (Bunnell, et al, 1979a,b) the I-Troop males were placed on a FI schedule and the effects of cafeine sodium benzoate and...A, ° • ° A D \\ ELEOCTE _ ’•L 2 U N 16 1•89 CCNTR[’CT NO.: DAMD17-9-.-C-3260 TITLE: The Effects of CW-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior and...NO. Frederick, I 21701-5012 62734A 62734A875 AE 455 11. TITLE (Include Securtry Clauidication) The Effects of CW-Related Chemicals on Social Behavior

  13. Effect of magnetic treatment of water on chemical properties of water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed effect of magnetic treatment of water on chemical properties of water, sodium adsorption ratio, electrical conductivity (EC) of the water and the lifespan of the magnetic effect on water. Magnetic flux densities used for treating the water were 124, 319, 443 and 719 gauss. All the cations (Calcium, Sodium, ...

  14. Guidelines of Italian CCTN for classification of some effects of chemical substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mucci, N. [ISPESL, Monteporzio Catone, Rome (Italy). Dip. di Medicina del Lavoro; Camoni, I. [Ist. Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Applicata

    1996-03-01

    Definitions of the categories and the criteria for the classification of chemical substances on the basis of their potential carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic-reproductive effects, elaborated by the Italian National Advisory Toxicological Committee (CCTN) in 1994. Besides all the allocations effected by the CCTN in the period 1977-1995 are reported, updated according to these criteria.

  15. Treatment of olive mill wastewater by chemical processes: effect of acid cracking pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande Gursoy-Haksevenler, B; Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acid cracking (pH 2.0; T 70 °C) and filtration as a pretreatment step on the chemical treatability of olive mill wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD) 150,000 m/L; total organic carbon (TOC) 36,000 mg/L; oil-grease 8,200 mg/L; total phenols 3,800 mg/L) was investigated. FeCl3 coagulation, Ca(OH)2 precipitation, electrocoagulation using stainless steel electrodes and the Fenton's reagent were applied as chemical treatment methods. Removal performances were examined in terms of COD, TOC, oil-grease, total phenols, colour, suspended solids and acute toxicity with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri. Significant oil-grease (95%) and suspended solids (96%) accompanied with 58% COD, 43% TOC, 39% total phenols and 80% colour removals were obtained by acid cracking-filtration pretreatment. Among the investigated chemical treatment processes, electrocoagulation and the Fenton's reagent were found more effective after pretreatment, especially in terms of total phenols removal. Total phenols removal increased from 39 to 72% when pretreatment was applied, while no significant additional (≈10-15%) COD and TOC removals were obtained when acid cracking was coupled with chemical treatment. The acute toxicity of the original olive mill wastewater sample increased considerably after pretreatment from 75 to 89% (measured for the 10-fold diluted wastewater sample). An operating cost analysis was also performed for the selected chemical treatment processes.

  16. The effect of the indoor environment on the fate of organic chemicals in the urban landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Anna Palm

    2012-11-01

    To assess the effect of the indoor environment on the urban fate of organic chemicals, an 8-compartment indoor-inclusive steady state multimedia chemical fate model was developed. The model includes typical urban compartments (air, soil, water, sediment, and urban film) and a novel module representing a generic indoor environment. The model was parameterized to the municipality of Stockholm, Sweden and applied to four organic chemicals with different physical-chemical characteristics and use patterns: formaldehyde, 2,4,6-tribromophenol, di-ethylhexylphthalate and decabromodiphenyl ether. The results show that emissions to indoor air may increase the steady state mass and residence time in the urban environment by a factor of 1.1 to 22 for the four chemicals, compared to if emissions are assigned to outdoor air. This is due to the nested nature of the indoor environment, which creates a physical barrier that prevents chemicals from leaving the urban system with outflowing air. For DEHP and BDE 209, the additional partitioning to indoor surfaces results in a greater importance of the indoor removal pathways from surfaces. The outdoor environmental concentrations of these chemicals are predicted to be lower if emitted to indoor air than if emitted to outdoor air because of the additional indoor removal pathways of dust and indoor film, leading to loss of chemical from the system. For formaldehyde and 2,4,6-TBP outdoor environmental concentrations are not affected by whether the release occurs indoors or outdoors because of the limited partitioning to indoor surfaces. A sensitivity analysis revealed that there appears to be a relationship between logK(OA) and the impact of the ventilation rate on the urban fate of organic chemicals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Berry

    Full Text Available In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate and Check Mite+ (coumaphos and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  18. Field-level sublethal effects of approved bee hive chemicals on Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer A; Hood, W Michael; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Delaplane, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    In a study replicated across two states and two years, we tested the sublethal effects on honey bees of the miticides Apistan (tau fluvalinate) and Check Mite+ (coumaphos) and the wood preservative copper naphthenate applied at label rates in field conditions. A continuous covariate, a colony Varroa mite index, helped us disambiguate the effects of the chemicals on bees while adjusting for a presumed benefit of controlling mites. Mite levels in colonies treated with Apistan or Check Mite+ were not different from levels in non-treated controls. Experimental chemicals significantly decreased 3-day brood survivorship and increased construction of queen supercedure cells compared to non-treated controls. Bees exposed to Check Mite+ as immatures had higher legacy mortality as adults relative to non-treated controls, whereas bees exposed to Apistan had improved legacy mortality relative to non-treated controls. Relative to non-treated controls, Check Mite+ increased adult emergence weight. Although there was a treatment effect on a test of associative learning, it was not possible to statistically separate the treatment means, but bees treated with Apistan performed comparatively well. And finally, there were no detected effects of bee hive chemical on colony bee population, amount of brood, amount of honey, foraging rate, time required for marked released bees to return to their nest, percentage of released bees that return to the nest, and colony Nosema spore loads. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine sublethal effects of bee hive chemicals applied at label rates under field conditions while disambiguating the results from mite control benefits realized from the chemicals. Given the poor performance of the miticides at reducing mites and their inconsistent effects on the host, these results defend the use of bee health management practices that minimize use of exotic hive chemicals.

  19. Denaturation of collagen structures and their transformation under the physical and chemical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivankin, A.; Boldirev, V.; Fadeev, G.; Baburina, M.; Kulikovskii, A.; Vostrikova, N.

    2017-11-01

    The process of denaturation of collagen structures under the influence of physical and chemical factors play an important role in the manufacture of food technology and the production of drugs for medicine and cosmetology. The paper discussed the problem of the combined effects of heat treatment, mechanical dispersion and ultrasonic action on the structural changes of the animal collagen in the presence of weak protonated organic acids. Algorithm combined effects of physical and chemical factors as a result of the formation of the technological properties of products containing collagen has been shown.

  20. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  1. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    The career of Dr. E.L. Powers, a pioneer in the development of radiobiology, is reviewed. His initial research involved the effects of radiation and certain chemicals on Paramecium, associated ultrastructural studies on protozoan cells, responses of Rickettsia and bacteriophage to irradiation, and the development of techniques for studying bacterial spores. These efforts established the basic radiation biology of the spore and its importance in understanding the effects of free radicals, oxygen, and water. His recent research extended work on the dry spore to the very wet spore and to other selected chemical systems in aqueous suspension. 126 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1987-03-01

    The career of Dr. E.L. Powers, a pioneer in the development of radiobiology, is reviewed. His initial research involved the effects of radiation and certain chemicals on Paramecium, associated ultrastructural studies on protozoan cells, responses of Rickettsia and bacteriophage to irradiation, and the development of techniques for studying bacterial spores. These efforts established the basic radiation biology of the spore and its importance in understanding the effects of free radicals, oxygen, and water. His recent research extended work on the dry spore to the very wet spore and to other selected chemical systems in aqueous suspension. 126 refs., 2 figs

  3. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Sei-ichi; Tanaka, Ryou-ichi

    1986-01-01

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  4. Hadron production at RHIC - chemical freeze-out, effective masses and expanding matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zschiesche, D.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W.; Schramm, S.; Schaffner-Bielich, J.

    2003-01-01

    The properties of the strongly interacting matter produced at RHIC are investigated within a chemical and thermal equilibrium chiral SU(3) σ - ω approach. The focus is on the freeze-out conditions, the effective masses of the produced hadrons and the expansion of the system. For the freeze-out conditions the commonly adopted noninteracting gas calculations yield temperatures and chemical potentials close to or above the critical temperature for the chiral phase transition, but without taking into account any interactions. Contrary, the chiral SU(3) model predicts temperature and density dependent effective hadron masses and effective chemical potentials in the medium and a transition to a chirally restored phase at high temperatures or chemical potentials. Three different parametrizations of the model, which show different types of phase transition behaviour, are investigated. We show that if a chiral phase transition occurred in those collisions, 'freezing' of the relative hadron abundances in the symmetric phase is excluded by the data. Therefore, either very rapid chemical equilibration must occur in the broken phase, or the measured hadron ratios are the outcome of the dynamical symmetry breaking. (author)

  5. The combined toxic effects of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shih-Hung; Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Chen, Chung-Yuan

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the toxicity data of 10 nonpolar narcotic chemicals on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (green algae) assessed by a new algal toxicity testing technique conducted under air-tight environment. Based on DO production, median effective concentration (EC50) varies from 1.73 mg/L (1-octanol) to 8,040 mg/L (2-propanol). The endpoint of algal growth rate reveals similar sensitivity as that from DO production. Compared to literature data, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitrosomonas are apparently more sensitive to nonpolar narcotics than other organisms such as minnow, daphnia, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. Furthermore, good correlations between toxic effects observed from Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and other aquatic organisms were found. Hence, algal toxicity test can be considered as a surrogate test for estimating the toxicity of nonpolar chemicals to fathead minnow, Microtox, activated sludge, Daphina magna, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The combined effects of 13 binary mixtures of nonpolar chemicals were investigated using both additive-index method and isobologram analysis. Overall speaking, the joint actions between these chemicals are strictly additive. Model analyses indicate that these compounds act on identical reaction sites or receptors, which verify that these chemicals are of the same toxicity mechanism (narcosis).

  6. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil physical properties and dispersion. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.P.; Brown, C.E.; Pjontek, D.

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory and field testing have shown that the dispersion of oil spilled in water is influenced by chemical dispersants via the modification of the interfacial properties of the oil, such as oil-brine interfacial tension (IFT). This study focused on new laboratory experiments that measured the effects on the physical properties and dispersion of oil, with particular reference to the effects of chemical dispersants on IFT and oil viscosity and the subsequent effects on oil droplet formation. Experiments were conducted at 15 degrees C using Arabian Medium, Alaska North Slope and South Louisiana crude and Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 chemical dispersants. The dispersants were denser than the 3 oils. The effect of IFT reduction on oil dispersion was measured and showed substantial reduction in the size and enhancement of the concentration of oil droplets in the water column. It was shown that the brine-oil IFT associated with the 3 crudes reduced to less than 3.6 mN/m with the application of the chemical dispersants, even at a low dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR) value of 1:200. The use of chemical dispersants increased the viscosity of the dispersant-oil mixture up to 40 per cent over the neat crude oil. It was shown that for each mixing condition, an optimum value of DOR exists that provides for maximal dispersant effectiveness. The IFT reaches maximum reduction at optimum DOR. It was suggested that oil spill modelling can be improved with further study of IFT reduction with DOR and variations of critical micelle concentration with the type and solubility of chemical dispersant, oil type and oil to water ratio. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  7. Fate and effects of anthropogenic chemicals in mangrove ecosystems: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael, E-mail: lewis.michael@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, 1 Sabine Island Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561 (United States); Pryor, Rachel; Wilking, Lynn [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, 1 Sabine Island Drive, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The scientific literature for fate and effects of non-nutrient contaminant concentrations is skewed for reports describing sediment contamination and bioaccumulation for trace metals. Concentrations for at least 22 trace metals have been reported in mangrove sediments. Some concentrations exceed sediment quality guidelines suggesting adverse effects. Bioaccumulation results are available for at least 11 trace metals, 12 mangrove tissues, 33 mangrove species and 53 species of mangrove-habitat biota. Results are specific to species, tissues, life stage, and season and accumulated concentrations and bioconcentration factors are usually low. Toxicity tests have been conducted with 12 mangrove species and 8 species of mangrove-related fauna. As many as 39 effect parameters, most sublethal, have been monitored during the usual 3 to 6 month test durations. Generalizations and extrapolations for toxicity between species and chemicals are restricted by data scarcity and lack of experimental consistency. This hinders chemical risk assessments and validation of effects-based criteria. - Chemical risk assessments and resource management are restricted by the limited chemical fate and effects database for mangroves.

  8. Chemical effects induced in alkali phosphates by 2 keV Ar ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marletta, G.; Puglisi, O.; Pignataro, S.

    1986-09-01

    The chemical effects induced in various alkali phosphates by 2keV Ar ion bombardment (doses: 10/sup 15/-4 x 10/sup 16/ ions/cm) and detected by Electron Spectroscopy Chemical Analysis (ESCA), are reported. The paper was presented at the International Conference on radiation effects in insulators, Guildford (United Kingdom) 1985. The ESCA spectra indicate that the residual surfaces have been in part transformed into polyphosphate-like compounds. The main parameter which determined the condensation degree was found to be the oxygen/metal ratio. The results are interpreted in terms of a recently proposed model which links the primary physical processes, mainly considered to be binary collisions between the projectile and the target atoms, to the subsequent chemical reactions.

  9. Chemical effects of alkali atoms on critical temperature in superconducting alkali-doped fullerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetfleisch, F.; Gunnarsson, O.; Srama, R.; Han, J. E.; Stepper, M.; Roeser, H.-P.; Bohr, A.; Lopez, J. S.; Mashmool, M.; Roth, S.

    2018-03-01

    Alkali metal doped fullerides (A3C60) are superconductors with critical temperatures, Tc, extending up to 38 K. Tc is known to depend strongly on the lattice parameter a, which can be adjusted by physical or chemical pressure. In the latter case an alkali atom is replaced by a different sized one, which changes a. We have collected an extensive data base of experimental data for Tc from very early up to recent measurements. We disentangle alkali atom chemical effects on Tc, beyond the well-known consequences of changing a. It is found that Tc, for a fixed a, is typically increased as smaller alkali atoms are replaced by larger ones, except for very large a. Possible reasons for these results are discussed. Although smaller in size than the lattice parameter contribution, the chemical effect is not negligible and should be considered in future physical model developments.

  10. The effect of the indoor environment on the fate of organic chemicals in the urban landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, Anna Palm

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effect of the indoor environment on the urban fate of organic chemicals, an 8-compartment indoor-inclusive steady state multimedia chemical fate model was developed. The model includes typical urban compartments (air, soil, water, sediment, and urban film) and a novel module representing a generic indoor environment. The model was parameterized to the municipality of Stockholm, Sweden and applied to four organic chemicals with different physical–chemical characteristics and use patterns: formaldehyde, 2,4,6-tribromophenol, di-ethylhexylphthalate and decabromodiphenyl ether. The results show that emissions to indoor air may increase the steady state mass and residence time in the urban environment by a factor of 1.1 to 22 for the four chemicals, compared to if emissions are assigned to outdoor air. This is due to the nested nature of the indoor environment, which creates a physical barrier that prevents chemicals from leaving the urban system with outflowing air. For DEHP and BDE 209, the additional partitioning to indoor surfaces results in a greater importance of the indoor removal pathways from surfaces. The outdoor environmental concentrations of these chemicals are predicted to be lower if emitted to indoor air than if emitted to outdoor air because of the additional indoor removal pathways of dust and indoor film, leading to loss of chemical from the system. For formaldehyde and 2,4,6-TBP outdoor environmental concentrations are not affected by whether the release occurs indoors or outdoors because of the limited partitioning to indoor surfaces. A sensitivity analysis revealed that there appears to be a relationship between logK OA and the impact of the ventilation rate on the urban fate of organic chemicals. -- Highlights: ► A novel indoor-inclusive multimedia urban fate model is developed and applied. ► Emissions indoors may increase the urban chemical residence time. ► Indoor removal from surfaces constitutes an additional loss process

  11. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were......-on laboratory time. This assay is a powerful tool for the efficient and accurate determination and quantification of the effects of antiandrogens on reporter gene transcription, To extend the application of FuGene, the reagent was shown to be superior compared to Lipofectin for transfecting MCF7 human breast...

  12. Effects of coupled thermal, hydrological and chemical processes on nuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-03-01

    Coupled thermal, hydrological and chemical processes can be classified in two categories. One category consists of the ''Onsager'' type of processes driven by gradients of thermodynamic state variables. These processes occur simultaneously with the direct transport processes. In particular, thermal osmosis, chemical osmosis and ultrafiltration may be prominent in semipermeable materials such as clays. The other category consists of processes affected indirectly by magnitudes of thermodynamic state variables. An important example of this category is the effect of temperature on rates of chemical reactions and chemical equilibria. Coupled processes in both categories may affect transport of radionuclides. Although computational models of limited extent have been constructed, there exists no model that accounts for the full set of THC-coupled processes. In the category of Onsager coupled processes, further model development and testing is severely constrained by a deficient data base of phenomenological coefficients. In the second category, the lack of a general description of effects of heterogeneous chemical reactions on permeability of porous media inhibits progress in quantitative modeling of hydrochemically coupled transport processes. Until fundamental data necessary for further model development have been acquired, validation efforts will be limited necessarily to testing of incomplete models of nuclide transport under closely controlled experimental conditions. 34 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Sequential nearest-neighbor effects on computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, Jorge A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Serrano, Pedro; Wuethrich, Kurt [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology (United States); Scheraga, Harold A., E-mail: has5@cornell.ed [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To evaluate sequential nearest-neighbor effects on quantum-chemical calculations of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts, we selected the structure of the nucleic acid binding (NAB) protein from the SARS coronavirus determined by NMR in solution (PDB id 2K87). NAB is a 116-residue {alpha}/{beta} protein, which contains 9 prolines and has 50% of its residues located in loops and turns. Overall, the results presented here show that sizeable nearest-neighbor effects are seen only for residues preceding proline, where Pro introduces an overestimation, on average, of 1.73 ppm in the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts. A new ensemble of 20 conformers representing the NMR structure of the NAB, which was calculated with an input containing backbone torsion angle constraints derived from the theoretical {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts as supplementary data to the NOE distance constraints, exhibits very similar topology and comparable agreement with the NOE constraints as the published NMR structure. However, the two structures differ in the patterns of differences between observed and computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts, {Delta}{sub ca,i}, for the individual residues along the sequence. This indicates that the {Delta}{sub ca,i} -values for the NAB protein are primarily a consequence of the limited sampling by the bundles of 20 conformers used, as in common practice, to represent the two NMR structures, rather than of local flaws in the structures.

  14. Remarkable nanoconfinement effects on chemical equilibrium manifested in nucleotide dimerization and H-D exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Micha; Rubinovich, Leonid

    2011-10-06

    Nanoconfinement entropic effects on chemical equilibrium involving a small number of molecules, which we term NCECE, are revealed by two widely diverse types of reactions. Employing statistical-mechanical principles, we show how the NCECE effect stabilizes nucleotide dimerization observed within self-assembled molecular cages. Furthermore, the effect provides the basis for dimerization even under an aqueous environment inside the nanocage. Likewise, the NCECE effect is pertinent to a longstanding issue in astrochemistry, namely the extra deuteration commonly observed for molecules reacting on interstellar dust grain surfaces. The origin of the NCECE effect is elucidated by means of the probability distributions of the reaction extent and related variations in the reactant-product mixing entropy. Theoretical modelling beyond our previous preliminary work highlights the role of the nanospace size in addition to that of the nanosystem size, namely the limited amount of molecules in the reaction mixture. Furthermore, the NCECE effect can depend also on the reaction mechanism, and on deviations from stoichiometry. The NCECE effect, leading to enhanced, greatly variable equilibrium "constants", constitutes a unique physical-chemical phenomenon, distinguished from the usual thermodynamical properties of macroscopically large systems. Being significant particularly for weakly exothermic reactions, the effects should stabilize products in other closed nanoscale structures, and thus can have notable implications for the growing nanotechnological utilization of chemical syntheses conducted within confined nanoreactors.

  15. Domino effects within a chemical cluster: a game-theoretical modeling approach by using Nash-equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, Genserik; Dullaert, Wout; Karel, Soudan

    2009-08-15

    Every company situated within a chemical cluster faces domino effect risks, whose magnitude depends on every company's own risk management strategies and on those of all others. Preventing domino effects is therefore very important to avoid catastrophes in the chemical process industry. Given that chemical companies are interlinked by domino effect accident links, there is some likelihood that even if certain companies fully invest in domino effects prevention measures, they can nonetheless experience an external domino effect caused by an accident which occurred in another chemical enterprise of the cluster. In this article a game-theoretic approach to interpret and model behaviour of chemical plants within chemical clusters while negotiating and deciding on domino effects prevention investments is employed.

  16. the effect of rubber effluent on some chemical properties of soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A preliminary pot trial was conducted in a greenhouse to determine the effects of rubber effluent on some soil chemical properties as well as early growth and nutrient uptake by maize plant. The levels of rubber effluent used were 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 ml per 2 kg soil. The trial was arranged in a completely ...

  17. The effect of plant age on the chemical composition of fresh and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of plant age on the chemical composition of fresh and ensiled Agave salmiana leaves. JM Pinos-Rodríguez, M Zamudio, SS González. Abstract. In the first study dry matter (DM), organic matter, crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and soluble carbohydrate (SC) concentrations were determined in ...

  18. Effect of textured soy protein and tomato pulp on chemical, physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effectiveness of textured soy protein, tomato pulp and their combination on inhibition of lipid oxidation which affects the shelf life of meat products. In addition, microbiological, chemical, textural and sensory properties of döner kebab were determined in this study. According ...

  19. Effects of organic versus conventional management on chemical and biological parameters in agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeningen, van A.D.; Vos, de O.J.; Korthals, G.W.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study of organic and conventional arable farming systems was conducted in The Netherlands to determine the effect of management practices on chemical and biological soil properties and soil health. Soils from thirteen accredited organic farms and conventionally managed neighboring

  20. Structuring effects of chemicals from the sea fan Phyllogorgia dilatata on benthic communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe V. Ribeiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in understanding the ecological functions of secondary metabolites from marine organisms, there has been little focus on the influence of chemically-defended species at the community level. Several compounds have been isolated from the gorgonian octocoral Phyllogorgia dilatata, a conspicuous species that forms dense canopies on rocky reefs of northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Manipulative experiments were performed to study: (1 the effects of live colonies of P. dilatata (physical presence and chemistry on recruitment of sympatric benthic organisms; (2 the allelopathic effects of its chemicals on competitors; and (3 chemotactic responses of the non-indigenous brittle star, Ophiothela mirabilis. Early establishment of benthic species was influenced on substrates around live P. dilatata colonies and some effects could be attributed to the gorgonian’s secondary metabolites.In addition, the gorgonian chemicals also exerted an allelopathic effect on the sympatric zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum, and positive chemotaxis upon O. mirabilis. These results indicate multiple ecological roles of a chemically-defended gorgonian on settlement, sympatric competitors, and non-indigenous species.

  1. Structuring effects of chemicals from the sea fanPhyllogorgia dilatataon benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Felipe V; da Gama, Bernardo A P; Pereira, Renato C

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the ecological functions of secondary metabolites from marine organisms, there has been little focus on the influence of chemically-defended species at the community level. Several compounds have been isolated from the gorgonian octocoral Phyllogorgia dilatata , a conspicuous species that forms dense canopies on rocky reefs of northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Manipulative experiments were performed to study: (1) the effects of live colonies of P. dilatata (physical presence and chemistry) on recruitment of sympatric benthic organisms; (2) the allelopathic effects of its chemicals on competitors; and (3) chemotactic responses of the non-indigenous brittle star, Ophiothela mirabilis . Early establishment of benthic species was influenced on substrates around live P. dilatata colonies and some effects could be attributed to the gorgonian's secondary metabolites . In addition, the gorgonian chemicals also exerted an allelopathic effect on the sympatric zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum, and positive chemotaxis upon O. mirabilis . These results indicate multiple ecological roles of a chemically-defended gorgonian on settlement, sympatric competitors, and non-indigenous species.

  2. Differential effects of environmental chemicals and food contaminants on adipogenesis, biomarker release and PPARγ activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Sørensen, Karin Dreisig; Boberg, Julie

    2012-01-01

    and resistin from the cells. Butylparaben activated PPARγ as well, which may be a mediator of the adipogenic effect. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)153 also stimulate adipogenesis and biomarker release, but did not affect PPARs. The data indicates that PPARγ activating chemicals often stimulate adipocyte...

  3. A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaoning; Luo Wenzong

    1987-01-01

    A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change is developed and described. This method is simple to use and consumes less extractant as compared with the commonly used Woodward method. It is also convenient for unstable systems

  4. Chemical and Physical Comparative Study of the Effect of Wet and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical and physical comparative effect of wet and dry beneficiation processes for purification of kaolin was studied. X-ray flourescence XRF and particle size analysis of kaolin clay before and after beneficiation were carried out. The Si/Al ratio of the raw kaolin which was 1.90 decreased by 1.6 and 17.9% after the wet ...

  5. Evaluation of the effects of enzyme-based liquid chemical stabilizers on subgrade soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mgangira, Martin B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to asses the strength of enzyme treated soil material. Thus the aim of the paper is to present laboratory results on the effects of two enzyme-based liquid chemicals as soil stabilizers. Soil samples were prepared...

  6. Inferring chemical effects on carbon flows in aquatic food webs: Methodology and case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Laender, F.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of ecotoxicological enclosure experiments monitor species abundances at different chemical concentrations. Here, we present a new modelling approach that estimates changes in food web flows from such data and show that population- and food web level effects are revealed that are not

  7. Effect of drying methods on the physico-chemical properties of soyflour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of drying methods on the physico-chemical properties of soyflour. JAV Famurewa, AO Raji. Abstract. This study investigated the relationship between the drying methods and the physicochemical properties of soybean during drying prior to converting it into flour. Three samples were prepared for each of Tax 1485 and ...

  8. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static” ...

  9. Review and evaluation of the effects of xenobiotic chemicals on microorganisms in soil. [139 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J.; Van Voris, P.

    1988-02-01

    The primary objective was to review and evaluate the relevance and quality of existing xenobiotic data bases and test methods for evaluating direct and indirect effects (both adverse and beneficial) of xenobiotics on the soil microbial community; direct and indirect effects of the soil microbial community on xenobiotics; and adequacy of test methods used to evaluate these effects and interactions. Xenobiotic chemicals are defined here as those compounds, both organic and inorganic, produced by man and introduced into the environment at concentrations that cause undesirable effects. Because soil serves as the main repository for many of these chemicals, it therefore has a major role in determining their ultimate fate. Once released, the distribution of xenobiotics between environmental compartments depends on the chemodynamic properties of the compounds, the physicochemical properties of the soils, and the transfer between soil-water and soil-air interfaces and across biological membranes. Abiotic and biotic processes can transform the chemical compound, thus altering its chemical state and, subsequently, its toxicity and reactivity. Ideally, the conversion is to carbon dioxide, water, and mineral elements, or at least, to some harmless substance. However, intermediate transformation products, which can become toxic pollutants in their own right, can sometimes be formed. 139 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. The Effectiveness of Conceptual Change Texts in Remediating High School Students' Alternative Conceptions Concerning Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of conceptual change texts in remediating high school students' alternative conceptions concerning chemical equilibrium. A quasi-experimental design was used in this study. The subjects for this study consisted of a total 78 tenth-grade students, 38 of them in the experimental group and 40 of them in the…

  11. Effects of pond fertilization on the physico-chemical water quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of fertilization on the physico-chemical water quality of six selected earthen fishponds in Ife North Local Government Area of Osun State was investigated for a period of two years sampling the ponds every other month. The fishponds were grouped with regard to fertilization practice and water flowage regime into ...

  12. Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM David G. Nashab, Esra Mutluc, William T. Prestond, Michael D. Haysb, Sarah H. Warrenc, Charly Kingc, William P. Linakb, M. lan Gilmourc, and David M. DeMarinic aOak Ridge Institute for Science and Ed...

  13. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on in vitro global DNA methylation and adipocyte differentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos Sales, L.; Kamstra, J.H.; Cenijn, P.H.; van Rijt, L.S.; Hamers, T.; Legler, J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may form a risk factor for obesity by altering energy metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of a range of EDCs with putative obesogenic properties on global DNA methylation

  14. Toxic effects of the interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with chemicals or physical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Zhao, Jinshun

    2013-01-01

    Due to their chemical stability and nonallergic, nonirritant, and ultraviolet protective properties, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in industries such as electronics, optics, and material sciences, as well as architecture, medicine, and pharmacology. However, increasing concerns have been raised in regards to its ecotoxicity and toxicity on the aquatic environment as well as to humans. Although insights have been gained into the effects of TiO2 NPs on susceptible biological systems, there is still much ground to be covered, particularly in respect of our knowledge of the effects of the interaction of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. Studies suggest that interactions of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors may result in an increase in toxicity or adverse effects. This review highlights recent progress in the study of the interactive effects of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. PMID:23901269

  15. How synergistic or antagonistic effects may influence the mutual hazard ranking of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Carlsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of various agents, including humic materials, nanomaterials, microplastics, or simply specific chemical compounds, may cause changes in the apparent persistence, bioaccumulation, and/or toxicity (PBT of a chemical compound leading to an either increased or decreased PBT characteristics and thus an increased or decreased hazard evaluation. In the present paper, a series chloro-containing obsolete pesticides is studied as an illustrative example. Partial order methodology is used to quantify how changed P, B, or T characteristics of methoxychlor (MEC influences the measure of the hazard of MEC, relative to the other 11 compounds in the series investigated. Not surprisingly, an increase in one of the three indicators (P, B, or T lead to an increased average order and thus an increased relative hazard as a result of a synergistic effect. A decrease in one of the indicator values analogously causes a decreased average order/relative hazard through an antagonistic effect; the effect, however, being less pronounced. It is further seen that the effect of changing the apparent value of the three indicators is different. Thus, persistence apparently is more important that bioaccumulation which again appears more important than toxicity, which is in agreement with previous work. The results are discussed with reference to the European chemicals framework on registration, evaluation and authorization of chemicals (REACH framework.

  16. Pattern Dependency and Loading Effect of Pure-Boron-Layer Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; De Boer, W.B.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    The pattern dependency of pure-boron (PureB) layer chemical-vapor Deposition (CVD) is studied with respect to the correlation between the deposition rate and features like loading effects, deposition parameters and deposition window sizes. It is shown experimentally that the oxide coverage ratio and

  17. The Effect of Rubber Effluent on some Chemical Properties of Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary pot trial was conducted in a greenhouse to determine the effects of rubber effluent on some soil chemical properties as well as early growth and nutrient uptake by maize plant. The levels of rubber effluent used were 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 ml per 2 kg soil. The trial was arranged in a completely randomized ...

  18. The Effective Concepts on Students' Understanding of Chemical Reactions and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyildiz, Yildizay; Tarhan, Leman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the basic concepts related to the unit of "Chemical Reactions and Energy" and the sub-concepts underlying for meaningful learning of the unit and to investigate the effectiveness of them on students' learning achievements. For this purpose, the basic concepts of the unit…

  19. The effect of chemical treatment on life broilers before slaughter and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, effect of chemical treatment (surface and oral) using chlorine and TH4 of life broilers before slaughter and slaughter conditions on bacterial and keeping quality of broiler meat was investigated. The objectives were to improve both bacterial and keeping quality of broiler meat and to identify critical control points ...

  20. Time-dependent effect of composted tannery sludge on the chemical and microbial properties of soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, de Ricardo Silva; Santos, Vilma Maria; Melo, de Wanderley Jose; Nunes, Luis Alfredo Pinheiro Leal; Brink, van den Paul J.; Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Composting has been suggested as an efficient method for tannery sludge recycling before its application to the soil. However, the application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) should be monitored to evaluate its effect on the chemical and microbial properties of soil. This study evaluated the

  1. Co-Exposure with Fullerene May Strengthen Health Effects of Organic Industrial Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehto, M.; Karilainen, T.; Rog, T.

    2014-01-01

    co-exposure scenarios in in vitro studies where acute cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of C-60 and organic chemicals are tested together and alone by using human THP-1-derived macrophages. Statistically significant co-effects are observed for an unfiltered mixture of benzaldehyde and C-60 that is more...

  2. The effect of chemical treatment on life broilers before slaughter and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of chemical treatment on life broilers before slaughter and slaughter conditions on microbial quality and shelf life of broiler meat. ... Journal of Food Technology in Africa ... Slaughtering broilers at farm level using unskilled labour results in heavy bacterial contamination and lowering of shelf life of broiler meat.

  3. The Effect of a Conceptual Change Approach on Understanding of Students' Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasoy, Basri; Akkus, Huseyin; Kadayifci, Hakki

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on tenth-grade students' conceptual achievement in understanding chemical equilibrium. The study was conducted in two classes of the same teacher with participation of a total of 44 tenth-grade students. In this study, a…

  4. Effect of indium doping on zinc oxide films prepared by chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the conducting and transparent In doped ZnO films fabricated by a homemade chemical spray pyrolysis system (CSPT). The effect of In concentration on the structural, morphological, electrical and optical properties have been studied. These films are found to show (0 0 2) preferential growth at low indium ...

  5. Effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on in vitro global DNA methylation and adipocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos Sales, L.; Kamstra, J. H.; Cenijn, P. H.; van Rijt, L. S.; Hamers, T.; Legler, J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may form a risk factor for obesity by altering energy metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of a range of EDCs with putative obesogenic properties on global DNA methylation

  6. Human health effects of residual carbon nanotubes and traditional water treatment chemicals in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simate, Geoffrey S; Iyuke, Sunny E; Ndlovu, Sehliselo; Heydenrych, Mike; Walubita, Lubinda F

    2012-02-01

    The volume of industrial and domestic wastewater is increasing significantly year by year with the change in the lifestyle based on mass consumption and mass disposal brought about by the dramatic development of economies and industries. Therefore, effective advanced wastewater treatment is required because wastewater contains a variety of constituents such as particles, organic materials, and emulsion depending on the resource. However, residual chemicals that remain during the treatment of wastewaters form a variety of known and unknown by-products through reactions between the chemicals and some pollutants. Chronic exposure to these by-products or residual chemicals through the ingestion of drinking water, inhalation and dermal contact during regular indoor activities (e.g., showering, bathing, cooking) may pose cancer and non-cancer risks to human health. For example, residual aluminium salts in treated water may cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). As for carbon nanotubes (CNTs), despite their potential impacts on human health and the environment having been receiving more and more attention in the recent past, existing information on the toxicity of CNTs in drinking water is limited with many open questions. Furthermore, though general topics on the human health impacts of traditional water treatment chemicals have been studied, no comparative analysis has been done. Therefore, a qualitative comparison of the human health effects of both residual CNTs and traditional water treatment chemicals is given in this paper. In addition, it is also important to cover and compare the human health effects of CNTs to those of traditional water treatment chemicals together in one review because they are both used for water treatment and purification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical Characterization and Prebiotic Effect of Water-Soluble Polysaccharides from Zizyphus lotus Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Zakaria Boual; Abdellah Kemassi; Toufik Chouana; Philippe Michaud; Mohammed Didi Ould El Hadj

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the prebiotic potential of oligosaccharides prepared by chemical hydrolysis of water-soluble polysaccharides (WSP) from Zizyphus lotus leaves, the effect of oligosaccharides on bacterial growth was studied. The chemical composition of WSP was evaluated by colorimetric assays revealed the average values: 7.05±0.73% proteins and 86.21±0.74% carbohydrates, among them 64.81±0.42% is neutral sugar and the rest 16.25±1.62% is uronic acids. The characteri...

  8. Stereoelectronic effects on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts in methoxybenzenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Maja; Olsen, Lars; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    ). The differences are due to different conformational behavior of the OH and OCH3 groups; while the ortho-disubstituted OH group remains planar in polyphenols due to hydrogen bonding and conjugative stabilization, the steric congestion in ortho-disubstituted anisoles outweighs the conjugative effects and forces...... correlation between computed and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts, including agreement between computed and observed chemical shift changes caused by O-methylation. The observed regularities can aid structure elucidation of partly O-methylated polyphenols, including many natural products and drugs...

  9. Chemical effects in ion mixing of a ternary system (metal-SiO2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, T.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Sands, T.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    The mixing of Ti, Cr, and Ni thin films with SiO2 by low-temperature (- 196-25 C) irradiation with 290 keV Xe has been investigated. Comparison of the morphology of the intermixed region and the dose dependences of net metal transport into SiO2 reveals that long range motion and phase formation probably occur as separate and sequential processes. Kinetic limitations suppress chemical effects in these systems during the initial transport process. Chemical interactions influence the subsequent phase formation.

  10. Effect of chemical treatment on thermal properties of fibers from pineapple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Rafael I.M.; Mulinari, Daniella R.; Carvalho, Kelly C.C.; Conejo, Luiza dos Santos; Voorwald, Herman J.C.; Cioffi, Maria Odila H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the effect of the chemical modification of natural fibres from of pineapple fibres with alkaline solution was studied. After modification the in nature and modified fibres were analyzed by XRD diffractometry and thermogravimetry with objective to evaluate influence chemical treatment in surface and in the thermal properties fibres. With the obtained results it was possible to verify an increase of 10.4 % in the crystallinity index of fibres beyond the increase around 4.5% in the degradation temperature, what it indicates an increase in the stability thermal of the fibres. (author)

  11. Investigation of effect of Ag(1), Cd(2) and Zn(2) on chemical nickel plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunyatskas, A.M.; Tarozajte, R.K.; Gyanutene, I.K.; Lyaukonis, Yu.Yu.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of Ag(1), Cd(2) and Zn(2) on chemical nickel plating using hypophosphite aimed to get corresponding alloys from alkali solutions. The H 2 formed volume and potential of coating have been measured while nickel plating. It is possible to have plating of Ni-P-Ag, Ni-P-Zn, Ni-P-Cd, Ni-P-Zn-Cd content coatings in alkali solutions using hypophosphite Ni-P-Zh and Ni-P-Zn-Cd coatings have corrosion resistance and unporousness. Cd and Zn inclusion in Ni-P coating is supposed to have both chemical and electrochemical origin

  12. Effect of Chemical Admixtures on the Engineering Properties of Tropical Peat Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Bujang B.K. Huat; Shukri Maail; Thamer A. Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    This research describes a study on the effect of chemical (cement and lime) admixtures on the index and engineering properties (compaction and unconfined strength) of tropical peat soils. The ordinary Portland cement and hydrated lime were used. The amounts cement and lime added to the peat soil sample, as a percentage of the dry soil mass was in the range of 5-15% and 5-25%, respectively. The results of the study show that the addition of the chemical admixture, cement and lime, can improve ...

  13. Numerical study of base effects on population inversion in DF chemical laser cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Sung; Baek, Seung Wook [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea). Division of Aerospace Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-10-15

    Nowadays a chemical laser is globally studied and examined as a means of new high strategic weapon system or industrial equipment system. Different from the other laser systems, the chemical laser system has a great advantage in that a high power laser beam with megawatt range can be easily generated. In order to do that, the chemical laser system employs a supersonic mixing and chemical reaction in the cavity. In the DF chemical laser system, F atom as an oxidant and D{sub 2} molecule as a fuel are injected and reacted so that the DF excited molecules are produced. These phenomena occur in a non-equilibrium state. The excited molecules are degenerated into the lower level energy states so as to generate the laser beam by means of the stimulated emission. Therefore, more excited molecules in higher energy level are desirable in order to generate a higher power laser beam by controlling a flow mixing and chemical reaction in the cavity. There are a lot of factors that may affect mixing and chemical reaction in producing excited molecules. Usually, the chemical laser system adopts a diffusion type of injection system with base. Thereby, a recirculation zone is formed behind the base which determines characteristics of mixing and chemical reaction. In this study, the effects of base height on the population inversion, that is one of the most important aspects in the chemical laser system, are numerically investigated. The results are discussed by considering three base heights of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6mm. Major results reveal that a transition of DF(1)-DF(0) as one of population inversions takes place in the whole range of cavity while its value decreases as the base height increases. On the contrary, the region over which the transitions of DF(2)-DF(1) and DF(3)-DF(2) occur, increases as the base height increases, while so does its value. Therefore, as the base height decreases, the maximum small signal gain (SSG) becomes higher in the v{sub 1-0} transition, whereas it

  14. Cross-coupling effects in chemically non-equilibrium viscous compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustova, E.V.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Self-cosistent kinetic-theory description of chemical-reaction rates and mean normal stress in one-temperature viscous compressible gas flows. Reaearch highlights: → In chemically non-equilibrium viscous compressible flows, the rate of each reaction depends on the velocity divergence and rates of all other reactions. → Cross effects between the rates of chemical reactions and normal mean stress can be found in the symmetric form and expressed in terms of the reaction affinities. → In the case of small affinities, the entropy production is unconditionally non-negative; in the case of finite affinities, the entropy production related to the scalar forces has no definite sign. - Abstract: A closed self-consistent description of a one-temperature non-equilibrium reacting flow is presented on the basis of the kinetic theory methods. A general case including internal degrees of freedom, dissociation-recombination and exchange reactions, and arbitrary values of affinities of chemical reactions is considered. Chemical-reaction rates and mean normal stress in viscous compressible flows are studied and a symmetric cross coupling between these terms is found. It is shown that the rate of each chemical reaction and the mean normal stress depend on velocity divergence and affinities of all chemical reactions; the law of mass action is violated in viscous flows. The results obtained in the frame of linear irreversible thermodynamics can be deduced from the proposed model for the particular case of small affinities. The reciprocal Onsager-Casimir relations are verified, the symmetry of kinetic coefficients is demonstrated, and the entropy production in a viscous flow is studied.

  15. Sublethal effects of some botanical and chemical insecticides on the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem: Aleyrodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jafarbeigi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortalities caused by acute concentrations of insecticides, some biological traits of target pests may be also affected by sublethal doses. The cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem: Aleyrodidae is an important pest of a wide variety of agricultural crops across the world. The control of B. tabaci largely relies on wide application of chemical insecticides. In this study, we analyzed the life table parameters to evaluate the sublethal effect of three plant-derived insecticides (Fumaria parviflora (Fumariaceae, Teucrium polium (Lamiaceae, and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae and two chemical insecticides (pymetrozin and neemarin on B. tabaci. The whiteflies were allowed to oviposit on plants infected with each of the five insecticides using leaf-dip method. The data were analyzed using the age-stage two-sex life table. We found significant differences in the gross reproductive rate (GRR, the net reproductive rat (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r and the finite rate of increase (λ of treated whiteflies compared to control. Our results showed that some biological traits of B. tabaci are affected by sub-lethal doses of the plant-derived extracts and that these effects are comparable to those of chemical insecticides. Given the detrimental effects of chemical insecticides on human, environment and non-target organisms, plant-derived insecticides may provide valuable environmentally friendly tools for pest management programs.

  16. Effects of chemical oxidation on sorption and desorption of PAHs in typical Chinese soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Hou Lei; Luo Xiaoli; Zhu Lingyan

    2009-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a commonly applied soil and groundwater remediation technology, but can have significant effects on soil properties, which in turn might affect fate and transport of organic contaminants. In this study, it was found that oxidation treatment resulted mainly in breakdown of soil organic matter (SOM) components. Sorption of naphthalene and phenanthrene to the original soils and the KMnO 4 -treated soils was linear, indicating that hydrophobic partitioning to SOM was the predominant mechanism for sorption. Desorption from the original and treated soils was highly resistant, and was well modeled with a biphasic desorption model. Desorption of residual naphthalene after treating naphthalene-contaminated soils with different doses of KMnO 4 also followed the biphasic desorption model very well. It appears that neither changes of soil properties caused by chemical oxidation nor direct chemical oxidation of contaminated soils had a noticeable effect on the nature of PAH-SOM interactions. - Chemical oxidation of soils had little effect on the mechanisms controlling sorption and desorption of PAHs.

  17. Effect Of Incorporation Of Sunflower Seed Flour On The Chemical And Sensory Characteristics Of Cracker Biscuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona MAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sunflower seed flour supplementation on the quality characteristics of wheat flour cracker biscuits was studied. For this purpose, four experimental variants obtained by substituting wheat flour with different proportions (0%, 15%, 25%, and 35% of sunflower seed flour, were used. The cracker biscuits with sunflower seed flour and the control samples were subjected to physico-chemical and organoleptic analyses. The cracker biscuits, prepared with sunflower seed flour up to a 35% level of supplementation in wheat flour, were found to be acceptable with respect to all sensory attributes. In the present study, significant improvement in the chemical composition (ash, fat, and crude protein of wheat-flour cracker biscuits supplemented with sunflower seed flour was observed. This reflects the potential for use of sunflower seed flour, as a partial replacement for wheat flour, for enhancement of these nutrients/chemical constituents

  18. Effects of Chemically Doped Bioactive Borate Glass on Neuron Regrowth and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Brinda; Papke, Jason B; Mohammadkhah, Ali; Day, Delbert E; Harkins, Amy B

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries present challenges to regeneration. Currently, the gold standard for nerve repair is an autograft that results in another region of the body suffering nerve damage. Previously, bioactive borate glass (BBG) has been studied in clinical trials to treat patients with non-healing wounds, and we have reported that BBG is conducive for soft tissue repair. BBG provides structural support, degrades in a non-cytotoxic manner, and can be chemically doped. Here, we tested a wide range of chemical compounds that are reported to have neuroprotective characteristics to promote regeneration of peripheral neurons after traumatic injury. We hypothesized that chemical dopants added in trace amounts to BBG would improve neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. We measured neurite outgrowth from whole DRG explants, and survival rates of dissociated neurons and support cells that comprise the DRG. Results show that chemically doped BBGs have differentially variable effects on neuronal survival and outgrowth, with iron, gallium, and zinc improving outgrowth of neurons, and iodine causing the most detriment to neurons. Because chemically doped BBGs support increased nerve regrowth and survival, they show promise for use in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  19. Calibration of a portable cost-effective chemical residue detection system with adaptive neural net control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Alan C.; Walker, James C.

    2003-07-01

    The Sensory Research Institute at the Florida State University has quantitatively characterized a chemical residue detection system with adaptive neural net data processing. Two separate configurations, "Stormy" and "Gaea", were trained by exposure to decreasing amounts of n-amyl acetate from chemical emitters randomly distributed among a collection of non-emitters. The concentration of chemical in the sampled air stream was controlled precisely. The detection threshold for "Stormy" was 1.14 ppt; that for "Gaea" was 1.9 ppt. Cycle time for sampling and chemical analysis of each sample port was on the order of seconds. Possible effects on the sensors of environmental factors such as ambient humidity, temperature, and air velocity were not considered. Besides processing individual air sample data, the neural nets can sense concentration gradients and track to chemical source. The adaptive neural nets are accessed by a voice recognition system and are capable of point testing or free-ranging search. The service life of the detectors, the neural net processors, and auxiliary packaging is approximately 8 years under normal field use. Maintenance requires a good quality kibble and an occasional romp in the park.

  20. Effect of irrigation intervals on growth and chemical composition of some Curcuma spp. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAKARIM A. MOHAMED

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed MA, Wahba HE, Ibrahim ME, Yousef AA. 2014. Effect of irrigation intervals on growth and chemical composition of some Curcuma spp. plants. Nusantara Bioscience 6: 140-145. The Influence of irrigation intervals on the growth, yield of rhizomes and chemical composition of both Curcuma aromatica and Curcuma domestica plants was investigated. Three irrigation treatments were used in this experiment. The first treatment was irrigated every one week. The second and third treatments were irrigated every two and three weeks. The long irrigation intervals significantly reduced growth parameters and chemical composition. Growth parameters, i.e. plant height, number of leaves, width of the leaf, fresh and dry weight of rhizomes, as well as chemical composition, i.e. total carbohydrate, volatile oil and curcumin in dry rhizomes increased when the plants irrigated every week compared to irrigation treatments every two or three weeks. Also, C. aromatica gave the higher values of growth parameter and chemical composition compared to C. domestica under all irrigation treatments.

  1. Comprehensive investigation of the corrosion and surface chemical effects of the decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo-Nagy, Andrea; Varga, Kalman; Deak-Horvath, Emese; Nemeth, Zoltan; Horvath, David; Schunk, Janos; Patek, Gabor

    2012-09-01

    Decontamination technologies are mainly developed to reduce the collective dose of the maintenance personnel at NPPs. The highest efficiency (i.e., the highest DF values) available without detrimental modification of the treated surface of structural material is the most important goal in the course of the application of a decontamination technology. A so-called 'soft' chemical decontamination technology has been developed - supported by the Paks Nuclear Power Plant - at the Institute of Radiochemistry and Radioecology of the University of Pannonia. The novel base technology can be effectively applied for the decontamination of the heat exchanger tubes of steam generators. In addition, by optimizing the main technological parameters (temperature, concentration of the liquid chemicals, flow rates, contact time, etc.) it can be utilized for specific applications such as decontamination of some dismountable devices and separable equipment or the total decontamination prior to plant dismantling (decommissioning) in the future. The aim of this work is to compare the efficiency, corrosion and surface chemical effects of some improved versions of the novel base-technology elaborated for decontamination of austenitic stainless steel surfaces. The experiments have been performed at laboratory conditions in decontamination model systems. The applied methods: γ-spectrometry, ICP-OES, voltammetry and SEM-EDX. The experimental results revealed that the efficiency of the base-technology mainly depends on the surface features of the stainless steel samples such as the chemical composition and thickness of the oxide layer, the nature (quantity, morphology and chemical composition) of the crystalline deposits. It has been documented that the improved version of the base-technology are suitable for the decontamination of both steel surfaces covered by chemically resistant large Cr-content crystals and that having compact oxide-layers (up to a thickness of 10

  2. Effect of Applying Chemical Fertilizers on Concentration of Cd, Pb and Zn in Agricultural Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourmoghadas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background &Objective:  Nowadays uncontrolled uses of chemical fertilizers which have many heavy metals such as Cadmium, Lead and Zinc in addition have economic problems, cause to serious damages in the environment. Therefore uncontrolled application of fertilizers can cause accumulation contaminants in soil, water sources and increasing in plants and human & animals’ food chain. The main objective of this research was to investigate the effects of chemical fertilizers application to increase heavy metals in agricultural soils at directions to prevent contamination in water sources, agricultural products and the best uses of chemical fertilizers. Methods: In this study, 20 soil samples and 5 useful chemical fertilizer samples were collected and investigated. After fertilizer and soil samples were prepared, digested and filtered, heavy metals were determined with using atomic absorption. Results: The results of this study showed that, Cd in Diammonum phosphate  fertilizer 1.25 times, Super phosphate triple 1.7 times and in Macro granular fertilizer 1.5 times were as much as maximum acceptable concentration in chemical fertilizers. Cadmium concentration in all of the Jarghoye (Isfahan agricultural soil samples 3 to 7 times and in the Mobarake village (Najaf abad agricultural soil samples 10 to 35 times were as much as maximum acceptable concentration in agricultural soils. But Pb and Zn concentration in all of the agricultural soil samples was less than the amount of maximum acceptable concentration. Conclusion: Phosphate chemical fertilizers were positive effects to increase concentration of Pb and Zn in agricultural soils. Therefore, application of the fertilizer must be more attention because of increasing heavy metals in the agriculture soils and probably increasing heavy metals in food chain.  

  3. Sex-Specific Effects of Combined Exposure to Chemical and Non-chemical Stressors on Neuroendocrine Development: a Review of Recent Findings and Putative Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Whitney J; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-12-01

    Environmental toxicants and psychosocial stressors share many biological substrates and influence overlapping physiological pathways. Increasing evidence indicates stress-induced changes to the maternal milieu may prime rapidly developing physiological systems for disruption by concurrent or subsequent exposure to environmental chemicals. In this review, we highlight putative mechanisms underlying sex-specific susceptibility of the developing neuroendocrine system to the joint effects of stress or stress correlates and environmental toxicants (bisphenol A, alcohol, phthalates, lead, chlorpyrifos, and traffic-related air pollution). We provide evidence indicating that concurrent or tandem exposure to chemical and non-chemical stressors during windows of rapid development is associated with sex-specific synergistic, potentiated and reversed effects on several neuroendocrine endpoints related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function, sex steroid levels, neurotransmitter circuits, and innate immune function. We additionally identify gaps, such as the role that the endocrine-active placenta plays, in our understanding of these complex interactions. Finally, we discuss future research needs, including the investigation of non-hormonal biomarkers of stress. We demonstrate multiple physiologic systems are impacted by joint exposure to chemical and non-chemical stressors differentially among males and females. Collectively, the results highlight the importance of evaluating sex-specific endpoints when investigating the neuroendocrine system and underscore the need to examine exposure to chemical toxicants within the context of the social environment.

  4. Effect of slope and depth on soil chemical properties of a typical alfisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnenne Bassey Anwanane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management options proffered with respect to the chemical properties along a toposequence are a key to sustainable crop and soil productivity since nutrient status and soil properties are related to topography of the land area. A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of slope and depth on selected soil chemical properties at the University of Ilorin Teaching and Research Farm in 2013. Three points: upper, middle and bottom slope, along a toposequence with an average distance of 200 m apart were delineated and sampled for soil analysis at depths of 0–30 cm, 30–60 cm and 60–90 cm using core sampler and auger. Soil chemical properties which included pH in water, pH in KCl, electrical conductivity, organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, exchangeable bases (Ca, Mg, K, Na, exchangeable acidity, effective cation exchange capacity, base saturation, exchangeable sodium percentage and sodium adsorption ratio were determined in the laboratory/ computed afterwards. Data from the analysis were subjected to ANOVA using 2x3 factorial combinations of factors slope and depth - in randomized complete block design (RCBD with five replicates. Results on the effects of slope and soil depth on soil chemical properties showed that soil depth affected all the measured soil chemical properties except exchangeable sodium. The pH (both in water and KCl, electrical conductivity, available phosphorus and exchangeable potassium were not affected by slope. Also, pH, exchangeable magnesium and sodium were not affected by the interaction between the effect of slope and soil depth.

  5. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemical reactions and photodissociation processes: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The origins of isotope effects in equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes are reviewed. In non-equilibrium processes, attention is given to isotope effects in simple bimolecular reactions, symmetry-related reactions, and photodissociation processes. Recent examples of isotope effects in these areas are reviewed. Some indication of other scientific areas for which measurements and/or calculations of isotope effects are used is also given. Examples presented focus on neutral molecule chemistry and in many cases complement examples considered in greater detail in the other chapters of this volume

  6. Cumulative and competitive effects of chemical elements on nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Helene

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses under repository conditions. The main objective is to identify, understand and compare the effects of some chemical elements present in the glass composition and/or in the repository media (Zn, Mg, Ni, Co, Fe, Ca, Gd, Ce, K, Cs, Cr and Ag) on the processes involved in glass alteration by water. The cumulative or competitive nature of the effects of these chemical elements was determined. To reach this goal, a 6 oxides simple glass (ISG) has been altered for more than 500 days in a solution containing one or more of the chemical elements of interest. The results indicate that Zn, Mg, Ni, Co and Fe elements increase glass alteration forming secondary phases with the same structure and stoichiometry (tri-octahedral smectites). To form, these silicates consume chemical elements (Si, Al) from the environment and induce a pH decrease until a limiting value of pH. Beyond this pH the precipitation of secondary phases is inhibited and these chemical elements can be integrated into the gel, replacing Ca whose solubility increases at lower pH. As long as they form secondary phases, the effects of these elements are cumulative. Rare earths Gd and Ce also increase glass alteration forming secondary phases but their effects are lower as they contain less silicon. These elements are not integrated in the gel. Chromium increases glass alteration by precipitating with Ca and leading to a less protective gel, depleted in Ca. Silver precipitates as AgCl and has no effect on the alteration of the glass. The chemical elements K, Cs and Ca limit glass alteration by integrating into the gel and slowing down the transport phenomena therein. This integration is competitive: the order of integration (quantity and effectiveness glass alteration limitation) is the following Ca≥≥Cs≥K. Thus, the increase of glass alteration may be proportional to the quantity of elements promoting the precipitation of

  7. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyodo-Taguchi, Y.; Aoki, K.; Matsudaira, H.

    1982-01-01

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  8. Effects of diet breadth on autogenous chemical defense of a generalist grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C G; Hess, T A; Whitman, D W; Silk, P J; Blum, M S

    1987-02-01

    The lubber grasshopper,Romalea guttata, produces a metathoracic defensive secretion containing primarily phenolics and quinones. This insect feeds on a wide range of plant species. Insects reared on an artificial diet and a diet of onion,Allium canadense, had secretions that contained fewer compounds, lower concentrations of compounds, and markedly altered relative composition of components compared to insects reared on a varied diet of 26 plant species that included onion. The study demonstrates that diet breadth has a major effect on the quality and quantity of the autogenous defensive secretion of this generalist herbivore. The results are compared to diet effects known in chemically defended specialists. Two possible mechanisms explaining the effects of diet breadth are proposed: one involves changes in precursor availability with changing diet breadth; the other suggests that physiological stress due to diet restriction changes allocation of resources to chemical defense.

  9. Effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on water-quality samples obtained from wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Gibs, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    Factors that affect the mass of chemical constituents entering a well include the distributions of flow rate and chemical concentrations along and near the screened or open section of the well. Assuming a layered porous medium (with each layer being characterized by a uniform hydraulic conductivity and chemical concentration), a knowledge of the flow from each layer along the screened zone and of the chemical concentrations in each layer enables the total mass entering the well to be determined. Analyses of hypothetical systems and a site at Galloway, NJ, provide insight into the temporal variation of water-quality data observed when withdrawing water from screened wells in heterogeneous ground-water systems.The analyses of hypothetical systems quantitatively indicate the cause-and-effect relations that cause temporal variability in water samples obtained from wells. Chemical constituents that have relatively uniform concentrations with depth may not show variations in concentrations in the water discharged from a well after the well is purged (evacuation of standing water in the well casing). However, chemical constituents that do not have uniform concentrations near the screened interval of the well may show variations in concentrations in the well discharge water after purging because of the physics of ground-water flow in the vicinity of the screen.Water-quality samples were obtained through time over a 30 minute period from a site at Galloway, NJ. The water samples were analyzed for aromatic hydrocarbons, and the data for benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene were evaluated for temporal variations. Samples were taken from seven discrete zones, and the flow-weighted concentrations of benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene all indicate an increase in concentration over time during pumping. These observed trends in time were reproduced numerically based on the estimated concentration distribution in the aquifer and the flow rates from each zone.The results of

  10. Study on effects of sulfur fumigation on chemical constituents of Chrysanthemum morifolium cv. Boju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You-lian; Wang, Shan; Zhu, Jing-jing; Wang, Wei-hao; Xiang, Shi-xie; Feng, Wei-hong; Chen, Liang-mian; Wang, Zhi-min; Lu, Tu-lin

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensively comparison of the chemical profiles between sun-drying BJ (NBJ) and sulfur-fumigated BJ (SBJ) was conducted by HPLC analysis and the discrepant peaks were identified or tentatively assigned by HPLC-ESI-MSn. A total of 32 chemical components were used for qualitative comparison. Meanwhile, a quantitative comparison of BJwere conducted by HPLC analysis and determining seven compounds from 3 NBJ and 3 SBJ samples dramatic chemical changes were found. After sulfur fumigation, the contents of flavonoids glycosides and phenolic acids were remarkably reduced, but the contents of flavonoids aglycones were significantly increased. Multivariate statistics, including principle component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) were used to investigate the potential damaging effect of sulfur-fumigating process. The PCA score plots showed six samples were clearly classified into the sun-drying and sulfur-fumigating groups. And according to VIP >1, the most important chemical markers were apigenin, luteolin and 3,5-dicaffeoylquninic acid which could be used to distinguish NBJ and SBJ samples. Combining the results of qualitative and quantitative analysis, it showed that the sulfur fumigation has a significant effect on BJ.

  11. Molecular finite-size effects in stochastic models of equilibrium chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Claudia; Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-02-28

    The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here, we introduce the excluded volume reaction-diffusion master equation (vRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. We obtain an exact closed form solution of the RDME and of the vRDME for a general chemical system in equilibrium conditions. The difference between the two solutions increases with the ratio of molecular diameter to the compartment length scale. We show that an increase in the fraction of excluded space can (i) lead to deviations from the classical inverse square root law for the noise-strength, (ii) flip the skewness of the probability distribution from right to left-skewed, (iii) shift the equilibrium of bimolecular reactions so that more product molecules are formed, and (iv) strongly modulate the Fano factors and coefficients of variation. These volume exclusion effects are found to be particularly pronounced for chemical species not involved in chemical conservation laws. Finally, we show that statistics obtained using the vRDME are in good agreement with those obtained from Brownian dynamics with excluded volume interactions.

  12. Shear mixing in stellar radiative zones. I. Effect of thermal diffusion and chemical stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, V.; Lignières, F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Turbulent transport of chemical elements in radiative zones of stars is considered in current stellar evolution codes thanks to phenomenologically derived diffusion coefficients. Recent local numerical simulations suggest that the coefficient for radial turbulent diffusion due to radial differential rotation satisfies Dt ≃ 0.058κ/Ri, in qualitative agreement with the model of Zahn (1992, A&A, 265, 115). However, this model does not apply (i) when differential rotation is strong with respect to stable thermal stratification or (ii) when chemical stratification has a significant dynamical effect, a situation encountered at the outer boundary of nuclear-burning convective cores. Aims: We extend our numerical study to consider the effects of chemical stratification and of strong shear, and compare the results with prescriptions used in stellar evolution codes. Methods: We performed local, direct numerical simulations of stably stratified, homogeneous, sheared turbulence in the Boussinesq approximation. The regime of high thermal diffusivities, typical of stellar radiative zones, is reached thanks to the so-called small-Péclet-number approximation, which is an asymptotic development of the Boussinesq equations in this regime. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on chemical stratification was explored in this approximation. Results: Maeder's extension of Zahn's model in the strong-shear regime (Maeder 1995, A&A, 299, 84) is not supported by our results, which are better described by a model found in the geophysical literature. As regards the effect of chemical stratification, our quantitative estimate of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the mean gradient of mean molecular weight leads to the formula Dt ≃ 0.45κ(0.12-Riμ) /Ri, which is compatible in the weak-shear regime with the model of Maeder & Meynet (1996, A&A, 313, 140) but not with Maeder's (1997, A&A, 321, 134).

  13. Chemical mechanical glass polishing with cerium oxide: Effect of selected physico-chemical characteristics on polishing efficiency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoš, P.; Ederer, J.; Pilařová, V.; Henych, Jiří; Tolasz, Jakub; Milde, D.; Opletal, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 362, SEP (2016), s. 114-120 ISSN 0043-1648 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015073 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Chemical mechanical polishing * Ceria-based polishing powders * Polishing efficienc Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.531, year: 2016

  14. Thyroid disrupting effects of halogenated and next generation chemicals on the swim bladder development of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Amy; Hooser, Blair; Abdelmoneim, Ahmed; Horzmann, Katharine A; Freemanc, Jennifer L; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2017-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter thyroid function and adversely affect growth and development. Halogenated compounds, such as perfluorinated chemicals commonly used in food packaging, and brominated flame retardants used in a broad range of products from clothing to electronics, can act as thyroid disruptors. Due to the adverse effects of these compounds, there is a need for the development of safer next generation chemicals. The objective of this study was to test the thyroid disruption potential of old use and next generation halogenated chemicals. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to three old use compounds, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and two next generation chemicals, 9,10-dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphaphenanthrene-10-oxdie (DOPO) and perfluorobutyric acid (PFBA). Sub-chronic (0-6days post fertilization (dpf)) and chronic (0-28dpf) exposures were conducted at 1% of the concentration known to kill 50% (LC 50 ) of the population. Changes in the surface area of the swim bladder as well as in expression levels of genes involved in the thyroid control of swim bladder inflation were measured. At 6dpf, zebrafish exposed to all halogenated chemicals, both old use and next generation, had smaller posterior swim bladder and increased expression in the gene encoding thyroid peroxidase, tpo and the genes encoding two swim bladder surfactant proteins, sp-a and sp-c. These results mirrored the effects of thyroid hormone-exposed positive controls. Fish exposed to a TPO inhibitor (methimazole, MMI) had a decrease in tpo expression levels at 28dpf. Effects on the anterior swim bladder at 28dpf, after exposure to MMI as well as both old and new halogenated chemicals, were the same, i.e., absence of SB in ∼50% of fish, which were also of smaller body size. Overall, our results suggest thyroid disruption by the halogenated compounds tested via the swim bladder surfactant system. However

  15. Effect of Gamma Rays and Salinity on Growth and Chemical Composition of Ambrosia maritima L. Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moemen, A.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    This work achieved to study the effects of, mixture of salt 2:2:1 (Na Cl-CaCl 2 and Mg SO 4 ), concentration of (0, 2000, 4000 and 6000 ppm). on growth characters, some chemical components and some active ingredients in shoots of Ambrosia maritima plants, at different stages of growth, during two seasons. Pots 30 cm in diameter were filled of sand-loamy soils in appropriate concentration, all pots were irrigated with tap water. The exposed damsisa seeds to gamma rays, doses (0, 20, 40, and 80 Gy) before sowing together with control non irradiated seeds were sown in saline soils (0, 2000, 4000 and 6000 ppm). Soil salinity treatments caused a decrease in plant height, number of leaves, content of damsin, and an increase in fresh weigh, dry weight, total sugars, total chlorophyll, amino acids and ambrosine content. Also, Gamma rays caused an increase in most of growth parameters and most of chemical composition. It was observed that 40 or 80 Gy was more effective. We investigated the combined effect of levels of salinity and doses of radiation used, this interference improve growth parameters and chemical composition in ambrosia maritima plants and caused ascertain the role of gamma irradiation in plants tolerance to soil salinity and alleviation their harmful effect on plants.

  16. Neurological effects on startle response and escape from predation by medaka exposed to organic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.; Drummond, R.; Hammermeister, D.; Bradbury, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1995-12-31

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and behavioral studies were performed on juvenile Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to representative neurotoxic organic chemicals at sublethal concentrations. Non-invasive recordings were made of the electrical impulses generated within giant neuronal Mauthner cells, associated interneurons or motoneurons, and musculature, all of which initiate the startle or escape response in fish. Timing in milliseconds between these electrical sequelae was measured for each fish before and at 24 and 48 hours exposure to a chemical. Also noted was the number of startle responses to number of stimuli ratio (R/S). Other groups of medaka were fed to bluegills and consumption times recorded to assess their ability to escape predation. These results were compared to neurophysiological effect levels. Phenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, chlorpyrifos, fenvalerate, and 1-octanol impaired the ability of medaka to escape predation at all concentrations. Medaka were more susceptible to predation in high concentrations of carbaryl and strychnine, but less susceptible at low concentrations, whereas the reverse was true for endosulfan. The variety of neurological effects detected at these concentrations suggest that different mechanisms may be responsible. Phenol and strychnine affected Mauthner cell to motoneuron transmission, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl showed neuromuscular effects, and R/S was affected by most chemicals. Although a variety of neurotoxic mechanisms were examined, the exposure threshold for significant effects for each specific compound was found to be consistent for both the neurophysiological and behavioral endpoints.

  17. Motif analysis for small-number effects in chemical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nen; Sughiyama, Yuki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-09-07

    The number of molecules involved in a cell or subcellular structure is sometimes rather small. In this situation, ordinary macroscopic-level fluctuations can be overwhelmed by non-negligible large fluctuations, which results in drastic changes in chemical-reaction dynamics and statistics compared to those observed under a macroscopic system (i.e., with a large number of molecules). In order to understand how salient changes emerge from fluctuations in molecular number, we here quantitatively define small-number effect by focusing on a "mesoscopic" level, in which the concentration distribution is distinguishable both from micro- and macroscopic ones and propose a criterion for determining whether or not such an effect can emerge in a given chemical reaction network. Using the proposed criterion, we systematically derive a list of motifs of chemical reaction networks that can show small-number effects, which includes motifs showing emergence of the power law and the bimodal distribution observable in a mesoscopic regime with respect to molecule number. The list of motifs provided herein is helpful in the search for candidates of biochemical reactions with a small-number effect for possible biological functions, as well as for designing a reaction system whose behavior can change drastically depending on molecule number, rather than concentration.

  18. Effect-based tools for monitoring and predicting the ecotoxicological effects of chemicals in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen; Werner, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s). The promising concept of "adverse outcome pathways (AOP)" links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  19. Effect-Based Tools for Monitoring and Predicting the Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Connon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s. The promising concept of “adverse outcome pathways (AOP” links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  20. Effect-Based Tools for Monitoring and Predicting the Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E.; Geist, Juergen; Werner, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s). The promising concept of “adverse outcome pathways (AOP)” links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services. PMID:23112741

  1. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    on effects of potential endocrine disrupters on crustacean development and reproduction have been published since the beginning of the nineties. However, most crustacean toxicity test protocols routinely used so far have not been designed with endocrine-specific endpoints in mind. The main objectives...... of effective concentrations (ECx). After having demonstrated that larval development of A. tonsa was a very sensitive endpoint for evaluating effects of chemicals that might interfere with the endocrine system of crustaceans, the larval development test has been applied to two groups of emerging environmental...

  2. Domino effects within a chemical cluster : A game-theoretical modeling approach by using Nash-equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, Genserik; Dullaert, Wout; Karel, Soudan

    2009-01-01

    Every company situated within a chemical cluster faces domino effect risks, whose magnitude depends on every company's own risk management strategies and on those of all others. Preventing domino effects is therefore very important to avoid catastrophes in the chemical process industry. Given that

  3. Effect of chemical disinfectant on the transverse strength of heat-polymerized acrylic resins subjected to mechanical and chemical polishing: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Smitha; Kavitha, H R; Konde, Harish; Kalahasti, Deepthi

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of chemical disinfectant on the transverse strength of heat-polymerized acrylic resins subjected to mechanical and chemical polishing. A total of 256 rectangular specimens (65 * 10 * 3 mm) 128 per resin (Lucitone-199 and Acralyn-H) were fabricated. One side of each specimen was not polished and the other was either mechanically (n = 96) or chemically (n = 96) polished and immersed for 10, 30 and 60 minutes in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde. Mechanically polished (n = 32) and chemically polished (n = 32) control specimens were immersed only in distilled water. The transverse strength (N/mm(2)) was tested for failure in a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Student t-test. chemical polishing resulted in significantly lower transverse strength values than mechanical polishing. Lucitone- 199 resin demonstrated the highest overall transverse strength for the materials tested. Heat-polymerized acrylic resins either mechanically or chemically polished, did not demonstrate significant changes in transverse strength during immersion in the disinfecting solution tested, regardless of time of immersion. Lucitone-199 resin demonstrated the highest overall transverse strength for the materials tested and significantly stronger than Acralyn-H with either type of polishing following immersion in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde. There is a concern that immersion in chemical solutions often used for cleansing and disinfection of prostheses may undermine the strength and structure of denture base resins. In this study it was observed that, the transverse strength of samples of Lucitone-199 was higher than that of the samples of Acralyn-H. The chances of fracture of the denture made of Lucitone-199 are less than that of dentures made of Acralyn-H. The chemically polished dentures may be more prone to fracture than mechanically polished dentures.

  4. Seasonal variations in chemical composition and in vitro biological effects of fine PM from Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Maria Grazia; Gualtieri, Maurizio; Ferrero, Luca; Lo Porto, Claudia; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Camatini, Marina

    2010-03-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM1 and PM2.5) was collected in Milan over the summer (August-September) and winter (January-March) seasons of 2007/2008. Particles were analyzed for their chemical composition (inorganic ions, elements and PAHs) and the effects produced on the human lung carcinoma epithelial cell line A549. In vitro tests were performed to assess cell viability with MTT assay, cytokine release (IL-6 and IL-8) with ELISA, and DNA damage with COMET assay. Results were investigated by bivariate analysis and multivariate data analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA) to investigate the relationship between PM chemical composition and the biological effects produced by cell exposure to 12 microg cm(-2). The different seasonal chemical composition of PM showed to influence some biological properties. Summer PM samples had a high mass contribution of SO(4)(=) (13+/-2%) and were enriched in some elements, like Al, As, Cr, Cu, and Zn, compared to winter PM samples. Cell viability reduction was two times higher for summer PM samples in comparison with winter ones (27+/-5% and 14+/-5%, respectively), and the highest correlation coefficients between cell viability reduction and single chemical components were with As (R(2)=0.57) and SO(4)(=) (R(2)=0.47). PM1 affected cell viability reduction and induced IL-8 release, and these events were interrelated (R(2)=0.95), and apparently connected with the same chemical compounds. PM2.5 fraction, which was enriched in Ca(++) and Mg(++) (from soil dust), and Al, Fe, Zn, Ba Mn, produced cell viability reduction and DNA damage (R(2)=0.73). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical reaction effect on MHD free convection flow in a micropo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Rout

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyses the chemical reaction effect on a boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid subject to transverse magnetic field along a vertical plate with variable wall temperature and concentration. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by applying similarity transformations and then solved using Runge–Kutta fourth order scheme followed by shooting technique. The striking features of the analysis are (i the destructive chemical reaction parameter overrides the effect of resistive magnetic force on velocity field, (ii the coupling parameter decreases the velocity and (iii the higher solutal stratification is desirable in controlling the growth of solutal boundary layer.

  6. Combined Effects of Prenatal Exposures to Environmental Chemicals on Birth Weight

    OpenAIRE

    Govarts, Eva; Remy, Sylvie; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Den Hond, Elly; Sioen, Isabelle; Nelen, Vera; Baeyens, Willy; Nawrot, Tim; Loots, Ilse; Van Larebeke, Nick; Schoeters, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal chemical exposure has been frequently associated with reduced fetal growth by single pollutant regression models although inconsistent results have been obtained. Our study estimated the effects of exposure to single pollutants and mixtures on birth weight in 248 mother-child pairs. Arsenic, copper, lead, manganese and thallium were measured in cord blood, cadmium in maternal blood, methylmercury in maternal hair, and five organochlorines, two perfluorinated compounds and diethylhexy...

  7. Effect of organic growing systems on sensory quality and chemical composition of tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    Thybo, Anette K.; Edelenbos, Merete; Christensen, Lars P.; Sørensen, Jørn Nygaard; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2006-01-01

    Tomato plants were grown in open beds, confined beds, or combined beds with compost based on clover grass hay, deep litter and peat. Due to only minor effects of growing systems on sensory quality and chemical composition of tomato fruits is was concluded that it is possible to produce tomato fruits in confined and combined soil bed systems without any loss in eating quality. Actually the results indicate, that a slight increase in quality of tomatoes from the confined and combined systems is...

  8. Combined Effects of Noise and Shift Work on Workers’ Physiological Parameters in a Chemical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    M. Motamedzade; S. Ghazaiee

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the combined effects of noise and shift work on physiological parameters including body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. This study was performed in a chemical industry in Tehran in 1993. The workers’ physiological parameters was recorded at the beginning and at the end of all work shifts. Groups under study included : day workers (n=115) , day workers with continuous noise exposure (n=44) , two-shift workers without...

  9. Temporal effects of organic and conventional farming systems on the chemical properties of vineyard

    OpenAIRE

    Erdal, Ulfet; Ongun, Ali Rıza; Sökmen, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    In this study, It is aim to compare the effects of chemical properties in organic and conventional vineyard farming system for 9 year long between 2000-2009.in Manisa,Salihli, in Aegean Region. The study was carried out in 5 replicates completely randomized design According to soil analysis results, certified fertilizer and green manure and ground pruned branches were applied as plant nutrition material in organic plots. On the other hand, 21% ammonium sulphate, 26% ammonium nitrate, 43% trip...

  10. The Effects of Chemical Wash Additives on the Corrosion of Aerospace Alloys in Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Louis; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Joseph; Hodge, Tim; Barile, Ronald; Heidersbach, Robert; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for comparing the relative effectiveness of four chemical products used for rinsing airplanes and helicopters. The products were applied on a weekly basis to a series of flat alloy panels exposed to an oceanfront marine environment for one year. The results are presented along with comparisons of exposures of the same alloys that were not washed, were washed with seawater, or washed with de-ionized water.

  11. ACE-ASIA - Regional climatic and atmospheric chemical effects of Asian dust and pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Seinfeld, John H.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Arimoto, Richard; Conant, William C.; Brechtel, Frederick J.; Bates, Timothy S.; Cahill, Thomas A.; Clarke, Antony D.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Huebert, Barry J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2004-01-01

    Although continental-scale plumes of Asian dust and pollution reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth's surface and perturb the chemistry of the atmosphere, our ability to quantify these effects has been limited by a lack of critical observations, particularly of layers above the surface. Comprehensive surface, airborne, shipboard, and satellite measurements of Asian aerosol chemical composition, size, optical properties, and radiative impacts were performed during the Asian P...

  12. The Effect of Sodium Hydroxide Treatment on Chemical Composition and Digestibility of Straw

    OpenAIRE

    ARISOY, Münevver

    1998-01-01

    Digestibility in vivo, in vitro and, in situ and effect on the chemical composition of barley straw following pilot-scale treatment with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were investigated A range of laboratory measurements were also verified. Laboratory methods included three estimates of digestibility in vivo, in vitro and in situ. NaO treatment reduced the hemicellulose content and this resulted in an increased content of cellulose and lignin in the remaining cell wall. The mean increased in org...

  13. Physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpaste and evaluation of its effects on enamel roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Paulo Hilgenberg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpastes and their effect on bovine enamel after application of a bleaching agent (16% carbamide peroxide. Physical-chemical analysis was made considering mass loss by desiccation, ash content and pH of the toothpastes. Thirty bovine dental enamel fragments were prepared for roughness measurements. The samples were subjected to bleaching treatments and simulated brushing: G1. Sorriso Dentes Brancos (Conventional toothpaste, G2. Close-UP Whitening (Whitening toothpaste, and G3. Sensodyne Branqueador (Whitening toothpaste. The average roughness (Ra was evaluated prior to the bleaching treatment and after brushing. The results revealed differences in the physical-chemical characteristics of the toothpastes (p < 0.0001. The final Ra had higher values (p < 0.05 following the procedures. The mean of the Ra did not show significant differences, considering toothpaste groups and bleaching treatment. Interaction (toothpaste and bleaching treatment showed significant difference (p < 0.0001. The whitening toothpastes showed differences in their physical-chemical properties. All toothpastes promoted changes to the enamel surface, probably by the use of a bleaching agent.

  14. Cobalt toxicity: Chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gault, N. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, DSV/IRCM/SCSR/LRTS, 92265 Fontenay aux Rose (France); Sandre, C.; Moulin, B.; Bresson, C. [CEA, DEN, SECR, Laboratoire de Speciation des Radionucleides et des Molecules, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poncy, J.L. [CEA Bruyeres Le Chatel, DSV/IRCM/SREIT/LRT, 91680 Bruyeres Le Chatel (France); Lefaix, J.L. [CEA Caen, DSV/IRCM/SRO/LARIA, 14070 Caen (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B12, but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radio-toxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl{sub 2}) with or without {gamma}-ray doses to mimic contamination by {sup 60}Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate {gamma}-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species. (authors)

  15. Effect of maturation on physico-chemical and sensory quality characteristics of custard apple wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have taken a shift to utilize the custard apple for wine preparation besides its major use in ice cream, confectionary and milk products. In the present study, an attempt has been made to study the effect of maturation on physico-chemical and sensory quality characteristics of custard apple wine. Custard apple wine was prepared as per the earlier standardized method. The wine so prepared was matured for six months. The physico-chemical analysis was conducted at every three months interval for six months and sensory evaluation was performed after six months of storage. With the maturation, a decrease in total soluble solids, total sugars, titratable acidity, ethanol, total phenols and tannins was observed, whereas, an increase in reducing sugars and pH was observed. All the sensory quality characteristics of custard apple wine increased with advancement of the maturation period except astringency. Cluster analysis of the data obtained from physico-chemical analysis revealed that there was no difference between three months and six months of storage. Physico-chemical characteristics of custard apple wine were reduced to two principal components using principal component analysis which accounted for 100% variation. In general, maturation for six months improved the quality of custard apple wine considerably.

  16. Effect of teapot materials on the chemical composition of oolong tea infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zih-Hui; Chen, Ying-Jie; Tzen, Jason Tze-Cheng; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Lee, Maw-Rong; Mai, Fu-Der; Rairat, Tirawat; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2018-01-01

    The flavor and quality of tea are widely believed to be associated with the pot in which the tea is made. However, this claim is mostly by experiences and lacks solid support from scientific evidence. The current study investigated and compared the chemical compositions of oolong tea made with six different teapot materials, namely Zisha, Zhuni, stainless steel, ceramic, glass and plastic. For each tea sample, polyphenols and caffeine were examined by HPLC-UV, volatile compounds by GC/MS, amino acids by LC/MS and minerals by ICP-MS. The results suggested that tea infusions from Zisha and Zhuni pots contain higher levels of EGC, EGCG and total catechins and less caffeine than those from ceramic, glass and plastic pots and tend to have the lowest total mineral contents, potassium and volatile compounds in tea soup. The statistical differences were not all significant among Zisha, Zhuni and stainless steel pots. Based on the overall chemical composition of the tea infusion, Yixing clay pots (Zisha and Zhuni) produce tea infusions that are presumably less bitter and more fragrant and tend to contain more healthful compounds than tea infusions from other pots. The results could partially explain why Yixing clay pots are among the most popular teapots. The beneficial effects of long-term repeated use of these teapots warrants further study. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Cobalt toxicity: Chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandre, C.; Moulin, C.; Bresson, C.; Gault, N.; Poncy, J. L.; Lefaix, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B 12 , but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radio-toxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, 58 Co and 60 Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl 2 ) with or without gamma-ray doses to mimic contamination by 60 Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate gamma-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species. (authors)

  18. Why Do Lithium-Oxygen Batteries Fail: Parasitic Chemical Reactions and Their Synergistic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiahui; Dong, Qi; Cheng, Qingmei; Wang, Dunwei

    2016-09-12

    As an electrochemical energy-storage technology with the highest theoretical capacity, lithium-oxygen batteries face critical challenges in terms of poor stabilities and low charge/discharge round-trip efficiencies. It is generally recognized that these issues are connected to the parasitic chemical reactions at the anode, electrolyte, and cathode. While the detailed mechanisms of these reactions have been studied separately, the possible synergistic effects between these reactions remain poorly understood. To fill in the knowledge gap, this Minireview examines literature reports on the parasitic chemical reactions and finds the reactive oxygen species a key chemical mediator that participates in or facilitates nearly all parasitic chemical reactions. Given the ubiquitous presence of oxygen in all test cells, this finding is important. It offers new insights into how to stabilize various components of lithium-oxygen batteries for high-performance operations and how to eventually materialize the full potentials of this promising technology. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  19. Computational study of substituent effects on the acidity, toxicity and chemical reactivity of bacteriostatic sulfonamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Barrientos-Salcedo, Carolina; Francisco-Márquez, Misaela; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2018-02-16

    Relationships among physicochemical properties, the chemical structure and antibacterial activity of sulfonamides have not been completely explicated yet. Nevertheless, from a therapeutics and prodrugs design point of view, a substituent group can modify the electronic structure, the physicochemical features and chemical reactivity which are critical for the biological activity. In this work, we analyze the substituent effects on the physicochemical properties, toxicity, chemical reactivity and its relation with the bacteriostatic activity of selected sulfonamides by means of DFT-M06-2X calculations in aqueous solution, using quantum chemical and docking descriptors. A correlation between the theoretical acidity and the pKa experimental values has been found. The more active sulfonamides have a larger acidity. The acidity increases with electron-withdrawing substituents. The main reactivity takes place on N4 atoms linked to aromatic ring, and in the SO 2 NH moiety, which are influenced by substituents. Docking descriptors showed binding affinities between sulfonamides and target receptor, the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical toxicity of uranium hexafluoride compared to acute effects of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1991-02-01

    The chemical effects from acute exposures to uranium hexafluoride are compared to the nonstochastic effects from acute radiation doses of 25 rems to the whole body and 300 rems to the thyroid. The analysis concludes that an intake of about 10 mg of uranium in soluble form is roughly comparable, in terms of early effects, to an acute whole body dose of 25 rems because both are just below the threshold for significant nonstochastic effects. Similarly, an exposure to hydrogen fluoride at a concentration of 25 mg/m{sup 3} for 30 minutes is roughly comparable because there would be no significant nonstochastic effects. For times t other than 30 minutes, the concentration C of hydrogen fluoride considered to have the same effect can be calculated using a quadratic equation: C = 25 mg/m{sup 3} (30 min/t). The purpose of these analyses is to provide information for developing design and siting guideline based on chemical toxicity for enrichment plants using uranium hexafluoride. These guidelines are to be similar, in terms of stochastic health effects, to criteria in NRC regulations of nuclear power plants, which are based on radiation doses. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1988-01-01

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  2. Toxic Effects of Peracetic Acid Used as a Chemical Weapon During Workers Riots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovic-Stosic, J.; Todorovic, V.; Segrt, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a mixture of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, often used as antimicrobial agent on food processing equipment. It may explosively decompose on shock, friction or concussion. PAA is a strong oxidant, corrosive to the eyes, skin, respiratory and digestive tract. Depending on concentration, contact may cause severe burns of the skin or the eyes, and inhalation may cause lung edema. We report toxic effects of PAA used as a chemical weapon in workers riots. Group of workers attacked the security guards in beverage plant, throwing out beer bottles filled with PAA. Bottles exploded, producing irritant mists and fumes, and splashing some of the guards with acid. After about 20 minutes of exposure in the closed space, 30 persons were transported to the emergency room; 22 of them were transferred to the hospital. After the initial treatment, 10 patients were admitted for further treatment. The symptoms of exposure included burning sensation and pain of the eyes, throat and skin, cough and shortness of breath. Effects on the eyes included redness and corneal erosions. Pulmonary disturbances were prolonged expirium and wheezing by auscultation, and hypoxemia. Skin burns were ranged as grade I-III. Treatment included rinse of eyes and skin, systemic therapy with corticosteroids, beta adrenergic drugs and theophylline. Surgical treatment was necessary in grade III skin burns. A variety of common industrial chemicals may be misused as a chemical weapon. We point out the hazards of serious toxic effects of PAA if used in riots or terrorists attacks. (author)

  3. Windows of sensitivity to toxic chemicals in the motor effects development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Susan Z; Pohl, Hana R

    2016-02-01

    Many chemicals currently used are known to elicit nervous system effects. In addition, approximately 2000 new chemicals introduced annually have not yet undergone neurotoxicity testing. This review concentrated on motor development effects associated with exposure to environmental neurotoxicants to help identify critical windows of exposure and begin to assess data needs based on a subset of chemicals thoroughly reviewed by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in Toxicological Profiles and Addenda. Multiple windows of sensitivity were identified that differed based on the maturity level of the neurological system at the time of exposure, as well as dose and exposure duration. Similar but distinct windows were found for both motor activity (GD 8-17 [rats], GD 12-14 and PND 3-10 [mice]) and motor function performance (insufficient data for rats, GD 12-17 [mice]). Identifying specific windows of sensitivity in animal studies was hampered by study designs oriented towards detection of neurotoxicity that occurred at any time throughout the developmental process. In conclusion, while this investigation identified some critical exposure windows for motor development effects, it demonstrates a need for more acute duration exposure studies based on neurodevelopmental windows, particularly during the exposure periods identified in this review. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Windows of sensitivity to toxic chemicals in the motor effects development✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Susan Z.; Pohl, Hana R.

    2017-01-01

    Many chemicals currently used are known to elicit nervous system effects. In addition, approximately 2000 new chemicals introduced annually have not yet undergone neurotoxicity testing. This review concentrated on motor development effects associated with exposure to environmental neurotoxicants to help identify critical windows of exposure and begin to assess data needs based on a subset of chemicals thoroughly reviewed by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in Toxicological Profiles and Addenda. Multiple windows of sensitivity were identified that differed based on the maturity level of the neurological system at the time of exposure, as well as dose and exposure duration. Similar but distinct windows were found for both motor activity (GD 8–17 [rats], GD 12–14 and PND 3–10 [mice]) and motor function performance (insufficient data for rats, GD 12–17 [mice]). Identifying specific windows of sensitivity in animal studies was hampered by study designs oriented towards detection of neurotoxicity that occurred at any time throughout the developmental process. In conclusion, while this investigation identified some critical exposure windows for motor development effects, it demonstrates a need for more acute duration exposure studies based on neurodevelopmental windows, particularly during the exposure periods identified in this review. PMID:26686904

  5. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlait, D; Clavier, N; Szenknect, S; Dacheux, N; Dubois, V

    2012-03-19

    The dissolution of Ce(1-x)Ln(x)O(2-x/2) solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R(L,0)) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R(L,0) values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E(A) ≈ 60-85 kJ·mol(-1)) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H(3)O(+)) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO(2) matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  6. Local chemical sympathectomy of rat bone marrow and its effect on marrow cell composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubový, P; Klusáková, I; Kučera, L; Osičková, J; Chovancová, J; Loja, T; Mayer, J; Doubek, M; Joukal, M

    2017-09-01

    Existing experimental studies of the effect of sympathetic nerve fibers on bone marrow cells are based on the systemic administration of neurotoxic 6-hydroxydopamine. The method of global chemical sympathectomy has some serious disadvantages and could lead to questionable results. We describe a new method of local chemical sympathectomy of rat femoral bone marrow using guanethidine (Ismelin) delivery using an osmotic mini pump. Local guanethidine treatment for 14days led to complete elimination of sympathetic fibers in femoral bone marrow in contrast to bone marrow of contralateral or naïve femurs. Ablation of sympathetic fibers was associated with a loss of rat endothelial cell marker (RECA) indicating immunophenotype changes in blood vessel endothelial cells, but no significant effect of guanethidine was found on the survival of endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. Moreover, local guanethidine treatment also elicited a significant reduction of Nestin+/SDF1+ mesenchymal stem cells and c-Kit+/CD90+ hematopoietic stem cells in femoral bone marrow. Tissue-specific chemical sympathectomy of rat bone marrow by guanethidine overcomes some of the drawbacks of systemic administration of neurotoxic compounds like 6-hydroxydopamine and delivers unequivocal evidence on the effects of sympathetic innervation on the cell content of bone marrow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. International Research Project on the Effects of Chemical Ageing of Polymers on Performance Properties: Chemical and Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Work during the past six months has included significant research in several areas aimed at further clarification of the aging and chemical failure mechanism of thermoplastics (PVDF or Tefzel) pipes. Among the areas investigated were the crystallinity changes associated with both the Coflon and Tefzel after various simulated environmental exposures using X-ray diffraction analysis. We have found that significant changes in polymer crystallinity levels occur as a function of the exposures. These crystallinity changes may have important consequences on the fracture, fatigue, tensile, and chemical resistance of the materials. We have also noted small changes in the molecular weight distribution. Again these changes may result in variations in the mechanical and chemical properties in the material. We conducted numerous analytical studies with methods including X-ray Diffraction, Gel Permeation Chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Ultra- Violet Scanning Analysis, GC/Mass Spectrometry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermomechanical Analysis. In the ultra-violet analysis we noted the presence of an absorption band indicative of triene formation. We investigated a number of aged samples of both Tefzel and Coflon that were forwarded from MERL. We also cast films at SWT and subjected these films to a refluxing methanol 1% ethylene diamine solution. An updated literature search was conducted using Dialog and DROLLS to identify any new papers that may have been published in the open literature since the start of this project. The updated literature search and abstracts are contained in the Appendix section of this report.

  8. Effect of Lepidium meyenii (maca) on testicular function of mice with chemically and physically induced subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Cuya, M; Yarasca De La Vega, K; Lévano Sánchez, G; Vásquez Cavero, J; Temoche García, H; Torres Torres, L; Cruz Ornetta, V

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Lepidium meyenii (maca) in chemically and physically subfertile mice. After 35 days, the following groups of mice were evaluated: control, sham, chemical subfertility, chemical subfertility-maca-supplemented, physical subfertility, physical subfertility-maca-supplemented and maca-supplemented only. Motility (32.36% ± 5.34%) and sperm count (44.4 ± 5.37 × 10(6) /ml) in the chemically and physically subfertile mice (11.81% ± 4.06%, 17.34 ± 13.07 × 10(6) /ml) decreased compared to the control (75.53% ± 2.97% and 57.4 ± 19.6 10(6) /ml) and sham (53.5% ± 7.86% and 58.4 ± 14.10 10(6) /ml). Maca was able to reverse the deleterious effect of motility (76.36 ± 1.97) as well as sperm count (53.5 ± 9.18 × 10(6) /ml) on chemical subfertility. In contrast, maca did not reverse the effects of induced physical subfertility nor motility (18.78% ± 14.41%) or sperm count (20.17 ± 11.20 × 10(6) /ml). The percentage of sperm DNA fragmentation in the physically subfertile mice increased (11.1% ± 19.29%) compared to the control (0.84% ± 0.85%). However, in the physically subfertile group, maca decreased sperm DNA fragmentation (2.29% ± 2.30%) closer to the sham (1.04% ± 0.62%) and the control (0.84% ± 0.85%). The group supplemented only with maca showed 0.54% ± 0.50% of spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation. Yet, the differences observed were statistically not significant. In conclusion, it appears that maca activates the cytochrome P450 system after chemically induced subfertility. However, it does not reverse the low mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa compromised in the physical subfertility group. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of cytoplasmic male sterility and xenia on the chemical composition of maize grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vančetović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterile hybrids often outyield their fertile counterparts, especially if pollinated by a genetically unrelated pollinator. The combined effect of cms and xenia is referred to as the Plus-hybrid effect. The objective of this study was to determine the individual, as well as, combining effect of cms and xenia on the maize grain chemical composition. The percent of oil, protein and starch in the grain was also observed. Two sterile hybrids, their fertile counterparts and five fertile pollinator-hybrids were selected for the studies. The three-replicate trial set up according to the split-plot experimental design was performed at Zemun Polje in 2008. The obtained results show that the effects of cms on the oil percent was not significant in the studied hybrid ZP 341, while it increased at the significance level of P = 0.1 in the second observed hybrid ZP 360. The effect of this factor on the protein and starch percent was also significant (P = 0.01 in some hybrid combinations. Xenia effects on all three chemical parameters were significant (P = 0.01 in some hybrid combinations. The gained results indicate that the identification of a good combination of two hybrids, in which one would be a sterile female component, and the other a pollinator, would end up not only in the increased yield, but also in the improved maize grain quality.

  11. Review article: effects of oil pollution, chemically treated oil, and cleaning on thermal balance of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, B M

    1994-01-01

    The acute effect of oil pollution on birds is on their thermal balance. Oil adheres to the plumage and causes a reduction in water repellant properties of the plumage, causing water to penetrate into the plumage to displace the insulating layer of air. The effect of oil on the plumage insulation is dose-dependent. The effect of oiling is greatly enhanced when the oil is spread in the plumage due to preening. In water, plumage oiling may cause the heat loss to exceed the bird's heat production capacity, resulting in hypothermia. If the oiled bird is ashore, with a dry plumage, it may have a normal thermal insulation. Bird species dependent upon feeding in water (such as diving birds) are therefore much more susceptible to the harmful effects of oil pollution than are semi-aquatic species that can feed ashore. It is possible to restore the water-repelling and insulative properties of the plumage by the process of cleaning if all the oil and soap is removed, and if the plumage is completely dry. Chemical treatment of oil has been suggested as a way to reduce the impact of oil spills on avian life. However, very few reports seem to have addressed the effects of chemically treated oil on the thermal balance of birds, and the results from one study actually indicate that oil treated with dispersants may be more harmful to birds than oil. The urgent need for more information about the effects of chemically treated oil on aquatic birds is therefore stressed.

  12. Effects of various organic and chemical fertilizers on growth indices of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.K. Tahami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop the high intensive agriculture, more chemical fertilizers are applied to the soil that resulting in soil degradation and environment deterioration. Application of organic manure is an important approach for maintaining and improving the soil fertility and increasing fertilizer use efficiency. Therefore, in order to evaluate the effect of organic manures and chemical fertilizer on growth indices and biological yield of basil (Ocimum basilicum L., an experiment was conducted at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during growing season of 2008-2009. A complete randomized block design with six treatments and three replications was used. The treatments were: cow manure, sheep manure, chicken manure, vermicompost, chemical NPK fertilizers and control (no fertilizer. The results showed that the use of organic fertilizers significantly increased seed and biological yield of basil compared with chemical fertilizer and control. The maximum and the minimum dry weights were observed at 105 days after planting, in sheep and cow manures, respectively. Gradually during the period of plant growth and development to reproduction phase percent of stem decreased and dry weight of inflorescence increased. The highest and the lowest leaf area index were observed at 90 days after planting, in cow manure and control, respectively, and then decreased in all treatments. The maximum crop growth rate in most of treatments at 90 days after planting was obtained, except the control which plant growth rate was lowest. Net assimilation rate (NAR in most treatments increased until 75 days after planting and then declined. While the highest and the lowest NAR were observed at 75 days after planting in chicken manure and chemical treatment, respectively.

  13. Protective effects of green tea on antioxidative biomarkers in chemical laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Heidary Shayesteh; Akram, Ranjbar; Azam, Sayadi; Nahid, Zadkhosh

    2015-09-01

    Chemical materials are environmental contaminants, are extensively used in laboratories, and may cause various forms of health hazards in laboratory workers. Therefore, this toxicity most likely is a result of the oxidative metabolism of chemical to reactive products. As green tea (GT) possesses antioxidant effects, the objective of this study was to examine any amelioration oxidative stress in chemical laboratory workers drinking one cup (3 g/300 ml water) of freshly prepared tea once daily. Baseline characteristics including age, sex, smoking, fruit consumption, and duration of exposure were recorded via questionnaire to the subjects. Saliva level oxidative stress parameters such as total antioxidant capacity (TAC), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were estimated before and after consumption of GT in these workers. Treatment of subjects with GT induced a significant reduction in saliva GPx activity (406.61 ± 22.07 vs. 238.96 ± 16.26 U/l p = 0.001) and induction in TAC (0.46 ± 0.029 μmol/ml vs. 0.56 ± 0.031, p = 0.016). No statistically significant alteration was found for saliva SOD (0.080 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.079 ± 0.0014, p > 0.05) and CAT (20.36 ± 0.69 vs. 19.78 ± 0.71, p > 0.05) after 28 days treatment by GT. These results demonstrate that drinking GT during chemical exposure can reduce several parameters indicative of oxidative stress. In conclusion, using GT as a dietary supplement can be a rational protocol to control source of hazards in chemical laboratory workers. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Chemical and Hormonal Effects on STAT5b-Dependent Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiyu Oshida

    Full Text Available The growth hormone (GH-activated transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b is a key regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Suppression of hepatic STAT5b signaling is associated with lipid metabolic dysfunction leading to steatosis and liver cancer. In the companion publication, a STAT5b biomarker gene set was identified and used in a rank-based test to predict both increases and decreases in liver STAT5b activation status/function with high (≥ 97% accuracy. Here, this computational approach was used to identify chemicals and hormones that activate (masculinize or suppress (feminize STAT5b function in a large, annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone and thyroid hormone caused liver masculinization, whereas glucocorticoids, fibroblast growth factor 15, and angiotensin II caused liver feminization. In mouse models of diabetes and obesity, liver feminization was consistently observed and was at least partially reversed by leptin or resveratrol exposure. Chemical-induced feminization of male mouse liver gene expression profiles was a relatively frequent phenomenon: of 156 gene expression biosets from chemically-treated male mice, 29% showed feminization of liver STAT5b function, while <1% showed masculinization. Most (93% of the biosets that exhibited feminization of male liver were also associated with activation of one or more xenobiotic-responsive receptors, most commonly constitutive activated receptor (CAR or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα. Feminization was consistently associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg but not other lipogenic transcription factors linked to steatosis. GH-activated STAT5b signaling in mouse liver is thus commonly altered by diverse chemicals, and provides a linkage between chemical exposure and dysregulated gene

  15. Effects of mass transfer on MHD flow of casson fluid with chemical reaction and suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shehzad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of mass transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic flow of a Casson fluid over a porous stretching sheet is addressed in the presence of a chemical reaction. A series solution for the resulting nonlinear flow is computed. The skin friction coefficient and local Sherwood number are analyzed through numerical values for various parameters of interest. The velocity and concentration fields are illustrated for several pertinent flow parameters. We observed that the Casson parameter and Hartman number have similar effects on the velocity in a qualitative sense. We further analyzed that the concentration profile decreases rapidly in comparison to the fluid velocity when we increased the values of the suction parameter.

  16. Effect of vapor-phase oxygen on chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Tomo-o.; Saiki, Koichiro

    2015-03-01

    To obtain a large-area single-crystal graphene, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on Cu is considered the most promising. Recently, the surface oxygen on Cu has been found to suppress the nucleation of graphene. However, the effect of oxygen in the vapor phase was not elucidated sufficiently. Here, we investigate the effect of O2 partial pressure (PO2) on the CVD growth of graphene using radiation-mode optical microscopy. The nucleation density of graphene decreases monotonically with PO2, while its growth rate reaches a maximum at a certain pressure. Our results indicate that PO2 is an important parameter to optimize in the CVD growth of graphene.

  17. Effects of Chemical Fertilizer, Algea Compost and Zeolite on Green Bean Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Türkmen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study used chemical fertilizer, brown algae compost and zeolite carried out in the field of Giresun Hazelnut Research Center between May-November 2014 in pots according to randomized blog design as three replicate each. Treatment groups were consist of eight different combinations as follow; G1-Control, G2-Zeolite, G3-Compost, G4-Chemical Fertilizer, G5-Zeolite+Compost, G6-Zeolite+Chemical Fertilizer, G7-Compost+ Chemical Fertilizer, G8-Compost+Zeolite+ Chemical Fertilizer. The brown algae (Cystoseira sp. were used as compost material. These combinations were applied to green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris. The green beans were seeded by hand to arrange planting depth of 5-6 cm and 20 seeds/m2. Except control group, each treatment was added fertilizers as 50 g zeolite, 50 g compost, and 25 g chemical according to treatment design. Half of the chemical fertilizers were added at seeding time and the rest after two weeks. Collected soil samples were analyzed right after harvest, the greatest values of treatment groups were determined as; Carbon% G1: 5.08, nitrogen G3: 0.09 ppm, sodium G5: 139 ppm, potassium G6 and G8: 5 ppm, magnesium G2: 1865 ppm, calcium G6: 8.33 ppm, manganese G2: 359 ppm, iron G6 : 16070 ppm, cobalt G6 and G7: 7.91 ppm, copper G2: 17.5 ppm, zinc G8: 28.0 ppm, selenium G7: 4.17 ppm, cadmium G5: 0.08 ppm, lead G4: 5.31 ppm. The greatest harvest value as g/m2 was obtained from zeolite only group G2 with 273 while the lowest was obtained from Compost only group G3 with 113 g/m2, obviously showing the effectiveness of zeolite only application moreover, also thinking that better results may get if the present study run for longer period.

  18. Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transformations. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The study of the chemical changes consequent upon the nuclear transformation of an atom that is linked with other atoms in a molecule and surrounded by other similar or dissimilar molecules has intrigued chemists for a number of years. This interest is certainly not static but if anything is increasing. The main theme of this meeting was a discussion of the suggestions and theories that have been advanced to explain the wealth of experimental observations on the behaviour of atoms at energies and in situations not normally accessible in the laboratory. Though the subject has some practical implications in the preparation of radioisotopes, this was not an important consideration at this Symposium. The first Symposium on hot-atom chemistry organized by the Agency was held in Prague in October 1960. Comparison of the past and the present state of the subject shows that a greater variety and sophistication of techniques are now being applied as the simpler approaches used in the past have been shown to be inadequate. Progress has been made in the understanding of the simpler gas system, but in liquids and solids there is still much to clarify. It is also of interest that for the majority of the work reported in these Proceedings a reactor was the radiation source, and in this field much experimental work still remains to be done. The Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations was held from 7 to 11 December 1964 in Vienna, and was attended by 136 participants from 29 countries and 4 international organizations. It was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in co-operation with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity. The publication of these Proceedings makes the content of the papers and discussion available to a wider audience than was possible at the meeting in Vienna

  19. Analysis of aging effects on chemical property of human hair by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-02-01

    In the previous work, we investigated the aging effect on morphology and mechanical property of the hair by using atomic force microscopy. The effects of aging on chemical properties of human hair were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Healthy hair samples with no diseases were collected from 60 Koreans (30 males and 30 females) and they were grouped by age: 1-10, 11-20, 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, and 51-60 years. The characteristic parameters of FT-IR absorbance bands including center frequency, half width, height, and area were analyzed using the Gaussian model. To quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of hair, the height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652-1659 and 1654-1658 cm(-1), for male and female hairs, respectively. In all male and female hairs, the spectra of specific components of the hair keratin showed to have the same dependence on aging. The center positions of the bands arising from amide A, CH(3) mode, and amide I were altered by aging. The female hair contains more cystein than the male hair. Changes in the amount of amide II and amide A by aging were more significant in male hair than in female hair. The changes in chemical components of the hair according to the ages were shown at the inflection point at 30 s. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Effects of soil management systems on soil microbial activity, bulk density and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valpassos Maria Alexandra Reis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of soil management systems on the bulk density, chemical soil properties, and on the soil microbial activity on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Oxisol. Soil samples were collected from plots under the following management conditions: a natural dense "cerrado" vegetation (savanna; b degraded Brachiaria decumbens pasture, 20 years old; c no-tillage treatment with annual crop sequence (bean, corn, soybean and dark-oat in continuous rotation, 8 years old; d conventional tillage treatment with crop residues added to the soil, and annual crop sequence, 10 years old. The continuous use of no-tillage system resulted in an increase in microbial biomass and decrease in soil basal respiration, therefore displaying evident long-term effects on the increase of soil C content. The no-tillage system also provided an improvement in bulk density and chemical properties of the soil. Hence, the no-tillage management system could be an alternative for the conservation and maintenance of physical and chemical conditions and the productive potential of "cerrado" soils.

  1. Effects of the main extraction parameters on chemical and microbial characteristics of compost tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M K; Yaseen, T; Traversa, A; Ben Kheder, M; Brunetti, G; Cocozza, C

    2016-06-01

    The rising popularity of compost tea as fertilizer or foliar spray against pathogens has encouraged many researchers to evaluate its performance without standardizing its quality, so obtaining inconsistent and controversial results. The fertilizing and pesticide-like effects of compost tea are due to its chemical and microbiological properties. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the best combination of the compost tea extraction parameters for exalting both chemical and microbiological features. A factorial design was adopted to evaluate the effects of compost/water ratio, extraction time, storage duration and storage temperature in different combination on physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of compost tea, and the results were elaborated through different statistical analyses. Compost tea nutrients and microorganisms were influenced by compost/water ratio and extraction time. In addition, the storage duration affected the microbial populations, whereas the storage temperature influenced only the fungal population of compost tea. Results suggested that the best combination of the studied parameters was: 1:2.5 compost/water ratio, 2days of extraction time and the compost tea should be utilized immediately after the extraction, since the storage reduced the microbial populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation on chemical effects on GMZ bentonite used as buffer materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GMZ bentonite has been selected as a buffer/backfill material for the design of Chinese HLW repository due to its suitable properties. Investigations have been conducted on this material to have a better understanding of its engineering behavior. In this paper, a review of the studies on the chemical effects in GMZ bentonite is presented. The adsorption of radionuclides Ni(II, Cr(III and Eu(III etc. on GMZ bentonite is investigated and the influences of external chemical agents are assessed. Some modifications on GMZ bentonite have been implemented to improve its adsorption properties. In the meantime, the influences of NaOH solutions with variations in concentration and pH values on hydraulic conductivity, mechanical behavior and mineralogy of GMZ bentonite are investigated with consideration of temperature. Effects of salt solutions are also assessed in different studies using solutions of Na+ and Ca2+, which are the predominant cations in the groundwater of Beishan area. It is observed that both cations influence the buffering behavior of bentonite at a different degree. Further investigations should be done for better understanding the influences of coupling factors and time on the chemical behavior of material.

  3. Chemical Composition and Vasorelaxant and Antispasmodic Effects of Essential Oil from Rosa indica L. Petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Majid Rasheed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosa indica L. belongs to the family Rosaceae and is locally known as gulaab. It has different traditional uses in cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders but there is no scientific data available in this regard. Therefore, the basic aim of this study was to explore the chemical composition and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of the essential oil obtained from R. indica. The chemical composition of the essential oil was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS technique. The cardiovascular and gastrointestinal effects were investigated using electrophysiological measurements. The GC-MS analysis of the essential oil showed various chemical components including acetic acid, mercaptohexyl ester, butanoic acid, 2-methyl-5-oxo-1-cyclopentene-1-yl ester, artemiseole, methyl santonilate, isosteviol, caryophyllene oxide, pentyl phenyl acetate, dihydromyrcene, 1,5-octadecadien, octadecanoic acid, ethyl ester, palmitic acid (2-phenyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl methyl ester, santolina epoxide, and 9-farnesene. The electrophysiological measurements revealed that essential oil was more potent against K+ (80 mM than phenylephrine precontractions using isolated rabbit aorta preparations. In isolated rabbit jejunum preparations, it showed more potency against high K+ induced contractions than spontaneous contractions. Considering these evidences, it can be concluded that R. indica essential oil may work as a complementary and alternative medicine in gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  5. Plant Sterols: Chemical and Enzymatic Structural Modifications and Effects on Their Cholesterol-Lowering Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Sen; Zhu, Hanyue; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2018-03-28

    Plant sterols have attracted increasing attention due to their excellent cholesterol-lowering activity. However, free plant sterols have some characteristics of low oil solubility, water insolubility, high melting point, and low bioavailability, which greatly limit their application in foods. Numerous studies have been undertaken to modify their chemical structures to improve their chemical and physical properties in meeting the needs of various applications. The present review is to summarize the literature and update the progress on structural modifications of plant sterols in the following aspects: (i) synthesis of plant sterol esters by esterification and transesterification with hydrophobic fatty acids and triacylglycerols to improve their oil solubility, (ii) synthesis of plant sterol derivatives by coupling with various hydrophilic moieties to enhance their water solubility, and (iii) mechanisms by which plant sterols reduce plasma cholesterol and the effect of structural modifications on plasma cholesterol-lowering activity of plant sterols.

  6. NSR&D FY15 Final Report. Modeling Mechanical, Thermal, and Chemical Effects of Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Christopher Curtis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ma, Xia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zhang, Duan Zhong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The main goal of this project is to develop a computer model that explains and predicts coupled mechanical, thermal and chemical responses of HE under impact and friction insults. The modeling effort is based on the LANL-developed CartaBlanca code, which is implemented with the dual domain material point (DDMP) method to calculate complex and coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical effects among fluids, solids and the transitions between the states. In FY 15, we have implemented the TEPLA material model for metal and performed preliminary can penetration simulation and begun to link with experiment. Currently, we are working on implementing a shock to detonation transition (SDT) model (SURF) and JWL equation of state.

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on microbial load, chemical and sensory evaluation of chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bachir, M.

    2008-03-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on microbial load, chemical sensory characteristics of chicken meat has been evaluated. Chicken meat were irradiated at doses of 0, 2, 4 and 6 kGy of gamma irradiation. Irradiated and unirradiated meat were kept in a refrigerator (1-4 Degree Centigrade). Immediately after irradiation, general composition, microbiological and sensory evaluation of chicken meat were done. Microbiological and chemical analysis of chicken meat were evaluated at weekly up to end of the storage period. The results indicated that all doses of gamma irradiation reduced the microbial load, and increased the shelf-life of chicken meat. Total acidity, volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) and lipid oxidation value in chicken meat were not affected by gamma irradiation. Sensory evaluation showed no significant differences between irradiated and un-irradiated chicken meat. (author)

  8. Effects of sodium diacetate on the fermentation profile, chemical composition and aerobic stability of alfalfa silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, XianJun; Wen, AiYou; Desta, Seare T.; Wang, Jian; Shao, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sodium diacetate (SDA) on fermentation profile, chemical composition and aerobic stability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) silage. Methods Fresh alfalfa was ensiled with various concentrations of SDA (0, 3, 5, 7, and 9 g/kg of fresh forage). After 60 days of the ensiling, the samples were collected to examine the fermentative quality, chemical composition and aerobic stability. Results The application of SDA significantly (pensiling. Alfalfa silages treated with SDA at 7 g/kg had highest Flieg’s point and remained stable more than 9 d during aerobic exposure under humid and hot conditions in southern China. Conclusion SDA may be used as an additive for alfalfa silages at a level of 7 g/kg. PMID:28111451

  9. Effect of extraction methods on the chemical components and taste quality of green tea extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-Quan; Ji, Wei-Bin; Yu, Peigen; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wang, Fang; Yin, Jun-Feng

    2018-05-15

    The physicochemical properties of tea extracts are significantly affected by the extraction method. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static and dynamic extractions on the concentrations of chemical components and taste quality of green tea extracts. Our results show that extraction of chemical components using static extraction follows a pseudo-second-order reaction, while that of dynamic extraction follows a first-order reaction. The concentrations of the solids, polyphenols, and free amino acids in green tea extract prepared by dynamic extraction were much higher, although the overall yields were not significantly different between the two extraction methods. Green tea extracts obtained via dynamic extraction were of lower bitterness and astringency, as well and higher intensities of umami and overall acceptability. These results suggest that dynamic extraction is more suitable for the processing of green tea concentrate because of the higher concentration of green tea extract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preventive effect of two-component chemical radioprotector and variability in its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambov, V.; Metodiev, S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radioprotective efficiency of two-component radioprotective schema consisting of the chemically synthesized radioprotector WR-2721 (OK-79) and a new glycoside pigment obtained from melanoidine CL. The application of melanoidine 7-21 days before WR-2721 significantly increases the radioprotective efficiency of the chemically obtained product and enhances the 30-day survival of hybrid mice treated with 15 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The effect of potentiated radioprotection is not observed when the interval between the application of the two agents is reduced to 24 h. It is suggested that the observed enhancement of the radioprotective efficiency in the two-component schema is due to the antioxidant and immuno modulating properties of the pigment product, observed and described in our previous investigations. (author)

  11. Effect of Chemical Treatments on Flax Fibre Reinforced Polypropylene Composites on Tensile and Dome Forming Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentian; Lowe, Adrian; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Tensile tests were performed on two different natural fibre composites (same constituent material, similar fibre fraction and thickness but different weave structure) to determine changes in mechanical properties caused by various aqueous chemical treatments and whether any permanent changes remain on drying. Scanning electronic microscopic examinations suggested that flax fibres and the flax/polypropylene interface were affected by the treatments resulting in tensile property variations. The ductility of natural fibre composites was improved significantly under wet condition and mechanical properties (elongation-to-failure, stiffness and strength) can almost retain back to pre-treated levels when dried from wet condition. Preheating is usually required to improve the formability of material in rapid forming, and the chemical treatments performed in this study were far more effective than preheating. The major breakthrough in improving the formability of natural fibre composites can aid in rapid forming of this class of material system. PMID:25789505

  12. Effect of crosslinking on the physico-chemical properties of radiation grafted PEM fuel cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Mahmoud Nasef; Hamdani Saidi

    2006-01-01

    The effect of crosslinking on the physico-chemical properties of radiation grafted proton conducting membranes (PFA-g-PSSA) was investigated. The membranes were prepared by radiation induced grafting of styrene/divinylbenzene (DVB) mixtures onto poly (tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluorovinyl either) (PFA) films followed by sulfonation reactions. The variation of DVB content in the grafting mixture was in the range of 1-4 vol %. The equivalent weight, swelling, behavior and the proton conductivity of crosslinked membranes having equal degrees of grafting prepared found to be dependent predominantly on the level of crosslinking. The obtained membranes were found to posses a good combination of physico-chemical properties that is matching the commercial Nation 117 membranes

  13. Effect of hydrostatic and chemical pressure on the exchange interaction in magnetic borocarbide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michor, H.; El-Hagary, M.; Naber, L.; Bauer, E.; Hilscher, G.

    2000-03-01

    The investigation of pair-breaking effects in magnetic rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors reveals a considerable increase of the magnetic exchange integral Jsf by hydrostatic as well as chemical pressure. In both, Jsf is governed by the R-C distance (or lattice constant a) and is described quantitatively by a simple phenomenological model. Thereby, just two parameters Jsf0=31 meV and ΔJsf/Δa=165 meV/Å explain well the influence of chemical pressure upon the initial depression rates of Tc in solid solutions R'1-xRxNi2B2C with R=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho and R'=Y and Lu.

  14. A study on the effect of chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles on earthworm: Eudrilus eugeniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrot, Antony V.; Justin, C.; Padmanaban, S.; Burman, Ujjala

    2017-02-01

    Most look into the benefits of the nanoparticles, but keeping aside the benefits; this study focuses on the impacts of nanoparticles on living systems. Improper disposal of nanoparticles into the environment is a subject of pollution or nano-pollution which in turn affects the flora and fauna in the ecosystem, particularly soil ecosystem. Thus, this study was done to understand the impacts of chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles on earthworm— Eudrilus eugeniae, a soil-dependent organism which acquires food and nutrition from decaying matters. The chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Earthworms were allowed to interact with different concentrations of synthesized nanoparticles and the effect of the nanoparticles was analysed by studying the phenotypic changes followed by histology and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analyses.

  15. Preservation effect of organic acids on microbial, chemical and organoleptic parameters of chicken meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hajipour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adding edible acids to food products not only has inhibitory effects on microorganisms, but also causes an appropriate flavor and color. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the preservation effect of organic acids on microbial, chemical and organoleptic parameters of chicken meat. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 200 samples of chicken meat in Koohdasht, 2014. The chicken thighs were sprayed with sterilized citric acid 1%, acetic acid 1%, and propionic acid 1%. The samples were packed and were kept at 4º C temperature, and were examined with 2 days intervals. The effect of different treatments were studied in terms of microbial (count of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms, psychotropic bacteria and anaerobes, chemical (pH, total volatile nitrogen, and organoleptic (drip loss, flavor, and color quality parameters. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, LSD and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Findings: The bacterial growth and shelf life were significantly different between the controls and the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid. The samples treated with citric acid were significantly different from the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid in terms of bacterial growth and shelf life. But there was no significant difference between the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid. With regards to the microbial, chemical, and organoleptic parameters, the controls, the samples treated with citric acid, and the samples treated with acetic acid and propionic acid were preserved for 4 days, 5 days, and 6-7 days, respectively. Conclusion: With regards to the results, organic acids (1% were effective in extending the shelf life of chicken meat without adverse effect on organoleptic parameters.

  16. Soil microcosm for testing the effects of chemical pollutants on soil fauna communities and trophic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmelee, R.W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Entomology); Wentsel, R.S.; Phillips, C.T.; Checkai, R.T. (Army CRDEC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)); Simini, M. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A microcosm technique is presented that uses community and trophic-level analysis of soil nematodes and microarthropods to determine the effects of chemicals on soil systems. Forest soil was treated with either copper, p-nitrophenol, or trinitrotoluene. Nematodes were sorted into bacterivore, fungivore, herbivore, and omnivore-predator trophic groups, and a hatchling category. Microarthropods were sorted to the acarine suborders Prostigmata, Mesostigmata, and Oribatida; the insectan order Collembola; and a miscellaneous group. Omnivore-predator nematodes and meso-stigmatid and oribatid mites were the groups most sensitive to copper and were significantly reduced at levels as low as 100 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] copper. Total nematode and microarthropod numbers declined above 200 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] copper. Trophic structure analysis suggested that high sensitivity of nematode predators to intermediate levels of copper reduced predation on herbivore nematodes and resulted in greater numbers of nematodes compared to controls. p-Nitrophenol was very toxic to the nematode community, and all trophic groups were significantly reduced above 20 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. However, there was no effect of p-nitrophenol on microarthropods. Trinitrotoluene had no significant negative effect on total abundance of either groups of soil fauna, but oribatids were significantly reduced at 200 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. The results demonstrated that soil nematodes and microarthropods were sensitive indicators of environmental contaminants and that trophic-structure and community analysis has the potential to detect more subtle indirect effects of chemicals on soil food-web structure. The authors conclude that microcosms with field communities of soil microfauna offer high resolution of the ecotoxicological effects of chemicals in complex soil systems.

  17. The Synergistic Effect between Electrical and Chemical Factors in Plasma Gene/Molecule-Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasma and processes on cells promote plasma gene/molecule transfection. We have discovered a new plasma source using a microcapillary electrode which enables high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability simultaneously. However, the mechanism of the transfection by plasma was not clear. To clarify the transfection mechanisms by micro plasma, we focused on the effects of electrical (current, charge, field, etc.) and chemical (radicals, RONS, etc.) factors generated by the micro plasma and evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones. At first, the necessity of the electrical factors was estimated by the laser produced plasma (LPP). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cell was cultured on a 96-well plate or 12-well micro slide chamber. Plasmids pCX-EGFP in Tris-EDTA buffer was dropped on the cells and they were exposed to the capillary discharge plasma (CDP) or the LPP. In the case of the CDP, the plasma was generated between the tip of the capillary electrode and the cells so that both electrical and chemical factors were supplied to the cells. In this setup, about 20% of average transfection efficiency was obtained. In the case of the LPP, the plasma was generated apart from the cells so that electrical factors were not supplied to the cells. In this setup, no transfection was observed. These results show that the electrical factors are necessary for the plasma gene transfection. Next, the necessity of the chemical factors was estimated the effect of catalase to remove H2O2 in CDP. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.4 by scavenging H2O2 with catalase. However, only the solution of H2O2 caused no gene transfection in cells. These results shows that H2O2 is important species to cause gene/molecule transfection but still needs a synergistic effect with electrical or other chemical factors. This work was partly supported by

  18. Combined Effects of Prenatal Exposures to Environmental Chemicals on Birth Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Govarts

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal chemical exposure has been frequently associated with reduced fetal growth by single pollutant regression models although inconsistent results have been obtained. Our study estimated the effects of exposure to single pollutants and mixtures on birth weight in 248 mother-child pairs. Arsenic, copper, lead, manganese and thallium were measured in cord blood, cadmium in maternal blood, methylmercury in maternal hair, and five organochlorines, two perfluorinated compounds and diethylhexyl phthalate metabolites in cord plasma. Daily exposure to particulate matter was modeled and averaged over the duration of gestation. In single pollutant models, arsenic was significantly associated with reduced birth weight. The effect estimate increased when including cadmium, and mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP co-exposure. Combining exposures by principal component analysis generated an exposure factor loaded by cadmium and arsenic that was associated with reduced birth weight. MECPP induced gender specific effects. In girls, the effect estimate was doubled with co-exposure of thallium, PFOS, lead, cadmium, manganese, and mercury, while in boys, the mixture of MECPP with cadmium showed the strongest association with birth weight. In conclusion, birth weight was consistently inversely associated with exposure to pollutant mixtures. Chemicals not showing significant associations at single pollutant level contributed to stronger effects when analyzed as mixtures.

  19. Combined Effects of Prenatal Exposures to Environmental Chemicals on Birth Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govarts, Eva; Remy, Sylvie; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Den Hond, Elly; Sioen, Isabelle; Nelen, Vera; Baeyens, Willy; Nawrot, Tim S; Loots, Ilse; Van Larebeke, Nick; Schoeters, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal chemical exposure has been frequently associated with reduced fetal growth by single pollutant regression models although inconsistent results have been obtained. Our study estimated the effects of exposure to single pollutants and mixtures on birth weight in 248 mother-child pairs. Arsenic, copper, lead, manganese and thallium were measured in cord blood, cadmium in maternal blood, methylmercury in maternal hair, and five organochlorines, two perfluorinated compounds and diethylhexyl phthalate metabolites in cord plasma. Daily exposure to particulate matter was modeled and averaged over the duration of gestation. In single pollutant models, arsenic was significantly associated with reduced birth weight. The effect estimate increased when including cadmium, and mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (MECPP) co-exposure. Combining exposures by principal component analysis generated an exposure factor loaded by cadmium and arsenic that was associated with reduced birth weight. MECPP induced gender specific effects. In girls, the effect estimate was doubled with co-exposure of thallium, PFOS, lead, cadmium, manganese, and mercury, while in boys, the mixture of MECPP with cadmium showed the strongest association with birth weight. In conclusion, birth weight was consistently inversely associated with exposure to pollutant mixtures. Chemicals not showing significant associations at single pollutant level contributed to stronger effects when analyzed as mixtures. PMID:27187434

  20. Effects of the chemical characteristics and concentration of inorganic suspended solids on nitrification in freshwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quynh Nga; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Fujii, Manabu

    2017-12-01

    The effect of inorganic suspended solids (ISS) on nitrification in freshwater samples has been described inconsistently and remains unclear. This study therefore investigated the effects of the chemical characteristics and concentration of ISS on the nitrification rate by focusing on Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi as the two most dominant nitrification species in freshwater. Batch-wise experiments were conducted using three chemically well-characterized ISS (i.e. the clay minerals montmorillonite, sericite, and kaolinite in the concentration range 0-1,000 mg L -1 ). The results show that the ammonium oxidation rate constant (k NH4 ) was significantly affected by the ISS type, whereas changes in the ISS concentration had an insignificant effect on k NH4 , except for kaolinite. The highest k NH4 was observed in samples containing sericite (k NH4 , 0.067 L mg -1 day -1 ), followed by samples containing montmorillonite (k NH4 , 0.044 L mg -1 day -1 ). The ammonium oxidation rate was low in the control and kaolinite samples. Nitrite oxidation was enhanced in the presence of all types of ISS. The rate constants of ISS-mediated nitrite oxidation (k NO2 , 0.13-0.21 L mg -1 day -1 ) were not significantly different among the three types of ISS, but k NO2 was significantly affected by ISS concentration. Overall, our study indicated various effects of the ISS type and concentration on nitrification and, in particular, a notable positive effect of sericite.

  1. Comparisons of potential health effects originating from natural radioactivity and nuclear wastes repositories with effects of genotoxic chemical wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.; Latarjet, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper gives quantitative comparisons of potential health effects and risks in connection with the proximity of a radioactive wastes repository and those with natural radioactivity or chemical genotoxic wastes (such vinyl chloride monomer, ethylene and ethylene oxide). This paper presents the different sources of natural radioactivity responsible for external irradiation (cosmic rays) or internal ( 40 K, 238 U, 226 Ra, 222 Rn) and compares the statistical results of epidemiological studies about populations subjected to a significant irradiation. 27 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Effects of chemical-induced DNA damage on male germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holme, J.A.; Bjoerge, C.; Trbojevic, M.; Olsen, A.K.; Brunborg, G.; Soederlund, E.J. [National Inst. of Public Health, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Bjoeras, M.; Seeberg, E. [National Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Microbiology; Scholz, T.; Dybing, E.; Wiger, R. [National Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Inst. for Surgical Research and Surgical Dept. B

    1998-12-31

    Several recent studies indicate declines in sperm production, as well as increases in the incidence of genitourinary abnormalities such as testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. It is not known if these effects are due to exposure to chemical pollutants or if other ethiological factors are involved. Animal studies indicate that chemicals will induce such effects by various genetic, epigenetic or non-genetic mechanisms. Recently, much attention has been focused on embryonic/fetal exposure to oestrogen-mimicking chemicals (Toppari et al., 1996). However, the possibility that chemicals may cause reproductive toxicity by other mechanisms such as interactions with DNA, should not be ignored. DNA damage in germ cells may lead to the production of mutated spermatozoa, which in turn may result in spontaneous abortions, malformations and/or genetic defects in the offspring. Regarding the consequences of DNA alterations for carcinogenesis it is possible that genetic damage may occur germ cells, but the consequences are not expressed until certain genetic events occur in postnatal life. Transmission of genetic risk is best demonstrated by cancer-prone disorders such as hereditary retinoblastoma and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. A number of experiments indicate that germ cells and proliferating cells may be particularly sensitive to DNA damaging agents compared to other cells. Furthermore, several lines of evidence have indicated that one of the best documented male reproductive toxicants, 1,2-dibrome-3-chloropropane (DBCP), causes testicular toxicity through DNA damage. It is possible that testicular cells at certain maturational stages are more subject to DNA damage, have less efficient DNA repair, or have different thresholds for initiating apoptosis following DNA damage than other cell types. (orig.)

  3. Physical and chemical changes of rapeseed meal proteins during toasting and their effects onin vitrodigestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Villanea, Sergio; Bruininx, Erik M A M; Gruppen, Harry; Hendriks, Wouter H; Carré, Patrick; Quinsac, Alain; van der Poel, Antonius F B

    2016-01-01

    Toasting during the production of rapeseed meal (RSM) decreases ileal crude protein (CP) and amino acid (AA) digestibility. The mechanisms that determine the decrease in digestibility have not been fully elucidated. A high protein quality, low-denatured, RSM was produced and toasted up to 120 min, with samples taken every 20 min. The aim of this study was to characterize secondary structure and chemical changes of proteins and glucosinolates occurring during toasting of RSM and the effects on its in vitro CP digestibility. The decrease in protein solubility and the increase of intermolecular β-sheets with increasing toasting time were indications of protein aggregation. The contents of NDF and ADIN increased with increasing toasting time. Contents of arginine, lysine and O -methylisourea reactive lysine (OMIU-RL) linearly decreased with increasing toasting time, with a larger decrease of OMIU-RL than lysine. First-order reactions calculated from the measured parameters show that glucosinolates were degraded faster than lysine, OMIU-RL and arginine and that physical changes to proteins seem to occur before chemical changes during toasting. Despite the drastic physical and chemical changes noticed on the proteins, the coefficient of in vitro CP digestibility ranged from 0.776 to 0.750 and there were no effects on the extent of protein hydrolysis after 120 min. In contrast, the rate of protein hydrolysis linearly decreased with increasing toasting time, which was largely correlated to the decrease in protein solubility, lysine and OMIU-RL observed. Rate of protein hydrolysis was more than 2-fold higher for the untoasted RSM compared to the 120 min toasted material. Increasing the toasting time for the production of RSM causes physical and chemical changes to the proteins that decrease the rate of protein hydrolysis. The observed decrease in the rate of protein hydrolysis could impact protein digestion and utilization.

  4. Effect of electromagnetic radiation on the physico-chemical properties of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, A.; Delgadillo G, J. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2014-08-01

    The electromagnetic radiation effect represented by gamma rays was investigated through; chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem) and magnetization when applied at a dose of 0.5704 Gy (0.5704 J/ kg) at a feed relation of 18.40 ± 1.13 mGy/ h., in different minerals; in order to characterize the impact of the same from 137 Cs in the physicochemical properties of these minerals. All the irradiated samples showed chemical stability at this stage undetectable other both in the XRD study and in the images analysis obtained by Sem; and at present almost the same chemical composition as the non-irradiated samples. So the same patterns of X-ray diffraction thereof, show a tendency to slightly lower the intensity of the most representative peaks of each mineral phase, which may be due to a decrease in crystallinity or preferential crystallographic orientation in crystals. In the micrographs analysis obtained by Sem on the irradiated samples, some holes (open pores) present in the particles were observed, mainly chalcopyrite and sphalerite lesser extent, seen this fact may be due to Compton Effect, in the radiation process. In relation to the magnetization property, a variation is obtained in the saturation magnetization (Ms) for the irradiated samples containing iron and more significantly in the chalcopyrite case. Therefore, with the radiation level used; slight changes occurring in the physical properties of minerals, whereas they remained stable chemically. These small changes may represent a signal that electromagnetic radiation applied at higher doses, is a viable option for improving the mineral processing. (author)

  5. In silico prediction of harmful effects triggered by drugs and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedani, Angelo; Dobler, Max; Lill, Markus A.

    2005-01-01

    While the computer-assisted discovery and optimization of drug candidates based on the known three-dimensional structure of the macromolecular target (structure-based design) or a binding-site surrogate (receptor modeling) is doubtless one of the more potent approaches in rational drug design, the simulation and quantification of side effects triggered by drugs and chemicals are still in their infancy. Major obstacles include the often not available 3D structure of the molecular target, the low specificity of the involved bioregulators and the identification of the controlling metabolic pathways. In the recent past, our laboratory has explored concepts allowing to simulate receptor-mediated toxic phenomena by developing algorithms, allowing to construct realistic 3D binding-site surrogates of receptors known or assumed triggering adverse effects and validating them against large batches of molecular data. The underlying technology (software Quasar and Raptor, respectively) specifically allows for induced fit, solvation phenomena and entropic effects. It has been applied to various systems both of pharmacological and toxicological interest including the neurokinin-1, chemokine-3, bradykinin B 2 , steroid, 5 HT 2A , aryl hydrocarbon, estrogen and androgen receptor, respectively. In this account, we describe the design of a virtual laboratory allowing for a reliable estimation of harmful effects triggered by drugs, chemicals and their metabolites in silico. In the recent past, the Biographics Laboratory 3R has compiled a 3D database including the surrogates of three major receptor systems known to mediate adverse effects (the aryl hydrocarbon, the estrogen and the androgen receptor, respectively) and validated them against a total of 345 compounds (drugs, chemicals, toxins) using multidimensional QSAR technologies. Within this pilot project, we could demonstrate that our virtual laboratory is able to both recognize toxic compounds substantially different from those

  6. Long-term effects of soil management practices on selected indicators of chemical soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Pecio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in scope of Catch-C project “Compatibility of agricultural management practices and types of farming in the EU to enhance climate change mitigation and soil health” (7FP, realized in 2012–2014 by the consortium of partners from 10 European countries (http://www.catch-c.eu. This work reports the effects of soil management practices – under different soil and climatic conditions – on the selected soil chemical quality indicators, based on the analysis of data extracted from literature on long term experiments (LTEs in Europe, as well as from LTEs held by the Catch-C consortium partners. The dataset related to soil chemical quality indicators consisted of 1044 records and referred to 59 long-term trials. The following indicators of chemical soil quality were analyzed: pH, N total content, N total stock, C:N ratio, N mineral content, P and K availability. They are the most frequently used indicators in the European literature on long-term experiments collected in the Catch-C project database. Soil organic carbon, however, the most important indicator was not presented here, due to it was covered by a separate study on indicators for climate change mitigation. The indicators were analyzed using their response ratio (RR to a management practice. For a given treatment (management practice, this ratio was calculated as the quotient between the indicator value obtained in the treatment, and the indicator value in the reference treatment. The examples were: rotation (with cereals, with legume crops, with tuber or root crops, with grassland vs. adequate monoculture, catch/cover crops vs. no catch/cover crops, no-tillage and no-inversion tillage vs. conventional tillage, mineral fertilization vs. no fertilization, organic fertilization (compost, farmyard manure, slurry vs. mineral fertilization at the same available nitrogen input, crop residue incorporation vs. removal. All tested practices influenced soil chemical quality

  7. A comparative study of the effect on irradiation and chemical preservatives on fresh-cut mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasu, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for ready-to-eat fruits has resulted in cut-fruits such as pawpaw, watermelon and pineapple in the local market. However the safety and quality these products cannot be guaranteed due to the mode of preparation and packaging. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits are consumed, among other reasons, for their pleasant flavour. They are rich sources of vitamins A, B6 and C. Mango fruits are being increasingly processed into ready-to-eat products such as fresh-cut mango slices. These products have longer shelf life when properly preserved and, therefore, assure all year round availability of mango in different forms. In order to produce fresh-cut mango slices of acceptable quality, determination of the most appropriate stage of ripening of fruits for fresh-cut slices production should be known. This study determined the effects of irradiation and chemical preservatives on the safety and shelf life quality of fresh-cut mango products. The effects of gamma irradiation and chemical preservatives on physicochemical, microbiological and sensory qualities of fresh-cut mango products were evaluated. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate public perception of cut-fruits and irradiated foods. Well matured half-ripe with peel of green and a little yellow intact fruits were sampled for laboratory analysis using 2x2x5 factorial experiment. The fruits were sanitized, peeled and sliced into cubes and packaged in two sets of 30 PET jars. One set was subjected to various radiation dose levels (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5) kGy and a control. The second set was chemically preserved with various chemicals (sucrose, citric acid, sodium benzoate and a combination of these chemicals in equal proportions. The treated cut-mangoes were stored at 6 degrees Celsius and 10 degrees Celsius for 15 days and samples taken at 3 days interval for analysis. The pH, titratable acidity (TTA), vitamins C content, total soluble solids (TSS), microbial quality and sensory evaluations were carried out

  8. Toxic effects of chemical dispersant Corexit 9500 on water flea Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; McNabb, Nicole A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Iguchi, Taisen; Kohno, Satomi

    2017-02-01

    In 2010, approximately 2.1 million gallons of chemical dispersants, mainly Corexit 9500, were applied in the Gulf of Mexico to prevent the oil slick from reaching shorelines and to accelerate biodegradation of oil during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Recent studies have revealed toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on marine microzooplankton that play important roles in food chains in marine ecosystems. However, there is still little known about the toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on freshwater zooplankton, even though oil spills do occur in freshwater and chemical dispersants may be used in response to these spills. The cladoceran crustacean, water flea Daphnia magna, is a well-established model species for various toxicological tests, including detection of juvenile hormone-like activity in test compounds. In this study, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the acute and chronic toxicity of Corexit 9500 using D. magna. The acute toxicity test was conducted according to OECD TG202 and the 48 h EC 50 was 1.31 ppm (CIs 0.99-1.64 ppm). The reproductive chronic toxicity test was performed following OECD TG211 ANNEX 7 and 21 days LOEC and NOEC values were 4.0 and 2.0 ppm, respectively. These results indicate that Corexit 9500 has toxic effects on daphnids, particularly during the neonatal developmental stage, which is consistent with marine zooplankton results, whereas juvenile hormone-like activity was not identified. Therefore, our findings of the adverse effects of Corexit 9500 on daphnids suggest that application of this type of chemical dispersant may have catastrophic impacts on freshwater ecosystems by disrupting the key food chain network. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Ecological Models to Predict and Test the Effects of Chemical Stressors: Integration across 2 EPA STAR cooperative agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accessible tools to quantify adverse outcomes pathways (AOPs) that can predict the ecological effects of chemicals and other stressors are a major goal of Chemical Safety and Sustainability research within US EPA’s Office of Research and Development. To address this goal, w...

  10. Predicting In Vivo Effect Levels for Repeat Dose Systemic Toxicity using Chemical, Biological, Kinetic and Study Covariates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to ensure chemical safety while reducing reliance on animal testing, USEPA and L’Oréal have collaborated to address a major challenge in chemical safety assessment using alternative approaches: the prediction of points-of-departure (POD) of systemic effects. Systemic...

  11. Effects of chemical-physical pre-treatment processes on hemp fibres for reinforcement of composites and textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Thygesen, Anders; Bohn, Vibeke

    2006-01-01

    Retted hemp fibres were treated using chemical-physical pre-treatments and the material was characterised chemically in order to evaluate the effect of the pre-treatments, respectively, wet oxidation (WO), hydrothermal treatment (HT) and steam explosion (STEX). Process variables were addition...

  12. Systematic Review of the Effects of Chemical Insecticides on Four Common Butterfly Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Mulé

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Safeguarding crop productivity by protecting crops from pest attacks entails the wide use of plant protection products that provide a quick, easy and cheap solution. The objective of this study is to understand the effects of insecticides used in agriculture on non-target butterflies, specifically on the families Lycaenidae, Nymphalidae, Hesperiidae, and Papilionidae. To achieve this goal, a formal systematic review was performed according to European Food Safety Authority (EFSA guidelines, by entering a combination of keywords on 3 online databases. Three reviewers independently extracted information on study characteristics and quality. The main results were collected and grouped by the insecticide used, butterflies species and family, and endpoints. The output was valuable but heterogeneous as the endpoints and methodologies of the studies reviewed were different. Few experimental studies on the effects of insecticides on the most common butterfly families have been published. Naled and permethrin are the most commonly used insecticides in the experiments, whilst the target organisms of these studies are Vanessa cardui, Danaus plexippus, Heliconius charitonius, belonging to the Nymphalidae family, and Eumaeus atala, belonging to the Lycaenidae family; the effects were evaluated on all developmental stages, with special attention to the larval phase. This systematic review highlights the need for more studies on the effects of chemical insecticides on non-target Lepidoptera in light of their ecological importance and the extensive use of these chemical products.

  13. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil from Farfugium japonicum flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Oh, Tae-Heon; Kim, Byeong Jin; Kim, Sang-Suk; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the chemical composition and anti-inflammatory activities of hydrodistilled essential oil from Farfugium japonicum were investigated for the first time. The chemical constituents of the essential oil were further analyzed by GC-MS and included 1-undecene (22.43%), 1-nonene (19.83%), beta-caryophyllene (12.26%), alpha-copaene (3.70%), gamma-curcumene (2.86%), germacrene D (2.69%), and 1-decene (2.08%). The effects of the essential oil on nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages were also examined. The results indicate that the F. japonicum essential oil is an effective inhibitor of LPS-induced NO and PGE(2) production in RAW 264.7 cells. These inhibitory effects of the F. japonicum essential oil were accompanied by dose-dependent decreases in the iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression. In order to determine whether F. japonicum essential oil can safely be applied to human skin, the cytotoxic effects of F. japonicum essential oil were determined by colorimetric MTT assays in human dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte HaCaT cells. F. japonicum essential oil exhibited low cytotoxicity at 100 mug/mL. Based on these results, we suggest that F. japonicum essential oil may be considered a potential anti-inflammatory candidate for topical application.

  14. Effects of gamma irradiation on physical-chemical properties and dewatering characteristics of sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groneman, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    Separation of solids from liquids is a paramount operation in the processes applied in treating sewage and waste waters. Therfore, studies were undertaken to investigate effects of gamma irradiation on the physical-chemical properties of sludges and the de-watering characteristics of anaerobically digested sludge and aerobically activated sludge. A dose of 300 krad reduced the specific resistance of anaerobically digested sludges from 33 x 10 sec 2 /g to approximately 10 x 10 9 sec 2 /g. This conditioning effect was little influenced by the presence of oxygen or nitrogen. Pasteurization increased the specific resistance to filtration up to 48 x 10 9 sec 2 /g. Dewatering characteristics of raw sludge were not affected by irradiation in the presence of oxygen but a slight conditioning effect was noticed when the sludge was irradiated under deaerated conditions. Experimental evidence indicated that gamma irradiation detached organic substances from the sludge flocks resulting in a decrease of the specific resistance and an increase in the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) in the filtrates. Elutriation reduced but did not eliminate the conditioning effect of gamma irradiation. (author)

  15. Chemical exchange effects during refocusing pulses in constant-time CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myint, Wazo; Ishima, Rieko

    2009-01-01

    In the analysis of the constant-time Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CT-CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiment, chemical exchange parameters, such as rate of exchange and population of the exchanging species, are typically optimized using equations that predict experimental relaxation rates recorded as a function of effective field strength. In this process, the effect of chemical exchange during the CPMG pulses is typically assumed to be the same as during the free-precession. This approximation may introduce systematic errors into the analysis of data because the number of CPMG pulses is incremented during the constant-time relaxation period, and the total pulse duration therefore varies as a function of the effective field strength. In order to estimate the size of such errors, we simulate the time-dependence of magnetization during the entire constant time period, explicitly taking into account the effect of the CPMG pulses on the spin relaxation rate. We show that in general the difference in the relaxation dispersion profile calculated using a practical pulse width from that calculated using an extremely short pulse width is small, but under certain circumstances can exceed 1 s -1 . The difference increases significantly when CPMG pulses are miscalibrated

  16. Lipid spectrum of the newborn rats' blood at the radioactive and chemical effects in the prenatal period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzan, Kh.

    1998-01-01

    The radioactive and chemical factors used in complex or separately during the prenatal period in the experiment induce ambiguous effects on the lipid metabolism in blood plasma and erythrocytes of newborn rats. The chemicals cause more significant changes in the blood plasma lipid metabolism than the radioactive irradiation does. Being used combined the radioactive and chemical factors do not increase each other's effect- their effects have opposite directions. The radiochemical exposure induce more significant shifts in the lipid spectrum in erythrocytic membranes than the separate factors

  17. Important sources and chemical species of ambient fine particles related to adverse health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, J.

    2017-12-01

    Although many epidemiological studies have reported that exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been linked to increases in mortality and mobidity health outcomes, the key question of which chemical species and sources of PM2.5 are most harmful to public health remains unanswered in the air pollution research area. This study was designed to address the key question with evaluating the risks of exposure to chemical species and source-specific PM2.5 mass on morbidity. Hourly measurements of PM2.5 mass and its major chemical species, including organic carbon, elemental carbon, ions, and trace elements, were observed from January 1 to December 31, 2013 at four of the PM2.5 supersites in urban environments in Korea and the reuslts were used in a positive matrix factorization to estimate source contributions to PM2.5 mass. Nine sources, including secondary sulfate, secondary nitrate, mobile, biomass burning, roadway emission, industry, oil combustion, soil, and aged sea salt, were identified and secondary inorganic aerosol factors (i.e. secondary sulfalte, and secondary nitrate) were the dominant sources contributing to 40% of the total PM2.5 mass in the study region. In order to evaluate the risks of exposure to chemical species and sources of PM2.5 on morbidity, emergency room visits for cardivascular disease and respiratory disease were considered. Hourly health outcomes were compared with hourly measurments of the PM2.5 chemical species and sources using a poission generalized linear model incorporating natural splines, as well as time-stratified case-crossover design. The PM2.5 mass and speveral chemical components, such as organic carbon, elemetal carbon, zinc, and potassium, were strongly associated with morbidity. Source-apporitionmened PM2.5 mass derived from biomass burning, and mobile sources, was significantly associated with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. The findings represent that local combustion may be particularly important

  18. The effect of natural weathering on the chemical and isotopic composition of biotites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.; Bonnot-Courtois, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of progressive natural weathering on the isotopic (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, deltaD, delta 18 O) and chemical (REE, H 2 O + ) compositions of biotite has been studied on a suite of migmatitic biotites from the Chad Republic. During the early stages of weathering the Rb-Sr system is strongly affected, the hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions change markedly, the minerals are depleted in light REE, the water content increases by a factor of two, and the K-Ar system is relatively little disturbed. During intensive weathering the K-Ar system is more strongly disturbed than the Rb-Sr system. Most of the isotopic and chemical modifications take place under nonequilibrium conditions and occur before newly formed kaolinite and/or smectite can be detected. These observations suggest that (a) 'protominerals' may form within the biotite structure during the initial period of weathering, and (b) only when chemical equilibrium is approached in the weathering profile are new minerals able to form. (author)

  19. Electron irradiation of high fiber by-products: effects on chemical composition and digestibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitti, D.M.S.S.; Nogueira, N. de L.; Mastro, N.L. del

    1998-01-01

    Samples of sugar cane bagasse, rice and cotton residues were irradiated with various doses (200,400,600,800 and 1000 kg) in an electron accelerator with or without anhydrous gaseous N H 3 post-treatment, to evaluate the effects of irradiation on dry matter digestibility and on their chemical and physical properties. After irradiation, samples were dried and ground for chemical analysis. Dry matter digestibility was determined with the nylon bag technique. Structural analysis was performed using light and electron microscopy. Crude fiber and neutral detergent fiber significantly decreased (P<0.01) for irradiated samples. Phenolic contents increased with the applied dose indicating that lignin was decomposed. dry matter digestibility increased with increasing dose. An increase of 24 digestibility units was observed for bagasse at highest dose. Based on microscopy, fragmentation of sugarcane bagasse was observed at 800-1000 kGy and some cellular alterations occurred at 200 kGy for rice and cotton residues. It was concluded that irradiation caused significant changes on chemical and physical properties and on digestibility of fibrous residues. Utilization of irradiated biomass for animal feed appears promising. (author)

  20. Control of chemical effects in the separation process of a differential mobility mass spectrometer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Coy, Stephen L; Krylov, Evgeny V; Nazarov, Erkinjon G

    2010-01-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) separates ions on the basis of the difference in their migration rates under high versus low electric fields. Several models describing the physical nature of this field mobility dependence have been proposed but emerging as a dominant effect is the clusterization model sometimes referred to as the dynamic cluster-decluster model. DMS resolution and peak capacity is strongly influenced by the addition of modifiers which results in the formation and dissociation of clusters. This process increases selectivity due to the unique chemical interactions that occur between an ion and neutral gas-phase molecules. It is thus imperative to bring the parameters influencing the chemical interactions under control and find ways to exploit them in order to improve the analytical utility of the device. In this paper, we describe three important areas that need consideration in order to stabilize and capitalize on the chemical processes that dominate a DMS separation. The first involves means of controlling the dynamic equilibrium of the clustering reactions with high concentrations of specific reagents. The second area involves a means to deal with the unwanted heterogeneous cluster ion populations emitted from the electrospray ionization process that degrade resolution and sensitivity. The third involves fine control of parameters that affect the fundamental collision processes, temperature and pressure.

  1. Effect of chemical treatment of Kevlar fibers on mechanical interfacial properties of composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Ma, Tae-Jun; Lee, Douk-Rae

    2002-08-01

    In this work, the effects of chemical treatment on Kevlar 29 fibers have been studied in a composite system. The surface characteristics of Kevlar 29 fibers were characterized by pH, acid-base value, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR. The mechanical interfacial properties of the final composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and specific fracture energy (G(IC)). Also, impact properties of the composites were investigated in the context of differentiating between initiation and propagation energies and ductile index (DI) along with maximum force and total energy. As a result, it was found that chemical treatment with phosphoric acid solution significantly affected the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and resin matrix, resulting in improved mechanical interfacial strength in the composites. This was probably due to the presence of chemical polar groups on Kevlar surfaces, leading to an increment of interfacial binding force between fibers and matrix in a composite system.

  2. Chemical evidence for the effect of Urochloa ruziziensis on glyphosate-resistant soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno, Mariluce; Chinchilla, Nuria; Varela, Rosa M; Molinillo, José Mg; Lacret, Rodney; Alves, Pedro Lca; Macias, Francisco A

    2017-10-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is an important oleaginous legume that has been cultivated in new areas in Brazil, including pastures. Problems of reduced production yields have been reported by soybean growers when the crop is sown immediately after desiccation of pastures of Urochloa spp. using glyphosate. The objective of this work was to extract, isolate and identify the major chemicals from U. ruziziensis that have phytotoxic activity and to evaluate the possible relation between this effect and reduced soybean yield. U. ruziziensis plants at the flowering stage were desiccated using glyphosate at 1.44 kg ha -1 . The plants were collected between five and ten days after treatment. Extracts of dried and ground shoots were obtained by sequential extraction with hexane, dichloromethane and methanol. The results of wheat coleoptile bioassays indicated that the methanol extract was more inhibitory than the dichloromethane extract regardless of glyphosate application. Protodioscin, a steroidal saponin, was isolated from the extract as the major component and the activities of this compound were in good agreement with those found for the extract. The release of this compound into the soil is a plausible explanation for the decrease in production observed in transgenic soybean crop after desiccation of U. ruziziensis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Effects of diet on the chemical composition of migratory locusts (Locusta migratoria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonincx, D G A B; van der Poel, A F B

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of diet on the chemical composition of migratory locusts (Locusta migratoria L.). Fresh and dry weight and the contents of dry matter, ash, lipid, protein, Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Cu, Fe, Zn, retinol, lutein, zeaxanthine, cryptoxanthin, carotenes, lycopene and gross energy were determined in penultimate instar and adult locusts, that had been fed three different diets. The locusts received a diet of grass or grass+wheat bran or grass+wheat bran+carrots. Adding wheat bran decreased the protein content and increased fat content (633 vs. 583 and 182 vs. 231 g/kg DM, respectively). Addition of carrots to the diet increased fat content further from 231 to 271 g/kg DM. Mineral concentrations of Ca, K, Mg, and Na, were significantly affected by diet. P, K, Cu, and Fe concentrations were significantly different in penultimate migratory locusts compared with adults. Wheat bran decreased the α-carotene content, which did not change by incorporating carrots in the diet. However, carrots did result in higher β-carotene concentrations. Retinol concentrations were increased by incorporating both wheat bran and carrots in the diet compared with the diet containing only grass. This study shows that the chemical composition of migratory locusts can be manipulated through the diet. As such, it enables nutritionists to adapt the chemical composition of live feeder insects to better meet the nutritional demands of predators. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

    1994-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

  5. Effects of Sewage Sludge and Chemical Fertilizers on Pb and Cd Accumulation in Fenugreek (Trigonella gracum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Cheraghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reprocessing of sewage sludge to agricultural land is preferred to disposal through landfill or incineration due to its potentially beneficial effects on soil fertility from organic matter and plant nutrients, such as N and P, present in the sludge. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the impact of sewage sludge and chemical fertilizers on Pb and Cd accumulation in fenugreek, Trigonella gracum. Methods: The experiment was carried out in earthen pots, 30 cm in diameter and 30 cm in depth. The study was done on five groups- control, S1: sewage sludge (50 tone/ha, S2: sew-age sludge (50 tone/ha+heavy metals [85 ppm of Cd(Cl2; 840 ppm of Pb(NO32], F1: chemi-cal fertilizer (250 kg/ha, and F2: chemical fertilizer (250 kg/ha+ heavy metals [85 ppm of Cd(Cl2; 840 ppm of Pb(NO32]- in three replicates. Results: The results showed that total Pb concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 2 mg/kg, with the maximum level in the sewage sludge treatment (S2 while Cd concentrations in the plant ranged from 0.07 to 1.1 mg/kg with the maximum content in the chemical fertilizer treatment (F2. The concentrations of Pb and Cd in vegetables were significantly higher than the permis-sible limits. Conclusion: This study highlights the potential risks involved in the cultivation and consump-tion of vegetables on plots irrigated with sewage sludge, a practice which may endanger the health of urban populations that consume these vegetables.

  6. The effect of municipal sewage sludge on the chemical composition of spring barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kępka Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that soils in Poland are mostly light soils, there is a need to improve their physical, chemical and biological properties. In addition, as a result of the decrease in the number of farm animals, a decrease in production of natural fertilizers can be observed. Low production of natural fertilizers speaks in favor of agricultural use of municipal sewage sludge in Poland. Municipal sewage sludge is composed of large quantities of macronutrients necessary for plants. This waste also contains significant amounts of organic substance. Chemical properties, including a high content of nitrogen, phosphorus, and often calcium, speak in favor of environmental use of municipal sewage sludge. Increasing requirements with respect to environmental protection cause the necessity to assess the effects of using organic waste for fertilization. In a farm located in the commune of Iwanowice (Małopolska province, municipal sewage sludge was applied under spring barley cultivation. The soil on which municipal sewage sludge was applied was classified into the category of heavy soils with neutral reaction. When assessing the content of available nutrients (P, K, Mg in the soil, their low content was determined. After application of municipal sewage sludge in a dose of 24 Mg fresh matter per hectare, which corresponded to 5.34 Mg DM·ha−1, under spring barley, beneficial changes in chemical properties of the soil were observed. An increase in soil abundance in organic carbon and total nitrogen was observed, as well as an increase in the content of available forms of phosphorus, potassium and magnesium. Based on the results of the conducted chemical analyses, it was established that biomass of spring barley fertilized with sewage sludge contained more macronutrients (N, P, K, Na, Ca and Mg, which improved its feed value. The field experiment showed that application of municipal sewage sludge increased uptake of macronutrients by spring barley.

  7. Effects of pig slurry application on soil physical and chemical properties and glyphosate mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aparecida de Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pig slurry applied to soil at different rates may affect soil properties and the mobility of chemical compounds within the soil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of rates of pig slurry application in agricultural areas on soil physical and chemical properties and on the mobility of glyphosate through the soil profile. The study was carried out in the 12th year of an experiment with pig slurry applied at rates of 0 (control, 50, 100 and 200 m³ ha-1 yr-1 on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Hapludox soil. In the control, the quantities of P and K removed by harvested grains were replaced in the next crop cycle. Soil physical properties (bulk density, porosity, texture, and saturated hydraulic conductivity and chemical properties (organic matter, pH, extractable P, and exchangeable K were measured. Soil solution samples were collected at depths of 20, 40 and 80 cm using suction lysimeters, and glyphosate concentrations were measured over a 60-day period after slurry application. Soil physical and chemical properties were little affected by the pig slurry applications, but soil pH was reduced and P levels increased in the surface layers. In turn, K levels were increased in sub-surface layers. Glyphosate concentrations tended to decrease over time but were not affected by pig slurry application. The concentrations of glyphosate found in different depths show that the pratice of this application in agricultural soils has the potential for contamination of groundwater, especially when the water table is the surface and heavy rains occur immediately after application.

  8. Effects of simplifying fracture network representation on inert chemical migration in fracture-controlled aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Tristan; Shapiro, Allen M.; Hill, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that highly permeable 'large-scale' fractures dominate chemical migration in many fractured aquifers, recent studies suggest that the pervasive 'small-scale' fracturing once considered of less significance can be equally important for characterizing the spatial extent and residence time associated with transport processes. A detailed examination of chemical migration through fracture-controlled aquifers is used to advance this conceptual understanding. The influence of fracture structure is evaluated by quantifying the effects to transport caused by a systematic removal of fractures from three-dimensional discrete fracture models whose attributes are derived from geologic and hydrologic conditions at multiple field sites. Results indicate that the effects to transport caused by network simplification are sensitive to the fracture network characteristics, degree of network simplification, and plume travel distance, but primarily in an indirect sense since correlation to individual attributes is limited. Transport processes can be 'enhanced' or 'restricted' from network simplification meaning that the elimination of fractures may increase or decrease mass migration, mean travel time, dispersion, and tailing of the concentration plume. The results demonstrate why, for instance, chemical migration may not follow the classic advection-dispersion equation where dispersion approximates the effect of the ignored geologic structure as a strictly additive process to the mean flow. The analyses further reveal that the prediction error caused by fracture network simplification is reduced by at least 50% using the median estimate from an ensemble of simplified fracture network models, and that the error from network simplification is at least 70% less than the stochastic variability from multiple realizations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Effect of chemical composition and superheat on macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, Omer N.

    2005-08-01

    White cast irons are frequently used in applications requiring high wear resistance. High Cr white cast irons have a composite microstructure composed of hard (Fe,Cr)7C3 carbides in a steel matrix. Previous research has indicated that the equiaxed region of these high Cr white iron castings is much more wear resistant under high stress abrasive conditions than the columnar region, when the carbides are oriented perpendicular to the wear surface. In the present study, the effect of both the chemical composition, particularly carbon content, and the pouring superheat of the melt on the macrostructure of high Cr white iron castings is investigated.

  10. Investigations with beagles about toxicity and radioprotective effect of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Sedlmeier, H.; Wustrow, T.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl-thiophosphate) was examined in 25 beagles. The study showed that the toxicity of the substance increases as the dose gets higher. Between the doses 200 and 250 mg/kg of body weight, the increase of toxicity was significantly greater than could be expected on the basis of the dose difference. Until a dose of 200 mg/kg, the authors found no side effects which would have disturbed vital functions, but higher doses led to marked symptoms of intoxication. (orig.) [de

  11. Effects of ionizing radiation in the physico-chemical characteristics of red wine Cabernet Sauvignon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fellipe Souza da; Leiras, Anderson; Wagner, Walsan

    2014-01-01

    The oenology in the current days is increasingly aimed obtain improvements on wine quality produced without there the deterioration of characteristics of the same, using new technologies for such order. The objective of present work will be the application of the radiation ionizing in wines Cabernet Sauvignon, with the interest of analyzing its effects on physic-chemical characteristics of this wines, such as quality, aging and etc. Were analyzed the following strands: degree alcoholic; dry extract; density and absorbance with spectrometer (420, 520 and 620 nm). (author)

  12. Compensation effects in molecular interactions and the quantum chemical le Chatelier principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G

    2015-05-28

    Components of molecular interactions and various changes in the components of total energy changes during molecular processes typically exhibit some degrees of compensation. This may be as prominent as the over 90% compensation of the electronic energy and nuclear repulsion energy components of the total energy in some conformational changes. Some of these compensations are enhanced by solvent effects. For various arrangements of ions in a solvent, however, not only compensation but also a formal, mutual enhancement between the electronic energy and nuclear repulsion energy components of the total energy may also occur, when the tools of nuclear charge variation are applied to establish quantum chemically rigorous energy inequalities.

  13. Contribution of the Endocrine Perspective in the Evaluation of Endocrine Disrupting Chemical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Juul, Anders; Franssen, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Debate makes science progress. In the field of endocrine disruption, endocrinology has brought up findings that substantiate a specific perspective on the definition of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), the role of the endocrine system and the endpoints of hormone and EDC actions among other...... issues. This paper aims at discussing the relevance of the endocrine perspective with regard to EDC effects on pubertal timing. Puberty involves particular sensitivity to environmental conditions. Reports about the advancing onset of puberty in several countries have led to the hypothesis...

  14. Effect of gamma radiation on chemical composition and storability of lime RTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, S.K.; Bisen, A.; Dwivedi, V.

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation, the RTS was irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation to study their effect on chemical composition and storability of lime RTS and vitamin C content only was influenced significantly by 50 Gy gamma radiation during storage (16 days) without adversely affecting the quality of lime fruits, whereas, under control and higher doses of gamma radiation, the quality of lime RTS was deteriorated. The irradiation of lime with 50 Gy gamma radiation may be useful for extending storability of lime of RTS and stabilizing the market demand. (author)

  15. Effect of Chemical Composition of Honey on Cream Formation in Honey Lemon Tea

    OpenAIRE

    J. Hategekimana; J.G. Ma, Y. Li, E. Karangwa, W. Tang and F. Zhong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chemical composition of honey and environmental factors such as pH, storage temperature and ionic strength on cream formation in honey lemon tea drink. The results showed that minerals, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were involved in cream formation while Fe2+ participated in changing color to tar black at pH 4.12 and above. Honey rich in polyphenols and proteins increased the cream to 2.51%. High proline content (0.506 mg/g) induced creaming in GH (Germany Ho...

  16. Chemical effects on the Kβ/Kα intensity ratios in first-row transition element compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuecuekoender, A.; Buekuekkasap, E.; Yilmaz, R.; Sahin, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical effects on the K β /K α X-ray intensity ratios for some first-row transition element compounds were studied experimentally and calculated. The vacancies in the K shell were created by 59.5 keV γ rays from an 241 Am radioactive source and characteristic X-ray radiation from sample was measured by using Si(Li) and Ge(Li) detectors. The calculations were carried out using Brunner's model. The calculated relative K β /K α X-ray intensity ratios are in good agreement with the present and the previously published experimental data. (author)

  17. Modelling of harmful effect of the combined environmental impacts of physical and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paskalev, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Bio-physico-chemical mechanisms leading to pathological state of human organism caused by several simultaneously introduced harmful factors are discussed. A scheme of combined effect of two factors is proposed. An important element in determining the resulting effect is the conjuction of the development of biological effect and recovery process. An equation describing the change in biological system state is given taking into account the duration of impact, time interval, function of recovery and number of repetition of impacts. Two kind of investigations are considered for establishing the degree of harmful impacts: experimental and epidemiological. The results are given of author's experiments on rats with phosalon pesticide (chemical factor) and internal irradiation from the beta emitters 89 Sr and 144 Ce (physical factors), introduced separately and in combination. The change in the serum cholinesterase and amylase have been used as criteria for harmful impacts. Data from epidemiological studies in Bulgaria are also presented showing an increase in morbidity of the population connected with the combined influence of various radiation and non radiation factors. 3 tabs., 6 figs., 8 refs

  18. An external domino effects investment approach to improve cross-plant safety within chemical clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reniers, Genserik

    2010-01-01

    Every company situated within a chemical cluster faces the risk of being struck by an escalating accident at one of its neighbouring plants (the so-called external domino effect risks). These cross-plant risks can be reduced or eliminated if neighbouring companies are willing to invest in systems and measures to prevent them. However, since reducing such multi-plant risks does not lead to direct economic benefits, enterprises tend to be reluctant to invest more than needed for meeting minimal legal requirements and they tend to invest without collaborating. The suggested approach in this article indicates what information is required to evaluate the available investment options in external domino effects prevention. To this end, game theory is used as a promising scientific technique to investigate the decision-making process on investments in prevention measures simultaneously involving several plants. The game between two neighbouring chemical plants and their strategic investment behaviour regarding the prevention of external domino effects is described and an illustrative example is provided. Recommendations are formulated to advance cross-plant prevention investments in a two-company cluster.

  19. Revisiting the effects of hydrodynamic sorting and sedimentary recycling on chemical weathering indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yulong; Yang, Shouye; Su, Ni; Li, Chao; Yin, Ping; Wang, Zhongbo

    2018-04-01

    Although the proxies based on elemental geochemistry of siliciclastic sediments have been well developed to indicate the intensity of chemical weathering in various catchments, their geological indications and limitations, and especially how the differentiation of minerals and sediment grain size influences the applications of these proxies needs more clarification. This paper investigates the interactive effects of weathering, hydraulic sorting and sedimentary recycling on river sediment chemistry, and further validates the application of various weathering indices by measuring mineralogical and geochemical compositions of bank sediments and suspended particulate matters (SPMs) from five rivers in East China bearing various sizes, geologic settings and climatic regimes. For a specific river, the silicate weathering intensity registered in the fine SPMs is systematically stronger than that in the coarse-grained bank sediments. Most of the weathering indices not only reflect the integrated weathering history of various catchments but also depend on hydraulic sorting effect during sediment transport and depositional processes. The correlation between CIA (chemical index of alteration) and WIP (weathering index of Parker) offers an approach to predict the weathering trends of the fine SPMs, coarse bank sediments and recycled sediments under the influence of quartz dilution. To minimize the effects of hydrodynamic sorting and sedimentary recycling, we suggest that the fine sediments (e.g. SPMs and <2 μm fraction of bank sediments) in rivers can better reflect the average of present-day weathering crust in catchments and the weathered terrigenous materials into marginal seas and oceans.

  20. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in tautomeric systems with double proton transfer. Citronin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.; Langgard, M.; Bolvig, S.

    1998-01-01

    Primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects on 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts are measured in citrinin, a tautomeric compound with an unusual doubly intramolecularly hydrogen bonded structure. The isotope effects are to a large extent dominated by equilibrium contributions and deuteration leads to more of the deuterated enol forms rather than the deuterated acid form. 1 H 13 C and 17 O nuclear shieldings are calculated using density functional ab initio methods. A very good correlation between calculated nuclear shieldings and experimental 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts is obtained. The tautomeric equilibrium can be analyzed based on the isotope effects on B-6 and C-8 carbons and shows an increase in the o-quinone form on lowering the temperature. Furthermore, upon deuteration the largest equilibrium shift is found for deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration is increasing at lower temperature. (author)

  1. Multiple stressors in amphibian communities: Effects of chemical contamination, bullfrogs, and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Doyle, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    A leading hypothesis of amphibian population declines is that combinations of multiple stressors contribute to declines. We examined the role that chemical contamination, competition, and predation play singly and in combination in aquatic amphibian communities. We exposed larvae of American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (R. catesbeiana), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the insecticide carbaryl, and ammonium nitrate fertilizer in 1000-L mesocosms. Most significantly, our study demonstrated that the presence of multiple factors reduced survival of B. americanus and A. maculatum and lengthened larval periods of R. sphenocephala. The presence of bluegill had the largest impact on the community; it eliminated B. americanus and A. maculatum and reduced the abundance of R. sphenocephala. Chemical contaminants had the second strongest effect on the community with the insecticide, reducing A. maculatum abundance by 50% and increasing the mass of anurans (frogs and toads) at metamorphosis; the fertilizer positively influenced time and mass at metamorphosis for both anurans and A. maculatum. Presence of overwintered bullfrogs reduced mass and increased time to metamorphosis of anurans. While both bluegill and overwintered bullfrog tadpoles had negative effects on the amphibian community, they performed better in the presence of one another and in contaminated habitats. Our results indicate that predicting deleterious combinations from single-factor effects may not be straightforward. Our research supports the hypothesis that combinations of factors can negatively impact some amphibian species and could contribute to population declines. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  2. [Chemical composition of essential oil from Thymus citriodorus and its toxic effect on liver cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Wei, Feng-Xiang; Li, Hong-Zhi; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Liu, Jun-Xing

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the chemical composition of essential oil from Thymus citriodorus and its toxic effect on liver cancer cells. The essential oil from Thymus citriodorus leaves was extracted by steam distillation, and GC-MS was used for analyzing chemical composition. 35 components were identified which accounted for 95.44% of the total peak area. The main components were borneol (28.82%), thymol (14.43%), 3, 7-dimethyl-1, 6-octadiene-3-ol (8.26%), 1-methyl-4-[alpha-hydroxy-isopropyl] cyclohexene (8.23%) and terpenes camphor (5.1%), et. al. The toxic effects on HepG2 cells and expression of NF-kappabeta65 were measured by MTT assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy, respectively. The IC50 of HepG2 cells inhibition was 0.34%. The mean fluorescence intensity of NF-kappabeta65 expression was as follows: control group 323.25, 2(-10) concentration group 84.18, 2(-11) concentration group 197.93 and 2(-12) concentration group 261.43. The essential oil from Thymus citriodorus leaves has strong toxic effects. The induced apoptosis mechanism may be associated with the expression of NF-kappabeta65.

  3. Theoretical study of relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Jun; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Sekine, Rika; Nakamatsu, Hirohide; Mukoyama, Takeshi; Adachi, Hirohiko.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed the relativistic molecular orbital calculation for the ground state of UF 6 , using the discrete-variational Dirac-Slater method (DV-DS), in order to elucidate the relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding. Compared with the electronic structure calculated by the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (DV-X α )MO method, not only the direct relativistic effects (spin-orbit splitting etc), but also the indirect effect due to the change in screening core potential charge are shown to be important in the MO level structure. From the U-F bond overlap population analysis, we found that the U-F bond formation can be explained only by the DV-DS, not by the DV-X α . The calculated electronic structure in valence energy region (-20-OeV) and excitation energies in UV region are in agreement with experiments. (author)

  4. Biological effects of anthropogenic chemical stress: Tools for the assessment of ecosystem health (BEAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehtonen, Kari K.; Sundelin, Brita; Lang, Thomas

    of Finland, Gulf of Riga, Gulf of Gdansk and the Belt Sea, most of which are characterised by scarce data on biological effects of hazardous substances. The data acquired will be combined with previous data (e.g. national monitoring activities, case studies, EU BEEP project) to reach the goals of WP2 and WP3......In the Baltic Sea Action Plan the urgent need to develop biological effects monitoring of hazardous substances and the assessment of ecosystem health has been clearly indicated. These goals will be tackled in the newly launched BEAST project (Biological Effects of Anthropogenic Chemical Stress...... and experiments in selected sub-regions of the Baltic Sea, WP2 - Application and validation of methods in monitoring and assessment in the Baltic Sea, and WP3 - Developing tools for ecosystem health assessment in the Baltic Sea. BEAST research activities are focused in the sub-regions of Gulf of Bothnia, Gulf...

  5. Evaluating effects of sewage sludge and household compost on soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Petersen, S.O.; Kure, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    C, as well as in the field. The following properties were monitored: wet-stability of soil aggregates, clay dispersibility, hot-water extractable carbohydrates, resin-extractable P-i, inorganic N, biomass C and N, PLFA profiles, FDA hydrolysis activity, beta-glucosidase activity and CO2 evolution. In general......Recycling of organic wastes within agriculture may help maintain soil fertility via effects on physical, chemical and biological properties. Efficient use, however, requires an individual assessment of waste products, and effects should be compared with natural variations due to climate and soil......, effects of waste amendment were positive, but moderate compared to the dynamics observed in unamended soil, and mainly occurred in the first several weeks after amendment. The temporal dynamics of inorganic N, FDA hydrolysis activity, biomass C and PLFA composition appeared to be faster under...

  6. Evaluating effects of sewage sludge and household compost on soil physical, chemical and microbiological properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debosz, K.; Petersen, S.O.; Kure, L.K.

    2002-01-01

    Recycling of organic wastes within agriculture may help maintain soil fertility via effects on physical, chemical and biological properties. Efficient use, however, requires an individual assessment of waste products, and effects should be compared with natural variations due to climate and soil......C, as well as in the field. The following properties were monitored: wet-stability of soil aggregates, clay dispersibility, hot-water extractable carbohydrates, resin-extractable P-i, inorganic N, biomass C and N, PLFA profiles, FDA hydrolysis activity, beta-glucosidase activity and CO2 evolution. In general......, effects of waste amendment were positive, but moderate compared to the dynamics observed in unamended soil, and mainly occurred in the first several weeks after amendment. The temporal dynamics of inorganic N, FDA hydrolysis activity, biomass C and PLFA composition appeared to be faster under...

  7. The effects of whole green tea infusion on mouse urinary bladder chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Andreia; Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; I Faustino-Rocha, Ana; I Teixeira-Guedes, Catarina; Pinho-Oliveira, Jacinta; Talhada, Daniela; H Teixeira, José; Andrade, Andreia; Colaço, Bruno; N Paiva-Cardoso, Maria; J Pires, Maria; Mvd Ferreira, Ana; M Nunes, Fernando; A Oliveira, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Green tea (GT) is one of the most popular beverages worldwide whose beneficial effects on health have been demonstrated. Recent studies suggest that GT may contribute to reduction of cancer risk and progression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole GT on urinary bladder chemical carcinogenesis in male and female ICR mice. The GT characterization was performed using spectrophotometric methods. Urinary bladder lesions were induced using N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) by gavage during 10 weeks and whole GT (0.5%) was provided ad libitum during 20 weeks. Animals from groups BBN+GT and BBN only developed preneoplastic lesions. We did not observe any effects by GT infusion administration on urinary bladder cancer development.

  8. Post-dredging effect assessment based on sediment chemical quality in urban rivers of Yangzhou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jia-Xing

    2017-06-01

    Deteriorating of urban river environment in Yangzhou is gradually serious in recent years. Treatment measures including pollution source control, sewage interception, and sludge dredging have been carried out in recent years, but urban river environment is still poor. In order to ascertain the causes, post-dredging effects were assessed based on sediment chemical quality in urban rivers of Yangzhou. Results indicate that post-dredging effects are not ideal because of backward dredging technique and incomplete pollution control. Eutrophication degree is still relatively high for most of them and pollution degree of nutrients is total phosphorus (TP) > total nitrogen (TN) > organic matter (OM). Although the pollution of heavy metals is not serious, the major pollution factors Cd and Hg should still be monitored intensively in the sludge dredging for the toxic effect of heavy metals.

  9. The effect of biologically and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojniak, Joanna; Biedroń, Izabela; Mendrek, Barbara; Płaza, Grażyna

    2017-11-01

    Bionanotechnology has emerged up as integration between biotechnology and nanotechnology for developing biosynthetic and environmental-friendly technology for synthesis of nanomaterials. Different types of nanomaterials like copper, zinc, titanium, magnesium, gold, and silver have applied in the various industries but silver nanoparticles have proved to be most effective against bacteria, viruses and eukaryotic microorganisms. The antimicrobial property of silver nanoparticles are widely known. Due to strong antibacterial property silver nanoparticles are used, e.g. in clothing, food industry, sunscreens, cosmetics and many household and environmental appliances. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized biologically and chemically on the biofilm formation. The biofilm was formed by the bacteria isolated from the water supply network. The commonly used crystal violet assay (CV) was applied for biofilm analysis. In this study effect of biologically synthesized Ag-NPs on the biofilm formation was evaluated.

  10. Effect of Chemical Treatment of Sesame Stover with NaOH and Urea on Chemical Composition and In vivo Rumen Digestion in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad MALEKKHAHI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the effect of urea, urea sodium hydroxide (NaOH and NaOH + urea on chemical composition and total tract nutrition in sheep. Treated stovers were prepared by mixing stovers with aqueous solution of urea (SU, 3g in 100 ml water /100 g DM, NaOH (SN, 4g in 100 ml water /100g DM and urea + NaOH (SUN. Five male Balouchi sheep (30 ±1.4 kg were used in a change-over design. In vivo experimental diets were as follows: alfalfa hay (AH, alfalfa hay + S (AHS, alfalfa hay + SU (AH SU, alfalfa hay + SN (AHSN and alfalfa hay + SUN (AHSUN. The NDF content significantly (P0.05 in urea and NaOH. The urea caused a significant (P<0.05 increase in CP content of sesame stover. The digestibility coefficients of DM, OM, NDF and ADF increased with chemically treatment of sesame stover. Furthermore, rumen pH was not affected by the chemical treatment, while rumen NH3- N (P<0.05 concentration was enhanced by urea +NaOH treatment. These results suggest that digestibility of DM, OM, CP, NDF and ADF could be improved by chemical treatment with urea and NaOH.

  11. Environmental parameters of the Tennessee River in Alabama. 2: Physical, chemical, and biological parameters. [biological and chemical effects of thermal pollution from nuclear power plants on water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosing, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Physical, chemical and biological water quality data from five sites in the Tennessee River, two in Guntersville Reservoir and three in Wheeler Reservoir were correlated with climatological data for three annual cycles. Two of the annual cycles are for the years prior to the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant operations and one is for the first 14 months of Plant operations. A comparison of the results of the annual cycles indicates that two distinct physical conditions in the reservoirs occur, one during the warm months when the reservoirs are at capacity and one during the colder winter months when the reservoirs have been drawn-down for water storage during the rainy months and for weed control. The wide variations of physical and chemical parameters to which the biological organisms are subjected on an annual basis control the biological organisms and their population levels. A comparison of the parameters of the site below the Power plant indicates that the heated effluent from the plant operating with two of the three reactors has not had any effect on the organisms at this site. Recommendations given include the development of prediction mathematical models (statistical analysis) for the physical and chemical parameters under specific climatological conditions which affect biological organisms. Tabulated data of chemical analysis of water and organism populations studied is given.

  12. The effect of microplastic on chemical uptake by the lugworm Arenicola marina (L.) under environmentally relevant conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ingestion of microplastic increases exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic contaminants. To date, most laboratory studies investigated chemical transfer from ingested microplastic without taking other exposure pathways into account. Therefore we studied the effect

  13. Relationship between chemical composition and biological function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide: effect on human neutrophil chemotaxis and oxidative burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Fomsgaard, A; Conrad, R S

    1991-01-01

    There are conflicting data on the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the function of human neutrophils. The present study was designed to examine the relationship between chemical composition and the modulatory effect of LPS on human neutrophil function. LPS was extracted from five...... no effect on neutrophil chemotaxis and a slight effect on chemiluminescence. The major differences in chemical composition of the LPS from these two strains are in the rhamnose and heptose content of the O side chain and in the alanine content of the core region. These data indicate that chemical...... strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients by the hot phenol-water method. Chemical characterization included neutral sugars, amino components, and fatty acids. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals were preincubated with different concentrations...

  14. Long term effects of chemical weapons on health in Kurdistan of Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizaye, K.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive exposure to chemical weapons such as mustard gas, nerve gas and cyanide caused high mortality, morbidity, injuries, and chronic side effects in vital organs, especially the respiratory tract. Chemical weapons were heavily used by Iraq against Iranian soldiers between 1984-1986. Then, against the Iraqi Kurd in Sheikh Wasan and Balisan valley, during April 1987 and in Halabja on 18th March 1988. Reports suggested that as many as 2.9 percent of the Kurdish population have been exposed to chemical weapon at some level. This case report describes a Kurdish lady who was exposed to mustard gas during a chemical attack in sheikh Wasan in Iraq. A thirty two years old woman wearing black clothes presented to our center at 1999 complaining from shortness of breath (SOB). Her condition started 12 years ago when the Iraqi Government attacked her village Sheikh Wasan by Chemical weapons which included Mustard gas and nerve gases such as Sarin, Tabun and VX in April 1987. She described how the gas smelled like garlic as it spread over the village. During the attack she suffered from sever SOB, cough, skin burn and eyes irritation and lacrimation. After several days of being without medical care, she received some medical attention by local medical staff at the area because the Iraqi authorities at that time refused and prohibited them from management at the major hospitals. After several days when she returned back to her home she found that several members of her family have died during the exposure to chemical gases. Among the dead people were her husband, her son, her brother in addition to other second and third degree relatives. Since that time she suffered from repeated attacks of cough and SOB and wheezing that were increased by exertion and cold exposure. The attacks were more sever with time and the SOB has interfered with her daily activity and even lastly she was suffering from SOB at rest and during sleep that made her unable to sleep lying down. Moreover

  15. Assessing the effectiveness of chemical treatment with nanomaterials in improving the quality of different industrial effluents =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Veronica Ines Jesus Oliveira

    Industrial activities are the major sources of pollution in all environments. Depending on the type of industry, various levels of organic and inorganic pollutants are being continuously discharged into the environment. Although, several kinds of physical, chemical, biological or the combination of methods have been proposed and applied to minimize the impact of industrial effluents, few have proved to be totally effective in terms of removal rates of several contaminants, toxicity reduction or amelioration of physical and chemical properties. Hence, it is imperative to develop new and innovative methodologies for industrial wastewater treatment. In this context nanotechnology arises announcing the offer of new possibilities for the treatment of wastewaters mainly based on the enhanced physical and chemical proprieties of nanomaterials (NMs), which can remarkably increase their adsorption and oxidation potential. Although applications of NMs may bring benefits, their widespread use will also contribute for their introduction into the environment and concerns have been raised about the intentional use of these materials. Further, the same properties that make NMs so appealing can also be responsible for producing ecotoxicological effects. In a first stage, with the objective of selecting NMs for the treatment of organic and inorganic effluents we first assessed the potential toxicity of nanoparticles of nickel oxide (NiO) with two different sizes (100 and 10-20 nm), titanium dioxide (TiO2, wastewater (OMW). They were used as catalyst in photodegradation systems (TiO2/UV, Fe2O3/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV and Fe2O3/H2O2/UV). The treatments with TiO2 or Fe2O3 combined with H2O2 were the most efficient in ameliorating some chemical properties of the effluent. Regarding the toxicity to V. fischeri the highest reduction was recorded for the H2O2/UV system, without NMs. Afterwards a sequential treatment using photocatalytic oxidation with NMs and degradation with white-rot fungi was

  16. Photodynamic Action against Wastewater Microorganisms and Chemical Pollutants: An Effective Approach with Low Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bartolomeu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater (WW from urban and industrial activities is often contaminated with microorganisms and chemical pollutants. To reduce the concentration of microorganisms in WW to levels comparable to those found in natural waters, the sewage effluent is usually subjected to disinfection with chlorine, ozone, or ultraviolet light, which may lead to the formation of toxic products and contribute to the selection of resistant genes. Moreover, the changing patterns of infectious diseases and the emerging of multidrug resistant microbial strains entail the development of new technologies for WW decontamination. Microbial photodynamic inactivation (PDI with photosensitizers, oxygen, and visible light has demonstrated to be effective in the inactivation of microorganisms via photogeneration of reactive oxygen species able to induce microbial damage at the external structures level. The promising results of PDI suggest that this principle can be applied to WW treatment to inactivate microorganisms but also to photodegrade chemical pollutants. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of PDI for the microbial and chemical decontamination of secondarily treated WW. To evaluate the efficiency of bacterial inactivation in WW, experiments were done in both phosphate buffer saline (PBS and filtered WW with the bioluminescent Escherichia coli, using small and large volumes of WW. The potential of PDI to inactivate the native bacteria (E. coli and Enterococcus present in WW was tested and assays without the adding of bacteria to the WW were performed. It was also tested if the same PDI protocol was able to induce phototransformation of phenol. The cationic porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-ylporphyrin tetra-iodide (Tetra-Py+-Me was shown to be effective against both bacterial groups representing both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria used as microbiological parameters to instigate water quality and even showing the power to

  17. Effect of electrical vs. chemical deep brain stimulation at midbrain sites on micturition in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E; Coote, J H; Lovick, T A

    2015-05-01

    To understand how deep brain stimulation of the midbrain influences control of the urinary bladder. In urethane-anaesthetized male rats, saline was infused continuously into the bladder to evoke cycles of filling and voiding. The effect of electrical (0.1-2.0 ms pulses, 5-180 Hz, 0.5-2.5 V) compared to chemical stimulation (microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid, 50 nL 0.1 M solution) at the same midbrain sites was tested. Electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal grey matter and surrounding midbrain disrupted normal coordinated voiding activity in detrusor and sphincters muscles and suppressed urine output. The effect occurred within seconds was reversible and not secondary to cardiorespiratory changes. Bladder compliance remained unchanged. Chemical stimulation over the same area using microinjection of D,L-homocysteic acid (DLH) to preferentially activate somatodendritic receptors decreased the frequency of micturition but did not disrupt the coordinated pattern of voiding. In contrast, chemical stimulation within the caudal ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, in the area where critical synapses in the micturition reflex pathway are located, increased the frequency of micturition. Electrical deep brain stimulation within the midbrain can inhibit reflex micturition. We suggest that the applied stimulus entrained activity in the neural circuitry locally, thereby imposing an unphysiological pattern of activity. In a way similar to the use of electrical signals to 'jam' radio transmission, this may prevent a synchronized pattern of efferent activity being transmitted to the spinal outflows to orchestrate a coordinated voiding response. Further experiments to record neuronal firing in the midbrain during the deep brain stimulation will be necessary to test this hypothesis. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Application of dynamic Bayesian network to risk analysis of domino effects in chemical infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakzad, Nima

    2015-01-01

    A domino effect is a low frequency high consequence chain of accidents where a primary accident (usually fire and explosion) in a unit triggers secondary accidents in adjacent units. High complexity and growing interdependencies of chemical infrastructures make them increasingly vulnerable to domino effects. Domino effects can be considered as time dependent processes. Thus, not only the identification of involved units but also their temporal entailment in the chain of accidents matter. More importantly, in the case of domino-induced fires which can generally last much longer compared to explosions, foreseeing the temporal evolution of domino effects and, in particular, predicting the most probable sequence of accidents (or involved units) in a domino effect can be of significance in the allocation of preventive and protective safety measures. Although many attempts have been made to identify the spatial evolution of domino effects, the temporal evolution of such accidents has been overlooked. We have proposed a methodology based on dynamic Bayesian network to model both the spatial and temporal evolutions of domino effects and also to quantify the most probable sequence of accidents in a potential domino effect. The application of the developed methodology has been demonstrated via a hypothetical fuel storage plant. - Highlights: • A Dynamic Bayesian Network methodology has been developed to model domino effects. • Considering time-dependencies, both spatial and temporal evolutions of domino effects have been modeled. • The concept of most probable sequence of accidents has been proposed instead of the most probable combination of accidents. • Using backward analysis, the most vulnerable units have been identified during a potential domino effect. • The proposed methodology does not need to identify a unique primary unit (accident) for domino effect modeling

  19. Characterization of a 20 kHz sonoreactor. Part II: analysis of chemical effects by classical and electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez Bernal, Verónica; Frías Ferrer, Ángel; Iniesta, Jesus; González García, José; Aldaz Riera, Antonio; Riera Franco de Sarabia, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    A new electrochemical redox probe has been investigated in order to characterize the local production of radicals during the cavitation events. The results have been compared with those obtained with Fe(CN)6 3-/Fe(CN)6 4- (electrochemical probe for local mechanical effects) and classical chemical methods such as iodide and Fricke dosimeters (chemical probes for global effects). Universidad de Alicante (project GR03-05).

  20. Effects of chemical management for invasive plants on the performance of Lithobates pipiens tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Amanda N; Bidart, M Gabriela

    2017-11-01

    Invasive plants impact amphibians by altering habitat, altering species interactions, and releasing potentially toxic secondary chemicals. Despite being costly and having the potential to affect nontarget wildlife, chemical management is commonly used to control invasive plants. Prior research has indicated that individual effects of invasive plants or herbicides can be harmful to aquatic organisms; however, information is lacking on the combined effect of these factors on amphibians. A laboratory experiment was performed to assess the impact of leachates of the invasive plants Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) and European buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), the herbicide Renovate ® 3 (triclopyr [3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinyloxyacetic acid]), and the combined effects of each plant leachate and the herbicide on the growth, morphology, and survival of northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) tadpoles. No effects of treatment on survival were observed. Tadpole exposure to M. spicatum reduced body mass by 17%, exposure to R. cathartica increased body mass by 36%, and exposure to R. cathartica + low herbicide increased body mass by 38% (although only early in the experiment). Exposure to Renovate 3 induced a 16% and 29% decrease in tadpole size in lower (0.22 mg triclopyr active ingredient [a.i.]/L) and higher (0.92 mg triclopyr a.i./L) concentration treatments, respectively. Results from the present study highlight the importance of considering both individual and combined effects of invasive plants and herbicides because they may have different outcomes for tadpole growth and development. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2958-2964. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  1. Hypolipidaemic effect of chemically different mucilages in rats: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boban, Puthenpura T; Nambisan, Bala; Sudhakaran, Perumana R

    2006-12-01

    Different classes of fibres differ in their potential to lower lipid levels. In order to examine how chemically diverse fibres differ in their hypolipidaemic activity, mucilages of varying chemical composition isolated from three different sources were administered to experimental animals and the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins was studied. The mucilages used were a galactomannan isolated from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds, a glucomannan from Dioscorea esculenta tubers and an arabinogalactan from Colocasia esculenta tubers. Rats were fed these mucilages at a dose of 4 mg/100 g body weight per d for 8 weeks and the changes in the levels of total cholesterol and triacylglycerols in serum, liver and aorta were analysed. All these mucilages decreased lipid levels both in serum and tissues. Among these mucilages, glucomannan showed the most hypolipidaemic effect followed by galactomannan and arabinogalactan. Further, hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of mucilage-fed rats and the synthesis and secretion of lipoproteins were studied using metabolic labelling. There was a decrease in the synthesis and secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins, mainly VLDL, by hepatocytes isolated from mucilage-fed rats when compared to control (Pmucilages, mannose-rich glucomannan showed the most effect followed by galactomannan, and mannose-free arabinogalactan showed minimal effect. Comparison of relative viscosity and water-holding capacity showed that mannan-rich mucilages like galactomannan and glucomannan, which showed greater hypolipidaemic effect, had greater relative viscosity and water-holding capacity. The present results suggested that the hypolipidaemic effect of dietary fibre involves a decrease in hepatic production of VLDL and further that it varies with the nature of the fibre.

  2. Model of physico-chemical effect on flow accelerated corrosion in power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Domae, Masafumi; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Model of chemical effect on FAC was developed. → Equation to evaluate the dissolved oxygen concentration for FAC suppression was derived. → The model explains the qualitatively the effect of parameters on FAC rate. → Diffusion of soluble species well reproduces the unique FAC behavior. - Abstract: Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is caused by the accelerated dissolution of protective oxide film under the condition of high flow rate and has been one of the most important subjects in fossil and nuclear power plants. The dominant factors of FAC are water chemistry, material, and fluid dynamics. Understanding of the thinning mechanism is very important to estimate the quantitative effects of the dominant factors on FAC. In this study, a novel model of chemical effect on FAC under the steady-state condition was developed in consideration of the diffusion of soluble iron and chromium species, dissolved hydrogen, and dissolved oxygen. The formula to evaluate the critical concentration of dissolved oxygen for FAC suppression was derived. The present model reproduced qualitatively the effect of major environmental parameters on FAC rate. The model could explain the following facts. (1) The FAC rate shows a peak around 413 K. (2) The FAC rate decreases with an increase in Cr content. (3) The FAC rate decreases with an increase in pH. (4) The FAC rate decreases with an increase in dissolved oxygen concentration. (5) The maximum of critical dissolved oxygen concentration is observed around 353 K. (6) The critical dissolved oxygen concentration decreases with an increase in pH. We conclude that the diffusion of soluble species from the saturated layer under the steady-state condition well reproduces the unique FAC behavior with variation of water chemistry parameters.

  3. Effect of adsorbents and chemical treatments on the removal of strontium from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Zabihi, M.; Tahmasbi, M.; Bastami, T. Rohani

    2010-01-01

    In the present investigation, three different solid wastes namely almond green hull, eggplant hull, and moss were initially treated and used as adsorbents for the adsorption of strontium ion from aqueous solutions. Adsorbent types and chemical treatments are proved to have effective roles on the adsorption of Sr(II) ion. Among the three adsorbents, almond green hull demonstrated strong affinity toward strontium ion in different solutions. The effectiveness of this new adsorbent was studied in batch adsorption mode under a variety of experimental conditions such as: different chemical treatments, various amounts of adsorbent, and initial metal-ion concentration. The optimum doses of adsorbent for the maximum Sr(II) adsorption were found to be 0.2 and 0.3 g for 45 and 102 mg L -1 solutions, respectively. High Sr(II) adsorption efficiencies were achieved only in the first 3 min of adsorbent's contact time. The kinetics of Sr(II) adsorption on almond green hull was also examined and it was observed that it follows the pseudo second-order behavior. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models well predicted the experimental adsorption isotherm data. The maximum adsorption capacity on almond green hull was found to be 116.3 mg g -1 . The present study also confirmed that these low cost agriculture byproducts could be used as efficient adsorbents for the removal of strontium from wastewater streams.

  4. Effect of chemical degradation followed by toothbrushing on the surface roughness of restorative composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Regina Voltarelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the exposure to food-simulating liquids prior to brushing simulation on the surface roughness of five composite materials (Quixfil, Filtek Supreme, Esthet-X, Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram. Material and METHODS: Twenty cylinders (5 mm diameter and 4 mm height of each composite were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=5, according to the food-simulating liquid in which they were immersed for 7 days at 37°C: artificial saliva, heptane, citric acid, and ethanol. After this period, the top surface of composite cylinders was submitted to 7,500 brushing cycles (200 g load. Measurements of the surface roughness (Ra, ¼m were carried out before and after the exposure to the chemicals/brushing simulation. Changes on the morphology of composite surfaces were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA with cofactor / Tukey's test, α=5% detected a significant interaction between solutions and composite resins. Esthet-X, Filtek Z250 and Tetric Ceram were not affected by the food-simulating liquids/toothbrushing. Citric acid and ethanol increased the surface roughness of Quixfil and Filtek Supreme, respectively. SEM images corroborate the surface roughness findings, demonstrating the negative effect from chemical solutions and mechanical abrasion. CONCLUSIONS: The surface roughness of composite resin materials are differently affected by the food-simulating solutions, depending on the immersion media.

  5. Effect of chemical degradation followed by toothbrushing on the surface roughness of restorative composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    VOLTARELLI, Fernanda Regina; dos SANTOS-DAROZ, Claudia Batitucci; ALVES, Marcelo Corrêa; CAVALCANTI, Andrea Nóbrega; MARCHI, Giselle Maria

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of the exposure to food-simulating liquids prior to brushing simulation on the surface roughness of five composite materials (Quixfil, Filtek Supreme, Esthet-X, Filtek Z250, Tetric Ceram). Material and methods Twenty cylinders (5 mm diameter and 4 mm height) of each composite were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=5), according to the food-simulating liquid in which they were immersed for 7 days at 37ºC: artificial saliva, heptane, citric acid, and ethanol. After this period, the top surface of composite cylinders was submitted to 7,500 brushing cycles (200 g load). Measurements of the surface roughness (Ra, µm) were carried out before and after the exposure to the chemicals/brushing simulation. Changes on the morphology of composite surfaces were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The statistical analysis (ANOVA with cofactor / Tukey's test, α=5%) detected a significant interaction between solutions and composite resins. Esthet-X, Filtek Z250 and Tetric Ceram were not affected by the food-simulating liquids/toothbrushing. Citric acid and ethanol increased the surface roughness of Quixfil and Filtek Supreme, respectively. SEM images corroborate the surface roughness findings, demonstrating the negative effect from chemical solutions and mechanical abrasion. Conclusions The surface roughness of composite resin materials are differently affected by the food-simulating solutions, depending on the immersion media. PMID:21308289

  6. Chemical effects of low-energy electron impact on hydrocarbons in the gas phase. II. Propene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derai, R.; Danon, J.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical effects of low-energy (3.5 to 15.0 eV) electron impact on propene were investigated. The setup used for the irradiations has previously been described. Appearance curves for stable products were determined, from which correlations between products and precursors were deduced. In the excitation range, the main precursors are the triplet state at 4.4 eV and various singlet states around 7.0 and 9.0 eV. Above the ionization potential, contribution from superexcited molecules and ions was noted. Superexcited molecules are formed with a much higher cross section than excited molecules. A reaction scheme was proposed to account for the chemical effects associated with excited states and the yields of excited molecules in dissociating states were derived from experimental data. Results concerning the fragmentation of propene excited in singlet states conform to photolysis data. The following new results were obtained: the decomposition of propene excited in the triplet state at 4.4 eV involves mainly C--C bond rupture; the decomposition processes of superexcited and excited molecules are similar. A higher degree of fragmentation is observed in the case of superexcited molecules

  7. The effects of space radiation on a chemically modified graphite-epoxy composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the engineering properties and chemistry of a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite system are characterized. The material was subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th power rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation under vacuum to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous earth orbit. Monotonic tension tests were performed at room temperature (75 F/24 C) and elevated temperature (250 F/121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates. From these tests, inplane engineering and strength properties (E sub 1, E sub 2, Nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T) were determined. Cyclic tests were also performed to characterize energy dissipation changes due to irradiation and elevated temperature. Large diameter graphite fibers were tested to determine the effects of radiation on their stiffness and strength. No significant changes were observed. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature was reduced by 50 F(28 C) after irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated material. The chemical modification of the epoxy did not aid in producing a material which was more radiation resistant than the standard T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. Irradiation was found to cause crosslinking and chain scission in the polymer. The latter produced low molecular weight products which plasticize the material at elevated temperatures and cause apparent material stiffening at low stresses at room temperature.

  8. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Catalá

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others.

  9. The effect of gamma irradiation on the chemical composition and digestible crude protein of poultry excreta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.R.

    1994-06-01

    The changes in the chemical composition, digestible crude protein and cell-wall constituents for two types of excreta of laying hens were studied. In type I, excreta were dried at 170-180 C for 10 minutes whereas in type II dried at 55-60 C for several days. Each type was divided into two parts, the first stored for 3 months with the control. The second part was irradiated by gamma irradiation at 100 KGy and stored for 3 months with the control. The results indicated that here was significant decrease in the crude fibre (CF), NDF and ADF between the samples and the control, for the types I and II where CF, NDF and ADF values, before and after storage, decreased by 12%, 5% and 6%, respectively, ADL values decreased by 8% (I) and 3%(II). Hemicellulose and soluble carbohydrate (NFE) values increased by 5% and 7% for types I and II respectively as a result of irradiation in comparison to the control before and after storage. Gamma irradiation had no effect on crude protein, crude fat, crude ash and digested crude protein for types I and II before and after storage. Drying type I at high temperature in comparison to type II, before and after storage, decreased the crude protein values by 16%. Digested crude protein and CF, decreased 12% and NDF by 7%. Storage of excreta after drying had no effect on the chemical changes due to irradiation for types I and II. (author). 23 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Chemical fate and biological effects of several endocrine disrupters compounds in two echinoderm species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugni, Michela; Tremolada, Paolo; Porte, Cinta; Barbaglio, Alice; Bonasoro, Francesco; Carnevali, M Daniela Candia

    2010-03-01

    Two echinoderm species, the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the feather star Antedon mediterranea, were exposed for 28 days to several EDCs: three putative androgenic compounds, triphenyltin (TPT), fenarimol (FEN), methyltestosterone (MET), and two putative antiandrogenic compounds, p,p'-DDE (DDE) and cyproterone acetate (CPA). The exposure nominal concentrations were from 10 to 3000 ng L(-1), depending on the compound. This paper is an attempt to join three different aspects coming from our ecotoxicological tests: (1) the chemical behaviour inside the experimental system; (2) the measured toxicological endpoints; (3) the biochemical responses, to which the measured endpoints may depend. The chemical fate of the different compounds was enquired by a modelling approach throughout the application of the 'Aquarium model'. An estimation of the day-to-day concentration levels in water and biota were obtained together with the amount assumed each day by each animal (uptake in microg animal(-1) d(-1) or ng g-wet weight(-1) d(-1)). The toxicological endpoints investigated deal with the reproductive potential (gonad maturation stage, gonad index and oocyte diameter) and with the regenerative potential (growth and histology). Almost all the compounds exerted some kind of effect at the tested concentrations, however TPT was the most effective in altering both reproductive and regenerative parameters (also at the concentration of few ng L(-1)). The biochemical analyses of testosterone (T) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) also showed the ability of the selected compounds to significantly alter endogenous steroid concentrations.

  11. Effect of thyme (Thymus vulgaria extract on chemical, microbiological and sensory properties of sausage during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pirouti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the side effects of synthetic food preservatives on human health, more studies have been recently focused on natural preservatives. This research aimed to investigate the effect of Thymus vulgaria extract on some of chemical (TVb-N, microbiological (total count and psychrophilic count and sensory (texture, taste, flavor and color properties of susage during storage. Different concentrations (0, 1%, 2% and 3% of thyme extract were added to the sausage farsh. After the production of sausages, the samples were stored in the refrigerator. During the storage period (0, 14, 28 and 42 days the samples were subjected to chemical, microbialogical and sensory examinations. Results of total microbial count and psychrophilic count revealed a significant (p 0.05 difference was observed among treatment groups (1, 2 and 3% thyme. Regarding the results of sensory assays, no significant difference was observed between the samples containing 1% thyme extract and control group. On the other hand, the difference between the samples containing 1% and 3% thyme extract was not statistically significant (p < 0.05. Considering all above it was concluded that thyme extract at the concentration of 2% could be used as a preservative in sausage.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition grown monolayer graphene field-effect transistors with reduced impurity concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Lee, Alvin

    2015-07-01

    We report on the restoration of the electronic characteristics of waferscale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) monolayer graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) by reducing the impurity concentration. An optimized electropolishing process on copper foils combined with carbon-fluorine encapsulation using a suitable amorphous fluoropolymer enables reducing the surface roughness of graphene and screening out interfacial impurity scattering, which leads to an improvement in all key device metrics. The conductivity at the Dirac point is substantially reduced, resulting in an increase in the on-off current ratio. In addition, the field-effect mobility increased from 1817 to 3918 cm2/V-s, the impurity concentration decreased from 1.1 × 1012 to 2.1 × 1011 cm-2 and the electron and hole transport became more symmetric. Significantly, favorable shifts toward zero voltage were observed in the Dirac point. We postulate that the smoother surface due to electropolishing and a pool of strong dipole-dipole moments in the flouropolymer coating provide a charge buffer that relaxes the fluctuation in the electron-hole puddles. We also investigate the long-term stability in GFETs encapsulated with fluoropolymer, which exhibit a high hydrophobicity that suppresses the chemical interaction with water molecules. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Cooperative biological effects between ionizing radiation and other physical and chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, Lorenzo; D'Arco, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), at environmentally and therapeutically relevant doses or as a result of diagnostics or accidents, causes cyto- and genotoxic damage. However, exposure to IR alone is a rare event as it occurs in spatial and temporal combination with several physico-chemical agents. Some of these are of known noxiousness, as is the case with chemical compounds at high dose, hence additive/synergistic effects can be expected or have been demonstrated. Conversely, the cellular toxicity of other agents, such as non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), is only presumed and their short- and long-term cooperation on IR-induced damage remains undetermined. In this review, we shall examine evidence in support of the interplay between spatially and/or temporally related environmentally relevant stressors. In vitro or animal-based studies as well as epidemiological surveys have generally examined the combined action of no more than a couple of known or potentially DNA-damaging agents. Moreover, most existing research mainly focused on short-term effects of combined exposures. Hence, it is important that quantitative research addresses the issue of the possible cooperation between chronic exposure to environmental trace contaminants and exposure to EMFs, examining not only the modulation of damage acutely induced by IR but also long-term genome stability. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological effects of activation products and other chemicals released from fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Poston, T.M.

    1976-09-01

    Literature reviews indicate that existing information is incomplete, often contradictory, and of questionable value for the prediction and assessment of ultimate impact from fusion-associated activation products and other chemical releases. It is still uncertain which structural materials will be used in the blanket and first wall of fusion power plants. However, niobium, vanadium, vanadium-chromium alloy, vanadium-titanium alloy, sintered aluminum product, and stainless steel have been suggested. The activation products of principal concern will be the longer-lived isotopes of /sup 26/Al, /sup 49/V, /sup 51/Cr, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 93/Nb, and /sup 94/Nb. Lithium released to the environment either during the mining cycle, from power plant operation or accident, may be in the form of a number of compound types varying in solubility and affinity for biological organisms. The effects of a severe liquid metal fire or explosion involving Na or K will vary according to inherent abiotic and biotic features of the affected site. Saline, saline-alkaline, and sodic soils of arid lands would be particularly susceptible to alkaline stress. Beryllium released to the environment during the mining cycle or reactor accident situation could be in the form of a number of compound types. Adverse effects to aquatic species from routine chemical releases (biocides, corrosion inhibitors, dissolution products) may occur in the discharge of both fission and fusion power plant designs.

  15. Investigation on the effect of chemical composition on the texture and bake hardening I F steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariman, M.; Motaghi, A.; Raygan, Sh.; Habibi Parsa, M.; Nili Ahmadabadi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial free steels have good formability and also excellent deep draw ability. These features make them one of the applicable materials in automotive industry. Chemical composition and thermomechanical treatment used to process these steels have important role in final properties of them. In this study, the effect of chemical composition on texture, anisotropic properties and bake harden ability of these steels were investigated. The results showed that contribution of vanadium as a weak carbonitride former element with titanium as strong carbonitride former could change the texture of steels. Replacing titanium with vanadium caused harmful effect on mechanical properties. In this research deep drawing properties of five steels were compared based on I {111} / I{001} and I {111} / I{110} parameters. The results of bake harden ability test showed that there were critical limits for vanadium volume fractions above which bake harden properties was improved. It was shown that the bake harden properties of Nb-steels were better than that of Ti-steels. This was due to the better solution of Nb(C,N) compared to Ti(C,N). Addition of vanadium to Ti-steels may improve bake harden properties of I F steels

  16. Estrogenic chemical effects are independent from the degree of sex role reversal in pipefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárria, Marisa P; Santos, Miguel M; Castro, L Filipe C; Vieira, Natividade M; Monteiro, Nuno M

    2013-12-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported to disturb several ecological relevant endpoints. Surprisingly, EDC-induced effects on fish sexual behaviour have been poorly studied despite the fact that even subtle alterations might contribute to a disruption of sexual interactions, thus negatively impacting reproduction. As the few assessments on sexual behaviour have been conducted in species with orthodox sex roles, it might be argued that sex-role reversed species might provide a potentially complementary system to further explore the effects of EDCs on reproduction. In the present study, two pipefish species with distinct degrees of sex-role reversal were selected to further elucidate the impact of chronic EE2 exposure on sexual behaviour and reproduction-related endpoints. The obtained results indicate that, independently of the degree of sex role reversal, courtship behaviour seems to resist oestrogenic chemical exposure. However, exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 levels did induce a complete absence of pregnancies at 18 ng/L. Even though pregnancies were observed at intermediate concentrations, the percentage of non-transferred or misplaced oocytes increased and a dose-dependent decrease of oocyte volume was observed. Imbalances in the oogenesis process, induction of vitellogenin in males and the absence of pregnancies highlight that environmental relevant concentrations of EE2 have the potential to negatively affect pipefish populations, most of them inhabiting coastal areas where oestrogenic contamination is more prevalent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. General extrapolation model for an important chemical dose-rate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1984-12-01

    In order to extrapolate material accelerated aging data, methodologies must be developed based on sufficient understanding of the processes leading to material degradation. One of the most important mechanisms leading to chemical dose-rate effects in polymers involves the breakdown of intermediate hydroperoxide species. A general model for this mechanism is derived based on the underlying chemical steps. The results lead to a general formalism for understanding dose rate and sequential aging effects when hydroperoxide breakdown is important. We apply the model to combined radiation/temperature aging data for a PVC material and show that this data is consistent with the model and that model extrapolations are in excellent agreement with 12-year real-time aging results from an actual nuclear plant. This model and other techniques discussed in this report can aid in the selection of appropriate accelerated aging methods and can also be used to compare and select materials for use in safety-related components. This will result in increased assurance that equipment qualification procedures are adequate

  18. Effects of different forages on the chemical compositions and antiosteoporotic activities of velvet antlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Sung-Hui; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Lai, Ying-Jang; Wang, Kun-Teng; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-08-01

    For this study, we aimed to assess the dose-response antiosteoporotic effects of the middle section of velvet antlers (VAs) from sika deers (Cervus nippon) fed with different types of fodders. VAs prepared from farmed sika deers fed with feed mixtures containing sorghum distillery residue (VA-SDR) or without SDR (SDR replaced with hay, VA-Hay) were divided into upper (VAU), middle (VAM) and basal (VAB) sections. The chemical constituents of the middle sections obtained from each VA type were compared, and their antiosteoporotic activities were evaluated using rats with ovaries removed surgically (ovariectomy, OVX). The VA-Hay exhibited markedly increased iron and cysteine levels, whereas the VA-SDR exhibited markedly increased level of alcoholic extract and testosterone. Both VA-Hay- and VA-SDR-treated rats exhibited increased femur strength compared with the control group. However, VA-SDR exhibited greater bone-strengthening effects than did VA-Hay. The serum osteocalcin and estradiol levels were significantly moderated in the VA-Hay group alone. These results suggest that VA-SDR and VA-Hay prevent the loss of bone strength, and preserve trabecular architecture connectivity in an estrogen-deficient state. However, differences in the chemical compositions of different forages may be responsible for the varying antiosteoporotic mechanisms observed. Thus, the addition of SDR in deer forage may enhance antiosteoporosis activity in VAs, and confer considerable economic and ecological benefits. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Isoparaffinic diluents for tri-n-butyl phosphate. Chemical, radiation-chemical stability, effect on tetravalent plutonium and thorium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, E.V.; Pyatibratov, Yu.P.; Neumoev, N.V.; Chizhov, A.A.; Kulikov, I.A.; Gol'dfarb, Yu.Ya.; Sirotkina, I.G.; Semenova, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    By means of catalytic hydroisomerization of the n-paraffinic raw material in a reactor using alumino-platinum catalysts, there was attained a 45-90% degree of conversion of n-paraffins into branched iso-paraffins with mono- and dimethyl structure. From a batch of extensively isomerized n-paraffins, by carrying out the operations of distillation of the light (benzine) fraction, dearomatization, de-n-paraffinization and fractional distillation on a rectification column, isoparaffinic (99%) concentrates were obtained with a constant molecular weight, from iso-C 10 to isoC 15 . The solubility of plutonium and thorium nitrates in 30% solutions of TBP in iso-paraffins (mixtures of iso-paraffins with the same number of C-atoms) increases with decrease in the molecular weight of the iso-paraffin; a system with a 30% TBP in a mixture of iso-decanes practically does not stratify (∼104 g Pu/liter, 22-25 degree C). Nevertheless, a twofold increase (compared with NP) of the maximally permissible (up to the formation of the third phase) concentration, is attained when iso-paraffins are introduced into NP with a similar molecular composition in a 1:1 ratio. With respect to the main requirements demanded of diluents for radiochemical extractional operations, such as density, viscosity, boiling point, flash point, and freezing point, the chemical stability and radiation resistance, content of radioruthenium and radiozirconium, rate of stratification of two-phase systems, the synthetic iso-paraffin-containing solvents are as suitable as n-paraffins

  20. Chemical, green and organic manure effects on chemical properties on a savannah oxisol and on corn under conventional tillage and no-tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannigel, Anny R.; Alves, Marlene C.; Valério Filho, Walter V.

    2015-04-01

    Modern agriculture, in general, has always been based on the concept that natural resources are endless; however, this concept is changing. Concern for the environment is increasingly becoming part of farming practices, either by the awareness of society, or because the high cost of fertilizers or even the exhaustion of soils. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of the green manure and mineral fertilizer and/or organic manure and, on the chemical properties of an Oxisol, on "Savannah" (cerrado) area in Mato Grosso do Sul-Brazil, cultivated with corn (Zea mays L.) on the following management conditions: no-tillage and conventional tillage, on area previously under pasture (Brachiaria decumbens). The experimental design was a randomized blocks and the tested treatments were: control (without organic manure or chemical fertilizer); chemical fertilizer, as recommended for the culture and based on the chemical soil analysis; organic manure (cow manure); organic manure + half of the mineral fertilizer recommended rate; and the green manure Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum. The chemical analyses were the soil chemical analysis to the intent of soil fertility. Corn yield was evaluated. The collect of soil samples were realized in depths of 0.00-0.05 m and 0.05-0.10 m and 0.10-0.20 m. The organic manure and the organic manure + half of the mineral recommended rate increased P, Ca, Mg, K and Organic Matter in the first depth (0.00 - 0.05 m). These treatments also increased K and Mg at the second depth analyzed (0.05 - 0.10 m) and K in the depth from 0.10 - 0.20 m. Under conventional tillage management presents better crop results with an average grain yield of 3649 kg ha-1 versus 2374 kg ha-1 obtained under no-tillage. The use of chemical fertilizer, organic manure + half of the mineral recommended rate, Crotalaria juncea, organic manure and Pennisetum americanum increased corn yield by 84, 79, 58, 44 and 41 %, respectively.