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Sample records for chemical development section

  1. Results of Section 4 Chemical Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requires that data be developed on the effect of chemical substances and mixtures on health and the environment. This data...

  2. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  3. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  4. Development of chemical dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergani, F.F.

    2006-03-01

    A chemical dosimeter is a system that measures the energy by virtue of chemical changes from ionizing absorbed radiation produced unit when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. In all chemical dosimeters radiation induced chemical reaction produces at least one, initially absent species, which is properties long lived enough to determine its quantity or the change in the initial systems. Different types of chemical dosimeters were discussed such as aqueous, gaseous and solid, but the great consideration was given to aqueous systems because of their vital role in setting many processes.(Author)

  5. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  6. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  7. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  8. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  9. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  10. Developing cross section sets for fluorocarbon etchants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Successful modeling of plasmas used in materials processing depends on knowledge of a variety of collision cross sections and reaction rates, both within the plasma and at the surface. Electron-molecule collision cross sections are especially important, affecting both electron transport and the generation of reactive fragments by dissociation and ionization. Because the supply of cross section data is small and measurements are difficult, computational approaches may make a valuable contribution, provided they can cope with the significant challenges posed. In particular, a computational method must deal with the full complexity of low-energy electron-molecule interactions, must treat polyatomic molecules, and must be capable of computing cross sections for electronic excitation. These requirements imply that the method will be numerically intensive and thus must exploit high-performance computers to be practical. We have developed an ab initio computational method, the Schwinger multichannel (SMC) method, that possesses the characteristics just described, and we have applied it to compute cross sections for a variety of molecules, with particular emphasis on fluorocarbon and hydrofluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry. A key aspect of this work has been an awareness that cross section sets, validated when possible against swarm data, are more useful than individual cross sections. To develop such sets, cross section calculations must be integrated within a focused collaborative effort. Here we describe electron cross section calculations carried out within the context of such a focused effort, with emphasis on fluorinated hydrocarbons including CHF3 (trifluoromethane), c-C4F8 (octafluorocyclobutane), and C2F4 (tetrafluoroethene)

  11. Development and assessment of frying characteristics, chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development and assessment of frying characteristics, chemical composition, descriptive sensory properties and preference mapping of wheat-orange fleshed sweet potato composite Swahili buns ( Maandazi )

  12. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  13. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  14. 1996 Central New Mexico Section [American Chemical Society] annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, M.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemistry Science and Technology Div.

    1997-02-07

    The main goal of the Central New Mexico Section this year was to increase attendance at the local meetings. Throughout the course of the year attendance at the meeting more than doubled. This was brought on by several factors: having the meeting spread throughout the section (Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Socorro, Los Alamos); supplementing the ACS National Tour speakers with interesting local sections speakers; and making full use of the newly formed Public Relations Committee. Activities during 1996 are summarized.

  15. Prediction of Chemical Function: Model Development and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Exposure Forecaster (ExpoCast) project is developing both statistical and mechanism-based computational models for predicting exposures to thousands of chemicals, including those in consumer products. The high-throughput (HT) screening-level exposures developed under ExpoCast can be combined with HT screening (HTS) bioactivity data for the risk-based prioritization of chemicals for further evaluation. The functional role (e.g. solvent, plasticizer, fragrance) that a chemical performs can drive both the types of products in which it is found and the concentration in which it is present and therefore impacting exposure potential. However, critical chemical use information (including functional role) is lacking for the majority of commercial chemicals for which exposure estimates are needed. A suite of machine-learning based models for classifying chemicals in terms of their likely functional roles in products based on structure were developed. This effort required collection, curation, and harmonization of publically-available data sources of chemical functional use information from government and industry bodies. Physicochemical and structure descriptor data were generated for chemicals with function data. Machine-learning classifier models for function were then built in a cross-validated manner from the descriptor/function data using the method of random forests. The models were applied to: 1) predict chemi

  16. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesper, M.J.; Cross, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 μM) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 μM. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of [ 3 H]IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of [ 3 H]IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H + secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth

  17. Chemical Microsensor Development for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Lukco, Dorothy; Chen, Liangyu; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous aerospace applications, including low-false-alarm fire detection, environmental monitoring, fuel leak detection, and engine emission monitoring, would benefit greatly from robust and low weight, cost, and power consumption chemical microsensors. NASA Glenn Research Center has been working to develop a variety of chemical microsensors with these attributes to address the aforementioned applications. Chemical microsensors using different material platforms and sensing mechanisms have been produced. Approaches using electrochemical cells, resistors, and Schottky diode platforms, combined with nano-based materials, high temperature solid electrolytes, and room temperature polymer electrolytes have been realized to enable different types of microsensors. By understanding the application needs and chemical gas species to be detected, sensing materials and unique microfabrication processes were selected and applied. The chemical microsensors were designed utilizing simple structures and the least number of microfabrication processes possible, while maintaining high yield and low cost. In this presentation, an overview of carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and hydrogen/hydrocarbons (H2/CxHy) microsensors and their fabrication, testing results, and applications will be described. Particular challenges associated with improving the H2/CxHy microsensor contact wire-bonding pad will be discussed. These microsensors represent our research approach and serve as major tools as we expand our sensor development toolbox. Our ultimate goal is to develop robust chemical microsensor systems for aerospace and commercial applications.

  18. Expanding the species and chemical diversity of Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W Peterson

    Full Text Available A set of isolates very similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a BLAST search of ITS similarity among described (GenBank and undescribed Penicillium isolates in our laboratories. DNA was amplified from six loci of the assembled isolates and sequenced. Two species in section Cinnamopurpurea are self-compatible sexual species, but the asexual species had polymorphic loci suggestive of sexual reproduction and variation in conidium size suggestive of ploidy level differences typical of heterothallism. Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species. Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here. Extrolite analysis showed that two of the new species, P. colei and P. monsserratidens produce the mycotoxin citreoviridin that has demonstrated pharmacological activity against human lung tumors. These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research.

  19. Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarning, Esben

    Abstract This thesis entitled Development of Green and Sustainable Chemical Reactions is divided into six chapters involving topics and projects related to green and sustainable chemistry. The chapters can be read independently, however a few concepts and some background information is introduced...... in chapter one and two which can be helpful to know when reading the subsequent chapters. The first chapter is an introduction into the fundamentals of green and sustainable chemistry. The second chapter gives an overview of some of the most promising methods to produce value added chemicals from biomass...... as well as the possibility for establishing a renewable chemical industry is discussed. The development of a procedure for using unsaturated aldehydes as olefin synthons in the Diels- Alder reaction is described in chapter three. This procedure affords good yields of the desired Diels- Alder adducts...

  20. Milestones of Chemical Engineering Development in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hraste, M.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Solving important problems of chemical and process industries stimulated the creation of a new scientific discipline, chemical engineering, which apart from other disciplines includes firm theoretical foundations, core subjects taught to entering students, widely adopted textbooks and journals. The new discipline, at the beginning of the 20th century, provided a way of analyzing the wide variety of processes in terms of small "unit operations". Later, the largely empirical approach of the unit operations was broadened by molecular explanations of macroscopic phenomena. It was not long before chemical engineering extended the operation approach to chemical reaction engineering. At the same time, process optimization prompted the system approach. Instead of looking for details, higher levels of organization were recognized by synthesis. The use of computers has become the key element in process modeling and control. The methods of chemical engineering have extended to other fields, while the discipline keeps the same basis and characteristics.The changes on the global market stimulate new trends in research and education. Product development has become an important segment of the discipline, which presumes an integrated approach to the phenomena and processes at different time and length levels following the possible transfer from molecule to product at process level.This paper mainly deals with the development of this discipline in Croatia, with a preview of the persons that contributed to the acceptance and propagation of the new concepts.

  1. Recent developments in chemical decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Chemical decontamination of parts of reactor coolant systems is a mature technology, used routinely in many BWR plants, but less frequently in PWRs. This paper reviews recent developments in the technology - corrosion minimization, waste processing and full system decontamination, including the fuel. Earlier work was described in an extensive review published in 1990.

  2. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for

  3. Development of Electric and Chemical Microthrusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tajmar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of microsatellites (from 10 kg up to 100 kg as well as CubeSats for a rising number of various missions demands the development of miniaturized propulsion systems. Fotec and The University of Applied Sciences at Wiener Neustadt is developing a number of micropropulsion technologies including both electric and chemical thrusters targeting high performance at small scales. Our electric propulsion developments include a series of FEEP (field emission electric propulsion thrusters, of which the thrust ranges from μN to mN level. The thrusters are highly integrated into clusters of indium liquid-metal-ion sources that can provide ultralow thrust noise and long-term stability. We are also developing a micro PPT thruster that enables pointing capabilities for CubeSats. For chemical thrusters, we are developing novel micromonopropellant thrusters with several hundred mN as well as a 1–3 N bipropellant microrocket engine using green propellants and high specific impulse performance. This paper will give an overview of our micropropulsion developments at Fotec, highlighting performance as well as possible applications.

  4. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING DIVISION BURNUP, CROSS SECTIONS, AND DOSIMETRY SEMIANNUAL REPORT, JANUARY--JUNE 1972.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R P; Dudey, N D; Crouthamel, C E; Tevebaugh, A D; Levenson, M; Vogel, R C

    1972-09-01

    Research and development efforts of the burnup, cross sections and dosimetry programs in the Chemical Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory are reported for the period January to June 1972. Work is reported in the following areas: (1) development of an X-ray spectrometric method for the determination of the rare-earth fission products and application of this method to the determinations of burnup in nuclear fuels; (2) determination of fast ·fission yields of bum up monitors and other fission products; (3) a search for a spon~aneously fissioning isomer of {sup 241}Pu; (4) measurements of the tritium and alpha particle yields in fast-neutron fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; (5) evaluations of available data on the differential cross sections for the {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn and {sup 32}S(n,p){sup 32}P reactions; and (6) measurements of both fission rates by solid-state track recorders and reaction rates by foil activation, in the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility.

  5. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, F.G.

    1994-02-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) mission is to receive and store spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes for disposition for Department of Energy (DOE) in a cost-effective manner that protects the safety of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) employees, the public, and the environment by: Developing advanced technologies to process spent nuclear fuel for permanent offsite disposition and to achieve waste minimization. Receiving and storing Navy and other DOE assigned spent nuclear fuels. Managing all wastes in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Identifying and conducting site remediation consistent with facility transition activities. Seeking out and implementing private sector technology transfer and cooperative development agreements. Prior to April 1992, the ICPP mission included fuel reprocessing. With the recent phaseout of fuel reprocessing, some parts of the ICPP mission have changed. Others have remained the same or increased in scope

  6. Chemical-looping combustion - status of development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyngfelt, Anders; Johansson, Marcus; Mattisson, Tobias

    2008-05-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology with inherent separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier which transfers oxygen from combustion air to the fuel, and hence a direct contact between air and fuel is avoided. Two inter-connected fluidized beds, a fuel reactor and an air reactor, are used in the process. In the fuel reactor, the metal oxide is reduced by the reaction with the fuel and in the air reactor; the reduced metal oxide is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and almost pure stream of CO{sub 2} is obtained when water is condensed. Considerable research has been conducted on CLC in the last years with respect to oxygen carrier development, reactor design, system efficiencies and prototype testing. In 2002 the process was a paper concept, albeit with some important but limited laboratory work on oxygen carrier particles. Today more than 600 materials have been tested and the technique has been successfully demonstrated in chemical-looping combustors in the size range 0.3 - 50 kW, using different types of oxygen carriers based on the metals Ni, Co, Fe, Cu and Mn. The total time of operational experience is more than a thousand hours. From these tests it can be established that almost complete conversion of the fuel can be obtained and 100% CO{sub 2} capture is possible. Most work so far has been focused on gaseous fuels, but the direct application to solid fuels is also being studied. Moreover, the same principle of oxygen transfer is used in chemical-looping reforming (CLR), which involves technologies to produce hydrogen with inherent CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents an overview of the research performed on CLC and CLR highlights the current status of the technology

  7. Advanced development in chemical analysis of Cordyceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Xie, J; Wang, L Y; Li, S P

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, also called DongChongXiaCao (winter worm summer grass) in Chinese, is a well-known and valued traditional Chinese medicine. In 2006, we wrote a review for discussing the markers and analytical methods in quality control of Cordyceps (J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 41 (2006) 1571-1584). Since then this review has been cited by others for more than 60 times, which suggested that scientists have great interest in this special herbal material. Actually, the number of publications related to Cordyceps after 2006 is about 2-fold of that in two decades before 2006 according to the data from Web of Science. Therefore, it is necessary to review and discuss the advanced development in chemical analysis of Cordyceps since then. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Graphs of neutron cross section data for fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asami, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shigeya

    1979-03-01

    Graphs of neutron cross section data relevant to fusion reactor development are presented. Nuclides and reaction types in the present compilation are based on a WRENDA request list from Japan for fusion reactor development. The compilation contains various partial cross sections for 55 nuclides from 6 Li to 237 Np in the energy range up to 20 MeV. (author)

  9. EUROPEAN CHEMICAL INDUSTRY COMPETITIVENESS: HISTORICAL TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENT PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Gladkykh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to analyze historical trends and development prospects of the European chemical industry competitiveness. It is concluded that the chemical industry is one of the EU’s most successful spheres, boasting €527 billion in sales in 2013, making it the second-largest global manufacture. Methodology. To explain the competitiveness of the EU chemical branch in the global market, it is proposed the constant-market share methodology to chemical exports coupled with econometric analysis. Results. The constant market share (CMS approach to assessing competitiveness, developed in the 1970 s for analysis of trade, is based on the principle that changes in the geographic and product structures of exports will affect a country’s export growth relative to that of the world, and that is way its global export market share. There were analyzed the EU biggest exporters (Germany, France, Italy, UK, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, the USA, Japan; China, India, Saudi Arabia, Brazil. Practical implication. The analysis presents the results of competitiveness assessment in a different way, showing the average annual growth rate of EU and world chemical exports in the top section and then decomposing the gap between the two into that thanks to growth dynamics (structure effect and competitive effect. It is defined a lot of factors that are important to industrial competitiveness. On the cost side, in many industries labor is a large enough share of overall production costs that international differences in salaries can have a large bearing on competitiveness. Costs are also affected by a variety of government policies. It is also defined that innovation is one of the most important factors, which opens up new opportunities both in terms of new products and more efficient processes for manufacturing existing products. Value/originality. Given analysis helps to understand the causes and factors that have an impact on the European

  10. Milestones of Chemical Engineering Development in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Hraste, M.

    2007-01-01

    Solving important problems of chemical and process industries stimulated the creation of a new scientific discipline, chemical engineering, which apart from other disciplines includes firm theoretical foundations, core subjects taught to entering students, widely adopted textbooks and journals. The new discipline, at the beginning of the 20th century, provided a way of analyzing the wide variety of processes in terms of small "unit operations". Later, the largely empirical approach of the uni...

  11. [The recent development of fiber-optic chemical sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wei, Jian-ping; Yang, Bo; Gao, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Li-wei; Yang, Xue-feng

    2014-08-01

    The present article provides a brief review of recent research on fiber-optic chemical sensor technology and the future development trends. Especially, fiber-optic pH chemical sensor, fiber-optic ion chemicl sensor, and fiber-optic gas chemical sensor are introduced respectively. Sensing film preparation methods such as chemical bonding method and sol-gel method were briefly reviewed. The emergence of new type fiber-microstructured optical fiber opened up a new development direction for fiber-optic chemical sensor. Because of its large inner surface area, flexible design of structure, having internal sensing places in fibers, it has rapidly become an important development direction and research focus of the fiber-optic chemical sensors. The fiber-optic chemical sensor derived from microstructured optical fiber is also discussed in detail. Finally, we look to the future of the fiber-optic chemical sensor.

  12. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  13. 78 FR 41768 - Chemical Substances and Mixtures Used in Oil and Gas Exploration or Production; TSCA Section 21...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Chapter I Chemical Substances and Mixtures Used in Oil and Gas Exploration or Production... substances and mixtures to maintain certain records and submit reports on those records; TSCA section 8(d) to... related to E&P chemical substances and mixtures; TSCA section 8(c) to request submission of copies of any...

  14. 77 FR 28340 - Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical Substance AGENCY...]- (CAS No. 1324-76-1), also known as C.I. Pigment Blue 61. EPA is basing its decision to take this action... is proposing to amend the TSCA section 4(a) chemical testing requirements for one high production...

  15. Development and Assessment of Frying Characteristics, Chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grating. Solar drying. Dried chips. Milling. Flour. Packing and storage. 131. Dev. & Assessment of Frying Characteristics, Chemical, Sensory & Preference of bun .... Descriptive analysis. A descriptive sensory profiling was conducted by a trained sensory panel of 10 assessors, comprising of four males and six females with.

  16. [Chemical peritonitis after a bladder lesion during a cesarean section. A case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cuenca, Alejandro; Ángel-Muller, Edith; González-Carrillo, Viviana Andrea

    2015-02-01

    This paper reviews the case of a patient who underwent a cesarean surgery and re-entered with an oral way intolerance, postprandial emesis, abdominal pain and clear-fluid exit from surgical wound. After possible bladder injury and secondary chemistry peritonitis, the patient was taken to surgery where the diagnosis was confirmed, and the correction of bladder injury as well as peritoneal lavage were performed, it antibiotic therapy for three days and the patient had satisfactory evolution. Bladder injury is a rare complication of cesarean section with an estimated incidence between 0.0016 and 0.94%; but if it is not diagnosed intraoperative it can trigger a clinical setting of secondary chemical peritonitis, due to secondary irritation of the peritoneum. Chemical peritonitis is among the classification of secondary peritonitis. Within the pathophysiology, the mechanical, chemical or bacterial stimulus generates an inflammatory reaction, with progressive generation of exudate, leukocytes and fibrin deposit, which injure mesothelial cells, disrupt the defense and maintenance of peritoneal homeostasis, triggering serious complications, which can lead to multiple organ failure and death. The chemical peritonitis should be suspected with the clinical setting and the risk factors of recent surgical history and timely management should be instituted properly with correction of the cause, antimicrobial treatment, blood volume therapy and nutritional support, which leads to a favorable outcome for the patient and improves survival with fewer complications.

  17. Discussion on the Development of Green Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2017-11-01

    Chemical industry plays a vital role in the development process of national economy. However, in view of the special nature of the chemical industry, a large number of poisonous and harmful substances pose a great threat to the ecological environment and human health in the entire process of raw material acquisition, production, transportation, product manufacturing, and the final practical application. Therefore, it is a general trend to promote the development of chemistry and chemical engineering towards a greener environment. This article will focus on some basic problems occurred in the development process of green chemistry and chemical engineering.

  18. Development of bioeffect sensor for environmental chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Chiharu; Mochitate, Katsumi; Furuyama, Akiko; Aoki, Yasunobu

    1998-01-01

    In order to obtain culturable MT-gene deletion cell, immortalized cell of transgenic mouse was tried. By using the immortalized cell, establishment on assay system of liver cell toxicity was intended mainly through oxidative stress aiming environmental chemical substances. As a result of trying to isolate Cd resistant cell by culturing MT(-) cell at presence of 30 μM of CdC12, a cell (MT(-)Cdr) showing about twice higher resistance than that of MT(-) cell, it parent cell strain could be obtained. The MT(-)Cdr showed interesting characteristics of showing resistances to not only Cd but also Hg, but showing inversely higher sensitivity to tert-butyl-hydroperoxide and paraquat inducing oxidative stress than the MT(-) cel did. The obtained MT(-) and MT(+) cells were thought to be useful materials to investigate the biological action of MT as well as an assay system of toxicity evaluation of environmental chemicals and others through active oxygen against the liver. (G.K.)

  19. Section 508 Electronic Information Accessibility Requirements for Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Section 508 Subpart B 1194.21 outlines requirements for operating system and software development in order to create a product that is accessible to users with various disabilities. This portion of Section 508 contains a variety of standards to enable those using assistive technology and with visual, hearing, cognitive and motor difficulties to access all information provided in software. The focus on requirements was limited to the Microsoft Windows® operating system as it is the predominant operating system used at this center. Compliance with this portion of the requirements can be obtained by integrating the requirements into the software development cycle early and by remediating issues in legacy software if possible. There are certain circumstances with software that may arise necessitating an exemption from these requirements, such as design or engineering software using dynamically changing graphics or numbers to convey information. These exceptions can be discussed with the Section 508 Coordinator and another method of accommodation used.

  20. Development of Cross Section Library and Application Programming Interface (API)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Marin-Lafleche, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Smith, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-04-09

    The goal of NEAMS neutronics is to develop a high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code termed PROTEUS for use on all reactor types of interest, but focused primarily on sodium-cooled fast reactors. While PROTEUS-SN has demonstrated good accuracy for homogeneous fast reactor problems and partially heterogeneous fast reactor problems, the simulation results were not satisfactory when applied on fully heterogeneous thermal problems like the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is mainly attributed to the quality of cross section data for heterogeneous geometries since the conventional cross section generation approach does not work accurately for such irregular and complex geometries. Therefore, one of the NEAMS neutronics tasks since FY12 has been the development of a procedure to generate appropriate cross sections for a heterogeneous geometry core.

  1. Early Development of a Hazardous Chemical Protective Ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    this material in the Coast Guard’s HCPE System. The Coast Guard decided to make a closer examination of the chemicals for which the materials were...limited employment. Nevertheless the three material HCPE system allows response personnel to be protected against many more CHRIS chemicals than if...objective of Task II was to develop a Hazardous Chemical Protective Ensemble ( HCPE ) which integrated a self-contained breathing apparatus, liquid cooling

  2. Chemical Reactions: What Understanding Do Students with Blindness Develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Amy L. Micklos; Bodner, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the understanding of chemical equations developed by three students with blindness who were enrolled in the same secondary-school chemistry class. The students were interviewed while interpreting and balancing chemical equations. During the course of these interviews, the students produced diagrams using Braille symbols that…

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-COORDINATE VOCABULARY, CHEMICAL PHYSICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LERNER, RITA G.

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A METHOD (SCHEME) FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VOCABULARY IN THE FIELD OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS FROM PRIMARY JOURNAL ARTICLES. ALL TERMS APPEARING IN A RECENT JOURNAL (VOL. 39, JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS) JUDGED TO BE IMPORTANT WERE DIVIDED INTO THREE CATEGORIES--(1) PROPERTIES, PROCESSES, PHENOMENA, (2) OBJECTS, INCLUDING SYSTEMS AND…

  4. Do Thyroid Disrupting Chemicals Influence Foetal Development during Pregnancy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Boas, Malene; Bliddal, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    Maternal euthyroidism during pregnancy is crucial for normal development and, in particular, neurodevelopment of the foetus. Up to 3.5 percent of pregnant women suffer from hypothyroidism. Industrial use of various chemicals-endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-has been shown to cause almost...

  5. 78 FR 27860 - Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical Substance AGENCY... Production Volume (HPV) chemical substance, benzenesulfonic acid, [[4-[[4-(phenylamino)phenyl][4-(phenylimino)-2,5- cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]methyl]phenyl]amino]- (CAS No. 1324-76-1), also known as C.I. Pigment...

  6. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  7. Developing new chemical tools for solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, B.A.; Baes, C.F.; Burns, J.H.; Case, G.N.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bryan, S.A.; Lumetta, G.J.; McDowell, W.J.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Prospects for innovation and for greater technological impact in the field of solvent extraction (SX) seem as bright as ever, despite the maturation of SX as an economically significant separation method and as an important technique in the laboratory. New industrial, environmental, and analytical problems provide compelling motivation for diversifying the application of SX, developing new solvent systems, and seeking improved properties. Toward this end, basic research must be dedicated to enhancing the tools of SX: physical tools for probing the basis of extraction and molecular tools for developing new SX chemistries. In this paper, the authors describe their progress in developing and applying the general tools of equilibrium analysis and of ion recognition in SX. Nearly half a century after the field of SX began in earnest, coordination chemistry continues to provide the impetus for important advancements in understanding SX systems and in controlling SX chemistry. In particular, the physical tools of equilibrium analysis, X-ray crystallography, and spectroscopy are elucidating the molecular basis of SX in unprecedented detail. Moreover, the principles of ion recognition are providing the molecular tools with which to achieve new selectivities and new applications

  8. Prediction of Chemical Function: Model Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Exposure Forecaster (ExpoCast) project is developing both statistical and mechanism-based computational models for predicting exposures to thousands of chemicals, including those in consumer products. The high-throughput (...

  9. Remote Raman Efficiencies and Cross-Sections of Organic and Inorganic Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Maeda, Tayro E; Misra, Anupam K; Porter, John N; Bates, David E; Sharma, Shiv K

    2017-05-01

    We determined Raman cross-sections of various organic liquids and inorganic polyatomic ions in aqueous solutions with a 532 nm pulsed laser using remote Raman systems developed at the University of Hawaii. Using a calibrated integrating sphere as a light source, we converted the intensity counts in the spectrum of the light from the integrating sphere measured with UH remote Raman instrument to spectral radiance. From these data, a response function of the remote Raman instrument was obtained. With the intensity-calibrated instrument, we collected remote Raman data from a standard 1 mm path length fused silica spectrophotometer cell filled with cyclohexane. The measured value of the differential Raman cross-section for the 801 cm -1 vibrational mode of cyclohexane is 4.55 × 10 -30 cm 2 sr -1 molecule -1 when excited by a 532 nm laser, in good agreement with the values reported in the literature. Using the measured cyclohexane Raman cross-section as a reference and relative Raman mode intensities of the various ions and organic liquids, we calculated the Raman cross-sections of the strongest Raman lines of nitrate, sulfate, carbonate, phosphate ions, and organic liquids by maintaining same experimental conditions for remote Raman detection. These relative Raman cross-section values will be useful for estimating detection capabilities of remote Raman systems for planetary exploration.

  10. Development of techniques for tagging precursor and essential chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansiger, W.A.; Shepodd, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Phillips, M.L.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The ability to identify the manufacturers and distributors of chemicals seized in raids of illicit drug labs would be of great value in controlling the diversion of these chemicals. We developed a tagging scheme based on the addition of sub-ppM concentrations of various combinations of rare-earth elements to the target chemicals and evaluated a number of techniques for detecting the tags. We developed soluble tags for tagging liquids and selected Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the preferred detection technique. We developed insoluble tags for tagging solids and developed methods to analyze them and mix them into solid precursors. We have successfully demonstrated the tagging of several solvents and two of the precursor chemicals used in one of the most popular clandestine methamphetamine syntheses (ephedrine reacting with hydriodic acid/red phosphorus). The tagging scheme is capable of yielding tens of thousands of signatures (using holmium as an internal standard and up to 9 rare-earths at up to 3 concentrations yields 3{sup 9} {minus} 1 = 19,682 signatures) and is applicable to most of the chemicals on the precursor and essential chemicals list. In the concentrations employed, the tags are safe enough to be added to pharmaceuticals and cheap enough to tag tanker loads of chemicals.

  11. Persistent, Bioaccumulative, and Toxic (PBT) Chemicals under TSCA Section 6(h)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  12. Regulation of Chemicals under Section 6(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  13. Development of chemical flocculant for wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jang Jin; Shin, J. M.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, M. J.; Yang, M. S.; Park, H. S.

    2000-12-01

    Reagents 'KAERI-I and KAERI-II' which were developed as coagulants for industrial wastewater treatment in the study showed far superior performance to the existing inorganic coagulants such as Alum and Iron salt(FeSO4) when compared to their wastewater treatment performance in color and COD removal. Besides, it was not frozen at -25 deg C ∼ -30 deg C. When reagents 'KAERI-I and KAERI-II' were used as coagulant for wastewater treatment, the proper dosage was ranged from 0.1% to 0.5%(v/v) and proper pH range was 10.5 ∼ 11.5 in the area of alkaline pH.Reagents 'KAERI-I and KAERI-II' showed good performance with 95% or more removal of color-causing material and 60% or more removal of COD

  14. Developing Scientific Reasoning Through Drawing Cross-Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cross-sections and 3D models of subsurface geology are typically based on incomplete information (whether surface geologic mapping, well logs, or geophysical data). Creating and evaluating those models requires spatial and quantitative thinking skills (including penetrative thinking, understanding of horizontality, mental rotation and animation, and scaling). However, evaluating the reasonableness of a cross-section or 3D structural model also requires consideration of multiple possible geometries and geologic histories. Teaching students to create good models requires application of the scientific methods of the geosciences (such as evaluation of multiple hypotheses and combining evidence from multiple techniques). Teaching these critical thinking skills, especially combined with teaching spatial thinking skills, is challenging. My Structural Geology and Advanced Structural Geology courses have taken two different approaches to developing both the abilities to visualize and to test multiple models. In the final project in Structural Geology (a 3rd year course with a pre-requisite sophomore mapping course), students create a viable cross-section across part of the Wyoming thrust belt by hand, based on a published 1:62,500 geologic map. The cross-section must meet a number of geometric criteria (such as the template constraint), but is not required to balance. Each student tries many potential geometries while trying to find a viable solution. In most cases, the students don't visualize the implications of the geometries that they try, but have to draw them and then erase their work if it does not meet the criteria for validity. The Advanced Structural Geology course used Midland Valley's Move suite to test the cross-sections that they made in Structural Geology, mostly using the flexural slip unfolding algorithm and testing whether the resulting line lengths balanced. In both exercises, students seemed more confident in the quality of their cross-sections when the

  15. Chemical screening and development of novel gibberellin mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Shimotakahara, Hiroaki; Luo, Ming; Otani, Masato; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Moselhy, Said Salama; Abualnaja, Khalid Omer; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman Labeed; Kumosani, Taha Abduallah; Kitahata, Nobutaka; Nakano, Takeshi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao

    2017-08-15

    Gibberellin (GA) plays versatile roles in the regulation of plant growth and development and therefore is widely used as a regulator in agriculture. We performed a chemical library screening and identified a chemical, named 67D, as a stimulator of seed germination that was suppressed by paclobutrazol (PAC), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor. In vitro binding assays indicated that 67D binds to the GID1 receptor. Further studies on the structure-activity relationship identified a chemical, named chemical 6, that strongly promoted seed germination suppressed by PAC. Chemical 6 was further confirmed to promote the degradation of RGA (for repressor of ga1-3), a DELLA protein, and suppress the expression levels of GA3ox1 in the same manner as GA does. 67D and its analogs are supposed to be agonists of GID1 and are expected to be utilized in agriculture and basic research as an alternative to GA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Frank [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

    2013-10-31

    A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

  17. Compendium of shock wave data. Section C. Organic compounds excluding hydrocarbons. Section D. Mixtures. Section E. Mixtures and solutions without chemical characterization. Compendium index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Thiel, M.; shaner, J.; Salinas, E.

    1977-06-01

    This volume lists thermodynamic data for organic compounds excluding hydrocarbons, mixtures, and mixtures and solutions without chemical characterization. Alloys and some minerals are included among the mixtures. This volume also contains the index for the three-volume compendium

  18. Coal chemical industry and its sustainable development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Kechang; Li, Wenying; Zhao, Wei

    2010-01-01

    China is rich in coal resource, which is vital for energy security in this country. In early 21st century, the coal chemical industry in China will be oriented to the development of high efficiency, safety, cleanliness, and optimum utilization. In this review, the authors present an introduction to the utilization status of primary energy production and consumption in China. Since 2005, fundamental research studies, supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Chinese National Basic Research Program, have been carried out at Taiyuan University of Technology. The Ministry stresses that the new coal chemical industry should be developed in a sustainable manner to realize effective utilization of energy. Moreover, upgrading the high technology to improve actively the recycling processes of coal chemical engineering is of strategic importance to realize the modern coal chemical engineering.

  19. Thyroid-disrupting chemicals and brain development: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal B Mughal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This review covers recent findings on the main categories of thyroid hormone–disrupting chemicals and their effects on brain development. We draw mostly on epidemiological and experimental data published in the last decade. For each chemical class considered, we deal with not only the thyroid hormone–disrupting effects but also briefly mention the main mechanisms by which the same chemicals could modify estrogen and/or androgen signalling, thereby exacerbating adverse effects on endocrine-dependent developmental programmes. Further, we emphasize recent data showing how maternal thyroid hormone signalling during early pregnancy affects not only offspring IQ, but also neurodevelopmental disease risk. These recent findings add to established knowledge on the crucial importance of iodine and thyroid hormone for optimal brain development. We propose that prenatal exposure to mixtures of thyroid hormone–disrupting chemicals provides a plausible biological mechanism contributing to current increases in the incidence of neurodevelopmental disease and IQ loss.

  20. Development of the 2007 Chemical Decontaminant Source Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    be calculated using the contact sampler results (note definition as total measured agent, evaporative loss between touches is not included). The...Chemical Agent Simulant Specific DEM diethyl malonate MeS methyl salicylate PEG200 Polyethylene glycol 200 TEP triethyl phosphate Group 6...section contains the definitions for key terminology in this document. Some of the definitions are focused on the specific use or context of the test

  1. Development of chemical process for synthesis of polyunsaturated esters

    OpenAIRE

    Vera LÃcia Viana do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to develop refining processes, chemical alcoholysis followed by separation of fatty acids using the complexation with urea technique for the synthesis of poly-unsaturated esters from waste of fish oils. The special crude fish oil was purchased from Company Campestre - SÃo Paulo. Initially this oil has undergone a process of physical and chemical refining. From the refined oil, an alcoholysis process was carried out to obtain the mixture of free fatty acids. From the hydrolyzed...

  2. High-Throughput Automation in Chemical Process Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selekman, Joshua A; Qiu, Jun; Tran, Kristy; Stevens, Jason; Rosso, Victor; Simmons, Eric; Xiao, Yi; Janey, Jacob

    2017-06-07

    High-throughput (HT) techniques built upon laboratory automation technology and coupled to statistical experimental design and parallel experimentation have enabled the acceleration of chemical process development across multiple industries. HT technologies are often applied to interrogate wide, often multidimensional experimental spaces to inform the design and optimization of any number of unit operations that chemical engineers use in process development. In this review, we outline the evolution of HT technology and provide a comprehensive overview of how HT automation is used throughout different industries, with a particular focus on chemical and pharmaceutical process development. In addition, we highlight the common strategies of how HT automation is incorporated into routine development activities to maximize its impact in various academic and industrial settings.

  3. Development of high power chemical oxygen lodine laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Choi, Y. D.; Chung, C. M.; Kim, M. S.; Baik, S. H.; Kwon, S. O.; Park, S. K.; Kim, T. S

    2001-10-01

    This project is directed to construct 10kW Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) for decommissioning of old nuclear facilities, and to get the key technology that can be used for the development of high energy laser weapon. COIL is possible up to MW class in proportion to the amount of chemical reaction. For this reason, high energy laser weapon including Airborne Laser (ABL) and Airborne Tactical Laser (ATL) has been developed as a military use in USA. Recently, many research group have been doing a development study of COIL for nuclear and industrial use in material processing such as cutting and decommissioning by combining laser beam delivery through optical fiber. The Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser of 6 kW output power has been developed in this project. The main technologies of chemical reaction and supersonic fluid control were developed. This technology can be applied for construction of 10 kW laser system. This laser can be used for old nuclear facilities and heavy industry by combining laser beam delivery through optical fiber. The development of High Energy Laser (HEL) weapon is necessary as a military use, and we conclude that Airborne Tactical Laser should be developed in our country.

  4. Development of radar cross section analysis system of naval ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kookhyun; Kim, Jin-Hyeong; Choi, Tae-Muk; Cho, Dae-Seung

    2012-03-01

    A software system for a complex object scattering analysis, named SYSCOS, has been developed for a systematic radar cross section (RCS) analysis and reduction design. The system is based on the high frequency analysis methods of physical optics, geometrical optics, and physical theory of diffraction, which are suitable for RCS analysis of electromagnetically large and complex targets as like naval ships. In addition, a direct scattering center analysis function has been included, which gives relatively simple and intuitive way to discriminate problem areas in design stage when comparing with conventional image-based approaches. In this paper, the theoretical background and the organization of the SYSCOS system are presented. To verify its accuracy and to demonstrate its applicability, numerical analyses for a square plate, a sphere and a cylinder, a weapon system and a virtual naval ship have been carried out, of which results have been compared with analytic solutions and those obtained by the other existing software.

  5. Development of radar cross section analysis system of naval ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kookhyun Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A software system for a complex object scattering analysis, named SYSCOS, has been developed for a systematic radar cross section (RCS analysis and reduction design. The system is based on the high frequency analysis methods of physical optics, geometrical optics, and physical theory of diffraction, which are suitable for RCS analysis of electromagnetically large and complex targets as like naval ships. In addition, a direct scattering center analysis function has been included, which gives relatively simple and intuitive way to discriminate problem areas in design stage when comparing with conventional image-based approaches. In this paper, the theoretical background and the organization of the SYSCOS system are presented. To verify its accuracy and to demonstrate its applicability, numerical analyses for a square plate, a sphere and a cylinder, a weapon system and a virtual naval ship have been carried out, of which results have been compared with analytic solutions and those obtained by the other existing software.

  6. Green Toxicology: a strategy for sustainable chemical and material development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sarah E; Hartung, Thomas; Hollert, Henner; Mathes, Björn; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Studer, Christoph; Krug, Harald F

    2017-01-01

    Green Toxicology refers to the application of predictive toxicology in the sustainable development and production of new less harmful materials and chemicals, subsequently reducing waste and exposure. Built upon the foundation of "Green Chemistry" and "Green Engineering", "Green Toxicology" aims to shape future manufacturing processes and safe synthesis of chemicals in terms of environmental and human health impacts. Being an integral part of Green Chemistry, the principles of Green Toxicology amplify the role of health-related aspects for the benefit of consumers and the environment, in addition to being economical for manufacturing companies. Due to the costly development and preparation of new materials and chemicals for market entry, it is no longer practical to ignore the safety and environmental status of new products during product development stages. However, this is only possible if toxicologists and chemists work together early on in the development of materials and chemicals to utilize safe design strategies and innovative in vitro and in silico tools. This paper discusses some of the most relevant aspects, advances and limitations of the emergence of Green Toxicology from the perspective of different industry and research groups. The integration of new testing methods and strategies in product development, testing and regulation stages are presented with examples of the application of in silico, omics and in vitro methods. Other tools for Green Toxicology, including the reduction of animal testing, alternative test methods, and read-across approaches are also discussed.

  7. Development of Chemical Technology in Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Kwang Yong; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    This project mainly concentrates on the development of technologies related to elemental analysis for the mass balance of pyro-chemical process, on the development of in-line measurement system for high temperature molten salt, and on the development of radiation shielded LA-ICP-MS and micro-XRD system to evaluate the integrity of nuclear fuel. Chemical analysis methods for the quantitative determination of fissile elements, minor actinide elements, fission products, chemical additive and corrosion products in Uranium Metal Ingots are established. It will be applied to the evaluation of mass balance in electrolytic reduction process for the optimization of the process. Optical fiber based UV-VIS spectrophotometer combined with reaction cell was developed for the measurement of reactions in high temperature molten salt. This system is applicable to in-line monitoring of electro-refining process and contribute to clarify the chemical reactions. Radiation shielded LA-ICP-MS and micro-XRD systems are planned to be used for the analysis of isotopic distribution and structural changes from core to rim of spent nuclear fuel pellet, respectively. The developed techniques can contribute to produce database needed for authorization and practical use of ultra high burn-up fuel. In addition, it can be applicable to the other industries such as microelectronics, nano material science and semiconductor to analyze micro region

  8. Chemical Fingerprinting of Materials Developed Due To Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Doris A.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on chemical fingerprinting of materials developed due to environmental issues. Some of the topics include: 1) Aerospace Materials; 2) Building Blocks of Capabilities; 3) Spectroscopic Techniques; 4) Chromatographic Techniques; 5) Factors that Determine Fingerprinting Approach; and 6) Fingerprinting: Combination of instrumental analysis methods that diagnostically characterize a material.

  9. IMS software developments for the detection of chemical warfare agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepel, ST.; Graefenhain, U.; Lippe, R.; Stach, J.; Starrock, V.

    1995-01-01

    Interference compounds like gasoline, diesel, burning wood or fuel, etc. are presented in common battlefield situations. These compounds can cause detectors to respond as a false positive or interfere with the detector's ability to respond to target compounds such as chemical warfare agents. To ensure proper response of the ion mobility spectrometer to chemical warfare agents, two special software packages were developed and incorporated into the Bruker RAID-1. The programs suppress interferring signals caused by car exhaust or smoke gases resulting from burning materials and correct the influence of variable sample gas humidity which is important for detection and quantification of blister agents like mustard gas or lewisite.

  10. Do Thyroid Disrupting Chemicals Influence Foetal Development during Pregnancy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Boas, Malene; Bliddal, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    constant exposure of humans with possible harmful influence on health and hormone regulation. EDCs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis by different mechanisms, and though the effect of each chemical seems scarce, the added effects may cause inappropriate consequences on, for example, foetal...... neurodevelopment. This paper focuses on thyroid hormone influence on foetal development in relation to the chemicals suspected of thyroid disrupting properties with possible interactions with maternal thyroid homeostasis. Knowledge of the effects is expected to impact the general debate on the use...

  11. Chemical water shutoff profile research status and development trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L. T.

    2017-08-01

    Excess water production is now a common problem encountered in almost every water flooding mature oilfield. The exploitation of oil field is faced with great challenge because of the decrease of oil field production. For the development of high water cut rare the status quo chemical water shutoff profile control technology is an important solution to solve this problem. Oilfield chemical water shutoff has important application prospects. This paper analyzes the water shutoff profile control and water shutoff profile control agent currently oilfield applications, moreover the use and development of blocking agent profile technology is to improve reservoir recovery and propose solutions. With the constant increase in water cut, profile technology should be simple, efficient, practical and profile control agent of development should be economic, environmental, and long period

  12. Advancements in Development of Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical-looping combustion (CLC is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of greenhouse CO2. Extensive research has been performed on CLC in the last decade with respect to oxygen carrier development, reaction kinetics, reactor design, system efficiencies, and prototype testing. Transition metal oxides, such as Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn oxides, were reported as reactive species in the oxygen carrier particles. Ni-based oxygen carriers exhibited the best reactivity and stability during multiredox cycles. The performance of the oxygen carriers can be improved by changing preparation method or by making mixedoxides. The CLC has been demonstrated successfully in continuously operated prototype reactors based on interconnected fluidized-bed system in the size range of 0.3–50 kW. High fuel conversion rates and almost 100%  CO2 capture efficiencies were obtained. The CLC system with two interconnected fluidized-bed reactors was considered the most suitable reactor design. Development of oxygen carriers with excellent reactivity and stability is still one of the challenges for CLC in the near future. Experiences of building and operating the large-scale CLC systems are needed before this technology is used commercially. Chemical-looping reforming (CLR and chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH are novel chemical-looping techniques to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen deserving more attention and research.

  13. Development of new thioester equivalents for protein chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ji-Shen; Tang, Shan; Huang, Yi-Chao; Liu, Lei

    2013-11-19

    The chemical synthesis of proteins provides synthetic chemists with an interesting challenge and supports biological research through the generation of proteins that are not produced naturally. Although it offers advantages, studies of solid phase peptide synthesis have established limits for this technique: researchers can only prepare peptides up to 50 amino acids in length in sufficient yields and purity. Therefore, researchers have developed techniques to condense peptide segments to build longer polypeptide chains. The method of choice for chemical synthesis of these longer polypeptides is convergent condensation of unprotected protein fragments by the native chemical ligation reaction in aqueous buffer. As researchers apply this strategy to increasingly difficult protein targets, they have needed to overcome diverse problems such as the requirement for a thiol-containing amino acid residue at the ligation site, the difficulty in synthesizing thioester intermediates under mild conditions, and the challenge of condensing multiple peptide segments with higher efficiency. In this Account, we describe our research toward the development of new thioester equivalents for protein chemical synthesis. We have focused on a simple idea of finding new chemistry to selectively convert a relatively "low-energy" acyl group such as an ester or amide to a thioester under mild conditions. We have learned that this seemingly unfavorable acyl substitution process can occur by the coupling of the ester or amide with another energetically favorable reaction, such as the irreversible hydrolysis of an enamine or condensation of a hydrazide with nitrous acid. Using this strategy, we have developed several new thioester equivalents that we can use for the condensation of protein segments. These new thioester equivalents not only improve the efficiency for the preparation of the intermediates needed for protein chemical synthesis but also allow for the design of new convergent routes

  14. Content Model Use and Development to Redeem Thin Section Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a catalog of documents and datasets that provide information about geothermal resources located primarily within the United States. The goal of NGDS is to make large quantities of geothermal-relevant geoscience data available to the public by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, and interoperable network of data providers. The Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) has been a data provider in the initial phase of NGDS. One method by which NGDS facilitates interoperability is through the use of content models. Content models provide a schema (structure) for submitted data. Schemas dictate where and how data should be entered. Content models use templates that simplify data formatting to expedite use by data providers. These methodologies implemented by NGDS can extend beyond geothermal data to all geoscience data. The GSA, using the NGDS physical samples content model, has tested and refined a content model for thin sections and thin section photos. Countless thin sections have been taken from oil and gas well cores housed at the GSA, and many of those thin sections have related photomicrographs. Record keeping for these thin sections has been scattered at best, and it is critical to capture their metadata while the content creators are still available. A next step will be to register the GSA's thin sections with SESAR (System for Earth Sample Registration) and assign an IGSN (International Geo Sample Number) to each thin section. Additionally, the thin section records will be linked to the GSA's online record database. When complete, the GSA's thin sections will be more readily discoverable and have greater interoperability. Moving forward, the GSA is implementing use of NGDS-like content models and registration with SESAR and IGSN to improve collection maintenance and management of additional physical samples.

  15. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  16. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  17. Design and development workshop interior design and furniture section

    OpenAIRE

    Fadhel saif bushehri

    2016-01-01

    International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) is an open access online peer reviewed international journal that publishes research and review articles in the fields of Computer Science, Neural Networks, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering, Information Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Plastic Engineering, Food Technology, Textile Engineering, Nano Technology & science, Power Electronics, Electronics & Communication Engineering, Computa...

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPTROLLER'S SECTION, SADF, 1966-1976

    OpenAIRE

    R.J. Bouch

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: the SecretariatThe Comptroller's Section of the SA Defence Force as it exists today is the inheritor of many of the functions of the civilian Defence Secretariat which was abolished in 1966.

  19. New Chemical Information Bulletin: Exemptions for Research and Development and Test Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has received numerous questions about the scope of the exemption for R&D, under TSCA section 5(h)(3). This New Chemical Information Bulletin provides more specific guidance to manufacturers and processors of new chemical substances.

  20. Development of Improved Chemicals and Plastics from Oilseeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Patricia A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2006-11-09

    The overall objective of this program was to develop technology that can be applied to the production of various chemicals and plastics from seed oils. This research and development program included activities in all four key barrier areas identified in the US DOE Technology Roadmap for Plant/Crop-Based Renewable Resources, namely Plant Science, Production, Processing, and Utilization. Participants in the project included The Dow Chemical Company, Castor Oil, Inc., and the USDA Western Regional Research Center (WRRC). The objective of this production task was to evaluate and develop metathesis catalyst technology as a means of utilizing seed oils as feedstocks for the chemical industry. Specifically, ethenolysis of fatty acid methyl esters, FAME’s, leads to functionalized derivatives. These serve as valuable starting points for materials which cascade into a variety of applications, many of which have a current market presence. The relatively recent discovery and commercial availability of a family of metathesis catalysts which are tolerant of polar functional groups and the acquisition and implementation of high throughput synthesis and screening infrastructure led to a prime opportunity to investigate this project area.

  1. 1995 Toxic chemical release inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincey, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Executive Order 12856, 'Federal Compliance With Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements' extends the requirements of EPCRA to all Federal agencies. The following document is the August 1996 submittal of the Hanford Site Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report. Included is a Form R for ethylene glycol, the sole chemical used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during Calendar Year 1995

  2. Developing Autonomic and Secure Virtual Organisations with Chemical Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Alvaro E.; Banâtre, Jean-Pierre; Priol, Thierry

    This paper studies the development of autonomic and secure Virtual Organisations (VOs) when following the chemical-programming paradigm. We have selected the Higher-Order Chemical Language (HOCL) as the representative of the chemical paradigm, due mainly to its generality, its implicit autonomic property, and its potential application to emerging computing paragidms such as Grid computing and service computing. We have advocated the use of aspect-oriented techniques, where autonomicity and security can be seen as cross-cutting concerns impacting the whole system. We show how HOCL can be used to model VOs, exemplified by a VO system for the generation of digital products. We develop patterns for HOCL, including patterns for traditional security properties such as authorisation and secure logs, as well as autonomic properties such as self-protection and self-healing. The patterns are applied to HOCL programs following an aspect-oriented approach, where aspects are modelled as transformation functions that add to a program a cross-cutting concern.

  3. 77 FR 15609 - Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for Certain High Production Volume Chemical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... for C.I. Pigment Blue 61, providing a structure- activity relationship (SAR) argument in the test plan... section 4. July 2007. (Document ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT- 2005-0033-0343). 7. Organisation for Economic Co...

  4. Free Radicals in Chemical Biology: from Chemical Behavior to Biomarker Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Carla; Masi, Annalisa; Melchiorre, Michele; Sansone, Anna; Terzidis, Michael A.; Torreggiani, Armida

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of free radicals in life sciences has constantly increased with time and has been connected to several physiological and pathological processes. This subject embraces diverse scientific areas, spanning from physical, biological and bioorganic chemistry to biology and medicine, with applications to the amelioration of quality of life, health and aging. Multidisciplinary skills are required for the full investigation of the many facets of radical processes in the biological environment and chemical knowledge plays a crucial role in unveiling basic processes and mechanisms. We developed a chemical biology approach able to connect free radical chemical reactivity with biological processes, providing information on the mechanistic pathways and products. The core of this approach is the design of biomimetic models to study biomolecule behavior (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins) in aqueous systems, obtaining insights of the reaction pathways as well as building up molecular libraries of the free radical reaction products. This context can be successfully used for biomarker discovery and examples are provided with two classes of compounds: mono-trans isomers of cholesteryl esters, which are synthesized and used as references for detection in human plasma, and purine 5',8-cyclo-2'-deoxyribonucleosides, prepared and used as reference in the protocol for detection of such lesions in DNA samples, after ionizing radiations or obtained from different health conditions. PMID:23629513

  5. Automated Physico-Chemical Cell Model Development through Information Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Ortoleva

    2005-11-29

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive models of the chemical responses of microbial cells to variations in their surroundings. The application of these models is optimization of environmental remediation and energy-producing biotechnical processes.The principles on which our project is based are as follows: chemical thermodynamics and kinetics; automation of calibration through information theory; integration of multiplex data (e.g. cDNA microarrays, NMR, proteomics), cell modeling, and bifurcation theory to overcome cellular complexity; and the use of multiplex data and information theory to calibrate and run an incomplete model. In this report we review four papers summarizing key findings and a web-enabled, multiple module workflow we have implemented that consists of a set of interoperable systems biology computational modules.

  6. Recent Developments in Chemical Synthesis with Biocatalysts in Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh K. Potdar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, a variety of ionic liquids have emerged as greener solvents for use in the chemical manufacturing industries. Their unique properties have attracted the interest of chemists worldwide to employ them as replacement for conventional solvents in a diverse range of chemical transformations including biotransformations. Biocatalysts are often regarded as green catalysts compared to conventional chemical catalysts in organic synthesis owing to their properties of low toxicity, biodegradability, excellent selectivity and good catalytic performance under mild reaction conditions. Similarly, a selected number of specific ionic liquids can be considered as greener solvents superior to organic solvents owing to their negligible vapor pressure, low flammability, low toxicity and ability to dissolve a wide range of organic and biological substances, including proteins. A combination of biocatalysts and ionic liquids thus appears to be a logical and promising opportunity for industrial use as an alternative to conventional organic chemistry processes employing organic solvents. This article provides an overview of recent developments in this field with special emphasis on the application of more sustainable enzyme-catalyzed reactions and separation processes employing ionic liquids, driven by advances in fundamental knowledge, process optimization and industrial deployment.

  7. Chemical Looping Combustion of Methane: A Technology Development View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutuja Bhoje

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane is a reliable and an abundantly available energy source occurring in nature as natural gas, biogas, landfill gas, and so forth. Clean energy generation using methane can be accomplished by using chemical looping combustion. This theoretical study for chemical looping combustion of methane was done to consider some key technology development points to help the process engineer choose the right oxygen carrier and process conditions. Combined maximum product (H2O + CO2 generation, weight of the oxygen carrier, net enthalpy of CLC process, byproduct formation, CO2 emission from the air reactor, and net energy obtainable per unit weight (gram of oxygen carrier in chemical looping combustion can be important parameters for CLC operation. Carbon formed in the fuel reactor was oxidised in the air reactor and that increased the net energy obtainable from the CLC process but resulted in CO2 emission from the air reactor. Use of CaSO4 as oxygen carrier generated maximum energy (−5.3657 kJ, 800°C per gram of oxygen carrier used in the CLC process and was found to be the best oxygen carrier for methane CLC. Such a model study can be useful to identify the potential oxygen carriers for different fuel CLC systems.

  8. The Application of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing miniature chemical sensors for a variety of applications including fire detection, emissions monitoring, fuel leak detection, and environmental monitoring. Smart Lick and Stick sensor technology which integrates a sensor array, electronics, telemetry, and power into one microsystem are being developed. These microsystems require low power consumption for long-term aerospace applications. One approach to decreasing power consumption is the use of nanotechnology. Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) carbon monoxide (CO) sensors developed previously by this group have been successfully used for fire detection and emissions monitoring. This presentation will briefly review the overall NASA GRC chemical sensor program and discuss our further effort in nanotechnology applications. New carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing material using doped nanocrystalline SnO2 will be discussed. Nanocrystalline SnO2 coated solid electrolyte CO2 sensors and SnO2 nanorod and nanofiber hydrogen (H2) sensors operated at reduced or room temperatures will also be discussed.

  9. Chemical and biological comparison of different sections of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Gou-Teng).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Gang; Geng, Chang-An; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Xing-Long; Ma, Yun-Bao; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2017-02-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (Gou-Teng in Chinese) is officially documented in Chinese pharmacopoeia as one of the authentic sources for the crude drug of Gou-Teng which has long been used for mental and cardiovascular diseases. Indole alkaloids are the characteristic constituents responsible for the desired hypotensive effect; however, the psychiatric active constituents of Gou-Teng are still unclear. According to traditional Chinese medicine theory, only the hook-bearing stems of U. rhynchophylla are used as the crude materials for Gou-Teng, while its leaves and fruits are scarcely used. The present study aimed to compare the metabolic fingerprints of different parts (hooks, stems, leaves and fruits) of U. rhynchophylla by LC-DAD-MS/MS analysis and further evaluate their psychiatric activities on HEK293 cell line in vitro. A total of 38 constituents including 26 alkaloids, six flavonoids, two triterpenoids, two chlorogenic acid analogs and two other compounds were characterized. The different parts of U. rhynchophylla can be well differentiated from their chemical profiles. Leaves displayed the most potent activity on both MT 1 and MT 2 receptors, with agonistic rates of 39.7% and 97.6%. For 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 2C receptors, hooks showed the strongest activity with agonistic rates of 92.6% and 83.1%, respectively. This investigation provided valuable information for understanding the chemical divergence between different parts of U. rhynchophylla, and their substantial bases for psychiatric purposes.

  10. Bisphenol A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical, and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical, widely used in various industries and the field of dentistry. The consequent increase in BPA exposure among humans has led us to some concerns regarding the potential deleterious effects on reproduction and brain development. The emphasis of this review is on the effects of prenatal and lactational exposure to low doses of BPA on brain development in mice. We demonstrated that prenatal exposure to BPA affected fetal murine neocortical development by accelerating neuronal differentiation/migration during the early embryonic stage, which was associated with up- and down-regulation of the genes critical for brain development, including the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. In the adult mice brains, both abnormal neocortical architecture and abnormal corticothalamic projections persisted in the group exposed to the BPA. Functionally, BPA exposure disturbed murine behavior, accompanied with a disrupted neurotransmitter system, including monoamines, in the postnatal development period and in adult mice. We also demonstrated that epigenetic alterations in promoter-associated CpG islands might underlie some of the effects on brain development after exposure to BPA. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Histological and chemical analyses of mesiodens development and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Awady; Moti, Moskovitz; Ornit, Cohen; Uri, Zilberman

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the developmental timing and mineralization quality of mesiodentes, i.e., supernumerary teeth located mainly in the midline of the maxilla between the central incisors, with the developmental timing and mineralization quality of permanent and primary central incisors. Sixteen mesiodentes, nine permanent and seven primary central incisors were collected. The location of the neonatal line was determined using a light microscope at 10× or 20× enlargements. Chemical composition of the enamel at two locations was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Neonatal lines were observed in eight out of 16 mesiodentes, in all primary central incisors and in none of the permanent central incisors. Chemical analyses showed that mesiodentes mineralization was impaired, resulting in higher amount of organic ions and reduced inorganic ions. Discriminant analysis showed minimal overlap of mesiodentes with either primary or permanent centrals. Mesiodentes development begins before birth in 50% of the cases but later than the primary centrals. Mineralization of mesiodens is impaired with less mineral content and higher organic content. The results showed that mesiodentes are a special group of teeth with defective morpho-differentiation and mineralization, with little similarity to primary or permanent central incisors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The development of integrated chemical microsensors in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; ASON,GREGORY CHARLES; HELLER,EDWIN J.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,S.L.

    1999-11-01

    Monolithic, integrated acoustic wave chemical microsensors are being developed on gallium arsenide (GaAs) substrates. With this approach, arrays of microsensors and the high frequency electronic components needed to operate them reside on a single substrate, increasing the range of detectable analytes, reducing overall system size, minimizing systematic errors, and simplifying assembly and packaging. GaAs is employed because it is both piezoelectric, a property required to produce the acoustic wave devices, and a semiconductor with a mature microelectronics fabrication technology. Many aspects of integrated GaAs chemical sensors have been investigated, including: surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors; monolithic SAW delay line oscillators; GaAs application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) for sensor operation; a hybrid sensor array utilizing these ASICS; and the fully monolithic, integrated SAW array. Details of the design, fabrication, and performance of these devices are discussed. In addition, the ability to produce heteroepitaxial layers of GaAs and aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) makes possible micromachined membrane sensors with improved sensitivity compared to conventional SAW sensors. Micromachining techniques for fabricating flexural plate wave (FPW) and thickness shear mode (TSM) microsensors on thin GaAs membranes are presented and GaAs FPW delay line and TSM resonator performance is described.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2003-05-31

    This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced

  14. Impact of psychological problems in chemical warfare survivors with severe ophthalmologic complication, a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaedi Gholamhosein

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfur mustard (SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent since the early twentieth century. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated SM induced ocular injuries, few of those studies have also focused on the psychological health status of victims. This study has evaluated the most prominent influences on the psychological health status of patients with severe SM induced ocular injuries. Methods This descriptive study was conducted on 149 Iranian war veterans with severe SM induced eye injuries. The psychological health status of all patients was assessed using the Iranian standardized Symptom Check List 90-Revised (SCL90-R questionnaire. The results of patients' Global Severity Index (GSI were compared with the optimal cut-off point of 0.4 that has previously been calculated for GSI in Iranian community. The Mann-Whitney U test, T tests and effect sizes (using Cohen's d were employed as statistical methods. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results The mean age of patients was 44.86 (SD = 8.7 and mean duration of disease was 21.58 (SD = 1.20 years. Rate of exposure was once in 99 (66.4% cases. The mean GSI (1.46 of the study group was higher compared to standardized cut off point (0.4 of the Iranian community. The results of this study showed that the mean of total GSI score was higher in participants with lower educational levels (effect size = 0.507, unemployment (effect size = 0.464 and having more than 3 children (effect size = 0.62. Among the participants, 87 (58.4% cases had a positive psychological history for hospitalization or receiving outpatient cares previously and 62 (41.6% cases had a negative psychological history. In addition, the mean of GSI in participants with negative psychological history was lower than those with positive psychological history (Mean Change Difference = -0.621 with SD = 0.120. There was a significant difference between positive and negative psychological history

  15. Chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) technology and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Edward A.; Truesdell, Keith A.

    2004-09-01

    In the late 1960's researchers realized that producing a population inversion in a moving medium could be used to generate high-energy laser beams. The first lasers to scale to the 10 kW size with good beam quality were supersonic flows of N2 - CO2, emitting radiation from the CO2 at 10.6 microns. In the 1970's gas dynamic CO2 lasers were scaled to hundreds of kilowatts and engineered into a KC-135 aircraft. This aircraft (The Airborne Laser Laboratory) was used to shoot down Sidewinder AIM-9B missiles in the early 1980"s. During this same time period (1970-1990) hydrogen fluoride and deuterium fluoride lasers were scaled to the MW scale in ground-based facilities. In 1978, the Iodine laser was invented at the Air Force Research Laboratory and scaled to the 100 kW level by the early 1990"s. Since the 60s, the DOD Chemical Laser development efforts have included CO2, CO, DF, HF, and Iodine. Currently, the DOD is developing DF, HF, and Iodine lasers, since CO2 and CO have wavelengths and diffraction limitations which make them less attractive for high energy weapons applications. The current military vision is to use chemical lasers to prove the principles and field ground and air mounted laser systems while attempting to develop weight efficient solid-state lasers at the high power levels for use in future Strategic and Tactical situations. This paper describes the evolution of Chemical Oxygen Iodine Lasers, their selection for use in the Airborne Laser (ABL), and the Advanced Tactical Laser (ATL). COIL was selected for these early applications because of its power scalability, its short wavelength, its atmospheric transmittance, and its excellent beam quality. The advantages and challenges are described, as well as some of the activities to improve magazine depth and logistics supportability. COIL lasers are also potentially applicable to mobile ground based applications, and future space based applications, but challenges exist. In addition, COIL is being

  16. Transferring Knowledge: A Parallel between Teaching Chemical Engineering and Developing Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are expert systems development and teaching, the representation and processing of knowledge, knowledge representation in chemical engineering, and expert systems in chemical engineering. The seven phases of expert system development are illustrated. (CW)

  17. Aum Shinrikyo’s Nuclear and Chemical Weapons Development Efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. Nehorayoff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article details the terrorist activities of the Japanese cult, Aum Shinrikyo, from the perspective of its complex engineering efforts aimed at producing nuclear and chemical weapons. The experience of this millenarian organization illustrates that even violent non-state actors with considerable wealth and resources at their disposal face numerous obstacles to realizing their destructive aspirations. Specifically, Aum’s attempts at complex engineering were stymied by a combination of unchecked fantastical thinking, self-imposed ideological constraints, and a capricious leadership. The chapter highlights each of these mechanisms, as well as the specific ways in which they constrained the decision-making process and the implementation of the complex engineering tasks associated with their unconventional weapons development.

  18. Proton Radiography: Cross Section Measurement and Detector Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Proton radiography offers significant advantages over conventional X-ray radiography, including the capability of looking into thick, dense materials, better contrast for a wide range of materials, sensitivity to different materials of similar density, and better resolution because of the ability to focus beams. In order to achieve this capability it is crucial to understand the background due to neutrons and photons and to develop techniques to reduce it to tolerable levels. The physics goal of this project is to measure forward production of neutrons and photons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. This work is being carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab Experiment 907 (MIPP) collaboration including physicists from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Our group is responsible for the E907 forward neutron/photon calorimeters. These are the only detectors in the experiment that provide information on neutrons and photons. We are taking a leading role in obtaining and analyzing the for-ward production data and in developing an optimal detector for proton radiography. With the support of our Stewardship Science Academic Alliances grant, we were able to design, build, and commission the calorimeters on budget and ahead of schedule. E-907 officially started physics running at Fermilab in January 2005, and data taking continued through February 2006. Data were taken on a range of targets, from liquid hydrogen to uranium, at beam energies from 5 GeV/c to 120 GeV/c. The analysis of the data is challenging because data from many different detector systems must be understood and merged and over 31 million events were accumulated. Our recent efforts have been devoted to the calibration of the neutron and photon detectors, to track and shower reconstruction, identification of forward-going neutrons, and simulation of the calorimeters in a Monte Carlo. Reconstruction of the data with improved tracking is underway

  19. Screening of Chemical Composition, Antioxidant and Anticholinesterase Activity of Section Brevifilamentum of Origanum (L. Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasibe Yılmaz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Six Origanum species, Origanum acutidens (Hand. -Mazz. Ietsw. (OA, Origanum brevidens (Bornm. Dinsm. (OB, Origanum haussknechtii Boiss. (OC, Origanum husnucan-baseri H.Duman, Aytaç & A.Duran (OHB, Origanum leptocladum Boiss. (OL, Origanum rotundifolium Boiss. (OR, belonging to sect. Brevifilamentum were analyzed for their essential oil and phenolic components. For the essential oil analyses, GC-MS and GC-FID were used. Phenolic contents of the aerial parts of the chloroform, acetone, and methanol extracts were analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Antioxidant activity of the species was investigated by three methods; DPPH free radical scavenging activity, β-carotene linoleic acid assays and CUPRAC assays. Also, acetyl and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition of the extracts were investigated. While the essential oil contents of the section Brevifilamentum showed difference in chemotype, the phenolic contents were found to be coumaric acids and derivatives. These groups were the most abundant components of the extracts. Especially rosmarinic acid was detected in high amounts in acetone and methanol extracts. OA had the best activity both in antioxidant and anticholinesterase assays.

  20. Laminar dispersion in parallel plate sections of flowing systems used in analytical chemistry and chemical engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolev, S.D.; Kolev, Spas D.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    An exact solution of the convective-diffusion equation for fully developed parallel plate laminar flow was obtained. It allows the derivation of theoretical relationships for calculating the Peclet number in the axially dispersed plug flow model and the concentration distribution perpendicular to

  1. Negative affect is associated with development and persistence of chemical intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Christensen, Karl Bang; Ebstrup, Jeanette Frost

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chemical intolerance (CI) is characterised by negative health effects attributed to a heightened responsiveness to common airborne chemicals. This longitudinal study explored the hypothesised role of negative affect in the development and persistence of CI in a general population...

  2. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  3. Agenda for the September 7, 2017 Webinar Use Information for PBT Chemicals under TSCA Section 6(h)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's existing chemicals programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and/or characterization, and risk management for chemicals substances in commercial use.

  4. Development of a methodology for analysis of the impact of modifying neutron cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenner, M. T.; Haghighat, A.; Adams, J. M.; Carlson, A. D.; Grimes, S. M.; Massey, T. N.

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo analysis of a Time-of-Flight (TOF) experiment can be utilized to examine the accuracy of nuclear cross section data. Accurate determination of this data is paramount in characterization of reactor lifetime. We have developed a methodology to examine the impact of modifying the current cross section libraries available in ENDF-6 format (1) where deficiencies may exist, and have shown that this methodology may be an effective methodology for examining the accuracy of nuclear cross section data. The new methodology has been applied to the iron scattering cross sections, and the use of the revised cross sections suggests that reactor pressure vessel fluence may be underestimated. (authors)

  5. 2009 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES)

    2010-11-01

    For reporting year 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2009 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2009, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  6. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockton, M.

    2003-01-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R

  7. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Stockton

    2003-11-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  8. Development of the chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) with chemical generation of atomic iodine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodymová, Jarmila; Špalek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Hager, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 77, - (2003), s. 331-336 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : atomic iodine * atomic chlorine * chemical oxygen-iodine laser(COIL) Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2003

  9. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Caroline E; Van Buren, Harry J

    2016-05-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood.

  10. Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Caroline E.; Van Buren, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use of such chemicals. These companies are exceeding regulatory requirements by restricting from their products chemicals that could harm human or environmental health, despite the fact that these actions are costly. They do not usually advertise the details of their strategies to end consumers. This article uses interviews with senior environmental directors of 20 multinational consumer product companies to investigate why these companies engage in voluntary chemicals management. The authors conclude that the most significant reasons are to achieve a competitive advantage and stay ahead of regulations, manage relationships and maintain legitimacy with stakeholders, and put managerial values into practice. Many of the characteristics related to the case of chemicals management are extendable to other areas of stakeholder management in which risks to stakeholders are either unknown or poorly understood. PMID:27471326

  11. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group (ENV-EAQ)

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  12. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  13. An Introduction to the Best Practices Section in the "Journal of Counseling & Development"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Sylvia A.; Watts, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to the Best Practices section in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." The section, announced in the fall of 2003, updates counselors on the latest research evidence to support their counseling practices. Four invited experts in the counseling profession (D. Bubenzer, J. G. Garci, T. Sexton, & J. West)…

  14. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult

  15. Advances in the development of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodymová, Jarmila; Špalek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2004), s. 561-574 ISSN 0011-4626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918; CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser * COIL * singlet oxygen Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  16. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult.

  17. Helping Students Develop a Critical Attitude towards Chemical Process Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nevers, Noel; Seader, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of computer-assisted programs that allow chemical engineering students to study textbook thermodynamics problems from different perspectives, including the classical graphical method, while utilizing more than one property correlation and/or operation model so that comparisons can be made and sensitivities determined more…

  18. The periodic system of chemical elements: old and new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.

    1987-09-01

    Some historical facts about the construction of a periodic system of chemical elements are reviewed. The Madelung rule is used to generate an unusual format for the periodic table. Following the work of Byakov, Kulakov, Rumer and Fet, such a format is further refined on the basis of a chain of groups starting with SU(2)xS0(4.2)

  19. Do indoor chemicals promote development of airway allergy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G D; Larsen, S T; Olsen, O

    2007-01-01

    Allergic asthma has increased worldwide in the industrialized countries. This review evaluates whether the major groups of indoor chemical exposures possess allergy-promoting (adjuvant) effects; formaldehyde was excluded, because of the size of the literature. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ar...

  20. Recent developments in metalorganic precursors for metalorganic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. C.; Rushworth, S. A.; Auld, J.

    1995-01-01

    Volatile metalorganic compounds are finding an increasing application in the deposition of metals and semiconductors by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). In this paper, the use of some new precursor systems in the growth of selected metals and alloys is reviewed with emphasis being placed on precursor chemistry in the gas phase and at the growth surface.

  1. Advances in the development of chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodymová, Jarmila; Špalek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2004), s. 561-574 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Grant - others:EOARD(XE) USAF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : chemical oxygen-iodine laser * COIL * singlet oxygen * atomic iodine Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  2. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  3. Forecasting global developments in the basic chemical industry for environmental policy analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeren, M.L.M.; Saygin, D.; Patel, M.K.

    The chemical sector is the largest industrial energy user, but detailed analysis of its energy use developments lags behind other energy-intensive sectors. A cost-driven forecasting model for basic chemicals production is developed, accounting for regional production costs, demand growth and stock

  4. Fostering Multirepresentational Levels of Chemical Concepts: A Framework to Develop Educational Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Guilherme A.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a convenient framework for developing interactive chemical education software to facilitate the integration of macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic dimensions of chemical concepts--specifically, via the development of software for gel permeation chromatography. The instructional role of the software was evaluated in a study…

  5. Chemical-Looping Combustion and Gasification of Coals and Oxygen Carrier Development: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical-looping technology is one of the promising CO2 capture technologies. It generates a CO2 enriched flue gas, which will greatly benefit CO2 capture, utilization or sequestration. Both chemical-looping combustion (CLC and chemical-looping gasification (CLG have the potential to be used to generate power, chemicals, and liquid fuels. Chemical-looping is an oxygen transporting process using oxygen carriers. Recently, attention has focused on solid fuels such as coal. Coal chemical-looping reactions are more complicated than gaseous fuels due to coal properties (like mineral matter and the complex reaction pathways involving solid fuels. The mineral matter/ash and sulfur in coal may affect the activity of oxygen carriers. Oxygen carriers are the key issue in chemical-looping processes. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA has been widely used for the development of oxygen carriers (e.g., oxide reactivity. Two proposed processes for the CLC of solid fuels are in-situ Gasification Chemical-Looping Combustion (iG-CLC and Chemical-Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU. The objectives of this review are to discuss various chemical-looping processes with coal, summarize TGA applications in oxygen carrier development, and outline the major challenges associated with coal chemical-looping in iG-CLC and CLOU.

  6. Development of an Efficient Steel Beam Section for Modular Construction Based on Six-Sigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyu Ha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a systematic approach for the development of an efficient steel beam section for modular construction based on Six-Sigma. Although the Six-Sigma is frequently implemented in manufacturing and other service industries, it is a relatively new concept in the area of building design and construction. As a first step in this approach, market studies and surveys are conducted to obtain the opinions of potential customers. Then the opinions of customers are converted into quality characteristics for the steel beam using the quality function deployment methodology. A steel hollow flanged channel is chosen as the main modular beam shape, and the design concept is derived and developed by applying the Pugh matrix methodology. A pilot test was performed to validate the effectiveness of the developed beam section. The results indicated that the developed channel beam section showed excellent performance and retained high accuracy in fabrication, thus resulting in a significant reduction of steel consumption.

  7. The Development of Learning Patterns of Student Teachers: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donche, Vincent; Van Petegem, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Research on learning pattern development during pre-service teacher education is scarce. In a cross-sectional (study 1) and longitudinal study (study 2) the development of learning patterns of student teachers is analysed. Participants in study 1 were 646 first-year and 350 third-year student teachers enrolled in an initial pre-service teacher…

  8. Research and development activities of the Seismology Section for the period January 1984 - December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, C.A.; Murty, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Research and Development (R and D) activities during 1984-1985 of the Seismology Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay are reported in the form of individual summaries. The R and D activities of the Section are directed towards development of seismological instruments and methods of analysis of the seismic field data with the main objective of detecting underground nuclear explosions and assessing seismicity and seismic risk of sites considered for nuclear power stations. The Section has two field stations - one at Gauribidanur in the Southern part of the country and another at Delhi i.e. in the northern part of the country. During the report period, a total of 62 events out of the detected ones were identified as underground explosions. The expertise of the Section is also made available for outside organisations. (M.G.B.)

  9. [Development and perspective of bio-based chemical fiber industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zengjun

    2016-06-25

    Bio-based fiber is environment friendly, reproducible, easily biodegradable. Therefore, rapid development of bio-based fiber industry is an obvious in progress to replace petrochemical resources, develop sustainable economy, build resource saving and environment friendly society. This article describes the current development of bio-based fiber industry, analyzes existing problems, indicates the trends and objectives of bio-based fiber materials technology innovation and recommends developing bio-based fibers industry of our country.

  10. Mixed endometrioid and serous carcinoma developing in abdominal wall endometriosis following Cesarean section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Ines, David; Montoriol, Pierre Francois; Petitcolin, Virginie; Garcier, Jean-Marc; Bourdel, Nicolas; Canis, Michel; Charpy, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is unusual and mostly occurs in scars following Cesarean section. Although malignant transformation is rare, it must be recognized in order to benefit from radical resection. We report a very rare case of mixed endometrioid and serous carcinoma developing in a Cesarean section endometriosis scar and the way we managed it using surgery and chemotherapy. 18-FDG PET-CT imaging was performed to correctly stage the disease

  11. Mixed endometrioid and serous carcinoma developing in abdominal wall endometriosis following Cesarean section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Ines, David; Montoriol, Pierre Francois; Petitcolin, Virginie; Garcier, Jean-Marc (Dept. of Radiology and Medical Imaging, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand (France)), email: ddaines@chu-clermontferrand.fr; Bourdel, Nicolas; Canis, Michel (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand (France)); Charpy, Cecile (Dept. of Pathology, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand (France))

    2011-06-15

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is unusual and mostly occurs in scars following Cesarean section. Although malignant transformation is rare, it must be recognized in order to benefit from radical resection. We report a very rare case of mixed endometrioid and serous carcinoma developing in a Cesarean section endometriosis scar and the way we managed it using surgery and chemotherapy. 18-FDG PET-CT imaging was performed to correctly stage the disease

  12. Hydrogen Peroxide: A Key Chemical for Today's Sustainable Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Albanese, Lorenzo; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Pagliaro, Mario

    2016-12-20

    The global utilization of hydrogen peroxide, a green oxidant that decomposes in water and oxygen, has gone from 0.5 million tonnes per year three decades ago to 4.5 million tonnes per year in 2014, and is still climbing. With the aim of expanding the utilization of this eminent green chemical across different industrial and civil sectors, the production and use of hydrogen peroxide as a green industrial oxidant is reviewed herein to provide an overview of the explosive growth of its industrial use over the last three decades and of the state of the art in its industrial manufacture, with important details of what determines the viability of the direct production from oxygen and hydrogen compared with the traditional auto-oxidation process. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Sustainable Chemical Process Development through an Integrated Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Anantpinijwatna, Amata

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development and the application of a general integrated framework based on systematic model-based methods and computer-aided tools with the objective to achieve more sustainable process designs and to improve the process understanding. The developed framework can be appli...... studies involve multiphase reaction systems for the synthesis of active pharmaceutical ingredients....

  14. How developing nations can protect children from hazardous chemical exposures while sustaining economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Massey, Rachel I; DiGangi, Joseph; Geiser, Kenneth; Olanipekun, Abiola Ifueko; Gallagher, Louise

    2011-12-01

    Increasing worldwide use of chemicals, including heavy metals used in industry and pesticides used in agriculture, may produce increases in chronic diseases in children unless steps are taken to manage the production, use, trade, and disposal of chemicals. In 2020 the developing world will account for 33 percent of global chemical demand and 31 percent of production, compared with 23 percent and 21 percent, respectively, in 1995. We describe present and potential costs of environmental exposures and discuss policy options to protect future generations of children in a sustainable development context. Specifically, we describe the principles of sound chemicals management, as follows: precaution, or the use of cost-effective measures to prevent potentially hazardous exposures before scientific understanding is complete; the right to know, or informing the public--especially vulnerable groups--in a timely fashion about the safe use of chemicals and any releases of chemicals into the environment; pollution prevention, or preventing the use of hazardous chemicals and the production of pollutants, rather than focusing on managing wastes; internalization of environmental and health costs, or ensuring that the consequences of exposures are reflected in the price of chemicals through such approaches as "polluter pays"; and use of best available scientific information in making decisions such as what chemicals to allow into the market. We recommend that industrializing nations in particular employ these principles to prevent disease among their populations while at the same time minimizing the risk to their own economic development.

  15. Development of microforming process combined with selective chemical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshimizu Kazushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microforming has been received much attention in the recent decades due to the wide use of microparts in electronics and medical purpose. For the further functionalization of these micro devices, high functional surface with noble metals and nanomaterials are strongly required in bio- and medical fields, such as bio-sensors. To realize the efficient manufacturing process, which can deform the submillimeter scale bulk structure and can construct the micro to nanometer scale structures in one process, the present study proposes a combined process of microforming for metal foils with a selective chemical vapor deposition (SCVD on the active surface of work materials. To clarify the availability of this proposed process, the feasibility of SCVD of functional materials to active surface of titanium (Ti was investigated. CVD of iron (Fe and carbon nanotubes (CNTs which construct CNTs on the patterned surface of active Ti and non-active oxidation layer were conducted. Ti thin films on silicon substrate and Fe were used as work materials and functional materials, respectively. CNTs were grown on only Ti surface. Consequently, the selectivity of the active surface of Ti to the synthesis of Fe particles in CVD process was confirmed.

  16. Development of an Integrated Biofuel and Chemical Refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trawick, John [Genomatica, San Diego, CA (United States); Burk, Mark [Genomatica, San Diego, CA (United States); Barton, Nelson [Genomatica, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    This project has demonstrated the level of commercial readiness for production of the industrial chemical, 1,4-butanediol (BDO), from lignocellulosic biomass by engineered E. coli. Targets were BDO titer, rate, and yield (TRY) and growth in lignocellulosic hydrolysates (Hz). A range of Hzs were used to assess limitations for biomass-to-BDO. Via adaptive evolution methods, whole-genome sequencing, and introduction of identified target genes, strains co-utilizing C5/ C6 sugars were made. The composition of Hz versus TRY led to a modified Hz composition. This was used in partnership with the DOE to redirect the project to focus on 1) several biomass Hz from new suppliers, 2) Hz specification due to the characteristics of the Genomatica BDO process, 3) a gene cassette to engineer any BDO producing strain for biomass, and 4) modified BDO recovery to more economically recover BDO at industry specifications. BDO TRY and growth of the E. coli strains were predictable based on Hz composition from several suppliers. This defined metrics for biomass Hz composition to achieve BDO TRY along with internal TEA to evaluate the economic potential of each modification to strain, Hz feed, and process. An improved biomass-to-BDO production strain reached BDO T-R in a 30 L fermentation above original objectives. Yield approached the proposed Y and modifications to BDO recovery were demonstrated. Genomatica is now in the position of being able to incorporate biomass feedstocks into the commercial GENO BDO process.

  17. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  18. Chemical thermodynamic data. 1. The concept of links to the chemical elements and the historical development of key thermodynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolery, Thomas J.; Jové Colón, Carlos F.

    2017-09-01

    Chemical thermodynamic data remain a keystone for geochemical modeling and reactive transport simulation as applied to an increasing number of applications in the earth sciences, as well as applications in other areas including metallurgy, material science, and industrial process design. The last century has seen the development of a large body of thermodynamic data and a number of major compilations. The past several decades have seen the development of thermodynamic databases in digital form designed to support computer calculations. However, problems with thermodynamic data appear to be persistent. One problem pertains to the use of inconsistent primary key reference data. Such data pertain to elemental reference forms and key, stoichiometrically simple chemical species including metal oxides, CO2, water, and aqueous species such as Na+ and Cl-. A consistent set of primary key data (standard Gibbs energies, standard enthalpies, and standard entropies for key chemical species) for 298.15 K and 1 bar pressure is essential. Thermochemical convention is to define the standard Gibbs energy and the standard enthalpy of an individual chemical species in terms of formation from reference forms of the constituent chemical elements. We propose a formal concept of ;links; to the elemental reference forms. This concept involves a documented understanding of all reactions and calculations leading to values for a formation property (standard Gibbs energy or enthalpy). A valid link consists of two parts: (a) the path of reactions and corrections and (b) the associated data, which are key data. Such a link differs from a bare ;key; or ;reference; datum in that it requires additional information. Some or all of its associated data may also be key data. In evaluating a reported thermodynamic datum, one should identify the links to the chemical elements, a process which can be time-consuming and which may lead to a dead end (an incomplete link). The use of two or more inconsistent

  19. Chemical and Sensorial Evaluation of a Newly Developed Bean Jam

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel; Figueiredo, Ana; Correia, Paula; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop an innovative food product with nutritional properties as well as appealing organoleptic qualities. The product, a jam, was prepared with the beans’ cooking water combined with fresh apple or carrot, without the addition of any conservatives. Three different jams were produced: bean and carrot, bean and apple and bean, apple and cinnamon. The developed products underwent a sensorial...

  20. Development of an Instrument to Evaluate High School Students' Chemical Symbol Representation Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuhao; Chi, Shaohui; Luo, Ma; Yang, Yuqin; Huang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Chemical symbol representation is a medium for transformations between the actual phenomena of the macroscopic world and those of the sub-microscopic world. The aim of this study is to develop an instrument to evaluate high school students' chemical symbol representation abilities (CSRA). Based on the current literature, we defined CSRA and…

  1. Mixtures of environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals affect mammary gland development in female and male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Johansson, Hanna Katarina Lilith; Boberg, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Estrogenic chemicals are able to alter mammary gland development in female rodents, but little is known on the effects of anti-androgens and mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with dissimilar modes of action. Pregnant rat dams were exposed during gestation and lactation to mixtures...

  2. Process development: from the initial idea to the chemical production plant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vogel, G. Herbert

    2005-01-01

    ... the development and evaluation of production processes and the execution of projects from the chemist's viewpoint. The various aspects chemical, engineering, materials science, legal, economic, safety, etc. that must be taken into account prior to and during the planning, erection, and startup of a chemical plant are treated. T...

  3. Development of chemical profiles for U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Wilkins, B.D.; Meshkov, N.K.; Dolak, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical and radiological profiles of waste streams from US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed wastes (LLMWs) have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide technical support information for evaluating waste management alternatives in the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The chemical profiles were developed for LLMW generated from both Waste Management (WM) operations and from Environmental Restoration (ER) activities at DOE facilities. Information summarized in the 1994 DOE Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Automated Remedial Assessment Methodology (ARAM), and associated PNL supporting data on ER secondary waste streams that will be treated in WM treatment facilities were used as the sources for developing chemical profiles. The methodology for developing the LLMW chemical profiles is discussed, and the chemical profiles developed from data for contact-handled (CH) non-alpha LLMW are presented in this paper. The hazardous chemical composition of remote-handled (RH) LLMW and alpha LLMW follow the chemical profiles developed for CH non-alpha LLMW

  4. Research and development activities of the Seismology Section for the period January 1982-December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Falguni

    1984-01-01

    The research and development activities of the Seismology Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) at Bombay are reported for the period January 1982-December 1983 in the form of summaries. The Section's activities are mainly directed towards detection of underground nuclear explosions. During the report period 64 signals out of about 12000 seismograms which were examined were identified as the signals due to underground nuclear explosions. The instrumentation work for Kolar rockburst research was almost completed under the collaboration programme of BARC with Bharat Gold Mines Ltd. Analytical methods have been developed for interpreting the frequency-magnitude relation of earthquake. These methods will be useful in the seismic estimation of risk in case only restricted data involving events of low magnitude are available. A list of publications of the staff-members of the Section during the report period is given. (M.G.B.)

  5. JOURNEY TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: A ROLE FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the publication of the report entitled, Our Common Future, under the auspices of the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED), also known as the Brundtand Commission, it has been generally acknowledged that the increasing use of non-renewable resources to supp...

  6. Development of a Rapid Chemical Identification System (RCIS) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Three members of this group of drugs (tablet form) available in the Nigerian market and labelled MA and MB for metronidazole, T A and TB for ... of acetone, ethyl acetate and ammonia (100:5:1) and method B with mobile phase consisting of acetone, chloroform and ammonia (100:15:1) were developed for the ...

  7. Development of Laser Scanner for Full Cross-Sectional Deformation Monitoring of Underground Gateroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianlong; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Xiaoqian; Ma, Shuqi

    2017-01-01

    The deformation of underground gateroads tends to be asymmetric and complex. Traditional instrumentation fails to accurately and conveniently monitor the full cross-sectional deformation of underground gateroads. Here, a full cross-sectional laser scanner was developed, together with a visualization software package. The developed system used a polar coordinate measuring method and the full cross-sectional measurement was shown by 360° rotation of a laser sensor driven by an electrical motor. Later on, the potential impact of gateroad wall flatness, roughness, and geometrical profile, as well as coal dust environment on the performance of the developed laser scanner will be evaluated. The study shows that high-level flatness is favorable in the application of the developed full cross-sectional deformation monitoring system. For a smooth surface of gateroad, the sensor cannot receive reflected light when the incidence angle of laser beam is large, causing data loss. Conversely, the roughness surface shows its nature as the diffuse reflection light can be received by the sensor. With regards to coal dust in the measurement environment, fine particles of floating coal dust in the air can lead to the loss of measurement data to some extent, due to scattering of the laser beam. PMID:28590449

  8. New airfoil sections for general aviation aircraft. [cruising and flap development tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A program has been undertaken to develop new airfoil sections suitable for general aviation aircraft, utilizing theoretical and experimental advanced technology developed in recent years primarily for subsonic jet transport and military aircraft. The airfoil development program is one component of the Advanced Technology Light Twin program sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center. Two-dimensional tests of a new airfoil have demonstrated high cruising performance over a fairly wide C sub 1 range, and a C sub 1 max value of 3.69 with Fowler flap and no leading-edge devices. Experimental and theoretical development of additional configurations is under way.

  9. Recent developments in chemical treatment of roughages and their relevance to animal production in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research in developed regions, at laboratory level, has investigated acids, amines and the oxidizing agents sulphur dioxide, ozone and alkaline hydrogen peroxide as reagents for upgrading roughages. In vivo experiments with sheep show improvements in digestibility from treating with 40 g SO 2 per kg wheat straw DM for 3 d at 70 deg. C, comparable to responses normally gained by treating with NaOH. Alkaline H 2 O 2 (pH11.5) treatment in one study increased wheat straw DM digestibility in sheep fed ad libitum, from 467 to 659 g/kg. However this treatment used large inputs (260 g H 2 O 2 and 180 g NaOH/kg straw DM in 26 L solution for 16 h, followed by drying); subsequent studies showed possible input reductions. The techniques are not relevant for use in developing countries except possibly at centralized processing plants, but greater commercial viability will need to be demonstrated before then. The NaOH dip method is the most effective current, low technology upgrading technique and is capable of further development to produce treated roughage of improved digestibility and optimum content of N and required minerals. There are no major new developments in urea ammonia treatment. The recent 'AGRI-AM' method produces NH 3 by hydrating a mixture of CaO and (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 fertilizers, but the method requires much chemical input. 'Ensiling' barley straw for 60 d with 60 g Ca(OH) 2 and 30 g urea per kg straw DM improves intake and digestibility in sheep, with little loss of N from the system. This is due to reduced urea hydrolysis caused by high pH. Other research shows that the quantity of straw needing to be treated can be halved by allowing goats (or sheep) to 'graze' untreated straw (to allow 50% refusals) followed by treatment and refeeding. 92 refs, 11 tabs

  10. Morbidity and mortality following high order caesarean section in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyginus, Ezegwui; Eric, Nwogu-Ikojo; Lawrence, Ikeako; Sylvester, Nweze

    2012-10-01

    To determine the morbidity and mortality associated with multiple (four and higher order) caesarean section. A group of 92 women who had undergone four or more caesarean sections was compared with another group of 184 women who had three or less such procedures at the obstetric unit of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2007. The record were retrieved by trained staff and data was extracted using pre-tested forms. SPSS 15 and Z test were used for statistical analysis. There were a total of 1,755 caesarean sections out of which 92 (5.24%) were higher order repeat caesarean. Three women had the 6th caesarean section, while one had her seventh. Women in the study group were three times more likely to have primary postpartum haemorrhage (p = 0.001); to spend more time on the operation table; and to receive blood transfusion (p = 0.001) compared to the control group. More neonatal morbidities were observed among the controls. Hypertensive disorder was the second most common indication for caesarean section in the control group. There was no clear difference in terms of hospital stay, pre-operative haemoglobin concentration, and caesarean hysterectomy in the two groups. No death was observed during the period. Higher order caesarean section was associated with increased maternal morbidity but there was no mortality. Every effort to reduce primary and repeat caesarean sections should be encouraged, as this will reduce the higher order caesarean section rate, especially in the developing world which places high premium on child-bearing and large family size. Counselling on different methods of contraception during visits to antenatal clinics must be done to limit family size.

  11. Chemical risk evaluation, importance of the risk analysis framework uses: Latin America development restrictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, M.

    2013-01-01

    The power point presentation is about reach and results of the risk analysis in Venezuela, chemical dangers in food, human damage, injuries , technologies news in fodd development, toxicity, microbiological risk, technical recommendations

  12. Leader Development in Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Defense: Trained and Ready

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van

    2001-01-01

    .... Careful and deliberate preparation and emphasis on leader development now will obviate the devastating role of WMD in the future and ensure that the Army is nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) trained and ready...

  13. Development of a global 1-D chemically radiatively coupled model and an introduction to the development of a chemically coupled General Circulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyoshi, H.

    1997-01-01

    A global one-dimensional, chemically and radiatively coupled model has been developed. The basic concept of the coupled model, definition of globally averaged zenith angles, the formulation of the model chemistry, radiation, the coupled processes, and profiles and diurnal variations of temperature and chemical species at a normal steady state are presented. Furthermore, a suddenly doubled CO 2 experiment and a Pinatubo aerosol increase experiment were performed with the model. The time scales of variations in ozone and temperature in the lower stratosphere of the coupled system in the doubled CO 2 experiment was long, due to a feedback process among ultra violet radiation, O(1D), NO y , NO x , and O 3 . From the Pinatubo aerosol experiment, a delay of maximum ozone decrease from the maximum aerosol loading is shown and discussed. Developments of 3-D chemical models with coupled processes are briefly described, and the ozone distribution from the first version of the 3-D model are presented. Chemical model development in National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) are briefly described. (author)

  14. Development of optical techniques for chemical engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamadie, F.; Charton, S.; Langlard, M. de; Ouattara, M.; Sentis, M. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, DEN,DTEC,SGCS, F-30207 Marcoule (France)

    2016-07-01

    The design of separation processes for nuclear spend fuel treatment, dedicated to either research studies or industrial applications, is currently based on a phenomenological approach, relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics, and complemented by validation tests performed at small-scale. Indeed, most of the steps of the Purex process involve multiphasic flows (dissolution, leaching, liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation, filtration, etc.). Therefore an accurate knowledge of the dispersed phase properties is required in order to assess their coupling with the flow features, to predict the process performance and efficiency and to achieve size reduction or extrapolation. Hence, the measurements of particulate flows properties, and especially the particles (or drops or bubbles) size distribution, concentration (i.e. hold-up) and velocity has become a growing issue. Relevant techniques for measuring these flow properties are multiple, from the high-speed video acquisition coupled to image processing to the laser-induced fluorescence, including the particle imaging velocimetry or interferometric techniques (digital in-line holography, rainbow refractometry, etc.). In this communication, different techniques developed at CEA Marcoule for the characterization of multiphase flows, will be introduced. The strong interaction with computational fluid dynamics, in the scope of a multi-scale approach, will be discussed through typical results of gas-liquid, liquid-liquid and solid-liquid flows possibly encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing process. (authors)

  15. Expanding the test set: Chemicals with potential to disrupt mammalian brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput test methods including molecular, cellular, and alternative species-based assays that examine critical events of normal brain development are being developed for detection of developmental neurotoxcants. As new assays are developed, a "training set' of chemicals i...

  16. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  17. Development of ANJOYMC Program for Automatic Generation of Monte Carlo Cross Section Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Lee, Chung Chan

    2007-03-01

    The NJOY code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to generate the cross section libraries in ACE format for the Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP and McCARD by processing the evaluated nuclear data in ENDF/B format. It takes long time to prepare all the NJOY input files for hundreds of nuclides with various temperatures, and there can be some errors in the input files. In order to solve these problems, ANJOYMC program has been developed. By using a simple user input deck, this program is not only to generate all the NJOY input files automatically, but also to generate a batch file to perform all the NJOY calculations. The ANJOYMC program is written in Fortran90 and can be executed under the WINDOWS and LINUX operating systems in Personal Computer. Cross section libraries in ACE format can be generated in a short time and without an error by using a simple user input deck

  18. Geology and ground-water resources of Platte County, Wyoming, with a section on Chemical quality of the water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D.A.; Babcock, H.M.; Langford, R.H.

    1960-01-01

    flowing wells obtain water from this sand near Glendo. Moderate to large supplies of ground water adequate for small-scale irrigation or industrial uses or for public supply can be obtained from properly constructed wells penetrating thick saturated sections of the Arikaree formation and from the terrace and flood-plain deposits. Large supplies of ground water can be obtained from the flood-plain deposits of the North Platte River near Guernsey, where wells commonly yield more than 1,000 gpm (gallons per minute). The aquifers with greatest potential for additional groundwater development in Platte County, in decreasing order of importance, are the flood-plain deposits along the North Platte River and its tributaries, the Arikaree formation and terrace deposits in parts of the Wheatland Flats, and the 'Converse sand' in the general vicinity of Glendo.

  19. Research and development activities of the Seismology Section for the period January 1988-December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Murty, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarises the research and development activities of the Seismology Section during the periods from January 1988 to December 1989. Apart from the ongoing work on forensic seismology, seismicity studies, rock burst monitoring, elastic wave propagation, a new field system became operational at Bhatsa, located about 100 km from Bombay, comprising 11 station radio-telemetered seismic network with a central recording laboratory to study the reservoir induced seismicity. (author). figs., tabs

  20. Development of LTCC smart channels for integrated chemical, temperature, and flow sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Kenneth Allen; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Turner, Timothy Shawn

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the development of 'smart' channels that can be used simultaneously as a fluid channel and as an integrated chemical, temperature, and flow sensor. The uniqueness of this device lies in the fabrication and processing of low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) materials that act as the common substrate for both the sensors and the channel itself. Devices developed in this study have employed rolled LTCC tubes, but grooves or other channel shapes can be fabricated depending on the application requirements. The chemical transducer is fabricated by depositing a conductive polymer 'ink' across a pair of electrodes that acts as a chemical resistor (chemiresistor) within the rolled LTCC tube. Volatile organic compounds passing through the tube are absorbed into the polymers, causing the polymers to reversibly swell and change in electrical resistance. The change in resistance is calibrated to the chemical concentration. Multiple chemiresistors have been integrated into a single smart channel to provide chemical discrimination through the use of different polymers. A heating element is embedded in the rolled tube to maintain a constant temperature in the vicinity of the chemical sensors. Thick-film thermistor lines are printed to monitor the temperature near the chemical sensor and at upstream locations to monitor the incoming ambient flow. The thermistors and heating element are used together as a thermal anemometer to measure the flow rate through the tube. Configurations using both surface-printed and suspended thermistors have been evaluated.

  1. Development of a Raman chemical image detection algorithm for authenticating dry milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2013-05-01

    This research developed a Raman chemical imaging method for detecting multiple adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the concentration range of 0.1-5.0%. A Raman imaging system using a 785-nm laser acquired hyperspectral images in the wavenumber range of 102-2538 cm-1 for a 25×25 mm2 area of each mixture. A polynomial curve-fitting method was used to correct fluorescence background in the Raman images. An image classification method was developed based on single-band fluorescence-free images at unique Raman peaks of the adulterants. Raman chemical images were created to visualize identification and distribution of the multiple adulterant particles in the milk powder. Linear relationship was found between adulterant pixel number and adulterant concentration, demonstrating the potential of the Raman chemical imaging for quantitative analysis of the adulterants in the milk powder.

  2. Social disparities in exposures to bisphenol A and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals: a cross-sectional study within NHANES 2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Jessica W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bisphenol A (BPA and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs are suspected endocrine disrupting compounds known to be ubiquitous in people's bodies. Population disparities in exposure to these chemicals have not been fully characterized. Methods We analyzed data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Using multivariable linear regression we examined the association between urinary concentrations of BPA, serum concentrations of four PFCs, and multiple measures of socioeconomic position (SEP: family income, education, occupation, and food security. We also examined associations with race/ethnicity. Results All four PFCs were positively associated with family income, whereas BPA was inversely associated with family income. BPA concentrations were higher in people who reported very low food security and received emergency food assistance than in those who did not. This association was particularly strong in children: 6-11 year-olds whose families received emergency food had BPA levels 54% higher (95% CI, 13 to 112% than children of families who did not. For BPA and PFCs we saw smaller and less consistent associations with education and occupation. Mexican Americans had the lowest concentrations of any racial/ethnic group of both types of chemicals; for PFCs, Mexican Americans not born in the U.S. had much lower levels than those born in the U.S. Conclusions People with lower incomes had higher body burdens of BPA; the reverse was true for PFCs. Family income with adjustment for family size was the strongest predictor of chemical concentrations among the different measures of SEP we studied. Income, education, occupation, and food security appear to capture different aspects of SEP that may be related to exposure to BPA and PFCs and are not necessarily interchangeable as measures of SEP in environmental epidemiology studies. Differences by race/ethnicity were independent of SEP.

  3. Naval Research Laboratory Industrial Chemical Analysis and Respiratory Filter Standards Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6360--17-9750 Naval Research Laboratory Industrial Chemical Analysis and Respiratory...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Naval Research Laboratory Industrial Chemical Analysis and Respiratory Filter Standards Development Thomas E. Sutto Naval Research ...09-2017 NRL Memorandum Report 2009 – 2016 63-4974-07 Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6362 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL 6.1

  4. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit

  5. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  6. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L. [and others

    1995-11-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit.

  7. Development of estrogen receptor beta binding prediction model using large sets of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Gong, Ping; Zhang, Chaoyang; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2017-11-03

    We developed an ER β binding prediction model to facilitate identification of chemicals specifically bind ER β or ER α together with our previously developed ER α binding model. Decision Forest was used to train ER β binding prediction model based on a large set of compounds obtained from EADB. Model performance was estimated through 1000 iterations of 5-fold cross validations. Prediction confidence was analyzed using predictions from the cross validations. Informative chemical features for ER β binding were identified through analysis of the frequency data of chemical descriptors used in the models in the 5-fold cross validations. 1000 permutations were conducted to assess the chance correlation. The average accuracy of 5-fold cross validations was 93.14% with a standard deviation of 0.64%. Prediction confidence analysis indicated that the higher the prediction confidence the more accurate the predictions. Permutation testing results revealed that the prediction model is unlikely generated by chance. Eighteen informative descriptors were identified to be important to ER β binding prediction. Application of the prediction model to the data from ToxCast project yielded very high sensitivity of 90-92%. Our results demonstrated ER β binding of chemicals could be accurately predicted using the developed model. Coupling with our previously developed ER α prediction model, this model could be expected to facilitate drug development through identification of chemicals that specifically bind ER β or ER α .

  8. Development of Chemical Engineering Course Methods Using Action Research: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki-Hatakka, Terhi; Tuunila, Ritva; Nurkka, Niina

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the systematic development of a teaching methodology for two chemical engineering courses. The aim was to improve the quality of teaching to achieve expected learning outcomes more effectively. The development was carried out over a period of several years based on an action research methodology with data systematically…

  9. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  10. Development of a database for chemical mechanism assignments for volatile organic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, William P L

    2015-10-01

    The development of a database for making model species assignments when preparing total organic gas (TOG) emissions input for atmospheric models is described. This database currently has assignments of model species for 12 different gas-phase chemical mechanisms for over 1700 chemical compounds and covers over 3000 chemical categories used in five different anthropogenic TOG profile databases or output by two different biogenic emissions models. This involved developing a unified chemical classification system, assigning compounds to mixtures, assigning model species for the mechanisms to the compounds, and making assignments for unknown, unassigned, and nonvolatile mass. The comprehensiveness of the assignments, the contributions of various types of speciation categories to current profile and total emissions data, inconsistencies with existing undocumented model species assignments, and remaining speciation issues and areas of needed work are also discussed. The use of the system to prepare input for SMOKE, the Speciation Tool, and for biogenic models is described in the supplementary materials. The database, associated programs and files, and a users manual are available online at http://www.cert.ucr.edu/~carter/emitdb . Assigning air quality model species to the hundreds of emitted chemicals is a necessary link between emissions data and modeling effects of emissions on air quality. This is not easy and makes it difficult to implement new and more chemically detailed mechanisms in models. If done incorrectly, it is similar to errors in emissions speciation or the chemical mechanism used. Nevertheless, making such assignments is often an afterthought in chemical mechanism development and emissions processing, and existing assignments are usually undocumented and have errors and inconsistencies. This work is designed to address some of these problems.

  11. Development of modern CANDU PHWR cross-section libraries for SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoman, Nathan T., E-mail: nshoman@vols.utk.edu; Skutnik, Steven E., E-mail: sskutnik@utk.edu

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • New ORIGEN libraries for CANDU 28 and 37-element fuel assemblies have been created. • These new reactor data libraries are based on modern ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section data. • The updated CANDU data libraries show good agreement with radiochemical assay data. • Eu-154 overestimated when using ENDF-VII.0 due to a lower thermal capture cross-section. - Abstract: A new set of SCALE fuel lattice models have been developed for the 28-element and 37-element CANDU fuel assembly designs using modern cross-section data from ENDF-B/VII.0 in order to produce new reactor data libraries for SCALE/ORIGEN depletion analyses. These new libraries are intended to provide users with a convenient means of evaluating depletion of CANDU fuel assemblies using ORIGEN through pre-generated cross sections based on SCALE lattice physics calculations. The performance of the new CANDU ORIGEN libraries in depletion analysis benchmarks to radiochemical assay data were compared to the previous version of the CANDU libraries provided with SCALE (based on WIMS-AECL models). Benchmark comparisons with available radiochemical assay data indicate that the new cross-section libraries perform well at matching major actinide species (U/Pu), which are generally within 1–4% of experimental values. The library also showed similar or better results over the WIMS-AECL library regarding fission product species and minor actinoids (Np, Am, and Cm). However, a notable exception was in calculated inventories of {sup 154}Eu and {sup 155}Eu, where the new library employing modern nuclear data (ENDF/B-VII.0) performed substantially poorer than the previous WIMS-AECL library (which used ENDF-B/VI.8 cross-sections for these species). The cause for this discrepancy appears to be due to differences in the {sup 154}Eu thermal capture cross-section between ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0, an effect which is exacerbated by the highly thermalized flux of a CANDU heavy water reactor compared to that of a

  12. Environmental Product Development Combining the Life Cycle Perspective with Chemical Hazard Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askham, Cecilia

    ) are essential. Many life cycle assessments of product systems are performed without the inclusion of toxicity data and indicators. Ecodesign processes for products are often based upon just one, or very few, environmental indicators. Regulatory issues are sometimes addressed in an ad hoc fashion, often late......Concerns regarding the short- and long-term detrimental effects of chemicals on human health and ecosystems have made the minimisation of chemical hazards a vitally important issue. If sustainable development is to be achieved, environmental efficient products (and product life cycles...... in the design or redesign process. This thesis concerns marrying the life cycle perspective with chemical hazard information, in order to advance the practice of environmental product development, and hence takes further steps towards sustainable development. The need to consider the full value chain...

  13. Chemical probes of quorum sensing: from compound development to biological discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Michael A.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can utilize chemical signals to coordinate the expression of group-beneficial behaviors in a method of cell–cell communication called quorum sensing (QS). The discovery that QS controls the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation in many common pathogens has driven an explosion of research aimed at both deepening our fundamental understanding of these regulatory networks and developing chemical agents that can attenuate QS signaling. The inherently chemical nature of QS makes studying these pathways with small molecule tools a complementary approach to traditional microbiology techniques. Indeed, chemical tools are beginning to yield new insights into QS regulation and provide novel strategies to inhibit QS. Here, we review the most recent advances in the development of chemical probes of QS systems in Gram-negative bacteria, with an emphasis on the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We first describe reports of novel small molecule modulators of QS receptors and QS signal synthases. Next, in several case studies, we showcase how chemical tools have been deployed to reveal new knowledge of QS biology and outline lessons for how researchers might best target QS to combat bacterial virulence. To close, we detail the outstanding challenges in the field and suggest strategies to overcome these issues. PMID:27268906

  14. Research on the competitiveness and development strategy of china's modern coal chemical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Han, Y. J.; Yu, Z. F.

    2016-08-01

    China's modern coal chemical industry has grown into a certain scale after over a decade of development, and remarkable progress has been made in key technologies. But as oil price collapsed since 2015, the economic benefit of the industry also slumped, with loud controversies in China over the necessity of modern coal chemical industry. The research believes that the modern coal chemical industry plays a positive role in the clean and sustainable exploitation of coal in China. It makes profit when oil price is no lower than 60/bbl, and outperforms petrochemical in terms of cost effectiveness when the price is between 60/bbl and 80/bbl. Given the low oil price and challenges posed by environmental protection and water restraints, we suggest that the state announce a guideline quickly, with adjusted tax policies and an encouragement to technological innovation, so that the modern coal chemical industry in China can grow sound and stable.

  15. From plant biomass to bio-based chemicals: latest developments in xylan research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Rudolf; Dekker, Robert F H

    2012-01-01

    For a hundred years or more, oil and natural gas has supplied fuel and other raw chemicals to support economic growth. In the last decades their shrinking reservoirs and the increasing cost of production has become obvious, leading researchers to look for alternative substitutes of all the chemical materials presently derived from oil and gas. This review is focused on xylan, the second most abundant plant polysaccharide on our planet. Some xylan-derived products have already found commercial applications (ethanol, xylitol, xylo-oligosaccharides) while others could have a great future in a wide range of industries. The chemical and structural variations of xylans produced by different plants, and the concentration of xylan in various plant resources are summarized. This review discusses the latest research developments in extraction and purification methodologies, and chemical modification, as well as the analytical methods necessary for xylan related research. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical Atherogenesis: Role of Endogenous and Exogenous Poisons in Disease Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew K. Ross

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical atherogenesis is an emerging field that describes how environmental pollutants and endogenous toxins perturb critical pathways that regulate lipid metabolism and inflammation, thus injuring cells found within the vessel wall. Despite growing awareness of the role of environmental pollutants in the development of cardiovascular disease, the field of chemical atherogenesis can broadly include both exogenous and endogenous poisons and the study of molecular, biochemical, and cellular pathways that become dysregulated during atherosclerosis. This integrated approach is logical because exogenous and endogenous toxins often share the same mechanism of toxicity. Chemical atherogenesis is a truly integrative discipline because it incorporates concepts from several different fields, including biochemistry, chemical biology, pharmacology, and toxicology. This review will provide an overview of this emerging research area, focusing on cellular and animal models of disease.

  17. Challenges to developing countries after joining WTO: risk assessment of chemicals in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junshi

    2004-01-01

    FAO/WHO encourages member countries to develop national food control measures based on risk assessment in order to assure proper protection level to consumers and facilitate fair trade. This is particularly important for developing countries as WTO members because it is clearly stated in the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS) Agreement that: (a) SPS measures should be based on risk assessment techniques developed by relevant international organizations; and (b) Codex standards which is based on risk assessment are regarded as the international norm in trade dispute settlement. When conducting risk assessment on food chemicals (including additives and contaminants) in developing countries, in most cases it is not necessary to conduct their own hazard characterization because the ADIs or PTWIs of food chemicals developed by international expert groups (e.g. JECFA) are universally applicable and also developing countries do not have the resources to repeat those expensive toxicological studies. On the other hand, it is necessary to conduct exposure assessment in developing countries because exposure to food chemicals varies from country to country. This is not only crucial in setting national standards, but also very important for developing countries to participate in the process of developing Codex standards. In addition to food standard development, risk assessment is also useful in setting up priorities in imported food inspection and evaluating the success of various food safety control measures

  18. The design and development of an acoustic test section for the ARA transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M. E.; Newman, D. A.

    1988-11-01

    The structural, aerodynamic and acoustic design of a lined test section necessary to produce a sufficiently reflection-free environment for noise tests in the Aircraft Research Association (ARA) tunnel at Mach numbers up to 0.85 are described. The aerodynamic design was aided by computational fluid dynamics methods and the acoustic design by a ray-theory model. Results of the aerodynamic calibration of the liner and preliminary acoustic and performance tests on two model propellers are presented. Development work carried out to improve the liner acoustically and aerodynamically is described.

  19. Empirically based development of a framework for advancing and stimulating collaboration in the chemical industry (ASC) : Creating sustainable chemical industrial parks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, Genserik; Dullaert, Wout; Visser, Lenny

    2010-01-01

    Based on literature, we identify collaboration drivers and partner features for enhancing vertical and/or horizontal collaboration in the chemicals using industries. We further develop constructs for both types of collaboration. A survey-based analysis within the largest chemical cluster worldwide

  20. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered.

  1. Development of California Public Health Goals (PHGs) for chemicals in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howd, R A; Brown, J P; Morry, D W; Wang, Y Y; Bankowska, J; Budroe, J D; Campbell, M; DiBartolomeis, M J; Faust, J; Jowa, L; Lewis, D; Parker, T; Polakoff, J; Rice, D W; Salmon, A G; Tomar, R S; Fan, A M

    2000-01-01

    As part of a program for evaluation of environmental contaminants in drinking water, risk assessments are being conducted to develop Public Health Goals (PHGs) for chemicals in drinking water, based solely on public health considerations. California's Safe Drinking Water Act of 1996 mandated the development of PHGs for over 80 chemicals by 31 December 1999. The law allowed these levels to be set higher or lower than federal maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), including a level of zero if data are insufficient to determine a specific level. The estimated safe levels and toxicological rationale for the first 26 of these chemicals are described here. The chemicals include alachlor, antimony, benzo[a]pyrene, chlordane, copper, cyanide, dalapon, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 2,4-D, diethylhexylphthalate, dinoseb, endothall, ethylbenzene, fluoride, glyphosate, lead, nitrate, nitrite, oxamyl, pentachlorophenol, picloram, trichlorofluoromethane, trichlorotrifluoroethane, uranium and xylene(s). These risk assessments are to be considered by the State of California in revising and developing state MCLs for chemicals in drinking water (which must not exceed federal MCLs). The estimates are also notable for incorporation or consideration of newer guidelines and principles for risk assessment extrapolations.

  2. Length-scales of chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle section of the Shetland Ophiolite Complex, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, B.; Walker, R. J.; Clay, P. L.; Day, J. M. D.; Ash, R. D.; Daly, J. S.

    2018-04-01

    Kilometre to sub-metre scale heterogeneities have been inferred in the oceanic mantle based on sampling of both ophiolites and abyssal peridotites. The ∼492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex (SOC) contains a well-preserved mantle section that is dominated by harzburgite (∼70 vol.%) previously reported to have variable major and trace element compositions, yet dominantly chondritic initial 187Os/188Os compositions. To assess the preservation of compositional heterogeneities at sub-metre length-scales in the oceanic mantle, a ∼45 m2 area of the SOC mantle section was mapped and sampled in detail. Harzburgites, dunites and a pyroxenite from this area were analysed for lithophile and highly-siderophile element (HSE) abundances, as well as for 187Os/188Os ratios. Lithophile element data for most rocks are characteristic of supra-subduction zone (SSZ) metasomatic processes. Two dunites have moderately fractionated HSE patterns and suprachondritic γOs(492 Ma) values (+5.1 and +7.5) that are also typical of ophiolitic dunites generated by SSZ melt-rock interactions. By contrast, six harzburgites and four dunites have approximately chondritic-relative abundances of Os, Ir and Ru, and γOs(492 Ma) values ranging only from -0.6 to +2.7; characteristics that imply no significant influence during SSZ processes. Two harzburgites are also characterised by significantly less radiogenic γOs(492 Ma) values (-3.5 and -4), and yield Mesoproterozoic time of Re depletion (TRD) model ages. The range of Os isotope compositions in the studied area is comparable to the range reported for a suite of samples representative of the entire SOC mantle section, and approaches the total isotopic variation of the oceanic mantle, as observed in abyssal peridotites. Mechanisms by which this heterogeneity can be formed and preserved involve inefficient and temporally distinct melt extraction events and strong localised channelling of these melts.

  3. Vocabulary development in children with Down syndrome: longitudinal and cross-sectional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Laura; D'Odorico, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Research findings on vocabulary development (1) in children with Down syndrome are inconsistent. This study aimed to analyse the developmental trend of vocabulary growth in children with Down syndrome and the relationships between vocabulary and chronological and developmental age. Children's vocabulary size was assessed by a parental report (the Italian version of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories [CDI]). A longitudinal study, involving 18 children with Down syndrome, and a cross-sectional study, involving 27 children with Down syndrome, were conducted. The variability in children's vocabulary size increased from a chronological age of 36 months. Both vocabulary size (from 36 months) and developmental level (from 42 months) were significant predictors of lexical outcomes at 48 months. A comparison with normative data showed that children with Down syndrome had a significantly lower vocabulary size than typically developing children at the same developmental age. Although there are similarities with vocabulary growth in typically developing children, lexical development in children with Down syndrome appears to lag behind their cognitive development.

  4. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  5. Culture of bovine ovarian follicle wall sections maintained the highly estrogenic profile under basal and chemically defined conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, R.B.; Salles, L.P.; Silva, I. Oliveira e; Gulart, L.V.M.; Souza, D.K.; Torres, F.A.G.; Bocca, A.L.; Silva, A.A.M. Rosa e

    2013-01-01

    Follicle cultures reproduce in vitro the functional features observed in vivo. In a search for an ideal model, we cultured bovine antral follicle wall sections (FWS) in a serum-free defined medium (DM) known to induce 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) production, and in a nondefined medium (NDM) containing serum. Follicles were sectioned and cultured in NDM or DM for 24 or 48 h. Morphological features were determined by light microscopy. Gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor were determined by RT-PCR; progesterone (P 4 ) and E 2 concentrations in the media were measured by radioimmunoassay. DM, but not NDM, maintained an FWS morphology in vitro that was similar to fresh tissue. DM also induced an increase in the expression of all steroidogenic enzymes, except FSH receptor, but NDM did not. In both DM and NDM, there was a gradual increase in P 4 throughout the culture period; however, P 4 concentration was significantly higher in NDM. In both media, E 2 concentration was increased at 24 h, followed by a decrease at 48 h. The E 2 :P 4 ratio was higher in DM than in NDM. These results suggest that DM maintains morphological structure, upregulates the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes, and maintains steroid production with a high E 2 :P 4 ratio in FWS cultures

  6. Culture of bovine ovarian follicle wall sections maintained the highly estrogenic profile under basal and chemically defined conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, R.B. [Laboratório de Biotecnologia da Reprodução, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Salles, L.P. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Silva, I. Oliveira e; Gulart, L.V.M. [Laboratório de Biotecnologia da Reprodução, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Souza, D.K. [Laboratório de Biotecnologia da Reprodução, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Faculdade de Ceilândia, Universidade de Brasília, Ceilândia, DF (Brazil); Torres, F.A.G. [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Bocca, A.L. [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Silva, A.A.M. Rosa e [Laboratório de Biotecnologia da Reprodução, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2013-08-16

    Follicle cultures reproduce in vitro the functional features observed in vivo. In a search for an ideal model, we cultured bovine antral follicle wall sections (FWS) in a serum-free defined medium (DM) known to induce 17β-estradiol (E{sub 2}) production, and in a nondefined medium (NDM) containing serum. Follicles were sectioned and cultured in NDM or DM for 24 or 48 h. Morphological features were determined by light microscopy. Gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor were determined by RT-PCR; progesterone (P{sub 4}) and E{sub 2} concentrations in the media were measured by radioimmunoassay. DM, but not NDM, maintained an FWS morphology in vitro that was similar to fresh tissue. DM also induced an increase in the expression of all steroidogenic enzymes, except FSH receptor, but NDM did not. In both DM and NDM, there was a gradual increase in P{sub 4} throughout the culture period; however, P{sub 4} concentration was significantly higher in NDM. In both media, E{sub 2} concentration was increased at 24 h, followed by a decrease at 48 h. The E{sub 2}:P{sub 4} ratio was higher in DM than in NDM. These results suggest that DM maintains morphological structure, upregulates the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes, and maintains steroid production with a high E{sub 2}:P{sub 4} ratio in FWS cultures.

  7. Connection between chemical zonation and microstructure as an indicator for the fabric development in eclogites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Kai; Kongsro Finstad, Ane; Stünitz, Holger; Konopasek, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    Eclogites are the most important piece of evidence of high pressure conditions in subduction zones. The deformation of eclogites and the driving forces for their fabric development are an interesting topic potentially allowing to determine deformation rates in subduction zones. Most previous studies suggested disclocation creep to be the principal process causing the fabric development. The viability of this process may be tested by studying the chemical zonation of garnet and omphacite in order to track and quantify texture and microstructure development in eclogites. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of crystal growth on mineral preferred orientation and therefore its role in fabric development in eclogite-facies rocks. Caledonian, Variscan and Alpine eclogites from four different locations are studied, representing a wide range of metamorphic conditions as well as different subduction and exhumation rates. Variscan eclogites from the western Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) show elongated garnet grain shapes parallel to the rock`s extension direction. Asymmetric chemical zoning developed during prograde garnet growth together with the elongated garnet grain shape and can be related to a corresponding prograde (in terms of pressure change) chemical zoning in omphacite grains. Crystal plastic deformation of garnet can be excluded based on chemical zonation patterns. Preliminary results of chemical, microstructural and texture data indicate a direct relationship between the growth of garnet and omphacite grains with fabric development during prograde and peak metamorphic conditions. A later stage of retrogression observed along garnet and omphacite grain boundaries produces mineral phases with an orientation clearly parallel to the prograde fabric orientation. The results will be compared with those of Caledonian eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region and the Tromsø Nappe (southwestern and northern Norway, respectively), as well as with Alpine

  8. Developing a list of reference chemicals for testing alternatives to whole fish toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Kristin; Tanneberger, Katrin; Kramer, Nynke I; Völker, Doris; Scholz, Stefan; Hafner, Christoph; Lee, Lucy E J; Bols, Niels C; Hermens, Joop L M

    2008-11-11

    This paper details the derivation of a list of 60 reference chemicals for the development of alternatives to animal testing in ecotoxicology with a particular focus on fish. The chemicals were selected as a prerequisite to gather mechanistic information on the performance of alternative testing systems, namely vertebrate cell lines and fish embryos, in comparison to the fish acute lethality test. To avoid the need for additional experiments with fish, the U.S. EPA fathead minnow database was consulted as reference for whole organism responses. This database was compared to the Halle Registry of Cytotoxicity and a collation of data by the German EPA (UBA) on acute toxicity data derived from zebrafish embryos. Chemicals that were present in the fathead minnow database and in at least one of the other two databases were subject to selection. Criteria included the coverage of a wide range of toxicity and physico-chemical parameters as well as the determination of outliers of the in vivo/in vitro correlations. While the reference list of chemicals now guides our research for improving cell line and fish embryo assays to make them widely applicable, the list could be of benefit to search for alternatives in ecotoxicology in general. One example would be the use of this list to validate structure-activity prediction models, which in turn would benefit from a continuous extension of this list with regard to physico-chemical and toxicological data.

  9. Development of Screening Tools for the Interpretation of Chemical Biomonitoring Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Becker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of a larger number of chemicals in commerce from the perspective of potential human health risk has become a focus of attention in North America and Europe. Screening-level chemical risk assessment evaluations consider both exposure and hazard. Exposures are increasingly being evaluated through biomonitoring studies in humans. Interpreting human biomonitoring results requires comparison to toxicity guidance values. However, conventional chemical-specific risk assessments result in identification of toxicity-based exposure guidance values such as tolerable daily intakes (TDIs as applied doses that cannot directly be used to evaluate exposure information provided by biomonitoring data in a health risk context. This paper describes a variety of approaches for development of screening-level exposure guidance values with translation from an external dose to a biomarker concentration framework for interpreting biomonitoring data in a risk context. Applications of tools and concepts including biomonitoring equivalents (BEs, the threshold of toxicologic concern (TTC, and generic toxicokinetic and physiologically based toxicokinetic models are described. These approaches employ varying levels of existing chemical-specific data, chemical class-specific assessments, and generic modeling tools in response to varying levels of available data in order to allow assessment and prioritization of chemical exposures for refined assessment in a risk management context.

  10. Cesarean section delivery and development of food allergy and atopic dermatitis in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathoma, Evangelia; Triga, Maria; Fouzas, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Delivery by Cesarean section (CS) may predispose to allergic disorders, presumably due to alterations in the establishment of normal gut microbiota in early infancy. In this study, we sought to investigate the association between CS and physician-diagnosed food allergy and atopic dermatitis during the first 3 years of life, using data from a homogeneous, population-based, birth cohort. A total of 459 children born and cared for in the same tertiary maternity unit were examined at birth and followed up at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months of age. Participants with symptoms suggestive of food allergy or atopic dermatitis were evaluated by a pediatric allergy specialist to confirm the diagnosis based on well-defined criteria. The rate of CS was 50.8% (n = 233). Food allergy was diagnosed in 24 participants (5.2%) while atopic dermatitis was diagnosed in 62 children (13.5%). Cesarean section (OR 3.15; 95% CI 1.14-8.70), atopic dermatitis of the child (OR 3.01; 95% CI 1.18-7.80), parental atopy (OR 4.33; 95% CI 1.73-12.1), and gestational age (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.07-2.37) were significant and independent predictors of food allergy. Children with at least one allergic parent delivered by CS had higher probability of developing food allergy compared with vaginally delivered children of non-allergic parents (OR 10.0; 95% CI 3.06-32.7). Conversely, the effect of CS on atopic dermatitis was not significant (OR 1.35; 95% CI 0.74-2.47). Delivery by CS predisposes to the development of food allergy but not atopic dermatitis in early childhood. Cesarean section delivery seems to upregulate the immune response to food allergens, especially in children with allergic predisposition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Recent developments in the Clean Water Act: Section 404 regulatory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsch, T. (EPA, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Since the late 1970's and the 1980's, the Nation has become increasingly aware of the vital role wetlands play in providing habitat, protecting us from flooding and maintaining surface water quality. This public awakening came at the same time that the Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory published reports indicating that less than one half of the wetlands that existed when the Europeans came to the US remain. The reports also indicated that the US was continuing to lose approximately 450,000 acres of our wetlands per year. Although recent data updating the status and trends of wetland losses for the 1980's indicate that the rate of loss has decreased, the Fish and Wildlife Service estimates indicate that approximately 290,000 acres of wetlands are still lost each year. Any loss in the natural functions provided by wetlands is not just felt in the environment; we simultaneously sustain, as a loss to our national economy, a decline in the income that could have been derived from the fisheries, recreation and other critical services performed by wetland systems. Clearly wetlands merit protection. However, in the US, where over 75 percent of our remaining wetlands are on private property, the protection of wetlands is often a difficult and sometimes contentious issue -- evoking debate about private property rights, economic development, the public interest in protecting wetland values, and the kind of world we wish to leave for future generations. Section 404 of the Clean Water Act establishes the primary Federal regulatory program providing protection for the Nation's remaining wetlands. The Section 404 permit program is recognized by both its supporters and critics as one of the strongest, yet often most contentious, Federal environmental protection programs. This presentation provides an overview of the Section 404 regulatory requirements and discusses some of the recent developments that have stirred considerable

  12. A Collaborative Approach to Transportation Planning: Federal and State Perspectives on Section 180(c) Program Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macaluso, C.; Strong, T.; Janairo, L.; Helvey, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) committed in its November 2003 Strategic Plan for the Safe Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to Yucca Mountain: A Guide to Stakeholder Interactions to develop the transportation system collaboratively with stakeholders. The Strategic Plan further stated that four state regional groups (SRGs) would be the 'anchors' for OCRWM's collaboration with the states. The first major transportation planning activity that OCRWM initiated after publication of the Strategic Plan was the development of the Section 180(c) grant program. This document describes that collaboration and its outcomes from the perspective of the OCRWM participants and one of the SRGs, the Council of State Governments - Midwestern Office (CSG Midwest). (authors)

  13. Intercomparison of modal and sectional aerosol microphysics representations within the same 3-D global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Mann

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the most advanced aerosol-climate models it is common to represent the aerosol particle size distribution in terms of several log-normal modes. This approach, motivated by computational efficiency, makes assumptions about the shape of the particle distribution that may not always capture the properties of global aerosol. Here, a global modal aerosol microphysics module (GLOMAP-mode is evaluated and improved by comparing against a sectional version (GLOMAP-bin and observations in the same 3-D global offline chemistry transport model. With both schemes, the model captures the main features of the global particle size distribution, with sub-micron aerosol approximately unimodal in continental regions and bi-modal in marine regions. Initial bin-mode comparisons showed that the current values for two size distribution parameter settings in the modal scheme (mode widths and inter-modal separation sizes resulted in clear biases compared to the sectional scheme. By adjusting these parameters in the modal scheme, much better agreement is achieved against the bin scheme and observations. Annual mean surface-level mass of sulphate, sea-salt, black carbon (BC and organic carbon (OC are within 25% in the two schemes in nearly all regions. Surface level concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, surface area density and condensation sink also compare within 25% in most regions. However, marine CCN concentrations between 30° N and 30° S are systematically 25–60% higher in the modal model, which we attribute to differences in size-resolved particle growth or cloud-processing. Larger differences also exist in regions or seasons dominated by biomass burning and in free-troposphere and high-latitude regions. Indeed, in the free-troposphere, GLOMAP-mode BC is a factor 2–4 higher than GLOMAP-bin, likely due to differences in size-resolved scavenging. Nevertheless, in most parts of the atmosphere, we conclude that bin

  14. Signal Processor Development by Personnel of the JSC Signal Processing Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, S. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe systems and components of systems developed by personnel in the Signal Processing Section of the Tracking and Communications Division. The scope of this includes past developments which are in current use in NASA flight operations and future developments which are targeted for upcoming NASA applications. These projects specifically are: (1) NASA High Definition Television (HDTV) Project, (2) Video Codecs, (3) NASA Electronic Still Camera (ESC) Project, (4) Hercules Payload, (5) Ku-band Communications Adapter (KCA), (6) Windows Drivers for Satellite Interfacing to Commercial Equipment, and (7) Advanced Statistical Multiplexers. The methods used to determine what projects should be done in-house as opposed to which should not is based in NASA applications versus commercially available systems to meet those applications. If a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) component or system is available which meets the need, the first choice is to use COTS equipment. If it is not, and there is a NASA requirement, it is developed in-house. This results in technology which is being developed which otherwise was not available. Personnel involved in these projects have been contacted by many commercial companies interested in licensing or obtaining the NASA design.

  15. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  16. Solar cells elaborated by chemical methods: examples of research and development at CIE-UNAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, Marina E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: At the Energy Research Center (CIE-UNAM-Mexico), the major areas of renewable energy research are solar thermal energy, photovoltaic energy, geothermal energy, hydrogen energy, materials for renewable energy, and energy planning. Among the efforts to developed solar cells, both physical and chemical methods are in progress at CIE-UNAM. In this contribution we focus on the advancement in efficiency, stability, and cost, of photovoltaic junctions based on chemically deposited films. Examples of early research are a composite thin film electrode comprised of SnO2/Bi2S3 nanocrystallites (5 nm) prepared by sequential deposition of SnO2 and Bi2S3 films onto an optically transparent electrode; the co-deposition of pyrrole and Bi2S3 nanoparticles on chemically deposited bismuth sulfide substrates to explore new approaches to improve light-collection efficiency in polymer photovoltaics; the sensitization of titanium dioxide coatings by chemically deposited cadmium selenide and bismuthe sulfide thin films. Here the good photostability of the coatings was promising for the use of the sensitized films in photocatalytic as well as photovoltaic applications. More recently, chemically deposited cadmium sulfide thin films have been explored in planar hybrid heterojunctions with chemically synthesized poly 3-octylthiophene, as well as all-chemically deposited photovoltaic structures. Examples of the last are: chemically deposited thin films of CdS (80 nm), Sb2S3 (450 nm), and Ag2Se (150 nm) annealed at 300 C and integrated into a p-i-n structure glass/SnO2:F/n-CdS/Sb2S3/p-AgSbSe2/Ag, showing Voc ∼ 550 mV and Jsc ∼ 2.3 mA/cm2 at 1 kW/m2 (tungsten halogen) intensity. Similarly, chemically deposited SnS (450nm) and CuS (80nm) thin films integrated in a photovoltaic structure SnO2:F/CdS/SnS/CuS/Ag, showing Voc>300 mV and Jsc up to 5 mA/cm2 under 850 W/m2 tungsten halogen illumination. These photovoltaic structures have been found to be stable over a period extending over

  17. Grand Challenges and Chemical Engineering Curriculum--Developments at TU Dortmund University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockmann, Norbert; Lutze, Philip; Gorak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Chemical processing industry is progressively focusing their research activities and product placements in the areas of Grand Challenges (or Global Megatrends) such as mobility, energy, communication, or health care and food. Innovation in all these fields requires solving high complex problems, rapid product development as well as dealing with…

  18. Recommendations for Developing Alternative Test Methods for Screening and Prioritization of Chemicals for Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) is perceived by many stakeholders to be an area in critical need of alternative methods to current animal testing protocols and gUidelines. An immediate goal is to develop test methods that are capable of screening large numbers of chemic...

  19. Can Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Increase the Risk of Diabetes Type 1 Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Bodin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disease, where destruction of beta-cells causes insulin deficiency. The incidence of T1DM has increased in the last decades and cannot entirely be explained by genetic predisposition. Several environmental factors are suggested to promote T1DM, like early childhood enteroviral infections and nutritional factors, but the evidence is inconclusive. Prenatal and early life exposure to environmental pollutants like phthalates, bisphenol A, perfluorinated compounds, PCBs, dioxins, toxicants, and air pollutants can have negative effects on the developing immune system, resulting in asthma-like symptoms and increased susceptibility to childhood infections. In this review the associations between environmental chemical exposure and T1DM development is summarized. Although information on environmental chemicals as possible triggers for T1DM is sparse, we conclude that it is plausible that environmental chemicals can contribute to T1DM development via impaired pancreatic beta-cell and immune-cell functions and immunomodulation. Several environmental factors and chemicals could act together to trigger T1DM development in genetically susceptible individuals, possibly via hormonal or epigenetic alterations. Further observational T1DM cohort studies and animal exposure experiments are encouraged.

  20. Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-29

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.

  1. Development of Algal Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Chemical Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web-based Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) is an application developed to predict the acute toxicity of a chemical from 1 species to another taxon. Web-ICE models use the acute toxicity value for a surrogate species to predict effect values for other species, thus potent...

  2. Development of In Vitro Assays to Assess Chemicals and Environmental Samples for Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This abstract presents research being conducted at MED under the Safe Pesticides/Safe Products and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals research area. The research described herein is in response to the mandate to the Agency to develop a research program to evaluate the potential adve...

  3. Integrating Sustainable Development in Chemical Engineering Education: The Application of an Environmental Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanes, M. T.; Palomares, A. E.; Sanchez-Tovar, R.

    2012-01-01

    The principles of sustainable development have been integrated in chemical engineering education by means of an environmental management system. These principles have been introduced in the teaching laboratories where students perform their practical classes. In this paper, the implementation of the environmental management system, the problems…

  4. Development of a Minimum Data Set (MDS) for C-Section Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhotayefeh, Mostafa; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Khademi, Seyed Hossein; Seyed Farajolah, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Maserat, Elham; Jebraeily, Mohamad; Torabi, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    Caesarean section, also known as C-section, is a very common procedure in the world. Minimum data set (MDS) is defined as a set of data elements holding information regarding a series of target entities to provide a basis for planning, management, and performance evaluation. MDS has found a great use in health care information systems. Also, it can be considered as a basis for medical information management and has shown a great potential for contributing to the provision of high quality care and disease control measures. The principal aim of this research was to determine MDS and required capabilities for Anesthesia information management system (AIMS) in C-section in Iran. Data items collected from several selected AIMS were studied to establish an initial set of data. The population of this study composed of 115 anesthesiologists was asked to review the proposed data elements and score them in order of importance by using a five-point Likert scale. The items scored as important or highly important by at least 75% of the experts were included in the final list of minimum data set. Overall 8 classes of data (consisted of 81 key data elements) were determined as final set. Also, the most important required capabilities were related to airway management and hypertension and hypotension management. In the development of information system (IS) based on MDS and identification, because of the broad involvement of users, IS capabilities must focus on the users' needs to form a successful system. Therefore, it is essential to assess MDS watchfully by considering the planned uses of data. Also, IS should have essential capabilities to meet the needs of its users.

  5. Prototype development of radio frequency cavity and quadrupole for ADSS - initial efforts by mechanical design and prototype development section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Kamble, Sunil; Choughule, L.S.; Kumar, Sunil; Patankar, S.R.; Phalke, V.M.; Dharmik, D.A.; Singh, Tejinder; Ram, Y.; Chaudhari, A.T.; Pathak, Kavindra; Prasad, N.K.; Marathe, V.V.; Matkar, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical Design and Prototype Development Section has participated in the efforts for development of RF cavity and Quadrupole for ADSS. Recently prototype Super conducting RF cavity, Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) Simulation Chamber and related experimental setups were developed, fabricated and delivered for the characterisation of various relevant parameters. Under the program for development of Super conducting RF Cavity for high-energy section of LINAC of ADS first prototype RF Cavity of ETP copper was developed by machining and brazing process. The prototype cavity having elliptical and circular profile is the heart of this setup. The cavity is made up of two symmetrical cups joined together by welding or brazing. Various methods are being tried out by MD and PDS for the fabrication of cups and joining them together. Manufacturing of cup by machining and joining them by conventional brazing technique to make the cavity was the first step in this direction. Another method of manufacturing and joining viz forming of cup by deep drawing and joining them by EB welding is in progress. RFQ is a versatile and efficient system for accelerating ion beams especially at low energy. It works in quadrupole mode, which is at 350M Hz. RFQ Focuses, Bunches and Accelerates the beam simultaneously. The bunching is done in this RFQ, which results in more than 95% transmission where as in the normal buncher the transmission is less than 40%. The actual RFQ, which is designed for the PURNIMA facility, will be fabricated from OFHC copper that will accelerate a deuteron (D+) ion beam from 50keV to 400keV over its 1.37meter length. For the validation of manufacturing process and characterisation of various parameters at low frequency a 500mm long prototype RFQ in Aluminium with an accuracy of ± 25microns and surface finish of 1.6 micron has been fabricated by MD and PDS. A simplified simulation chamber to facilitate the development of RFQ for

  6. Development of an operational waterborne weaponized chemical agent transport modeling capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M.C.; Cragan, J.A.; Mueller, C.

    2009-01-01

    The fate of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in aqueous environments is not well characterized. Limited physical and kinetic data are available for these chemicals in the open literature, partly due to their inherent lethality. As a result, the development of methods for determining the persistence and extent of impact for waterborne chemical agent releases is a significant challenge. In this study, a hydrolysis model was developed to track the fate of several critical CWAs. VX, sarin, soman, tabun, and cyclosarin modeling capabilities were developed for an instantaneous point source aqueous release. Hydrolysis products were tracked and the resulting change in pH was calculated for the local dispersive environment. Using this data, instantaneous hydrolysis rates were calculated. This framework was applied to assess the persistence and fate of the CWAs in different turbulent environments. From this hydrolysis model, estimates of the time and extent of lethality from an aqueous release can be made. Refinement to these estimates requires further investigation into the impact of potential catalysts on these chemicals. Enhanced understanding of equivalent acute percutaneous toxicity for solutions requires changes to current testing and estimation methods.(author)

  7. Development of chemically defined media supporting high-cell-density growth of lactococci, enterococci, and streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiying; Mills, David A; Block, David E

    2009-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis IL1403 was used as an experimental strain to develop a chemically defined medium for study of the physiology and metabolic pathways of lactococci. An experimental leave-one-out technique was employed to determine the necessity of each of the 57 chemical components used in medium development. A statistical experimental design approach including three fractional factorial designs and a central composite design was used to optimize the fermentation process with 21 variables composed of 19 nutritional factors grouped from the 57 components and two environmental factors (initial pH and temperature). For L. lactis IL1403, the maximum biomass concentrations obtained with the two optimal chemically defined media developed in this study (ZMB1 and ZMB2) were generally 3.5- to 4-fold higher than the maximum biomass concentrations obtained with the previously described best synthetic media (SA) and 50% to 68% higher than the maximum biomass concentrations obtained with M17, a complex medium commonly used for lactococci. The new chemically defined media support high-cell-density growth of numerous strains of L. lactis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus thermophilus.

  8. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesions Developed after Peritoneal Nonclosure in Primary Cesarean Section Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaduldin Seyam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the current study was to laparoscopically investigate the effects of peritoneal nonclosure on the sites, types, and degrees of adhesions developed after primary caesarean section (CS in women complaining of secondary infertility after first CS delivery. Study Design. This was a cross-sectional study, where 250 women suffering from secondary infertility after their first CS had been recruited. They had been classified into group I (n = 89, where both the visceral and parietal peritoneum had been left opened; group II (n = 75, where only the parietal peritoneum had been closed; and group III (n = 86, where both peritoneal layers had been closed. Laparoscopy had been used to classify those adhesions according to the location, severity, and their adverse impact on the reproductive capacity. Results. Both adnexal and nonadnexal adhesions had been found significantly higher in group I, while adnexal types of adhesions were significantly higher after nonclosure of the visceral peritoneum in group II. Laparoscopic tubal surgery performed included tubo-ovariolysis, fimbrioplasty, and neosalpingostomy. Pregnancy rate was found correlating with the adnexal adhesion location and score. Conclusion. Nonclosure of the peritoneum in CS is associated with more adhesion formation, which might adversely affect the future women reproduction.

  9. Development of chemical cleaning formulation for service water system of FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Mathur, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Service water system of Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) was found to be corroded and at few locations, the corrosion product oxides were choking the smaller diameter pipelines. An attempt was made to develop a chemical cleaning formulation to chemically remove the oxides using a surface conditioner and chelating agents. Of the several complexants tested, hydroxyethylethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (HEDTA) was found to be better than other complexants from the point of view of oxide dissolution efficiency, solubility etc. A two stage chemical cleaning process involving conditioning of the oxide layer with 0.1% tannic acid followed by exposure of the conditioned oxide layer with a formulation containing 1% HEDTA + 0.5% Sodium Gluconate +0.2% hexamine was recommended to remove the corrosion product oxide present in the service water system. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program: Recent developments in crack initiation and arrest research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for the analysis of crack initiation and arrest is central to the reactor pressure vessel fracture-margin-assessment process. Regulatory procedures for nuclear plants utilize this technology to assure the retention of adequate fracture-prevention margins throughout the plant operating license period. As nuclear plants age and regulatory procedures dictate that fracture-margin assessments be performed, interest in the fracture-mechanics technology incorporated into those procedures has heightened. This has led to proposals from a number of sources for development and refinement of the underlying crack-initiation and arrest-analysis technology. This paper presents an overview of ongoing Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program research aimed at refining the fracture toughness data used in the analysis of fracture margins under pressurized-thermal-shock loading conditions. 33 refs., 13 figs

  11. Development of bovine serum albumin-water partition coefficients predictive models for ionogenic organic chemicals based on chemical form adjusted descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Yang, Xianhai; Chen, Guosong; Liu, Jining; Shi, Lili; Chen, Jingwen

    2017-10-01

    The partition coefficients between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and water (K BSA/w ) for ionogenic organic chemicals (IOCs) were different greatly from those of neutral organic chemicals (NOCs). For NOCs, several excellent models were developed to predict their logK BSA/w . However, it was found that the conventional descriptors are inappropriate for modeling logK BSA/w of IOCs. Thus, alternative approaches are urgently needed to develop predictive models for K BSA/w of IOCs. In this study, molecular descriptors that can be used to characterize the ionization effects (e.g. chemical form adjusted descriptors) were calculated and used to develop predictive models for logK BSA/w of IOCs. The models developed had high goodness-of-fit, robustness, and predictive ability. The predictor variables selected to construct the models included the chemical form adjusted averages of the negative potentials on the molecular surface (V s-adj - ), the chemical form adjusted molecular dipole moment (dipolemoment adj ), the logarithm of the n-octanol/water distribution coefficient (logD). As these molecular descriptors can be calculated from their molecular structures directly, the developed model can be easily used to fill the logK BSA/w data gap for other IOCs within the applicability domain. Furthermore, the chemical form adjusted descriptors calculated in this study also could be used to construct predictive models on other endpoints of IOCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of tight-binding, chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator for combinatorial computational chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Momoji; Ando, Minako; Sakahara, Satoshi; Jung, Changho; Seki, Kotaro; Kusagaya, Tomonori; Endou, Akira; Takami, Seiichi; Imamura, Akira; Miyamoto, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a new concept called 'combinatorial computational chemistry' to realize a theoretical, high-throughput screening of catalysts and materials. We have already applied our combinatorial, computational-chemistry approach, mainly based on static first-principles calculations, to various catalysts and materials systems and its applicability to the catalysts and materials design was strongly confirmed. In order to realize more effective and efficient combinatorial, computational-chemistry screening, a high-speed, chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator based on quantum-chemical, molecular-dynamics method is essential. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator, which has an enough high-speed ability to perform a high-throughput screening. In the present study, we have succeeded in the development of a chemical-reaction-dynamics simulator based on our original, tight-binding, quantum-chemical, molecular-dynamics method, which is more than 5000 times faster than the regular first-principles, molecular-dynamics method. Moreover, its applicability and effectiveness to the atomistic clarification of the methanol-synthesis dynamics at reaction temperature were demonstrated

  13. Development of a Reactor Model for Chemical Conversion of Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, U.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar regolith will be used for a variety of purposes such as oxygen and propellant production and manufacture of various materials. The design and development of chemical conversion reactors for processing lunar regolith will require an understanding of the coupling among the chemical, mass and energy transport processes occurring at the length and time scales of the overall reactor with those occurring at the corresponding scales of the regolith particles. To this end, a coupled transport model is developed using, as an example, the reduction of ilmenite-containing regolith by a continuous flow of hydrogen in a flow-through reactor. The ilmenite conversion occurs on the surface and within the regolith particles. As the ilmenite reduction proceeds, the hydrogen in the reactor is consumed, and this, in turn, affects the conversion rate of the ilmenite in the particles. Several important quantities are identified as a result of the analysis. Reactor scale parameters include the void fraction (i.e., the fraction of the reactor volume not occupied by the regolith particles) and the residence time of hydrogen in the reactor. Particle scale quantities include the time for hydrogen to diffuse into the pores of the regolith particles and the chemical reaction time. The paper investigates the relationships between these quantities and their impact on the regolith conversion. Application of the model to various chemical reactor types, such as fluidized-bed, packed-bed, and rotary-bed configurations, are discussed.

  14. Systematic development and optimization of chemically defined medium supporting high cell density growth of Bacillus coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Dong, Fengqing; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    With determined components and experimental reducibility, the chemically defined medium (CDM) and the minimal chemically defined medium (MCDM) are used in many metabolism and regulation studies. This research aimed to develop the chemically defined medium supporting high cell density growth of Bacillus coagulans, which is a promising producer of lactic acid and other bio-chemicals. In this study, a systematic methodology combining the experimental technique with flux balance analysis (FBA) was proposed to design and simplify a CDM. The single omission technique and single addition technique were employed to determine the essential and stimulatory compounds, before the optimization of their concentrations by the statistical method. In addition, to improve the growth rationally, in silico omission and addition were performed by FBA based on the construction of a medium-size metabolic model of B. coagulans 36D1. Thus, CDMs were developed to obtain considerable biomass production of at least five B. coagulans strains, in which two model strains B. coagulans 36D1 and ATCC 7050 were involved.

  15. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatapathy, Raghuraman; Wang Chingyi; Bruce, Robert Mark; Moudgal, Chandrika

    2009-01-01

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to identify alternative toxicity measures that may be used as surrogates for carcinogenic potency. Alternative toxicity measures for carcinogenic potency currently being used in the literature include lethal dose (dose that kills 50% of a study population [LD 50 ]), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between tumor dose (TD 50 ) and three alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency. A second aim of this study was to develop a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) between TD 50 and estimated/experimental predictor variables to predict the carcinogenic potency of new chemicals. Rat TD 50 s of 590 structurally diverse chemicals were obtained from the Cancer Potency Database, and the three alternative toxicity measures considered in this study were estimated using TOPKAT, a toxicity estimation software. Though poor correlations were obtained between carcinogenic potency and the three alternative toxicity (both experimental and TOPKAT) measures for the CPDB chemicals, a CART developed using experimental data with no missing values as predictor variables provided reasonable estimates of TD 50 for nine chemicals that were part of an external validation set. However, if experimental values for the three alternative measures, mutagenicity and logP are not available in the literature, then either the CART developed using missing experimental values or estimated values may be used for making a prediction

  16. Develop of a model to minimize and to treat waste coming from the chemical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon Hernandez, M.

    2000-01-01

    They were investigated and proposed alternative of minimization and treatment of waste organic type coming from chemical laboratories, considering as alternative the disposition for the drainage, the chemical treatment of the waste, the disposition in sanitary fillers, the creation of a cellar to recycle material, the incineration, the distillation and the possibility to establish an agreement with the company Cements INCSA to discard the materials in the oven to cements of this enterprise. the methodology had as first stage the summary of information about the production of residuals for Investigation Center or Academic Unit. For this they were considered the laboratories of investigation of the CICA, CELEQ, CIPRONA, LAYAFA, and the laboratories of teaching of the sections of Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Physicochemical, Pharmacognosy, Drugs Analysis, Physicopharmacy, Histology and Physiology. Additionally, you considers the office of purveyor of the Microbiology School. Subsequently one carries out an analysis of costs to determine which waste constituted most of the waste generated by the University, as for cost and volume. Then, they were carried out classifications of the materials according to chemical approaches, classification of the NFPA and for data of combustion heats. Once carried out this classification and established the current situation of the laboratories considered as for handling and treatment of waste, they proceeded to evaluate and select treatment options and disposition of waste considering advantages and disadvantages as for implementation possibility and cost stops this way a minimization model and treatment that it can be implemented in the University to settle down [es

  17. Risk Factors for Developing Scoliosis in Cerebral Palsy: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncelli, Carlo M; Solla, Federico; Loughenbury, Peter R; Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Bertoncelli, Domenico; Rampal, Virginie

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to identify the risk factors leading to the development of severe scoliosis among children with cerebral palsy. A cross-sectional descriptive study of 70 children (aged 12-18 years) with severe spastic and/or dystonic cerebral palsy treated in a single specialist unit is described. Statistical analysis included Fisher exact test and logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors. Severe scoliosis is more likely to occur in patients with intractable epilepsy ( P = .008), poor gross motor functional assessment scores ( P = .018), limb spasticity ( P = .045), a history of previous hip surgery ( P = .048), and nonambulatory patients ( P = .013). Logistic regression model confirms the major risk factors are previous hip surgery ( P = .001), moderate to severe epilepsy ( P = .007), and female gender ( P = .03). History of previous hip surgery, intractable epilepsy, and female gender are predictors of developing severe scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy. This knowledge should aid in the early diagnosis of scoliosis and timely referral to specialist services.

  18. Justification of Constructing Rijeka-Zagreb Motorway Section for the Development of the Port of Rijeka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Huzjan

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the significance of the Rijeka-Zagrebmotorway for the development of the Port of Rijeka, as well asits significance in the European road network and the networkof state motorways. It gives a short historic overview of thephase construction of the Rijeka-Zagreb motorway per sectionsand years of completion, and the most important parametersare mentioned that influence the justification of the upgradingof the motorway section to full transversal profile.Since "traffic" is one of the key components of developmentand necessary for all the aspects of human activities, the completionof a safe, reliable and fast traffic connection of the Croatiancapital with the biggest Croatian port represents the keyfactor of the Strategy of traffic development of the Republic ofCroatia.Besides, the Rijeka-Zagreb motorway represents the backboneof the Croatian motorway network, since it integrates theCroatian space connecting it with the European traffic corridors.Thus, new possibilities are opened to the national economy,mainly tourism and port traffic, and bringing direct benefits.Therefore, the greatest significance of the construction i. e.upgrading of this motorway lies precisely in raising the qualityof traffic service regarding road connection, but also in a widertraffic sense.

  19. Analysis on Development of Transverse - Sectioned Weld Zone using FEM Verified with Multipulsed Resistance Seam Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation, through an experimental study, of the development of weld nuggets and a heat-affected zone (HAZ in resistance seam welding(RSEW using a numerical simulation approach. SYSWELD software for the simulation of heat treatment, welding, and welding assembly was utilized for the simulation process. The integrated Spot Weld Advisor (SWA in SYSWELD was applied to simulate the RSEW model using a two-dimensional axis-symmetric FE model with customized electrode meshing. The thermal-mechanical-electrical characteristic and contact condition were taken into account throughout this study. The developed model comprised a transverse cross section for welding two layers of low carbon steel with a thickness of 1 mm. For the experimental verification, three-pulsed RSEW with two different current stages was carried out. It was discovered that this program code, Spotweld Advisor, when used with the meshing method, was capable of offering results that were in agreement with physical experiments.

  20. Development and evaluation of cesarean section surgical training using computer-enhanced visual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sloane L; Maizels, Max; Cohen, Elaine; Stoltz, Rachel Stork; Jamil, Adeel; McGaghie, William C; Gossett, Dana R

    2014-11-01

    Skilled performance of cesarean deliveries is essential in obstetrics and gynecology residency. A computer-enhanced visual learning module (CEVL Cesarean) was developed to teach cesarean deliveries. An online module presented cesarean deliveries as a series of components using text, audio, video and animation. First-year residents used CEVL Cesarean and were evaluated intra-operatively by trained raters, then provided feedback about surgical performance. Clinical outcomes were collected for approximately 50 cesarean deliveries for each resident. From 2010 to 2011, 12 first-year residents participated in the study. About 406 unique observed cesarean deliveries were analyzed. Procedures up to each resident's 70th case were analyzed by grouping cases in 10 s (cases 1-10 and 11-20), or deciles. Resident performance significantly improved by decile [χ(2)(6) = 47.56, p < 0.001]. When examining each resident's performance, surgical skill acquisition plateaued by cases 21-30. Procedural performance, independent of resident, also improved significantly by decile [χ(2)(6) = 186.95, p < 0.001], plateauing by decile 4 (cases 31-40). Throughout the observation period, operative time decreased by 3.84 min (p = 0.006). Pre-clinical teaching using computer-based modules for cesarean sections is feasible to develop. Novice surgeons required at least 30 procedures before performing the procedure competently. When residents performed competently, operative time and complications decreased.

  1. Comparison of chemical and radiological risk assessment and management in a perspective of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    2002-01-01

    The development towards improved health in the world has been associated with increased pressures on the environment. To cope with these and promote development, strategies to develop social, economic and environmental sustainability have been developed following the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio 1992. The OECD has established an Initiative for Sustainable Development, and will in the spring of 2001 discuss an Environmental Outlook and a Strategy. The objectives of the Environmental Outlook and Strategy are: (i) to generate an economy-based 'vision' of environmental conditions in 2020 (the Outlook); and (ii) to review (and recommend) practical policy options for moving that outlook in a more 'environmentally-friendly' direction (the Strategy). In discussions around the Environmental strategy, five objectives have been proposed to enhance environmental policies in the context of sustainable development. The human practices involving radiation and chemicals should concur with these objectives. The purposes of radiation protection and chemical safety are to ensure that protection of health and the environment is given sufficient weight when the balance is sought between the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. This paper examines to what extent such balance is addressed in about 60 examples of principles and implementation, structured according to the five draft objectives. To give a couple of examples, in radiation protection, control of new practices from the beginning is distinguished from intervention in existing situations. In both radiation protection and chemical safety, control of practices as well as interventions is used, but radiation protection has come much further in controlling practices, with e.g. due regard taken to the long-term capacity of sinks to absorb pollution. For nuclear power, costs of environmental pollution, waste management and accidents are to a high degree

  2. 15 CFR 742.14 - Significant items: hot section technology for the development, production or overhaul of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Significant items: hot section... systems. 742.14 Section 742.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... amended, foreign policy controls apply to technology required for the development, production or overhaul...

  3. Early developed section of the jaw as an index of prenatal growth conditions in adult roe deer Capreolus capreolus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Toke Thomas; Forchhammer, Mads Cedergreen

    2006-01-01

    -maturing bones are poor predictors of resource limitations during early development, as later benign conditions may lead to compensatory growth. We analysed the temporal growth dynamics of different sections of the lower jaw of roe deer Capreolus capreolus and found that the medioanterior section of the lower...

  4. A Facet-Factorial Approach towards the Development and Validation of a Jazz Rhythm Section Performance Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Brian C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable rating scale to assess jazz rhythm sections in the context of jazz big band performance. The research questions that guided this study included: (a) what central factors contribute to the assessment of a jazz rhythm section? (b) what items should be used to describe and assess a jazz…

  5. Development of pure component property models for chemical product-process design and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hukkerikar, Amol Shivajirao

    statistical information about the quality of parameter estimation, such as the parameter covariance, the standard errors in predicted properties, and the confidence intervals. For parameter estimation, large data sets of experimentally measured property values of a wide range of pure components taken from......Property prediction models based on the group-contribution+ (GC+) approach have been developed to provide reliable predictions of pure component properties together with uncertainties of predicted property values which is much needed information in performing chemical product and process design...... and analysis of sustainable chemical processes. For developing property models, a systematic methodology for property modeling and uncertainty analysis is employed. The methodology includes a parameter estimation step to determine parameters of the property model and an uncertainty analysis step to establish...

  6. Status summary of chemical processing development in plutonium-238 supply program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Benker, Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wham, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DePaoli, David W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sherman, Steven R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This document summarizes the status of development of chemical processing in the Plutonium-238 Supply Program (PSP) near the end of Demonstration 1. The objective of the PSP is “to develop, demonstrate, and document a production process that meets program objectives and to prepare for its operation” (Frazier et al. 2016). Success in the effort includes establishing capability using the current infrastructure to produce Np targets for irradiation in Department of Energy research reactors, chemically processing the irradiated targets to separate and purify the produced Pu and transferring the PuO2 product to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at an average rate of 1.5 kg/y.

  7. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  8. Experimental Engineering Section semiannual progress report (excluding reactor programs), March 1, 1975--August 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, C.D.; Burtis, C.A.; Groenier, W.S.; Pitt, W.W.; Ryon, A.D.; Watson, C.D.; Watson, J.S. (comps.)

    1976-09-01

    Sections are included on centrifugal analyzer development, advanced analytical techniques, bioengineering research and development, environmental studies, chemical engineering research, controlled thermonuclear processing, and coal conversion process development. A separate abstract was prepared for each section. (JRD)

  9. Sex-Specific Effects of Combined Exposure to Chemical and Non-chemical Stressors on Neuroendocrine Development: a Review of Recent Findings and Putative Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Whitney J; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-12-01

    Environmental toxicants and psychosocial stressors share many biological substrates and influence overlapping physiological pathways. Increasing evidence indicates stress-induced changes to the maternal milieu may prime rapidly developing physiological systems for disruption by concurrent or subsequent exposure to environmental chemicals. In this review, we highlight putative mechanisms underlying sex-specific susceptibility of the developing neuroendocrine system to the joint effects of stress or stress correlates and environmental toxicants (bisphenol A, alcohol, phthalates, lead, chlorpyrifos, and traffic-related air pollution). We provide evidence indicating that concurrent or tandem exposure to chemical and non-chemical stressors during windows of rapid development is associated with sex-specific synergistic, potentiated and reversed effects on several neuroendocrine endpoints related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function, sex steroid levels, neurotransmitter circuits, and innate immune function. We additionally identify gaps, such as the role that the endocrine-active placenta plays, in our understanding of these complex interactions. Finally, we discuss future research needs, including the investigation of non-hormonal biomarkers of stress. We demonstrate multiple physiologic systems are impacted by joint exposure to chemical and non-chemical stressors differentially among males and females. Collectively, the results highlight the importance of evaluating sex-specific endpoints when investigating the neuroendocrine system and underscore the need to examine exposure to chemical toxicants within the context of the social environment.

  10. Development of a Communication System Compatible with Chemical Protective Clothing and Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-23

    as part of the program to develop a Hazardous Chemical Protection Ensemble ( HCPE ). RE4IC Corporation, of Elkhart, Indiana, was awarded the contract...determined that the HCPE communications system should be built into a separate light-weight garment with low profile so as not to interfere with other...connectors to the radio as possible. Although first consideration is to provide a communications system for use with the HCPE suit, the system should

  11. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  12. Possibilities for recovery and prospects of the Serbian chemical industry in the light of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Petar M.

    2014-01-01

    such as food, construction, energy, and many others, from the medium technologies domain, as well as those from the high technologies domain, such as bio-medical, pharmaceutical or cosmetic technologies. In such manner, the participation of chemical industry in the re-industrialisation of Serbia should not be observed only as a contribution to the recovery of industry, but as a factor of sustainable development in all its components, economic, social and ecological.

  13. Education and severe maternal outcomes in developing countries: a multicountry cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçalp, Ö; Souza, J P; Hindin, M J; Santos, C A; Oliveira, T H; Vogel, J P; Togoobaatar, G; Ha, D Q; Say, L; Gülmezoglu, A M

    2014-03-01

    To assess the relationship between education and severe maternal outcomes among women delivering in healthcare facilities. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-nine countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Pregnant women admitted to 359 facilities during a period of 2-4 months of data collection between 2010 and 2011. Data were obtained from hospital records. Stratification was based on the Human Development Index (HDI) values of the participating countries. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between maternal morbidity and education, categorised in quartiles based on the years of formal education by country. Coverage of key interventions was assessed. Severe maternal outcomes (near misses and death). A significant association between low education and severe maternal outcomes (adjusted odds ratio, aOR, 2.07; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 1.46-2.95), maternal near miss (aOR 1.80; 95% CI 1.25-2.57), and maternal death (aOR 5.62; 95% CI 3.45-9.16) was observed. This relationship persisted in countries with medium HDIs (aOR 2.36; 95% CI 1.33-4.17) and low HDIs (aOR 2.65; 95% CI 1.54-2.57). Less educated women also had increased odds of presenting to the hospital in a severe condition (i.e. with organ dysfunction on arrival or within 24 hours: aOR 2.06; 95% CI 1.36-3.10). The probability that a woman received magnesium sulphate for eclampsia or had a caesarean section significantly increased as education level increased (P education are at greater risk for severe maternal outcomes, even after adjustment for key confounding factors. This is particularly true for women in countries that have poorer markers of social and economic development. © 2014 RCOG The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  14. Fatty acid composition of developing tree peony (Paeonia section Moutan DC.) seeds and transcriptome analysis during seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng; Shu, Qing-Yan; Wu, Jie; Chen, Li-Guang; Shao, Shuai; Yin, Dan-Dan

    2015-03-18

    Tree peony (Paeonia section Moutan DC.) is known for its excellent ornamental and medicinal values. In 2011, seeds from P. ostii have been identified as novel resource of α-linolenic acid (ALA) for seed oil production and development in China. However, the molecular mechanism on biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in tree peony seeds remains unknown. Therefore, transcriptome data is needed to better understand the underlying mechanisms. In this study, lipid accumulation contents were measured using GC-MS methods across developing tree peony seeds, which exhibited an extraordinary ALA content (49.3%) in P. ostii mature seeds. Transcriptome analysis was performed using Illumina sequencing platform. A total of 144 million 100-bp paired-end reads were generated from six libraries, which identified 175,874 contigs. In the KEGG Orthology enrichment of differentially expressed genes, lipid metabolism pathways were highly represented categories. Using this data we identified 388 unigenes that may be involved in de novo fatty acid and triacylglycerol biosynthesis. In particular, three unigenes (SAD, FAD2 and FAD8) encoding fatty acid desaturase with high expression levels in the fast oil accumulation stage compared with the initial stage of seed development were identified. This study provides the first comprehensive genomic resources characterizing tree peony seeds gene expression at the transcriptional level. These data lay the foundation for further understanding of molecular mechanism responsible for lipid biosynthesis and the high unsaturated fatty acids (especially ALA) accumulation. Meanwhile, it provides theoretical base for potential oilseed application in the respect of n-6 to n-3 ratio for human diets and future regulation of target healthy components of oils.

  15. Thyroid disrupting effects of halogenated and next generation chemicals on the swim bladder development of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Amy; Hooser, Blair; Abdelmoneim, Ahmed; Horzmann, Katharine A; Freemanc, Jennifer L; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2017-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter thyroid function and adversely affect growth and development. Halogenated compounds, such as perfluorinated chemicals commonly used in food packaging, and brominated flame retardants used in a broad range of products from clothing to electronics, can act as thyroid disruptors. Due to the adverse effects of these compounds, there is a need for the development of safer next generation chemicals. The objective of this study was to test the thyroid disruption potential of old use and next generation halogenated chemicals. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to three old use compounds, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and two next generation chemicals, 9,10-dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphaphenanthrene-10-oxdie (DOPO) and perfluorobutyric acid (PFBA). Sub-chronic (0-6days post fertilization (dpf)) and chronic (0-28dpf) exposures were conducted at 1% of the concentration known to kill 50% (LC 50 ) of the population. Changes in the surface area of the swim bladder as well as in expression levels of genes involved in the thyroid control of swim bladder inflation were measured. At 6dpf, zebrafish exposed to all halogenated chemicals, both old use and next generation, had smaller posterior swim bladder and increased expression in the gene encoding thyroid peroxidase, tpo and the genes encoding two swim bladder surfactant proteins, sp-a and sp-c. These results mirrored the effects of thyroid hormone-exposed positive controls. Fish exposed to a TPO inhibitor (methimazole, MMI) had a decrease in tpo expression levels at 28dpf. Effects on the anterior swim bladder at 28dpf, after exposure to MMI as well as both old and new halogenated chemicals, were the same, i.e., absence of SB in ∼50% of fish, which were also of smaller body size. Overall, our results suggest thyroid disruption by the halogenated compounds tested via the swim bladder surfactant system. However

  16. Development of low-dose protocols for thin-section CT assessment of cystic fibrosis in pediatric patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Owen J

    2010-12-01

    To develop low-dose thin-section computed tomographic (CT) protocols for assessment of cystic fibrosis (CF) in pediatric patients and determine the clinical usefulness thereof compared with chest radiography.

  17. Development and Field Trial of Dimpled-Tube Technology for Chemical Industry Process Heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov

    2006-10-12

    Most approaches to increasing heat transfer rates in the convection sections of gas-fired process heaters involve the incorporation of fins, baffles, turbulizers, etc. to increase either the heat transfer surface area or turbulence or both. Although these approaches are effective in increasing the heat transfer rates, this increase is invariably accompanied by an associated increase in convection section pressure drop as well as, for heaters firing ‘dirty’ fuel mixtures, increased fouling of the tubes – both of which are highly undesirable. GTI has identified an approach that will increase heat transfer rates without a significant increase in pressure drop or fouling rate. Compared to other types of heat transfer enhancement approaches, the proposed dimpled tube approach achieves very high heat transfer rates at the lowest pressure drops. Incorporating this approach into convection sections of chemical industry fired process heaters may increase energy efficiency by 3-5%. The energy efficiency increase will allow reducing firing rates to provide the required heating duty while reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOx.

  18. Development of a technical scheme for the management of chemical dangerous substances in hospitable environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleja Amador, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical substances that are used in the hospitals, and their remainders, represent risks for the environment, the health and security of those who work in these establishments, and of the civil population. The deficiency of a norm that establishes the directives for the handling responsible for such products in the hospitals that our country has motivated the elaboration of a technical scheme that serves as it guides for the correct manipulation, storage and safe disposition of chemical substances in the twenty-nine hospitals of the Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social, establishing Procedures of Standard Operation for its management. To development of the guideline proposal it took a sample of hospitals that includes three levels of comple complexity: national, regional and peripheral. Applying a methodology of evaluation of risks two factors of risk of hospitable were determined, the zones and the population but affected by the existence of chemical substances, which allowed to identify some operative deficiencies in the product handling diverse. The qualitative analysis of the results lead to the elaboration of a technical scheme that includes an instrument for the identification of risks, guideline for the management responsible for hospitable chemical substances, a friendly tool computations like complementary source of intelligence and the proposal of a governing group in charge of the monitoring of the fulfillment of these lineament. (Author) [es

  19. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and obesity development in humans: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang-Péronard, Jeanett; Andersen, Helle Raun; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed the literature on the relations between exposure to chemicals with endocrine-disrupting abilities and obesity in humans. The studies generally indicated that exposure to some of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals was associated with an increase in body size in humans. The resu......This study reviewed the literature on the relations between exposure to chemicals with endocrine-disrupting abilities and obesity in humans. The studies generally indicated that exposure to some of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals was associated with an increase in body size in humans...... dibenzofurans found either associations with weight gain or an increase in waist circumference, or no association. The one study investigating relations with bisphenol A found no association. Studies investigating prenatal exposure indicated that exposure in utero may cause permanent physiological changes...... predisposing to later weight gain. The study findings suggest that some endocrine disruptors may play a role for the development of the obesity epidemic, in addition to the more commonly perceived putative contributors....

  20. Reproductive toxicity assessment of surface water of the Tai section of the Yangtze River, China by in vitro bioassays coupled with chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoyi; Wu Jiang; Hao Yingqun; Zhu Bingqing; Shi Wei; Hu Guanjiu; Han Xiaodong; Giesy, John P.; Yu Hongxia

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive toxicity of organic extracts of the surface water from the Tai section of the Yangtze River was assessed by in vitro cytotoxity assays and selected persistent organic pollutants including PCBs, OCPs and PAHs were quantified by instrumental analysis. Eleven of the US EPA priority PAHs were detected. Individual PAHs were found to range from 0.7 to 20 ng/L. Concentrations of BaP did not exceed the national drinking water source quality standard of China. However, a 286-fold concentrated organic extract induced significant reproductive toxicity in adult male rats. The morphology of cells, MTT assay and LDH release assay were all affected by exposure to the organic extracts of water. The results of the reproductive toxicity indicated that PAHs posed the greatest risk of the chemicals studied. The compounds present in the water could be bioconcentrated and result in adverse effects. - Highlights: → Only 11 PAHs of US EPA priority PAHs were detected in surface water the Yangtze River. → Level of BaP didn't exceed national drinking water source quality standard of China. → 286-fold concentrated organic extracts induced great reproductive toxicity in rats. → PAHs posed the greatest risk of the chemicals studied. → The compounds in the water could be bioconcentrated and result in adverse effects. - In vitro bioassay responses observed in Yangtze River source water extracts showed great reproductive toxicity, and PAHs were responsible.

  1. Development of a cross-section methodology and a real-time core model for VVER-1000 simulator application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, Emiliya Lyudmilova

    2016-06-06

    The novel academic contributions are summarized as follows. A) A cross-section modelling methodology and a cycle-specific cross-section update procedure are developed to meet fidelity requirements applicable to a cycle-specific reactor core simulation, as well as particular customer needs and practices supporting VVER-1000 operation and safety. B) A real-time version of the Nodal Expansion Method code is developed and implemented into Kozloduy 6 full-scope replica control room simulator.

  2. Environmental assessment of bio-based chemicals in early-stage development : A review of methods and indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeren, Martijn L.M.; Zijp, Michiel C.; Waaijers-van der Loop, Susanne L.; Heugens, Evelyn H.W.; Posthuma, Leo; Worrell, Ernst; Shen, Li

    2017-01-01

    Climate change and fossil resource depletion are driving a transition to a bio-based economy, for which novel bio-based chemical processes need to be developed. The environmental performance of the novel bio-based chemicals should be assessed during their development, when the production process can

  3. Antidoping attitudes among elite athletes: a cross sectional study in biathlon using a suitably developed questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Nicola; Malagoni, Anna M; Felisatti, Michele; Caracciolo, Stefano; Resch, Nicole; Litmanen, Hannu; Dalfollo, Donatella; Jeannier, Pierre; Zhukovskaja, Larisa; Carrabre, James E; Manfredini, Fabio

    2017-05-01

    The attitude of athletes towards antidoping interventions was surveyed among biathletes by a properly developed questionnaire. Topics and items were identified by a multidisciplinary team. A demographics and an awareness sections exploring respondents' characteristics and knowledge of the antidoping rules were added. The anonymous, self-administered tool was distributed to athletes during two international events. Two hundred forty-four biathletes participated in the survey. The structure of the questionnaire, determined by factor analysis, included three domains: safety (items N.=12) acceptance (N.=11), and satisfaction (N.=13) exploring respectively the perceived protection from cheating, the acceptance of the limitations on daily activities imposed by the antidoping interventions and the satisfaction with antidoping rules and actions. The domain scores and a general antidoping attitude score were calculated. The questionnaire, which displayed construct validity (r=0.500, Pattitude (general score: 64.9/100±8.8) and in relation to each domain a satisfaction of athletes with antidoping interventions (65.3±13.6), good acceptance of the related restrictions (70.1±10.9), and concerns about safety (59.5±11.9), which was the lowest scoring domain (Pattitude score. The new questionnaire revealed a positive mood of biathletes towards antidoping interventions, pointed out their necessity of protection from cheating and highlighted the positive influence of awareness of the rules on antidoping attitude. The questionnaire is not sport-specific, which allows any international federation to evaluate the impact of antidoping strategies on athletes.

  4. Development of a novel scoring system for identifying emerging chemical risks in the food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, J; Licht, O; Bitsch, A; Bohlen, M-L; Escher, S E; Silano, V; MacLeod, M; Serafimova, R; Kass, G E N; Merten, C

    2018-02-21

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is responsible for risk assessment of all aspects of food safety, including the establishment of procedures aimed at the identification of emerging risks to food safety. Here, a scoring system was developed for identifying chemicals registered under the European REACH Regulation that could be of potential concern in the food chain using the following parameters: (i) environmental release based on maximum aggregated tonnages and environmental release categories; (ii) biodegradation in the environment; (iii) bioaccumulation and in vivo and in vitro toxicity. The screening approach was tested on 100 data-rich chemicals registered under the REACH Regulation at aggregated volumes of at least 1000 tonnes per annum. The results show that substance-specific data generated under the REACH Regulation can be used to identify potential emerging risks in the food chain. After application of the screening procedure, priority chemicals can be identified as potentially emerging risk chemicals through the integration of exposure, environmental fate and toxicity. The default approach is to generate a single total score for each substance using a predefined weighting scenario. However, it is also possible to use a pivot table approach to combine the individual scores in different ways that reflect user-defined priorities, which enables a very flexible, iterative definition of screening criteria. Possible applications of the approaches are discussed using illustrative examples. Either approach can then be followed by in-depth evaluation of priority substances to ensure the identification of substances that present a real emerging chemical risk in the food chain.

  5. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: solvent and process development. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Paasch, R.A.; Hall, T.M.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1979-01-01

    A program to demonstrate chemical cleaning methods for removing magnetite corrosion products from the annuli between steam generator tubes and the tube support plates in vertical U-tube steam generators is described. These corrosion products have caused steam generator tube ''denting'' and in some cases have caused tube failures and support plate cracking in several PWR generating plants. Laboratory studies were performed to develop a chemical cleaning solvent and application process for demonstration cleaning of the Indian Point Unit 2 steam generators. The chemical cleaning solvent and application process were successfully pilot-tested by cleaning the secondary side of one of the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Although the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators do not have a tube denting problem, the pilot test provided for testing of the solvent and process using much of the same equipment and facilities that would be used for the Indian Point Unit 2 demonstration cleaning. The chemical solvent selected for the pilot test was an inhibited 3% citric acid-3% ascorbic acid solution. The application process, injection into the steam generator through the boiler blowdown system and agitation by nitrogen sparging, was tested in a nuclear environment and with corrosion products formed during years of steam generator operation at power. The test demonstrated that the magnetite corrosion products in simulated tube-to-tube support plate annuli can be removed by chemical cleaning; that corrosion resulting from the cleaning is not excessive; and that steam generator cleaning can be accomplished with acceptable levels of radiation exposure to personnel

  6. Development of hydraulic analysis code for optimizing thermo-chemical is process reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Atsuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro; Hirayama, Toshio; Nakajima, Norihiro; Sugiyama, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting study on thermochemical IS process for water splitting hydrogen production. Based on the test results and know-how obtained through the bench-scale test, a pilot test plant, which has a hydrogen production performance of 30 Nm 3 /h, is being designed conceptually as the next step of the IS process development. In design of the IS pilot plant, it is important to make chemical reactors compact with high performance from the viewpoint of plant cost reduction. A new hydraulic analytical code has been developed for optimizing mixing performance of multi-phase flow involving chemical reactions especially in the Bunsen reactor. Complex flow pattern with gas-liquid chemical interaction involving flow instability will be characterized in the Bunsen reactor. Preliminary analytical results obtained with above mentioned code, especially flow patterns induced by swirling flow agreed well with that measured by water experiments, which showed vortex breakdown pattern in a simplified Bunsen reactor. (author)

  7. Development of a physical and chemical property database for ten US EPA-selected oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Hollebone, B.P.; Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.; Landriault, M.; Smith, P.; Weaver, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the event of an oil spill, data on the physical properties and chemical composition of crude oils and hydrocarbons must be known to allow experts to use environmental fate simulations. The complexity and expense of making the required measurements had rendered this data largely unavailable. A database of several physical and chemical properties of crude oils and petroleum products was developed by Environment Canada. A project called Development of a Composition Database for Selected Multicomponent Oils was initiated in 2002 with funding from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and Environment Canada. In this cooperative project, the research laboratory of the Emergencies Science and Technology Division of Environment Canada characterized ten typical crude oils and refined products identified by the US EPA. Measurements of physical properties included API gravity, density, sulphur content, water content, flash point, pour point, viscosity, surface and interfacial tension, adhesion, the equation for predicting evaporation, emulsion formation, and simulated boiling point distribution. The chemical composition of the oils selected included hydrocarbon groups, volatile organic compounds (including BTEX and other alkyl-benzene compounds), n-alkane distribution, distribution of alkylated polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) homologues and other EPA priority PAHs, and biomarkers. The results obtained were integrated into the existing Environment Canada oil properties database and are made available to the public. This data will be used to support oil spill modelling for application to environmental problems caused by oil spills. 38 refs., 18 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Windows of sensitivity to toxic chemicals in the motor effects development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Susan Z; Pohl, Hana R

    2016-02-01

    Many chemicals currently used are known to elicit nervous system effects. In addition, approximately 2000 new chemicals introduced annually have not yet undergone neurotoxicity testing. This review concentrated on motor development effects associated with exposure to environmental neurotoxicants to help identify critical windows of exposure and begin to assess data needs based on a subset of chemicals thoroughly reviewed by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in Toxicological Profiles and Addenda. Multiple windows of sensitivity were identified that differed based on the maturity level of the neurological system at the time of exposure, as well as dose and exposure duration. Similar but distinct windows were found for both motor activity (GD 8-17 [rats], GD 12-14 and PND 3-10 [mice]) and motor function performance (insufficient data for rats, GD 12-17 [mice]). Identifying specific windows of sensitivity in animal studies was hampered by study designs oriented towards detection of neurotoxicity that occurred at any time throughout the developmental process. In conclusion, while this investigation identified some critical exposure windows for motor development effects, it demonstrates a need for more acute duration exposure studies based on neurodevelopmental windows, particularly during the exposure periods identified in this review. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Low-carbon Scenarios Development for Modal Shift in the Chemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocicka Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply chain managers have to deal with the performance requirement to significantly reduce CO2 emissions in searching for excellence in green business processes management. The purpose of this article is to examine the perspectives on low-carbon scenarios development for modal shift in the chemical industry. The author outlines main research findings from the Interreg Central Europe ChemMultimodal project realised by 14 partners from 7 countries, among others by Department of Logistics at Warsaw School of Economics in Poland. The project idea is focused on analysing the potential and growth opportunities for multimodal transport usage in chemical supply chain management. Firstly, the objectives, current status and methodology of the project are explained. Then, the results of the research carried out among chemical and logistics companies operating in Poland are discussed. Furthermore, there is recognised that transport modal shift decisions determine changes in supply chain configurations that might be supported by planning and management tools. Consequently, the elements of the ChemMultimodal toolbox are outlined and its potential significance for low-carbon scenarios development is highlighted. As a result, both theoretical and practical implications of the research findings are indicated.

  10. Developing predictive models for toxicity of organic chemicals to green algae based on mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakire, Serge; Yang, Xinya; Ma, Guangcai; Wei, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Haiying; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun

    2018-01-01

    Organic chemicals in the aquatic ecosystem may inhibit algae growth and subsequently lead to the decline of primary productivity. Growth inhibition tests are required for ecotoxicological assessments for regulatory purposes. In silico study is playing an important role in replacing or reducing animal tests and decreasing experimental expense due to its efficiency. In this work, a series of theoretical models was developed for predicting algal growth inhibition (log EC 50 ) after 72 h exposure to diverse chemicals. In total 348 organic compounds were classified into five modes of toxic action using the Verhaar Scheme. Each model was established by using molecular descriptors that characterize electronic and structural properties. The external validation and leave-one-out cross validation proved the statistical robustness of the derived models. Thus they can be used to predict log EC 50 values of chemicals that lack authorized algal growth inhibition values (72 h). This work systematically studied algal growth inhibition according to toxic modes and the developed model suite covers all five toxic modes. The outcome of this research will promote toxic mechanism analysis and be made applicable to structural diversity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Global Chemical Profiling for Quality Assessment of Ganoderma Species by ChemPattern Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids are the major secondary metabolites and active substances in Ganoderma, considered as the “marker compounds” for the chemical evaluation or standardization of Ganoderma. A response surface methodology was used to optimize the ultrasonic-assisted extraction of triterpenoids. The extraction rate was 7.338 ± 0.150 mg/g under the optimum conditions: 87% ethanol, ratio of solid to liquid (w : v 1 : 28, and ultrasound extraction time 36 min. Based on the high sensitivity and selectivity of HPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap-MSn, 24 components of triterpenoids were tentatively identified in the negative mode. Then, the global chemical profiling consisting of HPLC and TLC fingerprints generated by ChemPattern™ software was developed for evaluation of Ganoderma species. For fingerprint analysis, 11 peaks of triterpenoids were selected as the characteristic peaks to evaluate the similarities of different samples. The correlation coefficients of similarity were greater than 0.830. The cluster analysis showed a clear separation of three groups, and 11 peaks played key roles in differentiating these samples. The developed global chemical profiling method could be applied for rapid evaluation, quality control, and authenticity identification of Ganoderma and other herbal medicines.

  12. Developing a multi-physics solver in APOLLO3 and applications to cross section homogenization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, Kevin-James

    2016-01-01

    Multi-physics coupling is becoming of large interest in the nuclear engineering and computational science fields. The ability to obtain accurate solutions to realistic models is important to the design and licensing of novel reactor designs, especially in design basis accident situations. The physical models involved in calculating accident behavior in nuclear reactors includes: neutron transport, thermal conduction/convection, thermo-mechanics in fuel and support structure, fuel stoichiometry, among others. However, this thesis focuses on the coupling between two models, neutron transport and thermal conduction/convection.The goal of this thesis is to develop a multi-physics solver for simulating accidents in nuclear reactors. The focus is both on the simulation environment and the data treatment used in such simulations.This work discusses the development of a multi-physics framework based around the Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method. The framework includes linear and nonlinear solvers, along with interfaces to existing numerical codes that solve neutron transport and thermal hydraulics models (APOLLO3 and MCTH respectively) through the computation of residuals. a new formulation for the neutron transport residual is explored, which reduces the solution size and search space by a large factor; instead of the residual being based on the angular flux, it is based on the fission source.The question of whether using a fundamental mode distribution of the neutron flux for cross section homogenization is sufficiently accurate during fast transients is also explored. It is shown that in an infinite homogeneous medium, using homogenized cross sections produced with a fundamental mode flux differ significantly from a reference solution. The error is remedied by using an alternative weighting flux taken from a time dependent calculation; either a time-integrated flux or an asymptotic solution. The time-integrated flux comes from the multi-physics solution of the

  13. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Harris; Gan, K.K.; Kass, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  14. Development of a Thermo-chemical Non-equilibrium Solver for Hypervelocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Anandhanarayanan, K.

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, a three dimensional flowsolver is indigenously developed to numerically simulate hypervelocity thermal and chemical non equilibrium reactive air flow past flight vehicles. The two-temperature, five species, seventeen reactions, thermo-chemical non equilibrium, non-ionizing, air-chemistry model of Park is implemented in a compressible viscous code CERANS and solved in the finite volume framework. The energy relaxation is addressed by a conservation equation for the vibrational energy of the gas mixture resulting in the evaluation of its vibrational temperature. The AUSM-PW+ numerical flux function has been used for modeling the convective fluxes and a central differencing approximation is used for modeling the diffusive fluxes. The flowsolver had been validated for specifically chosen test cases with inherent flow complexities of non-ionizing hypervelocity thermochemical nonequilibrium flows and results obtained are in good agreement with results available in open literature.

  15. Development and implementation of the IPCS conceptual framework for evaluating mode of action of chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybing, E

    2002-12-27

    The framework developed by the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) for assessing the mode of action of tumour induction of chemicals in experimental animals has been illustrated with d-limonene, sodium saccharin, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and sulfamethazine as examples. d-Limonene causes renal tumours only in male rats through a response associated with alpha(2u)-globulin. Sodium saccharin induces urinary bladder tumours only in male rats through formation of a urinary precipitate causing erosion of the bladder surface and extensive regenerative hyperplasia. DEHP causes liver tumours in rats and mice through activation of the receptor PPAR alpha leading to peroxisome proliferation and hepatocellular proliferation. Sulfamethazine induces thyroid follicular cell tumours in rats and mice through a mechanism involving altered thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  16. Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violi, Angela [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Michelsen, Hope [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, Nils [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Kevin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-07

    In order to provide the scientific foundation to enable technology breakthroughs in transportation fuel, it is important to develop a combustion modeling capability to optimize the operation and design of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The goal of this proposal is to develop a validated predictive model to describe the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles in premixed and diffusion flames. Atomistic studies in conjunction with state-of-the-art experiments are the distinguishing characteristics of this unique interdisciplinary effort. The modeling effort has been conducted at the University of Michigan by Prof. A. Violi. The experimental work has entailed a series of studies using different techniques to analyze gas-phase soot precursor chemistry and soot particle production in premixed and diffusion flames. Measurements have provided spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other gas-phase species and size and composition of incipient soot nanoparticles for comparison with model results. The experimental team includes Dr. N. Hansen and H. Michelsen at Sandia National Labs' Combustion Research Facility, and Dr. K. Wilson as collaborator at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's Advanced Light Source. Our results show that the chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles affect the coagulation behavior in soot formation, and our results on an experimentally validated, predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles will not only enhance our understanding of soot formation since but will also allow the prediction of particle size distributions under combustion conditions. These results provide a novel description of soot formation based on physical and chemical properties of the particles for use in the next generation of soot models and an enhanced capability for facilitating the design of alternative fuels and the engines they will power.

  17. Development of a biofluid chemical measurement system using liquid core optical fiber Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dahu

    Near Infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy can provide compositional information about chemicals dissolved in biological fluids. The Raman intensity is proportional to the amount of chemicals. It has been developed for years as a tool to measure biofluid chemical concentrations by illuminating sample and collecting Raman intensity holding the sample in a cuvette geometry. It has been found that the Raman intensity can be enhanced by increasing the excitation and collection sample volume in a liquid core optical fiber (LCOF) geometry. In this thesis, we present a biofluid chemical concentration measurement system using LCOF Raman spectroscopy. A home-built LCOF Raman spectroscopy system designed for this purpose using 830 nm illumination is described in the thesis. The system is switchable between LCOF and traditional cuvette geometry. The system was characterized using aqueous solutions. The Raman intensities of aqueous solutions from the two geometries were compared in both theory and experiment. The results agreed well with each other. As high as 15 fold Raman enhancement was observed. The Raman spectra of biological chemicals in aqueous solution and spiked urine samples were acquired from LCOF and cuvette geometries. The concentrations were predicted using partial least squares (PLS) leave one out cross validation. The results from the two geometries were compared. Concentrations of creatinine were measured in both setups. The LCOF geometry had an advantage at shorter integration times because of Raman enhancement while the cuvette geometry gave better results at longer integration times due to a better system reproducibility. The LCOF Raman intensity varies from sample to sample with sample absorption coefficient as well as the chemical concentration. This effect can add uncertainty to the concentration measurement. Biofluid samples from multiple patients vary a lot in absorption coefficient, which could cause as much as 20% uncertainty in concentration measurement

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF INTERACTIVE E-BOOK BASED ON CHEMICAL REPRESENTATION REFER TO CURRICULUM 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tania

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop an interactive e-book based representations of chemistry; describes the characteristics of the interactive e-book developed; the teachers responses in content suitability with curriculum and graphics aspects; and student responses in readibility aspects. The method used was research and development. The characteristics of interactive e-book: it was developed referring to the core competencies (KI and basic competence (KD in the curriculum 2013, allowed active interaction between students and e-book, completed with pictures, animations or videos in three levels of the chemical representation. Teachers’ responses to the content suitability and graphic aspects were very good with the percentage of each 98.46% and 97.5%. The students’ responses in readibility aspects was very good with percentage of 88.5%.

  19. Development of a Multi-Group Neutron Cross Section Library Generation System for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Hong, Ser Gi; Song, Jae Seung; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Cho, Jin Young; Kim, Ha Yong; Koo, Bon Seung; Shim, Hyung Jin; Park, Sang Yoon

    2008-10-15

    This report describes a generation system of multi-group cross section library which is used in the KARMA lattice calculation code. In particular, the theoretical methodologies, program structures, and input preparations for the constituent programs of the system are described in detail. The library generation system consists of the following five programs : ANJOY, GREDIT, MERIT, SUBDATA, and LIBGEN. ANJOY generates automatically the NJOY input files and two batch files for automatic NJOY run for all the nuclides considered. The automatic NJOY run gives TAPE 23 (PENDF output file of BROADR module of NJOY) and TAPE24 (GENDF output file of GROUPR module of NJOY) files for each nuclide. GREDIT prepares a formatted multi-group cross section file in which the cross sections are tabulated versus temperature and background cross section after reading the TAPE24 file. MERIT generates the hydrogen equivalence factors and the resonance integral tables by solving the slowing down equation with ultra-fine group cross sections which are prepared with the TAPE 23 file. SUBDATA generates the subgroup data including subgroup levels and weights after reading the MERIT output file. Finally, LIBGEN generates the final multi-group library file by assembling the data prepared in the previous steps and by reading the other data such as fission product yield data and decay data.The multi-group cross section library includes general multi-group cross sections, resonance data, subgroup data, fission product yield data, kappa-values (energy release per fission), and all the data which are required in the depletion calculation. The addition or elimination of the cross sections for some nuclides can be easily done by changing the LIBGEN input file if the general multi-group cross section and the subgroup data files are prepared.

  20. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argabright, T.A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 110/sup 0/C (160 to 230/sup 0/F) for the source heat and 140 to 190/sup 0/C (280 to 375/sup 0/F) for the product heat. These ranges are applicable to many processes in industries such as food, textile, paper and pulp, and chemical. The hydride pair well suited for these temperatures is LaNi/sub 5//LaNi/sub 4/ /sub 5/Al/sub 0/ /sub 5/. The EDTU was designed for the upgrade cycle. It is a compact finned tube arrangement enclosed in a pressure vessel. This design incorporates high heat transfer and low thermal mass in a system which maximizes the coefficient of performance (COP). It will be constructed in Phase II. Continuation of this effort is recommended.

  1. Metal hydride/chemical heat-pump development project, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argabright, T. A.

    1982-02-01

    The metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP) is a chemical heat pump containing two hydrides for the storage and/or recovery of thermal energy. It utilizes the heat of reaction of hydrogen with specific metal alloys. The MHHP design can be tailored to provide heating and/or cooling or temperature upgrading over a wide range of input and ambient temperatures. The system can thus be used with a variety of heat sources including waste heat, solar energy or a fossil fuel. The conceptual design of the MHHP was developed. A national market survey including a study of applications and market sectors was conducted. The technical tasks including conceptual development, thermal and mechanical design, laboratory verification of design and material performance, cost analysis and the detailed design of the Engineering Development Test Unit (EDTU) were performed. As a result of the market study, the temperature upgrade cycle of the MHHP was chosen for development. Operating temperature ranges for the upgrader were selected to be from 70 to 1100 C (160 to 2300 F) for the source heat and 140 to 1900 C (280 to 3750 F) for the product heat.

  2. Antibiotic use in dentistry: A cross-sectional survey from a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakrishnan Gowri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance is a well-known entity and the most common factor leading to this is the irrational use of antibiotics. Several studies from the West have substantiated the irrational use of antibiotics in dentistry. Aims: The aim was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP of antimicrobial drug use among dental fraternity in a tertiary care teaching dental college and hospital. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional survey of various dental fraternities using a structured validated questionnaire. The study was initiated following approval from Institutional Ethics Committee and interns, junior residents and faculty members of various departments in dentistry were enrolled after obtaining written informed consent. A structured validated questionnaire was developed to assess the above-mentioned objectives. Statistical analysis: Descriptive statistics was used for representing each category of response and kappa statistics were used to assess the reliability in the initial cohort. Chi-square test for independence was used to evaluate the difference in proportion between different professional cadres. Results: A total of 120 participants were recruited out of which 81.6% (98/120 of the participants accepted their frequent antibiotic usage. The most common dental indication of antibiotics among dentists was post dental extraction, attributing to 30.8% (37/120, followed by dental abscess 21.6% (26/120 and 60% (72/120 prescribed antibiotics after most minor surgical procedures. Surprisingly, 37.5% (45/120 of the participants opined that they use antibiotics against viral infection. Regarding the spectrum of antibiotic usage, 74.1% (89/120 preferred broad spectrum instead of narrow spectrum 25.8% (31/120. The commonly prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin 71.7% (86/120, metronidazole 33.3% (40/120, amoxicillin with clavulanic acid 26.6% (32/120. A total of (43/120 35.8% opted generic name for mentioning the

  3. Us army corps of engineers - Engineering research and development center - Petrographic analysis of section 3 personnel tunnel concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-04

    The Concrete and Materials Branch (CMB) of the Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory was requested to perform an analysis on concrete cores collected from the north and south walls of the H-Canyon Section 3 Personnel Tunel, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina to determine the cause of the lower than expected compressive strength. This study examined five cores provided to the ERDC by the Department of Energy. The cores were logged in as CMB No. 170051-1 to 170051-5 and subjected to petrographic examination, air void analysis, chemical sprays, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction.

  4. Development of quality assessment method for optically active food flavor chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Koichi; Hosono, Kouhei; Kitazawa, Nariko; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Ito, Rie; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A quality assessment method for commercially available, optically active flavor compounds, namely, menthol, menthyl acetate, borneol, perillaldehyde, and 1,8-cineol, was developed. A gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector and a DB-5ms capillary column was used for the chemical purity test. A GC/MS with a beta-DEX cyclodextrin column was used for the optical purity test, by which the enantiomeric separation of each flavor compound was achieved. Enantiomeric excess was calculated as an expression of optical purity. Of the 25 standard samples subjected to the chemical purity test, six were found to have lower purity than the data provided by the manufacturers. When the same samples were subjected to the optical purity test, 11 were found to have lower purity than that indicated on the reagent labels. These results suggest that there is a need to conduct an optical purity test, in addition to a chemical purity test, for the quality assessment of flavor standards.

  5. The development of multitasking in children aged 7-12 years: Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, T.X.; Xie, W.; Chen, C.S.; Altgassen, A.M.; Wang, Y.; Cheung, E.F.C.; Chan, R.C.K.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the development of multitasking ability across childhood. A sample of 65 typically developing children aged 7, 9, and 11 years completed two multitasking tests across three time points within a year. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data consistently indicated continuous

  6. Nanoscale Chemical Characterization of Solid-State Microbattery Stacks by Means of Auger Spectroscopy and Ion-Milling Cross Section Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhart, A; Ledeuil, J B; Pecquenard, B; Le Cras, F; Proust, M; Martinez, H

    2017-09-27

    The current sustained demand for "smart" and connected devices has created a need for more miniaturized power sources, hence for microbatteries. Lithium-ion or "lithium-free" all-solid-state thin-film batteries are adapted solutions to this issue. The capability to carry out spatially resolved chemical analysis is fundamental for the understanding of the operation in an all-solid-state microbattery. Classically cumbersome and not straightforward techniques as TEM/STEM/EELS and FIB preparation methods could be used to address this issue. The challenge in this work is to make the characterization of Li-based material possible by coupling ion-milling cross section preparation method and AES techniques to characterize the behavior of a LiCoO 2 positive electrode in an all solid state microbattery. The surface chemistry of LiCoO 2 has been studied before and after LiPON deposition. Modifications of the chemical environments characteristic of the positive electrode have been reported at different steps of the electrochemical process. An original qualitative and a semiquantitative analysis has been used in this work with the peak deconvolution method based on real, certified reference spectra to better understand the lithiation/delithiation process. This original coupling has demonstrated that a full study of the pristine, cycled, and post mortem positive electrode in a microbattery is also possible. The ion-milling preparation method allows access to a large area, and the resolution of Auger analysis is highly resolved in energy to separate the lithium and the cobalt signals in an accurate way.

  7. Asymmetric catalysis in Brazil: development and potential for advancement of Brazilian chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Antonio Luiz; Luedtke, Diogo Seibert; Schneider, Paulo Henrique; Andrade, Leandro Helgueira; Paixao, Marcio Weber

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of enantiomerically pure or enriched substances is of fundamental importance to pharmaceutical, food, agrochemical, and cosmetics industries and involves a growing market of hundreds of billions of dollars. However, most chemical processes used for their production are not environmentally friendly because in most cases, stoichiometric amounts of chiral inductors are used and substantial waste is produced. In this context, asymmetric catalysis has emerged as an efficient tool for the synthesis of enantiomerically enriched compounds using chiral catalysts. More specifically, considering the current scenario in the Brazilian chemical industry, especially that of pharmaceuticals, the immediate prospect for the use of synthetic routes developed in Brazil in an enantioselective fashion or even the discovery of new drugs is practically null. Currently, the industrial production of drugs in Brazil is primarily focused on the production of generic drugs and is basically supported by imports of intermediates from China and India. In order to change this panorama and move forward toward the gradual incorporation of genuinely Brazilian synthetic routes, strong incentive policies, especially those related to continuous funding, will be needed. These incentives could be a breakthrough once we establish several research groups working in the area of organic synthesis and on the development and application of chiral organocatalysts and ligands in asymmetric catalysis, thus contributing to boost the development of the Brazilian chemical industry. Considering these circumstances, Brazil can benefit from this opportunity because we have a wide biodiversity and a large pool of natural resources that can be used as starting materials for the production of new chiral catalysts and are creating competence in asymmetric catalysis and related areas. This may decisively contribute to the growth of chemistry in our country. (author)

  8. Developmental neurotoxicity testing: recommendations for developing alternative methods for the screening and prioritization of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofton, Kevin M; Mundy, William R; Lein, Pamela J; Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Seiler, Andrea E M; Knaut, Holger; Buzanska, Leonora; Goldberg, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) is perceived by many stakeholders to be an area in critical need of alternative methods to current animal testing protocols and guidelines. An immediate goal is to develop test methods that are capable of screening large numbers of chemicals. This document provides recommendations for developing alternative DNT approaches that will generate the type of data required for evaluating and comparing predictive capacity and efficiency across test methods and laboratories. These recommendations were originally drafted to stimulate and focus discussions of alternative testing methods and models for DNT at the TestSmart DNT II meeting (http://caat.jhsph.edu/programs/workshops/dnt2.html) and this document reflects critical feedback from all stakeholders that participated in this meeting. The intent of this document is to serve as a catalyst for engaging the research community in the development of DNT alternatives and it is expected that these recommendations will continue to evolve with the science.

  9. Recent developments and applications of clickable photoprobes in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, David J; Johnson, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling is a well-known biochemical technique that has grown significantly since the turn of the century, principally due to its combination with bioorthogonal/click chemistry reactions. This review highlights new developments and applications of clickable photoprobes in medicinal chemistry and chemical biology. In particular, recent examples of clickable photoprobes for target identification, activity- or affinity-based protein profiling (ABPP or AfBPP), characterization of sterol- or lipid-protein interactions and characterization of ligand-binding sites are presented.

  10. Problems in the development of autonomous mobile laser systems based on a cw chemical DF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, B P; Bashkin, A S; Beznozdrev, V N; Parfen'ev, M V; Pirogov, N A; Semenov, S N

    2003-01-01

    The problems involved in designing autonomous mobile laser systems based on high-power cw chemical DF lasers, whose mass and size parameters would make it possible to install them on various vehicles, are discussed. The need for mobility of such lasers necessitates special attention to be paid to the quest for ways and means of reducing the mass and size of the main laser systems. The optimisation of the parameters of such lasers is studied for various methods of scaling their systems. A complex approach to analysis of the optical scheme of the laser system is developed. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  11. Predicting dermal absorption of gas-phase chemicals: transient model development, evaluation, and application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, M.; Zhang, Y.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    A transient model is developed to predict dermal absorption of gas-phase chemicals via direct air-to-skin-to-blood transport under non-steady-state conditions. It differs from published models in that it considers convective mass-transfer resistance in the boundary layer of air adjacent to the skin....... Results calculated with this transient model are in good agreement with the limited experimental results that are available for comparison. The sensitivity of the modeled estimates to key parameters is examined. The model is then used to estimate air-to-skin-to-blood absorption of six phthalate esters...

  12. Development of a Whole Slide Imaging System on Smartphones and Evaluation With Frozen Section Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Liren; Ma, Shuoxin

    2017-09-15

    The aim was to develop scalable Whole Slide Imaging (sWSI), a WSI system based on mainstream smartphones coupled with regular optical microscopes. This ultra-low-cost solution should offer diagnostic-ready imaging quality on par with standalone scanners, supporting both oil and dry objective lenses of different magnifications, and reasonably high throughput. These performance metrics should be evaluated by expert pathologists and match those of high-end scanners. The aim was to develop scalable Whole Slide Imaging (sWSI), a whole slide imaging system based on smartphones coupled with optical microscopes. This ultra-low-cost solution should offer diagnostic-ready imaging quality on par with standalone scanners, supporting both oil and dry object lens of different magnification. All performance metrics should be evaluated by expert pathologists and match those of high-end scanners. In the sWSI design, the digitization process is split asynchronously between light-weight clients on smartphones and powerful cloud servers. The client apps automatically capture FoVs at up to 12-megapixel resolution and process them in real-time to track the operation of users, then give instant feedback of guidance. The servers first restitch each pair of FoVs, then automatically correct the unknown nonlinear distortion introduced by the lens of the smartphone on the fly, based on pair-wise stitching, before finally combining all FoVs into one gigapixel VS for each scan. These VSs can be viewed using Internet browsers anywhere. In the evaluation experiment, 100 frozen section slides from patients randomly selected among in-patients of the participating hospital were scanned by both a high-end Leica scanner and sWSI. All VSs were examined by senior pathologists whose diagnoses were compared against those made using optical microscopy as ground truth to evaluate the image quality. The sWSI system is developed for both Android and iPhone smartphones and is currently being offered to the

  13. Development of standards for chemical and biological decontamination of buildings and structures affected by terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumley, T.C.; Volchek, K.; Fingas, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch; Hay, A.W.M. [Leeds Univ., Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are no suitable standards for determining levels of safety when reoccupying a building that has been recommissioned following a biological or chemical attack. For that reason, this study focused on developing clean-up standards for decontaminating buildings and construction materials after acts of terrorism. Several parameters must be assessed when determining the course of action to decontaminate toxic agents and to rehabilitate facilities. First, the hazardous substance must be positively identified along with the degree of contamination and information on likely receptors. Potential exposure route is also a key consideration in the risk assessment process. A key objective of the study was to develop specific guidelines for ascertaining and defining clean. In particular, standards for chemical and biological agents that pose a real or potential risk for use as agents of terrorism will be developed. The selected agents for standards development were ammonia, fentanyl, malathion, mustard gas, potassium cyanide, ricin, sarin, hepatitis A virus, and bacillus anthracis. The standards will be developed by establishing the relationship between the amount of exposure and expected health effects; assessing real and potential risks by identifying individuals at risk and consideration of all exposure routes; and, characterizing the risk to determine the potential for toxicity or infectivity. For non-carcinogens, this was done through the analysis of other known guidelines. Cancer-slope factors will be considered for carcinogens. The standards will be assessed in the laboratory using animal models. The guidelines and standards are intended for first-responders and are scheduled for development by the end of 2006. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Fueling Chemical Engineering Concepts with Biodiesel Production: A Professional Development Experience for High School Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anju

    2015-01-01

    This one-day workshop for pre-service teachers was aimed at implementing a uniquely designed and ready-to-implement chemical engineering curriculum in high school coursework. This educational and professional development opportunity introduced: 1) chemical engineering curriculum and career opportunities, 2) basic industrial processes and flow…

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A CHEMICAL PROCESS MODELING ENVIRONMENT BASED ON CAPE-OPEN INTERFACE STANDARDS AND THE MICROSOFT .NET FRAMEWORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical process simulation has long been used as a design tool in the development of chemical plants, and has long been considered a means to evaluate different design options. With the advent of large scale computer networks and interface models for program components, it is po...

  16. Measurement of the thorium absorption cross section shape near thermal energy (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, L.

    1976-11-01

    The shape of the thorium absorption cross section near thermal energies was investigated. This shape is dominated by one or more negative energy resonances whose parameters are not directly known, but must be inferred from higher energy data. Since the integral quantity most conveniently describing the thermal cross section shape is the Westcottg-factor, effort was directed toward establishing this quantity to high precision. Three nearly independent g-factor estimates were obtained from measurements on a variety of foils in three different neutron spectra provided by polyethylene-moderated neutrons from a 252 Cf source and from irradiations in the National Bureau of Standards ''Standard Thermal Neutron Density.'' The weighted average of the three measurements was 0.993 +- 0.004. This is in good agreement with two recent evaluations and supports the adequacy of the current cross section descriptions

  17. Innovative Strategies to Develop Chemical Categories Using a Combination of Structural and Toxicological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Batke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 1.AbstractInterest is increasing in the development of non-animal methods for toxicological evaluations. These methods are however, particularly challenging for complex toxicological endpoints such as repeated dose toxicity. European Legislation, e.g. the European Union´s Cosmetic Directive and REACH, demands the use of alternative methods. Frameworks, such as the Read-across Assessment Framework or the Adverse Outcome Pathway Knowledge Base, support the development of these methods. The aim of the project presented in this publication was to develop substance categories for a read-across with complex endpoints of toxicity based on existing databases. The basic conceptual approach was to combine structural similarity with shared mechanisms of action. Substances with similar chemical structure and toxicological profile form candidate categories suitable for read-across. We combined two databases on repeated dose toxicity, RepDose database and ELINCS database to form a common database for the identification of categories. The resulting database contained physicochemical, structural and toxicological data, which were refined and curated for cluster analyses. We applied the Predictive Clustering Tree (PCT approach for clustering chemicals based on structural and on toxicological information to detect groups of chemicals with similar toxic profiles and pathways/mechanisms of toxicity. As many of the experimental toxicity values were not available, this data was imputed by predicting them with a multi-label classification method, prior to clustering. The clustering results were evaluated by assessing chemical and toxicological similarities with the aim of identifying clusters with a concordance between structural information and toxicity profiles/mechanisms. From these chosen clusters, seven were selected for a quantitative read-across, based on a small ratio of NOAEL of the members with the highest and the lowest NOAEL in the cluster (<5. We discuss

  18. The use of dialogic electronic journal writing to develop students' understanding of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Sarah Collard

    The intent of this study is to examine how the implementation of a dialogic electronic journal writing environment continues the development of students' understanding of chemistry, specifically chemical bonding, through written communication between the individual students and their chemistry teacher. This study is framed within a constructivist theoretical context where students' understanding is constructed through written discussions with the educator, the students' interaction with the classroom environment, and his/her interaction with the computer environment. The research design of collective case study was employed to allow multiple perspectives and processes conveyed by the participants to be examined in the context in which they occurred while considering multiple sources of information. Data sources included electronic journal entries, classroom artifacts, and semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, which involved coding, categorizing, and interpreting for patterns and relationships. Four cases were reported in detail. This study found that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was an effective venue in revealing previously undiscovered students' alternative conceptions of chemical bonding. Opportunities to actively confront and reconcile such conceptions were afforded through educator/student dialogic written interaction. The dialogic electronic journal-writing environment was also critical in the identification of gaps in students' conceptual understanding linked to improper sequencing of chemistry content. This study also found that the on-line environment provided the educator the opportunity to scaffold chemical bonding concepts to meet the needs of the students involved in the study. This study concluded that the dialogic electronic journal-writing environment positively contributed to the development of student understanding. These findings may have practical implications for teachers in

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage and reprocessing since 1953. Reprocessing of SNF has resulted in an existing inventory of 1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid waste and 3800 cubic meters (m 3 ) of calcine, in addition to the 768 metric tons (MT) of SNF and various other fuel materials in inventory. To date, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, recent changes in world events have diminished the demand to recover and recycle this material. As a result, DOE has discontinued reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery, making the need to properly manage and dispose of these and future materials a high priority. In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended, disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a geological repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF ampersand WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will properly stored and prepared for final disposal. Program elements in support of acceptable interim storage and waste minimization include: developing and implementing improved radioactive waste treatment technologies; identifying and implementing enhanced decontamination and decommissioning techniques; developing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) recycle capabilities; and developing and implementing improved technologies for the interim storage of SNF

  20. Development of chemically assisted etching method for GaAs-based optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.; Rhallabi, A.; Elmonser, L.; Talneau, A.; Pommereau, F.; Pagnod-Rossiaux, Ph.; Bouadma, N.

    2005-01-01

    Chemically assisted ion beam etching of GaAs-based materials using Cl 2 reactive gas was has been experimentally and theoretically examined. The primary effort was the design of an etching system for high reproducibility and improved throughput. Characteristics of the etching process, i.e., etch rate, etch profiles, and surface morphology as a function of etching parameters, i.e., substrate temperature, Cl 2 flow rate, ion current density, and energy are reported. In addition, we have analyzed the etched surfaces qualitatively by Auger electron spectroscopy, and quantitatively by atomic force microscopy. The developed process yielded stoichiometric and smooth GaAs surfaces. Moreover, in order to understand the mechanism of the Cl 2 etching reaction with GaAs, a simulation of the etch profile evolution with time as function of etching parameters was carried out. Simulations were compared with experimentally derived data and were found to be in good agreement. Finally, the developed process was successfully applied to the fabrication of ridge waveguides GaAs/GaAlAs lasers with cw optical characteristics similar to wet chemical etched lasers

  1. Development of the common law in view of Sections 39(2) and 173 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Constitution illuminates the legal landscape, but it is not blinding; it does not provide a trench from which the common law may be attacked, but it entrenches rights. Sections 39(2) and 173 of the Constitution do not place a machete in the hands of the judge to decapitate or to castrate, but it provides modeling clay out of ...

  2. Using Market Segmentation to Develop a Large Section, Web-Enhanced Survey Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jason; Robertson, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Increasing enrollment and decreasing budgets have caused many public universities, such as San Fransisco State University (SFU), to offer mega-sections of courses to hundreds of students. Yet the needs of many students are at odds with the large enrollments, inflexible times, and inconvenient locations of these classes. Jason Cole and Bruce…

  3. Biofuels and bio-based chemicals from lignocellulose: metabolic engineering strategies in strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rachel; Dou, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Interest in developing a sustainable technology for fuels and chemicals has unleashed tremendous creativity in metabolic engineering for strain development over the last few years. This is driven by the exceptionally recalcitrant substrate, lignocellulose, and the necessity to keep the costs down for commodity products. Traditional methods of gene expression and evolutionary engineering are more effectively used with the help of synthetic biology and -omics techniques. Compared to the last biomass research peak during the 1980s oil crisis, a more diverse range of microorganisms are being engineered for a greater variety of products, reflecting the broad applicability and effectiveness of today's gene technology. We review here several prominent and successful metabolic engineering strategies with emphasis on the following four areas: xylose catabolism, inhibitor tolerance, synthetic microbial consortium, and cellulosic oligomer assimilation.

  4. The Chemical Recycling of PET in the Framework of Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilias, D. S.; Karayannidis, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, all the techniques used in the chemical recycling of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are critically reviewed according to the overall benefits together with the environmental surcharge that they cause. Those, which are consistent with the principles of sustainable development, are indicated. Experimental data are presented for the acid hydrolysis of PET and compared with previous results on the alkaline hydrolysis of PET with, or without, the use of a phase transfer catalyst. Overall material balances are carried out for the hydrolysis of PET. Finally, it can be postulated that recycling according to the scheme:is the only one within the framework of sustainable development. Therefore, the recycling of PET does not only serve as a partial solution to the solid waste problem but also contributes to the conservation of raw petrochemical products and energy

  5. Quantum mechanics of chemical reactions: Recent developments in reactive scattering and in reaction path Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1988-12-01

    Two recent developments in the theory of chemical reaction dynamics are reviewed. First, it has recently been discovered that the S- matrix version of the Kohn variational principle is free of the ''Kohn anomalies'' that have plagued other versions and prevented its general use. This has considerably simplified quantum mechanical reactive scattering calculations, which provide the rigorous characterizations of bimolecular reactions. Second, a new kind of reaction path Hamiltonian has been developed, one based on the ''least motion'' path that interpolates linearly between the reactant and product geometry of the molecule (rather than the previously used minimum energy, or ''intrinsic'' reaction path). The form of Hamiltonian which results is much simpler than the original reaction path Hamiltonian, but more important is the fact that it provides a more physically correct description of hydrogen atom transfer reactions. 44 refs., 4 figs

  6. Chemical aspects of cylinder corrosion and a scenario for hole development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, E.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In June 1990, two cylinders in the depleted UF{sub 6} cylinder storage yards at Portsmouth were discovered to have holes in their walls at the valve-end stiffening ring at a point below the level of the gas-solid interface of the UF{sub 6}. The cylinder with the larger hole, which extended under the stiffening ring, was stacked in a top row 13 years ago. The cylinder with the smaller hole had been stacked in a bottom row 4 years ago. The lifting lugs of the adjacent cylinders pointed directly at the holes. A Cylinder Investigating Committee was appointed to determine the cause or causes of the holes and to assess the implications of these findings. This report contains a listing of the chemically related facts established by the Investigating Committee with the cooperation of the Operations and Technical Support Divisions at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the scenario developed to explain these findings and some implications of this scenario. In summary, the interrelated reactions of water, solid UF{sub 6} and iron presented by R. L. Ritter are used to develop a scenario which explains the observations and deductions made during the investigation. The chemical processes are intimately related to the course of the last three of the four stages of hole development. A simple model is proposed which permits semiquantitative prediction of such information as the HF loss rates as a function of time, the rate of hole enlargement, the time to hydrolyze a cylinder of UF{sub 6} and the approximate size of the hole. The scenario suggests that the environmental consequences associated with a developing hole in a depleted UF{sub 6} cylinder are minimal for the first several years but will become significant if too many years pass before detection. The overall environmental picture is presented in more detail elsewhere.

  7. Do hormone-modulating chemicals impact on reproduction and development of wild amphibians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Frances; Tyler, Charles R

    2015-11-01

    Globally, amphibians are undergoing a precipitous decline. At the last estimate in 2004, 32% of the approximately 6000 species were threatened with extinction and 43% were experiencing significant declines. These declines have been linked with a wide range of environmental pressures from habitat loss to climate change, disease and pollution. This review evaluates the evidence that endocrine-disrupting contaminants (EDCs) - pollutants that affect hormone systems - are impacting on wild amphibians and contributing to population declines. The review is limited to anurans (frogs and toads) as data for effects of EDCs on wild urodeles (salamanders, newts) or caecilians (limbless amphibians) are extremely limited. Evidence from laboratory studies has shown that a wide range of chemicals have the ability to alter hormone systems and affect reproductive development and function in anurans, but for the most part only at concentrations exceeding those normally found in natural environments. Exceptions can be found for exposures to the herbicide atrazine and polychlorinated biphenyls in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and perchlorate in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). These contaminants induce feminising effects on the male gonads (including 'intersex' - oocytes within testes) at concentrations measured in some aquatic environments. The most extensive data for effects of an EDC in wild amphibian populations are for feminising effects of atrazine on male gonad development in regions across the USA. Even where strong evidence has been provided for feminising effects of EDCs, however, the possible impact of these effects on fertility and breeding outcome has not been established, making inference for effects on populations difficult. Laboratory studies have shown that various chemicals, including perchlorate, polychlorinated biphenyls and bromodiphenylethers, also act as endocrine disrupters through interfering with thyroid-dependent processes that are fundamental for

  8. Antibiotic use in dentistry: A cross-sectional survey from a developing country

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaramakrishnan Gowri; Deeksha Mehta; Sridharan Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance is a well-known entity and the most common factor leading to this is the irrational use of antibiotics. Several studies from the West have substantiated the irrational use of antibiotics in dentistry. Aims: The aim was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of antimicrobial drug use among dental fraternity in a tertiary care teaching dental college and hospital. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional survey of various dental fraternities...

  9. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management technology development program plan: 1994 Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until April 1992, the major activity of the ICPP was the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium and the management of the resulting high-level wastes (HLW). In 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the continued safe management and disposition of SNF and radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste), 3,800 cubic meters of calcine waste, and 289 metric tons heavy metal of SNF are in inventory at the ICPP. Disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is planned for a repository. Preparation of SNF, HLW, and other radioactive wastes for disposal may include mechanical, physical, and/or chemical processes. This plan outlines the program strategy of the ICPP spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF ampersand WMTDP) to develop and demonstrate the technology required to ensure that SNF and radioactive waste will be properly stored and prepared for final disposal in accordance with regulatory drivers. This Plan presents a brief summary of each of the major elements of the SF ampersand WMTDP; identifies key program assumptions and their bases; and outlines the key activities and decisions that must be completed to identify, develop, demonstrate, and implement a process(es) that will properly prepare the SNF and radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP for safe and efficient interim storage and final disposal

  10. Chemical methods in the development of eco-efficient wood-based pellet production and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuokkanen, Matti; Kuokkanen, Toivo; Stoor, Tuomas; Niinimäki, Jouko; Pohjonen, Veli

    2009-09-01

    Up to 20 million tons of waste wood biomass per year is left unused in Finland, mainly in the forests during forestry operations, because supply and demand does not meet. As a consequence of high heat energy prices, the looming threat of climate change, the greenhouse effect, and due to global as well as national demands to considerably increase the proportion of renewable energy, there is currently tremendous enthusiasm in Finland to substantially increase pellet production. As part of this European objective to increase the eco- and cost-efficient utilization of bio-energy from the European forest belt, the aim of our research group is - by means of multidisciplinary research, especially through chemical methods - to promote the development of Nordic wood-based pellet production in both the qualitative and the quantitative sense. Wood-based pellets are classified as an emission-neutral fuel, which means that they are free from emission trading in the European Union. The main fields of pellet research and the chemical toolbox that has been developed for these studies, which includes a new specific staining and optical microscope method designed to determine the cross-linking of pellets in the presence of various binding compounds, are described in this paper. As model examples illustrating the benefits of this toolbox, experimental data is presented concerning Finnish wood pellets and corresponding wood-based pellets that include the use of starch-containing waste potato peel residue and commercial lignosulfonate as binding materials. The initial results concerning the use of the developed and optimized specific staining and microscopic method using starch-containing potato peel residue as binding material are presented.

  11. Development of Chemical and Metabolite Sensors for Rhodococcus opacus PD630.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Drew M; Henson, William R; Moon, Tae Seok

    2017-10-20

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630 is a nonmodel, Gram-positive bacterium that possesses desirable traits for biomass conversion, including consumption capabilities for lignocellulose-based sugars and toxic lignin-derived aromatic compounds, significant triacylglycerol accumulation, relatively rapid growth rate, and genetic tractability. However, few genetic elements have been directly characterized in R. opacus, limiting its application for lignocellulose bioconversion. Here, we report the characterization and development of genetic tools for tunable gene expression in R. opacus, including: (1) six fluorescent reporters for quantifying promoter output, (2) three chemically inducible promoters for variable gene expression, and (3) two classes of metabolite sensors derived from native R. opacus promoters that detect nitrogen levels or aromatic compounds. Using these tools, we also provide insights into native aromatic consumption pathways in R. opacus. Overall, this work expands the ability to control and characterize gene expression in R. opacus for future lignocellulose-based fuel and chemical production.

  12. Development of a Wireless and Passive SAW-Based Chemical Sensor for Organophosphorous Compound Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Qian Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW-based chemical sensor for organophosphorous compound (OC detection is presented. A 434 MHz reflective delay line configuration composed by single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and three shorted reflectors was fabricated on YZ LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate as the sensor element. A thin fluoroalcoholpolysiloxane (SXFA film acted as the sensitive interface deposited onto the SAW propagation path between the second and last reflectors of the SAW device. The first reflector was used for the temperature compensation utilizing the difference method. The adsorption between the SXFA and OC molecules modulates the SAW propagation, especially for the time delay of the SAW, hence, the phase shifts of the reflection peaks from the corresponding reflectors can be used to characterize the target OC. Prior to the sensor fabrication, the coupling of modes (COM and perturbation theory were utilized to predict the SAW device performance and the gas adsorption. Referring to a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW-based reader unit, the developed SAW chemical sensor was wirelessly characterized in gas exposure experiments for dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP detection. Sensor performance parameters such as phase sensitivity, repeatability, linearity, and temperature compensation were evaluated experimentally.

  13. Development and validation of NIR-chemometric methods for chemical and pharmaceutical characterization of meloxicam tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomuta, Ioan; Iovanov, Rares; Bodoki, Ede; Vonica, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is an important component of a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) toolbox and is a key technology for enabling the rapid analysis of pharmaceutical tablets. The aim of this research work was to develop and validate NIR-chemometric methods not only for the determination of active pharmaceutical ingredients content but also pharmaceutical properties (crushing strength, disintegration time) of meloxicam tablets. The development of the method for active content assay was performed on samples corresponding to 80%, 90%, 100%, 110% and 120% of meloxicam content and the development of the methods for pharmaceutical characterization was performed on samples prepared at seven different compression forces (ranging from 7 to 45 kN) using NIR transmission spectra of intact tablets and PLS as a regression method. The results show that the developed methods have good trueness, precision and accuracy and are appropriate for direct active content assay in tablets (ranging from 12 to 18 mg/tablet) and also for predicting crushing strength and disintegration time of intact meloxicam tablets. The comparative data show that the proposed methods are in good agreement with the reference methods currently used for the characterization of meloxicam tablets (HPLC-UV methods for the assay and European Pharmacopeia methods for determining the crushing strength and disintegration time). The results show the possibility to predict both chemical properties (active content) and physical/pharmaceutical properties (crushing strength and disintegration time) directly, without any sample preparation, from the same NIR transmission spectrum of meloxicam tablets.

  14. Cross-sectional imaging of biliary tumors: current clinical status and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Christoph J.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Reiser, Maximilian; Helmberger, Thomas [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich University Hospitals-Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Munich (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, including hilar cholangiocarcinoma, is a relatively rare diagnosis. However, it frequently has been associated with major problems in diagnostics and clinical management from its first comprehensive description by Klatskin up until today. In this article, cholangiocarcinoma, representing the most common biliary tumor, as well as the differential diagnoses of benign and malignant biliary obstruction, will be discussed. The latest improvements of cross-sectional imaging modalities (sonography, CT, MRI and PET) and their diagnostic values for detection and staging will be displayed. A practical imaging-based diagnostic approach to obstructive biliary disease will be proposed. (orig.)

  15. Innovative development of mesosystems in the sphere of chemical technology (by the example of Tatarstan Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulpan A. Misbakhova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify the peculiarities of innovative development of mesosystems basing on the systematization of practical experience of Tatarstan Republic and to conduct the economicmathematical modeling. Methods systemic analysis description and generalization component and factor analysis. Results the author substantiates the necessity of development and modernization of petrochemical plants as one of the most important sectors of Russian industry. It is stated that the development of petrochemical wastesrsquo processing technologies flexible production technologies as well as the creation of energy efficient and ecologically safe technologies of oil refining requires substantial revision of approaches to innovations implementation and financing. The article shows that despite the large number of hightech industries Russia ranks only 20 among developed countries by the level of spending on research and development. The analysis carried out on the basis of statistical data for the Republic of Tatarstan showed that the petrochemical complex occupies the leading position in the regional economy while demonstrating higher efficiency compared to other industries. The main institutions for the petrochemical industry development in the Republic have been defined including Tekhnopolis quotKhimgradquot quotRegional center of engineering in the sphere of chemical technologiesquot JSC and others. To assess the development of the national innovation system the innovation diffusion factors were studied and systematized. 16 indicators of research and innovation activities in the Republic of Tatarstan for 20102014 were selected which were then grouped into four integrated categories intellectual activity research and development innovation activity of small businesses and innovation outcomes. Factor analysis determined their contribution to the process of the innovations diffusion at the level of 86 . Scientific novelty the model of innovation diffusion at

  16. Integrated approach of nutritional and molecular epidemiology, mineralogical and chemical pollutant characterisation: the protocol of a cross-sectional study in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchitta, Martina; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Maugeri, Andrea; Barone, Germana; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Catalfo, Alfio; De Guidi, Guido; Iemmolo, Maria; Crimi, Nunzio; Agodi, Antonella

    2017-04-04

    Environmentally-related health and disease are the result of the exposome, the totality of a person's environmental exposures, from all sources and routes, across their lifespan. Epigenetic phenomena, including DNA methylation, can be potentially modified by environmental and lifestyle factors, and result in environmental reprogramming of the genome for exposed individuals and for future generations of offspring. The objective of the project is to evaluate the risk of DNA hypomethylation due to air pollution, Mediterranean diet adherence, folate intake, and demographic and socioeconomic factors, in healthy women living in the metropolitan area of Catania, Italy. Non-pregnant healthy women will be enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic, lifestyle and dietary intake information will be collected. LINE-1 methylation will be measured by pyrosequencing. The participants' home addresses will be geocoded and each woman will be assigned to the closest monitoring station for particulate matter (PM) exposure assessment. Mineralogical-chemical characterisation of PM and cellular model assays will be performed. An integrated approach will be designed to estimate the combined possible effect of air pollution, Mediterranean diet adherence, folate intake and other lifestyle characteristics on LINE-1 methylation levels. The project has been approved by the ethics committees of the involved institution and funded by the University of Catania (Finanziamento della Ricerca, FIR 2014). All participants will be fully informed of the purpose and procedures of the study, and signed written consents will be obtained. All the data collected will be treated confidentially and analysed in an aggregate and anonymous way. The results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and communicated to local public health agencies, in order to provide essential information for timely and effective public health action. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  17. Development of a chemically defined medium for studying foodborne bacterial-fungal interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing; Honoré, Anders Hans; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest for using natural preservatives in the food and dairy industries including the application of bacterial cultures to inhibit fungal spoilage. Several antifungal metabolites from bacteria have been identified, but their relative importance has been difficult to establish....... In dynamic systems such as fermented milk products, the complexity of the food matrix affects detection, identification and quantification of antifungal metabolites, and thereby the understanding of the bacterial-fungal interactions. To ease the identification and quantification of bacterial metabolites (as...... judged by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry) a chemically defined interaction medium (CDIM) was developed. The medium supported growth of antifungal cultures such as Lactobacillus paracasei and Propionibacterium freudenreichii, as well as spoilage moulds and yeasts isolated from...

  18. Development of novel protecting derivatives for chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyasu; Tanagi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Shoichi; Furukawa, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    EUV lithography is the most favorable process for high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices below 1X nm half-pitch. Many efforts have revealed that the effective proton generation and the control of the generated acid diffusion are required to improve the breakthrough of the RLS trade-off. For the development of EUV resists, the novel protecting derivatives were designed. To clarify the lithographic performance of these derivatives, we synthesized the acrylic polymers containing these derivatives as model photopolymers and exposed the resist samples based on these polymers to EUV/EB radiation. On the basis of the lithographic performances of these resist sample, we evaluated the characteristics of novel protecting derivatives upon exposure to EUV/EB radiation. We discuss the relationship between the chemical structures of these derivatives and lithographic performance.

  19. HISTORY OF FORMATION AND PROSPECTS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF BELARUSIAN SCIENTIFIC CHEMICAL ANT THERMAL TREATMENT SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Ivanitsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available History of the «Material Science in Mechanical Engineering»” accounts for more than 40 years and by right it can be called a history of the Belarusian School of Metal Science Specialists. One of the founders of the Scientific School of Belarusian Metal Science Specialists has been Professor Leonid Grigorievich Voroshnine, double N.A. Minkevich prize-winner, Doctor of Technical Sciences, Head of the Department. Under his leadership and as a result of his personal participation more than 100 new diffusion coatings of multi- and special purposes such as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, anti-corrosive, cavitation- resistant have been developed. The papers written by the Department scientists are well known and they are generally recognized as classical books on chemical and thermal treatment. Nowadays the Scientific School created by Professor Voroshnine L.G is successfully working.

  20. Evaluation and Development of Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Reduction Scheme for Biodiesel and Diesel Fuel Surrogates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the existing chemical kinetic mechanism reduction techniques. From here, an appropriate reduction scheme was developed to create compact yet comprehensive surrogate models for both diesel and biodiesel fuels for diesel engine applications. The reduction......-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study. A new reduction scheme was therefore formulated. A 68-species mechanism for biodiesel surrogate and a 49-species mechanism for diesel surrogate were successfully derived from the respective detailed mechanisms. An overall 97% reduction in species number......-hexadecane mechanism is expected to be a better representative of surrogate component for various transportation fuels such as biodiesel. Additionally, it can be applied to predict the reactivity of other n-alkane or interchange with one another for kinetic and CFD simulations....

  1. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  2. Developing pongid dentition and its use for ageing individual crania in comparative cross-sectional growth studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, M C; Wood, B A

    1981-01-01

    This study of the developing pongid dentition is based on cross-sectional radiographic data of juvenile Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo pygmaeus skulls. Comparisons with developmental features of the human dentition are made, and possible explanations for the formation of larger teeth within the reduced pongid growth period are discussed. The data presented in this study provide an alternative method for ageing individual pongid crania in comparative cross-sectional growth studies. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by ageing individual Gorilla crania form radiographs and plotting relative dental age against length of the jaw.

  3. Cross Sectional Study of Agile Software Development Methods and Project Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Agile software development methods, characterized by delivering customer value via incremental and iterative time-boxed development processes, have moved into the mainstream of the Information Technology (IT) industry. However, despite a growing body of research which suggests that a predictive manufacturing approach, with big up-front…

  4. Transformative Role of Epigenetics in Child Development Research: Commentary on the Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Lester, Conradt, and Marsit (2016) have assembled a set of articles that bring to readers of "Child Development" the scope and impact of the exponentially growing research on epigenetics and child development. This commentary aims to place this work in a broader context of theory and research by (a) providing a conceptual framework for…

  5. Chemical sensors for breath gas analysis: the latest developments at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisch, Ulrike; Haick, Hossam

    2014-06-01

    Profiling the body chemistry by means of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breath opens exciting new avenues in medical diagnostics. Gas sensors could provide ideal platforms for realizing portable, hand-held breath testing devices in the near future. This review summarizes the latest developments and applications in the field of chemical sensors for diagnostic breath testing that were presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013 in Wallerfangen, Germany. Considerable progress has been made towards clinically applicable breath testing devices, especially by utilizing chemo-sensitive nanomaterials. Examples of several specialized breath testing applications are presented that are either based on stand-alone nanomaterial-based sensors being highly sensitive and specific to individual breath compounds over others, or on combinations of several highly specific sensors, or on experimental nanomaterial-based sensors arrays. Other interesting approaches include the adaption of a commercially available MOx-based sensor array to indirect breath testing applications, using a sample pre-concentration method, and the development of compact integrated GC-sensor systems. The recent trend towards device integration has led to the development of fully integrated prototypes of point-of-care devices. We describe and compare the performance of several prototypes that are based on different sensing technologies and evaluate their potential as low-cost and readily available next-generation medical devices.

  6. Abnormal development of tapetum and microspores induced by chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Wang

    Full Text Available Chemical hybridization agent (CHA-induced male sterility is an important tool in crop heterosis. To demonstrate that CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility is associated with abnormal tapetal and microspore development, the cytology of CHA-SQ-1-treated plant anthers at various developmental stages was studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL assay and DAPI staining. The results indicated that the SQ-1-treated plants underwent premature tapetal programmed cell death (PCD, which was initiated at the early-uninucleate stage of microspore development and continued until the tapetal cells were completely degraded; the process of microspore development was then blocked. Microspores with low-viability (fluorescein diacetate staining were aborted. The study suggests that premature tapetal PCD is the main cause of pollen abortion. Furthermore, it determines the starting period and a key factor in CHA-SQ-1-induced male sterility at the cell level, and provides cytological evidence to further study the mechanism between PCD and male sterility.

  7. Guest Editorial: The Nexus of Violence, Violence Research, and Development. Introduction to the Focus Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Imbusch

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    This focus section of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence is dedicated to violence and violence research in the Global South. It examines the causes, forms, perpetrators, processes, and outcomes of violence. While the contributions go into detail on what is commonly understood as politically motivated violence, they also examine societal, criminal, urban, and gendered violence, as well as the involvement of youth. Four articles explore the significance of violence in specific regions: Africa south of the Sahara, West Asia and North Africa, East Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors describe and assess the state of research within and about the different countries. Two further articles review the body of research on the causes of civil war, which has
    been the dominant issue in much violence-related research on the global South since the end of the Cold War.

  8. Developing new platform chemicals: what is required for a new bio-based molecule to become a platform chemical in the bioeconomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtempo, José-Vitor; Chaves Alves, Flavia; de Almeida Oroski, Fabio

    2017-09-21

    This paper proposes a framework with six dimensions that can be useful for evaluating the potential and the current stage of a bio-based platform chemical. The framework considers the technological and strategic challenges to be fulfilled by a company that intends to lead a platform based on a bio-based chemical. A platform chemical should be an intermediate molecule, with a structure able to generate a number of derivatives, that is produced at a competitive cost, capable of allowing exploitation of the scale and scope economies, and inserted within a complete innovation ecosystem that is able to create value with governance mechanisms that are capable of allowing coordination of the innovation process and facilitation of the value capture by the focal company leading the platform, in our case the producer of the platform molecule. Based on these six dimensions, three potential platform chemicals - succinic acid, butanol and farnesene - are compared and discussed. It is possible to identify important differences concerning the technological dimensions and the strategic dimensions as well. Two of the molecules - farnesene and succinic acid - adhere to most of the conditions required to structure a platform chemical. However, the innovation ecosystem is not complete and the governance mechanisms are still under development, so it is not clear if they will be capable of allowing a favorable position for value capture by the platform leader. Butanol structuring for a platform does not seem promising. The potential of the molecule is apparently not high and the strategic initiatives are in general not focused on innovation ecosystem structuring.

  9. Development of Methods for Obtaining Position Image and Chemical Binding Information from Flow Experiments of Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugan, Are

    1998-12-01

    Existing oil reservoirs might be more fully exploited if the properties of the flow of oil and water in porous media were better known. In laboratory experiments it is important to collect as much information as possible to make a descriptive model of the system, including position imaging and chemical binding information. This thesis develops nuclear methods for obtaining position image and chemical binding information from flow experiments of porous media. A combined positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography system to obtain position images, and a time-differential perturbed angular correlation system to obtain chemical binding information, have been built and thoroughly tested. 68 refs., 123 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. [Dietary Fiber and Pubertal Development among Children and Adolescents--a Cross-sectional Study in Chengdu, Sichuan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guo; Liu, Yan; Xue, Hong-mei; Luo, Jiao; Chen, Yan-rong; Bao, Yu-xin; Duan, Ruo-nan; Yang, Ming-zhe; Cheng, Guo

    2016-03-01

    To determine the association between intake of dietary fiber and pubertal development among children and adolescents in Chengdu. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in 1 340 children and adolescents aged 9-15 years. Data about dietary intake were collected through 24-h dietary self-recall. Pubertal development was measured by trained investigators using Tanner criteria. Consumptions of total fiber and fiber from different sources were compared among the participants with different stages of pubertal development. Data from 1 328 children and adolescents were analyzed. Boys (n = 667) at a later stage of pubertal development consumed less total fiber and fruit fiber than those at an earlier stage (P fiber than those at an earlier stage (P Dietary fiber intake, especially fruit fiber, is lower in children and adolescents with early commencement of puberty development. Further studies are needed to establish the relationship between dietary fiber and pubertal development.

  11. Planning for transit-supportive development : a practitioner's guide. Section 5 : local planning and transit-supportive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Planning for Transit-Supportive Development: A Practitioners Guide is a toolkit of practical and innovative measures to help : Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), regional planners, transit agencies, and local government elected o...

  12. Planning for transit-supportive development : a practitioner's guide. Section 2 : general transit-supportive development planning topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Planning for Transit-Supportive Development: A Practitioners Guide is a toolkit of practical and innovative measures to help : Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), regional planners, transit agencies, and local government elected o...

  13. Planning for transit-supportive development : a practitioner's guide. Section 4 : corridor planning and transit-supportive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Planning for Transit-Supportive Development: A Practitioners Guide is a toolkit of practical and innovative measures to help : Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), regional planners, transit agencies, and local government elected o...

  14. Development of chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for silkworm hemolymph metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Weifeng; Han, Wei; Li, Yunong; Meng, Zhiqi; Cai, Leiming; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    -Methyl-D-aspartic and tyrosine were identified. The changes of these biomarkers were likely due to the disruption of the endocrine system of silkworm by DDT. This work illustrates that the method of CIL LC-MS is useful to generate quantitative submetabolome profiles from a small volume of silkworm hemolymph with much higher coverage than conventional LC-MS methods, thereby facilitating the discovery of potential metabolite biomarkers related to EDC or other chemical exposure. - Highlights: • A method was developed for profiling silkworm hemolymph metabolome with high coverage. • Dansylation isotope labeling LC-MS was used for amine/phenol submetabolome quantification. • Metabolomic changes in silkworm after DDT exposure were studied. • Among 2044 metabolites detected, 65 were positively identified and 1809 were putatively identified. • 33 positively identified metabolites showed significant changes in five groups of silkworms.

  15. MATLAB as a tool as Analysis and Problem Solving Competency Development in Chemical Engineering Degree using MATLAB

    OpenAIRE

    López-Pérez, Maria-Fernanda; Cardona, S. C.; Lora, J.; Abad, A.

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Analysis and solving problems is a Chemical Engineering student capability. In order to develop this ability, activities that encompass problem-solving by students may involve problems in real-world settings. In Chemical Engineering degree, MATLAB is a numerical software package that helps in the process of designing, evaluating and implementing a strategy to answer an open-ended question or achieve a desired goal.  In this context, Matlab is software used in process simulation. Several ...

  16. Development of a chlorine chemistry module for the Master Chemical Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L. K.; Saunders, S. M.; Wang, T.; Gao, R.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, Q. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2015-10-01

    The chlorine atom (Cl·) has a high potential to perturb atmospheric photochemistry by oxidizing volatile organic compounds (VOCs), but the exact role it plays in the polluted troposphere remains unclear. The Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) is a near-explicit mechanism that has been widely applied in the atmospheric chemistry research. While it addresses comprehensively the chemistry initiated by the OH, O3 and NO3 radicals, its representation of the Cl· chemistry is incomplete as it only considers the reactions for alkanes. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive Cl· chemistry module that can be directly incorporated within the MCM framework. A suite of 205 chemical reactions describes the Cl·-initiated degradation of alkenes, aromatics, alkynes, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, and some organic acids and nitrates, along with the inorganic chemistry involving Cl· and its precursors. To demonstrate the potential influence of the new chemistry module, it was incorporated into a MCM box model to evaluate the impacts of nitryl chloride (ClNO2), a product of nocturnal halogen activation by nitrogen oxides (NOX), on the following day's atmospheric photochemistry. With constraints of recent observations collected at a coastal site in Hong Kong, southern China, the modeling analyses suggest that the Cl· produced from ClNO2 photolysis may substantially enhance the atmospheric oxidative capacity, VOC oxidation and O3 formation, particularly in the early morning period. The results demonstrate the critical need for photochemical models to include more detailed chlorine chemistry in order to better understand the atmospheric photochemistry in polluted environments subject to intense emissions of NOX, VOCs and chlorine-containing constituents.

  17. The development of a nuclear chemical plant human reliability management approach: HRMS and JHEDI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirwan, Barry

    1997-05-01

    -be-assessed, task or scenario. The extrapolation process therefore required a set of PSF profiles for a number of real and representative data-based scenarios, and empirically-derived rules to extrapolate to new but similar scenarios. Using existing nuclear chemical plant human error and other data, a PSF profiling and extrapolation system was developed, which could assess most HEPs required for nuclear chemical risk assessments. The two techniques were then employed in a major risk assessment, with HRMS being utilised for approximately twenty high risk scenarios, and JHEDI being used to calculate well over five hundred HEPs for a large range of tasks and scenarios, by a number of assessors.

  18. Development of a quantum chemical molecular dynamics tribochemical simulator and its application to tribochemical reaction dynamics of lubricant additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, T; Tsuboi, H; Hatakeyama, N; Endou, A; Miyamoto, A; Miura, R; Takaba, H; Suzuki, A; Kubo, M

    2010-01-01

    Tribology at the atomistic and molecular levels has been theoretically studied by a classical molecular dynamics (MD) method. However, this method inherently cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics because it does not consider the electrons in nature. Although the first-principles based MD method has recently been used for understanding the chemical reaction dynamics of several molecules in the tribology field, the method cannot simulate the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system including solid surfaces and interfaces due to its huge computation costs. On the other hand, we have developed a quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator on the basis of a hybrid tight-binding quantum chemical/classical MD method. In the simulator, the central part of the chemical reaction dynamics is calculated by the tight-binding quantum chemical MD method, and the remaining part is calculated by the classical MD method. Therefore, the developed tribochemical simulator realizes the study on tribochemical reaction dynamics of a large complex system, which cannot be treated by using the conventional classical MD or the first-principles MD methods. In this paper, we review our developed quantum chemical MD tribochemical simulator and its application to the tribochemical reaction dynamics of a few lubricant additives

  19. Chemical and structural characterization of char development during lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafu, Lihle D; Neomagus, Hein W J P; Everson, Raymond C; Strydom, Christien A; Carrier, Marion; Okolo, Gregory N; Bunt, John R

    2017-11-01

    The chemical and structural changes of three lignocellulosic biomass samples during pyrolysis were investigated using both conventional and advanced characterization techniques. The use of ATR-FTIR as a characterization tool is extended by the proposal of a method to determine aromaticity, the calculation of both CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and the degree of aromatic ring condensation ((R/C) u ). With increasing temperature, the H/C and O/C ratios, X A and CH 2 /CH 3 ratio decreased, while (R/C) u and aromaticity increased. The micropore network developed with increasing temperature, until the coalescence of pores at 1100°C, which can be linked to increasing carbon densification, extent of aromatization and/or graphitization of the biomass chars. WAXRD-CFA measurements indicated the gradual formation of nearly parallel basic structural units with increasing carbonization temperature. The char development can be considered to occur in two steps: elimination of aliphatic compounds at low temperatures, and hydrogen abstraction and aromatic ring condensation at high temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recent Developments on Genetic Engineering of Microalgae for Biofuels and Bio-Based Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Tan, Shih-I; Kao, Pei-Hsun; Chang, Yu-Kaung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2017-10-01

    Microalgae serve as a promising source for the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals. They are superior to terrestrial plants as feedstock in many aspects and their biomass is naturally rich in lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, pigments, and other valuable compounds. Due to the relatively slow growth rate and high cultivation cost of microalgae, to screen efficient and robust microalgal strains as well as genetic modifications of the available strains for further improvement are of urgent demand in the development of microalgae-based biorefinery. In genetic engineering of microalgae, transformation and selection methods are the key steps to accomplish the target gene modification. However, determination of the preferable type and dosage of antibiotics used for transformant selection is usually time-consuming and microalgal-strain-dependent. Therefore, more powerful and efficient techniques should be developed to meet this need. In this review, the conventional and emerging genome-editing tools (e.g., CRISPR-Cas9, TALEN, and ZFN) used in editing the genomes of nuclear, mitochondria, and chloroplast of microalgae are thoroughly surveyed. Although all the techniques mentioned above demonstrate their abilities to perform gene editing and desired phenotype screening, there still need to overcome higher production cost and lower biomass productivity, to achieve efficient production of the desired products in microalgal biorefineries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Incidence of the biotechnology in the academic development of the chemical engineering in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Oscar Fernando; Rueda Maria Angelica; Ramirez, Julio Cesar

    1998-01-01

    In Colombia, the biotechnology, during the last years, it has been developed in a quick way, particularly in their fundamental and theoretical aspect. In the national market consumption there are products obtained with the help of the advances of the industrial biotechnology, which, for their implementation, it has had to appeal to import technologies and of transfer. This way, among the theoretical investigations in biotechnology and the applicability of their results in production processes in our country a direct relationship has not existed generally. At the moment, the necessities of scientific and technological progress demand the harmonic interaction of the different aspects of the biotechnology. For it, it is indispensable the formation of professionals, able to apply engineering concepts in the processes developed in biotechnical laboratories, like they have already made it other countries, with more scientific and economic advance. In the Colombian universities it is hour of reinforcing the line considerably in biochemical engineering of chemical engineering programs in the different pre and graduate levels; this profundity will allow significantly shortening distances between the different areas of the biotechnology and its industrial application

  2. Research and development activities of the seismology section for the period January 1986 to December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, T.K.; Murty, G.S.

    1988-01-01

    This report sumarises the R and D in Seismology during the period from January 1986 to December 1987. Major topics of current study are (1) Forensic Seismology, (2) Seismicity and Seismic Risk estimates, (3) Reservoir induced seismicity and (4) Rockburst monitoring. Considerable effort is devoted to development of seismic data acquisition systems and theoretical aspects of seismology. (author)

  3. Mindfulness and Compassion in Human Development: Introduction to the Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Robert W.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on contemplative practices (e.g., mindfulness or compassion training) is growing rapidly in the clinical, health and neuro-sciences, but almost none of this research takes an explicitly developmental life span perspective. At present, we know rather little about the naturalistic development of mindfulness or compassion in children and…

  4. JChemPaint - Using the Collaborative Forces of the Internet to Develop a Free Editor for 2D Chemical Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Steinbeck

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The open source program for drawing 2D chemical structures JChemPaint, its current features, its envisioned further development and the principles enabling researchers and students at places all over the world to collaboratively develop such a program are described.

  5. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain

  6. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A lin...

  7. Possibility of the development of a Serbian protection system against chemical accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan R. Inđić

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a draft of a system model for responding in case of chemical accidents in accordance with the current legislation regarding the environment protection, the structure and elements of the existing response system in case of chemical accidents, other works dealing with the issue as well as the prospects planned by those responsible for the environmental protection. The paper discuss the possibilities of different institutions and agencies of the Republic of Serbia to engage in specialized methods of cooperation and protection against chemical hazards in accordance with Article X of the Convention on the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

  8. Measurement of developing turbulent flow in a U-bend of circular cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gun Hyee; Choi, Young Don; Han, Seong Ho

    2007-01-01

    Hot-wire measurements of the full mapping of the velocity and Reynolds stress components are reported for developing turbulent flow in a strongly curved 180 deg pipe and its tangents. A slanted wire is rotated into 6 orientations and the voltage outputs from wires are combined to obtain the mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. The strength of secondary flow reaches up to the 28% of bulk mean velocity. The strong counter-rotating vortex pair induced by the transverse pressure gradient and centrifugal force imbalance grows up to θ = 67.5 .deg. into the bend. But the vortex pair breaks down into two cell pattern after θ=90 .deg. Core vortex formation and reversal of secondary flow direction along the bend symmetry plane is cleanly found in the secondary vector plot. At θ=67.5 .deg. and θ = 90 .deg. into bend a large 'trough' develops in the longitudinal velocity toward the inside of the bend due to the breakdown of secondary flow. In the bend, the mean longitudinal velocity component changes little after θ=90 .deg., but secondary flow never achieves fully-developed state. Similar behaviors are observed in the radial and circumferential stresses

  9. [Cross-sectional study on growth and development of Chinese Han students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Ji, Cheng-ye; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Bing

    2006-03-01

    To analyze the current situation of the growth and development on Chinese Han children and adolescents. Using the 2004 National Survey on Students' Physical Fitness and Health, the body height, weight and chest circumference of 161,477 subjects aged 7 to 18 enrolled in this study were analyzed. It showed that the levels of the growth and development in urban students were better than those of rural students (P urban and rural boys, and the deference was 4.12 cm; the mean heights of urban and rural girls were 152.68 cm and 149.24 cm respectively, and the deference was 3.44 cm. The average level on body weight of 12-aged students were 44.75 kg and 39.27 kg respectively for urban and rural boys, and the deference was 5.48 kg; the mean weights of urban and rural girls were 42.91 kg and 39.17 kg respectively, and the deference was 3.74 kg. The average level on chest circumference of 12-aged urban students was beyond the rural students 3.68 cm and 2.56 cm respectively by gender. The average level on body height and weight of 7 to 14 aged students of east inshore areas were more than those of southwest, northwest and middle areas (P growth and development of the children and adolescents.

  10. Some tools of the trade we've developed for our cross-section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1992-11-01

    A number of compute codes have been modified or developed, both main-frame and PC. Seven codes, of which three are discussed in some detail. The later are: a controller-driven, double-precision version of the coupled-channel code ECIS; the latest version of STAPRE, a precompound plus Hauser-Feshbach nuclear reaction code; and NUSTART, a PC code that analyzes large sets of discrete nuclear levels and the multipole transitions among them. All main-frame codes are now being converted to the UNICOS operating system

  11. Cesarean Section Delivery Is Not a Risk Factor for Development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Population-based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Charles N; Banerjee, Ankona; Targownik, Laura E; Singh, Harminder; Ghia, Jean Eric; Burchill, Charles; Chateau, Dan; Roos, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    Mode of birth affects development of the intestinal microbiota, and microbial dysbiosis has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We performed a population-based analysis to determine whether mode of delivery (cesarean section vs. vaginal delivery) affects risk of IBD. We collected data from the University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database, which contains records on all Manitobans diagnosed with IBD from 1984 through 2010. Starting in 1970, 6-digit family health registration numbers were used in Manitoba to link mothers with their offspring. Maternal health records, including dates and modes of delivery and siblings of individuals with IBD, were identified. We obtained data on 1671 individuals with IBD and 10,488 controls (individuals without IBD, matched by age, sex, and area of residence at IBD diagnosis) linked to mothers' obstetrical records. Higher proportions of urban than rural residents were delivered by cesarean section for IBD cases (12.8% vs. 9.7%, P = .05) and controls (13.3% vs. 9.4%, P cesarean section (13.5% vs. 8.4%, P = .01). Overall, there was no difference in the percentage of IBD cases born by cesarean section (11.6%) vs. controls (11.7%, P = .93). In multivariate analysis, birth by cesarean section was not associated with an increased risk of subsequent IBD, controlling for age, sex, urban residence, and income (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.23). Persons with IBD were no more likely to have been born by cesarean section than their siblings without IBD (1740 siblings from 1615 families) (11.6% vs. 11.3%; odds ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.80; P = .79). People with IBD were not more likely to have been born via cesarean section than controls or siblings without IBD. These findings indicate that events of the immediate postpartum period that shape the developing intestinal microbiome do not affect risk for IBD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of cognitive schemata in the development of posttraumatic stress disorder: results of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Bohdan; Szymczak, Wiesław

    2011-03-01

    There are two theories (by Horowitz and by Foa) which attempt at explaining the process of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) development by information dissonance. The purpose of the present study was to verify these theories via cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. The study based on a cross-sectional design was performed on a representative group of Polish firefighters. The study using a longitudinal protocol was conducted among police officers. The level of PTSD was assessed using the Questionnaire for PTSD Measurement (K-PTSD). The sense of coherence (SOC) was measured with the Polish adaptation of the Orientation to Life Questionnaire by A. Antonovsky. In the cross-sectional study, the correlation coefficients between K-PTSD and SOC were -0.35 (p 0.05 indicated that the tendency we observed was not statistically significant. We would like to propose two possible explanations for the difference in the relationships between SOC and PTSD symptoms obtained in the studies employing the cross-sectional and the longitudinal protocols.

  13. Developing Quantum Chemical and Polyparameter Models for Predicting Environmentally Significant Parameters for New Munition Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    solute partition coefficient between two phases, K, for the changes in molecular interaction energies involved in transferring a chemical between the...Office of chemical safety and pollution prevention. Washington, D.C: US EPA. 2012. 46. American Society for Testing and Materials. E1963 − 09: Standard...

  14. Developing, Applying, and Evaluating Models for Rapid Screening of Chemical Exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, J.; Shin, H.; Ernstoff, Alexi

    2015-01-01

    to limited exposure data there is limited information on chemical use patterns and production and emission quantities. These data gaps require the application of mass balance, statistical and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict exposure and exposure potential for humans...... provides an introduction to underlying principles of some models used for exposure- and risk-based HTS for chemical prioritization for human health, including tools used in the ExpoDat project (USEtox, RAIDAR, CalTox) and other initiatives (SHEDS-HT). Case study examples of HTS include(i) model......Chemical risk estimation requires quantitative information on exposures and toxicological effects. Quantitative exposure information can include chemical intake rates and (bio)monitoring data; however, such information does not exist for the vast majority of marketed chemicals. In addition...

  15. FINAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT - PROTON RADIOGRAPHY: CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS AND DETECTOR DEVELOPMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, Michael J.; Gustafson, H. Richard.; Rajaram, Durga; Nigmanov, Turgun

    2007-01-01

    Proton radiography offers significant advantages over conventional X-ray radiography, including the capability of looking into thick, dense materials, better contrast for a wide range of materials, sensitivity to different materials of similar density, and better resolution because of the ability to focus beams. In order to achieve this capability it is crucial to understand the background due to neutrons and photons and to develop techniques to reduce it to tolerable levels. The physics goal of this project is to measure forward production of neutrons and photons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. This work is being carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab Experiment 907 (MIPP) collaboration including physicists from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Our group is responsible for the E907 forward neutron/photon calorimeters. These are the only detectors in the experiment that provide information on neutrons and photons. We are taking a leading role in obtaining and analyzing the for-ward production data and in developing an optimal detector for proton radiography. With the support of our Stewardship Science Academic Alliances grant, we were able to design, build, and commission the calorimeters on budget and ahead of schedule. E-907 officially started physics running at Fermilab in January 2005, and data taking continued through February 2006. Data were taken on a range of targets, from liquid hydrogen to uranium, at beam energies from 5 GeV/c to 120 GeV/c. The analysis of the data is challenging because data from many different detector systems must be understood and merged and over 31 million events were accumulated. Our recent efforts have been devoted to the calibration of the neutron and photon detectors, to track and shower reconstruction, identification of forward-going neutrons, and simulation of the calorimeters in a Monte Carlo. Reconstruction of the data with improved tracking is underway

  16. Bridging gaps in discovery and development: chemical and biological sciences for affordable health, wellness and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Prem Man Singh

    2011-05-01

    To commemorate 2011 as the International Year of Chemistry, the Indian Society of Chemists and Biologists organized its 15th International Conference on 'Bridging Gaps in Discovery and Development: Chemical and Biological Sciences for Affordable Health, Wellness and Sustainability' at Hotel Grand Bhagwati, in association with Saurashtra University, Rajkot, India. Anamik Shah, President of the Indian Society of Chemists and Biologists, was organizing secretary of the conference. Nicole Moreau, President of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and Secretary General of the Comité National de la Chimie, National Centre for Scientific Research France, was chief guest of the function. The four-day scientific program included 52 plenary lectures, 24 invited lectures by eminent scientists in the field and 12 oral presentations. A total of 317 posters were presented by young scientists and PhD students in three different poster sessions. Approximately 750 delegates from India, the USA, UK, France, Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Sweden, Japan and other countries attended the conference. The majority of the speakers gave presentations related to their current projects and areas of interest and many of the talks covered synthesis, structure-activity relationships, current trends in medicinal chemistry and drug research.

  17. Review on modeling development for multiscale chemical reactions coupled transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Martin; Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt [Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    A literature study is performed to compile the state-of-the-art, as well as future potential, in SOFC modeling. Principles behind various transport processes such as mass, heat, momentum and charge as well as for electrochemical and internal reforming reactions are described. A deeper investigation is made to find out potentials and challenges using a multiscale approach to model solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and combine the accuracy at microscale with the calculation speed at macroscale to design SOFCs, based on a clear understanding of transport phenomena, chemical reactions and functional requirements. Suitable methods are studied to model SOFCs covering various length scales. Coupling methods between different approaches and length scales by multiscale models are outlined. Multiscale modeling increases the understanding for detailed transport phenomena, and can be used to make a correct decision on the specific design and control of operating conditions. It is expected that the development and production costs will be decreased and the energy efficiency be increased (reducing running cost) as the understanding of complex physical phenomena increases. It is concluded that the connection between numerical modeling and experiments is too rare and also that material parameters in most cases are valid only for standard materials and not for the actual SOFC component microstructures. (author)

  18. Synthesis of Effective Food Constituents toward the Development of Chemical Biology Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the development of various probes and immunogens for chemical-biological investigations of food flavonoids. We accomplished a large (gram)-scale asymmetric synthesis of a key intermediate, 5-aminopentyl deoxy epigallocatechin-3-gallate (APDOEGCg; 3), an analogue of green tea polyphenol EGCg, in which the key step was cationic cyclization utilizing neighboring group participation of the gallate carbonyl group. The synthetic APDOEGCg (3) was efficiently converted to a fluorescent probe 18 and an immunogen 19 by utilizing the high reactivity of the amine functional group. We confirmed the usefulness of these probes for imaging studies and the generation of antibodies, respectively. We also describe the efficient synthesis of a positron emission tomography (PET) probe [ 11 C]20 by incorporation of 11 C into EGCg (1), for which synthetic 4″-Me-EGCg (20) was utilized as an authentic sample. Our synthetic strategy was also applied for the practical synthesis of nobiletin (21), a polymethoxylated flavone from citrus. Synthetic nobiletin was readily converted to various probes by selective demethylation and incorporation of fluorescein, biotin or 11 C. These probes should be useful for a range of biological applications. Detailed examination of the mechanisms and further applications are in progress.

  19. Chemical composition of tempeh from soybean cultivars specially developed for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Furlan Bavia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tempeh is a food obtained by fermentation of soybean grains by the fungus Rizophus oligosporus. It is a traditional Indonesian food that presents benefits for human health protecting against diarrhea and chronic diseases. Tempeh processing includes dehulling, cooking, inoculation, and fermentation. In this study, chemical characteristics of tempeh prepared with soybean cultivars specially developed for human consumption (BRS 216, BRS 232, BRS 257, and BRS 267 were investigated. Soybean grains and tempeh obtained from these cultivars were analyzed for oil, protein, antinutrional factors, and isoflavone content. Cultivar BRS 216 presented the highest protein content in the grains (36.81% and in tempeh (51.99%. On average, the protein content in tempeh increased 16% in relation to that of soybean grains. Isoflavone content was higher in the grains than in tempeh with significant differences among the cultivars. However, the aglycones content increased about 50% in tempeh (49.00 mg.100 g-1 on average compared to that of raw material (soybean grains - 21.49 mg.100 g-1, on average. The content of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KSTI reduced 83% in tempeh, on average, as compared to the value found in the grains. Phytic acid content was similar in both tempeh and the grains.

  20. Impacts of chemical modification on the toxicity of diverse nanocellulose materials to developing zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Bryan J; Clendaniel, Alicea; Sinche, Federico; Way, Daniel; Hughes, Michael; Schardt, Jenna; Simonsen, John; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Harper, Stacey L

    2016-06-01

    Cellulose is an abundant and renewable resource currently being investigated for utility in nanomaterial form for various promising applications ranging from medical and pharmaceutical uses to mechanical reinforcement and biofuels. The utility of nanocellulose and wide implementation ensures increasing exposure to humans and the environment as nanocellulose-based technologies advance. Here, we investigate how differences in aspect ratio and changes to surface chemistry, as well as synthesis methods, influence the biocompatibility of nanocellulose materials using the embryonic zebrafish. Investigations into the toxicity of neutral, cationic and anionic surface functionalities revealed that surface chemistry had a minimal influence on the overall toxicity of nanocellulose materials. Higher aspect ratio cellulose nanofibers produced by mechanical homogenization were, in some cases, more toxic than other cellulose-based nanofibers or nanocrystals produced by chemical synthesis methods. Using fluorescently labeled nanocellulose we were able to show that nanocellulose uptake did occur in embryonic zebrafish during development. We conclude that the benign nature of nanocellulose materials makes them an ideal platform to systematically investigate the inherent surface features driving nanomaterial toxicity in order to create safer design principles for engineered nanoparticles.

  1. Development, chemical and sensory characterization of semi skim yogurt added with whey protein concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Regina Antunes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop, to perform the chemical characterization and verify the acceptability of a semi skim yogurt added with whey protein concentrate (WPC 35 %, and compare it to traditional yogurt, without adding any protein source. For this, two formulations were prepared: 1- traditional semi skim and 2: semi skim added with WPC 35 %, with subsequent evaluation of physicochemical characteristics of acidity, pH and viscosity, as well as the compositional analysis of the levels of humidity, full solids, ash, protein, fat and carbohydrates for both formulations. The sensory analysis was performed with 80 untrained tasters, which was based on parameters of appearance, taste, flavor and consistency. The appearance and consistency parameters showed a significant difference between received grades, and the yogurt added with WPC 35 % the most preferred these aspects, as well as the formulation with the highest widespread acceptance among testers. The results indicate that the use of WPC 35 % in foods is a promising alternative, considering the overall acceptance obtained, the protein content beneficial to the consumers health, the improvement of technological properties provided to food coupled to the extent which it is produced, low cost and reducing the damage caused to the environment. 

  2. Chemical Characterization of Nuclear Materials: Development a New Combined X-Ray Fluorescence and Raman Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szaloki, I.; Gerenyi, A.

    2015-01-01

    New mobile analytical device based on combination of X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometer has been developed for prompt and quantitative characterization of chemical component from Al to U in nuclear waste or undeclared materials. The excitation source of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is an air-cooled X-ray tube with Ag transmission anode. For collection of secondary X-ray photons and data processing, a compact Amptek X-ray detector system is applied with silicon drift X-ray detector. The XRF system operates in confocal mode with focal volume around 1-4 mm 3 . Varying the geometrical position and orientation of the sample optional part of its surface can be analyzed. The Raman unit includes thermoelectrically cooled laser source having 500 mW power at wavelength 785 nm. In order to obtain spectral information from sample surface a reflection-type probe is connected by optical fibres to the Raman spectrometer. A mini focusing optics is set up to the sensor-fibre that provides the system to operate as confocal optical device in reflection mode. The XRF spectrometer with X-ray detector, Raman probe and X-ray tube are mechanically fixed and hermetically connected to an aluminium chamber, which can be optionally filled with helium. The chamber is mounted on a vertical stage that provides moving it to the sample surface. A new model and computer code have been developed for XRF quantitative analysis which describes the mathematical relationship between the concentration of sample elements and their characteristic X-ray intensities. For verification of the calculations standard reference alloy samples were measured. The results was in good agreement with certified concentrations in range of 0.001-100 w%. According to these numerical results this new method is successfully applicable for quick and non-destructive quantitative analysis of waste materials without using standard samples. (author)

  3. WetA bridges cellular and chemical development in Aspergillus flavus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Wu

    Full Text Available Bridging cellular reproduction and survival is essential for all life forms. Aspergillus fungi primarily reproduce by forming asexual spores called conidia, whose formation and maturation is governed by the central genetic regulatory circuit BrlA→AbaA→WetA. Here, we report that WetA is a multi-functional regulator that couples spore differentiation and survival, and governs proper chemical development in Aspergillus flavus. The deletion of wetA results in the formation of conidia with defective cell walls and no intra-cellular trehalose, leading to reduced stress tolerance, a rapid loss of viability, and disintegration of spores. WetA is also required for normal vegetative growth, hyphal branching, and production of aflatoxins. Targeted and genome-wide expression analyses reveal that WetA exerts feedback control of brlA and that 5,700 genes show altered mRNA levels in the mutant conidia. Functional category analyses of differentially expressed genes in ΔwetA RNA-seq data indicate that WetA contributes to spore integrity and maturity by properly regulating the metabolic pathways of trehalose, chitin, α-(1,3-glucan, β-(1,3-glucan, melanin, hydrophobins, and secondary metabolism more generally. Moreover, 160 genes predicted to encode transcription factors are differentially expressed by the absence of wetA, suggesting that WetA may play a global regulatory role in conidial development. Collectively, we present a comprehensive model for developmental control that bridges spore differentiation and survival in A. flavus.

  4. Development of low-cost welding procedures for thick sections of HY-150 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P. M.; Snow, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost welding procedures were developed for welding 6-inch thick HY-150 steel to be used in the manufacture of large diameter motor case Y rings and nozzle attachment flanges. An extensive investigation was made of the mechanical and metallurgical properties and fracture toughness of HY-150 base plate and welds made with manual shielded metal arc process and semi-automatic gas metal arc process in the flat position. Transverse tensiles, all-weld metal tensiles, Charpy V-notch specimens and edge notched bend specimens were tested in the course of the program. In addition metallographic studies and hardness tests were performed on the weld, weld HAZ and base metal. The results of the work performed indicate that both the shielded metal arc and gas metal arc processes are capable of producing consistently sound welds as determined by radiographic and ultrasonic inspection. In addition, the weld metal, deposited by each process was found to exhibit a good combination of strength and toughness such that the selection of a rolled and welded procedure for fabricating rocket motor case components would appear to be technically feasible.

  5. Development of chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for silkworm hemolymph metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Weifeng [Key Laboratory of Detection for Pesticide Residues, Ministry of Agriculture (China); Sericultural Research Institute, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou (China); Han, Wei; Li, Yunong [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Meng, Zhiqi [Sericultural Research Institute, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou (China); Cai, Leiming, E-mail: cailm@mail.zaas.ac.cn [Institute of Quality and Standard for Agro-products, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou (China); Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2016-10-26

    -Methyl-D-aspartic and tyrosine were identified. The changes of these biomarkers were likely due to the disruption of the endocrine system of silkworm by DDT. This work illustrates that the method of CIL LC-MS is useful to generate quantitative submetabolome profiles from a small volume of silkworm hemolymph with much higher coverage than conventional LC-MS methods, thereby facilitating the discovery of potential metabolite biomarkers related to EDC or other chemical exposure. - Highlights: • A method was developed for profiling silkworm hemolymph metabolome with high coverage. • Dansylation isotope labeling LC-MS was used for amine/phenol submetabolome quantification. • Metabolomic changes in silkworm after DDT exposure were studied. • Among 2044 metabolites detected, 65 were positively identified and 1809 were putatively identified. • 33 positively identified metabolites showed significant changes in five groups of silkworms.

  6. Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranasinghe Priyanga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of computer assisted learning (CAL has enhanced undergraduate medical education. CAL improves performance at examinations, develops problem solving skills and increases student satisfaction. The study evaluates computer literacy among first year medical students in Sri Lanka. Methods The study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka between August-September 2008. First year medical students (n = 190 were invited for the study. Data on computer literacy and associated factors were collected by an expert-validated pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Computer literacy was evaluated by testing knowledge on 6 domains; common software packages, operating systems, database management and the usage of internet and E-mail. A linear regression was conducted using total score for computer literacy as the continuous dependant variable and other independent covariates. Results Sample size-181 (Response rate-95.3%, 49.7% were Males. Majority of the students (77.3% owned a computer (Males-74.4%, Females-80.2%. Students have gained their present computer knowledge by; a formal training programme (64.1%, self learning (63.0% or by peer learning (49.2%. The students used computers for predominately; word processing (95.6%, entertainment (95.0%, web browsing (80.1% and preparing presentations (76.8%. Majority of the students (75.7% expressed their willingness for a formal computer training programme at the faculty. Mean score for the computer literacy questionnaire was 48.4 ± 20.3, with no significant gender difference (Males-47.8 ± 21.1, Females-48.9 ± 19.6. There were 47.9% students that had a score less than 50% for the computer literacy questionnaire. Students from Colombo district, Western Province and Student owning a computer had a significantly higher mean score in comparison to other students (p Conclusion Sri Lankan medical undergraduates had a low-intermediate level of computer

  7. Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted learning (CAL) has enhanced undergraduate medical education. CAL improves performance at examinations, develops problem solving skills and increases student satisfaction. The study evaluates computer literacy among first year medical students in Sri Lanka. Methods The study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka between August-September 2008. First year medical students (n = 190) were invited for the study. Data on computer literacy and associated factors were collected by an expert-validated pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Computer literacy was evaluated by testing knowledge on 6 domains; common software packages, operating systems, database management and the usage of internet and E-mail. A linear regression was conducted using total score for computer literacy as the continuous dependant variable and other independent covariates. Results Sample size-181 (Response rate-95.3%), 49.7% were Males. Majority of the students (77.3%) owned a computer (Males-74.4%, Females-80.2%). Students have gained their present computer knowledge by; a formal training programme (64.1%), self learning (63.0%) or by peer learning (49.2%). The students used computers for predominately; word processing (95.6%), entertainment (95.0%), web browsing (80.1%) and preparing presentations (76.8%). Majority of the students (75.7%) expressed their willingness for a formal computer training programme at the faculty. Mean score for the computer literacy questionnaire was 48.4 ± 20.3, with no significant gender difference (Males-47.8 ± 21.1, Females-48.9 ± 19.6). There were 47.9% students that had a score less than 50% for the computer literacy questionnaire. Students from Colombo district, Western Province and Student owning a computer had a significantly higher mean score in comparison to other students (p computer training was the strongest predictor of computer literacy (β = 13.034), followed by using

  8. Development of a portable petroleum by-products chemical sensor : phase III and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-21

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are considered to have potential for chemical sensing application : because of their high surface to volume ratio and unique size tunable properties like : photoluminescence (PL). However, our study revealed for the f...

  9. The development of multitasking in children aged 7-12years: Evidence from cross-sectional and longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Xiao; Xie, Weizhen; Chen, Chu-Sheng; Altgassen, Mareike; Wang, Ya; Cheung, Eric F C; Chan, Raymond C K

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the development of multitasking ability across childhood. A sample of 65 typically developing children aged 7, 9, and 11years completed two multitasking tests across three time points within a year. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data consistently indicated continuous linear growth in children's multitasking ability. By the age of 12years, children could effectively perform a simple multitasking scenario comprising six equally important tasks, although their ability to strategically organize assorted tasks with varied values and priorities in a complex multitasking setting had not reached proficiency yet. Cognitive functions underlying a complex multitasking scenario varied in their developmental trajectories. Retrospective memory developed continuously from 7 to 12years of age, suggesting its supporting role in the development of multitasking. Planning skills developed slowly and showed practice effects for older children but not for younger children. The ability to adhere to plans also developed slowly, and children of all age groups benefited from practice. This study offers a preliminary benchmark for future comparison with clinical populations and may help to inform the development of targeted interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a Procedure to Apply Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms to CFD Simulations as Post Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker

    2003-01-01

    It is desired to make detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms applicable to the complex geometries of practical combustion devices simulated with computational fluid dynamics tools. This work presents a novel general approach to combining computational fluid dynamics and a detailed chemical kinetic...... mechanism. It involves post-processing of data extracted from computational fluid dynamics simulations. Application of this approach successfully describes combustion chemistry in a standard swirl burner, the so-called Harwell furnace. Nevertheless, it needs validation against more complex combustion models...

  11. Development of a New Decision Tree to Rapidly Screen Chemical Estrogenic Activities of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Li, Weiying; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Lin, Zhifen; Kong, Deyang

    2014-02-01

    During the last past decades, there is an increasing number of studies about estrogenic activities of the environmental pollutants on amphibians and many determination methods have been proposed. However, these determination methods are time-consuming and expensive, and a rapid and simple method to screen and test the chemicals for estrogenic activities to amphibians is therefore imperative. Herein is proposed a new decision tree formulated not only with physicochemical parameters but also a biological parameter that was successfully used to screen estrogenic activities of the chemicals on amphibians. The biological parameter, CDOCKER interaction energy (Ebinding ) between chemicals and the target proteins was calculated based on the method of molecular docking, and it was used to revise the decision tree formulated by Hong only with physicochemical parameters for screening estrogenic activity of chemicals in rat. According to the correlation between Ebinding of rat and Xenopus laevis, a new decision tree for estrogenic activities in Xenopus laevis is finally proposed. Then it was validated by using the randomly 8 chemicals which can be frequently exposed to Xenopus laevis, and the agreement between the results from the new decision tree and the ones from experiments is generally satisfactory. Consequently, the new decision tree can be used to screen the estrogenic activities of the chemicals, and combinational use of the Ebinding and classical physicochemical parameters can greatly improves Hong's decision tree. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. [List of hazardous and extremely hazardous chemicals at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant]. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 311

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.A.; Martin, K.J.

    1997-03-01

    The information reflects changes in the lists of hazardous chemicals present at this facility in amounts equal to or greater than 10,000 pounds and extremely hazardous chemicals present in amounts equal to or greater than 500 pounds or its Threshold Planning Quantity, whichever was less. These lists represent the following: (1) List of materials last reported in March 1996 (reference Y/TS-l482); (2) Materials to be deleted from list; (3) Materials to be added to list; and (4) Revised list of materials

  13. Development and deployment of a chemical extraction treatment technology for uranium contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The remediation of contaminated soils is a major contributor to the cost of the environmental restoration effort at DOE sites previously employed in the DOE weapons production complex. At the RMI Decommissioning Project (RMIDP) in Ashtabula, Ohio, soil remediation by traditional ship and bury methods comprised over $44 million of the $164 million decommission baseline budget. The RMIDP has developed and is preparing to deploy a chemical treatment technology for washing uranium contaminated soil. Soil washing provides a significant volume reduction alternative to transportation and burial or on-site disposal when all life cycle costs of burial are considered. Soil washing at the RMIDP is projected to save the DOE over $13 million in direct remediation costs of the 40,000 tons of uranium contaminated soil, and $12 million in indirect project savings through schedule reduction. From August 1996 through February 1997, the RMIDP performed Process Definitive Testing (PDT) to validate initial screening study findings regarding the viability of soil washing. PDT defined the operating process parameter requirements for the soil washing carbonate leaching system, and provided valuable design data to be used in production plant design. A 2 ton per batch soil washing plant was designed, constructed, and operated in a 6 month period. Over 68 tons of soil were processed to provide operating data at a scale close to production scale. The data derived from pilot operations proved the technical viability of carbonate leaching on RMI soil and provided sufficient plant operating data to allow a cost-benefit assessment of soil washing to be performed. The RMIDP soil washing production facility design is complete and the facility was started up in April 1999

  14. Development of a cell-derived matrix: effects of epidermal growth factor in chemically defined culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throm, Angela M; Liu, Wai-Ching; Lock, Chi-Hung; Billiar, Kristen L

    2010-02-01

    Extracellular matrices without animal components and with high mechanical strength are needed for the development of the next generation of viable skin replacements. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal concentration of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to maximize the strength and collagen content of cell-derived matrix (CDM) produced by fibroblasts in vitro in serum-free media. Scaffold-free CDM samples were produced by human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of 0-50 ng/mL EGF in chemically defined media. After 21 days of culture, a membrane inflation system was used to measure the biaxial tensile strength, failure stretch ratio, and thickness of each treatment group. The fibroblasts treated with 5 ng/mL EGF produced the thickest matrix (270 microm). A thinner (130 microm) matrix, produced when the fibroblasts were treated with 0.5 ng/mL, had an ultimate tensile strength (895 kPa), greater than two times that of the other treatment groups. The fibroblasts treated with 0.5 ng/mL also had the highest collagen density (23.5 mg/cm(3)). Fibroblasts stimulated with the lowest (0.05 ng/mL) and highest (50 ng/mL) concentrations of EGF produced significantly weaker matrices and lower collagen densities. There was no significant correlation between UTS and collagen density suggesting that mechanisms other than density contribute to the strength of the matrix. Taken together, these data indicate that the optimal EGF concentration depends upon the relative importance of matrix strength and volume in a given application and that 0.5-5.0 ng/mL EGF promotes production of a robust extracellular matrix in only 3 weeks. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. HYPER-­TVT: Development and Implementation of an Interactive Learning Environment for Students of Chemical and Process Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Marina; Mazzotti, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Hyper-TVT is a computer-aided education system that has been developed at the Institute of Process Engineering at the ETH Zurich. The aim was to create an interactive learning environment for chemical and process engineering students. The topics covered are the most important multistage separation processes, i.e. fundamentals of separation…

  16. Development and Application of In Vitro Models for Screening Drugs and Environmental Chemicals that Predict Toxicity in Animals and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development and Application of In Vitro Models for Screening Drugs and Environmental Chemicals that Predict Toxicity in Animals and Humans (Presented by James McKim, Ph.D., DABT, Founder and Chief Science Officer, CeeTox) (5/25/2012)

  17. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  18. Development and Assessment of a Paper Electrophoresis Simulation Software for Chemical Equilibrium Teaching and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Montagna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Equilibrium misconceptions impaired the learning of many biochemicalundergraduate content. It was widely reinforced by chemical education data. On the otherhand there was no data for the consequences in biochemistry learning. OBJECTIVE Weproposed the construction of an Aminoacid Paper Electrophoresis software as a tool forChemical Equilibrium teaching and learning which aims to integrate the representationallevels, being macroscopic, microscopic and symbolic in a way to evidence to student thedynamic character of the equilibrium phenomena. It attenuates misconceptions andreduces impairments on biochemistry learning. Although the simulator is based onclassical biochemistry topic it is designed to deal with chemical equilibrium concepts in thecontext of biochemistry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The software is an PaperElectrophoresis Simulator programmed in HTML5 language. It guides the student stepstoward the simulation showing the technique fundamentals and variables allowing tochoose aminoacids in a list, as well as build even tetrapeptides and run even four samplesin a single simulation after what is defined a pH for simulation. The simulation results areshown in a depiction of a paper electrophoresis device (macroscopic the speciesproportion in the medium based on the Handerson-Hasselbalch formula (symbolic and thespecies charge change based on the medium pH (microscopic. All activities are guided bya task list based on previous diagnostic on chemical equilibrium misconceptions.RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Results were based on observation of students classdiscussion and survey. Many of previously diagnosed misconceptions were attenuated intests of chemical equilibrium falling from a 72% to 35% error average; and a studentssurvey agreed with simulator objectives (90%, ease of use (94%, chemicalrepresentations straightness (82%, simulation results (71% integration ofrepresentational levels (87%. CONCLUSIONS: Students declared the software

  19. Ionic liquids as green solvents and electrolytes for robust chemical sensor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2012-10-16

    Ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit complex behavior. Their simultaneous dual nature as solvents and electrolytes supports the existence of structurally tunable cations and anions, which could provide the basis of a novel sensing technology. However, the elucidation of the physiochemical properties of ILs and their connections with the interaction and redox mechanisms of the target analytes requires concerted data acquired from techniques including spectroscopic investigations, thermodynamic and solvation models, and molecular simulations. Our laboratory is using these techniques for the rational design and selection of ILs and their composites that could serve as the recognition elements in various sensing platforms. ILs show equal utility in both piezoelectric and electrochemical formats through functionalized ionics that provide orthogonal chemo- and regioselectivity. In this Account, we summarize recent developments in and applications of task-specific ILs and their surface immobilization on solid supports. Such materials can serve as a replacement for conventional recognition elements and electrolytic media in piezoelectric and electrochemical sensing approaches, and we place a special focus on our contributions to these fields. ILs take advantage of both the physical and chemical forces of interaction and can incorporate various gas analytes. Exploiting these features, we have designed piezoelectric sensors and sensor arrays for high-temperature applications. Vibrational spectroscopy of these ILs reveals that hydrogen bonding and dipole-dipole interactions are typically responsible for the observed sensing profiles, but the polarization and cavity formation effect as an analyte approaches the recognition matrix can also cause selective discrimination. IL piezoelectric sensors can have low sensitivity and reproducibility. To address these issues, we designed IL/conducting polymer host systems that tune existing molecular templates with highly selective structure

  20. Chemical composition of water buffalo milk and its low-fat symbiotic yogurt development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Han

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water buffalos are the second most widely available milk source in countries around the world. While typical average milk compositions are readily available, information on seasonal variation in chemical composition of buffalo milk is limited -especially in the Northeastern region of the United States. Data collected in this study can be useful for the manufacture of a wide variety of specialty dairy products such as symbiotic buffalo milk yogurt. To analyze functionality, symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt prototypes (plain and blueberry were developed using a commercial starter containing probiotics. Methods: During a one-year cycle, physicochemical and mineral contents of buffalo milk were analyzed. Prototype yogurts were manufactured commercially and samples of the yogurt prototypes were analyzed for physicochemical and microbiological properties and for the survivability of probiotics during ten weeks of storage.Results: Average contents of total solids, fat, lactose, crude protein, ash, specific gravity, and conjugated linoleic acid in the milk ranged from 16.39-18.48%, 6.57-7.97%, 4.49-4.73%, 4.59-5.37%, 0.91-0.92%, 1.0317-1.0380%, and 4.4-7.6 mg/g fat, respectively. The average mineral contents of calcium, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and zinc in the milk were 1798.89, 1216.76, 843.72, 337.20 and 7.48 mg/kg, respectively, and remained steady throughout the year. The symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurts evaluated in this study contained higher amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and calcium than similar yogurts manufactured with cows’ milk. During refrigerated storage, the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus was viable (>1×106CFU/g for the first two weeks, while Bifidobacterium spp.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:86-106 and Lactobacillus casei remained viable during the entire ten weeks. Reducing the acidity and enhancing the flavor of the yogurts could improve the overall acceptability

  1. Simulation codes of chemical separation process of spent fuel reprocessing. Tool for process development and safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Toshihide; Sato, Makoto; Matsumura, Masakazu; Morita, Yasuji

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the succeeding development and utilization of Extraction System Simulation Code for Advanced Reprocessing (ESSCAR). From the viewpoint of development, more tests with spent fuel and calculations should be performed with better understanding of the physico-chemical phenomena in a separation process. From the viewpoint of process safety research on fuel cycle facilities, it is important to know the process behavior of a key substance; being highly reactive but existing only trace amount. (author)

  2. The development of new transparent and ion-exchangeable polymer blends for chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Letian

    A polymer blend formulation originally patented by NASA has been modified for use in spectroscopic sensing. The cured polymer blend is a mixture of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in glutaraldehyde cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). With only the polymer blend directly applied as a fiber-optic cladding, aqueous Cu(II) ion can be detected as low as 10sp{-6} M by using a light-emitting diode at 810 nm as a light source. A blend-clad fiber-optic sensor can be regenerated at least 25x without significant deterioration. Subsequent to the first work, several new PVA-based polymer blends with polyelectrolytes such as Poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDMDAAC), Nafion, Poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSSA) and Poly(vinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride) (PVTAC) were developed. The blends have clear near-UV and visible spectral regions for direct spectroscopic sensing and they can readily concentrate cations and anions from aqueous solutions into a medium which has a suitable refractive index for an optical cladding on glass or silica surfaces. Three of the polymer blends, Nafion/PVA, PAA/PVA and PVTAC/PVA, were covalently coated onto planar glass and ITO-glass substrates using silane coupling reagents, i.e. 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTS) or 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS). Such covalently attached thin films remained well-adhered to oxide surfaces even in solutions of low pH. The potential use of these new materials for chemical sensing was also demonstrated by applying them to multiple internal reflection and hybrid spectroelectrochemical devices as thin films the prototype analytes as: Fe(CN)sb6sp{3-}, Ru(BiPy)sb3sp{2+} and Ru(CN)sb6sp{4-}. Well-defined and reversible cyclic voltammgrams were obtained, and satisfactory electrochemical modulation was achieved. The feasibility of improving sensor selectivity was explored with PVA-based polymer blend modified sensor that combines three modes of selectivity: charge-selective partitioning, electrolysis potential

  3. Macrosomia in 23 developing countries: an analysis of a multicountry, facility-based, cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Ai; Zhang, Jun; Dagvadorj, Amarjargal; Hirayama, Fumi; Shibuya, Kenji; Souza, João Paulo; Gülmezoglu, Ahmet Metin

    2013-02-09

    Macrosomia is a risk factor for adverse delivery outcomes. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors, and delivery outcomes of babies with macrosomia in 23 developing countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. We analysed data from WHO's Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health, which was a facility-based cross-sectional study that obtained data for women giving birth in 373 health facilities in 24 countries in Africa and Latin America in 2004-05, and in Asia in 2007-08. Facilities were selected by stratified multistage cluster sampling and women were recruited at admission for delivery. We extracted data from the medical records with a standardised questionnaire. We used logistic regression with random effects to assess the risk factors for macrosomia and the risks for caesarean section and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes (assessed by a composite score) in babies with the disorder. Of 290,610 deliveries, we analysed data for 276,436 singleton livebirths or fresh stillbirths. Higher maternal age (20-34 years), height, parity, body-mass index, and presence of diabetes, post-term pregnancy, and male fetal sex were associated with a significantly increased risk of macrosomia. Macrosomia was associated with an increased risk of caesarean section because of obstructed labour and post-term pregnancy in all regions. Additionally, macrosomia was associated with an increased risk of adverse maternal birth outcomes in all regions, and of adverse perinatal outcomes only in Africa. Increasing prevalence of diabetes and obesity in women of reproductive age in developing countries could be associated with a parallel increase in macrosomic births. The effect and feasibility of control of diabetes and preconception weight on macrosomia should be investigated in these settings. Furthermore, increased institutional delivery in countries where rates are low could be crucial to reduce macrosomia-associated morbidity and mortality. None. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  4. A multidimensional framework of conceptual change for developing chemical equilibrium learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanyoo, Wassana; Suwannoi, Paisan; Treagust, David F.

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this research is to investigate the existing chemical equilibrium lessons in Thailand based on the multidimensional framework of conceptual change, to determine how the existing lessons could enhance students' conceptual change. This research was conducted based on qualitative perspective. Document, observations and interviews were used to collect data. To comprehend all students conceptions, diagnostic tests were applied comprised of The Chemical Equilibrium Diagnostic Test (the CEDT) and The Chemical Equilibrium Test for Reveal Conceptual Change (the CETforRCC). In addition, to study students' motivations, the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (the MSLQ) and students' task engagement were applied. Following each perspective of conceptual change - ontological, epistemological, and social/affective - the result showed that the existing chemical equilibrium unit did not enhance students' conceptual change, and some issues were found. The problems obstructed students conceptual change should be remedy under the multidimensional framework of conceptual change. Finally, some suggestions were provided to enhance students' conceptual change in chemical equilibrium effectively

  5. Alternative approaches for modeling gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic chemicals: model development and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Christian W; Scheringer, Martin; MacLeod, Matthew; Roth, Christine M; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2007-02-15

    We present a novel model of gas-particle partitioning based on polyparameter linear free energy relationships (ppLFERs) that is capable of representing a broad range of aerosol properties. We apply the model to semivolatile organic chemicals including PCBs, DDT, and polar pesticides, and compare it to a widely adopted model based on the octanol-air partition coefficient (K(OA)). For nonpolar chemicals and cases where sorption to aerosols is dominated by absorption into organic matter, the two models are highly correlated and both are appropriate. Significant differences between the models are found for (a) polar chemicals and (b) aerosols with low organic matter content. The explicit description of polar interactions in the ppLFER approach implies stronger interactions between chemicals and aerosols than the K(OA)-based model, which describes polar interactions only implicitly and to a limited extent. Practical application of the ppLFER-based model to a wide range of chemicals is currently limited by data gaps in measured Abraham solvation parameters and uncertainties in estimation methods.

  6. Development of a one-group cross section data base of the ORIGEN2 computer code for research reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Do; Gil, Choong Sub; Lee, Jong Tai; Hwang, Won Guk

    1992-01-01

    A one-group cross section data base of the ORIGEN2 computer code was developed for research reactor applications. For this, ENDF/B-IV and -V data were processed using the NJOY code system into 69-group data. The burnup dependent weighting spectra for KMRR were calculated with the WIMS-KAERI computer code, and then the 69-group data were collapsed to one-group using the spectra. The ORlGEN2-predicted burnup-dependent actinide compositions of KMRR spent fuel using the newly developed data base show a good agreement with the results of detailed multigroup transport calculation. In addition, the burnup characteristics of KMRR spent fuel was analyzed with the new data base. (Author)

  7. Beyond mental health: an evolutionary analysis of development under risky and supportive environmental conditions: an introduction to the special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Bruce J; Bjorklund, David F

    2012-05-01

    Evolutionary approaches to behavior have increasingly captured the attention and imagination of academics and laypeople alike. One part of this trend has been the increasing influence of evolutionary theory in developmental science. The articles in this special section of Developmental Psychology attempt to demonstrate why an evolutionary analysis is needed to more fully understand the contexts and contingencies of development. The 3 theoretical articles articulate the core evolutionary logic underlying conditional adaptation (and maladaptation) to both stressful and supportive environmental conditions over development. These theoretical articles are then followed by 9 empirical articles that test these evolutionary-developmental theories and hypotheses. Finally, 6 commentaries evaluate the prospects, pitfalls, and implications of this body of work.

  8. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics.

  9. Epigenetic toxicity of environmental chemicals upon exposure during development - Bisphenol A and valproic acid may have epigenetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Narita, Minoru; Hirabayashi, Yoko

    2017-11-01

    As of 2017, chemical substances registered in Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) exceed 100 million, which is increasing yearly. The safety of chemical substances is adequately managed by regulations based on scientific information from toxicity tests. However, there are substances reported to have "biological effects" even though they are judged to be nontoxic in conventional toxicity tests. Therefore, it is necessary to consider a new concept on toxicity, "epigenetic toxicity". In this review, we explain about epigenetic toxicity using bisphenol A (BPA) and valproic acid (VPA) as examples. We also discuss the problems associated with the judgment of epigenetic toxicity. Currently, epigenetic changes can only be detected by biochemical methods, which are labor-intensive. Therefore, we are developing reporter mice that can be used to detect epigenetic toxicity during conventional toxicity tests. In addition, we consider that linking epigenomic changes with phenotypic changes is important, because causality is important for toxicity evaluation. Therefore, we are developing an artificial epigenome-editing technology. If we can develop a safety-assessment system by incorporating epigenetic evaluation into toxicity tests, we can increase the safety of both food and environmental chemical substances. The practical application of such a new safety-assessment system will be increasingly important in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Report on the FY17 Development of Computer Program for ASME Section III, Division 5, Subsection HB, Subpart B Rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, M. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jetter, R. I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    One of the objectives of the high temperature design methodology activities is to develop and validate both improvements and the basic features of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components, Division 5, High Temperature Reactors, Subsection HB, Subpart B (HBB). The overall scope of this task is to develop a computer program to aid assessment procedures of components under specified loading conditions in accordance with the elevated temperature design requirements for Division 5 Class A components. There are many features and alternative paths of varying complexity in HBB. The initial focus of this computer program is a basic path through the various options for a single reference material, 316H stainless steel. However, the computer program is being structured for eventual incorporation all of the features and permitted materials of HBB. This report will first provide a description of the overall computer program, particular challenges in developing numerical procedures for the assessment, and an overall approach to computer program development. This is followed by a more comprehensive appendix, which is the draft computer program manual for the program development. The strain limits rules have been implemented in the computer program. The evaluation of creep-fatigue damage will be implemented in future work scope.

  11. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator’s personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. Results A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Conclusions Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development. PMID:27731855

  12. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-09-12

    Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator's personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development.

  13. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL LIMITATIVE FACTORS FOR GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN STERLET (ACIPENSER RUTHENUS LINNAEUS, 1758 IN EXTENSIVELY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. DIMA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The oldest and most common method of increasing fish is a fish breeding ponds in which the supervision of nutrition and growth of biological material. Sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus ruthenus Linnaeus 1785 is the 4th of sturgeon scale and economic importance as a share of production of these fish .Monitoring of physicochemical parameters of sturgeons ponds has a crucial role to obtain satisfactory yields both in qualitative and quantitative. Chemical characteristics of water were determined in laboratory ecosystems Chemistry of the Institute of Research and Development for Ecology Aquaculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture Galaţi for the samples have been taken of the total water. Determination of the chemical characteristics was performed by standardized methods. Physic-chemical parameters of water were determined according to norm on the classification of surface water quality in order to establish the ecological status of water (Order no. 161/2006, for Class II of quality.

  14. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  15. From nuclides to nerve gas: The development of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Exercise Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, K.S.; Adler, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    The Army and the Federal Emergency Management Agency established the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), to improve emergency preparedness around each location storing the nation's aging stockpile of unitary chemical weapons. The CSEPP requires that a series of exercises be conducted at each location on a regular schedule. The CSEPP exercise program drew upon the existing Army and civilian exercises. Merging the exercise traditions of both the communities and installations into a joint exercise program acceptable to both sides and the particular nature of the hazard required a number of adjustments in the usual approaches. 14 refs., 1 fig

  16. Application of a gamma spectroscopy system to the measurement of neutron cross sections necessary to the development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deruelle, O.

    2002-09-01

    This work concerns the development of nuclear energy and nuclear waste management in particular. Two parts of this study can be distinguished. In the first part (theoretical), a thorium-plutonium fuel based on MOX and dedicated for PWR was investigated in order to transmute plutonium in a potentially low waste fuel cycle. It was shown that this type of fuel is not regenerative but could be used for a transition to the industrial thorium fuel cycle without building new reactors. Thanks to moderated neutron spectra and high loaded actinide mass in the core, U-233 is quickly created (∼300 kg/y) for a loss of about ∼1200 kg of fissile plutonium. In the second part (experimental), we have developed and built a new reaction chamber to measure neutron cross sections of actinides by alpha-gamma spectroscopy. This experimental device (in principle transportable) was commissioned in the high flux reactor of ILL Grenoble. Neutron flux was measured by gamma spectroscopy of irradiated Al and Co samples and was found to be of the order of 6,0. 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 (4%). By the irradiation of 11μg of Am-243 and Pu-242, corresponding capture cross sections were measured in the thermal neutron flux at 50 deg C. These are the results: 243 Am(n,γ) 244fond. Am = 4,72±1,42b; 243 Am(n,γ) 244total Am = 74,8±3,25b; 242 Pu (n,γ) 243 Pu = 22,7±1,09b. Uncertainties of the measurements are mostly due to the determination of the neutron flux, efficiency of the electronics and ambiguities related to the definition of the area under α-γ spectra. Although our measured cross sections deviate (by 10-30%) from the corresponding values widely used in evaluated data libraries such as ENDF, JEF and JENDL, in this work we have demonstrated the feasibility and principle of our experimental method. Furthermore, the value for the 243-americium capture cross-section is in very good agreement with the last two measurements done in 1975 and 1997. These facts allowed us to think of new experiments

  17. Development of New Generation of Ceramics for Environmentally Focused Chemical Separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Girish

    This dissertation focuses on the use of composite materials for environmental applications. For the first time, applications of both fresh and aged concrete as inexpensive adsorbents for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) removal is demonstrated. Concrete is the most widely used composite material of the modern era. Cement manufacturing (a major component of concrete) is considered to be one of the leading contributors to air pollution, resulting in 7% of the global carbon dioxide emissions along with a number of other harmful pollutants such as oxides, mercury and particulates. These emissions aide in the formation of acid rain, smog, and toxic ground level ozone, causing detrimental effects such as respiratory illnesses, visibility reduction, eutrification and global warming. This thesis offers a novel and sustainable solution in mitigating NOX emissions, by introducing the significant adsorption potential of recycled concrete. The work is based on both commercially available cement paste and already aged concrete samples, providing truly scalable solutions. The concrete samples aged for different periods of time were exposed to NO2 to measure their adsorption capacity. The results show that all of the concrete samples (fresh and aged) exhibited excellent NO2 adsorption capacity, with the fresh concrete samples removing almost 100% of the NO2. Furthermore, to compare the effects of long term aging, 12 year-old recently demolished concrete samples were obtained and its NOX removal was shown to be almost 60%. The experimental results provide evidence of nitrate and nitrite species formation from chemical reactions occurring between NO2 and surface alkaline species. This important discovery can be utilized for NO2 removal and subsequent NOX sequestered demolished concrete (NSDC) recycling in new concrete, either as a set accelerating admixture or as a corrosion inhibitor, a big leap towards better sustainability and longevity of the new reinforced concrete structures. The rest

  18. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  19. Development of corresponding states model for estimation of the surface tension of chemical compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Sattari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    The gene expression programming (GEP) strategy is applied for presenting two corresponding states models to represent/predict the surface tension of about 1,700 compounds (mostly organic) from 75 chemical families at various temperatures collected from the DIPPR 801 database. The models parameter...

  20. Bush will tour Illionois lab working to fight terrorism Argonne develops chemical detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "A chemical sensor that detects cyanide gas, a biochip that can determine the presence of anthrax, and a portable device that finds concealed nuclear materials are among the items scientists at Argonne National Laboratory are working on to combat terrorism" (1/2 page).

  1. Selenium prevents tumor development in a rat model for chemical carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorkhem-Bergman, L.; Torndal, U. B.; Eken, S.

    2005-01-01

    for chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, the resistant hepatocyte model. Selenite in supra-nutritional but subtoxic doses (1 and 5 p.p.m.) was administrated to the animals through the drinking water. Such supplementation during the initiation phase did not have a tumor preventive effect. However, selenite...

  2. Development of a QSAR for worst case estimates of acute toxicity of chemically reactive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freidig, A.P.; Dekkers, S.; Verwei, M.; Zvinavashe, E.; Bessems, J.G.M.; Sandt, J.J.M. van de

    2007-01-01

    Future EU legislations enforce a fast hazard and risk assessment of thousands of existing chemicals. If conducted by means of present data requirements, this assessment will use a huge number of test animals and will be neither cost nor time effective. The purpose of the current research was to

  3. Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass

    OpenAIRE

    Eichorst, Stephanie A.; Joshua, Chijioke; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities that deconstruct plant biomass have broad relevance in biofuel production and global carbon cycling. Biomass pretreatments reduce plant biomass recalcitrance for increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. We exploited these chemical pretreatments to study how thermophilic bacterial consortia adapt to deconstruct switchgrass (SG) biomass of various compositions. Microbial communities were adapted to untreated, ammonium fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated, and ionic-liqui...

  4. The Safety "Use Case": Co-Developing Chemical Information Management and Laboratory Safety Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Ralph B.; McEwen, Leah R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the American Chemical Society's "Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures for Bachelor's Degree Programs" identifies six skill sets that undergraduate chemistry programs should instill in their students. In our roles as support staff for chemistry departments at two different institutions (one a Primarily Undergraduate…

  5. Standing operating procedures for developing acute exposure guideline levels for hazardous chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology Staff; National Research Council Staff; Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; Commission on Life Sciences; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    ... Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Chemicals Subcommittee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels Committee on Toxicology Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology Commission on Life Sciences National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, origina...

  6. Development of Chemical Indicators of Groundwater Contamination Near the Carcass Burial Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Choi, J.; Kim, M.; Choi, J.; Lee, M.; Lee, H.; Jeon, S.; Bang, S.; Noh, H.; Yoo, J.; Park, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.

    2011-12-01

    A serious outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) and avian influenza (AI) led to the culling of millions of livestock in South Korea from late 2010 to earlier 2011. Because of the scale of FMD and AI epidemic in Korea and rapid spread of the diseases, mass burial for the disposal of carcass was conducted to halt the outbreak. The improper construction of the burial site or inappropriate management of the carcass burial facility can cause the contamination of groundwater mainly due to the discharges of leachate through the base of disposal pit. The leachate from carcass burial contains by products of carcass decay such as amino acids, nitrate, ammonia and chloride. The presence of these chemical components in groundwater can be used as indicators demonstrating contamination of groundwater with leachate from carcass. The major concern about using these chemical indicators is that other sources including manures, fertilizers and waste waters from human or animal activities already exist in farming area. However, we lack the understanding of how groundwater contamination due to mass burial of carcass can be differentiated from the contamination due to livestock manures which shows similar chemical characteristics. The chemical compositions of the leachate from carcass burial site and the wastewater from livestock manure treatment facilities were compared. The chemical compositions considered include total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), nitrate, organic nitrogen (Organic nitrogen =TN-Ammonium Nitrogen- Nitrate nitrogen), ammonia, chloride, sodium, potassium and amino acids (20 analytes). The ratios of concentrations of the chemical compositions as indicators of contamination were determined to distinguish the sources of contamination in groundwater. Indicators which showed a linear relationship between two factors and revealed a distinct difference between the carcass leachate and livestock manure were chosen. In addition, the background level of the

  7. Development of a Chemical Equilibrium Model for a Molten Core-Concrete Interaction Analysis Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Uk; Lee, Dae Young; Park, Chang Hwan [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This molten core could interact with the reactor cavity region which consists of concrete. In this process, components of molten core react with components of concrete through a lot of chemical reactions. As a result, many kinds of gas species are generated and those move up forming rising bubbles into the reactor containment atmosphere. These rising bubbles are the carrier of the many kinds of the aerosols coming from the MCCI (Molten Core Concrete Interaction) layers. To evaluate the amount of the aerosols released from the MCCI layers, the amount of the gas species generated from those layers should be calculated. The chemical equilibrium state originally implies the final state of the multiple chemical reactions; therefore, investigating the equilibrium composition of molten core can be applicable to predict the gas generation status. The most common way for finding the chemical equilibrium state is a minimization of total Gibbs free energy of the system. In this paper, the method to make good guess of initial state is suggested and chemical reaction results are compared with results of CSSI report No 164. Total mass of system and the number of atoms of each element are conserved. The tendency of calculation results is similar with results presented in CSNI Report except a few species. These differences may be caused by absence of Gibbs energy data of the species such as Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, U(OH){sub 3}, UO(OH), UO{sub 2}(OH), U{sub 3}O{sub 7}, La, Ce.

  8. Chemical injuries from assaults: An increasing trend in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaitan Peter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper describes chemical injuries, which presented to us and were managed at a burn unit in Nigeria. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the etiologies of these injuries, the extent of the injuries as well as to suggest possible ways to prevent chemical injuries in our environment. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of chemical burns treated at our center. Our sources of information were the burn unit admission registers, case notes of the patients and operation registers. The results were collated and then analyzed. Results: Twenty eight patients presented with chemical burn injuries during the study period between January 2000 and December 2003, constituting 5.7% of all patients with burns treated within that period. Seventeen (60.7% of the patients were males while 11 (29.3% were females with a mean age of 20.6 years. The injuries were sustained from assault in 21 (75%, armed robbery attacks in five (17.8% and suicide attempts in two (7.1%. The agents were usually unknown. Late presentation was observed in all the patients. Raw eggs, palm oil, gentian violet and engine oil were the substances applied immediately after the injuries. Complications observed included septicemia, respiratory distress, blindness, renal failure, mentosternal contractures, ectropion, axillary contractures, hypertrophic scars, keloids and skin depigmentation. Conclusion: Chemical burn injuries are mainly due to assaults in Nigeria and are usually extensive and presented late. Education of the people and penalty for any offender will reduce the current spate of such injuries.

  9. Optimization of microwave-induced chemical etching for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, G.S.; Tripathy, S.P.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic investigation is carried out to optimize the recently established microwave-induced chemical etching (MICE) parameters for rapid development of neutron-induced recoil tracks in CR-39 detectors. Several combinations of all available microwave powers with different etching durations were analysed to determine the most suitable etching condition. The etching duration was found to reduce with increasing microwave power and the tracks were observed at about 18, 15, 12, and 6 min for 300, 450, 600 and 900 W of microwave powers respectively compared to a few hours in chemical etching (CE) method. However, for complete development of tracks the etching duration of 30, 40, 50 and 60 min were found to be suitable for the microwave powers of 900, 600, 450 and 300 W, respectively. Temperature profiles of the etchant for all the available microwave powers at different etching durations were generated to regulate the etching process in a controlled manner. The bulk etch rates at different microwave powers were determined by 2 methods, viz., gravimetric and removed thickness methods. A logarithmic expression was used to fit the variation of bulk etch rate with microwave power. Neutron detection efficiencies were obtained for all the cases and the results on track parameters obtained with MICE technique were compared with those obtained from another detector processed with chemical etching. - Highlights: • Microwave-induced chemical etching method is optimized for rapid development of recoil tracks due to neutrons in CR-39 detector. • Several combinations of microwave powers and etching durations are investigated to standardize the suitable etching condition. • Bulk-etch rates are determined for all microwave powers by two different methods, viz. gravimetric and removed thickness method. • The method is found to be simple, effective and much faster compared to conventional chemical etching

  10. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Tan, Derek S; Gin, David Y

    2016-09-20

    Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with adjuvant

  11. Are doctors and nurses associated with coverage of essential health services in developing countries? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Pinho Helen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is broad policy consensus that a shortage of doctors and nurses is a key constraint to increasing utilization of essential health services important for achieving the health Millennium Development Goals. However there is limited research on the quantitative links between health workers and service coverage rates. We examined the relationship between doctor and nurse concentrations and utilization rates of five essential health services in developing countries. Methods We performed cross-national analyses of low- and middle-income countries by means of ordinary least squares regression with coverage rates of antenatal care, attended delivery, caesarean section, measles immunization, tuberculosis case diagnosis and care for acute respiratory infection as outcomes. Doctor, nurse and aggregate health worker (sum of doctors and nurses concentrations were the main explanatory variables. Results Nurses were associated with utilization of skilled birth attendants (P = 0.02 and doctors were associated with measles immunization rates (P = 0.01 in separate adjusted analyses. Aggregate health workers were associated with the utilization of skilled birth attendants (P Conclusion A range of health system and population-level factors aside from health workers influences coverage of health services in developing countries. However, it is also plausible that health workers who are neither doctors nor nurses, such as clinical officers and community health workers, may be providing a substantial proportion of health services. The human resources for health research agenda should be expanded beyond doctors and nurses.

  12. Development of an apparatus to study chemical reactions at high temperature - a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturzenegger, M.; Schelling, Th.; Steiner, E.; Wuillemin, D. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    TREMPER is an apparatus that was devised to study kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of high-temperature reactions under concentrated solar irradiation. The design allows investigations on solid or liquid samples under inert or reactive atmospheres. The working temperature is adjustable; the upper limit that has yet been reached is about 1900 K. TREMPER will facilitate chemical reactivity studies on a temperature level that is difficult to access by other means. First experiments were conducted to study the decomposition of manganese oxide MnO{sub 2}. Chemical analysis of exposed samples confirmed that the parent MnO{sub 2} was decomposed to mixtures of Mn O and Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The amount of Mn O ranged from 60 mol-% in air to 86 mol-% under inert atmosphere. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  13. Biomass Converting Enzymes as Industrial Biocatalysts for Fuels and Chemicals: Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The economic utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock for the production of fuel and chemicals would represent a profound shift in industrial carbon utilization, allowing sustainable resources to substitute for, and compete with, petroleum based products. In order to exploit biomass as a source material for production of renewable compounds, it must first be broken down into constituent compounds, such as sugars, that can be more easily converted in chemical and biological processes. Lignocellulose is, unfortunately, a heterogeneous and recalcitrant material which is highly resistant to depolymerization. Many microorganisms have evolved repertoires of enzyme activities which act in tandem to decompose the various components of lignocellulosic biomass. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of these enzymes, with particular regard to those activities deemed likely to be applicable in commercialized biomass utilization processes.

  14. In silico selection of therapeutic antibodies for development: Viscosity, clearance, and chemical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas K.; Patapoff, Thomas W.; Kabakoff, Bruce; Pai, Satyan; Hilario, Eric; Zhang, Boyan; Li, Charlene; Borisov, Oleg; Kelley, Robert F.; Chorny, Ilya; Zhou, Joe Z.; Dill, Ken A.; Swartz, Trevor E.

    2014-01-01

    For mAbs to be viable therapeutics, they must be formulated to have low viscosity, be chemically stable, and have normal in vivo clearance rates. We explored these properties by observing correlations of up to 60 different antibodies of the IgG1 isotype. Unexpectedly, we observe significant correlations with simple physical properties obtainable from antibody sequences and by molecular dynamics simulations of individual antibody molecules. mAbs viscosities increase strongly with hydrophobicity and charge dipole distribution and decrease with net charge. Fast clearance correlates with high hydrophobicities of certain complementarity determining regions and with high positive or high negative net charge. Chemical degradation from tryptophan oxidation correlates with the average solvent exposure time of tryptophan residues. Aspartic acid isomerization rates can be predicted from solvent exposure and flexibility as determined by molecular dynamics simulations. These studies should aid in more rapid screening and selection of mAb candidates during early discovery. PMID:25512516

  15. Chemical identification and functional analysis of apocarotenoids involved in the development of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Kohki

    2007-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae formed between more than 80% of land plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi represent the most widespread symbiosis on the earth. AM fungi facilitate the uptake of soil nutrients, especially phosphate, by plants, and in return obtain carbohydrates from hosts. Apocarotenoids, oxidative cleavage products of carotenoids, have been found to play a critical role in the establishment of AM symbiosis. Strigolactones previously isolated as seed-germination stimulants for root parasitic weeds act as a chemical signal for AM fungi during presymbiotic stages. Stimulation of carotenoid metabolism, leading to massive accumulation of mycorradicin and cyclohexenone derivatives, occurs during root colonization by AM fungi. This review highlights research into the chemical identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza-related apocarotenoids and their role in the regulation and establishment of AM symbiosis conducted in the past 10 years.

  16. Accelerating the development of transparent graphene electrodes through basic science driven chemical functionalization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Calvin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ohta, Taisuke [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brumbach, Michael T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wheeler, David Roger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Veneman, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gearba, I. Raluca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stevenson, Keith J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Chemical functionalization is required to adapt graphenes properties to many applications. However, most covalent functionalization schemes are spontaneous or defect driven and are not suitable for applications requiring directed assembly of molecules on graphene substrates. In this work, we demonstrated electrochemically driven covalent bonding of phenyl iodoniums onto epitaxial graphene. The amount of chemisorption was demonstrated by varying the duration of the electrochemical driving potential. Chemical, electronic, and defect states of phenyl-modified graphene were studied by photoemission spectroscopy, spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. Covalent attachment rehybridized some of the delocalized graphene sp2 orbitals to localized sp3 states. Control over the relative spontaneity (reaction rate) of covalent graphene functionalization is an important first step to the practical realization of directed molecular assembly on graphene. More than 10 publications, conference presentations, and program highlights were produced (some invited), and follow-on funding was obtained to continue this work.

  17. Development and characterization of Undoped Silicon Glass (USG) using chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesha T; Louis Kim; Joseph Gonsalvis,; Thammaiah Gowda

    2011-01-01

    Sub atmospheric chemical vapour deposition (SACVD) is a widely used technique in semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing, especially to form inter-metal silicon (IMD) dioxide thin films. It was designed for commercially available tools in order to satisfy the gap filling requirements necessary for 0.18 and 0.15 lm technology ICs, but it has been successfully extended also for 0.13 lm technological node and over. SACVD technique has a potential impact on device electrical character...

  18. Development of mathematical models and methods for calculation of rail steel deformation resistance of various chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umansky, A. A.; Golovatenko, A. V.; Kadykov, V. N.; Dumova, L. V.

    2016-09-01

    Using the device of the complex “Gleeble System 3800” the physical experimental studies of deformation resistance of chrome rail steel at different thermo-mechanical deformation parameters were carried out. On the basis of mathematical processing of experimental data the statistical model of dependence of the rail steel deformation resistance on the simultaneous influence of deformation degree, rate and temperature, as well as the steel chemical composition, was developed. The nature of influence of deformation parameters and the content of chemical elements in steel on its resistance to plastic deformation is scientifically substantiated. Verification of the adequacy of the proposed model by the comparative analysis of the calculated and actual rolling forces during passes in the universal rail-and-structural steel mill JSC “EVRAZ Consolidated West Siberian Metallurgical Plant” (“EVRAZ ZSMK”) showed the possibility of its use for development and improvement of new modes of rails rolling.

  19. Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, Stephanie A; Joshua, Chijioke; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities that deconstruct plant biomass have broad relevance in biofuel production and global carbon cycling. Biomass pretreatments reduce plant biomass recalcitrance for increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. We exploited these chemical pretreatments to study how thermophilic bacterial consortia adapt to deconstruct switchgrass (SG) biomass of various compositions. Microbial communities were adapted to untreated, ammonium fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated, and ionic-liquid (IL)-pretreated SG under aerobic, thermophilic conditions using green waste compost as the inoculum to study biomass deconstruction by microbial consortia. After microbial cultivation, gravimetric analysis of the residual biomass demonstrated that both AFEX and IL pretreatment enhanced the deconstruction of the SG biomass approximately 2-fold. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) experiments and acetyl bromide-reactive-lignin analysis indicated that polysaccharide hydrolysis was the dominant process occurring during microbial biomass deconstruction, and lignin remaining in the residual biomass was largely unmodified. Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene amplicon libraries revealed that although the dominant taxa across these chemical pretreatments were consistently represented by members of the Firmicutes, the Bacteroidetes, and Deinococcus-Thermus, the abundance of selected operational taxonomic units (OTUs) varied, suggesting adaptations to the different substrates. Combining the observations of differences in the community structure and the chemical and physical structure of the biomass, we hypothesize specific roles for individual community members in biomass deconstruction. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

    2013-07-10

    This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

  1. Critical Evaluation of Chemical Reaction Rates and Collision Cross Sections of Importance in the Earth's Upper Atmosphere and the Atmospheres of Other Planets, Moons, and Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to establish a long-term program of critical evaluation by domain experts of the rates and cross sections for atomic and molecular processes that are needed for understanding and modeling the atmospheres in the solar system. We envision data products resembling those of the JPL/NASA Panel for Data Evaluation and the similar efforts of the international combustion modeling community funded by US DoE and its European counterpart.

  2. Development of next generation consumable technologies for chemical mechanical planarization of copper/low K devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleher, Jason J.

    Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) has become the key planarization technology for the fabrication of ultra large-scale integration (ULSI) silicon devices that contain sub-quarter micron metal and dielectric lines. The rapid integration of copper as the interconnect material into IC production has placed a high demand on Cu CMP slurry development. Key issues in CMP today include reduction of surface defectivity and enhancement of planarization efficiency. More specifically, the polished surface should be free of defects such as scratches, pits, corrosion spots, trench copper loss, and residue particles. This dissertation will explore the use of Abrasive Free and Novel Abrasive systems as a plausible solution for the planarization Cu/low K devices. For copper/low K CMP, one of the most promising strategies to accomplishing these goals is an Abrasive-Free Process (AFP). By eliminating abrasive particles from the process, either free or fixed to the pad, it has been anticipated and realized that defects such as severe scratching, particle contamination and slurry instability via particle aggregation or settling will be significantly reduced. In addition, with proper formulation, an abrasive free process can also yield an excellent over polishing window and desired step function of pressure for material removal rate. Coupled with a supramolecular design, some of the characteristic advantages seen in abrasive containing systems, such as step height reduction efficiency, can be realized without the side effects often introduced from solid particles. The second portion of this dissertation deals with the use of novel hydrophobic particles such as diamond and boron nitride. Hydrophobic particles have received much less attention because of issues related to the stability when placed in an aqueous media as well as the inability of the particles to interact with the abraded material. In general the ability of the hydrophobic particle to interact with the oxidized or

  3. Development of 19F-NMR chemical shift detection of DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19F-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S; Yang, H; Hirata, C; Kersaudy, F; Fujimoto, K

    2017-06-28

    Various DNA conformational changes are in correlation with biological events. In particular, DNA B-Z equilibrium showed a high correlation with translation and transcription. In this study, we developed a DNA probe containing 5-trifluoromethylcytidine or 5-trifluoromethylthymidine to detect DNA B-Z equilibrium using 19 F-NMR. Its probe enabled the quantitative detection of B-, Z-, and ss-DNA based on 19 F-NMR chemical shift change.

  4. Development of Procedures for the Analysis of Components of Dumped Chemical Weapons and Their Principal Transformation Products in Sea Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saveleva, E. I.; Koryagina, N. L.; Radilov, A. S.; Khlebnikova, N. S.; Khrustaleva, V. S.

    2007-01-01

    A package of chemical analytical procedures was developed for the detection of products indicative of the presence of damped chemical weapons in the Baltic Sea. The principal requirements imposed upon the procedures were the following: high sensitivity, reliable identification of target compounds, wide range of components covered by survey analysis, and lack of interferences from sea salts. Thiodiglycol, a product of hydrolysis of sulfur mustard reportedly always detected in the sites of damping chemical weapons in the Baltic Sea, was considered the principal marker. We developed a high-sensitivity procedure for the determination of thiodiglycol in sea water, involving evaporation of samples to dryness in a vacuum concentrator, followed by tert-butyldimethylsilylation of the residue and GCMS analysis in the SIM mode with meta-fluorobenzoic acid as internal reference. The detection limit of thiodiglycol was 0.001 mg/l, and the procedure throughput was up to 30 samples per day. The same procedure, but with BSTFA as derivatizing agent instead of MTBSTFA, was used for preparing samples for survey analysis of nonvolatile components. In this case, full mass spectra were measured in the GCMS analysis. The use of BSTFA was motivated by the fact that trimethylsilyl derivatives are much wider represented in electronic mass spectral databases. The identification of sulfur mustard, volatile transformation products of sulfur mustard and lewisite, as well as chloroacetophenone in sea water was performed by means of GCMS in combination with SPME. The survey GC-MS analysis was focused on the identification of volatile and nonvolatile toxic chemicals whose mass spectra are included in the OPCW database (3219 toxic chemicals, precursors, and transformation products) with the use of AMDIS software (version 2.62). Using 2 GC-MS instruments, we could perform the survey analysis for volatile and nonvolatile components of up to 20 samples per day. Thus, the package of three procedures

  5. Developing a Robust Surrogate Model of Chemical Flooding Based on the Artificial Neural Network for Enhanced Oil Recovery Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of chemical flooding in petroleum reservoirs turns into hot topic of the recent researches. Development strategies of the aforementioned technique are more robust and precise when we consider both economical points of view (net present value, NPV and technical points of view (recovery factor, RF. In current study many attempts have been made to propose predictive model for estimation of efficiency of chemical flooding in oil reservoirs. To gain this end, a couple of swarm intelligence and artificial neural network (ANN is employed. Also, lucrative and high precise chemical flooding data banks reported in previous attentions are utilized to test and validate proposed intelligent model. According to the mean square error (MSE, correlation coefficient, and average absolute relative deviation, the suggested swarm approach has acceptable reliability, integrity and robustness. Thus, the proposed intelligent model can be considered as an alternative model to predict the efficiency of chemical flooding in oil reservoir when the required experimental data are not available or accessible.

  6. III Scientific-technical conference. Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005). Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Summaries of reports of the III Scientific-technical conference: Problems and outlooks for development of chemical and radiochemical control in atomic energetics (Atomenergoanalytics-2005) are presented. The conference performed 20-22 September, 2005, in Sosnovyj Bor. Problems of methodical, instrumental and metrological supply of chemical, radiochemical and radiometric control at active NPP and NPU, modern concepts of construction of automated systems of chemical and radiometric control in the atomic energetics, directions for the decision of questions in organization and conducting of chemical and radiochemical control of water-chemical regimes of NPP and NPU are discussed [ru

  7. Development and application of proposed ASME Section XI Code changes for risk-based inspection of piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    This synopsis has been written to describe a perspective on the development and application of ASME Section XI Code changes for risk-based inspection of piping. The content is specifically related to the use of risk-based technology for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of piping and efforts made to support the ASME Research/Westinghouse Owners Group/Millstone Unit 3 approach for use of this technology. The opinions contained herein may or may not reflect those of the ASME Codes and Standards Committees responsible for these activities. In order to take such a detailed technical subject and put it into an understandable format, the author has chosen to provide an analogy to simplify what is actually taking place. Risk-based technology in the ISI of piping can be likened to the process of making and using specifically ground prescription glasses to allow for better vision. It provides a process to develop and use these uniquely ground glasses that will dynamically focus on all the locations and obstacles within a plant's piping systems that could cause that plant to trip and fall; more importantly it identifies the locations where the fall could possibly hurt someone else. In this way, Nuclear Safety is being addressed

  8. Mother's lifestyle: development of a questionnaire to assess a determinant of children's health. A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Bezerra Nobre

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Lifestyle includes the personal attitudes or behavioral patterns that result in risks or benefits to the individual's own health or that of others. Children's health is particularly determined by their mother's lifestyle. The objective here was to develop and evaluate the reliability of a questionnaire capable of describing the lifestyles of preschoolers' mothers in terms of their activities, interests, opinions and values. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study conducted in a public university. METHODS: This study was conducted between January 2010 and March 2011, among 255 mothers of preschoolers living in the southeastern region of the municipality of São Paulo. A proportional stratified random probabilistic sample with two strata was selected: schools were drawn and then the children. Three instruments found in the literature were used to create the lifestyle questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed in eight stages: preliminary pretest, cultural adaptation, second pretest, pilot study, semantic correction and adaptation, third pretest, final research and final retest. Cronbach's alpha and pairwise correlation coefficients were used. RESULTS: The Cronbach's alpha value in the final version was 0.83 and the pre and post-test pairwise correlation coefficients were greater than 0.5. Factor analysis identified five factors that explained 73.51% of the correlation variance. As a result, seven variables were eliminated from the questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire described five lifestyle domains, with good reliability, and can be used in combination with preschoolers' health and nutritional outcomes.

  9. Status report on multigroup cross section generation code development for high-fidelity deterministic neutronics simulation system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W. S.; Lee, C. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2008-05-16

    Under the fast reactor simulation program launched in April 2007, development of an advanced multigroup cross section generation code was initiated in July 2007, in conjunction with the development of the high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code UNIC. The general objectives are to simplify the existing multi-step schemes and to improve the resolved and unresolved resonance treatments. Based on the review results of current methods and the fact that they have been applied successfully to fast critical experiment analyses and fast reactor designs for last three decades, the methodologies of the ETOE-2/MC{sup 2}-2/SDX code system were selected as the starting set of methodologies for multigroup cross section generation for fast reactor analysis. As the first step for coupling with the UNIC code and use in a parallel computing environment, the MC{sup 2}-2 code was updated by modernizing the memory structure and replacing old data management package subroutines and functions with FORTRAN 90 based routines. Various modifications were also made in the ETOE-2 and MC{sup 2}-2 codes to process the ENDF/B-VII.0 data properly. Using the updated ETOE-2/MC{sup 2}-2 code system, the ENDF/B-VII.0 data was successfully processed for major heavy and intermediate nuclides employed in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Initial verification tests of the MC{sup 2}-2 libraries generated from ENDF/B-VII.0 data were performed by inter-comparison of twenty-one group infinite dilute total cross sections obtained from MC{sup 2}-2, VIM, and NJOY. For almost all nuclides considered, MC{sup 2}-2 cross sections agreed very well with those from VIM and NJOY. Preliminary validation tests of the ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries of MC{sup 2}-2 were also performed using a set of sixteen fast critical benchmark problems. The deterministic results based on MC{sup 2}-2/TWODANT calculations were in good agreement with MCNP solutions within {approx}0.25% {Delta}{rho}, except a few small LANL fast assemblies

  10. Ultrasensitive and selective 4-aminophenol chemical sensor development based on nickel oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotube nanocomposites for green environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohammad Musarraf; Rahman, Mohammed M; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2017-03-01

    Nickel oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotube nanocomposites (NiO·CNT NCs) were prepared in a basic medium by using facile wet-chemical routes. The optical, morphological, and structural properties of NiO·CNT NCs were characterized using Fourier transformed infra-red (FT-IR), Ultra-violet visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray energy dispersed spectroscopy (XEDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Selective 4-aminophenol (4-AP) chemical sensor was developed by a flat glassy carbon electrode (GCE, surface area: 0.0316cm 2 ) fabricated with a thin-layer of NCs. Electrochemical responses including higher sensitivity, large dynamic range (LDR), limit of detection (LOD), and long-term stability towards 4-AP were obtained using the fabricated chemical sensors. The calibration curve was found linear (R 2 =0.914) over a wide range of 4-AP concentration (0.1nmol/L-0.1mol/L). In perspective of slope (2×10 -5 μA/μM), LOD and sensitivity were calculated as 15.0±0.1pM and ~6.33×10 -4 μA/(μM·cm) respectively. The synthesized NiO·CNT NCs using a wet-chemical method is a significant route for the development of ultrasensitive and selective phenolic sensor based on nano-materials for environmental toxic substances. It is suggested that a pioneer and selective development of 4-AP sensitive sensor using NiO·CNT NCs by a facile and reliable current vs voltage (I-V) method for the major application of toxic agents in biological, green environmental, and health-care fields in near future. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Development of a global aerosol model using a two-dimensional sectional method: 2. Evaluation and sensitivity simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Mahowald, N.

    2017-08-01

    Global aerosol simulations are conducted by using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 with the Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation version 2 (CAM5-chem/ATRAS2) which was developed in part 1. The model uses a two-dimensional (2-D) section representation with 12 size bins from 1 nm to 10 μm and 8 black carbon (BC) mixing state bins, and it can calculate detailed aerosol processes and their interactions with radiation and clouds. The simulations have similar or better agreement with aerosol observations (e.g., aerosol optical depth, absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD), aerosol number concentrations, mass concentrations of each species) compared with the simulations using the Modal Aerosol Model with three modes. Sensitivity simulations show that global mean AAOD is reduced by 15% by resolving BC mixing state as a result of two competing effects (optical and lifetime effects). AAOD is reduced by 10-50% at low and midlatitudes in the 2-D sectional simulation because BC absorption enhancement by coating species is reduced by resolving pure BC, thinly coated BC, and BC-free particles in the model (optical effect). In contrast, AAOD is enhanced by 5-30% at high-latitudes because BC concentrations are enhanced by 40-200% over the regions by resolving less CCN active particles (lifetime effect). The simulations also suggest a model which resolves more than 3 BC categories (including BC-free particles) is desirable to calculate the optical and lifetime effects accurately. The complexity of aerosol representation is shown to be especially important for simulations of BC and CCN concentrations and AAOD.

  12. Development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database. Summary report of an IAEA specialists' meeting, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    An IAEA Specialists' Meeting proposes procedures describing how an internationally accepted database of high-priority nuclear decay data and thermal neutron cross-sections can be developed through a network of experts coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  13. Development of a general model for determination of thermal conductivity of liquid chemical compounds at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani‐Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Sattari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a general model for representation/presentation of the liquid thermal conductivity of chemical compounds (mostly organic) at 1 atm pressure for temperatures below normal boiling point and at saturation pressure for temperatures above the normal boiling point is developed...... of the model comprise temperature, acentric factor, critical pressure, normal boiling temperature, and molecular weight. Nearly 80% of the data set (15,221 data) is randomly assigned to develop the model equation, 10% of the data set (1902 data) is used to validate the model, and the remaining data (1902 data...

  14. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. Indoor environment and children's health: recent developments in chemical, biological, physical and social aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Pierre; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Glorennec, Philippe; Deguen, Séverine; Goeury, Christophe; Le Bot, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Much research is being carried out into indoor exposure to harmful agents. This review focused on the impact on children's health, taking a broad approach to the indoor environment and including chemical, microbial, physical and social aspects. Papers published from 2006 onwards were reviewed, with regards to scientific context. Most of publications dealt with chemical exposure. Apart from the ongoing issue of combustion by-products, most of these papers concerned semi volatile organic compounds (such as phthalates). These may be associated with neurotoxic, reprotoxic or respiratory effects and may, therefore, be of particular interest so far as children are concerned. In a lesser extent, volatile organic compounds (such as aldehydes) that have mainly respiratory effects are still studied. Assessing exposure to metals is still of concern, with increasing interest in bioaccessibility. Most of the papers on microbial exposure focused on respiratory tract infections, especially asthma linked to allergens and bio-aerosols. Physical exposure includes noise and electromagnetic fields, and articles dealt with the auditory and non auditory effects of noise. Articles on radiofrequency electromagnetic fields mainly concerned questions about non-thermal effects and papers on extremely low-frequency magnetic fields focused on the characterization of exposure. The impact of the indoor environment on children's health cannot be assessed merely by considering the effect of these different types of exposure: this review highlights new findings and also discusses the interactions between agents in indoor environments and also with social aspects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of electrode surface modification techniques for the development of chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiatsatos, C.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis covers several aspects of electrode surface modification techniques. The successful application of gamma-radiation to create polymer-coated electrodes, where the polymers can be ion exchangers and consequently of great analytical interest by themselves (such as the polymer poly(diallyl) dimethyl ammonium chloride) or where some other neutral polymers can function as convenient matrices for the introduction of biomolecules and/or other electrochemically interesting species is reported. This is demonstrated by using the neutral polymer poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAL) as a matrix for immobilization of the enzyme glucose oxidase and the mediator methyl viologen. The effect of γ-radiation on PVAL is discussed, as well as swelling properties of the irradiated polymers and specific characteristics of the created chemical sensors. Results of an experiment where the various kinds of interactions between the ion-exchange polymer Nafion and some positively charged species are explored are reported, and a model system for competition (methyl viologen vs. ruthenium hexaamine) which increases significantly our understanding of the interaction is mentioned. The effect of γ-radiation on Nafion and its ion-exchange compabilities is discussed also. A system of conduction polymers primarily polypyrrole, used as a detector of electroinactive anions due to their doping-undergoing in the film is discussed. Preliminary results on a new method that involves chemical cross-linking of a triisocyane molecule with -OH containing polymers in the presence of enzymes are reported

  17. Oil and chemical spill research and development in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU) falls within the UK Department of Transport's Marine Directorate and is the lead agency in the UK for the control of marine pollution. The MPCU assumes central government's responsibility for controlling two aspects of marine pollution: at sea response to oil and chemical spills from ships, and coordinating beach cleaning activities. All research funded by the MPCU is therefore directed at these two responsibilities. The MPCU was established in 1978 after a series of major tanker incidents in European waters (notably the AMOCO CADIZ, France) in recognition of the fact that it was not reasonable to expect the owners of tankers which operate on a world-wide basis to make arrangements for dealing with oil spills wherever they may occur. The UK Government therefore decided to set up a response unit, the MPCU, with specific responsibilities for dealing with oil and chemical spills from ships at sea. The responsibility for dealing with pollution once it comes ashore lies with the local authorities. However, to avoid expenditure by individual authorities on specialized equipment which will be rarely required, the government decided to set up stockpiles of such equipment in strategic locations to be drawn on by authorities as and when necessary. The government also provides training in the use of this equipment, offers scientific and technical advice and, for major spills, will coordinate beach cleaning activities

  18. Development of Fabric-Based Chemical Gas Sensors for Use as Wearable Electronic Noses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thara Seesaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel gas sensors embroidered into fabric substrates based on polymers/ SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were proposed in this paper, aiming for their use as a wearable electronic nose (e-nose. The fabric-based chemical gas sensors were fabricated by two main processes: drop coating and embroidery. Four potential polymers (PVC, cumene-PSMA, PSE and PVP/functionalized-SWCNT sensing materials were deposited onto interdigitated electrodes previously prepared by embroidering conductive thread on a fabric substrate to make an optimal set of sensors. After preliminary trials of the obtained sensors, it was found that the sensors yielded a electrical resistance in the region of a few kilo-Ohms. The sensors were tested with various volatile compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ethanol, pyridine, triethylamine, methanol and acetone, which are commonly found in the wastes released from the human body. These sensors were used to detect and discriminate between the body odors of different regions and exist in various forms such as the urine, armpit and exhaled breath odor. Based on a simple pattern recognition technique, we have shown that the proposed fabric-based chemical gas sensors can discriminate the human body odor from two persons.

  19. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: I. Model development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Scholtz, M. Trevor; Yang, Fuquan; Sloan, James J.

    2011-07-01

    We have combined the US EPA MM5/MCIP/SMOKE/CMAQ modeling system with a dynamic soil model, the pesticide emission model (PEM), to create a multimedia chemical transport model capable of describing the important physical and chemical processes involving pesticides in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on the surface of vegetation. These processes include: agricultural practices (e.g. soil tilling and pesticide application mode); advection and diffusion of pesticides, moisture, and heat in the soil; partitioning of pesticides between soil organic carbon and interstitial water and air; emissions from the soil to the atmosphere; gas-particle partitioning and transport in the atmosphere; and atmospheric chemistry and dry and wet deposition of pesticides to terrestrial and water surfaces. The modeling system was tested by simulating toxaphene in a domain that covers most of North America for the period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2000. The results show obvious transport of the pesticide from the heavily contaminated soils in the southern United States and Mexico to water bodies including the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes, leading to significant dry and wet deposition into these ecosystems. The spatial distributions of dry and wet depositions differ because of their different physical mechanisms; the former follows the distribution of air concentrations whereas the latter is more biased to the North East due to the effect of precipitation.

  20. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: I. Model development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rong; Yang Fuquan; Sloan, James J; Scholtz, M Trevor

    2011-01-01

    We have combined the US EPA MM5/MCIP/SMOKE/CMAQ modeling system with a dynamic soil model, the pesticide emission model (PEM), to create a multimedia chemical transport model capable of describing the important physical and chemical processes involving pesticides in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on the surface of vegetation. These processes include: agricultural practices (e.g. soil tilling and pesticide application mode); advection and diffusion of pesticides, moisture, and heat in the soil; partitioning of pesticides between soil organic carbon and interstitial water and air; emissions from the soil to the atmosphere; gas-particle partitioning and transport in the atmosphere; and atmospheric chemistry and dry and wet deposition of pesticides to terrestrial and water surfaces. The modeling system was tested by simulating toxaphene in a domain that covers most of North America for the period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2000. The results show obvious transport of the pesticide from the heavily contaminated soils in the southern United States and Mexico to water bodies including the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Great Lakes, leading to significant dry and wet deposition into these ecosystems. The spatial distributions of dry and wet depositions differ because of their different physical mechanisms; the former follows the distribution of air concentrations whereas the latter is more biased to the North East due to the effect of precipitation.

  1. Development of a stable cell line with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis for screening environmental chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Christina T.; Beames, Burton; Alex Merrick, B.; Martin, Negin; Romeo, Charles; Jetten, Anton M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a stable cell line with intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis. • The ERRα repressor, XCT790, down regulates this pathway. • Phytoestrogen, genisten stimulates this pathway. - Abstract: The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) play critical roles in the control of several physiological functions, including the regulation of genes involved in energy homeostasis. However, little is known about the ability of environmental chemicals to disrupt or modulate this important bioenergetics pathway in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a cell-based assay system with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis that could be used as a screening assay for detecting such chemicals. To this end, we successfully generated several stable cell lines expressing PGC-1α and showed that the reporter driven by the native ERRα hormone response unit (AAB-Luc) is active in these cell lines and that the activation is PGC-1α-dependent. Furthermore, we show that this activation can be blocked by the ERRα selective inverse agonist, XCT790. In addition, we find that genistein and bisphenol A further stimulate the reporter activity, while kaempferol has minimal effect. These cell lines will be useful for identifying environmental chemicals that modulate this important pathway

  2. Development of a stable cell line with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis for screening environmental chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Christina T., E-mail: teng1@niehs.nih.gov [DNTP, BioMolecular Screening Branch, Division, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Beames, Burton; Alex Merrick, B. [DNTP, BioMolecular Screening Branch, Division, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Martin, Negin; Romeo, Charles [DIR, Viral Core Lab, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Jetten, Anton M. [DIR Laboratory of Respiratory Biology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • We developed a stable cell line with intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis. • The ERRα repressor, XCT790, down regulates this pathway. • Phytoestrogen, genisten stimulates this pathway. - Abstract: The estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) play critical roles in the control of several physiological functions, including the regulation of genes involved in energy homeostasis. However, little is known about the ability of environmental chemicals to disrupt or modulate this important bioenergetics pathway in humans. The goal of this study was to develop a cell-based assay system with an intact PGC-1α/ERRα axis that could be used as a screening assay for detecting such chemicals. To this end, we successfully generated several stable cell lines expressing PGC-1α and showed that the reporter driven by the native ERRα hormone response unit (AAB-Luc) is active in these cell lines and that the activation is PGC-1α-dependent. Furthermore, we show that this activation can be blocked by the ERRα selective inverse agonist, XCT790. In addition, we find that genistein and bisphenol A further stimulate the reporter activity, while kaempferol has minimal effect. These cell lines will be useful for identifying environmental chemicals that modulate this important pathway.

  3. Basic physical and chemical information needed for development of Monte Carlo codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.

    1993-01-01

    It is important to view track structure analysis as an application of a branch of theoretical physics (i.e., statistical physics and physical kinetics in the language of the Landau school). Monte Carlo methods and transport equation methods represent two major approaches. In either approach, it is of paramount importance to use as input the cross section data that best represent the elementary microscopic processes. Transport analysis based on unrealistic input data must be viewed with caution, because results can be misleading. Work toward establishing the cross section data, which demands a wide scope of knowledge and expertise, is being carried out through extensive international collaborations. In track structure analysis for radiation biology, the need for cross sections for the interactions of electrons with DNA and neighboring protein molecules seems to be especially urgent. Finally, it is important to interpret results of Monte Carlo calculations fully and adequately. To this end, workers should document input data as thoroughly as possible and report their results in detail in many ways. Workers in analytic transport theory are then likely to contribute to the interpretation of the results

  4. Environmental Impact Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Section is concerned with preparation of environmental statements and assessments and development of assessment methodologies for energy technologies. During 1976, activities involved nuclear, fossil, and geothermal energy; this work was supported by the U.S.Army, HUD, US ERDA, and US NRC. Two special studies--one on the effects of power plant intake structures on fish impingement and another on multiple uses of cooling lakes--were completed and should serve as references for future analyses. Two research projects sponsored by NRC--the Unified Transport Approach (UTA) to Power Plant Assessment and the Environmental Monitoring Data Evaluation Study--were continued. The purpose of the UA program is to develop fast-transient, one- and two-dimensional transport models for estimating thermal, radiological, chemical, and biological impacts in complicated water bodies. The impact of public use of various products that contain radioactive isotope is being evaluated. The Environmental Impact Sections assistance to NRC expanded to include assessments of fuel-fabrication facilities being considered for relicensing and two uranium in-situ solution mining facility proposals. The work for HUD comprises an assessment of the first application of MIUS in a new town development. A generic environmental statement was prepared and an environmental monitoring program for the facility was designed

  5. GEM-AQ/EC, an on-line global multi-scale chemical weather modelling system: model development and evaluation of global aerosol climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Gong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A global air quality modeling system GEM-AQ/EC was developed by implementing tropospheric chemistry and aerosol processes on-line into the Global Environmental Multiscale weather prediction model – GEM. Due to the multi-scale features of the GEM, the integrated model, GEM-AQ/EC, is able to investigate chemical weather at scales from global to urban domains. The current chemical mechanism is comprised of 50 gas-phase species, 116 chemical and 19 photolysis reactions, and is complemented by a sectional aerosol module CAM (The Canadian Aerosol Module with 5 aerosols types: sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea-salt and soil dust. Monthly emission inventories of black carbon and organic carbon from boreal and temperate vegetation fires were assembled using the most reliable areas burned datasets by countries, from statistical databases and derived from remote sensing products of 1995–2004. The model was run for ten years from from 1995–2004 with re-analyzed meteorology on a global uniform 1° × 1° horizontal resolution domain and 28 hybrid levels extending up to 10 hPa. The simulating results were compared with various observations including surface network around the globe and satellite data. Regional features of global aerosols are reasonably captured including emission, surface concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For various types of aerosols, satisfactory correlations were achieved between modeled and observed with some degree of systematic bias possibly due to large uncertainties in the emissions used in this study. A global distribution of natural aerosol contributions to the total aerosols is obtained and compared with observations.

  6. Phase equilibria for mixtures containing very many components. development and application of continuous thermodynamics for chemical process design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotterman, R.L.; Bender, R.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    For some multicomponent mixtures, where detailed chemical analysis is not feasible, the compositio of the mixture may be described by a continuous distribution function of some convenient macroscopic property suc as normal boiling point or molecular weight. To attain a quantitative description of phase equilibria for such mixtures, this work has developed thermodynamic procedures for continuous systems; that procedure is called continuous thermodynamics. To illustrate, continuous thermodynamics is used to calculate dew points for natural-gas mixtures, solvent loss in a high-pressure absorber, and liquid-liquid phase equilibria in a polymer fractionation process. Continuous thermodynamics provides a rational method for calculating phase equilibria for those mixtures where complete chemical analysis is not available but where composition can be given by some statistical description. While continuous thermodynamics is only the logical limit of the well-known pseudo-component method, it is more efficient than that method because it is less arbitrary and it often requires less computer time

  7. Development of chicken and fish muscle protein - Water partition coefficients predictive models for ionogenic and neutral organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Wang; Liu, Huihui; He, Junyi; Yang, Xianhai

    2018-04-01

    Muscle protein was one of critical accumulation protein for anthropogenic chemicals. However, few predictive models were constructed for muscle protein up to now. In addition, some ionizable chemicals classes e.g. sulfonates were not successfully modeled in previously models, indicating considerable work would be needed. The major objective of this study was to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting the muscle protein-water partition coefficient (logK MP/w ) of chicken and fish. In the modeling, the n-octanol/water distribution coefficient (logD), functional groups, atom-centred fragments and chemical form adjusted descriptors were used to construct the models. The application domain of the derived models was defined by the Euclidean distance-based method and Williams plot. The modeling results indicated that the determination coefficient (R 2 ), leave-one out cross validation Q 2 (Q 2 LOO ) and bootstrapping coefficient (Q 2 BOOT ) of the QSAR models for chicken and fish were 0.882 and 0.929, 0.844 and 0.906, 0.779 and 0.792, respectively, implying the models had good goodness-of-fit and robustness. The coefficient determination (R 2 EXT ) and external validation coefficient (Q 2 EXT ) of the validation set for the two models were 0.874 and 0.937, 0.869 and 0.915, respectively, indicating the models had good predictive ability. The predictor variables selected to construct the logK MP/w models of chicken and fish included logD, the function groups, and the fraction of the ionized species (δ I ). Considering the molecular descriptors used here can be calculated from their molecular structures directly, the developed models could be easily used to fill the logK MP/w data gap for other chemicals within the applicability domain. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a strategy for the total chemical synthesis of an allergenic protein: the peach LTP Pru p 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Sofie; Akkerdaas, Jaap H; A Pertinhez, Thelma; Van Ree, Ronald; Dossena, Arnaldo; Sforza, Stefano; Tedeschi, Tullia

    2017-04-01

    The possibility to obtain allergenic proteins by means of total chemical synthesis would be a big step forward in the development of cures to food allergy and in the study of the mechanism of allergic reactions, because this would allow to achieve control at the molecular level over the structure of the product and to study its relationship with the allergenic activity in fine details. This is instead not possible by using allergens produced by extraction from natural sources or by recombinant DNA techniques. In this work, we aimed to test for the first time the feasibility of the total chemical synthesis of an allergenic protein. Pru p 3, the most studied member of the family of lipid transfer proteins, relevant plant food pan-allergens, was used as model target. Strategies for the convergent assembly of the target protein, starting from five peptide fragments to be bound by means of either native chemical ligation or peptide hydrazide ligation, followed by desulfurization, to achieve ligations at alanine, were developed and tested. All the reaction conditions were set up and optimized. Two large peptides covering the two halves of the protein sequence were synthesized and structurally characterized by means of circular dichroism, and their immunogenicity was proved by means of immunoblot, using antibodies against Pru p 3, and immunoCAP inhibition tests. Finally, the five peptides were bound together to produce the whole protein stretch. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of total chemical synthesis as a new way to obtain pure allergens. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992--April 1993)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, S.; Goddard, J.G.; Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, S.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Reid, J.L.; Swift, J.H.; Talley, L.D. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    1998-06-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide concentration (TCO{sub 2}) and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in discrete water samples collected during three expeditions of the Research Vessel (R/V) Knorr in the South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the first cruise (WOCE Section P16A/P17A) began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on October 6, 1992, and returned to Papeete on November 25, 1992. The second cruise (WOCE Section P17E/P19S) began in Papeete on December 4, 1992, and finished in Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 22, 1993. The third expedition (WOCE Section P19C) started in Punta Arenas, on February 22 and finished in Panama City, Panama, on April 13, 1993. During the three expeditions, 422 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], as well as discrete measurements of salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, and pCO{sub 2} measured at 4 and 20 C. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

  10. Development of an Electrolyte CPA Equation of state for Applications in the Petroleum and Chemical Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn

    This thesis extends the Cubic Plus Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS) to handle mixtures containing ions from fully dissociated salts. The CPA EoS has during the past 18 years been applied to thermodynamic modeling of a wide range of industrially important chemicals, mainly in relation...... to provide sufficient driving forces for electrolytes towards the most polar phase. The static permittivity of the mixture was found to be the most important property; yet it was shown that the empirical models suggested by literature could lead to unphysical behavior of the equation of state. A new...... to the oil- and gas sector. One of the strengths of the CPA EoS is that it reduces to the Soave Redlich Kwong (SRK) cubic EoS in the absence of associating compounds and is therefore compatible with existing tools for oil characterization. In a similar fasion, the electrolyte CPA (e-CPA) EoS reduces...

  11. Development of catalysts for chemical reactions driven by concentrated solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, A.; Levitan, R.; Levy, M.

    1992-03-01

    The aim of this phase of the work is to study commercially available low priced catalysts, for the methanation and reforming processes in the closed-loop solar chemical heat pipe. This report summarized some long term tests of commercially available methanation catalysts and the measurement of their active surface before and after reaction. It was found that the 1%Ru on alumina stars catalysts (prepared by Englehard Company according to our request) is very active and stable at 350-750 C. The catalyst 'A' produced in Russia, is less active, however, did not lose the mechanical strength. The 50% Ni/SiO 2 catalyst is active as the 'A' catalyst but loses its activity after treatment at temperature > 600 C, its geometrical size shrinked. (authors). 25 refs., 25 figs., 36 tabs

  12. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  13. Chemical milling of zircaloy tubing to produce integral OD spiral finned tubes. AWBA development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, W. A.

    1982-02-01

    A detailed process description is provided for producing integral spiral fins on the outside surface of Zircaloy nuclear fuel cladding tubes by masking with pressure sensitive tape strips and then chemical milling (pickling) the tube wall between the tape strips to leave the fins in relief. Fins up to 0.020 inch high by 0.05 to 0.12 inch wide were consistently produced on tubes having wall thickness of 0.008 inch or greater after fin pickling. Wall thickness uniformity was excellent. Information is provided on tube surface preparation to maximize tape mask adhesion time during pickling, acid chemistry control to prevent local tube wall thinning near the fin, and pickling techniques to promote uniform material removal. Simple fixture designs are described for quickly and conveniently applying the tape strips to the tube wall in an accurate spiral.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Some recent developments in the chemical vapour deposition of electroceramic oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Chalker, Paul R.

    2003-03-01

    Metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) are highly promising techniques for the deposition of dielectric and ferroelectric oxide thin films, which have a variety of applications in electronic devices. A key requirement for both MOCVD and ALD is the availability of precursors with appropriate physical properties and decomposition characteristics, but there are problems associated with many of the existing precursors. Therefore, it is sometimes necessary to `tailor' the properties of the precursor in order to optimize MOCVD and ALD process parameters, such as evaporation temperature, deposition temperature, layer purity and uniformity. In this paper, the design of a number of new, improved oxide precursors is described, with emphasis on the influence of molecular structure on precursor properties and on the growth dynamics of the MOCVD and ALD processes.

  15. A numerical study on the flow development around a rotating square-sectioned U-Bend( II )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Baek, Je Hyun

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates in detail the combined effects of the Coriolis force and centrifugal force on the development of turbulent flows in a square-sectioned U-bend rotating about an axis parallel to the center of bend curvature. When a viscous fluid flows through a curved region of U-bend, two types of secondary flow occur. One is caused by the Coriolis force due to the rotation of U-bend and the other by the centrifugal force due to the curvature of U-bend. For positive rotation, where the rotation is in the same direction as that of the main flow, both the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force act radially outwards. Therefore, the flow structure is qualitatively similar to that observed in a stationary curved duct. On the other hand, under negative rotation, where these two forces act in opposite direction, more complex flow fields can be observed depending on the relative magnitudes of the forces. Under the condition that the value of Rossby number and curvature ratio is large, the flow field in a rotating U-bend can be represented by two dimensionless parameters : K LC = Re 1/4 / √ λ and a body force ratio F= λ/Ro. Here, K TC has the same dynamical meaning as K LC = Re/√ λ for laminar flow

  16. Delayed Development of Feeding Skills in Children with Feeding Difficulties—Cross-sectional Study in a Brazilian Reference Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia C. Ramos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDelays in gross motor development, sensory processing issues, and organic and behavioral problems are known to interfere in the development of feeding skills (FS; and—therefore—in the success of the process of feeding a child. Children with feeding difficulties (FD commonly present inadequacy of FS.ObjectivesAssessment of five FS in Brazilian children with FD, and search of associations with types of FD.MethodsCross-sectional study with 70 children below 10 years old. Data were obtained from medical records: age, gender, age at texture transitions, feeding phase (breastfeeding, weaning to solids or full solids at first complaint; characteristics of the meal (duration, environment, and shared meals with adults, self-feeding practices, use of feeding equipment and bottle, mouthing, feeding position and FD diagnosis. Skills were categorized according to standards for age. Chi-Square, Anova Test (or non-parametric equivalent and Multinomial logistic regression tests were used, with a significance level of 5%.ResultsThere was no difference in FS (p > 0.05 or in the number of FS inadequateness (p = 0.84 according to FD diagnosis. The majority (94% of children presented at least one delayed development of FS; 1/3 presented delays in more than half of the FS. The most prevalent inadequacies in FS were inadequate feeding position (73.5%, prolonged bottle feeding (56.9%, and inadequate self-feeding practices (37.9%. Feeding complaints first appeared at 10.9 ± 11.4 months, and picky eating was the most prevalent type of FD (37.1%. Most children were fed in inadequate environments (55.2%, without the company of adults (78%. Transition to solid foods occurred at 16 ± 5.6 months. Multinomial logistic regression showed no difference in likelihood of presenting any type of FD compared to picky eating, according to FS. Age at texture transition both from breastfeeding to complementary feeding (p = 0.95, and from

  17. Do we develop public health leaders?- association between public health competencies and emotional intelligence: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Malho, André; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; Popa, Daniela; Burazeri, Genc

    2014-04-17

    Professional development of public health leaders requires a form of instruction which is competency-based to help them develop the abilities to address complex and evolving demands of health care systems. Concurrently, emotional intelligence (EI) is a key to organisational success. Our aim was twofold: i) to assess the relationship between the level of self-assessed public health and EI competencies among Master of European Public Health (MEPH) students and graduates at Maastricht University, and; ii) to determine the relationship between different groups of public health competencies and specific EI skills. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all recent MEPH graduates and students from 2009-2012, out of 67 eligible candidates N = 51 were contacted and N = 33 responded (11 males and 22 females; overall response: 64.7%).Two validated tools were employed: i) public health competencies self-assessment questionnaire, and; ii) Assessing Emotions Scale. Females scored higher than males in all seven domains of the self-assessed key public health competencies (NS) and emotional intelligence competences (P = 0.022). Overall, the mean value of public health competencies was the lowest in students with "staff" preferences and the highest among students with mixed job preferences (P emotional intelligence competencies (r = 0.61, P < 0.001). The study shows a positive correlation between public health specific competencies and EI attributes. It can contribute to the improvement of the educational content of PH curricula by rising awareness through self-assessment and supporting the identification of further educational needs related to leadership.

  18. Assessment of maternal risk indicators for the development of caries in their children: A comparative, cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H R Priyadarshini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Certain factors in mothers could be risk indicators for certain diseases in their children. Hence, this study was undertaken to assess maternal risk indicators for the development of early childhood caries in their children. Methodology: A comparative, cross-sectional study was designed among 180 mother-child pairs attending various Anganwadi centers. Demographic, dietary, oral hygiene practices and other necessary information were collected from mothers using a structured questionnaire. Caries status and amount of plaque were recorded through clinical examination. Nonstimulated saliva from mothers was cultured for mutans streptococci (MS. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Chi-square, Student's t-test, and logistic regression were used. A P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In the study group, 73.3% of mothers had caries as compared to only 53.3% mothers in control group. While mean DMFT and mean DMFS of mothers in the study group was 3.78 ± 3.91 and 8.37 ± 12.2, respectively, the same for the mothers in the control group was 2.66 ± 3.01 and 5.8 ± 5.3. Sixty (66.7% out of ninety mothers in the study group had a high MS count as compared to only 40 (44.4% mothers in control group (P = 0.003. Conclusion: The present study showed that high salivary MS count and decay in mothers could be important risk indicators for the development of caries in their children.

  19. Building national public health capacity for managing chemical events: A case study of the development of health protection services in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Stephen; Coleman, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The revised International Health Regulations (2005) require that countries develop plans for chemical threats. In 2012, the World Health Assembly reported that most countries had not yet achieved ?adequate capacity'. We review the evolution of chemical hazards services in the United Kingdom, the result of 15 years of grass-roots pressure and an accumulating weight of chemical incidents that eventually convinced the UK Department of Health of the need for a new national public health function,...

  20. Investigation of discharged aerosol nanoparticles during chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis for developing safety measures in the nano research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Еvgeny; Karunakaran, Gopalu; Godymchuk, Anna; Vera, Levina; Yudin, Andrey Grigorjevich; Gusev, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Denis

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the demands for the nanoparticles are increasing due to their tremendous applications in various fields. As a consequence, the discharge of nanoparticles into the atmosphere and environment is also increasing, posing a health threat and environmental damage in terms of pollution. Thus, an extensive research is essential to evaluate the discharge of these nanoparticles into the environment. Keeping this in mind, the present investigation aimed to analyze the discharge of aerosol nanoparticles that are synthesized in the laboratory via chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis methods. The results indicated that the chemical precipitation method discharges a higher concentration of nanoparticles in the work site when compared to the spray pyrolysis method. The aerosol concentration also varied with the different steps involved during the synthesis of nanoparticles. The average particle's concentration in air for chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis methods was around 1,037,476 and 883,421particles/cm 3 . In addition, the average total discharge of nanoparticles in the entire laboratory was also examined. A significant variation in the concentration of nanoparticles was noticed, during the processing of materials and the concentration of particles (14-723nm) exceeding the daily allowed concentration to about 70-170 times was observed over a period of 6 months. Thus, the results of the present study will be very useful in developing safety measures and would help in organizing the rules for people working in nanotechnology laboratories to minimize the hazardous effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of method to chemical separation of gallium-67 by thermal diffusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Patricia de Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Radioisotopes of gallium have been studied and evaluated for medical applications since 1949. Over the past 50 years 67 Ga has been widely used in the diagnosis of various diseases, including acute and chronic inflammatory lesions, bacterial or sterile and several types of tumors. In Brazil 30% of clinics that provide services for Nuclear Medicine use 67 Ga citrate and the demand for 67 G a at IPEN-CNEN/SP is 37 GBq (1 Ci)/week. The 67 Ga presents physical half-life of 3.26 days (78 hours) and decays 100% by electron capture to stable 67 Zn. Its decay includes the emission of γ rays with energies of 93.3 keV (37%), 184.6 keV (20.4%), 300.2 keV (16.6%) and 888 keV (26%). In the past 67 Ga was produced by the reaction 68 Zn (p, 2n) 67 Ga at IPEN-CNEN/SP. After irradiation, the target was dissolved in concentrated HCl and the solution percolated through a cationic resin DOWEX 50W-X8, 200-400 mesh, conditioned with 10 mol L -1 HCl. Zinc, nickel and copper were eluted in 10 mol L -1 HCl and 67 Ga 3.5 mol L -1 HCl. The final product was obtained as 67 Ga citrate. This work presents a new, fast, direct and efficient method for the chemical separation of 67 G a by thermal diffusion (heating of the target) combined with concentrated acetic acid extraction. Purification was performed by ion exchange chromatography. Natural zinc electrodeposition was performed on nickel/copper plates as substrate and the zinc deposits were adherent to the substrate, slightly shiny and uniform. The targets were irradiated with 26 MeV protons and integrated current of 10 μA.h. After irradiation, the targets were heated at 300 deg C for 2 hours and placed in contact with concentrated acetic acid for 1 hour. The average yield of extraction of 67 Ga was (72 ± 10)%. This solution was evaporated and the residue was taken up in 0.5 mol L -1 NH 4 OH. The 67 G a was purified on cationic resin Dowex 50WX8 in NH 4 OH medium. The 67 Ga recovery was (98 ± 2)%. This solution was evaporated and taken up

  2. Development of a Systems Engineering Model of the Chemical Separations Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Lijian; Li, Jianhong; Chen, Yitung; Clarksean, Randy; Ladler, Jim; Vandergrift, George

    2002-01-01

    Work is being performed to develop a general-purpose systems engineering model for the AAA separation process. The work centers on the development of a new user interface for the AMUSE code and on the specification of a systems engineering model. This paper presents background information and an overview of work completed to date. (authors)

  3. Geology and ground-water resources of the upper Lodgepole Creek drainage basin, Wyoming, with a section on chemical quality of the water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Louis Jay; Krieger, R.A.; Jochens, E.R.

    1959-01-01

    depth beneath most of the Islay lowland, near the west end of the area, and at a depth of about 800 feet beneath the Pine Bluffs lowland. In the latter area it probably is finer grained and may not be permeable enough to yield water to wells. All the ground water in the area is derived from precipitation. It is estimated that about 5 percent of the precipitation infiltrates directly to the zone of saturation. The remainder either is evaporated immediately; is retained by the soil, later to be evaporated or transpired; or is discharged by overland flow to the surface drainage courses. Most of the water that reaches the surface drainage courses eventually sinks to the zone of saturation or is evaporated. The slope of the water table and the movement of ground water are generally eastward. The depth to water ranges from less than 10 feet in parts of the valley to about 300 feet in the upland areas. In much of the Pine Bluffs lowland, the depth to water is less than 50 feet. Ground water not pumped from wells within the area is discharged by evapotranspiration where the water table is close to the land surface, by outflow into streams, or by underflow eastward beneath the State line. The chemical quality of ground water from the principal sources is remarkably uniform, and the range in concentration of dissolved constituents is narrow. In general, the water is of the calcium bicarbonate type, is hard (hardness as CaC03 is as high as 246 ppm), and contains less than about 400 parts per million of dissolved solids, which is a moderate mineralization. Silica constitutes a large proportion of the dissolved solids. The water is suitable for irrigation and, except for iron in water from some wells that tap the Ogallala formation, meets the drinking water standards of the U.S. Public Health Service for chemical constituents. Because the water is siliceous, alkaline, and hard, it is unsuitable for many industrial uses unless treated.

  4. Chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics of analog rice developed from the mocaf, arrowroof, and red bean flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahjuningsih, S. B.; Susanti, S.

    2018-01-01

    This research was aimed to analyze the chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics of the analog rice developed from a composite formula consisting of mocaf, arrowroot, and red bean flour. Experiment was designed into 5 different composition types i.e B1 (90%: 0%: 10%), B2 (80%:10%: 10%), B3 (70% : 20% : 10%), B4 (60%: 30%:10%), and B5 (50%: 40%: 10%) which in each type was repeated in 4 times. Carrageenan was used as a binder in the making process of those analog rice. Investigation procedure was carried out into several stages such as preparation and characterization of raw materials, production of analog rice in composite formula, then the testing of its chemical and sensory properties. Chemical characteristics were evaluated about the level of starch, amylose, dietary fiber, and resistant starch while sensory characteristics were examined about the texture, flavor, and aroma. The result showed that based on the sensory test, the best composite formula of rice analog was B2 (ratio flour of mocaf: Arrowroot: Red bean = 80:10:10). In addition, B2 formula possessed the chemical characteristics similar with the truth rice either in water content (12.18%), ash (2.63%), protein (6.17%), fat (1.31%), carbohydrate (89.88%), starch (73.29%), amylose (24.91%), total dietary fiber (7.04%), or resistant starch (6.71%). Furthermore, the higher of arrowroot flour proportion, the greater of amylose, dietary fiber and resistant starch containing in the rice analog. In the opposite, its starch content was getting down.

  5. Comparative study of the efficacy of chemically and biologically extracted humic substances from various materials on the development of Poinsettia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Teodora; Metodieva, Tsvetelina; Again, Nadia; Angelova, Gergana; Popova, Todorka; Chakalov, Konstantin; Savov, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    There is a lot of research proving the positive influence of humic substances on the development of plants in combination with soil isolates such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus. Humic substances obtained by chemical extraction and biosolubilization of various sources of organic materials were tested for their effect on the growth of Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) cultivar „Mirat red". The test included the following variants: 1. Humic substances chemically extracted from "Humintech" leonardite (Ht); 2. Humic substances obtained from "Humintech" leonardite by biosolubilization with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (Ht Bp Pp); 3. Humic substances chemically extracted from "Sachalin" leonardite; 4. Humic substances obtained from "Sachalin" leonardite by biosolubilization with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (Sachalin Bp Pp); 5. Fulvic substances exracted after biosolubilization of "Staniantsy" lignite with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (FB Plantagra); 6. Humic substances exracted after biosolubilization of "Staniantsy" lignite with Pseudomonas putida (Pp) and Bacillus pasteurii (Bp) (Lignohumate); 7. Biohumax - commercial product of "Project Studio" EOOD, Varna Bulgaria; 8.Vermicompost inoculated with Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus pasteurii (Strong BG); 9. Control - Nutrient solution (background of nutrition). The test results indicate that as a result of microbial activity active bacterial compounds are probably present in the composition of the extracted humates, thus affecting the formation of red leaves.The application of all tested substances results in red leaves area increase of treated plants compared to the control plants, except the humates chemically extracted from Humintech leonardite. The ration between humic and fulvic acids determines the effect on the treated plants. The biosolubilized preparations contain more fulvic acids. Plants treated with them form up to three times more

  6. Chemical surface modifications for the development of silicon-based label-free integrated optical (IO) biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuls, María-José; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2013-05-13

    Increasing interest has been paid to label-free biosensors in recent years. Among them, refractive index (RI) optical biosensors enable high density and the chip-scale integration of optical components. This makes them more appealing to help develop lab-on-a-chip devices. Today, many RI integrated optical (IO) devices are made using silicon-based materials. A key issue in their development is the biofunctionalization of sensing surfaces because they provide a specific, sensitive response to the analyte of interest. This review critically discusses the biofunctionalization procedures, assay formats and characterization techniques employed in setting up IO biosensors. In addition, it provides the most relevant results obtained from using these devices for real sample biosensing. Finally, an overview of the most promising future developments in the fields of chemical surface modification and capture agent attachment for IO biosensors follows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of B vitamin deletion in chemically defined diets on brood development in Camponotus vicinus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Mark E; Morrell, J J

    2014-08-01

    The potential contributions of B vitamins by a yeast associate to the nutrition of the carpenter ant Camponotus vicinus Mayr was examined as part of an effort to develop a chemically defined diet. This diet was used to test the effects of individual B vitamin and other nutrient deletions on larval development. The chemically defined diet contained amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and other growth factors in a liquid sucrose matrix. C. vicinus worker colonies with third- and fourth-instar larvae were fed a complete artificial diet or that diet with a component deleted for a 12-wk period. There was a significant effect of diet on larval growth and number of adult worker ants produced in the overall nutrient deletion test, but ant development was often better on incomplete diets with one B vitamin deleted compared with the complete holidic basal diet. Thiamine deletion resulted in significantly higher brood weights compared with the complete diet. Diets of sugar water plus all B vitamins, sugar water only, or a diet minus all B vitamins and cholesterol were associated with significantly lower brood weights. Significantly more adult worker ants were produced by worker colonies fed diets minus cholesterol, choline, thiamine, or riboflavin compared with the complete basal diet. The results suggest that the diet, while suitable for rearing, could benefit from further study to better define component levels. The potential relationship of C. vicinus with yeast associates is discussed in relation to further studies.

  8. An in vivo model fish system to test chemical effects on sexual differentiation and development: exposure to ethinyl estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulias, Diana M.; Noltie, Douglas B.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    A model system was characterized which may be used as an in vivo screen for effects of chemicals or environmental mixtures on sexual differentiation and development of reproductive organs and gametes. We evaluated the effects of a model environmental estrogen, ethinyl estradiol (EE2), on the d-rR strain of medaka, Oryzias latipes, using a nano-injection exposure. Gonad histopathology indicated that a single injection of 0.5–2.5 ng EE2/egg can cause phenotypic sex-reversal of genetic males to females. Sex-reversals could be detected as early as 7 days post-hatch. Sex-reversed males had female-typical duct development and the secondary sex characteristics we measured were generally consistent with phenotype, with the exception of a few EE2-exposed XX and XY females which possessed ambiguous anal fins. Using discriminant analysis, we determined that the presence or absence of the secondary sex characteristic, a dorsal fin notch, was a very reliable indicator of gonadal sex. No instances of gonadal intersexes were observed. Ethinyl estradiol also appeared to reduce growth but not condition (weight-at-length) and exposed XX females appeared to have a higher incidence of atretic follicles relative to controls. Our results suggest that estrogenic chemicals may influence sexual differentiation and development and that the medaka model is well suited to assessing these effects.

  9. Challenges of developing a GC/IMS based personal chemical hazard detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.S. [FemtoScan Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dworzanski, J.P.; Meuzelaar, H.L.C.; McClennen, W.H. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Center for Micro Analysis and Reaction Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    Hand-portable gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry (GC/IMS) techniques have been identified as a promising area of development for field and process related analytical problems. Recent development of extremely small (15 inch) personal IMS detection devices offer new prospects for creating a miniaturized GC/IMS unit. This paper provides a feasibility examination of personal GC/IMS based on the automated vapor sampling-transfer line gas chromatography (AVS-TLGC) approach previously utilized in developing hand-portable GC/IMS instrumentation. Special focus is placed upon developing low power strategies for implementing this approach. The means for achieving low power operation for extended personal use has focused on pulsed, on-demand operation of the sampling systems, low (ambient) temperature GC operation, reduced GC flow rates and pressure drops and modification of the internal IMS system flows. Development efforts to date have utilized an existing prototype miniature IMS device, the GI-MINI from Graseby Ionics coupled with modified Enviroprobe AVS-TLGC equipment developed by FemtoScan. Effect of parameters such as GC column position, temperature and carrier gas flow as well as IMS purge flows are examined for their effects upon sensitivity and resolution in breadboard GC/IMS test instrument. An evaluation of the remaining engineering hurdles limiting the development of personal GC/IMS are also presented.

  10. Development of a method for environmentally friendly chemical peptide synthesis in water using water-dispersible amino acid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumori Yoshinobu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the vast importance of peptides in biological processes, there is an escalating need for synthetic peptides to be used in a wide variety of applications. However, the consumption of organic solvent is extremely large in chemical peptide syntheses because of the multiple condensation steps in organic solvents. That is, the current synthesis method is not environmentally friendly. From the viewpoint of green sustainable chemistry, we focused on developing an organic solvent-free synthetic method using water, an environmentally friendly solvent. Here we described in-water synthesis technology using water-dispersible protected amino acids.

  11. An approach to develop chemical intuition for atomistic electron transport calculations using basis set rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, A.; Solomon, G. C. [Department of Chemistry and Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2016-05-21

    Single molecule conductance measurements are often interpreted through computational modeling, but the complexity of these calculations makes it difficult to directly link them to simpler concepts and models. Previous work has attempted to make this connection using maximally localized Wannier functions and symmetry adapted basis sets, but their use can be ambiguous and non-trivial. Starting from a Hamiltonian and overlap matrix written in a hydrogen-like basis set, we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain a new basis set that is chemically more intuitive and allows interpretation in terms of simple concepts and models. By diagonalizing the Hamiltonians corresponding to each atom in the molecule, we obtain a basis set that can be partitioned into pseudo-σ and −π and allows partitioning of the Landuaer-Büttiker transmission as well as create simple Hückel models that reproduce the key features of the full calculation. This method provides a link between complex calculations and simple concepts and models to provide intuition or extract parameters for more complex model systems.

  12. Development of improved nanosilver-based antibacterial textiles via synthesis of versatile chemically modified cotton fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeish, A; El-Shafei, A; Sharaf, S; Zaghloul, S

    2014-11-26

    Cationization of cotton fabric form was effected by reacting the cellulose with 3-chloro-2 hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride in presence of sodium hydroxide as per the pad dry cure method. Thus obtained cationized cotton cellulose was reacted with a reactive copolymer, namely, reactive β-cyclodextrin grafted with polyacrylic acid (MCT-βCD-g-PAA).Bridging of another copolymer, namely, β-cyclodextrin grafted with polyacrylic acid (βCD-g-PAA) to the cationized fabric using epichlorohydrin crosslinker was also performed. Inclusion of Ag nanoparticles in these three cotton substrates via treatment of the latter with colloid of Ag nanoparticles or through in situ formation of the former was exercised. Characterization of cotton fabric before and after being chemically modified was carried out using FTIR, XRD and SEM. Bacterial examination of the cationized cotton containing either (MCT-βCD-g-PAA) or (βCD-g-PAA) incorporated with Ag nanoparticles showed these substrates function against G+ve and G-ve bacteria. Ability of (MCT-βCD-g-PAA) modified cotton to include hydrophobic molecules was examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A critical Action Research approach to curriculum development in a laboratory-based chemical engineering course

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Scott R.

    This dissertation is a report of an attempt to critically evaluate a novel laboratory course from within the context of a chemical engineering curriculum. The research was done in a college classroom-laboratory setting, entrenched in the everydayness of classroom activities. All of the students, instructors, and educational researchers were knowing participants in this Action Research study. The students, a mixture of juniors, seniors, & graduate students, worked together on semester-long projects in groups that were mixed by age, gender and academic level. Qualitative techniques were used to gather different forms of representations of the students and instructors' experiences. Emergent patterns from the data gave strength to emergent knowledge claims that informed the instructors and the researcher about what the students were learning about performing experimental work and communicating results with their peers and instructor. The course challenged and in some cases changed the conceptions of instruction previously held by the students and the instructors. The course did not proceed without problems, yet the majority of these problems were overcome by the design of the course. Assertions and recommendations for improvement and application to other educational contexts are suggested.

  14. Quantum mechanical reactive scattering theory for simple chemical reactions: Recent developments in methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.H.

    1989-08-01

    It has recently been discovered that the S-matrix version of the Kohn variational principle is free of the ''Kohn anomalies'' that have plagued other versions and prevented its general use. This has made a major contribution to heavy particle reactive (and also to electron-atom/molecule) scattering which involve non-local (i.e., exchange) interactions that prevent solution of the coupled channel equations by propagation methods. This paper reviews the methodology briefly and presents a sample of integral and differential cross sections that have been obtained for the H + H 2 → H 2 +H and D + H 2 → HD + H reactions in the high energy region (up to 1.2 eV translational energy) relevant to resonance structures reported in recent experiments. 35 refs., 11 figs

  15. Quantum mechanical reactive scattering theory for simple chemical reactions: Recent developments in methodology and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H.

    1989-08-01

    It has recently been discovered that the S-matrix version of the Kohn variational principle is free of the Kohn anomalies'' that have plagued other versions and prevented its general use. This has made a major contribution to heavy particle reactive (and also to electron-atom/molecule) scattering which involve non-local (i.e., exchange) interactions that prevent solution of the coupled channel equations by propagation methods. This paper reviews the methodology briefly and presents a sample of integral and differential cross sections that have been obtained for the H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} +H and D + H{sub 2} {yields} HD + H reactions in the high energy region (up to 1.2 eV translational energy) relevant to resonance structures reported in recent experiments. 35 refs., 11 figs.

  16. Innovation in Integrated Chemical Product-Process Design - Development through a Model-based Systems Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa

    in which experiments are planned and a third stage in which experiments are performed to validate the final product formula. The main focus of the project is on the development of the computer-aided stage of the methodology described above. The methodology considers two different scenarios: the design...... appropriate model-based screening techniques are employed. In the verification scenario, a shortlist of candidate ingredients is provided, therefore the problem size is much smaller and rigorous property models can be employed/developed. When using computer-aided tools for product design, several issues need...... to be addressed: new property models may need to be developed and/or the application range of existing property models may need to be extended (that is, new model parameters are needed), new and more efficient methods and tools for the application of the models may need to be developed, together with a flexible...

  17. Effects of the in vitro chemical environment during early embryogenesis on subsequent development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, D. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Animal Biotechnology Embryo Lab.

    1998-12-31

    The development of the preimplantation embryo seems morphologically very simple, and embryologists previously assumed that an embryo that developed to the blastocyst stage was fully capable of normal development after transfer to the uterus of a recipient female. This complacency was disturbed by reports that exposure of early embryos to mutagens such as methylnitrosourea led to fetal abnormalities, decreased birth rates, and decreased life-span. Even more disturbing are recent reports that culture of early embryos in supposedly benign conditions can adversely affect their subsequent development. Techniques have been developed for the production of cattle and sheep embryos by in-vitro fertilization and by cloning. Such embryos must be cultured for several days before they can be transferred, and, in some cases, this has been related to abortion, very high birthweight, physical abnormalities and peri-natal mortality of the calves and lambs. This syndrome may result from an unbalanced development of the trophoblast relative to the inner-cell mass, possibly related to the presence of serum, glucose, or ammonium in the culture medium. An analogous phenomenon has been observed in human in-vitro fertilization where babies from single pregnancies have below-normal birth-weight. There is also evidence to suggest that the in-vitro environment of the gametes before fertilization can affect subsequent embryonal and fetal development. Exposure of mouse oocytes to vitrification solutions has been shown to lead to fetal malformations, and treatment of bull sperm with glutathione improves early embryo development. The common thread in these diverse observations is that development can be affected by events that occur long before any defect is apparent. Consequently, the production of a morphologically normal embryo is no guarantee that fetal development and post-natal life will be normal. This is of immediate concern in human reproductive medicine due to the increasing use of

  18. Perception and use of massive open online courses among medical students in a developing country: multicentre cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshady, Omar A; Radwan, Ahmed E; Eltaweel, Asmaa R; Azzam, Ahmed; Aboelnaga, Amr A; Hashem, Heba A; Darwish, Salma Y; Salah, Rehab; Kotb, Omar N; Afifi, Ahmed M; Noaman, Aya M; Salem, Dalal S; Hassouna, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of awareness and use of massive open online courses (MOOCs) among medical undergraduates in Egypt as a developing country, as well as identifying the limitations and satisfaction of using these courses. Design A multicentre, cross-sectional study using a web-based, pilot-tested and self-administered questionnaire. Settings Ten out of 19 randomly selected medical schools in Egypt. Participants 2700 undergraduate medical students were randomly selected, with an equal allocation of participants in each university and each study year. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome measures were the percentages of students who knew about MOOCs, students who enrolled and students who obtained a certificate. Secondary outcome measures included the limitations and satisfaction of using MOOCs through five-point Likert scale questions. Results Of 2527 eligible students, 2106 completed the questionnaire (response rate 83.3%). Of these students, 456 (21.7%) knew the term MOOCs or websites providing these courses. Out of the latter, 136 (29.8%) students had enrolled in at least one course, but only 25 (18.4%) had completed courses earning certificates. Clinical year students showed significantly higher rates of knowledge (p=0.009) and enrolment (pstudents. The primary reasons for the failure of completion of courses included lack of time (105; 77.2%) and slow Internet speed (73; 53.7%). Regarding the 25 students who completed courses, 21 (84%) were satisfied with the overall experience. However, there was less satisfaction regarding student–instructor (8; 32%) and student–student (5; 20%) interactions. Conclusions About one-fifth of Egyptian medical undergraduates have heard about MOOCs with only about 6.5% actively enrolled in courses. Students who actively participated showed a positive attitude towards the experience, but better time-management skills and faster Internet connection speeds are required. Further studies are

  19. Safe-sex belief and sexual risk behaviours among adolescents from three developing countries: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Alfonso; Lopez-del Burgo, Cristina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Carlos, Silvia; de Irala, Jokin

    2015-04-27

    This study intends to evaluate whether the belief that condoms are 100% effective in protecting against HIV infection is associated with sexual risk behaviours among youth. A cross-sectional study was performed in representative samples of high-school students in the Philippines, El Salvador and Peru. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. Students were asked about the risk of HIV transmission if one has sex using condoms. They were also asked to indicate whether they had ever had sexual relations and whether they used a condom in their first sexual relation. The sample was composed of 8994 students, aged 13-18. One out of seven adolescents believed condoms are 100% effective (safe-sex believers). Those adolescents were 82% more likely to have had sex than those without such belief, after adjusting for confounders (OR=1.82; 95% CI 1.51 to 2.21). On the contrary, no association was found between risk perception and condom use. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses produced similar results. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study conducted specifically to evaluate this phenomenon and that has used the same questionnaire and the same data collection protocol in three different developing countries from Asia, Central and South America. These results reasonably suggest that there could be an association between safe sex beliefs and sexual initiation. Longitudinal studies are needed to better understand this possible association as it could influence how to better promote sexual health. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Cross-sectional study to evaluate the longitudinal development of child and adolescent psychiatric diagnoses of inpatients in Vorarlberg, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Karoline; Fuchs, Martin; Veraar, Maria; Menz, Wolfgang; Kemmler, Georg; Simma, Burkhard

    2016-02-01

    Clinical experience has repeatedly shown evidence for continuity between mental disorders in children and adolescents and mental disorders in adulthood. Up to now, Austria has had no epidemiologic data on psychiatric diseases in children and adolescents and their development into adulthood. How often do children and adolescents with psychiatric diseases have psychiatric diseases in adulthood? Is there any association between psychiatric diagnoses in childhood/adolescence and adulthood? Electronic medical records provided us with data on 2210 children and adolescents who were admitted to any hospital in the State of Vorarlberg, Austria, between 1997 and 2012 because of psychiatric diseases. In this cross-sectional study, diagnoses were coded according to ICD-10 and ICD-9 criteria. The three main reasons for admission of children and adolescents were substance abuse, emotional disorders and conduct disorders. Of the admitted children and adolescents, 9.8 % were readmitted to a psychiatric institution in adulthood. The main reason for readmission in adulthood appears to be disorders due to psychoactive substances (42.1 %). Of young patients with psychoactive substance use, 9.7 % were rehospitalized in adulthood, 70.8 % of them showed a diagnosis in the same category (F1) on admission. Children and adolescents admitted for schizophrenia, schizotypal, and delusional disorders (F2) were significantly more likely to be readmitted in adulthood (40.9 %) compared to any other child psychiatric diagnosis. This study once again shows the continuity of psychiatric disorders from childhood and adolescence to adulthood. It also gives further information about the transmission of diagnoses when patients reached the age of 18 years and their outcome. Until now, there is hardly any information about the outcome of children and adolescents with psychiatric diagnoses in Austria. We want to bring up more knowledge on that issue. Research findings may improve prevention and clinical

  1. Utilisation of internet resources for continuing professional development: a cross-sectional survey of general practitioners in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWalter, Gordon; McKay, John; Bowie, Paul

    2016-01-21

    Participation in continuing professional development (CPD) is a professional and regulatory expectation of general practitioners (GPs). Traditionally, CPD activity was undertaken face-to-face in educational settings, but internet based formats have found increasing favour. The need for doctors to use the internet for service and educational purposes is growing, particularly in support of specialty training and appraisal. We aimed to determine how GPs in Scotland utilise online resources in support of their CPD. This involved identifying which resources are used and how frequently, along with their preferences as to how and why they access these resources. A cross sectional study was undertaken using an online questionnaire to survey general practitioners across Scotland. Data were subjected to descriptive analysis and differences in attitudinal responses between groups and Fischer's exact tests were calculated. Three hundred and eighty-three GP responses were received, with the majority being female (n = 232, 60.6%) and GP partners (n = 236, 61.6%). The majority used the internet on three or more working days per week or more frequently (n = 361, 94.3%) with the three most common reasons being to obtain information for a patient (n = 358, 93.5%), answering a clinical question (n = 357, 93.2%) and CPD purposes (n = 308, 80.4%). Of 37 online resources used by respondents, the top five were SIGN Guidelines (n = 303, 79.3%), BMJ Learning (n = 279, 73.0%), NICE Guidelines (n = 255, 66.8%), GP Notebook (n = 243, 63.6%) and Google (n = 234, 61.3%). Low use of social media such as Facebook (n = 11, 2.9%) and Twitter (n = 11, 2.9%) was reported for CPD. A majority agreed that 'reading information online' (95.0%) and 'completing online learning modules' (87.4%) were the most valued online activities. Slow internet connections (n = 240, 62.7%), website access restrictions (n = 177, 46.2%) and difficulties logging

  2. Development of hazard analysis by critical control points (HACCP) procedures to control organic chemical hazards in the agricultural production of raw food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropkins, Karl; Ferguson, Andrew; Beck, Angus J

    2003-01-01

    Hazard Analysis by Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a systematic approach to the identification, assessment, and control of hazards in the food chain. Effective HACCP requires the consideration of all chemical microbiological, and physical hazards. However, current procedures focus primarily on microbiological and physical hazards, while chemical aspects of HACCP have received relatively little attention. In this article we discuss the application of HACCP to organic chemical contaminants and the problems that are likely to be encountered in agriculture. We also present generic templates for the development of organic chemical contaminant HACCP procedures for selected raw food commodities, that is, cereal crops,raw meats, and milk.

  3. Development of Chemically Amplified Optical Sensors for Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1162-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Stephen M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Mastrototaro, John J. [Minimed Technologies, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects 14 million people in the U.S. and more than 110 million people worldwide. Each year in this country 27,000 diabetic patients become blind, 15,000 have kidney failure, and over 54,000 have peripheral limb amputations. In 1992, total healthcare costs in the U.S. for diabetes were more than $105 billion, approximately 15% of our healthcare budget. Conventional therapy for the most severe form of diabetes, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or Type I diabetes, is to administer one or two injections per day of various forms of insulin while monitoring blood glucose levels twice or three times daily with commercial glucometers that require blood samples. Near normal blood sugar levels (glycemic control) is difficult to achieve with conventional therapy. In the fall of 1993, the results of the 10-year $165 million Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) were published which showed that intensive insulin management would lead to dramatically fewer cases of retinopathy (which leads to blindness), nephropathy (which leads to kidney failure), and neuropathy (which can lead to limb amputations) [New England Journal of Medicine, Vo1239, No.14 977-986 (1993)]. If existing commercial insulin pumps could be combined with a continuous glucose sensor, a more physiological and fine-tuned therapy could be provided - in effect, an artificial biomechanical pancreas would be available. Existing research suggested that such a development would dramatically improve glucose control, thus greatly reducing morbidity and mortality from this disease. MiniMed Technologies in Sylmar, CA, identified a number of optically based sensor strategies as well as candidate chemical reactions that could be used to implement a minimally invasive opto-chemical glucose sensor. LLNL evaluated these sensor strategies and chemical reactions. These evaluations were the first steps leading to development of a sensor of considerable importance that could

  4. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs. PMID:26091166

  5. Cancer and Toxicology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The Cancer and Toxicology Section is concerned with the investigation of the mechanisms by which chemicals, radiation, and viruses cause the changes broadly identified as cancer. In addition, the study of mechanisms has been extended to include the nontumorigenic effects of various agents associated with fossil energy and fuels. Research in molecular genetics of carcinogenesis focuses largely on the transposon properties of the genomes of retroviruses. The transposon structure of the DNA genomes of endogenous murine N-tropic and B-tropic type C retroviruses is being elucidated, and their chromosomal location mapped in hamster-mouse cell hybrids. A model of the mechanism of retrovirus induction by radiation and chemicals is being developed, and experiments have established that compounds such as hydroxyurea act as inducer. There is the possibility that transposition of sequences of this endogenous virus may be linked to leukemogenesis. Research in regulation of gene expression aims at defining in molecular terms the mechanisms determining expression of specific genes, how these are regulated by hormones, and the events responsible for dysfunction of gene expression in cancer. In corollary work, a library of cloned cDNAs specific for products of genes of special interest to regulation is being developed. Improvement of reversed-phase chromatography as a means of isolating bacterial plasmids and restriction fragments of DNA is underway. Newly developed techniques permit the isolation of supercoiled plasmid DNA directly from bacterial extracts. The technology has been developed recently for the photosynthetic growth of the chemo-autotrophic organism Rhodospirillum rubrum and the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase has been produced in quantity

  6. The development of a collapsing method for the mixed group and point cross sections and its application on multi-dimensional deep penetration calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor-Jing Chang; Yen-Wan H. Liu

    1992-01-01

    The HYBRID, or mixed group and point, method was developed to solve the neutron transport equation deterministically using detailed treatment at cross section minima for deep penetration calculations. Its application so far is limited to one-dimensional calculations due to the enormous computing time involved in multi-dimensional calculations. In this article, a collapsing method is developed for the mixed group and point cross section sets to provide a more direct and practical way of using the HYBRID method in the multi-dimensional calculations. A testing problem is run. The method is then applied to the calculation of a deep penetration benchmark experiment. It is observed that half of the window effect is smeared in the collapsing treatment, but it still provide a better cross section set than the VITAMIN-C cross sections for the deep penetrating calculations

  7. Rotary Bed Reactor for Chemical-Looping Combustion with Carbon Capture. Part 1: Reactor Design and Model Development

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2013-01-17

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel and promising technology for power generation with inherent CO2 capture. Currently, almost all of the research has been focused on developing CLC-based interconnected fluidized-bed reactors. In this two-part series, a new rotary reactor concept for gas-fueled CLC is proposed and analyzed. In part 1, the detailed configuration of the rotary reactor is described. In the reactor, a solid wheel rotates between the fuel and air streams at the reactor inlet and exit. Two purging sectors are used to avoid the mixing between the fuel stream and the air stream. The rotary wheel consists of a large number of channels with copper oxide coated on the inner surface of the channels. The support material is boron nitride, which has high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Gas flows through the reactor at elevated pressure, and it is heated to a high temperature by fuel combustion. Typical design parameters for a thermal capacity of 1 MW have been proposed, and a simplified model is developed to predict the performances of the reactor. The potential drawbacks of the rotary reactor are also discussed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Development and Application of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Chemical Warfare Nerve and Sulfur Mustard Agents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Opresko, Dennis M [ORNL; Young, Robert A [ORNL; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) have been developed for the chemical warfare agents GB, GA, GD, GF, VX, and sulfur mustard. These AEGLs were approved by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances after Federal Register publication and comment, and judged as scientifically valid by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology Subcommittee on AEGLs. AEGLs represent general public exposure limits for durations ranging from 10 min to 8 h, and for three levels of severity (AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3). Mild effects are possible at concentrations greater than AEGL-1, while life-threatening effects are expected at concentrations greater than AEGL-3. AEGLs can be applied to various civilian and national defense purposes, including evacuation and shelter-in-place protocols, reentry levels, protective clothing specifications, and analytical monitoring requirements. This report documents development and derivation of AEGL values for six key chemical warfare agents, and makes recommendations for their application to various potential exposure scenarios.

  9. Chemical characterization of leaves of organically grown carrot Dacus carota L. in various stages of development for use as food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Wihby Leite

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, street markets and vegetable distributors discard vegetable leaves and stems, including those of carrot (Dacus carota L.. Seeking to reduce the waste of vegetable parts, this study characterized chemically the leaves of organically grown carrot in three stages of development to determine the best time for their removal and consumption as food. The leaves were dehydrated in an oven at 70 °C for 43 hours and analyzed for chemical composition, antioxidant activity, chlorophyll content, fatty acid composition, and also calcium (Ca, sodium (Na, potassium (K, magnesium (Mg, manganese (Mn, iron (Fe, zinc (Zn, and copper (Cu contents. The analyses indicated 100 days of development as the ideal stage for the removal and consumption of carrot leaves with good antioxidant activity requiring only 63.78 ± 0.5 mg.L-1 methanol leaf extract to inhibit 50% of the concentration of the free radical DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1picrilidrazil, and total protein and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3 n-3/LNA contents of 18.23% ± 2.8 and 876.55 ± 20.62 mg.100 g-1 of dry matter, respectively.

  10. Development and Application of a Probabilistic Risk-Benefit Assessment Model for Infant Feeding Integrating Microbiological, Nutritional, and Chemical Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Géraldine; Cummins, Enda; Guillou, Sandrine; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2017-12-01

    A probabilistic and interdisciplinary risk-benefit assessment (RBA) model integrating microbiological, nutritional, and chemical components was developed for infant milk, with the objective of predicting the health impact of different scenarios of consumption. Infant feeding is a particular concern of interest in RBA as breast milk and powder infant formula have both been associated with risks and benefits related to chemicals, bacteria, and nutrients, hence the model considers these three facets. Cronobacter sakazakii, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCB), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were three risk/benefit factors selected as key issues in microbiology, chemistry, and nutrition, respectively. The present model was probabilistic with variability and uncertainty separated using a second-order Monte Carlo simulation process. In this study, advantages and limitations of undertaking probabilistic and interdisciplinary RBA are discussed. In particular, the probabilistic technique was found to be powerful in dealing with missing data and to translate assumptions into quantitative inputs while taking uncertainty into account. In addition, separation of variability and uncertainty strengthened the interpretation of the model outputs by enabling better consideration and distinction of natural heterogeneity from lack of knowledge. Interdisciplinary RBA is necessary to give more structured conclusions and avoid contradictory messages to policymakers and also to consumers, leading to more decisive food recommendations. This assessment provides a conceptual development of the RBA methodology and is a robust basis on which to build upon. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Development of a Zero-Cement Binder Using Slag, Fly Ash, and Rice Husk Ash with Chemical Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand and consumption of cement have necessitated the use of slag, fly ash, rice husk ash (RHA, and so forth as a supplement of cement in concrete construction. The aim of the study is to develop a zero-cement binder (Z-Cem using slag, fly ash, and RHA combined with chemical activator. NaOH, Ca(OH2, and KOH were used in varying weights and molar concentrations. Z-Cem was tested for its consistency, setting time, flow, compressive strength, XRD, SEM, and FTIR. The consistency and setting time of the Z-Cem paste increase with increasing RHA content. The Z-Cem mortar requires more superplasticizer to maintain a constant flow of 110±5% compared with OPC. The compressive strength of the Z-Cem mortar is significantly influenced by the amounts, types, and molar concentration of the activators. The Z-Cem mortar achieves a compressive strength of 42–44 MPa at 28 days with 5% NaOH or at 2.5 molar concentrations. The FTIR results reveal that molecules in the Z-Cem mortar have a silica-hydrate (Si-H bond with sodium or other inorganic metals (i.e., sodium/calcium-silica-hydrate-alumina gel. Therefore, Z-Cem could be developed using the aforementioned materials with the chemical activator.

  12. Development and Evaluation of Model Algorithms to Account for Chemical Transformation in the Nearroad Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and evaluation of two new model algorithms for NOx chemistry in the R-LINE near-road dispersion model for traffic sources. With increased urbanization, there is increased mobility leading to higher amount of traffic related activity on a global scale. ...

  13. Thomas Midgley, Jr., and the Development of New Substances: A Case Study for Chemical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Hélio Elael Bonini; Porto, Paulo Alves

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a history of chemistry case study focusing on selected aspects of the work of American engineer Thomas Midgley, Jr. (1889-1944): the development of tetraethyl lead as an antiknock gasoline additive and of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as fluids for refrigeration devices. One general aim of this case study is to display the complex…

  14. From population control politics to chemicals: the WHO as an intermediary organization in contraceptive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, Nelly E.J.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of laboratory work have rarely focused on the role of intermediary organizations in developing R&D activities. Most studies focus on a single university-based research laboratory or an industrial R&D unit. Moreover, the rejection by social constructivist scholars of universalistic,

  15. Chemical process developments in reprocessing from 1965--1975 in the Institute for Hot Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.

    Work on the aqueous reprocessing of fuels is described. The following are discussed: LABEX (laboratory-scale extraction), MILLI facility (1 kg/day), problems of aqueous reprocessing, centrifugal extractor development, radiolytic products from Purex process, and TAMARA facility. Results of the MILLI operation are reviewed. Solutions to problems are discussed

  16. Development and characterization of electrochemical cantilever sensor for bio/chemical sensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Xueling; Fischer, Lee MacKenzie; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    We report the improvements made to our previously developed electrochemical cantilever (EC) sensor, where nanoporous gold material is employed as working electrodes in microcantilever arrays, while combined counter-reference electrodes are integrated on the chip. For a surface stress change of 1m...

  17. Consumable Process Development for Chemical Mechanical Planarization of Bit Patterned Media for Magnetic Storage Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonivel, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    As the superparamagnetic limit is reached, the magnetic storage industry looks to circumvent the barrier by implementing patterned media (PM) as a viable means to store and access data. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is a semiconductor fabrication technique used to planarize surfaces and is investigated as a method to ensure that the PM is polished to surface roughness parameters that allow the magnetic read/write head to move seamlessly across the PM. Results from this research have implications in feasibility studies of utilizing CMP as the main planarization technique for PM fabrication. Benchmark data on the output parameters of the CMP process, for bit patterned media (BPM), based on the machine process parameters, pad properties, and slurry characteristics are optimized. The research was conducted in a systematic manner in which the optimized parameters for each phase are utilized in future phases. The optimum results from each of the phases provide an overall optimum characterization for BPM CMP. Results on the CMP machine input parameters indicate that for optimal surface roughness and material removal, low polish pressures and high velocities should be used on the BPM. Pad characteristics were monitored by non destructive technique and results indicate much faster deterioration of all padcharacteristics versus polish time of BPM when compared to IC CMP. The optimum pad for PM polishing was the IC 1400 dual layer Suba V pad with a shore hardness of 57, and a k-groove pattern. The final phase of polishing evaluated the slurry polishing properties and novel nanodiamond (ND) slurry was created and benchmarked on BPM. The resulting CMP output parameters were monitored and neither the ND slurry nor the thermally responsive polymer slurry performed better than the commercially available Cabot iCue slurry for MRR or surface roughness. Research results indicate CMP is a feasible planarization technique for PM fabrication, but successful implementation of CMP

  18. Papers presented at the IAEA specialists' meeting on the development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    The present report contains 20 papers presented at the IAEA meeting on the Development of an International Nuclear Decay Data and Cross-Section Database, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994, covering the following topics: Wall-charts of nuclides, PC systems presenting nuclear data, nuclear decay-data and uncertainties, nuclear spectroscopy, thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance-integrals, reactor-neutron activation analysis, nuclear data standards. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Development of a fully implemented sectional WPC-beam with the tribologic value as sliding rail for the use in an overhead conveying system

    OpenAIRE

    Eichhorn, Sven; Clauß, Brit; Nendel, Klaus; Gehde, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Aufbauend auf Forschungsarbeiten mit einer Hybridstruktur aus Aluminium und WPC (Wood Polymer Composite) werden die wichtigsten Entwicklungsschritte zur Synthese eines kompletten Tragprofils aus WPC vorgestellt. Dieses Tragprofil ist für den Einsatz in Hängefördersystemen vorgesehen. Based on research with an sectional beam in hybrid design made from aluminium and WPC (Wood Polymer Composite), the important steps for developing a fully implemented sectional WPC-beam are presented. This sec...

  20. Accounting and auditing of sectional title property: An overview from the governance perspective in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandi Steenkamp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The sectional title industry has been a part of the property landscape in South Africa for almost half a century, and plays a profound role in addressing the housing problem in the country. Stakeholders such as owners and investors in sectional title property are in most cases not directly involved in the management thereof, and place reliance on the audited annual financial statements of bodies corporate for decision-making purposes. Although the industry seems to be highly regulated, the legislation regarding accounting and auditing of sectional title property is vague and ambiguous. Furthermore, there are no industry-specific auditing and accounting standards to guide accounting and auditing practitioners in performing their work and industry financial benchmarks are not readily available. In addition, financial pressure on sectional title schemes is often very high due to the fact that some owners exercise unrealistic pressure to keep monthly levies as low as possible. Very little academic research has been undertaken on the sectional title industry in South Africa from an accounting and auditing perspective. The aim of this article is threefold: Firstly, to discuss the findings of a literature review on uncertainties, ambiguity and confusing aspects in legislation regarding the audit of sectional title property that may cause or increase the audit expectation gap. Secondly, to discuss the empirical findings of accountancy-related aspects of a sample of body corporate financial statements and accompanying audit reports, in order to identify current benchmarks, challenges, trends, deficiencies in reporting and possible norms for the sectional title industry. Specific reference will be made to the difference between the bodies corporate in the Mangaung and Matjhabeng areas. Thirdly, practical recommendations will be made on possibilities of closing the expectation gap, and further research opportunities in this regard will be discussed.

  1. Development of a new chemical introduction process for hours living radioisotope and it's application for PET imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Masaaki

    2004-01-01

    A new chemical introduction process of fluorine-18, 18 F was developed using solid phase synthesis technique, instead of a conventional liquid phase synthesis. Separation for a plenty of non-reaction compound was difficult in the liquid phase synthesis technique. Precursor compound reacted on the surface of solid phase (beads). Labeled compound with 18 F could be separated from the solid surface by reaction of fluoride reagent. A fundamental fluoric reaction was developed with the solid phase process. Sulfonyl chloride, polymer-bound 1 was used as a solid phase carrier of the precursor. The 18 F-FDG, which are replaced a hydroxyl group in D-glucose with 18 F, were used most frequently as a cancer marker in positron computed tomography (PET). Synthesis of the 18 F-FDG was investigated by the solid phase technique. (M. Suetake)

  2. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric; Zon, Leonard I

    2017-08-23

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly characterized. Here, we conducted a screen in primary zebrafish embryo cultures for chemicals that disrupt neural crest development, as read out by crestin:EGFP expression. We found that the natural product caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) disrupts neural crest gene expression, migration, and melanocytic differentiation by reducing Sox10 activity. CAPE inhibits FGF-stimulated PI3K/Akt signaling, and neural crest defects in CAPE-treated embryos are suppressed by constitutively active Akt1. Inhibition of Akt activity by constitutively active PTEN similarly decreases crestin expression and Sox10 activity. Our study has identified Akt as a novel intracellular pathway required for neural crest differentiation.

  3. Development of test stand for experimental investigation of chemical and physical phenomena in Liquid Rocket Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Andrade Santos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to present the specification of an experimental firing test stand for liquid rocket engines (LRE and develop a program for control and acquisition of data. It provides conditions to test rocket engines with thrust from 50 to 100 kgf. A methodology for laboratory work implementation using information technology, which will allow the automatic and remote functioning of the test stand, permits users to input the necessary data to conduct tests safely, achieve accurate measurements and obtain reliable results. The control of propellant mass flow rates by pressure regulators and other system valves, as well as the test stand data acquisition, are carried out automatically through LabVIEW commercial software. The test stand program is a readable, scalable and maintainable code. The test stand design and its development represent the state of art of experimental apparatus in LRE testing.

  4. Dynamic Chemical Model for $\\text {H} _2 $/$\\text {O} _2 $ Combustion Developed Through a Community Workflow

    KAUST Repository

    Oreluk, James

    2018-01-30

    Elementary-reaction models for $\\\\text{H}_2$/$\\\\text{O}_2$ combustion were evaluated and optimized through a collaborative workflow, establishing accuracy and characterizing uncertainties. Quantitative findings were the optimized model, the importance of $\\\\text{H}_2 + \\\\text{O}_2(1\\\\Delta) = \\\\text{H} + \\\\text{HO}_2$ in high-pressure flames, and the inconsistency of certain low-temperature shock-tube data. The workflow described here is proposed to be even more important because the approach and publicly available cyberinfrastructure allows future community development of evolving improvements. The workflow steps applied here were to develop an initial reaction set using Burke et al. [2012], Burke et al. [2013], Sellevag et al. [2009], and Konnov [2015]; test it for thermodynamic and kinetics consistency and plausibility against other sets in the literature; assign estimated uncertainties where not stated in the sources; select key data targets (

  5. Implementation of a cooperative methodology to develop organic chemical engineering skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, J. F.; Díaz Blanco, M. J.; Toscano Fuentes, C.; Martín Alfonso, J. E.

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate how most of the competences required by engineering students may be developed through an active methodology based on cooperative learning/evaluation. Cooperative learning was employed by the University of Huelva's third-year engineering students. The teaching methodology pretends to create some of the most relevant engineering skills required nowadays such as the ability to cooperate finding appropriate information; the ability to solve problems through critical and creative thinking; and the ability to make decisions and to communicate effectively. The statistical study carried out supports the hypothesis that comprehensive and well-defined protocols in the development of the subject, the rubric and cooperative evaluation allow students to acquire a successful learning.

  6. Development of test stand for experimental investigation of chemical and physical phenomena in Liquid Rocket Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Emerson Andrade Santos; Wilton Fernandes Alves; André Neves Almeida Prado; Cristiane Aparecida Martins

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of this work was to present the specification of an experimental firing test stand for liquid rocket engines (LRE) and develop a program for control and acquisition of data. It provides conditions to test rocket engines with thrust from 50 to 100 kgf. A methodology for laboratory work implementation using information technology, which will allow the automatic and remote functioning of the test stand, permits users to input the necessary data to conduct tests safely...

  7. Chemical analysis of solid residue from liquid and solid fuel combustion: Method development and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkmic, M. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecturek Zagreb (Croatia); Curkovic, L. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Zagreb (Croatia); Asperger, D. [HEP-Proizvodnja, Thermal Power Plant Department, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-06-15

    This paper deals with the development and validation of methods for identifying the composition of solid residue after liquid and solid fuel combustion in thermal power plant furnaces. The methods were developed for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer analysis. Due to the fuels used, the different composition and the location of creation of solid residue, it was necessary to develop two methods. The first method is used for identifying solid residue composition after fuel oil combustion (Method 1), while the second method is used for identifying solid residue composition after the combustion of solid fuels, i. e. coal (Method 2). Method calibration was performed on sets of 12 (Method 1) and 6 (Method 2) certified reference materials (CRM). CRMs and analysis test samples were prepared in pellet form using hydraulic press. For the purpose of method validation the linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity were determined, and the measurement uncertainty of methods for each analyte separately was assessed. The methods were applied in the analysis of real furnace residue samples. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Carnitines slow down tumor development of colon cancer in the DMH-chemical carcinogenesis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Mori, Federica; Di Napoli, Arianna; Mancini, Rita; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Virmani, Ashraf; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-07-01

    Dietary agents are receiving much attention for the chemoprevention of cancer. While curcumin is known to influence several pathways and affect tumor growth in vivo, carnitin and its congeners play a variety of important metabolic functions: are involved in the oxydation of long-chain fatty acids, regulate acyl-CoA levels and influence protein activity and stability by modifying the extent of protein acetylation. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of carnitines in the prevention of cancer development using the 1,2,-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis model. We also assessed whether their combination was able to give rise to increased protection from cancer development. Mice treated with DMH were dosed orally with curcumin and/or carnitine and acylcarnitines for 20 weeks. At the end of the treatment colon samples were collected, and scored for multiple ACF and adenomas. We observed that carnitine and acyl-carnitines had same, if not higher, efficacy than curcumin alone in inhibiting the formation of neoplastic lesions induced by DMH treatment. Interestingly, the combination of curcumin and acetyl-L-carnitine was able to fully inhibit the development of advanced adenoma lesions. Our data unveil the antitumor effects of carnitines and warrant additional studies to further support the adoption of carnitines as cancer chemopreventative agents. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Factors related to knowledge and perception of women about smoking: a cross sectional study from a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taj Fawad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking rates among women are currently low, but they are the fastest growing segment of cigarette smoking population in developing countries. We aimed to assess the knowledge and perceptions towards smoking and to identify the factors related with level of knowledge and perceptions among adult women in urban slums. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted on 250 adult (≥18 years of age women attending primary care clinics in three slums of Karachi, Pakistan. A pre-tested and structured, interviewer administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Factors associated with level of understanding about smoking were analyzed with chi-square test. Results Most of the women knew that smoking has adverse effects on women and children's health but the knowledge of specific health effects was limited. About one third of the women knew that active smoking can cause lung disease, but only a small percentage (7% knew that it could lead to heart disease. None of the women were aware that smoking contributes to infertility and osteoporosis. A small proportion of women were aware that smoking can lead to low birth weight (7%, congenital anomalies (5% and less than 1% of women knew that it contributes to pregnancy loss, still birth and preterm delivery. The understanding of passive smoking affecting children's lung was low (20% and a similar proportion voiced concern about the bad influence of maternal smoking on children. Educated women had better knowledge of health effects of smoking. Education was associated with having better knowledge about effects on women health in general (p = 0.02 and specific effects like lung (p = 0.03 and reproductive health effects (p Conclusions This study reveals that women are aware of the general ill effects of smoking but fail to identify smoking to be associated with female maladies particularly those who were illiterate and had lower levels of education. Understanding and attitudes

  10. CAREGIVER'S DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND YOUNG CHILDREN'S SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT DELAYS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY IN POOR RURAL AREAS OF CHINA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qianwei; Zhang, Cuihong; Zhang, Jingxu; Luo, Shusheng; Wang, Xiaoli

    2018-03-01

    Poverty and its associated factors put people at risk for depression. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of depressive symptoms (DS) of primary caregivers and socioemotional development (SED) delays of young children in poor rural areas of China, and to explore the association between them. Cross-sectional data of 2,664 children aged 3 to 35 months and their primary caregivers were used for analysis. Characteristics of the child, caregiver, and family were collected through face-to-face caregiver interviews. DS were assessed by the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (W.W. Zung, 1965, as cited in World Health Organization, ), and SED was evaluated by the Ages and Stage Questionnaires: Social-Emotional (J. Squires, D. Bricker, & L. Potter, 1997). The χ 2 test, stratification analysis, and logistic regression analyses were used to explore the association. Among the caregivers, 40.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [38.4, 42.1]), reported DS. Caregivers who were male, older and ethnic minorities as well as had a low level of education, a low family income, or more children were more likely to have DS. Of the children, 24.4% (95% CI [22.8, 26.0]) were recognized with SED delays. Older children displayed more delays than did younger children, but no significant differences between males and females were found. SED delays were significantly associated with mother outmigrating, male caregivers, older age, ethnic minorities, and low education or families with a single parent, low-income, and having more children. Caregivers having DS, odds ratio (OR) = 2.40, 95% CI [1.99, 2.88], was a significant predictor of increased odds of SED delays; other factors were single-parent family, OR = 1.99, 95% CI [1.37, 2.89], inadequate care, OR = 1.69, 95% CI [1.30, 2.21], physical punishment, OR = 1.61, 95% CI [1.33, 1.95], ethnic minorities, OR = 1.41, 95% CI [1.17, 1.71], and child age in months, OR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.02, 1.04], according to the logistic regression

  11. Perception and use of massive open online courses among medical students in a developing country: multicentre cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshady, Omar A; Radwan, Ahmed E; Eltaweel, Asmaa R; Azzam, Ahmed; Aboelnaga, Amr A; Hashem, Heba A; Darwish, Salma Y; Salah, Rehab; Kotb, Omar N; Afifi, Ahmed M; Noaman, Aya M; Salem, Dalal S; Hassouna, Ahmed

    2015-01-05

    To assess the prevalence of awareness and use of massive open online courses (MOOCs) among medical undergraduates in Egypt as a developing country, as well as identifying the limitations and satisfaction of using these courses. A multicentre, cross-sectional study using a web-based, pilot-tested and self-administered questionnaire. Ten out of 19 randomly selected medical schools in Egypt. 2700 undergraduate medical students were randomly selected, with an equal allocation of participants in each university and each study year. Primary outcome measures were the percentages of students who knew about MOOCs, students who enrolled and students who obtained a certificate. Secondary outcome measures included the limitations and satisfaction of using MOOCs through five-point Likert scale questions. Of 2527 eligible students, 2106 completed the questionnaire (response rate 83.3%). Of these students, 456 (21.7%) knew the term MOOCs or websites providing these courses. Out of the latter, 136 (29.8%) students had enrolled in at least one course, but only 25 (18.4%) had completed courses earning certificates. Clinical year students showed significantly higher rates of knowledge (p=0.009) and enrolment (pcourses included lack of time (105; 77.2%) and slow Internet speed (73; 53.7%). Regarding the 25 students who completed courses, 21 (84%) were satisfied with the overall experience. However, there was less satisfaction regarding student-instructor (8; 32%) and student-student (5; 20%) interactions. About one-fifth of Egyptian medical undergraduates have heard about MOOCs with only about 6.5% actively enrolled in courses. Students who actively participated showed a positive attitude towards the experience, but better time-management skills and faster Internet connection speeds are required. Further studies are needed to survey the enrolled students for a better understanding of their experience. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  12. WORKSHOP ON NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS FROM COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY AND RELATED SYNTHETIC STRATEGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Stephen G. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    1998-08-22

    The power of combinatorial chemistry and related high throughput synthetic strategies is currently being pursued as a fruitful way to develop molecules and materials with new properties. The strategy is motivated, for example in the pharmaceutical industry, by the difficulty of designing molecules to bind to specific sites on target biomolecules. By synthesizing a variety of similar structures, and then finding the one that has the most potent activity, new so-called lead structures will be found rapidly. Existing lead structures can be optimized. This relatively new approach has many implications for separation science. The most obvious is the call for more separations power: higher resolution, lower concentrations, higher speed. This pressure butresses the traditional directions of research into the development of more useful separations. The advent of chip-based, electroosmotically pumped systems1 will certainly accelerate progress in this traditional direction. The progress in combinatorial chemistry and related synthetic strategies gives rise to two other, broadly significant possibilities for large changes in separation science. One possibility results from the unique requirements of the synthesis of a huge number of products simultaneously. Can syntheses and separations be designed to work together to create strategies that lead to mixtures containing only desired products but without side products? The other possibility results from the need for molecular selectivity in separations. Can combinatorial syntheses and related strategies be used in the development of better separations media? A workshop in two parts was held. In one half-day session, pedagogical presentations educated across the barriers of discipline and scale. In the second half-day session, the participants broke into small groups to flesh out new ideas. A panel summarized the breakout discussions.

  13. Development of a probe by neutron activation for chemical analysis in drillings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.P.; Carriou, J.; Alexandre, J.; Pinault, J.L.; Dumas, A.; Huet, D.; Collins, V.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory studies on simulated drillings have been made and compared to calculations on mathematical models. A probe design has been developed with the Laboratory of Ponts et Chaussees. The probe has been tested in-situ on polymetallic sulfide mineralization. The study of the activation gamma allowed to log copper, iron, silicon and potassium. A very feasibility of neutronic activation has been proved during these three years. At the end of this optimization phase, the mining operators will have a device able to give them in real time informations necessary to control their operations [fr

  14. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals. II. Using oral slope factor as a measure of carcinogenic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nina Ching Yi; Venkatapathy, Raghuraman; Bruce, Robert Mark; Moudgal, Chandrika

    2011-03-01

    The overall risk associated with exposure to a chemical is determined by combining quantitative estimates of exposure to the chemical with their known health effects. For chemicals that cause carcinogenicity, oral slope factors (OSFs) and inhalation unit risks are used to quantitatively estimate the carcinogenic potency or the risk associated with exposure to the chemical by oral or inhalation route, respectively. Frequently, there is a lack of animal or human studies in the literature to determine OSFs. This study aims to circumvent this problem by developing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the OSFs of chemicals. The OSFs of 70 chemicals based on male/female human, rat, and mouse bioassay data were obtained from the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. A global QSAR model that considered all 70 chemicals as well as species and/or sex-specific QSARs were developed in this study. Study results indicate that the species and sex-specific QSARs (r(2)>0.8, q(2)>0.7) had a better predictive abilities than the global QSAR developed using data from all species and sexes (r(2)=0.77, q(2)=0.73). The QSARs developed in this study were externally validated, and demonstrated reasonable predictive abilities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT OF CHEMICAL TEACHING MATERIALS ON MATERIAL BASED THERMOCHEMICAL SOFT SKILLS FOR VOCATIONAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Purnawan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Business and industrial field need workers who have not only good academic achievement but also the ability of hard skills and soft skills.  In order to prepare students who have a good academic skills, hard skills, soft skills it has to be done in all subjects including chemistry expertise to integrate the competencies of Motorcycle Engineering.  The research design uses One Group Pretest Posttest Design imposed on students in class XI SMK 1 Kedung TSM. Validator assessment results indicate that teaching materials developed very feasible for use in learning chemistry.  The result show that the learning device by using the integrated chemistry materials can increase students understanding of the thermo chemistry material with the acquisition of N-gain is at 0.63 or in the medium category.  Group of high-achieving students have the score of N-gain of 0.65, while the medium-achieving students get 0.63 and low-achieving students get 0.61, all have medium category.  Percentage  of students who passes the mastery learning  if mastery learning (KKM > 75 or reach 87 %.  The percentage of students’ soft skills in at least good criteria is at 87.10 %.  Students gave positive responses  90.71 % towards the learning material that is developed.

  16. Characterization of chemical and mineral composition of marolo (Annona crassiflora Mart during physiological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Pablo da SILVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maroleiro (Annona crassiflora Mart, belonging to the family of Annonaceae is a typical specie of the Cerrado and has occurred in most states. For fruit characteristics “sui generis”, with significant nutritional value. This study aimed to characterize the marolo (Anonna crasiflora Mart during fruit development, through the evaluation of its proximal and mineral composition. The fruits 2012/2013 season, were picked to 12Km from the city of Itumirim, southern Minas Gerais, in intervals of 20 days from anthesis to maturity, and the first fruits were harvested 60 days after anthesis. The flowering marolo began in late September 2012, with fruiting initially observed at the end of October, with peak production at the end of February and beginning of March 2013 The fruits were harvested in the morning and carried to the laboratory, where followed up the moisture, ether extract, protein, ash, fiber and high sugar fraction beyond mineral quantification of them. During development reductions in moisture content and protein increments of ether extract, crude fiber and high sugar fraction and an oscillation in the mineral along the developmental stages was observed.

  17. Characterization of chemical and mineral composition of marolo (Annona crassiflora Mart during physiological development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Pablo da SILVA

    Full Text Available Abstract Maroleiro (Annona crassiflora Mart, belonging to the family of Annonaceae is a typical specie of the Cerrado and has occurred in most states. For fruit characteristics “sui generis”, with significant nutritional value. This study aimed to characterize the marolo (Anonna crasiflora Mart during fruit development, through the evaluation of its proximal and mineral composition. The fruits 2012/2013 season, were picked to 12Km from the city of Itumirim, southern Minas Gerais, in intervals of 20 days from anthesis to maturity, and the first fruits were harvested 60 days after anthesis. The flowering marolo began in late September 2012, with fruiting initially observed at the end of October, with peak production at the end of February and beginning of March 2013 The fruits were harvested in the morning and carried to the laboratory, where followed up the moisture, ether extract, protein, ash, fiber and high sugar fraction beyond mineral quantification of them. During development reductions in moisture content and protein increments of ether extract, crude fiber and high sugar fraction and an oscillation in the mineral along the developmental stages was observed.

  18. Accumulation of carbohydrates in the development of tomato plants treated with different chemical products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Ribeiro Pereira Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work had the purpose to study the physiological effects of pyraclostrobin, boscalid, plant growth regulators and plant extract on the accumulation of carbohydrates during the development of tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L., hybrid Giuliana, in protected environment conditions. The treatments were: T1- control; T2- pyraclostrobin 0.2 g L-1; T3- boscalid 0.075 g L-1, T4- pyraclostrobin 0.2 g L-1 + boscalid 0.075 g L-1, T5- IBA + GA3 + kinetin 375 mg L-1, T6- GA4+7 + benzylaminopurine 100 mg L-1 and T7- plant extract 100 mg L-1. The carbohydrate accumulation curve was accomplished with 5 samples, at 20-day intervals between evaluations, the 1st evaluation being carried out at 30 days after transplantation, on the day of the first treatment application. At each sampling the plants were separated in stem, leaves and fruits, of which the contents of total soluble sugars, reducing sugars and saccharose were evaluated. The effects of the treatments on chlorophyll content and gas exchanges were also evaluated. The experimental design was completely randomized, with 4 repetitions and 6 destructive evaluations during the development, with 1 plant per experimental unit for each sampling. The pyraclostrobin and boscalid applied in isolation and/or combined favor the increase of carbohydrates in leaves, stems and fruits of tomato hybrid Giuliana

  19. Development of linear free energy relationships for aqueous phase radical-involved chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Mezyk, Stephen P; Jones, Jace W; Daws, Brittany R; Crittenden, John C

    2014-12-02

    Aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) produce hydroxyl radicals (HO•) which can completely oxidize electron rich organic compounds. The proper design and operation of AOPs require that we predict the formation and fate of the byproducts and their associated toxicity. Accordingly, there is a need to develop a first-principles kinetic model that can predict the dominant reaction pathways that potentially produce toxic byproducts. We have published some of our efforts on predicting the elementary reaction pathways and the HO• rate constants. Here we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) that predict the rate constants for aqueous phase radical reactions. The LFERs relate experimentally obtained kinetic rate constants to quantum mechanically calculated aqueous phase free energies of activation. The LFERs have been applied to 101 reactions, including (1) HO• addition to 15 aromatic compounds; (2) addition of molecular oxygen to 65 carbon-centered aliphatic and cyclohexadienyl radicals; (3) disproportionation of 10 peroxyl radicals, and (4) unimolecular decay of nine peroxyl radicals. The LFERs correlations predict the rate constants within a factor of 2 from the experimental values for HO• reactions and molecular oxygen addition, and a factor of 5 for peroxyl radical reactions. The LFERs and the elementary reaction pathways will enable us to predict the formation and initial fate of the byproducts in AOPs. Furthermore, our methodology can be applied to other environmental processes in which aqueous phase radical-involved reactions occur.

  20. Development of a Detection Algorithm for Use with Reflectance-Based, Real-Time Chemical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony P. Malanoski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe our efforts focused on development of an algorithm for identification of detection events in a real-time sensing application relying on reporting of color values using commercially available color sensing chips. The effort focuses on the identification of event occurrence, rather than target identification, and utilizes approaches suitable to onboard device incorporation to facilitate portable and autonomous use. The described algorithm first excludes electronic noise generated by the sensor system and determines response thresholds. This automatic adjustment provides the potential for use with device variations as well as accommodating differing indicator behaviors. Multiple signal channels (RGB as well as multiple indicator array elements are combined for reporting of an event with a minimum of false responses. While the method reported was developed for use with paper-supported porphyrin and metalloporphyrin indicators, it should be equally applicable to other colorimetric indicators. Depending on device configurations, receiver operating characteristic (ROC sensitivities of 1 could be obtained with specificities of 0.87 (threshold 160 ppb, ethanol.