WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical control laser

  1. Lasers in chemical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high cost of laser energy is the crucial issue in any potential laser-processing application. It is expensive relative to other forms of energy and to most bulk chemicals. We show those factors that have previously frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser-induced processes for the production of materials. Having identified the general criteria to be satisfied by an economically successful laser process and shown how these imply the laser-system requirements, we present a status report on the uranium laser isotope separation (LIS) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  2. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  3. Low-intensity laser coupled with photosensitizer to reduce bacteria in root canals compared to chemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photodynamic therapy is a process in which a dye is associate with an appropriate wavelength of light and this dye goes to an excited state. The excited reacts with oxygen to form the highly reactive compound singlet oxygen, and this compound can kill bacteria and tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal reduction in root canal contaminated with E. Faecalis. Thirty teeth with their root canals prepared were contaminated with E. faecalis. The teeth have received the chemical substance sodium hypochlorite for 30 minutes; ten teeth have received the azulene dye paste for 5 minutes and have been irradiated with a diode laser, output power 10 mW and λ= 685 nm for 3 minutes. Ten teeth have not received treatment (control group). The bacterial reduction was significantly higher for laser group when compared to chemical and control groups. These results indicate photodynamic therapy as an effective method to kill bacteria. (author)

  4. Two-coordinate control of the radiation pattern of a chemical non-chain electric-discharge DF laser by using space-time light modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies of radiation parameters of a chemical non-chain DF laser (emitting in the range from 3.5 to 4.1 μm) with an intracavity control of the radiation pattern with the help of spatiotemporal modulators based on PLZT electrooptic ceramics are presented. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  5. Low-intensity laser coupled with photosensitizer to reduce bacteria in root canals compared to chemical control; Laser em baixa intensidade associado a fotosensibilizador para reducao bacteriana intracanal comparado ao controle quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcez Segundo, Aguinaldo Silva

    2002-07-01

    The photodynamic therapy is a process in which a dye is associate with an appropriate wavelength of light and this dye goes to an excited state. The excited reacts with oxygen to form the highly reactive compound singlet oxygen, and this compound can kill bacteria and tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal reduction in root canal contaminated with E. Faecalis. Thirty teeth with their root canals prepared were contaminated with E. faecalis. The teeth have received the chemical substance sodium hypochlorite for 30 minutes; ten teeth have received the azulene dye paste for 5 minutes and have been irradiated with a diode laser, output power 10 mW and {lambda}= 685 nm for 3 minutes. Ten teeth have not received treatment (control group). The bacterial reduction was significantly higher for laser group when compared to chemical and control groups. These results indicate photodynamic therapy as an effective method to kill bacteria. (author)

  6. Controlling Chaotic Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gills, Zelda; Roy, Rajarshi

    1995-01-01

    Irregular fluctuations in intensity have long plagued the operation of a wide variety of solid-state lasers. We are exploring the possibility of exploiting rather than avoiding a laser's chaotic output. As an important step in that direction, we have applied a novel control technique to stabilize a solid state laser. By making small periodic changes in only one input parameter of the laser, we are able to stabilize complex periodic waveforms and steady state behavior in the laser output. We demonstrate the application of this approach in a diode pumped Nd:/YAG laser system.

  7. Alpha high-power chemical laser program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordi, Anthony J.; Lurie, Henry; Callahan, David W.; Thomson, Matthew

    1993-06-01

    Alpha is a megawatt-class ground demonstration of a hydrogen fluoride, continuous wave, space-based chemical laser. The laser operates in the infrared at 2.8 microns. The basic device consists of a cylindrical combustion chamber that exhausts radially outward through circumferential nozzles into an annular lasing area. An annular ring resonator is used to extract the laser energy from this area. Technical firsts include: (1) use of aluminum combustion chamber/nozzle ring modules, (2) diamond turned, water-cooled optics made of molybdenum for low thermal distortion with good heat transfer, (3) use of uncooled silicon mirrors in a megawatt-class laser system, (4) an optical bench made of aluminum honeycomb, and (5) active controls to adjust alignment of selected mirrors and the optical bench.

  8. Chemical crowd control agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Hussain, Syed Ather; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed; Anwar, Naureen; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Chemical crowd control agents are also referred to as riot control agents and are mainly used by civil authorities and government agencies to curtail civil disobedience gatherings or processions by large crowds. Common riot control agents used to disperse large numbers of individuals into smaller, less destructive, and more easily controllable numbers include chloroacetophenone, chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile, dibenzoxazepine, diphenylaminearsine, and oleoresin capsicum. In this paper, we discuss the emergency medical care needed by sufferers of acute chemical agent contamination and raise important issues concerning toxicology, safety and health. PMID:26658556

  9. Control of chemical chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫东; 钱积新

    2002-01-01

    Lyapunov exponents can act as the judgment rule whether the systems is chaotic or not.We propose an approach to control chaotic systems by varying the Lyapunov exponents of the system. At last we use this method to control a chemical system. Both the theoretical analysis and the simulation results prove that this method can quickly and effectively stabilize the chaotic systems to the desire points.

  10. Computer control of pulsed tunable dye lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed tunable dye lasers are being used extensively for spectroscopic and photo-chemical experiments, and a system for acquisition and spectral analysis of a volume of data generated will be quite useful. The development of a system for wavelength tuning and control of tunable dye lasers and an acquisition system for spectral data generated in experiments with these lasers are described. With this system, it is possible to control the tuning of three lasers, and acquire data in four channels, simultaneously. It is possible to arrive at the desired dye laser wavelength with a reproducibility of ± 0.012 cm-1, which is within the absorption width (atomic interaction) caused by pulsed dye lasers of linewidth 0.08 cm-1. The spectroscopic data generated can be analyzed for spectral identification within absolute accuracy ± 0.012 cm-1. (author). 6 refs., 11 figs

  11. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  12. Pressure Controlled Chemical Gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Megan R; Batista, Bruno C; Steinbock, Oliver

    2016-06-30

    The dissolution of metal salts in silicate solution can result in the growth of hollow precipitate tubes. These "chemical gardens" are a model of self-organization far from the equilibrium and create permanent macroscopic structures. The reproducibility of the growth process is greatly improved if the solid salt seed is replaced by a salt solution that is steadily injected by a pump; however, this modification of the original experiment eliminates the membrane-based osmotic pump at the base of conventional chemical gardens and does not allow for analyses in terms of the involved pressure. Here we describe a new experimental method that delivers the salt solution according to a controlled hydrostatic pressure. In one form of the experiment, this pressure slowly decreases as zinc sulfate solution flows into the silicate-containing reaction vessel, whereas a second version holds the respective solution heights constant. In addition to three known growth regimes (jetting, popping, budding), we observe single tubes that fill the vessel in a horizontally undulating but vertically layered fashion (crowding). The resulting, dried product has a cylindrical shape, very low density, and one continuous connection from top to bottom. We also present phase diagrams of these growth modes and show that the flow characteristics of our experiments follow a reaction-independent Hagen-Poiseuille equation. PMID:27266993

  13. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  14. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Sias, Carlo; Köhl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achi...

  15. Laser welding closed-loop power control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    A closed-loop control system is developed to maintain an even seam width on the root side of a laser weld by continually controlling the output laser power of a 1500 W CO2 laser.......A closed-loop control system is developed to maintain an even seam width on the root side of a laser weld by continually controlling the output laser power of a 1500 W CO2 laser....

  16. Chemical Control of Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Center (USDA), Beltsville, MD.

    Seven experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to help students investigate the control of plant growth with chemicals. Plant growth regulators, weed control, and chemical pruning are the topics studied in the experiments which are based on investigations that have been and are being conducted at the U. S. Agricultural Research Center,…

  17. Laser-Beam-Alignment Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    In laser-beam-alignment controller, images from video camera compared to reference patterns by fuzzy-logic pattern comparator. Results processed by fuzzy-logic microcontroller, which sends control signals to motor driver adjusting lens and pinhole in spatial filter.

  18. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  19. Laser Controlled Molecular Orientation Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular orientation is a challenging control issue covering a wide range of applications from reactive collisions, high order harmonic generation, surface processing and catalysis, to nanotechnologies. The laser control scenario rests on the following three steps: (i) depict some basic mechanisms producing dynamical orientation; (ii) use them both as computational and interpretative tools in optimal control schemes involving genetic algorithms; (iii) apply what is learnt from optimal control to improve the basic mechanisms. The existence of a target molecular rotational state combining the advantages of efficient and post-pulse long duration orientation is shown. A strategy is developed for reaching such a target in terms of a train of successive short laser pulses applied at predicted time intervals. Each individual pulse imparts a kick to the molecule which orients. Transposition of such strategies to generic systems is now under investigation

  20. Optimal control for chemical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Upreti, Simant Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Optimal Control for Chemical Engineers gives a detailed treatment of optimal control theory that enables readers to formulate and solve optimal control problems. With a strong emphasis on problem solving, the book provides all the necessary mathematical analyses and derivations of important results, including multiplier theorems and Pontryagin's principle.The text begins by introducing various examples of optimal control, such as batch distillation and chemotherapy, and the basic concepts of optimal control, including functionals and differentials. It then analyzes the notion of optimality, de

  1. Laser pulse design for coherent laser control of potassium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xian-Zhou; Jia Guang-Rui; He Hai-Fang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the dynamics of coherent laser control of potassium atoms is studied by using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA).The calculation results of population transfer are presented with different laser fields. The results show that the population can be transferred to target state completely by a specially designed laser field.

  2. Laser-Beam-Absorption Chemical-Species Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersh, Michael; Goldstein, Neil; Lee, Jamine; Bien, Fritz; Richtsmeier, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus measures concentration of chemical species in fluid medium (e.g., gaseous industrial process stream). Directs laser beam through medium, and measures intensity of beam after passage through medium. Relative amount of beam power absorbed in medium indicative of concentration of chemical species; laser wavelength chosen to be one at which species of interest absorbs.

  3. Controllable Passively Q-Switched Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Cheng-Wei; HUO Yu-Jing; HE Shu-Fang; YIN Xiao-Dong; ZHANG Bao-Shun

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present a novel kind of pulsed laser named controllable passively Q-switched laser (CPQL). A CPQL of Nd:YVO4 with Cr:YAG as saturable absorber was demonstrated and studied as an example of the kind of pulsed lasers. In CPQL, as the actively controlling signal, a diode laser beam was focused onto the saturable absorber in the resonant cavity of the passively Q-switched laser (PQL) and was absorbed by the absorber to realize the active control of the CPQL. The characters of the CPQL output laser pulses, such as generation time, repetition rate, pulse width, peak power and energy per pulse, can be controlled by the operator. The CPQLs possess the advantages of both passively Q-switched laser and actively Q-switched 1aser. Because of their compactness, low cost and controllability, the CPQLs will find wide applications in many fields.

  4. Laser-Induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Silicon Carbonitride

    OpenAIRE

    Besling, W.; van der Put, P.; Schoonman, J.

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of silicon carbonitride coatings and powders has been investigated using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and ammonia as reactants. An industrial CW CO2-laser in parallel configuration has been used to heat up the reactant gases. HMDS dissociates in the laser beam and reactive radicals are formed which increase rapidly in molecular weight by an addition mechanism. Dense polymer-like silicon carbonitride thin films and nanosized powders are formed depending ...

  5. Fuzzy logic control of a nitrogen laser

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Siu-Chung; Tan, Siong-Chai; Neo, Wah-Peng; Foong, Sze-Chern; Chan, Choon-Hao; Ho, Anthony T. S.; Chua, Hock-Chuan; Lee, Sing

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, the stability of the output of a laser is controlled through scientific means or by a simple feedback loop. For multiinput multioutput control and for medium- to high-power lasers, however, these control schemes may break down. We report on the use of a fuzzy logic control scheme to improve the stability of a pulsed nitrogen laser. Specifically, the nitrogen laser is modeled as a two-input two-output system. The two input parameters are the discharge voltage (V) and nitrogen pr...

  6. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  7. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, N. (ed.)

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  8. Cleaning laser spark spectroscopy for online cleaning quality control method development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutin, T. Y.; Smirnov, V. N.; Veiko, V. P.; Volkov, S. A.

    2011-02-01

    This work is dedicated to spectroscopic investigations of laser spark during the laser cleaning process. The goal is to proof its analytical possibilities for chemical composition determination for online cleaning quality control. Photographic recordings of laser spark were performed to estimate its parameters. Fiber spectrometer was used to analyze the emission of cleaning process established with fiber laser. Conclusions have been made about fiber laser radiation usability for spectroscopic purpose.

  9. High-energy molecular lasers self-controlled volume-discharge lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, V V

    2016-01-01

    This book displays the physics and design of high-power molecular lasers. The lasers described are self-controlled volume-discharge lasers. The book explains self-sustained discharge lasers, self-initiated discharge lasers and technical approaches to laser design. Important topics discussed are laser efficiency, laser beam quality and electric field homogeneity. The book contains many new innovative applications.

  10. Project LOCOST: Laser or Chemical Hybrid Orbital Space Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Alan; Kost, Alicia; Lampshire, Gregory; Larsen, Rob; Monahan, Bob; Wright, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    A potential mission in the late 1990s is the servicing of spacecraft assets located in GEO. The Geosynchronous Operations Support Center (GeoShack) will be supported by a space transfer vehicle based at the Space Station (SS). The vehicle will transport cargo between the SS and the GeoShack. A proposed unmanned, laser or chemical hybrid orbital space transfer vehicle (LOCOST) can be used to efficiently transfer cargo between the two orbits. A preliminary design shows that an unmanned, laser/chemical hybrid vehicle results in the fuel savings needed while still providing fast trip times. The LOCOST vehicle receives a 12 MW laser beam from one Earth orbiting, solar pumped, iodide Laser Power Station (LPS). Two Energy Relay Units (ERU) provide laser beam support during periods of line-of-sight blockage by the Earth. The baseline mission specifies a 13 day round trip transfer time. The ship's configuration consist of an optical train, one hydrogen laser engine, two chemical engines, a 18 m by 29 m box truss, a mission-flexible payload module, and propellant tanks. Overall vehicle dry mass is 8,000 kg. Outbound cargo mass is 20,000 kg, and inbound cargo mass is 6,000 kg. The baseline mission needs 93,000 kg of propellants to complete the scenario. Fully fueled, outbound mission mass is 121,000 kg. A regeneratively cooled, single plasma, laser engine design producing a maximum of 768 N of thrust is utilized along with two traditional chemical engines. The payload module is designed to hold 40,000 kg of cargo, though the baseline mission specifies less. A proposed design of a laser/chemical hybrid vehicle provides a trip time and propellant efficient means to transport cargo from the SS to a GeoShack. Its unique, hybrid propulsion system provides safety through redundancy, allows baseline missions to be efficiently executed, while still allowing for the possibility of larger cargo transfers.

  11. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Geddes, Cameron; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Mittelberger, Daniel; Nakamura, Kei; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  12. Microprocessor-Controlled Laser Balancing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Material removed by laser action as part tested for balance. Directed by microprocessor, laser fires appropriate amount of pulses in correct locations to remove necessary amount of material. Operator and microprocessor software interact through video screen and keypad; no programing skills or unprompted system-control decisions required. System provides complete and accurate balancing in single load-and-spinup cycle.

  13. Comparison of Laser Chemical Processing and LaserMicroJet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (LaserMicroJet®, LMJ, and Laser Chemical Processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used.

  14. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or “photonic reagents,” that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed.

  15. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  16. How to control chemical hazards

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Improving protection against chemical hazards is one of the 2012 CERN safety objectives identified by the Director General. Identifying and drawing up a complete inventory of chemicals, and assessing the associated risks are important steps in this direction.   The HSE Unit has drawn up safety rules, guidelines and forms to help you to meet this objective. We would like to draw your attention to: • safety guidelines C-0-0-1 and C-1-0-2 (now also available in French), which deal with the identification of hazardous chemicals and the assessment of chemical risk; • safety guideline C-1-0-1, which deals with the storage of hazardous chemicals. All safety documents can be consulted at: cern.ch/regles-securite The HSE Unit will be happy to answer any questions you may have. Write to us at: safety-general@cern.ch The HSE Unit

  17. Standoff photoacoustic sensing of trace chemicals by laser Doppler vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Hu, Q.; Liu, H.

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful technique that suitable for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. Normally a high-sensitive microphone or a quartz tuning fork is used to detect the signal in photoacoustic cell. In recent years, laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed to remote-sense photoacoustic signal on various substrates. It is a high-sensitivity sensor with a displacement resolution of effect of various chemicals is excited by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) with a scanning wavelength range of 6.89μm to 8.5 μm. A home-developed LDV at 1550nm wavelength is applied to detect the vibration signal. After normalize the vibration amplitude with QCL power, the photoacoustic spectrum of various chemicals can be obtained. Different factors that affect the detection accuracy and sensitivity have also been discussed. The results show the potential of the proposed technique for standoff detection of trace chemicals and explosives.

  18. Wavelength control of visible light laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, N.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K.; Suzuki, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Otsu, M.

    1990-04-01

    Wavelength control of visible light laser diodes was studied. By combining an interferometer and a diffraction grating, it became possible to control the wavelength of continuous oscillation in the range of 664 to 673nm, the frequency fine control range being 2GHz. And the spectral linewidth was narrowed to about 44kHz (10 exp minus 7 nm). With the use of a collimator lens, the beam expansion was narrowed to 2mrad. It was confirmed that the pulse output of continuous oscillation visible light laser diodes can be amplified by the YAG laser excitation dye laser. In the case of pulse oscillation, oscillation of 1GHz spectral width was obtained at the wavelength of 0.8 micro m by using an injection synchronization method. In the injection synchronization method, other laser beam is injected in an oscillator and a superior laser beam of synchronized components alone is obtained. As the wavelength control method is now stabilized and satisfies the conditions of narrow band, it has the prospect to be applied to the laser uranium enrichment technology.

  19. Laser isotope separation - a new class of chemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers may soon find several applications in chemical processing. The applications that have attracted the most research funding to date involve isotope separation for the nuclear industry. These isotopes have an unusually high value (≥$1000/kg) compared to bulk chemicals (∼$1/kg) and are generally required in very large quantities. In a laser isotope separation process, light is used to convert a separation that is very difficult or even impossible by conventional chemical engineering techniques to one that is readily handled by conventional separation technology. For some isotopes this can result in substantial capital and energy savings. A uranium enrichment process developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the closest to commercialization of the large scale laser isotope separation processes. Of particular interest to the Canadian nuclear industry are the laser separation of deuterium, tritium, zirconium-90 and carbon-14. In this paper, the basic principles behind laser isotope separation are reviewed and brief dscriptions of the more developed processes are given

  20. Correlation control theory of chaotic laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel control theory of chaotic systems is studied. The correlation functions are calculated and used as feedback signals of the chaotic lasers. Computer experiments have shown that in this way the chaotic systems can be controlled to have time-independent output when the external control parameters are in chaotic domain. (author)

  1. Applications of laser in the field of chemical solubility determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingming Chen(陈明鸣); Peisheng Ma(马沛生); Xinxing Liu(柳新星)

    2003-01-01

    A novel experiment method for chemical solubility determination was brought forward, in which opticsand chemistry principles are united and the change of laser intensity indicates the process of chemicaldissolving. The more undissolved solid exists in the mixture of solute and solvent, the less transmittedlaser intensity is detected. Only when the transmitted laser intensity in stirring state and that in staticstate comes into equalization, the dissolving process stops. Under the help of laser intensity judgement,measurements turn to be more feasible and objective, especially at high pressure. The average relativeerrors for the solubility data determined in this paper are 2.3% for those in the minor value scope and 1.7%for those in the high value scope respectively. Comparison of the experimental solubility data with theliterature ones demonstrates that the laser-aid solubility determination apparatus is stable and reliable.

  2. Fire control apparatus for a laser weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, R. H.

    1985-10-01

    This patent application discloses a laser weapon fire control computer apparatus for responding in real time to the escort/threat scenario that confronts the weapon. The fire control computer apparatus compares the threat data with stored predicted scenarios to develop a firing strategy menu which takes into account the fact that the laser energy is instantaneously propagated to the target but requires a substantial amount of time to inflict damage. The fire control computer apparatus utilizes the weapon's status, dwell time, slow time and fuel limits to yield a weapon pointing sequence and weapon on-off times.

  3. Feasibility of constructing a laser thermonuclear fusion driver based on an oxygen-iodine chemical laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the feasibility of constructing a driver for laser thermonuclear fusion in which the second harmonic of an oxygen-iodine chemical laser is used to pump solid-state lasers (for example, Cr3+-activated crystals). In contrast to the existing systems, a separate master oscillator is proposed for each channel of the driver. The proposal has the advantages of relative technological simplicity, high degree of uniformity of target irradiation, and providing optimal profile of a heating pulse at 0.8, 0.4, and 0.27 μm. 35 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  4. Laser-controllable coatings for corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Skirtach, Andre G; Sviridov, Dmitry V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2009-07-28

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach to the corrosion protection by use of "smart" laser-controllable coating. The main advantage of the proposed technique is that one could terminate the corrosion process by very intensive healing after an appearance of corrosion centers using local laser irradiation. It is also shown that by applying a polyelectrolyte shell with noble metal particles over the mesoporous titania and silica via layer-by-layer assembly it is possible to fabricate micro- and nanoscaled reservoirs, which, being incorporated into the zirconia-organosilica matrix, are responsible for the ability of laser-driven release of the loaded materials (e.g., corrosion inhibitor). Furthermore, the resultant films are highly adhesive and could be easily deposited onto different metallic substrates. Laser-mediated remote release of incorporated corrosion inhibitor (benzotriazole) from engineered mesoporous containers with silver nanoparticles in the container shell is observed in real time on single and multicontainer levels.

  5. Robust Control for the Mercury Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jacob S.

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Laser Altimeter Science Algorithms is a software system for controlling the laser altimeter aboard the Messenger spacecraft, which is to enter into orbit about Mercury in 2011. The software will control the altimeter by dynamically modifying hardware inputs for gain, threshold, channel-disable flags, range-window start location, and range-window width, by using ranging information provided by the spacecraft and noise counts from instrument hardware. In addition, because of severe bandwidth restrictions, the software also selects returns for downlink.

  6. Laser welding control by monitoring of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelickova, Hana; Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Rihakova, Lenka; Nozka, Libor

    2013-04-01

    Deep penetration welding is a typical industrial application of high power lasers, where plasma can be generated above the keyhole. Thanks to the plasma plume presence welding process can be controlled on-line by means of the plasma intensity measurements. Various on-line monitoring methods have been developed in research centers all over the world. Goal of them is to enable promptly operator action to avoid enormous economical looses if un-expected defect is detected. Our laboratory was participated in project CLET - "Closed loop control of the laser welding process through the measurement of plasma" as a responsible partner for developed system testing both in the laboratory with pulsed Nd:YAG laser and in the real welding facility with high power continual CO2 laser. Control system is based on the electron temperature computation from the relative intensities of couple of emission lines belong to certain metal ion present in plasma plume. Our experiment was realized using Ocean Optics HR2000+ spectrometer within the stainless steel tube longitudinal welding. Several couples of emission lines were tested to acquire a good signal at actual welding conditions. Then power calibration was made to obtain the electron temperature dependence on increasing power. Samples were prepared for microanalysis and measured by laser confocal scanning microscope to find optimal power range for full penetrations achieving without thermal distortion of the tube or weld humping. Numerical model of the remelted area cross section was made to display temperature distribution dependence on increasing power.

  7. Controllability of intense-laser ion acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shigeo; Kawata; Toshihiro; Nagashima; Masahiro; Takano; Takeshi; Izumiyama; Daiki; Kamiyama; Daisuke; Barada; Qing; Kong; Yan; Jun; Gu; Ping; Xiao; Wang; Yan; Yun; Ma; Wei; Ming; Wang; Wu; Zhang; Jiang; Xie; Huiran; Zhang; Dongbo; Dai

    2014-01-01

    An ion beam has the unique feature of being able to deposit its main energy inside a human body to kill cancer cells or inside material. However, conventional ion accelerators tend to be huge in size and cost. In this paper, a future intenselaser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching, and the ion particle energy control. In the study, each component is designed to control the ion beam quality by particle simulations. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical-density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser–target interaction.

  8. Temperature control during laser vessel welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, T A; Welch, A J

    1993-02-01

    A technique is described for the computer control of temperature during laser vessel welding. The technique is based on the use of thermal feedback from a calibrated IR sensor. The utilization of thermalfeedback makes it possible for welding to be performed at a quasiconstant temperature. An experimentalsystem based on this concept has been developed and evaluated in mock anastomoses with vasculartissue. A computer simulation of laser vessel welding with a one-dimensional heat conduction model hasbeen performed. Model parameters have been adjusted so that the relative effect of laser penetrationdepth and tissue dehydration as well as the role of thermal feedback in limiting the peak surfacetemperature can be studied. The results of the mock anastomoses are discussed in light of the computer model.

  9. Control of photodetachment spectra through laser dressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Nathan; Greene, Chris

    2013-05-01

    Photodetachment and photoionization spectra often display rich resonance structures. The properties of these spectra can be modified through dressing with intense laser fields, providing control over photon absorption and the emitted electron. We present a Floquet R-matrix method for calculating photodetachment cross sections in the presence of a dressing laser. The full wave functions in the Floquet formalism for bound and escaping electrons are found by solving the Schrödinger equation near the atomic core and applying analytic boundary conditions outside of the interaction region. These calculations are used to investigate the modification of existing resonances, such as modifying the shape, or q parameter, of Feshbach resonances. We also investigate the creation of new resonances in cases where high-lying bound states become autoionizing through the absorption of dressing laser photons. This work was supported by the DOE.

  10. The research of laser marking control technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiue; Zhang, Rong

    2009-08-01

    In the area of Laser marking, the general control method is insert control card to computer's mother board, it can not support hot swap, it is difficult to assemble or it. Moreover, the one marking system must to equip one computer. In the system marking, the computer can not to do the other things except to transmit marking digital information. Otherwise it can affect marking precision. Based on traditional control methods existed some problems, introduced marking graphic editing and digital processing by the computer finish, high-speed digital signal processor (DSP) control marking the whole process. The laser marking controller is mainly contain DSP2812, digital memorizer, DAC (digital analog converting) transform unit circuit, USB interface control circuit, man-machine interface circuit, and other logic control circuit. Download the marking information which is processed by computer to U disk, DSP read the information by USB interface on time, then processing it, adopt the DSP inter timer control the marking time sequence, output the scanner control signal by D/A parts. Apply the technology can realize marking offline, thereby reduce the product cost, increase the product efficiency. The system have good effect in actual unit markings, the marking speed is more quickly than PCI control card to 20 percent. It has application value in practicality.

  11. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Haniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4 fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures.

  12. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  13. Study of silica coatings degradation under laser irradiation and in controlled environment; Etude de la degradation de couches minces de silice sous flux laser et en environnement controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S

    2006-11-15

    Performances of optical components submitted to high laser intensities are usually determined by their laser-induced damage threshold. This value represents the highest density of energy (fluence) sustainable by the component before its damage. When submitted to laser fluences far below this threshold, optical performances may also decrease with time. The degradation processes depend on laser characteristics, optical materials, and environment around the component. Silica being the most used material in optics, the aim of this study was to describe and analyse the physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for laser-induced degradation of silica coatings in controlled environment. Experimental results show that degradation is due to the growth of a carbon deposit in the irradiated zone. From these results, a phenomenological model has been proposed and validated with numerical simulations. Then, several technological solutions have been tested in order to reduce the laser-induced contamination of silica coatings. (author)

  14. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Chemical and Laser Sciences Division concludes its first year, the Division personnel can be proud of their many scientific and technical accomplishments. Among the important milestones which the Division achieved were significant demonstrations of the process performance in the Special Isotope Separation program, of beam sensing techniques for the NPB program, and of optical angular multiplexing and energy extraction from the ICF KrF laser. In addition, the Los Alamos FTS was brought to operational status and the Bright Source attained intensities on the order of 1017 W/cm2. A few highlights of these and other research and development activities are presented in the following sections of this report

  15. Clarification of sodium-water chemical reaction using laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water, sodium-oxygen and sodium-hydrogen counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as Raman, absorption and photo-fragmentation spectroscopies. The measurement results show that the main product of the sodium-water reaction is NaOH. The sodium-water reaction rate is slower than that of the sodium-oxygen reaction and hydrogen does not react noticeably with sodium. (author)

  16. Effects of He-Ne laser beam on mechanical, heat, chemical and superficial wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study summarizes the effects of low-doses of He-Ne laser radiation (λ = 6328 A), on healing of four types of wounds, including mechanical, heat, chemical and superficial wounds. The results revealed that variations between complete wound-closure in irradiated samples and that of control groups were statistically significant. Moreover, the results suggest that the stimulative action of laser is an accumulative phenomenon, that affects factors involved in the course of wound healing. The results also indicate that the skin epithelium is a highly responsive tissue towards this sort of radiation, which suggests that the stimulative action of He-Ne laser could be assayed easily by using such tissues as a test target. (author). 11 refs, 2 tabs

  17. Controlling Laser Spot Size in Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Harold E.

    2005-01-01

    Three documents discuss a method of controlling the diameter of a laser beam projected from Earth to any altitude ranging from low orbit around the Earth to geosynchronous orbit. Such laser beams are under consideration as means of supplying power to orbiting spacecraft at levels of the order of tens of kilowatts apiece. Each such beam would be projected by use of a special purpose telescope having an aperture diameter of 15 m or more. Expanding the laser beam to such a large diameter at low altitude would prevent air breakdown and render the laser beam eyesafe. Typically, the telescope would include an adaptive-optics concave primary mirror and a convex secondary mirror. The laser beam transmitted out to the satellite would remain in the near field on the telescope side of the beam waist, so that the telescope focal point would remain effective in controlling the beam width. By use of positioning stages having submicron resolution and repeatability, the relative positions of the primary and secondary mirrors would be adjusted to change the nominal telescope object and image distances to obtain the desired beam diameter (typically about 6 m) at the altitude of the satellite. The limiting distance D(sub L) at which a constant beam diameter can be maintained is determined by the focal range of the telescope 4 lambda f(sup 2) where lambda is the wavelength and f the f/number of the primary mirror. The shorter the wavelength and the faster the mirror, the longer D(sub L) becomes.

  18. Coherence control for laser fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques have been developed for the beam smoothing of high power glass laser for the inertial confinement fusion research. A principal concept of beam smoothing includes the random phasing of beam and the speckle suppression. Techniques of coherence control are quite important in order to smooth out the speckle. Techniques reviewed here are the polarization distribution across the beam, the introduction of incoherence, the angular dispersion of spectral component, and the frequency modulated light with temporal and spatial color cycles. (author)

  19. Laser assisted chemically shaped unstable resonator, for high power coherent laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser assisted chemical etching (LACE) is used to etch a continuous graded channel, set inside a wide stripe graded-index and separate confinement heterostructure (GRIN-SCH) for laser diodes, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). After a procedure of growing-etching-regrowing, a two-part waveguide is formed inside such modified structure, that is characterized by a negative change in the lateral effective refractive index (ERI). This effects the cavity to work as an unstable resonator. Procedures on the photo etching process are described, including the GaAs photochemistry and the optical system, with special emphasis on the fabrication of the approximately parabolic channels, as this represents a novel step. We call the cavity fabricated by this method, the shaped unstable resonator (SHUR). (Author)

  20. Femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication based on electrons dynamics control using temporally or spatially shaped pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xueliang; Hu, Jie; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Liu, Pengjun; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    With ultrashort pulse durations and ultrahigh power densities, femtosecond laser presents unique advantages of high precision and high quality fabrication of microchannels in transparent materials. In our study, by shaping femtosecond laser pulse energy distribution in temporal or spatial domains, localized transient electrons dynamics and the subsequent processes, such as phase changes, can be controlled, leading to the dramatic increases in the capability of femtosecond laser microchannels fabrication. The temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulse trains can significantly enhance the material removal rate in both water-assisted femtosecond laser drilling and femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. Besides, high-aspect-ratio and small-diameter microchannels are drilled by spatially shaped femtosecond laser pulses.

  1. Bifurcation and Chaos Control for Nonlinear Laser Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, complexity science, including various bifurcations ,chaos and turbulence, has become a great challenge in various interdisciplinary fields. It promises to have a major impact on many aspects of nature science and engineering, even social and economic science. Candidates of complex system include coupled laser systems, accelerator-driven clean nuclear power system, neural networks, cellular automata, living organism, human brain, chemical reactions and economic systems. This new and challenging research and development area has in effect become a scientific inter-discipline itself, involving systems and control engineers, theoretical and experimental

  2. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Flood Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Bruce D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes events leading to a flood in the Wehr Chemistry Laboratory at Marquette University, discussing steps taken to minimize damage upon discovery. Analyzes the problem of flooding in the chemical laboratory and outlines seven steps of flood control: prevention; minimization; early detection; stopping the flood; evaluation; clean-up; and…

  3. Development of convenient nitrogen laser by using control of discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Seiichi; Yamaguchi, Eiichiro; Ishii, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Among the most important UV lasers are the excimer and the nitrogen. A nitrogen gas laser is widely used in various fields. We considered some ideas for a nitrogen laser built in more easily by using of triboluminescence. In this study, we discussed development and discussion of convenient nitrogen laser. We considered utilization of triboluminescence for control of discharge and the system of electric generator using triboluminescence in the longitudinally excited nitrogen laser.

  4. Controlling exposure to chemicals: a simple guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alastair

    2006-09-01

    Controlling exposure to chemicals in the workplace has been made easier by the use of a guide published by the U.K. Health and Safety Executive (HSE). Known as COSHH (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations) Essentials, the guide is a simple five-step procedure to devise appropriate control strategies to reduce exposures to various substances under different conditions. U.K. health and safety law requires risk assessments prior to use of hazardous substances and installation of appropriate control strategies before work commences. A 1996 survey of 1500 safety managers and trade union safety representatives revealed that the majority had little understanding of occupational safety limits for chemicals. Small- and medium-sized companies had little understanding of limits, and most could not develop control strategies. A new approach was required. COSHH Essentials is it. Developed over 3 years by a working group of hygienists and toxicologists representing HSE, industry, trade unions, and independent experts, the guide is now available in both paper-based and internet versions. It applies a hazard banding approach validated by data for 111 substances that have well-founded U.K. occupational exposure limits. New users select an appropriate hazard band for chemicals based on risk phrases. Details about dustiness for powders or volatility for liquids are inserted, and the guide allocates substances to one of four exposure bands linked, in turn, to specific control strategies. Now accessible through the HSE web site, COSHH Essentials will offer control strategies for both single chemicals and whole processes. To date over 300,000 risk assessments have been carried out using the internet version of COSHH Essentials. PMID:17119256

  5. Controlling Second Harmonic Efficiency of Laser Beam Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling second harmonic efficiency of laser beam interactions. A laser system generates two laser beams (e.g., a laser beam with two polarizations) for incidence on a nonlinear crystal having a preferred direction of propagation. Prior to incidence on the crystal, the beams are optically processed based on the crystal's beam separation characteristics to thereby control a position in the crystal along the preferred direction of propagation at which the beams interact.

  6. Programmable chemical controllers made from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Dalchau, Neil; Srinivas, Niranjan; Phillips, Andrew; Cardelli, Luca; Soloveichik, David; Seelig, Georg

    2013-10-01

    Biological organisms use complex molecular networks to navigate their environment and regulate their internal state. The development of synthetic systems with similar capabilities could lead to applications such as smart therapeutics or fabrication methods based on self-organization. To achieve this, molecular control circuits need to be engineered to perform integrated sensing, computation and actuation. Here we report a DNA-based technology for implementing the computational core of such controllers. We use the formalism of chemical reaction networks as a 'programming language' and our DNA architecture can, in principle, implement any behaviour that can be mathematically expressed as such. Unlike logic circuits, our formulation naturally allows complex signal processing of intrinsically analogue biological and chemical inputs. Controller components can be derived from biologically synthesized (plasmid) DNA, which reduces errors associated with chemically synthesized DNA. We implement several building-block reaction types and then combine them into a network that realizes, at the molecular level, an algorithm used in distributed control systems for achieving consensus between multiple agents. PMID:24077029

  7. Size-controlled synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles through chemical and photo-chemical routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangeysh, Behzad

    The central objective of this work is developing convenient general procedures for controlling the formation and stabilization of nanoscale transition metal particles. Contemporary interest in developing alternative synthetic approaches for producing nanoparticles arises in large part from expanding applications of the nanomaterials in areas such as catalysis, electronics and medicine. This research focuses on advancing the existing nanoparticle synthetic routes by using a new class of polymer colloid materials as a chemical approach, and the laser irradiation of metal salt solution as a photo-chemical method to attain size and shape selectivity. Controlled synthesis of small metal nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 1 to 5nm is still a continuing challenge in nanomaterial synthesis. This research utilizes a new class of polymer colloid materials as nano-reactors and protective agents for controlling the formation of small transition metal nanoparticles. The polymer colloid particles were formed from cross-linking of dinegatively charged metal precursors with partially protonated poly dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDMAEMA). Incorporation of [PtCl6]2- species into the colloidal particles prior to the chemical reduction was effectively employed as a new strategy for synthesis of unusually small platinum nanoparticles with narrow size distributions (1.12 +/-0.25nm). To explore the generality of this approach, in a series of proof-of-concept studies, this method was successfully employed for the synthesis of small palladium (1.4 +/-0.2nm) and copper nanoparticles (1.5 +/-0.6nm). The polymer colloid materials developed in this research are pH responsive, and are designed to self-assemble and/or disassemble by varying the levels of protonation of the polymer chains. This unique feature was used to tune the size of palladium nanoparticles in a small range from 1nm to 5nm. The procedure presented in this work is a new convenient room temperature route for synthesis of

  8. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS

  9. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanawade, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Kanawade@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Mehari, Fanuel [Master Programme in Advanced Optical Technologies (MAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glueckstrasse 11, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Tangermann-Gerk, Katja [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS.

  10. Quantum cascade laser: Applications in chemical detection and environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the structural parameter optimization of the active region of a GaAs-based quantum cascade laser in order to maximize the optical gain of the laser at the characteristic wavelengths, which are best suited for detection of pollutant gasses, such as SO2, HNO3, CH4, and NH3, in the ambient air by means of direct absorption. The procedure relies on applying elaborate tools for global optimization, such as the genetic algorithm. One of the important goals is to extend the applicability of a single active region design to the detection of several compounds absorbing at close wave-lengths, and this is achieved by introducing a strong external magnetic field perpendicularly to the epitaxial layers. The field causes two-dimensional continuous energy subbands to split into the series of discrete Landau levels. Since the arrangement of Landau levels depends strongly on the magnitude of the magnetic field, this enables one to control the population inversion in the active region, and hence the optical gain. Furthermore, strong effects of band non-parabolicity result in subtle changes of the lasing wavelength at magnetic fields which maximize the gain, thus providing a path for fine-tuning of the output radiation properties and changing the target compound for detection. The numerical results are presented for quantum cascade laser structures designed to emit at specified wavelengths in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum.

  11. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions

  12. Laser and chemical surface modifications of titanium grade 2 for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwaśniak, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Pura, J., E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Zwolińska, M.; Wieciński, P. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Skarżyński, H.; Olszewski, L. [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland); World Hearing Center, Kajetany (Poland); Marczak, J. [Military University of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Garbacz, H.; Kurzydłowski, K.J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • DLIL technique and etching were used for functionalization of Ti grade 2 surface. • Modification was performed on semi-finished flat and curved Ti surfaces. • Modification results in periodic multimodal (micro and nano-size) Ti topography. - Abstract: The article presents combined, chemical and physical approach to titanium surface functionalization designed for biomedical applications. The topography modification has been obtained by employing the double laser beam interference technique and chemical etching. In the outcome, clean and smooth Ti surface as well as periodic striated topography with the roughness range from nano- to micrometers were created. The obtained structures were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, chemical composition, mechanical properties and microstructures. In order to achieve all information, numerous of research methods have been used: scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and microhardness measurements. Demonstrated methodology can be used as an effective tool for manufacturing controlled surface structures improving the bone–implants interactions.

  13. Study of silica coatings degradation under laser irradiation and in controlled environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performances of optical components submitted to high laser intensities are usually determined by their laser-induced damage threshold. This value represents the highest density of energy (fluence) sustainable by the component before its damage. When submitted to laser fluences far below this threshold, optical performances may also decrease with time. The degradation processes depend on laser characteristics, optical materials, and environment around the component. Silica being the most used material in optics, the aim of this study was to describe and analyse the physical-chemical mechanisms responsible for laser-induced degradation of silica coatings in controlled environment. Experimental results show that degradation is due to the growth of a carbon deposit in the irradiated zone. From these results, a phenomenological model has been proposed and validated with numerical simulations. Then, several technological solutions have been tested in order to reduce the laser-induced contamination of silica coatings. (author)

  14. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Homayoon; Voisinet, Leeann

    1995-01-01

    A report presents additional information about laser-beam-steering apparatus described in "Digital Controller for Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem" (NPO-19193) and "More About Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19381). Reiterates basic principles of operation of beam-steering subsystem, with emphasis on modes of operation, basic design concepts, and initial experiments on partial prototype of apparatus.

  15. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Skettrup, Torben;

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only. Coupling of optical cavities offers a means of controlling the properties of one cavity (e.g. a laser) by making adjustments to another, external cavity. In this contribution we consider a unidirectional ring laser (bow-tie laser) coupled to an external ring cavity. Using...

  16. Laser diagnostics of chemical vapour deposition of diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Wills, J B

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) has been used to make diagnostic measurements of chemically activated CH sub 4 / H sub 2 gas mixtures during the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of thin diamond films. Absolute absorbances, concentrations and temperatures are presented for CH sub 3 , NH and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a hot filament (HF) activated gas mixture and CH, C sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in a DC arc plasma jet activated mixture. Measurements of the radical species were made using a pulsed dye laser system to generate tuneable visible and UV wavelengths. These species have greatest concentration in the hottest, activated regions of the reactors. Spatial profiling of the number densities of CH sub 3 and NH radicals have been used as stringent tests of predictions of radical absorbance and number densities made by 3-D numerical simulations, with near quantitative agreement. O sub 2 has been shown to reside in the activated region of the Bristol DC arc jet at concentrations (approx 10 sup 1 sup 3 molecules / cm...

  17. Designing, modeling and controlling a novel autonomous laser weeding system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Andersson, Kim Johan; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm;

    2009-01-01

    conveyor belts fully controlled by a Siemens PLC controller (programmable logic controller), a stereo vision system consisting of two cameras, a 2-axis laser beam deflection unit and a laser source. The main challenge in this project was to accurately estimate and reconstruct the weed growth center using...

  18. AUTOMATED DYE LASER CALIBRATION USING MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL AND OPTOGALVANIC DETECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Nestor, J

    1983-01-01

    A nitrogen pumped, grazing incidence dye laser has been designed with a fully dedicated microprocessor controller. One of the primary tasks of the processor is to determine the dye laser output wavelength and to maintain the correct wavelength while scanning. For this purpose, a fraction of the laser output is diverted to a small neon glow discharge lamp which is monitored for resonant opto-galvanic responses associated with atomic neon. As the laser is tuned, the responses are correlated wit...

  19. Chemical optimization algorithm for fuzzy controller design

    CERN Document Server

    Astudillo, Leslie; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    In this book, a novel optimization method inspired by a paradigm from nature is introduced. The chemical reactions are used as a paradigm to propose an optimization method that simulates these natural processes. The proposed algorithm is described in detail and then a set of typical complex benchmark functions is used to evaluate the performance of the algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed optimization algorithm can outperform other methods in a set of benchmark functions. This chemical reaction optimization paradigm is also applied to solve the tracking problem for the dynamic model of a unicycle mobile robot by integrating a kinematic and a torque controller based on fuzzy logic theory. Computer simulations are presented confirming that this optimization paradigm is able to outperform other optimization techniques applied to this particular robot application

  20. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  1. Parallel femtosecond laser processing with vector-wave control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayasaki Yoshio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Parallel femtosecond laser processing with a computer-generated hologram displayed on a spatial light modulator, has the advantages of high throughput and high energy-use efficiency. for further increase of the processing efficiency, we demonstrated parallel femtosecond laser processing with vector-wave control that is based on polarization control using a pair of spatial light modulators.

  2. Spectral control of diode lasers using external waveguide circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated spectral control of diode lasers using external waveguide circuits. The purpose of this work is to investigate such external control for providing a new class of diode lasers with technologically interesting properties, such as a narrow spectral bandwidth and spectrally tunable outpu

  3. Controlling the formation of excited neutral D* fragments of D2 using intense ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizollah, Peyman; Berry, Ben; Severt, T.; Jochim, Bethany; Zohrabi, M.; Kanaka Raju, P.; Rajput, Jyoti; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2016-05-01

    Excited neutral D* fragments (n >> 1) are produced by the interaction of strong-field laser pulses with D2 molecules. In this work, we focus on the formation of low kinetic energy release (KER) D* fragments, which are relatively unstudied, using NIR (800-nm) and UV (400-nm) laser pulses. The KER spectrum is found to be very sensitive to the laser parameters, including laser chirp. By changing the chirp of the UV laser pulses, two separate low-KER peaks are generated instead of a single peak. Moreover, the ratio between these peaks can be controlled with the chirp. Similarly, by chirping the NIR pulses, the low-KER peak is attenuated and shifted to lower energy. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. Department of Energy. BJ was also supported in part by DOE-SCGF (DE-AC05-06OR23100).

  4. The Effect of Laser Treatment as a Weed Control Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Christensen, Svend;

    2006-01-01

    A laser beam directed towards weeds can be an efficient weed control method as an alternative to herbicides. Lasers may deliver high-density energy to selected plant material, raising the temperature of the water in the plant cells and thereby stop or delay the growth. A commercial use of lasers...... for weed control, however, require a systematic investigation of the relationship between energy density and the biological effect on different weed species, growth stages, etc. This paper investigates the effect of laser treatment directed towards the apical meristems of selected weed species...... chickweed), Tripleurospermum inodorum (scentless mayweed) and Brassica napus (oilseed rape). The experiment showed that laser treatment of the apical meristems caused significant growth reduction and in some cases had lethal effects on the weed species. The biological efficacy of the laser control method...

  5. Topographical and chemical microanalysis of surfaces with a scanning probe microscope and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakovski; Beauchamp

    2000-10-01

    Spatially resolved chemical imaging is achieved by combining a fiber-optic scanning probe microscope with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in a single instrument, TOPOLIBS. Elemental composition of surfaces can be mapped and correlated with topographical data. The experiment is conducted in air with minimal sample preparation. In a typical experiment, surface topography is analyzed by scanning a sharp fiber-optic probe across the sample using shear force feedback. The probe is then positioned over a feature of interest and pulsed radiation is delivered to the surface using a nitrogen laser. The pulse vaporizes material from the surface and generates a localized plasma plume. Optical emission from the plume is analyzed with a compact UV/visible spectrometer. Ablation crater size is controlled by the amount of laser power coupled into the probe. Sampling areas with submicrometer dimensions are achieved by using reduced laser power. PMID:11028639

  6. Broadband laser polarization control with aligned carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, He; Lia, Diao; Chen, Ya; Mattila, Marco; Tian, Ying; Yong, Zhenzhong; Yang, Changxi; Tittonen, Ilkka; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jingtao; Li, Qingwen; Kauppinen, Esko I; Lipsanen, Harri; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple approach to fabricate aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT) device for broadband polarization control in fiber laser systems. The ACNT device was fabricated by pulling from as-fabricated vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. Their anisotropic property is confirmed with optical and scanning electron microscopy, and with polarized Raman and absorption spectroscopy. The device was then integrated into fiber laser systems (at two technologically important wavelengths of 1 and 1.5 um) for polarization control. We obtained a linearly-polarized light output with the maximum extinction ratio of ~12 dB. The output polarization direction could be fully controlled by the ACNT alignment direction in both lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that ACNT device is applied to polarization control in laser systems. Our results exhibit that the ACNT device is a simple, low-cost, and broadband polarizer to control laser polarization dynamics, for various photonic applications (such as ...

  7. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    OpenAIRE

    Dominik Irnich; Norbert Salih; Martin Offenbächer; Johannes Fleckenstein

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratin...

  8. Intelligent Controller Design for a Chemical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Glan Devadhas G

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical process control is a challenging problem due to the strong on*line non*linearity and extreme sensitivity to disturbances of the process. Ziegler – Nichols tuned PI and PID controllers are found to provide poor performances for higher*order and non–linear systems. This paper presents an application of one*step*ahead fuzzy as well as ANFIS (adaptive*network*based fuzzy inference system tuning scheme for an Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor CSTR process. The controller is designed based on a Mamdani type and Sugeno type fuzzy system constructed to model the dynamics of the process. The fuzzy system model can take advantage of both a priori linguistic human knowledge through parameter initialization, and process measurements through on* line parameter adjustment. The ANFIS, which is a fuzzy inference system, is implemented in the framework of adaptive networks. The proposed ANFIS can construct an input*output mapping based on both human knowledge (in the form of fuzzy if*then rules and stipulated input*output data pairs. In this method, a novel approach based on tuning of fuzzy logic control as well as ANFIS for a CSTR process, capable of providing an optimal performance over the entire operating range of process are given. Here Fuzzy logic control as well as ANFIS for obtaining the optimal design of the CSTR process is explained. In this approach, the development of rule based and the formation of the membership function are evolved simultaneously. The performance of the algorithm in obtaining the optimal tuning values has been analyzed in CSTR process through computer simulation.

  9. Chemical Biology Strategies for Biofilm Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbes live as densely populated multicellular surface-attached biofilm communities embedded in self-generated, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). EPSs serve as a scaffold for cross-linking biofilm cells and support development of biofilm architecture and functions. Biofilms can have a clear negative impact on humans, where biofilms are a common denominator in many chronic diseases in which they prime development of destructive inflammatory conditions and the failure of our immune system to efficiently cope with them. Our current assortment of antimicrobial agents cannot efficiently eradicate biofilms. For industrial applications, the removal of biofilms within production machinery in the paper and hygienic food packaging industry, cooling water circuits, and drinking water manufacturing systems can be critical for the safety and efficacy of those processes. Biofilm formation is a dynamic process that involves microbial cell migration, cell-to-cell signaling and interactions, EPS synthesis, and cell-EPS interactions. Recent progress of fundamental biofilm research has shed light on novel chemical biology strategies for biofilm control. In this article, chemical biology strategies targeting the bacterial intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways will be discussed.

  10. Toxicological characterization of chemicals produced from laser irradiation of graphite composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major potential hazards associated with laser machining of graphite composite materials is the toxic fumes and gases that are generated. When exposed to the intense energy of the laser beam, the organic polymer matrix of the composite material may decompose into various toxic by-products. To advance the understanding of the laser machining process from a health and safety viewpoint, this particular study consisted of the following steps: collect and analyze gaseous by-products generated during laser machining; collect particulates generated during laser machining and chemically extract them to determine the chemical species that may have absorbed or recondensed onto these particles; and review and evaluate the toxicity of the identified chemical species

  11. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues. PMID:25474546

  12. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Irnich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point and sham laser (red light treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3 in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation. We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44% healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41% after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26. Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS. The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se.

  13. Is sham laser a valid control for acupuncture trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se. PMID:21772922

  14. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Abitan, Haim; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Variable phase coupling to an external ring is used to control a unidirectional ring laser. The observed behavior of the coupled rings is explained theoretically. We have found experimentally that by quickly changing the phase of the feedback from the external ring it is possible to Q-switch the...... ring laser. Also, at certain values of the phase of the feedback in the external ring, instabilities in the total system occur and oscillations arise in the ring laser....

  15. Integrated chemical-thermal and laser treatment of structural and tool steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the techniques of autoradiography, radiography, metallography and micro hardness measurement, the distribution of boron and the surface hardening of structural and tool steels under complex chemical, thermal and laser treatment have been investigated

  16. Molecular wave-packet dynamics on laser-controlled transition states

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Andreas; Cörlin, Philipp; Sperl, Alexander; Schönwald, Michael; Mizuno, Tomoya; Sansone, Giuseppe; Senftleben, Arne; Ullrich, Joachim; Feuerstein, Bernold; Pfeifer, Thomas; Moshammer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling the electronic as well as ro-vibrational motion and, thus, the entire chemical dynamics in molecules is the ultimate goal of ultrafast laser and imaging science. In photochemistry, laser-induced dissociation has become a valuable tool for modification and control of reaction pathways and kinetics. Here, we present a pump-probe study of the dissociation dynamics of H$_2^+$ using ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and near-infrared (IR) laser pulses. The reaction kinematics can be controlled by varying the pump-probe delay. We demonstrate that the nuclear motion through the transition state can be reduced to isolated pairs of initial vibrational states. The dynamics is well reproduced by intuitive semi-classical trajectories on a time-dependent potential curve. From this most fundamental scenario we gain insight in the underlying mechanisms which can be applied as design principles for molecular quantum control, particularly for ultrafast reactions involving protons.

  17. [Effects of helium-neon laser on physico-chemical properties of the bile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Kh Kh; Dzhuraev, Kh Sh; Barakaev, S B; Kharina, T P; Pulatov, L I

    1990-08-01

    The influence of helium-neon laser radiation on bile physico-chemical characteristics in healthy subjects and in patients with the physico-chemical stage of gallstone disease was studied in vitro. This type of laser was found to induce positive therapeutic effects, such as: correction of hydrogen ion concentrations, surface tension and viscosity decrease and prolonged bile nucleation in patients with gallstone disease.

  18. Noninvasive Facial Rejuvenation. Part 3: Physician-Directed-Lasers, Chemical Peels, and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaike, Jesse D; Agrawal, Nikhil; Chang, Daniel; Lee, Edward I; Nigro, Marjory G

    2016-08-01

    A proper knowledge of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is integral to the practice of a cosmetic surgeon. Noninvasive facial rejuvenation can be divided into patient- versus physician-directed modalities. Patient-directed facial rejuvenation combines the use of facial products such as sunscreen, moisturizers, retinoids, α-hydroxy acids, and various antioxidants to both maintain youthful skin and rejuvenate damaged skin. Physicians may recommend and often prescribe certain products, but patients are in control with this type of facial rejuvenation. On the other hand, physician-directed facial rejuvenation entails modalities that require direct physician involvement, such as neuromodulators, filler injections, laser resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. With the successful integration of each of these modalities, a complete facial regimen can be established and patient satisfaction can be maximized. This article is the last in a three-part series describing noninvasive facial rejuvenation. Here the authors review the mechanism, indications, and possible complications of lasers, chemical peels, and other commonly used noninvasive modalities. PMID:27478423

  19. Penetration control in laser welding of sheet metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Meijer, Johan; Jonker, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    For economical reasons it is desirable to apply the highest possible speed during laser welding. Increasing the welding speed at a certain laser power might result in insufficient penetration of the weld. This work describes the design of a feedback controller, which is able to maintain full penetra

  20. Picosecond lasers with the dynamical operation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. G.; Morozov, V. B.; Olenin, A. N.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical model for simulation of generation process in advanced pulse-periodic high-peak-power picosecond diode-pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF lasers has been developed. The model adequately describes picosecond pulse formation governed by active and passive mode-locking, negative feedback and adjustable loss level in the oscillator cavity. Optical jitter of output pulses attributed to laser generation development from spontaneous noise level was evaluated using statistical analysis of calculation results. In the presented laser scheme, minimal jitter value on the level ~40 ps was estimated.

  1. Heating power feedback control for CO2 laser fusion splicers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenxin; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Toshirou; Klimowych, William

    2013-02-01

    A novel feedback control method has been developed for an automated splicer using a CO2 laser as the heating element. The feedback method employs a sensor for laser beam power and CMOS cameras as sensors for fiber luminescence which is directly related to glass temperature. The CO2 laser splicer with this type of feedback system provides a consistent platform for the fiber laser and bio-medical industry for fabrication of fused glass components such as tapers, couplers, combiners, mode-field adaptors, and fusion splices. With such a closed loop feedback system, both splice loss and peak-to-peak taper ripple are greatly reduced.

  2. Texture control during laser deposition of nickel-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nickel-based superalloy was deposited on a nickel-based superalloy substrate by a laser-aided direct metal deposition process. The age-hardening behavior of the as-deposited clad was studied. The effect of laser beam scanning pattern on dendrite growth morphology was investigated using electron backscatter diffraction. Unidirectional laser beam scanning pattern developed a fiber texture; conversely, a backward and forward scanning pattern developed a rotated cube texture in the deposit. This paper reports a route to produce texture-controlled laser clad on a polycrystalline substrate.

  3. Features of Controlled Laser Thermal Cleavage of Crystalline Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled laser thermal cleavage of crystalline silicon has been numerically simulated. A 3D analysis of the thermoelastic fields formed in a single-crystal silicon wafer as a result of successive laser heating and exposure to a coolant was performed for three different versions of anisotropy. The simulation was performed for laser irradiation with different wavelengths: 1.06 and 0.808 μm. The calculation results have been experimentally verified using a YAG laser. The results can be used in the electronics industry to optimize the precise separation of silicon wafers into crystals.

  4. High stable power control of a laser diode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiu-ru; LI Cheng; YE Hong-an; L(U) Guo-hui; JIA Shi-lou

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,the low and the high frequency noises of a laser diode have been analyzed. Based on the analysis a novel scheme that adapts analog and digital hybrid techniques is proposed to stabilize the output power of a laser diode. With the hybrid controller,the low and the high frequency noises of a laser diode are conspicuously reduced.By accurate calculation,the short-term stability of the output power of laser diode reaches ±0.55‰, and the long-term stability is ±0.7‰.

  5. LASER-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF METAL CARBONYLS FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF MICROSTRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Tonneau, D.; Auvert, G.; Pauleau, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten and nickel carbonyls were used to produce metal microstructures by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various substrates. The deposition rate of microstructures produced by thermodecomposition of W(CO)6 on Si substrates heated with a cw Ar+ laser beam was relatively low (10 to 30 nm/s) even at high temperatures (above 900°C). Ni microstructures were deposited on quartz substrates irradiated with a CO2 laser beam. Relatively high laser powers were needed to heat the Ni s...

  6. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Chunhui [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yongsheng, E-mail: yongshengliu@nwpu.edu.cn [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Weinan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China); Zhang, Qing [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yang, Xiaojun [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 10068 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} after laser treatment.

  7. Microstructure and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films machined by femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. • The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. And the number of nanoparticles increased with the processing power as well. • It revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. • It showed that a great decrease of sp3/sp2 after laser treatment. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser is of great interest for machining high melting point and hardness materials such as diamond-like carbon, SiC ceramic, et al. In present work, the microstructural and chemical bond evolution of diamond-like carbon films were investigated using electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques after machined by diverse femtosecond laser power in air. The results showed the machining depth was essentially proportional to the laser power. The well patterned microgrooves and ripple structures with nanoparticles were formed distinctly in the channels. Considering the D and G Raman band parameters on the laser irradiation, it revealed a conversion from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite after laser treated with increasing laser power. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed a great decrease of sp3/sp2 after laser treatment

  8. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, S; Kamiyama, D; Nagashima, T; Barada, D; Gu, Y J; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q; Wang, P X

    2015-01-01

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters and the collimation target sizes. The intense short-pulse lasers are now available, and are used to generate an ion beam. The issues in the laser ion acceleration include an ion beam collimation, ion energy spectrum control, ion production efficiency, ion energy control, ion beam bunching, etc. The laser-produced ion beam tends to expand in the transverse and longitudinal directions during the ion beam propagation. The ion beam collimation is focused in this paper.

  9. Control of the differential interference contrast in reinjected bimode laser

    CERN Document Server

    Lacot, Eric; Hugon, Olivier; de Chatellus, Hugues Guillet

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, that it is possible to control (i.e., to enhance or cancel) the contrast of the interference pattern appearing in the intensity images obtained with a laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) setup using a bimode laser. The laser is composed of two coupled orthogonally polarized states that interact (i.e., interfere) through the cross saturation laser dynamics. We created the contrast control by choosing the frequency shift (i.e., the beating frequency) between the feedback electric fields and the intracavity electric fields. We have shown that the interference contrast of the output power modulation of the laser total intensity is independent from the frequency shift and is always maximal. On the other hand, the interference contrast of each polarization state is frequency dependent. We obtained the maximal contrast when the frequency shift was equal to one of the resonance frequencies of the bimode dynamics, and was very low (and almost cancels) for ...

  10. Laser-based measuring equipment controlled by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some laser-based measuring equipment controlled by microcomputer developed for industrial and scientific purposes are described. These equipments are intended for dial indicators verification, graduated rules measurement, and for very accurate measurement of the gravitational constant. (authors)

  11. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  12. Laser-machined components for microanalytical and chemical separation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1998-10-01

    Excimer lasers have proven to be powerful tools for machining polymeric components used in microanalytical and microchemical separation devices. We report the use of laser machining methods to produce microfluidic channels and liquid/liquid contact membranes for a number of devices fabricated at our laboratory. Microchannels 50- to 100- micrometers -wide have been produced directly in bulk polycarbonate chips using a direct-write laser micromachining system. Wider microchannels have been produced by laser machining paths through sheets of polyimide film, then sandwiching the patterned piece between solid chips of polycarbonate stock. A comparison of direct-write and mask machining processes used to produce some of the microfluidic features is made. Examples of microanalytical devices produced using these methods are presented. Included are microdialysis units used to remove electrolytes from liquid samples and electrophoretic separation devices, both used for extremely low volume samples intended for mass spectrometric analysis. A multilayered microfluidic device designed to analyze low volume groundwater samples for hazardous metals and a fluidics motherboard are also described. Laser machining processes have also been explored for producing polymeric membranes suitable for use in liquid/liquid contactors used for removal of soluble hazardous components from waste streams. A step-and-repeat mask machining process was used to produce 0.5 X 8 cm membranes in 25- and 50-micrometers -thick polyimide. Pore diameters produced using this method were five and ten micrometers. The laser machined membranes were sputter coated with PTFE prior to use to improve fluid breakthrough characteristics.

  13. A Polarization Controlled Switchable Multiwavelength Erbium-Doped Fibre Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯新焕; 刘艳格; 孙磊; 袁树忠; 开桂云; 董孝义

    2004-01-01

    A polarization controlled switchable multiwavelength erbium-dopedfibre laser with overlapping cavities is proposed. The wavelengths are specified by two Bragg gratings in polarization-maintaining PANDA fibre. The proposed laser can be designed to be operated in stable four-wavelength or wavelength switching modes only by simple adjustment of two polarization controllers. For wavelength switching, four single-wavelength, six dualwavelength, and four three-wavelength operations have been obtained. The minimum wavelength spacing is only about 0.4 nm.

  14. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  15. A high repetition rate passively Q-switched microchip laser for controllable transverse laser modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Bai, Sheng-Chuang; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    A Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 microchip laser for versatile controllable transverse laser modes has been demonstrated by adjusting the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal along the tilted pump beam direction. The pump beam diameter-dependent asymmetric saturated inversion population inside the Nd:YVO4 crystal governs the oscillation of various Laguerre-Gaussian, Ince-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian modes. Controllable transverse laser modes with repetition rates over 25 kHz and up to 183 kHz, depending on the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal, have been achieved. The controllable transverse laser beams with a nanosecond pulse width and peak power over hundreds of watts have been obtained for potential applications in optical trapping and quantum computation.

  16. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkowski, Joseph J.; Hagans, Karla G.

    1994-03-01

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multilaser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of 238U ground and metastable states, 235U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL's LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode- lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  17. Control of surface and bulk crystalline quality in single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Friel, I.; Clewes, S L; Dhillon, H. K.; Perkins, N.; Twitchen, D. J.; Scarsbrook, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of existing technologies based on single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), and to open up new technologies in fields such as quantum computing or solid state and semiconductor disc lasers, control over surface and bulk crystalline quality is of great importance. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching using an Ar/Cl gas mixture is demonstrated to remove sub-surface damage of mechanically processed surfaces, whilst maintaining macro...

  18. Chemical-ionization visible and ultraviolet gas lasers: A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudenslager, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions or Penning ionization reactions are used to produce population inversions between electronic states of molecular ions which should result in stimulated emission in ultraviolet and visible regions. Such lasers could be used in study of short-lived reaction intermediates, crystal structure and scattering, and photolysis.

  19. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  20. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  1. Electron-beam-controlled laser with a grid-controlled electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanesyan, V.S.; Dutov, A.I.; Lakhno, Y.V.; Malkhov, L.N.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental investigation was made of an electron-beam-controlled carbon dioxide laser with an electron gun in which the beam current was modulated by a control grid. The design features of the electron gun and laser are described and their performance is reported. Observations of instabilities of the electron beam in the gun are reported and methods for eliminating them are suggested.

  2. Microprocessor-controlled laser tracker for atmospheric sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. A.; Webster, C. R.; Menzies, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    An optical tracking system comprising a visible HeNe laser, an imaging detector, and a microprocessor-controlled mirror, has been designed to track a moving retroreflector located up to 500 m away from an atmospheric instrument and simultaneously direct spectrally tunable infrared laser radiation to the retroreflector for double-ended, long-path absorption measurements of atmospheric species. The tracker has been tested during the recent flight of a balloon-borne tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer which monitors the concentrations of stratospheric species within a volume defined by a 0.14-m-diameter retroreflector lowered 500 m below the instrument gondola.

  3. Laser induced chemical vapour deposition of TiN coatings at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Croonen, Y.; Verspui, G.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of a wide variety of materials has been studied extensively at reduced pressures. However, for this technique to be economically and industrially applicable, processes at atmospheric pressure are preferred. A model study was made on the substrate-coating system molybdenum-titaniumnitride focussing on the feasibility to deposit TiN films locally at atmospheric pressure. The results of this study turned out to be very promising. A Nd-YAG laser beam ([MAT...

  4. Fabrication of micro carbon pillar by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周健; 罗迎社; 李立君; 钟琦文; 李新华; 殷水平

    2008-01-01

    Argon ion laser was used as the induced light source and ethane(C2H4) was selected as the precursor gas,in the variety ranges of laser power from 0.5 W to 4.5 W and the pressure of the precursor gas from 225×133.3 Pa to 680×133.3 Pa,the experiments of laser induced chemical vapor deposition were proceeded for fabrication of micro carbon pillar.In the experiments,the influences of power of laser and pressure of work gas on the diameter and length of micro carbon pillar were investigated,the variety on averaged growth rate of carbon pillar with the laser irradiation time and moving speed of focus was discussed.Based on experiment data,the micro carbon pillar with an aspect ratio of over 500 was built through the method of moving the focus.

  5. Controllable Femtosecond Laser-Induced Dewetting for Plasmonic Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Shishkin, Ivan I; Zuev, Dmitriy A; Mozharov, Alexey M; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01

    Dewetting of thin metal films is one of the most widespread method for functional plasmonic nanostructures fabrication. However, simple thermal-induced dewetting does not allow to control degree of nanostructures order without additional lithographic process steps. Here we propose a novel method for lithography-free and large-scale fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures via controllable femtosecond laser-induced dewetting. The method is based on femtosecond laser surface pattering of a thin film followed by a nanoscale hydrodynamical instability, which is found to be very controllable under specific irradiation conditions. We achieve control over degree of nanostructures order by changing laser irradiation parametrs and film thickness. This allowed us to exploit the method for the broad range of applications: resonant light absorbtion and scattering, sensing, and potential improving of thin-film solar cells.

  6. Pulse selection control for the IR FEL photocathode drive laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.; Evans, R.; Garza, O. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The method for current control of a photocathode source is described. This system allows for full remote control of a photocathode drive laser for resulting electron beam currents ranging from less than one microamp to a full current ranging from less than one microamp to a full current of five milliamps. All current modes are obtained by gating the drive laser with a series of electro-optical cells. The system remotely generates this control signal by assuming a mode of operation with the following properties selectable: Current mode as continuous or gated, micropulse density, macropulse gate width from single shot to 1ms duration, macropulse synchronization to A/C line voltage (60 Hz) or an external trigger, 60 Hz phase and slewing through 60 Hz when applicable. All selections are derived from programmable logic devices operating from a master-oscillator resulting in a discrete, phase stable, pulse control for the drive laser.

  7. Taming random lasers through active spatial control of the pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, N; Andreasen, J; Gigan, S; Sebbah, P

    2012-07-20

    Active control of the spatial pump profile is proposed to exercise control over random laser emission. We demonstrate numerically the selection of any desired lasing mode from the emission spectrum. An iterative optimization method is employed, first in the regime of strong scattering where modes are spatially localized and can be easily selected using local pumping. Remarkably, this method works efficiently even in the weakly scattering regime, where strong spatial overlap of the modes precludes spatial selectivity. A complex optimized pump profile is found, which selects the desired lasing mode at the expense of others, thus demonstrating the potential of pump shaping for robust and controllable single mode operation of a random laser.

  8. Taming random lasers through active spatial control of the pump

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, Nicolas; Gigan, Sylvain; Sebbah, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Active control of the pump spatial profile is proposed to exercise control over random laser emission. We demonstrate numerically the selection of any desired lasing mode from the emission spectrum. An iterative optimization method is employed, first in the regime of strong scattering where modes are spatially localized and can be easily selected using local pumping. Remarkably, this method works efficiently even in the weakly scattering regime, where strong spatial overlap of the modes precludes spatial selectivity. A complex optimized pump profile is found, which selects the desired lasing mode at the expense of others, thus demonstrating the potential of pump shaping for robust and controllable singlemode operation of a random laser.

  9. Physico-Chemical Dynamics of Nanoparticle Formation during Laser Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, M.D.

    2005-06-01

    Laser-ablation based decontamination is a new and effective approach for simultaneous removal and characterization of contaminants from surfaces (e.g., building interior and exterior walls, ground floors, etc.). The scientific objectives of this research are to: (1) characterize particulate matter generated during the laser-ablation based decontamination, (2) develop a technique for simultaneous cleaning and spectroscopic verification, and (3) develop an empirical model for predicting particle generation for the size range from 10 nm to tens of micrometers. This research project provides fundamental data obtained through a systematic study on the particle generation mechanism, and also provides a working model for prediction of particle generation such that an effective operational strategy can be devised to facilitate worker protection.

  10. Experiments on laser beam jitter control with applications to a shipboard free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, Brett E.

    2007-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows potential as an effective defensive weapon for a naval ship against today's modern weapons such as supersonic anti-ship missiles. A laser can destroy these fast and highly maneuverable missiles at the speed of light. Several obstacles must be overcome to employ this weapon on a naval ship. This thesis discusses several methods for passive and active jitter control of a guided optical beam which might be employed in a FEL weapon system. Vibration experime...

  11. Advantages of Laser Polarimetry Applied to Tequila Industrial Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajer, V.; Rodriguez, C.; Flores, R.; Naranjo, S.; Cossio, G.; Lopez, J.

    2002-03-01

    The development of a polarimetric method for crude and cooked agave juice quality control not only by direct polarimetric measurement also by means of laser polarimeter LASERPOL 101M used as a liquid chromatographic detector is presented. The viability and advantage of this method for raw material quality control and during Tequila industrial process is shown.

  12. Benchmarking Advanced Control Algorithms for a Laser Scanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Ordys, A.W.; Smillie, I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes tests performed on the laser scanner system toassess feasibility of modern control techniques in achieving a requiredperformance in the trajectory following problem. The two methods tested areQTR H-infinity and Predictive Control. The results are ilustated ona simulation example....

  13. Ultrasensitive standoff chemical sensing based on nonlinear multi-photon laser wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregerson, Marc; Hetu, Marcel; Iwabuchi, Manna; Jimenez, Jorge; Warren, Ashley; Tong, William G.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear multi-photon laser wave mixing is presented as an ultrasensitive optical detection method for chem/bio agents in thin films and gas- and liquid-phase samples. Laser wave mixing is an unusually sensitive optical absorption-based detection method that offers significant inherent advantages including excellent sensitivity, small sample requirements, short optical path lengths, high spatial resolution, high spectral resolution and standoff remote detection capability. Wave mixing can detect trace amounts of chemicals even when using micrometer-thin samples, and hence, it can be conveniently interfaced to fibers, microarrays, microfluidic systems, lab-on-a-chip, capillary electrophoresis and other capillary- or fiber-based chemical separation systems. The wave-mixing signal is generated instantaneously as the two input laser beams intersect inside the analyte of interest. Laser excitation wavelengths can be tuned to detect multiple chemicals in their native form since wave mixing can detect both fluorescing and non-fluorescing samples at parts-pertrillion or better detection sensitivity levels. The wave-mixing signal is a laser-like coherent beam, and hence, it allows reliable and effective remote sensing of chemicals. Sensitive wave-mixing detectors offer many potential applications including sensitive detection of biomarkers, early detection of diseases, sensitive monitoring of environmental samples, and reliable detection of hazardous chem/bio agents with a standoff detection capability.

  14. Initiation of the emission of chemical gas lasers by neutron fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, N. G.; Molchanov, A. G.; Oraevskii, A. N.

    The possibility of initiating chemical lasers through a nuclear reaction is examined, and the required threshold density of a neutron flux is determined. In particular, attention is given to the conditions of lasing using UF6-H2, UF6-H2-F2, and UF6-D2-F2-CO2 mixtures in the case of a branched chain reaction. The possibility of chemical laser initiation using UF-containing mixtures, without any external neutron source, is demonstrated for the case where the total mass of the UF6 gas containing enriched uranium exceeds the critical mass.

  15. Chemical environment manipulation for pest insects control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, J. A.; Lewis, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical environment of pest species may be considered a habitat susceptible to management Management may be by means of manipulation of the environment of the pest for population suppression or for enhancement of natural enemies Examples of each are reviewed here Chemical stimuli influencing the behavior of phytophagous insects include host plant originated stimuli and pheromones The latter, especially sex pheromones, have proved most successful as tools for manipulation of pest population dynamics Factors influencing search behavior of natural enemies include habitat characteristics such as crop, associated plants and plant assemblages, host plant characteristics, influence of associated organisms, and characteristics of the searching entomophage Recent studies have shown potential for simultaneous management of a pest species and enhancement of natural enemies using pest pheromones

  16. Monitor and control of neuronal activities with femtosecond pulse laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wei; LIU XiuLi; L(U) XiaoHua; LI JiaSong; LUO QingMing; ZENG ShaoQun

    2008-01-01

    Combined with the fluorescence labeling technique, two-photon microscopy excited with femtosecond pulse laser has become an important tool for neuroscience research. In this research, the calcium signals from neurons in rat cortex slice were monitored by a custom-built two-photon microscopy, and the spontaneous calcium signals and the pharmacological responses as well as the responses to femtosecond pulse laser stimulation were recorded. The results showed that the amplitude of the cal-cium signals increased in direct proportion to the corresponding electrical activities. Glutamate induced a calcium transient, but continuous application resulted in smaller response. Simultaneous monitoring of neuronal populations distinguished the neurons of different microcircuits. The femtosecond pulse laser induced local or global calcium signals in the pyramidal neurons. The approach of interrogation and control of neural activities using femtosecond pulse laser is non-contact, nondestructive, repeatable, and without any additional substrates, which will contribute to the development of neuroscience.

  17. Effects of chemical reactions on the performance of gas dynamic lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rom, J.; Stricker, J.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that chemical reactions in the stagnation region of a gasdynamic laser in the shock tube may not be completed during the available test time. Therefore, analysis of data obtained in the shock tube must account for the instantaneous composition which may be effected by chemical reactions. A CO/sub 2/--N/sub 2/ gasdynamic laser experimental program in the shock tube including addition of H/sub 2/ into the system is described. This experiment involves reasonably complicated chemical reactions. These chemical reactions result in H/sub 2/O production under certain conditions. The comparison of the experimental results with the calculated results shows that such measurements can also be used to evaluate the energy transfer rates. The small-signal gain measurements indicate that the hydrogen is much more effective in depopulating the ..nu.. sub 3 level to ..nu.. sub 2 than previously assumed.

  18. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  19. Selective wet chemical etching of metallic thin films designed by laser interference metallurgy (LIMET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrin, Rodolphe; Gachot, Carsten; Marchand, Günter; Schmid, Ulrich; Mücklich, Frank

    2009-05-01

    The physical and chemical behaviour of materials is strongly correlated with their microstructure. Therefore, much effort is invested in the advanced microstructural design of metallic thin films. Laser Interference Metallurgy (LIMET) is used to locally tune the grain architecture of metallic thin films from the nanoto the microscale. This means a defined size and orientation of the grains with lateral periodicity, by interfering on the sample surface two or more laser beams of a high power nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. This technique enables the local nucleation and crystallization of amorphous or nanocrystalline metallic thin films, thus combining nano- and microcrystalline regions ordered in periodic line- or lattice-like arrangements in a composite architecture. After having locally modified the microstructure of e-beam evaporated Pt and Au thin films by laser irradiation a wet chemical etching procedure was induced in hot aqua regia. Doing so, a selective etching is achieved without using conventional lithography. Due to the laser-induced recrystallization in periodic structures, these microcrystalline zones of specific oriented grains show a higher resistance against the wet chemical etchant than the as-deposited, nanocrystalline areas, which are completely removed down to the substrate. Therefore, this procedure may have the potential to be an alternative, low cost approach to conventional lithographic techniques and provides a novel method for a straight-forward patterning of metallic thin films.

  20. Measurement and laser control of attosecond charge migration in ionized iodoacetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, P M; Mignolet, B; Baykusheva, D; Rupenyan, A; Horný, L; Penka, E F; Grassi, G; Tolstikhin, O I; Schneider, J; Jensen, F; Madsen, L B; Bandrauk, A D; Remacle, F; Wörner, H J

    2015-11-13

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes after light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. We advanced high-harmonic spectroscopy to resolve spatially and temporally the migration of an electron hole immediately after ionization of iodoacetylene while simultaneously demonstrating extensive control over the process. A multidimensional approach, based on the measurement and accurate theoretical description of both even and odd harmonic orders, enabled us to reconstruct both quantum amplitudes and phases of the electronic states with a resolution of ~100 attoseconds. We separately reconstructed quasi-field-free and laser-controlled charge migration as a function of the spatial orientation of the molecule and determined the shape of the hole created by ionization. Our technique opens the prospect of laser control over electronic primary processes. PMID:26494175

  1. Automatic control system design of laser interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qingjie; Li, Chunjie; Sun, Hao; Ren, Shaohua; Han, Sen

    2015-10-01

    There are a lot of shortcomings with traditional optical adjustment in interferometry, such as low accuracy, time-consuming, labor-intensive, uncontrollability, and bad repetitiveness, so we treat the problem by using wireless remote control system. Comparing to the traditional method, the effect of vibration and air turbulence will be avoided. In addition the system has some peculiarities of low cost, high reliability and easy operation etc. Furthermore, the switching between two charge coupled devices (CCDs) can be easily achieved with this wireless remote control system, which is used to collect different images. The wireless transmission is achieved by using Radio Frequency (RF) module and programming the controller, pulse width modulation (PWM) of direct current (DC) motor, real-time switching of relay and high-accuracy displacement control of FAULHABER motor are available. The results of verification test show that the control system has good stability with less than 5% packet loss rate, high control accuracy and millisecond response speed.

  2. Motivation and development of ultrafast laser-based accelerator techniques for chemical physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowell, Robert A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: rob_crowell@anl.gov; Shkrob, Ilya A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Oulianov, Dmitri A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Korovyanko, Oleg [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gosztola, David J. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Li, Yuelin [Accelerator Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rey-de-Castro, Roberto [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Building 200, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The products of radiation induced chemical reactions are determined by rapid primary processes such as energy transfer, thermalization and solvation. Ultrafast photoionization experiments on liquid water demonstrate that these initial events occur on time scales <5 ps and involve a complicated interplay between electronic relaxation and vibrational energy redistribution. These experiments also show that the chemical processes originating from ionizing radiation are unique and cannot be reproduced by laser photons alone. Due to the lack of a suitable femtosecond source of ionizing radiation, knowledge of the primary processes in radiation chemistry remains poor. To address this issue a 20 TW laser system has been constructed to obtain subpicosecond electron pulses with energies in the 1-10 MeV range. In addition to the production of femtosecond electron pulses, future efforts will be directed towards using this laser for accelerating heavier particles such as protons and generating hard X-rays.

  3. Motivation and development of ultrafast laser-based accelerator techniques for chemical physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The products of radiation induced chemical reactions are determined by rapid primary processes such as energy transfer, thermalization and solvation. Ultrafast photoionization experiments on liquid water demonstrate that these initial events occur on time scales <5 ps and involve a complicated interplay between electronic relaxation and vibrational energy redistribution. These experiments also show that the chemical processes originating from ionizing radiation are unique and cannot be reproduced by laser photons alone. Due to the lack of a suitable femtosecond source of ionizing radiation, knowledge of the primary processes in radiation chemistry remains poor. To address this issue a 20 TW laser system has been constructed to obtain subpicosecond electron pulses with energies in the 1-10 MeV range. In addition to the production of femtosecond electron pulses, future efforts will be directed towards using this laser for accelerating heavier particles such as protons and generating hard X-rays

  4. NONLINEAR MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVA R. G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new algorithm for model predictive control is presented. The algorithm utilizes a simultaneous solution and optimization strategy to solve the model's differential equations. The equations are discretized by equidistant collocation, and along with the algebraic model equations are included as constraints in a nonlinear programming (NLP problem. This algorithm is compared with the algorithm that uses orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The equidistant collocation algorithm results in simpler equations, providing a decrease in computation time for the control moves. Simulation results are presented and show a satisfactory performance of this algorithm.

  5. Precision temperature controller for laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doermann, Alex; Troxel, Daylin; Jones, Tyler; Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-10-01

    I will present the motivation, theory of operation, and some of the results found with the temperature controller used in Dr. Durfee's lab. I will also present my goal and possible data of the temperature drift as I attempt to make if more effective than a commercial temperature controller already in the lab.

  6. Laboratory Transferability of Optimally Shaped Laser Pulses for Quantum Control

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents", that achieve a wide variety of objectives. For many practical applications, an important criterion is that a particular photonic reagent prescription still produce a good, if not optimal, target objective yield when transferred to a different system or laboratory, {even if the same shaped pulse profile cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments.} First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found...

  7. Controlling a microdisk laser by local refractive index perturbation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui, E-mail: hui.cao@yale.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Ge, Li [Department of Engineering Science and Physics, College of Staten Island, CUNY, Staten Island, New York 10314 (United States); The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Solomon, Glenn S. [Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet effective approach of controlling lasing in a semiconductor microdisk by photo-thermal effect. A continuous wave green laser beam, focused onto the microdisk perimeter, can enhance or suppress lasing in different cavity modes, depending on the position of the focused beam. Its main effect is a local modification of the refractive index of the disk, which results in an increase in the power slope of some lasing modes and a decrease of others. The boundary roughness breaks the rotational symmetry of a circular disk, allowing the lasing process to be tuned by varying the green beam position. Using the same approach, we can also fine tune the relative intensity of a quasi-degenerate pair of lasing modes. Such post-fabrication control, enabled by an additional laser beam, is flexible and reversible, thus enhancing the functionality of semiconductor microdisk lasers.

  8. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J. [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  9. DSP-based multi-purpose control system for laser processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    U Tong-Hyok; ZHANG Guo-shun; XU Bao-zhong; GANG Bei; LI Cheng; WANG Meng

    2006-01-01

    A DSP-based control system for laser processing that enables the motion of laser beam in two dimensions,and the control of its power with PC or without PC is discussed. The operation and implementation of the control system along with the rapid processing of image data are presented. The purpose of the control system is to operate the laser equipments in such a manner that various programmable laser control signals are available for vector and bitmap processing of characters and pictures. This control system makes the laser processing more intelligent and flexible and can be used for welding, marking and engraving by lasers.

  10. Chemical sensors and gas sensors for process control in biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concerned with the possibilities for chemical measurement of the progress of biotechnological processes which are offered by devices already developed for other demanding applications. It considers the potential use of ultrasonic instrumentation originally developed for the nuclear industry, gas measurement methods from the fields of environmental monitoring and combustion control, nuclear instruments developed for the oil, mining and chemical industries, robotic systems and advanced control techniques. (author)

  11. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  12. Direct writing of carbon nanotube patterns by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition on a transparent substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dot array and line patterns of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully grown by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) on a transparent substrate at room temperature. In the proposed technique, a Nd:YVO4 laser with a wavelength of 532 nm irradiates the backside of multiple catalyst layers (Ni/Al/Cr) through a transparent substrate to induce a local temperature rise, thereby allowing the direct writing of dense dot and line patterns of MWCNTs below 10 μm in size to be produced with uniform density on the controlled positions. In this LCVD method, a multiple-catalyst-layer with a Cr thermal layer is the central component for enabling the growth of dense MWCNTs with good spatial resolution.

  13. In situ imaging and control of layer-by-layer femtosecond laser thinning of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D. W.; Zhou, Y. S.; Huang, X.; Jiang, L.; Silvain, J.-F.; Lu, Y. F.

    2015-02-01

    Although existing methods (chemical vapor deposition, mechanical exfoliation, etc.) are available to produce graphene, the lack of thickness control limits further graphene applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach to precisely thin graphene films to a specific thickness using femtosecond (fs) laser raster scanning. By using appropriate laser fluence and scanning times, graphene thinning with an atomic layer precision, namely layer-by-layer graphene removal, has been realized. The fs laser used was configured in a four-wave mixing (FWM) system which can be used to distinguish graphene layer thickness and count the number of layers using the linear relationship between the FWM signal intensity and the graphene thickness. Furthermore, FWM imaging has been successfully applied to achieve in situ, real-time monitoring of the fs laser graphene thinning process. This method can not only realize the large-scale thinning of graphene with atomic layer precision, but also provide in situ, rapid imaging capability of graphene for an accurate assessment of the number of layers.Although existing methods (chemical vapor deposition, mechanical exfoliation, etc.) are available to produce graphene, the lack of thickness control limits further graphene applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach to precisely thin graphene films to a specific thickness using femtosecond (fs) laser raster scanning. By using appropriate laser fluence and scanning times, graphene thinning with an atomic layer precision, namely layer-by-layer graphene removal, has been realized. The fs laser used was configured in a four-wave mixing (FWM) system which can be used to distinguish graphene layer thickness and count the number of layers using the linear relationship between the FWM signal intensity and the graphene thickness. Furthermore, FWM imaging has been successfully applied to achieve in situ, real-time monitoring of the fs laser graphene thinning process. This method can not

  14. Laser rangefinders for autonomous intelligent cruise control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, Bernard A.; Bazin, Gaelle

    1998-01-01

    THe purpose of this paper is to show to what kind of application laser range-finders can be used inside Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control systems. Even if laser systems present good performances the safety and technical considerations are very restrictive. As the system is used in the outside, the emitted average output power must respect the rather low level of 1A class. Obstacle detection or collision avoidance require a 200 meters range. Moreover bad weather conditions, like rain or fog, ar disastrous. We have conducted measurements on laser rangefinder using different targets and at different distances. We can infer that except for cooperative targets low power laser rangefinder are not powerful enough for long distance measurement. Radars, like 77 GHz systems, are better adapted to such cases. But in case of short distances measurement, range around 10 meters, with a minimum distance around twenty centimeters, laser rangefinders are really useful with good resolution and rather low cost. Applications can have the following of white lines on the road, the target being easily cooperative, detection of vehicles in the vicinity, that means car convoy traffic control or parking assistance, the target surface being indifferent at short distances.

  15. Digital Controller For Laser-Beam-Steering Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Homayoon

    1995-01-01

    Report presents additional information about proposed apparatus described in "Beam-Steering Subsystem for Laser Communication" (NPO-19069). Discusses design of digital beam-steering control subsystem and, in particular, that part of design pertaining to digital compensation for frequency response of steering mirror.

  16. A semiconductor laser with monolithically integrated dynamic polarization control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, B M; Naeem, M A; Hutchings, D C; Marsh, J H; Kelly, A E

    2012-08-27

    We report the first demonstration of a semiconductor laser monolithically integrated with an active polarization controller, which consists of a polarization mode converter followed by an active, differential phase shifter. High speed modulation of the device output polarization is demonstrated via current injection to the phase shifter section. PMID:23037101

  17. Centralized computer-based controls of the Nova Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article introduces the overall architecture of the computer-based Nova Laser Control System and describes its basic components. Use of standard hardware and software components ensures that the system, while specialized and distributed throughout the facility, is adaptable. 9 references, 6 figures

  18. Coupling chemical networks to hydrogels controls oscillatory behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, Daniel; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate that oscillations and excitable behavior can be imparted to a chemical network by coupling the network to an active hydrogel. We discuss two mechanisms by which the mechanical response of the gel to the embedded chemical reactant provides feedback into the chemistry. These feedback mechanisms can be applied to control existing chemical oscillations as well as create new oscillations under some conditions. We analyze two model systems to demonstrate these two effects, respectively: a theoretical system that exhibits no excitability in the absence of a gel, and the Oregonator model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in which the metal catalyst is intercalated into the polymer network. This work can aid in designing new materials that harness these feedbacks to create, control, and stabilize oscillatory and excitable chemical behavior in both oscillatory and non-oscillatory chemical networks.

  19. Laser processing of metallic biomaterials: An approach for surface patterning and wettability control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi, Sepehr; Mollabashi, Mahmoud; Madanipour, Khosro

    2015-12-01

    Q -switched Nd:YAG laser is used to manipulate the surface morphology and wettability characteristic of 316L stainless steel (SS) and titanium biomaterials. Water and glycerol are selected as wettability testing liquids and the sessile drop method is used for the contact angle measurements. Results indicate that on both of the metals, wettability toward water improves significantly after the laser treatment. Different analyses including the study of the surface morphology, free energy and oxidation are assessed in correlation with wettability. Beside the important role of the laser-induced surface patterns, the increase in the surface roughness, oxygen content and the polar component of the surface energy, are detected as the most important physical and chemical phenomena controlling the improvement in the wettability. However, all the processed hydrophilic surfaces that are exposed to air become hydrophobic over time. The time dependency of the surface wettability is related to the chemical activities on the treated surfaces and the reduction of oxygen/carbon (O/C) ratio on them. The behavior is further studied with investigating the effect of the keeping environment and changes of the components of the surface tension. Results show that the pulsed laser treatment is a versatile approach to create either hydrophobic or super hydrophilic surfaces for industrial and medical applications.

  20. Uses of ORACLE in the Nova Laser Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nova Laser System is a large-scale fusion experiment being constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Modern control system technology is required to efficiently manage the thousands of devices needed to operate the system. In order to reduce the requirements on the operations staff, much of the system is being automated. This requires a significant knowledge base including frequently used system configurations and device parameters. We will be using ORACLE to provide this information to the control system. To insure the control-system integrity, ORACLE will be used to maintain information about the control-system software. This information will be used to document the system as well as help track down problems. ORACLE will also be used to maintain data on the system performance. This data will be analyzed to optimize the laser performance and point out when maintenance is required

  1. Two-pulse laser control of nuclear and electronic motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønager, Michael; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We discuss an explicitly time-dependent two-pulse laser scheme for controlling where nuclei and electrons are going in unimolecular reactions. We focus on electronic motion and show, with HD+ as an example, that one can find non-stationary states where the electron (with some probability......) oscillates back and forth between the two nuclei. We discuss how this finding can be used in a scheme for controlling electron transfer in real-time. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  2. Two-pulse laser control of bond-selective fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    We elaborate on a two-pulse (pump-pump) laser control scheme for selective bond-breaking in molecules [Amstrup and Henriksen, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8285 (1992)]. We show, in particular, that with this scheme one can overcome the obstacle of intramolecular vibrational relaxation. As an example, we...... be obtained when such a non-stationary vibrating ozone molecule is photodissociated with short laser pulses (similar to 10-15 fs) with a time delay corresponding to half a vibrational period (similar to 17 fs). (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Dancing droplets: Chemical space, substrates, and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Previously we showed that droplets of propylene glycol and water display remarkable properties when placed on clean glass due to an interplay between surface tension and evaporation. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). We showed that these mechanisms apply to a range of two-component mixtures of miscible liquids where one component has both higher surface tension and higher vapor pressure on a variety of high energy surfaces. We now show how this rule can be cheated using a simple trick. We go on to demonstrate applications for cleaning, and show how this system works on substrates prepared only with sunlight. We finish by demonstrating active control of droplets, allowing access to a host of new possibilities.

  4. Fibre Laser Cutting and Chemical Etching of AZ31 for Manufacturing Biodegradable Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gökhan Demir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of magnesium-alloy stents shows promise as a less intrusive solution for the treatment of cardiovascular pathologies as a result of the high biocompatibility of the material and its intrinsic dissolution in body fluids. However, in addition to requiring innovative solutions in material choice and design, these stents also require a greater understanding of the manufacturing process to achieve the desired quality with improved productivity. The present study demonstrates the manufacturing steps for the realisation of biodegradable stents in AZ31 magnesium alloy. These steps include laser microcutting with a Q-switched fibre laser for the generation of the stent mesh and subsequent chemical etching for the cleaning of kerf and surface finish. Specifically, for the laser microcutting step, inert and reactive gas cutting conditions were compared. The effect of chemical etching on the reduction in material thickness, as well as on spatter removal, was also evaluated. Prototype stents were produced, and the material composition and surface quality were characterised. The potentialities of combining nanosecond laser microcutting and chemical etching are shown and discussed.

  5. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  6. Laser control of filament-induced shock wave in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2014-09-01

    We discovered that tight focusing of Cr:forsterite femtosecond laser radiation in water provides the unique opportunity of long filament generation. The filament becomes a source of numerous spherical shock waves whose radius tends to saturate with the increase of energy. These overlapping waves create a contrast cylindrical shock wave. The laser-induced shock wave parameters such as shape, amplitude and speed can be effectively controlled by varying energy and focusing geometry of the femtosecond pulse. Aberrations added to the optical scheme lead to multiple dotted plasma sources for shock wave formation, spaced along the optical axis. Increasing the laser energy launches filaments at each dot that enhance the length of the entire filament and as a result, the shock impact on the material.

  7. Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment

  8. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS

  9. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  10. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  11. Development of motion control method for laser soldering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yerganian, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Development of a method to generate the motion control data for sealing an electronic housing using laser soldering is described. The motion required to move the housing under the laser is a nonstandard application and was performed with a four-axis system using the timed data streaming mode capabilities of a Compumotor AT6400 indexer. A Microsoft Excel 5.0 spreadsheet (named Israuto.xls) was created to calculate the movement of the part under the laser, and macros were written into the spreadsheet to allow the user to easily create this data. A data verification method was developed for simulating the motion data. The geometry of the assembly was generated using Parametric Technology Corporation Pro/E version 15. This geometry was then converted using Pro/DADS version 3.1 from Computer Aided Design Software Inc. (CADSI), and the simulation was carried out using DADS version 8.0 from CADSI.

  12. Control of a resonant tunneling structure by intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, S.; Kes, H.; Boz, F. K.; Okan, S. E.

    2016-10-01

    The intense laser field effects on a resonant tunneling structure were studied using computational methods. The considered structure was a GaAs/InxGa1-xAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As/InyGa1-yAs/AlAs/GaAs well-barrier system. In the presence of intense laser fields, the transmission coefficient and the dwell time of the structure were calculated depending on the depth and the width of InGaAs wells. It was shown that an intense laser field provides full control on the performance of the device as the geometrical restrictions on the resonant tunneling conditions overcome. Also, the choice of the resonant energy value becomes possible depending on the field strength.

  13. Feedback Control Of Dynamical Instabilities In Classical Lasers And Fels

    CERN Document Server

    Bielawski, S; Szwaj, C

    2005-01-01

    Dynamical instabilities lead to unwanted full-scale power oscillations in many classical lasers and FEL oscillators. For a long time, applications requiring stable operation were typically performed by working outside the problematic parameter regions. A breakthrough occurred in the nineties [1], when emphasis was made on the practical importance of unstable states (stationary or periodic) that coexist with unwanted oscillatory states. Indeed, although not observable in usual experiments, unstable states can be stabilized, using a feedback control involving arbitrarily small perturbations of a parameter. This observation stimulated a set of works leading to successful suppression of dynamical instabilities (initially chaos) in lasers, sometimes with surprisingly simple feedback devices [2]. We will review a set of key results, including in particular the recent works on the stabilization of mode-locked lasers, and of the super-ACO, ELETTRA and UVSOR FELs [3].

  14. Chemical Control of Pennesetum Purpureum Laboratory Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N Tripathi

    1977-10-01

    Full Text Available Dichloral urea, diethyl chloracetamide, nitrourea, chloralhydrate, sodium trichloroacetate, sodium borate, ammonium thiocynate, sodium arsenite, arsenic oxide-sulphuric acid mixture, sodium chlorate, maleic hydrazide and the salts containing inorganic ions Cu/sup 2+/, Co/sup 2+/, MoO/sub 4//sup 2-/ and Zn/sup 2+/ were tested in experimental plots for their phytotoxic activity on a hybrid variety of Pennesetum purpureum. Sodium borate (2500 Kg/hectare, Sodium arsenite (250 Kg/hectare and sodium chlorate (1000 Kg/hectare through soil and ammonium thiocyanate (100 Kg/hectare through direct spray function as growth retardants. Arsenic oxide-sulphuric acid (100 : 300 Kg/hectare spray kills the existing leaves. Sodium chlorate (250 Kg/hectare spray exerts phytocidal action on young plants (3 weeks. Maleic hydrazide (50 Kg/hectare exerts permanent growth suppressant action on older plants (height >=1 m and kills the existing leaves of younger plants (height=<0.5 m. Copper sulphate (100 Kg/hectare induces partial drying of existing leaves and cobalt sulphate in the same dose induces yellowing of leaves extending the period of growth beyond the season of maximum growth of the control. Ammonium molybdate and Zinc acetate in the same dose do not exert any perceptible effect.

  15. Laser-chemical modification of nucleation barriers for area-selective thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, J. Y.; Ehrlich, D. J.

    1984-09-01

    The use of laser radiation to locally modify nucleation barriers to thin film growth is discussed. Examples are described in which UV laser photodeposition is used to directly pattern surface-altering monolayer or submonolayer films. The surface-altering films can then be used to promote or both physical condensation as well as surface chmistry. A qualitative is made of two kinds of processes: those relying on physical, and those relying on chemical, barriers. A figure of merit is defined and discussed, which measures the selectivity of a given process for patterned growth.

  16. Evolutionary algorithms for the optimal laser control of molecular orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In terms of optimal control, laser-induced molecular orientation is an optimization problem involving a global minimum search on a multi-dimensional surface function of varying parameters characterizing the laser pulse (frequency, peak intensity, temporal shape). Genetic algorithms, aiming at the optimization of different possible targets, may temporarily be trapped in a local minimum, before reaching the global one. A careful study of such local (robust) minima provides a key for the thorough interpretation of the orientation dynamics, in terms of basic mechanisms. Two targets are retained: the first, simple, one searching for an angle between molecular and laser polarization axes as close as possible to zero (orientation) at a given time; the second, hybrid, one combining the efficiency of orientation with its duration. Their respective roles are illustrated referring to two molecular systems, HCN and LiF, taken at a rigid rotor approximation level. A sudden and asymmetric laser pulse (provided by a frequency ω superposed on its second harmonic 2ω leads to the kick mechanism. The result is a very fast (as compared to the rotational period) angular momentum transfer to the molecule, that turns out to be responsible for an efficient orientation after the laser pulse is turned off

  17. Chemical and physical quality control of the HIPPURAN-131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some physico-chemical methods for analytical control of Hippuran-131I are compared. The most convenient to applicate in hospitals and in more specialized quality control laboratories are recommended. The quality of Hippuran-131I produced by ISOTOP (USSR) is also evaluated. The product met the requirement of the International Pharmacopeia

  18. Controllable Dispersion in an Optical Laser Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Owen; Du, Shuangli; Rochester, Simon; Budker, Dmitry; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy

    2016-05-01

    Optical gyroscopes use Sagnac interferometry to make precise measurements of angular velocity. Increased gyroscope sensitivity will allow for more accurate control of aerospace systems and allow for more precise measurements of the Earth's rotation. Severalfold improvements to optical gyroscope sensitivity were predicted for fast light regimes (ng gyroscope response via tuning the experimental parameters. Gyroscope sensitivity was shown to be dependent on several parameters including pump power, pump detunning, and vapor density. This work was supported by the NSF and Naval Air Warfare Center STTR program N68335-11-C-0428.

  19. ROBUST POSITIONING OF LASER BEAMS USING PROPORTIONAL INTEGRAL DERIVATIVE AND BASED OBSERVER-FEEDBACK CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    Kwabena A. Konadu; Sun Yi; Wonchang Choi; Taher Abu-Lebdeh

    2013-01-01

    High-precision positioning of laser beams has been a great challenge in industry due to inevitable existence of noise and disturbance. The work presented in this study addresses this problem by employing two different control strategies: Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control and state feedback control with an observer. The control strategies are intended to stabilize the position of a laser beam on a Position Sensing Device (PSD) located on a Laser Beam Stabilization (or, laser beam ...

  20. Self-organizing microstructures orientation control in femtosecond laser patterning on silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengjun; Jiang, Lan; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Shuai; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-14

    Self-organizing rippled microstructures are induced on silicon surface by linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. At a near threshold fluence, it is observed that ripple orientation is co-determined by the laser polarization direction and laser scanning parameters (scanning direction and scanning speed) in surface patterning process. Under fixed laser polarization, the ripple orientation can be controlled to rotate by about 40° through changing laser scanning parameters. In addition, it is also observed that the ripple morphology is sensitive to the laser scanning direction, and it is an optimal choice to obtain ordered ripple structures when the angle between laser scanning and laser polarization is less than 45°.

  1. Portable IR dye laser optofluidic microresonator as a temperature and chemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F; Martín, I R; Gil-Rostra, J; Oliva-Ramirez, M; Yubero, F; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R

    2016-06-27

    A compact and portable optofluidic microresonator has been fabricated and characterized. It is based on a Fabry-Perot microcavity consisting essentially of two tailored dichroic Bragg mirrors prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering deposition. The microresonator has been filled with an ethanol solution of Nile-Blue dye. Infrared laser emission has been measured with a pump threshold as low as 0.12 MW/cm2 and an external energy conversion efficiency of 41%. The application of the device as a temperature and a chemical sensor is demonstrated. Small temperature variations as well as small amount of water concentrations in the liquid laser medium are detected as a shift of the resonant laser modes. PMID:27410592

  2. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X. Y.; Huang, J.; Xiao, H.; Yang, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode-multimode-single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4-96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing.

  3. ZnO-coated SMS structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser for chemical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated single mode–multimode–single mode fiber (SMS) structure interrogated by a fiber ring laser has been developed as a chemical sensor. Response to relative humidity (RH) and ethanol volatilization was evaluated by tracking the wavelength shifts of the output laser line in different moisture environments and ethanol solutions, respectively. For humidity sensing a linear response with a measurement range of 4–96% RH, and a sensitivity of 0.06 nm per %RH were obtained. As for ethanol volatilization sensing obvious wavelength blue shift was observed for the sensor immersed in 50% and 62% ethanol solution, while no variation could be detected in pure ethanol solution (purity larger than 97%). With the advantages of low cost, ease of fabrication and sensitive response, ZnO-coated SMS interrogated with a fiber ring laser was demonstrated to be an effective sensor for humidity and ethanol volatilization sensing. (paper)

  4. Molecular Alignment and Orientation From Laser-Induced Mechanisms to Optimal Control

    CERN Document Server

    Atabek, O

    2002-01-01

    Genetic algorithms, as implemented in optimal control strategies, are currently successfully exploited in a wide range of problems in molecular physics. In this context, laser control of molecular alignment and orientation remains a very promising issue with challenging applications extending from chemical reactivity to nanoscale design. We emphasize the complementarity between basic quantum mechanisms monitoring alignment/orientation processes and optimal control scenarios. More explicitly, if on one hand we can help the optimal control scheme to take advantage of such mechanisms by appropriately building the targets and delineating the parameter sampling space, on the other hand we expect to learn, from optimal control results, some robust and physically sound dynamical mechanisms. We present basic mechanisms for alignment and orientation, such as pendular states accommodated by the molecule-plus-field effective potential and the "kick" mechanism obtained by a sudden excitation. Very interestingly, an optim...

  5. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  6. Determining treatment frequency for controlling weeds on traffic islands using chemical and non-chemical weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Larsen, S.U.; Andreasen, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Many public authorities rely on the use of non-chemical weed control methods, due to stringent restrictions on herbicide use in urban areas. However, these methods usually require more repeated treatments than chemical weed management, resulting in increased costs of weed management. In order...... to investigate the efficacy of four non-chemical weed control methods and glyphosate treatment, experiments were carried out on traffic islands in the growing seasons 2005 and 2006. Three trial sites were each divided into six treatment areas, which were either treated with glyphosate, flame, steam, hot air...... cover was measured every second week using a 75 cm × 75 cm quadrat divided into 100 squares. On the control areas, a rapid increase in weed cover was observed, whereas weed cover could be kept below 2% by 2–7 treatments per year, depending on control method. On average, the following numbers...

  7. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 deg. C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs

  8. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials

  9. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, L.V.; Mendivil, M.I.; Garcia Guillen, G.; Aguilar Martinez, J.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Shaji, S., E-mail: sshajis@yahoo.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); CIIDIT – Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties.

  10. CdS thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CdS thin films by conventional CBD and laser assisted CBD. • Characterized these films using XRD, XPS, AFM, optical and electrical measurements. • Accelerated growth was observed in the laser assisted CBD process. • Improved dark conductivity and good photocurrent response for the LACBD CdS. - Abstract: In this work, we report the preparation and characterization of CdS thin films by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD). CdS thin films were prepared from a chemical bath containing cadmium chloride, triethanolamine, ammonium hydroxide and thiourea under various deposition conditions. The thin films were deposited by in situ irradiation of the bath using a continuous laser of wavelength 532 nm, varying the power density. The thin films obtained during deposition of 10, 20 and 30 min were analyzed. The changes in morphology, structure, composition, optical and electrical properties of the CdS thin films due to in situ irradiation of the bath were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The thin films obtained by LACBD were nanocrystalline, photoconductive and presented interesting morphologies. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain nanocrystalline CdS thin films having good optoelectronic properties

  11. Controlling synchronization in large laser networks using number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Micha; Ronen, Eitan; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir; Kanter, Ido

    2011-01-01

    Synchronization in networks with delayed coupling are ubiquitous in nature and play a key role in almost all fields of science including physics, biology, ecology, climatology and sociology. In general, the published works on network synchronization are based on data analysis and simulations, with little experimental verification. Here we develop and experimentally demonstrate various multi-cluster phase synchronization scenarios within coupled laser networks. Synchronization is controlled by the network connectivity in accordance to number theory, whereby the number of synchronized clusters equals the greatest common divisor of network loops. This dependence enables remote switching mechanisms to control the optical phase coherence among distant lasers by local network connectivity adjustments. Our results serve as a benchmark for a broad range of coupled oscillators in science and technology, and offer feasible routes to achieve multi-user secure protocols in communication networks and parallel distribution...

  12. Chemical control of Aedes aegypti: a historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Manjarres-Suarez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the use of chemical insecticides throughout history as the main tool to fight against Aedes aegypti, a vector of dengue virus. Methods: A text mining approach was conducted on databases, such as PUBMED and SCIENCE DIRECT, using the keywords “Aedes aegypti”, combined with the words “insecticides”, “resistance”, “organochlorines”, “organophosphates”, “carbamates” and “pyrethroids”. Results related to historical information dealing with the chemical control of Aedes aegypti, in particular those containing data on insecticide resistance for this species, were scrutinized and analyzed. Results: Different chemical groups have been utilized to control A. aegypti, including organochlorine, organophosphate, carbamate and pyrethroid insecticides. In general, the tendency has been to replace a particular pesticide, for which resistance had been detected, for a new one, mosquito-sensitive, and with little evidence of deleterious effects derived from its use. The spread of resistance has been registered in several countries of America, Asia and Africa. Two mechanisms have been highly cited to be responsible for the resistance; the increase activity of detoxifying enzymes, and structural changes in the insecticide target site, mostly within the central nervous system. Conclusion: Excessive use of chemical insecticides and the lack of dosing control have led to widespread resistance in A. aegypti, as no “safer” alternative chemical options are available for vector control in different countries, impacting human health.

  13. Nanometer thickness laser ablation for spatial control of cell attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, H.; Hayes, J. P.; Kingshott, P.; Johnson, G.; Harvey, E. C.; Griesser, H. J.

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate here a new method to control the location of cells on surfaces in two dimensions, which can be applied to a number of biomedical applications including diagnostic tests and tissue engineered medical devices. Two-dimensional control over cell attachment is achieved by generation of a spatially controlled surface chemistry that allows control over protein adsorption, a process which mediates cell attachment. Here, we describe the deposition of thin allylamine plasma polymer coatings on silicon wafer and perfluorinated poly(ethylene-co-propylene) substrates, followed by grafting of a protein resistant layer of poly(ethylene oxide). Spatially controlled patterning of the surface chemistry was achieved in a fast, one-step procedure by nanometer thickness controlled laser ablation using a 248 nm excimer laser. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to confirm the production of surface chemistry patterns with a resolution of approximately 1 µm, which is significantly below the dimensions of a single mammalian cell. Subsequent adsorption of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen I and fibronectin followed by cell culture experiments using bovine corneal epithelial cells confirmed that cell attachment is controlled by the surface chemistry pattern. The method is an effective tool for use in a number of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  14. Towards initiation of explosives utilizing ultrafast laser quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Margo; McGrane, Shawn; Scharff, Jason; Moore, David

    2011-06-01

    Time dependent shaped electric fields can be utilized to control energetic materials by driving their reaction to initiation. This direct quantum controlled initiation (QCI) employs ultrafast shaped ultraviolet light to optimally control the explosives initiation reaction. QCI will enhance the understanding of energetic material reactions by yielding insight into the characteristics, such as reaction dynamics, necessary for initiation. Initial investigation into solutions of hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB), trinitroanaline (TNA), 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethene (FOX-7), and diaminoazozyfurazan (DAAF) have been performed. Novel transient absorption spectra have been obtained for each material and note worthy regions have been further investigated for simple control response. The explosives not controlled through a single parameter have been further investigated with complex control. Further experimentation will be performed to explore the effect of QCI on thin films as the optimally shaped ultrafast laser pulses guide the energy flow along the desired paths.

  15. Laser-assisted chemical liquid-phase deposition of metals for micro- and optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Kordás, K. (Krisztián)

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The demands toward the development of simple and cost-effective fabrication methods of metallic structures with high lateral resolution on different substrates - applied in many fields of technology, such as in microelectronics, optoelectronics, micromechanics as well as in sensor and actuator applications - gave the idea to perform this research. Due to its simplicity, laser-assisted chemical liquid-phase deposition (LCLD) has been investigated and applied for the metallization o...

  16. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  17. Active subnanometer spectral control of a random laser

    CERN Document Server

    Leonetti, Marco; 10.1063/1.4792759

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimental technique that allows to achieve a robust control on the emission spectrum of a micro random laser and to select individual modes with sub-nanometer resolution. The presented approach relies on an optimization protocol of the spatial profile of the pump beam. Here we demonstrate not only the possibility to increase the emission at a wavelength, but also that we can isolate an individual peak suppressing unwanted contributions form other modes.

  18. Ash characteristics in controlled diode laser pyrolysis of chlorinated rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peligrad, A. A.; Schmidt, M. J. J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J. T.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the effects of 60 W High Power Diode Laser (HPDL) beams on the removal of chlorinated rubber (CR) paint from concrete surfaces and the ash particles generated from this process. The physical characteristics, including shape and size distribution of the removed and collected airborne CR particles, down to a size of around 1 μm in diameter, were determined using optical microscopy and image analysis. The shape of the particles observed was highly irregular, displaying no symmetry. The size distribution of the collected particles was found to range between 1-2000 μm, with the maximum concentration being found between 29 and 60 μm. The chemical characteristics of the CR ash particles were investigated by means of ESEM and EDX techniques. From a comparative analysis, it was found that the concentration of chlorine within the CR material was significantly reduced after HPDL treatment. This, together with DTA/TGA results indicated a combustive degradation of the CR polymer through the interaction with the process gas, oxygen, and the laser irradiation. Also, a strong correlation between laser power and average particle sizes has been found, with higher powers generally producing larger particle sizes. Opposite effects have been found by changing the oxygen flow rate, with higher oxygen flow producing, on average, smaller particles. An interpretation of the combustion process, as well as a brief discussion on operational safety and environmental impact of the products is attempted.

  19. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  20. Ambient diode laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry of nonvolatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Schilling, Michael; Ahlmann, Norman; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-03-19

    In this work, the combined use of desorption by a continuous wave near-infrared diode laser and ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge-based probe (laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry (LD-DBDI-MS)) is presented as an ambient ionization method for the mass spectrometric detection of nonvolatile chemicals on surfaces. A separation of desorption and ionization processes could be verified. The use of the diode laser is motivated by its low cost, ease of use, and small size. To achieve an efficient desorption, the glass substrates are coated at the back side with a black point (target point, where the sample is deposited) in order to absorb the energy offered by the diode laser radiation. Subsequent ionization is accomplished by a helium plasmajet generated in the dielectric barrier discharge source. Examples on the application of this approach are shown in both positive and negative ionization modes. A wide variety of multiclass species with low vapor pressure were tested including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and explosives (reserpine, roxithromycin, propazine, prochloraz, spinosad, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, enrofloxacin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, spinosad, cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene tetranitrate (HMX), and cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene trinitramine (RDX)). A comparative evaluation revealed that the use of the laser is advantageous, compared to just heating the substrate surface. PMID:23419061

  1. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Ancona; Bert Huis in ’t Veld; Ronald Aarts; Ali Riza Konuk; Pietro Mario Lugarà; Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Teresa Sibillano; Domenico Rizzi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperatur...

  2. The electrically and magnetically controllable random laser from dye-doped liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lihua; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Yan; Cui, Yiping; Lu, Yanqing

    2014-08-01

    The electrically and magnetically controllable random laser from dye-doped liquid crystals (LCs) was studied. The rubbing-alignment of the polyimide in the LC cell influenced the threshold voltage and the response time of the electrically controllable random laser. When the applied electric field was increased, the response time of the random laser decreased. The magnetically controllable random laser was studied in the hollow fiber structure, of which the response time was less than 1 s.

  3. Laser vision based adaptive fill control system for TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The variation of joint groove size during tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding will result in the non-uniform fill of deposited metal. To solve this problem, an adaptive fill control system was developed based on laser vision sensing. The system hardware consists of a modular development kit (MDK) as the real-time image capturing system, a computer as the controller, a D/A conversion card as the interface of controlled variable output, and a DC TIG welding system as the controlled device. The system software is developed and the developed feature extraction algorithm and control strategy are of good accuracy and robustness. Experimental results show that the system can implement adaptive fill of melting metal with high stability, reliability and accuracy. The groove is filled well and the quality of the weld formation satisfies the relevant industry criteria.

  4. Controlled Chemical Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Redox Buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Jesse H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Surendranath, Yogesh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Alivisatos, Paul [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystal solids are attractive materials for active layers in next-generation optoelectronic devices; however, their efficient implementation has been impeded by the lack of precise control over dopant concentrations. Herein we demonstrate a chemical strategy for the controlled doping of nanocrystal solids under equilibrium conditions. Exposing lead selenide nanocrystal thin films to solutions containing varying proportions of decamethylferrocene and decamethylferrocenium incrementally and reversibly increased the carrier concentration in the solid by 2 orders of magnitude from their native values. This application of redox buffers for controlled doping provides a new method for the precise control of the majority carrier concentration in porous semiconductor thin films.

  5. Control of charge migration in molecules by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Golubev, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Due to electronic many-body effects, the ionization of a molecule can trigger ultrafast electron dynamics appearing as a migration of the created hole charge throughout the system. Here we propose a scheme for control of the charge migration dynamics with a single ultrashort laser pulse. We demonstrate by fully ab initio calculations on a molecule containing a chromophore and an amine moieties that simple pulses can be used for stopping the charge-migration oscillations and localizing the charge on the desired site of the system. We argue that this control may be used to predetermine the follow-up nuclear rearrangement and thus the molecular reactivity.

  6. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  7. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  8. Sign control of magnetoresistance through chemically engineered interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, David; Gobbi, Marco; Kinane, Christy J; Eich, Marius; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Hueso, Luis E

    2014-12-01

    Chemically engineered interfaces are shown to produce inversions of the magnetoresistance in spintronic devices including lithium fluoride interlayers. This behavior is explained by the formation of anti-ferromagnetic difluoride layers. By changing the order of deposition of the different materials, the sign of the magnetoresistance can be deterministically controlled both in organic spin valves and in inorganic magnetic tunnel junctions.

  9. MIMO Self-Tuning Control of Chemical Process Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallager, L.; Jørgensen, S. B.; Goldschmidt, L.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of selecting a feasible model structure for a MIMO self-tuning controller (MIMOSC) is addressed. The dependency of the necessary structure complexity in relation to the specific process operating point is investigated. Experimental results from a fixed-bed chemical reactor are used...

  10. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  11. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy of solid and liquid chemicals using laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi; Lim, Jacob Song Kiat; Liu, Huan; Fu, Yu

    2016-08-22

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity microphone or a piezo sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a laboratory environment. Due to the aforementioned requirements, traditionally this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms (membrane, powder and liquid) were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for applications in photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy, with potential to enable the detection of chemicals in open environment at safe standoff distance. PMID:27557194

  12. Effect of surface topography in the generation of chemical maps by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Quintas, I.; Piñon, V.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2012-09-01

    The development of technologically advanced materials is propelling the improvement of surface analytical techniques. In particular, the composition and hence the properties of most of these new materials are spatial dependent. Between the techniques able to provide chemical spatial information, laser-induced plasma spectroscopy known also as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a very promising analytical technique. During the last decade, LIBS was successfully applied to the analysis of surfaces and the generation of chemical maps of heterogeneous materials. In the LIBS analysis, several experimental factors including surface topography must be taken into account. In this work, the influence of surface roughness in LIBS signal during the point analysis and acquisition of chemical maps was studied. For this purpose, samples of stainless steel with different surface finishes were prepared and analyzed by LIBS. In order to characterize the different surfaces, confocal microscopy images were obtained. Afterwards, both topographic and spectroscopic information were combined to show the relationship between them. Additionally, in order to reveal the effect of surface topography in the acquisition of chemical maps, a three dimensional analysis of a sample exhibiting two different finishes was carried out.

  13. Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

    2006-05-30

    This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance

  14. Towards benchmarking of multivariable controllers in chemical/biochemical industries: Plantwide control for ethylene glycol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Bialas, Dawid Jan; Jørgensen, John Bagterp;

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a simple yet realistic benchmark plant for evaluation and comparison of advanced multivariable control for chemical and biochemical processes. The benchmark plant is based on recycle-separator-recycle systems for ethylene glycol production and implemented in Matlab-Simuli...... for education purposes (operator training, student education, etc) as well as scientific research into chemical process control where it enables rapid evaluation and comparison of advanced multivariable controllers as demonstrated in this study....

  15. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.

  16. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pollution control in oil, gas and chemical plants

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    This unique book covers the fundamental requirements for air, soil, noise and water pollution control in oil and gas refineries, chemical plants, oil terminals, petrochemical plants, and related facilities. Coverage includes design and operational considerations relevant to critical systems such as monitoring of water pollution control, equipment, and engineering techniques as well as engineering/technological methods related to soil, noise and air pollution control. This book also: ·         Covers a diverse list of pollution control strategies important to practitioners, ranging from waste water gathering systems and oil/suspended solids removal to chemical flocculation units, biological treatment, and sludge handling and treatment ·         Provides numerous step-by-step tutorials that orient both entry level and veteran engineers to the essentials of pollution control methods in petroleum and chemical industries ·         Includes a comprehensive glossary providing readers with...

  18. Thermal Performance of ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The second Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite mission currently planned by National Aeronautics and Space Administration will measure global ice topography and canopy height using the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System {ATLAS). The ATLAS comprises two lasers; but only one will be used at a time. Each laser will generate between 125 watts and 250 watts of heat, and each laser has its own optimal operating temperature that must be maintained within plus or minus 1 degree Centigrade accuracy by the Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) consisting of a constant conductance heat pipe (CCHP), a loop heat pipe (LHP) and a radiator. The heat generated by the laser is acquired by the CCHP and transferred to the LHP, which delivers the heat to the radiator for ultimate rejection. The radiator can be exposed to temperatures between minus 71 degrees Centigrade and minus 93 degrees Centigrade. The two lasers can have different operating temperatures varying between plus 15 degrees Centigrade and plus 30 degrees Centigrade, and their operating temperatures are not known while the LTCS is being designed and built. Major challenges of the LTCS include: 1) A single thermal control system must maintain the ATLAS at 15 degrees Centigrade with 250 watts heat load and minus 71 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature, and maintain the ATLAS at plus 30 degrees Centigrade with 125 watts heat load and minus 93 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature. Furthermore, the LTCS must be qualification tested to maintain the ATLAS between plus 10 degrees Centigrade and plus 35 degrees Centigrade. 2) The LTCS must be shut down to ensure that the ATLAS can be maintained above its lowest desirable temperature of minus 2 degrees Centigrade during the survival mode. No software control algorithm for LTCS can be activated during survival and only thermostats can be used. 3) The radiator must be kept above minus 65 degrees Centigrade to prevent ammonia from freezing using no more

  19. Incorporation of chemical kinetic models into process control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important consideration in chemical process control is to determine the precise rationing of reactant streams, particularly when a large time delay exists between the mixing of the reactants and the measurement of the product. In this paper, a method is described for incorporating chemical kinetic models into the control strategy in order to achieve optimum operating conditions. The system is first characterized by determining a reaction rate surface as a function of all input reactant concentrations over a feasible range. A nonlinear constrained optimization program is then used to determine the combination of reactants which produces the specified yield at minimum cost. This operating condition is then used to establish the nominal concentrations of the reactants. The actual operation is determined through a feedback control system employing a Smith predictor. The method is demonstrated on a laboratory bench scale enzyme reactor

  20. Estimation of risks by chemicals produced during laser pyrolysis of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lothar W.; Spleiss, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Use of laser systems in minimal invasive surgery results in formation of laser aerosol with volatile organic compounds of possible health risk. By use of currently identified chemical substances an overview on possibly associated risks to human health is given. The class of the different identified alkylnitriles seem to be a laser specific toxicological problem. Other groups of chemicals belong to the Maillard reaction type, the fatty acid pyrolysis type, or even the thermally activated chemolysis. In relation to the available different threshold limit values the possible exposure ranges of identified substances are discussed. A rough estimation results in an exposure range of less than 1/100 for almost all substances with given human threshold limit values without regard of possible interactions. For most identified alkylnitriles, alkenes, and heterocycles no threshold limit values are given for lack of, until now, practical purposes. Pyrolysis of anaesthetized organs with isoflurane gave no hints for additional pyrolysis products by fragment interactions with resulting VOCs. Measurements of pyrolysis gases resulted in detection of small amounts of NO additionally with NO2 formation at plasma status.

  1. Application of laser diagnostics to sodium-water chemical reaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes in a steam generator. Therefore the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of paramount importance for safety reasons. This study aims to clarify the sodium-water reaction mechanisms using laser diagnostics. The sodium-water counter-flow reactions were measured using laser diagnostics such as laser induced fluorescence, CARS, Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The measurement results show that the sodium-water reaction proceeds mainly by the reaction Na + H2O → NaOH + H and the main product is NaOH in this reaction. Its forward and backward reaction rates tend to balance with each other and the whole reaction rate reduces as temperature increases. (author)

  2. Control and optimization of a staged laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, G.; Banerjee, S.; Chen, S.; Powers, N.; Liu, C.; Yan, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, P.; Zhao, B.; Umstadter, D.

    2016-09-01

    We report results of an experimental study of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons, using a staged device based on a double-jet gas target that enables independent injection and acceleration stages. This novel scheme is shown to produce stable, quasi-monoenergetic, and tunable electron beams. We show that optimal accelerator performance is achieved by systematic variation of five critical parameters. For the injection stage, we show that the amount of trapped charge is controlled by the gas density, composition, and laser power. For the acceleration stage, the gas density and the length of the jet are found to determine the final electron energy. This independent control over both the injection and acceleration processes enabled independent control over the charge and energy of the accelerated electron beam while preserving the quasi-monoenergetic character of the beam. We show that the charge and energy can be varied in the ranges of 2-45 pC, and 50-450 MeV, respectively. This robust and versatile electron accelerator will find application in the generation of high-brightness and controllable x-rays, and as the injector stage for more conventional devices.

  3. Controlled Chemical Patterns with ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Keith; Giordano, Anthony; Wang, Debin; Kodali, Vamsi; King, W. P.; Marder, S. R.; Riedo, E.; Curtis, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    Many research areas, both fundamental and applied, rely upon the ability to organize non-trivial assemblies of molecules on surfaces. In this work, we introduce a significant extension of ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL), a high throughput chemical patterning technique that uses temperature-driven chemical reactions localized near the tip of a thermal cantilever. By combining a chemical kinetics based model with experiments, we have developed a protocol for varying the concentration of surface bound molecules. The result is an unprecedented ability to fabricate extremely complex patterns comprised of varying chemical concentrations, as demonstrated by sinusoidal patterns of amine groups with varying pitches (˜5-15 μm) and the replication of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa with dimensions of ˜30 x 40 μm^2. Programmed control of the chemical reaction rate should have widespread applications for a technique which has already been shown to nanopattern various substrates including graphene nanowires, piezoelectric crystals, and optoelectronic materials.

  4. Chemical and ecological control methods for Epitrix spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. S. Cuthbertson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little information exists in regards to the control options available for potato flea beetles, Epitrix spp. This short review covers both chemical and ecological options currently available for control of Epitrix spp. Synthetic pyrethroids are the weapon of choice for the beetles. However, the impetus in integrated pest management is to do timely (early-season applications with something harsh which will give long-term protection at a time when there are not a lot of beneficials in the field. Finding the balance for control of Epitrix spp. is proving difficult.

  5. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Influences of CO2 laser on lime wood surface were studied. • With growth of the irradiation dose brightness decrease and increase of the total colour difference were observed. • Cellulose degradation and loss of hemicelluloses were observed. • Higher values at the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. • CO2 laser irradiation can be used as a new colouring method. - Abstract: We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm−2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses

  6. Chemical and mechanical weed control in soybean (Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Jonas Felix

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the possibility of chemical and mechanical weed control strategies in soybean. Soybean field experiments were carried out in 2013 and 2014 in Southern Germany. Five treatments including common herbicide mixtures and four mechanical weed control treatments, implementing a harrow and a hoe, were tested at different locations. In the herbicide experiments two treatments were applied by PRE emergence herbicides (metribuzin, clomazone, dimethenamid and metribuzin, flufenacet, clomazone and another two treatments were sprayed with a combination of PRE + POST emergence herbicides (metribuzin, flufenacet, thifensulfuron and pendimethalin, thifensulfuron, bentazone, cycloxydim. Furthermore, a POST herbicide treatment was implemented (thifensulfuron, bentazone, thifensulfuron and fluazifop-P-butyl. In the mechanical weed control experiments, treatments were: three times hoeing, PRE emergence harrowing plus three times hoeing, hoeing and harrowing in rotation or three times harrowing. In both experiments an untreated control was included. A 90% weed control efficacy and 23% yield increase was observed in the POST herbicide treatment. PRE + POST treatments resulted in 92% to 99% weed control efficiency and 15% yield increase compared to the untreated control. In the mechanical weed control experiments the combination of PRE emergence harrowing and POST emergence hoeing resulted in 82% weed control efficiency and 34% higher yield compared to the untreated control. Less weed control efficiency (72% was observed in the harrow treatment, leading to 20% higher yield compared to the control. The suitability of both strategies for implementation in “Integrated Weed Management” has been investigated.

  7. Chemical reactions of excited nitrogen atoms for short wavelength chemical lasers. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-15

    Accomplishments of this program include the following: (1) Scalable, chemical generation of oxygen atoms by reaction of fluorine atoms and water vapor. (2) Production of nitrogen atom densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 1}5 cm{sup {minus}3} with 5% electrical efficiency by injecting trace amounts of fluorine into microwave discharged nitrogen. (3) Production of cyanide radicals by reaction of high densities of N atoms with cyanogen. (4) Production of carbon atoms by reaction of nitrogen atoms with cyanogen or with fluorine atoms and hydrogen cyanide. (5) Confirmation that the reaction of carbon atoms and carbonyl sulfide produces CS(a{sup 3} {Pi}{sub r}), as predicted by conservation of electron spin and orbital angular momenta and as proposed by others under another SWCL program. (6) Production of cyanide radicals by injection of cyanogen halides into active nitrogen and use as spectroscopic calibration source. (7) Demonstration that sodium atoms react with cyanogen chloride, bromide and iodide and with cyanuric trifluoride to produce cyanide radicals. (8) Demonstration of the potential utility of the fluorine atom plus ammonia reaction system in the production of NF(b{sup l}{Sigma}{sup +}) via N({sup 2}D) + F{sub 2}.

  8. Spectrocolorimetric Control of Ancient Documents Postablation with Excimer Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Olivério D. D.; Miranda, Rosa M.; Costa, José L. C.

    1999-10-01

    The application of excimer lasers in ablation, cleaning, and restoration for the recovery of paper and parchment manuscripts is a recently implemented technique. A report of the use of excimer lasers in a cleaning process by which mud was removed from Islamic papers and parchments is presented. It was found that, because of the close proximity of the binding energies of paper to paper and of paper to mud, it was difficult to maintain control of the ablation process. However, the substrate was not affected. Spectrocolorimetry was used as a technique to detect the effects of ablation on cleaned areas of the manuscripts in terms of change in color appearance and severity of aging postablation. The analysis was performed by comparison of treated and untreated areas. Mathematical modeling was developed to define a representative original color and a color-distribution parameter. Improvements in the measuring method were made to yield the required precision for evaluating differences in color produced by laser ablation and to follow the color evolution after ablation. Results show that the effects of restoration, aging, and the environmental conditions can be individually identified under certain conditions. The method has applications in other domains.

  9. Measurements and simulation of controlled beamfront motion in the Laser Controlled Collective Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Striffler, C.D.; Rodgers, J.; Scgalov, Z.

    1989-01-01

    In the Laser Controlled Collective Accelerator, an intense electron beam is injected at a current above the vacuum space charge limit into an initially evacuated drift tube. A plasma channel, produced by time-sequenced, multiple laser beam ionization of a solid target on the drift tube wall, provides the necessary neutralization to allow for effective beam propagation. By controlling the rate of production of the plasma channel as a function of time down the drift tube, control of the electron beamfront can be achieved. Recent experimental measurements of controlled beamfront motion in this configuration are presented, along with results of ion acceleration experiments conducted using two different accelerating gradients. These results are compared with numerical simulations of the system in which both controlled beamfront motion and ion acceleration is observed consistent with both design expectations and experimental results. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  11. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  12. The evolution of a large laser control system - From Shiva to Nova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nova laser system is a 200 terawatt laser facility under construction at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Its current operational predecessor, the 30 terawatt Shiva laser, is controlled and diagnosed via a network of 50 computers. Although the highly distributed Shiva control system has proven effective and reliable, the need for more integrated process control on Nova is leading to a more centralized architecture. An overview of these control systems is presented and their differences are discussed

  13. Femtosecond laser pulse control of electron transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mančal, Tomáš; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; May, Volkhard

    2002-07-01

    Laser-pulse guided ultrafast electron transfer (ET) is studied theoretically for different types of donor-acceptor systems. The pulse initiates an optical transition from the electronic ground state into an excited state and controls the ET. The computations concentrate on systems where (a) the excited state (donor) is coupled to an acceptor level and where (b) the ET proceeds as an internal conversion from the excited state to the ground state. For both examples the manifold of vibrational coordinates is mapped on a single reaction coordinate coupled to a dissipative reservoir of further coordinates. Utilizing the methods of dissipative quantum dynamics combined with the optimal control (OC) scheme, it is demonstrated that control fields really exist which drive the ET in the required manner. Various properties of the OC algorithm are discussed when applied to dissipative dynamics and a scheme is proposed to avoid pinning in a local extremum.

  14. The density matrix picture of laser coherent control current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOU Qian; ZHANG Haichao; LIU Luning; LIN Weizhu

    2004-01-01

    The physical substance of the coherent control current and the optical rectification have been analyzed based on density matrix perturbation theory. The analytical results demonstrate that they arise from the real and virtual manifestations of the same nonlinear process associated with diagonal and non-diagonal density matrix.And in terms of polarization, they respectively arise from the intraband and interband polarizations. Both the evolution of the coherent control current exited by ultrafast laser pulse and its dependence on frequency have been studied in time and frequency domains. In order to get an explicit knowledge of intraband polarization and the origination of the coherent control current, we have investigated the initial photo-carriers momentum distribution. The ultrafast decay of the polar momentum population in order of tens of femtosends is given to illustrate its instantaneous optical response.

  15. Temperature Controlled Laser Joining of Aluminum to Galvanized Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Simon, Jörg; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Bezençon, Cyrille; Bassi, Corrado

    Reliable joining of 6000 series aluminum alloy to galvanized steel is a challenge for current manufacturing technologies. To control and limit the formation of brittle intermetallic phases, mixing of both metals in liquid state has to be avoided. It has been shown that laser weld-brazing is a possible process. Thereby the aluminum and zinc layer of the galvanized steel are molten and the steel remains solid during the process. In addition, to avoid zinc degassing, the aluminum melt bath temperature has to be below zinc boiling temperature of 907°C. To meet these requirements a temperature controlled laser process was developed, allowing to join the two materials without flux and filler material. The thickness of the intermetallic layer shows a dependency on the set temperature used to control the process. At optimum set temperature the thickness of intermetallic phases can be limited to about 5 μm. Tensile strengths of the joints of up to 75% of the aluminum base material were achieved.

  16. Controlled calibration method for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Chijian Zhang; Yuan Feng

    2008-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a potential technique for rapid analysis of samples present in solids, gases and liquids. In the last two decades it was an object of extensive studies. Controlled calibration method used to analysis the LIBS spectra is investigated. Compared with the inner calibration and calibration-free (CF) methods, this new method overcomes "matrix effect", and demonstrates a better ability to cope with the spectra. It is used to analyze natural soil, and errors of the concentration are decreased about 5%. The result shows that the new method is feasible and accurate.

  17. Laser system for identification, tracking, and control of flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Emma R; Rutschman, Phillip; Pegram, Nathan; Patt, Joseph M; Adamczyk, John J; Johanson, 3ric

    2016-05-30

    Flying insects are common vectors for transmission of pathogens and inflict significant harm to humans and agricultural production in many parts of the world. We present proof of principle for an optical system capable of highly specific vector control. This system utilizes a combination of optical sources, detectors, and sophisticated software to search, detect, and identify flying insects in real-time, with the capability of eradication using a lethal laser pulse. We present data on two insect species to show species distinction; Diaphorina citri, a vector of the causal agent of citrus greening disease, and Anopheles stephensi, a malaria vector.

  18. Laser system for identification, tracking, and control of flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Emma R; Rutschman, Phillip; Pegram, Nathan; Patt, Joseph M; Adamczyk, John J; Johanson, 3ric

    2016-05-30

    Flying insects are common vectors for transmission of pathogens and inflict significant harm to humans and agricultural production in many parts of the world. We present proof of principle for an optical system capable of highly specific vector control. This system utilizes a combination of optical sources, detectors, and sophisticated software to search, detect, and identify flying insects in real-time, with the capability of eradication using a lethal laser pulse. We present data on two insect species to show species distinction; Diaphorina citri, a vector of the causal agent of citrus greening disease, and Anopheles stephensi, a malaria vector. PMID:27410106

  19. Infrared free electron laser magnet power supply control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An infrared free-electron laser (IR-FEL) is under development at Materials and Advanced Accelerator Sciences Division, RRCAT, Indore, for the investigation of materials using an electron beam. This system consists of a 90 keV electron gun as an electron source, a linear accelerator (LINAC) which accelerates the beam to energy in the range of 15-25 MeV, beam transport line and an undulator. Beam transport line consists of dipoles, quadrupoles and steering magnets for transporting beam from the LINAC exit to the entrance of the undulator. In this paper we are presenting the development of control system for these precision power supplies

  20. ATControl: Controlling Software for Leica AT40x Laser Trackers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Dvořáček

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a software called ATControl which is based on the Matworks Matlab high-level programming language. This software is under constant development by the author in order to collect geospatial data by measuring with the absolute laser tracker Leica AT40x (AT401, AT402. Commercially available software solutions are shortly reviewed and the reasons for developing the new controlling application are discussed. Advantages of ATControl concerning metrological traceability of measured distances are stated. Key functional features of software are introduced.

  1. High energy conversion efficiency in laser-proton acceleration by controlling laser-energy deposition onto thin foil targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, C. M. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Robinson, A. P. L.; Markey, K.; Scott, R. H. H.; Lancaster, K. L.; Musgrave, I. O.; Spindloe, C.; Winstone, T.; Wyatt, D.; Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Deppert, O. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Batani, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Universita di Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy); Davies, J. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hassan, S. M.; Tatarakis, M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Centre for Plasma Physics and Lasers, 73133 Chania, 74100 Rethymno, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-02-24

    An all-optical approach to laser-proton acceleration enhancement is investigated using the simplest of target designs to demonstrate application-relevant levels of energy conversion efficiency between laser and protons. Controlled deposition of laser energy, in the form of a double-pulse temporal envelope, is investigated in combination with thin foil targets in which recirculation of laser-accelerated electrons can lead to optimal conditions for coupling laser drive energy into the proton beam. This approach is shown to deliver a substantial enhancement in the coupling of laser energy to 5–30 MeV protons, compared to single pulse irradiation, reaching a record high 15% conversion efficiency with a temporal separation of 1 ps between the two pulses and a 5 μm-thick Au foil. A 1D simulation code is used to support and explain the origin of the observation of an optimum pulse separation of ∼1 ps.

  2. ROBUST TEMPERATURE CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR A CHEMICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Glan Devadhas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to tuning out a new PID control strategy to provide Robust Control for a Chemical process. Chemical process control is a challenging problem due to the strong on-line non-linearity and extreme sensitivity to disturbances of the process. The proposed method has the advantage that it takes into account all the parameters variations associated with the process. The variations in the process parameters are modeled as a gaussian noise and an adaptive gaussian filter is placed in the feedback path. The adaptivegaussian filter in the feedback path adapts its filter coefficients based on a kalman estimation algorithm. This adaptive filter adapts so as to maintain the mean square error a minimum. The LQG (Linear Quadratic Gaussian in Robust Control is used in designing of the proposed strategy. The analysis of a PID tuning [7] strategy and the necessity of such an adaptive strategy is also explored in this paper. The proposed strategy of Robust Control has been designed for a First Order Lag Plus Delay (FOLPD process. The proposed strategy ofRobust Control has been simulated for an FOLPD process in SIMULINK.

  3. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y2O3 coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y2O3 coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y2O3 reaction with Cl2, U and UCl3. • Y2O3 coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt

  4. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  5. Communication: Control of chemical reactions using electric field gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Shivaraj D.; Tsori, Yoav

    2016-05-01

    We examine theoretically a new idea for spatial and temporal control of chemical reactions. When chemical reactions take place in a mixture of solvents, an external electric field can alter the local mixture composition, thereby accelerating or decelerating the rate of reaction. The spatial distribution of electric field strength can be non-trivial and depends on the arrangement of the electrodes producing it. In the absence of electric field, the mixture is homogeneous and the reaction takes place uniformly in the reactor volume. When an electric field is applied, the solvents separate and the reactants are concentrated in the same phase or separate to different phases, depending on their relative miscibility in the solvents, and this can have a large effect on the kinetics of the reaction. This method could provide an alternative way to control runaway reactions and to increase the reaction rate without using catalysts.

  6. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  7. AMAZON RAINFOREST COSMETICS: CHEMICAL APPROACH FOR QUALITY CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    Mariko Funasaki; Hileia dos Santos Barroso; Valdelira Lia Araújo Fernandes; Ingrid Sabino Menezes

    2016-01-01

    The market for natural cosmetics featuring ingredients derived from Amazon natural resources is growing worldwide. However, there is neither enough scientific basis nor quality control of these ingredients. This paper is an account of the chemical constituents and their biological activities of fourteen Amazonian species used in cosmetic industry, including açaí (Euterpe oleracea), andiroba (Carapa guianensis), bacuri (Platonia insignis), Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa), buriti (Mauritia vi...

  8. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  9. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water chemical reaction field using laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is used as a heat transfer fluid because of its excellent heat transport capability. On the other hand, it has strong chemical reactivity with water vapor. One of the design basis accidents of the SFR is the water leakage into the liquid sodium flow by a breach of heat transfer tubes. Therefore, the study on sodium-water chemical reactions is of importance for security reasons. This study aims to clarify the gas phase sodium-water reaction path and reaction products. Na, Na2, H2O, and reaction products in the counter-flow sodium-water reaction field were measured using laser diagnostics such as Raman scattering and photo-fragmentation. The main product in the sodium-water reaction was determined to be NaOH and its reaction path was discussed using Na-H2O elementally reaction analysis. (author)

  10. Fabrication of microchannels in single-crystal GaN by wet-chemical-assisted femtosecond-laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated micro- and nano-fabrication of wide band-gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Nanoscale craters were successfully formed by wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation, in which the laser beam is focused onto a single-crystal GaN substrate in a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. This allows efficient removal of ablation debris produced by chemical reactions during ablation, resulting in high-quality ablation. However, a two-step processing method involving irradiation by a fs-laser beam in air followed by wet etching, distorts the shape of the crater because of residual debris. The threshold fluence for wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation is lower than that for fs-laser ablation in air, which is advantageous for improving fabrication resolution since it reduces thermal effects. We have fabricated craters as small as 510 nm by using a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with an NA of 0.73. Furthermore, we have formed three-dimensional hollow microchannels in GaN by fs-laser direct-writing in HCl solution.

  11. Laser velocimeter data acquisition, processing, and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a mini-computer for data acquisition, processing, and control of a two-velocity-component dual beam laser velocimeter in a low-speed wind tunnel is described in detail. Digital stepping motors were programmed to map the mean-flow and turbulent fluctuating velocities in the test section boundary layer and free stream. The mini-computer interface controlled the operation of the LV processor and the high-speed selection of the photomultiplier tube whose output was to be processed. A statistical analysis of the large amount of data from the LV processor was performed by the computer while the experiment was in progress. The resulting velocities are in good agreement with hot-wire survey data obtained in the same facility

  12. Surface chemical reactions induced by well-controlled molecular beams: translational energy and molecular orientation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Michio, E-mail: okada@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.j, E-mail: mokada@cw.osaka-u.ac.j [Renovation Center of Instruments for Science Education and Technology, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 and 1-2 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2010-07-07

    I review our recent studies of chemical reactions on single-crystalline Cu and Si surfaces induced by hyperthermal oxygen molecular beams and by oriented molecular beams, respectively. Studies of oxide formation on Cu induced by hyperthermal molecular beams suggest that the translational energy of the incident molecules plays a significant role. The use of hyperthermal molecular beams enables us to open up new chemical reaction paths, and to develop new methods for the fabrication of thin films. Oriented molecular beams also demonstrate the possibility for controlling surface chemical reactions by varying the orientation of the incident molecules. The steric effects found on Si surfaces hint at new ways of achieving material fabrication on Si surfaces. Controlling the initial conditions of incoming molecules is a powerful tool for creating new materials on surfaces with well-controlled chemical reactions. (topical review)

  13. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser for decommissioning and dismantlement of nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Kazuyoku; Sugimoto, Daichi; Endo, Masamori; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual designs of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) facility for decommissioning and dismantlement (DD) of nuclear facility is proposed. The requisite output power and beam quality was determined base don our preliminary experiments of nonmetal material processing. Assuming the laser power of 30kW, it is derived that the beam quality of M2 equals 36 required to cut a biological shield wall of a nuclear power plant at a cutting speed of 10mm/min. Then the requisite specification of an optical fiber to deliver the laser is calculated. It turned to be quite extreme, core diameter of 1.7mm and NA equals 0.018. The mass flow and heat balance of proposed facility is calculated based on our recent COIL studies. With the high-pressure subsonic mode, the vacuum pump size is minimized compared to the supersonic operation. Finally, the size of the facility is estimated assuming tow-hour continuous operation. It is revealed that such a system can be packed in five railway containers.

  14. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  15. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Pirotta; Roberta Chow; Ian Relf

    2008-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or b...

  16. AMAZON RAINFOREST COSMETICS: CHEMICAL APPROACH FOR QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Funasaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The market for natural cosmetics featuring ingredients derived from Amazon natural resources is growing worldwide. However, there is neither enough scientific basis nor quality control of these ingredients. This paper is an account of the chemical constituents and their biological activities of fourteen Amazonian species used in cosmetic industry, including açaí (Euterpe oleracea, andiroba (Carapa guianensis, bacuri (Platonia insignis, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa, buriti (Mauritia vinifera or M. flexuosa, cumaru (Dipteryx odorata, cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum, guarana (Paullinia cupana, mulateiro (Calycophyllum spruceanum, murumuru (Astrocaryum murumuru, patawa (Oenocarpus bataua or Jessenia bataua, pracaxi (Pentaclethra macroloba, rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora, and ucuuba (Virola sebifera. Based on the reviewed articles, we selected chemical markers for the quality control purpose and evaluated analytical methods. Even though chromatographic and spectroscopic methods are major analytical techniques in the studies of these species, molecular approaches will also be important as used in food and medicine traceability. Only a little phytochemical study is available about most of the Amazonian species and some species such as açaí and andiroba have many reports on chemical constituents, but studies on biological activities of isolated compounds and sampling with geographical variation are limited.

  17. Kinetics analysis of chemiluminescence in discharge-driven HF chemical lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Luo; Shengfu Yuan; Baozhu Yan; Qisheng Lu; Qianjin Zou

    2011-01-01

    The chcinilummescence spectrum in the optical cavity of discharge-driven hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is measured. The result reveals that the spectra of the helium and fluorine (F) atoms are the major components. Moreover, the green chemiluminescence in the downstream of the optical axis is mostly composed of the 60P20 spectral line of the HF molecule. The analysis shows that, except for the cold pumping reaction, the recombination of the F atoms and the hot pumping reaction also occur in the optical cavity. Due to the hot. Pumping reaction and the optical cavity temperature in a specific range, the 60P20 line becomes the strongest HF molecule in the downstream region of the optical axis. After the hot pumping reaction, the green chcmilum inference always appears in the downstream region of the optical axis when the optical cavity temperature varies in a greater range.%@@ The chemiluminescence spectrum in the optical cavity of discharge-driven hydrogen fluoride(HF) chemical laser is measured.The result reveals that the spectra of the helium and fluorine(F) atoms are the major components.Moreover,the green chemiluminescence in the downstream of the optical axis is mostly composed of the 60P20 spectral line of the HF molecule.

  18. Chemical and explosive detection with long-wave infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, Ei E.; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) mostly uses silicon-based detectors and measures the atomic emission in the UV-Vis-NIR (UVN) region of the spectrum. It can be used to detect the elements in the sample under test, such as the presence of lead in the solder for electronics during RoHS compliance verification. This wavelength region, however, does not provide sufficient information on the bonding between the elements, because the molecular vibration modes emit at longer wavelength region. Measuring long-wave infrared spectrum (LWIR) in a LIBS setup can instead reveal molecular composition of the sample, which is the information sought in applications including chemical and explosive detection and identification. This paper will present the work and results from the collaboration of several institutions to develop the methods of LWIR LIBS for chemical/explosive/pharmaceutical material detection/identification, such as DMMP and RDX, as fast as using a single excitation laser pulse. In our latest LIBS setup, both UVN and LWIR spectra can be collected at the same time, allowing more accurate detection and identification of materials.

  19. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  20. Semi-gas kinetics model for performance modeling of flowing chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COIL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi; HU Limin; SHEN Yiqing

    2004-01-01

    A semi-gas kinetics (SGK) model for performance analyses of flowing chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is presented. In this model, the oxygen-iodine reaction gas flow is treated as a continuous medium, and the effect of thermal motions of particles of different laser energy levels on the performances of the COIL is included and the velocity distribution function equations are solved by using the double-parameter perturbational method. For a premixed flow, effects of different chemical reaction systems, different gain saturation models and temperature, pressure, yield of excited oxygen, iodine concentration and frequency-shift on the performances of the COIL are computed, and the calculated output power agrees well with the experimental data. The results indicate that the power extraction of the SGK model considering 21 reactions is close to those when only the reversible pumping reaction is considered, while different gain saturation models and adjustable parameters greatly affect the output power, the optimal threshold gain range, and the length of power extraction.

  1. Chemical-Assisted Femtosecond Laser Writing of Lab-in-Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Moez

    fringe contrast and peak resolution beyond that available with FPIs and offer a significant theoretical improvement in refractometer sensitivity. The advanced laser processes optimized here may provide a new base for photonics, microfluidics, and optofluidics fabrication in a LIF platform with multiplexed functionality and rapid prototyping capabilities of fully integrable 3D optofluidic systems. The proposed LIF devices define new micro-systems for temperature, strain, pressure, refractive index, and bend strain sensing that may find application in the acoustic, aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, civil, or medical fields.

  2. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants.

  3. Controlling condensation and frost growth with chemical micropatterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Hansen, Ryan R; Murphy, Kevin R; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In-plane frost growth on chilled hydrophobic surfaces is an inter-droplet phenomenon, where frozen droplets harvest water from neighboring supercooled liquid droplets to grow ice bridges that propagate across the surface in a chain reaction. To date, no surface has been able to passively prevent the in-plane growth of ice bridges across the population of supercooled condensate. Here, we demonstrate that when the separation between adjacent nucleation sites for supercooled condensate is properly controlled with chemical micropatterns prior to freezing, inter-droplet ice bridging can be slowed and even halted entirely. Since the edge-to-edge separation between adjacent supercooled droplets decreases with growth time, deliberately triggering an early freezing event to minimize the size of nascent condensation was also necessary. These findings reveal that inter-droplet frost growth can be passively suppressed by designing surfaces to spatially control nucleation sites and by temporally controlling the onset of freezing events. PMID:26796663

  4. Controlling condensation and frost growth with chemical micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Murphy, Kevin R.; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In-plane frost growth on chilled hydrophobic surfaces is an inter-droplet phenomenon, where frozen droplets harvest water from neighboring supercooled liquid droplets to grow ice bridges that propagate across the surface in a chain reaction. To date, no surface has been able to passively prevent the in-plane growth of ice bridges across the population of supercooled condensate. Here, we demonstrate that when the separation between adjacent nucleation sites for supercooled condensate is properly controlled with chemical micropatterns prior to freezing, inter-droplet ice bridging can be slowed and even halted entirely. Since the edge-to-edge separation between adjacent supercooled droplets decreases with growth time, deliberately triggering an early freezing event to minimize the size of nascent condensation was also necessary. These findings reveal that inter-droplet frost growth can be passively suppressed by designing surfaces to spatially control nucleation sites and by temporally controlling the onset of freezing events. PMID:26796663

  5. Selective control of HOD photodissociation using CW lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manabendra Sarma; S Adhikari; Manoj K Mishra

    2007-09-01

    Selective control of HOD photodissociation (H-O + D ← HOD → H + O-D) has been theoretically investigated using CW lasers with appropriate carrier frequency and |0, 0〉, |0, 1〉 and |0, 2〉 with zero quantum of excitation in the O-H bond and zero, one and two quanta of excitation in the O-D bond as the initial states. Results indicate that the O-H bond in HOD can be selectively dissociated with a maximum flux of 87% in the H + O-D channel from the ground vibrational state |0, 0〉. For the O-D bond dissociation, it requires two quanta of excitation (|0, 2〉) in the O-D mode to obtain 83% flux in the H-O + D channel. Use of a two colour laser set-up in conjunction with the field optimized initial state (FOIST) scheme to obtain an optimal linear combination of |0, 0〉 and |0, 1〉 vibrational states as the initial state provides an additional 7% improvement to flux in the H-O + D channel as compared to that from the pure |0, 1〉 state.

  6. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  7. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  8. Quantum control and entanglement in a chemical compass

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jianming; Briegel, Hans J

    2009-01-01

    The radical pair mechanism is one of the two main hypotheses to explain the navigability of animals in weak magnetic fields, enabling e.g. birds to see the Earth's magnetic field. We show how quantum control can be used to either enhance or reduce the performance of such a chemical compass, providing a route to further test this hypothesis experimentally. We investigate the dynamics of quantum entanglement in this model, and demonstrate intriguing connections between radical-pair entanglement and the magnetic field sensitivity of the compass. The nature of the nuclear-spin environment plays an essential role for the observed effects.

  9. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Wang, Ying; Kumar, Ananad; Wavrik, Kathryn

    2001-10-29

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs. This research project had three objectives. The first objective was to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective was to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective was to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs.

  10. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, G I; Sheridan, E; Sachkou, Y; Baker, C; Bowen, W P

    2015-01-01

    Superfluidity is an emergent quantum phenomenon which arises due to strong interactions between elementary excitations in liquid helium. These excitations have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However measurements to-date have been limited, quite generally, to average properties of bulk superfluid or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of superfluid excitations in real-time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification of the thermal motion. This provides a new tool to understand and control the microscopic behaviour of superfluids, including phonon-phonon interactions, quantised vortices and two-dimensional quantum phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including femtogram effective masses, high me...

  11. Acoustic bubble: Controlled and selective micropropulsion and chemical waveform generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Daniel

    The physics governing swimming at the microscale---where viscous forces dominate over inertial---is distinctly different than that at the macroscale. Devices capable of finely controlled swimming at the microscale could enable bold ideas such as targeted drug delivery, non-invasive microsurgery, and precise materials assembly. Progress has already been made towards such artificial microswimmers using several means of actuation: chemical reactions and applied magnetic, electric or acoustic fields. However, the prevailing goal of selective actuation of a single microswimmer from within a group, the first step towards collaborative, guided action by a group of swimmers, has so far not been achieved. Here I present a new class of microswimmer that accomplishes for the first time selective actuation (Chapter 1). The swimmer design eschews the commonly-held design paradigm that microswimmers must use non-reciprocal motion to achieve propulsion; instead, the swimmer is propelled by oscillatory motion of an air bubble trapped within the swimmer's polymer body. This oscillatory motion is driven by a low-power biocompatible acoustic field to the ambient liquid, with meaningful swimmer propulsion occurring only at resonance frequencies of the bubble. This acoustically-powered microswimmer performs controllable rapid translational and rotational motion even in highly viscous liquid. By using a group of swimmers each with a different bubble size (and thus different resonance frequencies) selective actuation of a single swimmer from among the group can be readily achieved. Cellular response to chemical microenvironments depends on the spatiotemporal characteristics of the stimulus, which is central to many biological processes including gene expression, cell migration, differentiation, apoptosis, and intercellular signaling. To date, studies have been limited to digital (or step) chemical stimulation with little control over the temporal counterparts. Microfluidic approaches

  12. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Relf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or bias. This indicates significant deficiencies in laser trial methodology. We report the development and preliminary testing of a novel laser machine that can blind both patient and operator to treatment allocation without staff participation. The new laser machine combines sealed preset and non-bypassable randomization codes, decoy lights and sound, and a conical perspex tip to overcome laser diode glow detection.

  13. Rapidly developed squamous cell carcinoma after laser therapy used to treat chemical burn wound: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyung-Rok; Kwon, Soon-Sung; Chung, Seum; Kie, Jeong-Hae

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic wounds, especially burn scars, malignant tumors can arise. However, it is rare for a subacute burn injury to change to a malignant lesion within one month. Moreover, a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn has never been reported. Case report In this report, we examine a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn. Because pathologic investigations were made from the first oper...

  14. Controlling Chaos in a Semiconductor Laser via Weak Optical Positive Feedback and Modulating Amplitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Sen-Lin

    2007-01-01

    Numerical analysis of weak optical positive feedback (OPF) controlling chaos is studied in a semiconductor laser.The physical model of controlling chaos produced via modulating the current of semiconductor laser is presented under the condition of OPF.We find the physical mechanism that the nonlinear gain coefficient and linewidth enhancement factor of the laser are affected by OPF so that the dynamical behaviour of the system can be efficiently controlled.Chaos is controlled into a single-periodic state,a dual-periodic state,a fri-periodic state,a quadr-periodic state,a pentaperiodic state,and the laser emitting powers are increased by OPF in simulations.Lastly,another chaos-control method with modulating the amplitude of the feedback light is presented and numerically simulated to control chaotic laser into multi-periodic states.

  15. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic surface of beam tubes can be transmitted to the optical surfaces and lead to damage of optical components. For the high-power solid-state laser facilities, contamination control focuses on the slab amplifiers, spatial filters, and final-optical assemblies. In this paper, an effective solution to control contaminations including the whole process of the laser driver is put forward to provide the safe operation of laser facilities, and the detailed technical methods of contamination control such as washing, cleanliness metrology, and cleanliness protecting are also introduced to reduce the probability of laser-induced damage of optics. The experimental results show that the cleanliness level of SG-III laser facility is much better to ensure that the laser facility can safely operate at high energy flux.

  16. Laser-error-correction control unit for machine tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleson, R.R.

    1978-05-23

    An ultraprecision machining capability is needed for the laser fusion program. For this work, a precision air-bearing spindle has been mounted horizontally on a modified vertical column of a Moore Number 3 measuring machine base located in a development laboratory at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. An open-loop control system previously installed on this machine was inadequate to meet the upcoming requirements since accuracy is limited to 0.5 ..mu..m by the errors in the machine's gears and leadscrew. A new controller was needed that could monitor the actual position of the machine and perform real-time error correction on the programmed tool path. It was necessary that this project: (1) attain an optimum tradeoff between hardware and software; (2) use a modular design for easy maintenance; (3) use a standard NC tape service; (4) drive the x and y axes with a positioning resolution of 5.08 nm and a feedback resolution of 10 nm; (5) drive the x and y axis motors at a velocity of 0.05 cm/sec in the contouring mode and 0.18 cm/sec in the positioning mode; (6) eliminate the possibility of tape-reader errors; and (7) allow editing of the part description data. The work that was done to develop and install the new machine controller is described.

  17. Laser-error-correction control unit for machine tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultraprecision machining capability is needed for the laser fusion program. For this work, a precision air-bearing spindle has been mounted horizontally on a modified vertical column of a Moore Number 3 measuring machine base located in a development laboratory at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. An open-loop control system previously installed on this machine was inadequate to meet the upcoming requirements since accuracy is limited to 0.5 μm by the errors in the machine's gears and leadscrew. A new controller was needed that could monitor the actual position of the machine and perform real-time error correction on the programmed tool path. It was necessary that this project: (1) attain an optimum tradeoff between hardware and software; (2) use a modular design for easy maintenance; (3) use a standard NC tape service; (4) drive the x and y axes with a positioning resolution of 5.08 nm and a feedback resolution of 10 nm; (5) drive the x and y axis motors at a velocity of 0.05 cm/sec in the contouring mode and 0.18 cm/sec in the positioning mode; (6) eliminate the possibility of tape-reader errors; and (7) allow editing of the part description data. The work that was done to develop and install the new machine controller is described

  18. Exogenous bleaching evaluation on dentin using chemical activated technique compared with diode laser technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study compared the results of different exogenous bleaching proceedings on dentin after treatment of enamel surface. Thirty human canine were hewn preserving the vestibular half of the crown and 3 mm of root, showing a vestibular-lingual thickness average of 3,5 mm, measuring in the third middle of the crown. Ali teeth were maintained in wet chamber during the experiment. Digital photographs were taken of the dentin surface at 3 experimental times (LI: initial record, L0: immediate pos-bleaching record and L 15: 15 days after bleaching). The teeth were divided into 3 experimental groups of 10 teeth in each. The Control Group did not receive any kind of treatment. The Laser Group received 2 session of laser bleaching, with 3 applications each, using 35% hydrogen peroxide, activated by diode laser during 30 seconds, by scanning the enamel surface from incisal edge to the top of the crown, from mesial to distal portion of the crown and circularly, each movement during 10 seconds. The following parameters being adopted: wavelength of 808 nm, power of 1,5 W and optic fiber with 600 μm (core). The Peroxide Group received 28 daily applications, during 4 hours each application, using 16% carbamide peroxide. The bleaching records were analysed using a computer, through RGBK (red, green , blue and black). The K averages (K=100% for black and K=0% for white) of the records for Control Group were: LI=50,1 %, L0=50,3% and L 15=50,6%. For Laser Group the K averages were LI=48,5%, L0=50,0% and L 15=47,7%. And for the Peroxide Group were LI=50,5%, L0=35,9% and L 15=37,3%. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference of the K between the Control Group and the Laser Group, as to LI, L0 and L 15. Only Peroxide Group showed significant statistical difference between LI with L0 and L 15 (0,1%), and L0 in comparison with L 15 did not show any difference. (author)

  19. Control of Ultracold Chemical Reactions Through Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    The pioneering work on obtaining a quantum degenerate sample of ground state KRb molecules is one of the great successes in ultracold physics. The early experimental and theoretical investigations to describe quantum chemical reactions of ultracold KRb molecules with residual ultracold K atoms have been based on probing their inelastic collision loss rates. A natural progression towards control of molecular reactivity would be to study the potential landscape of the collisional complex with the inherited degeneracies and intersections between two lowest electronic states. The topology of these surfaces provide us with a qualitative understanding of the reaction mechanism. Here we study how the ability to prepare unique initial states combined with the presence of conical intersections can be used to control the outcome of ultracold chemical reactions of alkali-metal atoms and molecules. We locate and determine properties of conical intersections for the KRbK molecular system and determine signatures of non-adiabatic passage through the conical intersection to distinguish between relaxation and reaction pathways. This work is supported by the ARO-MURI and NSF Grants.

  20. Accuracy of navigated control concepts using an Er: Yag-laser for cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Regine; Weitz, Jochen; Poitzsch, Luise; Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Deppe, Herbert; Lueth, Tim C

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method for measuring the shape accuracy of a cylindrical hole which is created by means of an automatically power-controlled laser system using navigated control. In dental surgery, drills or mills are used for bone treatment. For most patients the use of these instruments is very inconvenient. Furthermore, the bone treatment with rotating instruments can lead to thermal necrosis. Using a laser system could be a good alternative for the patient. The utilization of a laser system could also facilitate bone treatment without any severe thermal damage. An optical navigation system can be used for a safer handling of a laser system. The position and the orientation of the laser handpiece relative to the patient can be calculated. Thereby, the laser can be automatically switched off, if the end of the laser beam does not hit the preoperative planned area. In order to measure the accuracy of such a laser system, we created several cavities in a phantom with a manually guided, automatically power-controlled laser. Afterwards, the deviation between the planned shape and the shape created by manually guided automatically power-controlled laser treatment has been measured. The application of this system showed, that the required accuracy of <1 mm for dental implantology applications, could not be reached.

  1. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  2. Chemically modified carbon nanotubes as material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI) material in protein profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomarkers play a potential role in the early detection and diagnosis of a disease. Our aim is to derivatize carbon nanotubes for exploration of the differences in human body fluids e.g. serum, through matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) that can be related to disease and subsequently to be employed in the biomarker discovery process. This application we termed as the material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI). The versatility of this technology is meant to increase the amount of information from biological samples on the protein level, which will have a major impact to serve the cause of diagnostic markers. Serum peptides and proteins are immobilized on derivatized carbon nanotubes, which function as binding material. Protein-loaded suspension is placed on a stainless steel target or buckypaper on aluminum target for direct analysis with MALDI-MS. The elution method to wash the bound proteins from carbon nanotubes was employed to compare with the direct analysis procedure. Elution is carried out by MALDI matrix solution to get them out of the entangled nanotubes, which are difficult to desorb by laser due to the complex nanotube structures. The advantage of these optimized methods compared to the conventional screening methods is the improved sensitivity, selectivity and the short analysis time without prior albumin and immunoglobulin depletion. The comparison of similarly modified diamond and carbon nanotubes exhibit differences in their nature to bind the proteins out of serum due to the differences in their physical characteristics. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provided hint for the presence of tertiary amine peak at the crucial chemical step of iminodiacetic acid addition to acid chloride functionality on carbon nanotubes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was utilized to quantitatively measure the copper capacity of these derivatized carbon nanotubes which is a direct measure of capacity of

  3. Chemically modified carbon nanotubes as material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI) material in protein profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najam-ul-Haq, M. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rainer, M. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schwarzenauer, T. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huck, C.W. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: christian.w.huck@uibk.ac.at; Bonn, G.K. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-03-02

    Biomarkers play a potential role in the early detection and diagnosis of a disease. Our aim is to derivatize carbon nanotubes for exploration of the differences in human body fluids e.g. serum, through matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) that can be related to disease and subsequently to be employed in the biomarker discovery process. This application we termed as the material enhanced laser desorption ionisation (MELDI). The versatility of this technology is meant to increase the amount of information from biological samples on the protein level, which will have a major impact to serve the cause of diagnostic markers. Serum peptides and proteins are immobilized on derivatized carbon nanotubes, which function as binding material. Protein-loaded suspension is placed on a stainless steel target or buckypaper on aluminum target for direct analysis with MALDI-MS. The elution method to wash the bound proteins from carbon nanotubes was employed to compare with the direct analysis procedure. Elution is carried out by MALDI matrix solution to get them out of the entangled nanotubes, which are difficult to desorb by laser due to the complex nanotube structures. The advantage of these optimized methods compared to the conventional screening methods is the improved sensitivity, selectivity and the short analysis time without prior albumin and immunoglobulin depletion. The comparison of similarly modified diamond and carbon nanotubes exhibit differences in their nature to bind the proteins out of serum due to the differences in their physical characteristics. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy provided hint for the presence of tertiary amine peak at the crucial chemical step of iminodiacetic acid addition to acid chloride functionality on carbon nanotubes. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was utilized to quantitatively measure the copper capacity of these derivatized carbon nanotubes which is a direct measure of capacity of

  4. Phase retarder in chemical oxygen-iodine laser at 45° incidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wang; Jianbing Huang; Yingjian Wang; Zhengxiu Fan

    2006-01-01

    @@ A phase retarder used in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) system has been fabricated by ion beam sputtering (IBS). When the incident angle is 45° the reflectivity is about 99.9% from 1290 to 1340 nm and about 83.8% at 632.8 nm, and the phase retardance between the parallel and perpendicular polarization components is -92.8° at 1315 nm. In order to get the influence of temperature on the phase retarder, six samples have been annealed from 523 to 648 K at interval of 25 K in air respectively, and the results show good temperature performance. With increasing temperature, phase retardance becomes smaller, and the variation is within 4° at 1315 nm. At the same time, the variation maintains within ±10° for the incidence from 44° to 49°.

  5. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubovský, Ivan; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm-2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  6. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.

  7. Provenance control on chemical indices of weathering (Taiwan river sands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Geochemical parameters obtained from the analysis of sediments and sedimentary rocks are widely used to infer weathering and paleo-weathering conditions in source areas. Chemical indices of weathering, however, may not reflect weathering only, or even principally. The concentration of chemical elements in terrigenous sediments is constrained by the original mineralogy of source rocks, and is thus provenance-dependent. Moreover, the mineralogy and consequently the geochemistry of sediments may undergo substantial modifications by diverse physical processes during transport and deposition, including recycling and hydraulic sorting by size, density or shape, and/or by chemical dissolution and precipitation during diagenesis. Around the island of Taiwan, temperature and rainfall are consistently high and relatively homogeneous, and no significant correlation is observed between geochemical and climatic parameters. Physical erosion, fostered by landslides induced by frequent earthquakes and typhoons, prevails because of high relief and extreme rates of tectonic uplift. In such a dynamic orogenic setting, all chemical indices of weathering are controlled principally by the geology of source terranes. Sedimentaclastic and metasedimentaclastic sands carried by western Taiwan rivers draining the pro-wedge display the strongest depletion in Na, Ca, Mg and Sr relative to average upper continental crust, and no depletion or even enrichment in K, Rb and Ba. Low WIP indices reflect erosion of phyllosilicate-dominated rocks in the Slate Belt and extensive recycling of clastic rocks exposed in the Western Foothills. Instead, metamorphiclastic sands carried by eastern Taiwan rivers draining the retro-wedge show no depletion or even enrichment in Mg and Ca, and low CIA and PIA, reflecting contributions from the Tailuko Belt and Coastal Range. Volcaniclastic sands have the same CIA values of their andesitic source rocks (47 ± 1 versus 47 ± 7), indicating that weathering is

  8. Controlling the Orientation and Alignment of Reagent Molecules by a Polarized Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛书林; 韩克利; 楼南泉

    2003-01-01

    The expressions used for controlling the alignment and orientation of reagent molecules are derived. The problem to the control of the orientation and alignment of reagent molecules by the polarization direction and propagation direction of laser is discussed.

  9. Development of real-time monitoring and control in COIL laser cutting for joint R and D between Korea and U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser monitoring and control technique investigated to experiment for cutting kerf width and result of laser cutting for D and D of nuclear facility. The demands for this laser monitoring and control technique were applied to process control in laser cutting and to fabricate monitoring and control system, focusing lens assembly. This system can had a advantage to monitor and control the laser cutting on real time. KAERI investigated the COIL laser and monitored 2 kW laser power

  10. Control of optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanocrystals by nanosecond-laser annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimogaki, T.; Ofuji, T.; Tetsuyama, N.; Kawahara, H.; Higashihata, M.; Ikenoue, H.; Nakamura, D.; Okada, T.

    2014-03-01

    Effects of laser annealing on electrical and optical properties of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals, which are expected as building blocks for optoelectronic devices, have been investigated in this study. In the case of fabricating p-n junction in single one-dimensional ZnO nanocrystal, phosphorus-ions implanted p-type ZnO nanocrystals were recrystallized and recovered in the optical properties by nanosecond-laser annealing using a KrF excimer laser. Antimony-doped p-type ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by irradiating laminated structure which antimony thin film were deposited on ZnO nanocrystals with the laser beam. Additionally, it is possible to control the growth rate of ZnO nanowires by using laser annealing. Irradiating with pulsed laser a part of ZnO buffer layer deposited on the a-cut sapphire substrate, then ZnO nanowires were grown on the ZnO buffer layer by the nanoparticle assisted pulsed laser deposition method. As a result, the clear boundary of the laser annealed and non-laser annealed area was appeared. It was observed that ZnO nanowires were grown densely at non-laser annealed area, on the other hand, sparse ones were grown at the laser-annealed region. In this report, the possibility of laser annealing techniques to establish the stable and reliable fabrication process of ZnO nanowires-based LD and LED are discussed on the basis of experimental results.

  11. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  12. Controlling laser beam irradiation area using an optical duplicate system to improve satellite-ground laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomoko; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Fujikawa, Chiemi; Kodate, Kashiko

    2016-08-01

    To improve the quality of ground to satellite laser communications, we propose an optical duplicate system of the optical ground station. Our proposed approach can be used to control the beam irradiation area for a satellite position without changing the total power of the output beam and the mechanical drive unit; this is performed by controlling the input pattern of a liquid crystal filter inserted in the input plane of the optical duplicate system. Most of the power of the diffracted laser beam emitted from the ground is focused on the optical axis. By distributing the power to side lobes, it is possible to extend the coverage area for a satellite position. This system allows the laser beam irradiation area to be controlled by a sufficient degree by adjusting the threshold of the satellite reception level. We verify the efficacy of the system using wave optics numerical calculations.

  13. Lasers in tattoo and pigmentation control: role of the PicoSure® laser system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbeck R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Richard Torbeck,1 Richard Bankowski,2 Sarah Henize,3 Nazanin Saedi,11Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, 2Cynosure, Inc, Westford, MA, 3Huron Consulting Group, Chicago, IL, USABackground and objectives: The use of picosecond lasers to remove tattoos has greatly improved due to the long-standing outcomes of nanosecond lasers, both clinically and histologically. The first aesthetic picosecond laser available for this use was the PicoSure® laser system (755/532 nm. Now that a vast amount of research on its use has been conducted, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature to validate the continued application of the PicoSure® laser system for tattoo removal.Study design and methods: A PubMed search was conducted using the term "picosecond" combined with "laser", "dermatology", and "laser tattoo removal".Results: A total of 13 articles were identified, and ten of these met the inclusion criteria for this review. The majority of studies showed that picosecond lasers are an effective and safe treatment mode for the removal of tattoo pigments. Several studies also indicated potential novel applications of picosecond lasers in the removal of various tattoo pigments (eg, black, red, and yellow. Adverse effects were generally mild, such as transient hypopigmentation or blister formation, and were rarely more serious, such as scarring and/or textural change.Conclusion: Advancements in laser technologies and their application in cutaneous medicine have revolutionized the field of laser surgery. Computational modeling provides evidence that the optimal pulse durations for tattoo ink removal are in the picosecond domain. It is recommended that the PicoSure® laser system continue to be used for safe and effective tattoo removal, including for red and yellow pigments.Keywords: tattoo, removal, laser, picosecond 

  14. Time-Delayed Feedback Control in a Single-Mode Laser System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effects of time-delayed feedback control in a single-mode laser system is investigated. Using the small time delay approximation, the analytic expression of the stationary probability distribution function of the laser field is obtaincd. The mean, normalized variance and skewness of the steady-state laser intensity are calculated. It is found that the time-delayed feedback control can suppress the intensity fluctuation of the laser system. The numerical simulations are in good agreement with the approximate analytic results.

  15. A Polymer Film Dye Laser with Spatially Modulated Emission Controlled by Transversely Distributed Pumping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zurab V. Wardosanidze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial modulation of laser emission controlled by the structure of excitation light field was demonstrated. A dye doped polymer film as an active medium was sandwiched between two laser mirrors forming a laser cell. The pumping was performed by an interference pattern formed with two mutually coherent beams of the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm and located in the plane of the laser cell. The laser emission was observed normally on the plane of the cell. The cross section of the obtained laser emission was modulated in intensity with an interval between maximums depending on the period of the pumping interference pattern. Thus, the emitted light field qualitatively looks like diffraction from an elementary dynamic hologram, that is, a holographic diffraction grating.

  16. Physico-chemical and Bio-chemical Controls on Soil C Saturation Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Six, Johan; Plante, Alain

    2011-06-02

    In this project, we tested through a multitude of lab and field experiments the concept of soil C stabilization and determined metrics for the level of C saturation across soils and soil organic matter fractions. The basic premise of the soil C saturation concept is that there is a maximum amount of C that can be stabilized within a soil, even when C input is further increased. In a first analysis, our results showed that linear regression models do not adequately predict maximal organic C stabilization by fine soil particles. Soil physical and chemical properties associated with soil clay mineralogy, such as specific surface area and organic C loading, should be incorporated into models for predicting maximal organic C stabilization. In a second analysis, we found significantly greater maximal C stabilization in the microaggregate-protected versus the non-microaggregate protected mineral fractions, which provides independent validation that microaggregation plays an important role in increasing the protection and stabilization of soil C leading to greater total soil C accumulation in these pools. In a third study, our results question the role of biochemical preference in mineral C stabilization and of the chemical recalcitrance of specific plant-derived compounds in non-protected soil C accumulation. Because C biochemical composition of slowly turning over mineral protected C pools does not change with C saturation, input C composition is unlikely to affect long-term C stabilization. Rather, C saturation and stabilization in soil is controlled only by the quantity of C input to the soil and the physical and chemical protection mechanisms at play in long-term C stabilization. In conclusion, we have further corroborated the concept of soil C saturation and elucidated several mechanisms underlying this soil C saturation.

  17. Hierarchical tree-structured control network for the Antares laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGirt, F.

    1979-01-01

    The design and implementation of a distributed, computer-based control system for the Antares 100-kJ gas laser fusion facility is presented. Control system requirements and their operational interrelationships that consider both integrated system control and individual subsystem control are described. Several configurations of minicomputers are established to provide direct control of sets of microcomputers and to provide points of operator-laser interaction. Over 100 microcomputers are located very close to the laser device control points or sources of data and perform the real-time functions of the control system, such as data and control signal multiplexing, stepping motor control, and vacuum and gas system control. These microcomputers are designed to be supported as an integral part of the control network and to be software compatible with the larger minicomputers.

  18. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Liu, Jin; Wavrik, Kathryn

    1999-09-27

    This report describes work performed during the first year of the project, ''Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs.'' This research project has three objectives. The first objective is to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective is to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective is to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs. This research project consists of three tasks, each of which addresses one of the above objectives. Our work is directed at both injection wells and production wells and at vertical, horizontal, and highly deviated wells.

  19. Development of multiple laser frequency control system for Ca{sup +} isotope ion cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyunghun, E-mail: jung@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Nuclear Professional School (Japan); Yamamoto, Yuta, E-mail: yamamoto@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management (Japan); Hasegawa, Shuichi, E-mail: hasegawa@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Nuclear Professional School (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We here developed and evaluated a laser frequency control system which synchronizes the laser frequency to the resonance of target Ca {sup +} isotope ion whose having more than 8 GHz of isotope shift based on the Fringe Offset Lock method for simple operation of ICPMS-ILECS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry - Ion trap Laser Cooling Spectroscopy) The system fulfilled the minimum requirements of four slave lasers stability for Doppler cooling of Ca {sup +} ions. A performance of the system was evaluated by cooling {sup 40}Ca {sup +} ions with the stabilized slave lasers. All the stable even Ca {sup +} isotope ions were trapped and their fluorescence was observed by switching laser frequencies using the system. An odd calcium isotope {sup 43}Ca {sup +}cooling was also succeeded by the control system.

  20. Controlling quantum coherence of atom laser by light with strong strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING; Hui(景辉); GE; Molin(葛墨林); GE; Molin(葛墨林)

    2002-01-01

    A new method for controlling the quantum coherence of atom laser by applying input light with strong strength is presented within the framework of quantum dynamical theory. Unlike the case of rotating wave approximation(RWA), we show that the non-classical properties, such as sub-Poisson distribution and quadrature squeezed effect, can appear in the output atom laser beam with time. By choosing suitable initial RF phase, a steady and brighter output of squeezed coherent atom laser is also available.

  1. Lasers in tattoo and pigmentation control: role of the PicoSure® laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeck, Richard; Bankowski, Richard; Henize, Sarah; Saedi, Nazanin

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The use of picosecond lasers to remove tattoos has greatly improved due to the long-standing outcomes of nanosecond lasers, both clinically and histologically. The first aesthetic picosecond laser available for this use was the PicoSure® laser system (755/532 nm). Now that a vast amount of research on its use has been conducted, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature to validate the continued application of the PicoSure® laser system for tattoo removal. Study design and methods A PubMed search was conducted using the term “picosecond” combined with “laser”, “dermatology”, and “laser tattoo removal”. Results A total of 13 articles were identified, and ten of these met the inclusion criteria for this review. The majority of studies showed that picosecond lasers are an effective and safe treatment mode for the removal of tattoo pigments. Several studies also indicated potential novel applications of picosecond lasers in the removal of various tattoo pigments (eg, black, red, and yellow). Adverse effects were generally mild, such as transient hypopigmentation or blister formation, and were rarely more serious, such as scarring and/or textural change. Conclusion Advancements in laser technologies and their application in cutaneous medicine have revolutionized the field of laser surgery. Computational modeling provides evidence that the optimal pulse durations for tattoo ink removal are in the picosecond domain. It is recommended that the PicoSure® laser system continue to be used for safe and effective tattoo removal, including for red and yellow pigments. PMID:27194919

  2. Controlling quantum dynamics regardless of laser beam spatial profile and molecular orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Herschel; Turinici, Gabriel

    2007-04-01

    In a typical experiment aiming to control quantum dynamics phenomena, each molecule experiences the same temporal laser field, but with an amplitude that depends on the spatial location and orientation of the molecule in the laser beam. It is proved under commonly arising conditions that at least one optimal laser field exists which will control all molecules in the sample, regardless of their orientation or spatial location. The optimal laser field may consist of a multipolarization control containing up to three orthogonal, independently shaped components. The analysis also includes the prospect of multipartite control where the field couples distinct groupings of states (e.g., multiple vibronic states), but without direct coupling within a group of states. This conclusion shows that achieving quantum control is not a matter of striking a compromise over the sample diversity, but rather a task subject to optimization to reach the highest possible level of control for all molecules in the sample.

  3. Laser cooling and control of excitations in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G. I.; McAuslan, D. L.; Sheridan, E.; Sachkou, Y.; Baker, C.; Bowen, W. P.

    2016-08-01

    Superfluidity is a quantum state of matter that exists macroscopically in helium at low temperatures. The elementary excitations in superfluid helium have been probed with great success using techniques such as neutron and light scattering. However, measurements of phonon excitations have so far been limited to average thermodynamic properties or the driven response far out of thermal equilibrium. Here, we use cavity optomechanics to probe the thermodynamics of phonon excitations in real time. Furthermore, strong light-matter interactions allow both laser cooling and amplification. This represents a new tool to observe and control superfluid excitations that may provide insight into phonon-phonon interactions, quantized vortices and two-dimensional phenomena such as the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. The third sound modes studied here also offer a pathway towards quantum optomechanics with thin superfluid films, including the prospect of femtogram masses, high mechanical quality factors, strong phonon-phonon and phonon-vortex interactions, and self-assembly into complex geometries with sub-nanometre feature size.

  4. A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Croft

    2007-06-01

    The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TA’s system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TA’s system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

  5. Laboratory feasibility study of fusion vessel inner wall chemical analysis by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Laser-Induced-Breakdown-Spectroscopy was used for the determination of the atomic composition of multilayered samples simulating the tiles of plasma facing components in the next generation fusion machines. Highlights: ► Description and characterization of an LIBS set-up for diagnostics in fusion machines. ► Identification of atomic composition of multilayered tiles simulating plasma facing components. ► Qualitative applicability of the Calibration Free method for quantitative analysis. ► Feasibility of large scale application in the processes of control during the tiles fabrication. ► Feasibility of erosion monitoring during operation of fusion machines. - Abstract: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is nowadays a well established tool for qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses of surfaces, with micro-destructive characteristics and capabilities for stratigraphy. LIBS is an appealing technique compared with many other types of elemental analysis thanks to the set up versatility facilitating non-invasive and remote analyses, as well as suitability to diagnostics in harsh environments. In this work, LIBS capabilities were used for the determination of the atomic composition of multilayered samples simulating the tiles of plasma facing components in the next generation fusion machines such as ITER. A new experimental setup was designed and realized in order to optimize the characteristics of an LIBS system working at low pressure and remotely, as it should be for an in situ system to be applied in monitoring the erosion and redeposition phenomena occurring on the inner walls of a fusion device. The effects of time delay and laser fluence on LIBS sensitivity at reduced pressure were examined, looking for operational conditions suitable to analytical applications. The quantitative analysis of some atomic species in the superficial layer has been carried out using a Calibration Free (CF) approach in the time

  6. Physico-chemical properties of Pd nanoparticles produced by Pulsed Laser Ablation in different organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladium nanoparticles are arousing an increasing interest because of their strong activity in heterogeneous catalysis in a wide range of reactions. Driven by the interest of producing Pd nanoparticles to be deposited for catalysis over hydrophobic supports, we investigated their synthesis via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid in several organic solvents, as acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, toluene, n-hexane. The colloids were produced by using a Nd:YAG ns laser and without the addition of surfactant agents. The morphology, composition, stability and oxidation state of the obtained nanoparticles were investigated by TEM-EDS analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results evidence that the nature of the solvent influences both the yield and the physico-chemical properties of the produced nanoparticles. While in acetone and alcohols spheroidal, non aggregated and stable particles are obtained, in case of toluene and n-hexane few unstable particles surrounded by a gel-like material are produced. Raman/XPS measurements suggest the presence of amorphous or graphitic carbon onto crystalline Pd nanoparticles, which could have hindered their growth and determined the observed smaller sizes if compared to nanoparticles produced in water. The stability of Pd colloids obtained in acetone and alcohols was attributed to adsorbed anions like enolates or alcoholates; non polar solvents like toluene and n-hexane, unable to give rise to adsorbed anionic species, cannot provide any stabilization to the palladium nanoparticles. XPS analyses also evidenced a partial oxidation of particles surface, with a ratio Pd2+:Pd0 of 1:2.5 and 1:4 in acetone and ethanol, respectively.

  7. Physico-chemical properties of Pd nanoparticles produced by Pulsed Laser Ablation in different organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristoforetti, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.cristoforetti@cnr.it [National Institute of Optics, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Pitzalis, Emanuela; Spiniello, Roberto [Institute of Chemistry of OrganoMetallic Compounds, Research Area of National Research Council, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ishak, Randa [Department of Chem. Eng. And Material Science, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Giammanco, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    Palladium nanoparticles are arousing an increasing interest because of their strong activity in heterogeneous catalysis in a wide range of reactions. Driven by the interest of producing Pd nanoparticles to be deposited for catalysis over hydrophobic supports, we investigated their synthesis via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid in several organic solvents, as acetone, ethanol, 2-propanol, toluene, n-hexane. The colloids were produced by using a Nd:YAG ns laser and without the addition of surfactant agents. The morphology, composition, stability and oxidation state of the obtained nanoparticles were investigated by TEM-EDS analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results evidence that the nature of the solvent influences both the yield and the physico-chemical properties of the produced nanoparticles. While in acetone and alcohols spheroidal, non aggregated and stable particles are obtained, in case of toluene and n-hexane few unstable particles surrounded by a gel-like material are produced. Raman/XPS measurements suggest the presence of amorphous or graphitic carbon onto crystalline Pd nanoparticles, which could have hindered their growth and determined the observed smaller sizes if compared to nanoparticles produced in water. The stability of Pd colloids obtained in acetone and alcohols was attributed to adsorbed anions like enolates or alcoholates; non polar solvents like toluene and n-hexane, unable to give rise to adsorbed anionic species, cannot provide any stabilization to the palladium nanoparticles. XPS analyses also evidenced a partial oxidation of particles surface, with a ratio Pd{sup 2+}:Pd{sup 0} of 1:2.5 and 1:4 in acetone and ethanol, respectively.

  8. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  9. Simplified extension of the LSI-11 Q-Bus for a high energy laser control application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antares, a large, experimental laser fusion facility under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, is controlled by a network of PDP-11 minicomputers and microprocessors. The remote nodes of the Antares control network are based on an LSI-11/2 microcomputer interfaced to an STD Bus. This machine interface or MI forms the intelligent process controller located directly adjacent to the many diverse laser subsystem devices. The STD Bus, linked to the LSI-11/2 microcomputer, offers a standardized, cost effective means for the development of the specialized interface functions required for the high energy laser environment

  10. Simple calculational model of a powerful laser system for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model permitting to calculate variation of laser radiation energy and pumping energy for a laser channel with an arbitrary law of diameter variation of an active element is described in brief. The model permits to determine performances of the facility and to give initial data for analysis of supply and control systems

  11. Closed loop control of laser welding using an optical spectroscopic sensor for Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Sibillano, T.; Rizzi, D.; Ancona, A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in laser joining show the applicability of spectral analysis of the plasma plume emission to monitor and control the quality of weld. The analysis of the complete spectra makes it possible to measure specific emission lines which reveal information about the welding process. The

  12. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; listed chemical. 598.309 Section 598.309 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical. The terms narcotic drug, controlled substance, and listed chemical have the meanings given those...

  13. Size control of vapor bubbles on a silver film by a tuned CW laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Zheng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A vapor bubble is created by a weakly focused continuous-wave (CW laser beam on the surface of a silver film. The temporal dynamics of the bubble is experimentally investigated with a tuned incident laser. The expansion and contraction rates of the vapor bubble are determined by the laser power. The diameter of the vapor bubble can be well controlled through tuning the laser power. A theory model is given to explain the underlying physics in the process. The method reported will have some interesting applications in micro-fluidics and bio-techniques.

  14. A combined experimental and theoretical study on realizing and using laser controlled torsion of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Bruun; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Viftrup, Simon;

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that strong laser pulses can introduce torsional motion in the axially chiral molecule 3,5-difluoro-3',5'-dibromobiphenyl. A nanosecond laser pulse spatially aligns the stereogenic carbon-carbon (C–C) bond axis allowing a perpendicularly polarized, intense femtosecond pulse...... to initiate torsional motion accompanied by a rotation about the fixed axis. We monitor the induced motion by femtosecond time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging. Our theoretical analysis corroborates the experimental findings and on the basis of these results we discuss future applications of laser......-induced torsion, viz., time-resolved studies of deracemization and laser controlled molecular junctions based on molecules with torsion....

  15. Towards understanding initiation reactions of explosives via ultrafast laser quantum control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Margo T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Grane, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, R. Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-08

    Optimal control can be utilized to control the initiation reaction of explosives, where time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of explosives a pulse is created which seeks to achieve initiation by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI will enhance the understanding of energetic material reactions by yielding insight into the characteristics, such as critical 'hot spot' size and reaction dynamics, necessary for initiation. Quantum control experiments require the ability to: (1) phase and amplitude shape an ultrafast laser pulse, (2) measure the effect of pulse shape, and (3) optimize the desired outcome. Pulse shaping is performed with a 4-focal length dispersed fused silica acousto-optic modulator (AOM) at 400 nm in the ultraviolet (UV). Transient absorption spectroscopy is used to measure the pulse shape effects. Both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex are used to search for the optimal pulse shape. Hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB), Trinitroanaline (TNA) and Diaminoazozyfurazan (DAAF) are excited to the first electronic state with 400 nm light. Our initiation experiments are studying the effect of phase shaped 400 nm pulses on HNAB, TNA and DAAF. Novel transient absorption spectra for each material have been obtained and note worthy regions further investigated with single parameter control (second order spectral phase and energy). Many systems have simple intensity control such as that shown by DAAF. TNA and HNAB have spectral features that are not single parameter driven and are being further investigated with complex control.

  16. Development of 3D control of a tiny dew droplet by scattered laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shigeaki

    2009-06-01

    In order to study dropwise condensation on a metal plate, the method for controlling a tiny dew droplet deposited on a copper plate has been developed by using scattered laser light. The method employed the proportional control combined with shifting movement by an integrator to control the intensity of the scattered laser light constantly. Also, the control simulation of the method has been developed to confirm the usefulness of the method and the simulated three-dimensional shape of controlled dew droplet was obtained with the control action. A tiny thin dew droplet, of which the diameter was of handreds micrometers and the mass was about 10-7 g, was controlled in the atmosphere at room temperature for 60 minutes at the preset level of the intensity of scattered laser light and the three-dimensional shape of the controlled dew droplet was shown from the interference fringes.

  17. Robust Collimation Control of Laser-Generated Ion Beam

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata, S; Takano, M.; Kamiyama, D.; T. Nagashima; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X; Yu, Q; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.

    2015-01-01

    The robustness of a structured collimation device is discussed for an intense-laser-produced ion beam. In this paper the ion beam collimation is realized by the solid structured collimation device, which produces the transverse electric field; the electric field contributes to reduce the ion beam transverse velocity and collimate the ion beam. Our 2.5 dimensional particle-in cell simulations demonstrate that the collimation device is rather robust against the changes in the laser parameters a...

  18. Force Control for Tissue Tensioning in Precise Robotic Laser Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Portoles Diez, Sergio; Vanbiervliet, Peter; Rosa, Benoît; Tomassetti, Carla; Meuleman, Christel; VANDER POORTEN, Emmanuel; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are being used in various surgical proce- dures to remove tissue or bones, to coagulate vessels or other structures. Due to difficulties in handling only a limited number of surgeons manage to display sufficient levels of precision in Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) procedures. Prior works on robotic laser surgery demonstrated shorter learning curves and higher ablation precision, but unfortunately ignored the fact that most clinically relevan...

  19. A non-contact temperature measurement system for controlling photothermal medical laser treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ã.-zgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal medical laser treatments are extremely dependent on the generated tissue temperature. It is necessary to reach a certain temperature threshold to achieve successful results, whereas preventing to exceed an upper temperature value is required to avoid thermal damage. One method to overcome this problem is to use previously conducted dosimetry studies as a reference. Nevertheless, these results are acquired in controlled environments using uniform subjects. In the clinical environment, the optical and thermal characteristics (tissue color, composition and hydration level) vary dramatically among different patients. Therefore, the most reliable solution is to use a closed-loop feedback system that monitors the target tissue temperature to control laser exposure. In this study, we present a compact, non-contact temperature measurement system for the control of photothermal medical laser applications that is cost-efficient and simple to use. The temperature measurement is achieved using a focused, commercially available MOEMS infrared thermocouple sensor embedded in an off-axis arrangement on the laser beam delivery hand probe. The spot size of the temperature sensor is ca. 2.5 mm, reasonably smaller than the laser spot sizes used in photothermal medical laser applications. The temperature readout and laser control is realized using a microcontroller for fast operation. The utilization of the developed system may enable the adaptation of several medical laser treatments that are currently conducted only in controlled laboratory environments into the clinic. Laser tissue welding and cartilage reshaping are two of the techniques that are limited to laboratory research at the moment. This system will also ensure the safety and success of laser treatments aiming hyperthermia, coagulation and ablation, as well as LLLT and PDT.

  20. Laser speckle technique to study the effect of chemical pre-treatment on the quality of minimally processed apples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minz, Preeti D.; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the laser speckle technique has been used for the quality evaluation of chemically treated cut apples. Chemical pre-treatment includes 1% (w/v) solution of citric acid (CA), sodium chloride (SC), and a combination of CA and sodium chloride (CS). The variation in weight loss, respiration rate, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA), and absorbance of chemically treated cut apples stored at 5 °C was monitored for 11 d. The speckle grain size was calculated by an autocovariance method from the speckled images of freshly cut chemically treated apples. The effect of chemicals on TSS and the TA content variation of the cut apples were well correlated to the linear speckle grain size. Circular degree of polarization confirms the presence of a small scatterer and hence Rayleigh diffusion region. For all the treated cut apples, a decrease in the concentration of small particles nearly after the mid-period of storage results in the fast decay of circular degree of polarization. For non-invasive and fast analysis of the chemical constituent of fruits during minimal processing, the laser speckle can be practically used in the food industry.

  1. Designing Allosteric Control into Enzymes by Chemical Rescue of Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S. Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C.; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John (Kansas)

    2012-08-07

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruption and restoration of structure, rather than active site chemistry, as a means to achieve modulate function. We present two examples, W33G in a {beta}-glycosidase enzyme ({beta}-gly) and W492G in a {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme ({beta}-gluc), in which we engineer indole-dependent activity into enzymes by removing a buried tryptophan side chain that serves as a buttress for the active site architecture. In both cases, we observe a loss of function, and in both cases we find that the subsequent addition of indole can be used to restore activity. Through a detailed analysis of {beta}-gly W33G kinetics, we demonstrate that this rescued enzyme is fully functionally equivalent to the corresponding wild-type enzyme. We then present the apo and indole-bound crystal structures of {beta}-gly W33G, which together establish the structural basis for enzyme inactivation and rescue. Finally, we use this designed switch to modulate {beta}-glycosidase activity in living cells using indole. Disruption and recovery of protein structure may represent a general technique for introducing allosteric control into enzymes, and thus may serve as a starting point for building a variety of bioswitches and sensors.

  2. Quantum yield measurement in the chemical reactions of laser-excited Zn and Rb atoms with molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A new method of determining the rate constants of chemical reactions proceeding with participant of Zn(4p 3P1) and Rb(11P3/2) atoms has been introduced. The method is based on the investigation of the spatial and temporary behavior of the atoms and their interaction with reagent-gas molecules in a carrier gas flow. For the excitation of the atom pulsed monochromatic resonance laser radiation was used. The interaction of electronically excited atoms with reagent-gas molecules causes a decrease in the concentration of atoms owing to chemical and physical quenching processes. Registering the change in the atom concentration at the end of the flow, one can evaluate the rate a constants of the reaction in which of stable chemical compounds forms. These investigations are necessary for the laser isotope separation. - Abstract: In the present paper, we introduce a method for measuring the apparent quantum yield θap and the rate-constant values of the physical kp and chemical kc quenching of electronically excited Zn and Rb atoms by gas molecules. The method is based on measuring the concentration of the atoms at the end of their flow in a mixture with a reagent-gas and a carrier gas, in the region where all quenching and secondary processes are already over. The concentration of the atoms was determined from measured absorbed energy of resonance laser radiation. The rate constants and the cross-sections of the chemical and physical quenching of Zn(3P10) and Rb(11P3/2) atoms with several molecules have been determined. For some collisions the quantum yield was found to be close to unity. The method may find applications in laser photochemical isotope separation and in measuring the rate constants of reactions proceeding with participation of ground state atoms.

  3. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-05-10

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t{sup 1/2} law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction.

  4. Chemical control of xylem differentiation by thermospermine, xylemin, and auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kaori; Takamura, Hiroyoshi; Kadota, Isao; Motose, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    The xylem conducts water and minerals from the root to the shoot and provides mechanical strength to the plant body. The vascular precursor cells of the procambium differentiate to form continuous vascular strands, from which xylem and phloem cells are generated in the proper spatiotemporal pattern. Procambium formation and xylem differentiation are directed by auxin. In angiosperms, thermospermine, a structural isomer of spermine, suppresses xylem differentiation by limiting auxin signalling. However, the process of auxin-inducible xylem differentiation has not been fully elucidated and remains difficult to manipulate. Here, we found that an antagonist of spermidine can act as an inhibitor of thermospermine biosynthesis and results in excessive xylem differentiation, which is a phenocopy of a thermospermine-deficient mutant acaulis5 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We named this compound xylemin owing to its xylem-inducing effect. Application of a combination of xylemin and thermospermine to wild-type seedlings negates the effect of xylemin, whereas co-treatment with xylemin and a synthetic proauxin, which undergoes hydrolysis to release active auxin, has a synergistic inductive effect on xylem differentiation. Thus, xylemin may serve as a useful transformative chemical tool not only for the study of thermospermine function in various plant species but also for the control of xylem induction and woody biomass production. PMID:26879262

  5. SOFTWARE TOOL FOR LASER CUTTING PROCESS CONTROL – SOLVING REAL INDUSTRIAL CASE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Madić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser cutting is one of the leading non-conventional machining technologies with a wide spectrum of application in modern industry. It order to exploit a number of advantages that this technology offers for contour cutting of materials, it is necessary to carefully select laser cutting conditions for each given workpiece material, thickness and desired cut qualities. In other words, there is a need for process control of laser cutting. After a comprehensive analysis of the main laser cutting parameters and process performance characteristics, the application of the developed software tool “BRUTOMIZER” for off-line control of CO2 laser cutting process of three different workpiece materials (mild steel, stainless steel and aluminum is illustrated. Advantages and abilities of the developed software tool are also illustrated.

  6. Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Michael; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.

  7. Precision Locking and Control of CW Lasers in Support of ASCENDS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vescent Photonics proposes to design and build significantly improved laser frequency locking and control systems that will be suitable for ASCENDS and other NASA...

  8. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  9. Particle Generation by Laser Ablation in Support of Chemical Analysis of High Level Mixed Waste from Plutonium Production Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigate particles produced by laser irradiation and their analysis by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA/ICP-MS), with a view towards optimizing particle production for analysis of high level waste materials and waste glass. LA/ICP-MS has considerable potential to increase the safety and speed of analysis required for the remediation of high level wastes from cold war plutonium production operations. In some sample types, notably the sodium nitrate-based wastes at Hanford and elsewhere, chemical analysis using typical laser conditions depends strongly on the details of sample history composition in a complex fashion, rendering the results of analysis uncertain. Conversely, waste glass materials appear to be better behaved and require different strategies to optimize analysis

  10. Indoor SLAM Using Laser and Camera with Closed-Loop Controller for NAO Humanoid Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Shuhuan Wen; Kamal Mohammed Othman; Rad, Ahmad B.; Yixuan Zhang; Yongsheng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We present a SLAM with closed-loop controller method for navigation of NAO humanoid robot from Aldebaran. The method is based on the integration of laser and vision system. The camera is used to recognize the landmarks whereas the laser provides the information for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM ). K-means clustering method is implemented to extract data from different objects. In addition, the robot avoids the obstacles by the avoidance function. The closed-loop controller reduc...

  11. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R [Institute of Applied Physics ' Nello Carrara' , National Research Council, via Madonna del Piano 10 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  12. High-pressure gravity-independent singlet oxygen generator, laser nozzle, and iodine injection system for the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, George

    2004-09-01

    A novel approach is outlined for a singlet oxygen generator (SOG), a laser minimum length nozzle (MLN), and an iodine injector system for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). A unified approach, referred to as a SOG/MLN/I2 system, is partly based on past experimental work. For instance, the SOG concept stems from sparger technology and a KSY fesibility experiment. A MLN with a curved sonic line is used for the laser nozzle, and slender struts are used for the injection, in the downstream direction, of iodine/helium vapor. The heated struts are located downstream of the nozzle's throat. The engineering logic behind the approach is discussed; it has a diversity of potential system benefits relative to current technology. These include a compact, scalable laser that can operate in space. The SOG operates at a significantly higher pressure with a high O2(1Δ) yield. In addition, basic hydrogen peroxide reconditioning is not required, a water vapor removal system is not required, and diluent may be unnecessary, although useful for pressure recovery. The impact on a COIL system in terms of power, efficiency, and pressure recovery is briefly assessed.

  13. High sensitivity stand-off detection and quantification of chemical mixtures using an active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-05-01

    High sensitivity detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in a stand-off configuration is a highly sought after capability across the security and defense sector. Specific applications include assessing the presence of explosive related materials, poisonous or toxic chemical agents, and narcotics. Real world field deployment of an operational stand-off system is challenging due to stringent requirements: high detection sensitivity, stand-off ranges from centimeters to hundreds of meters, eye-safe invisible light, near real-time response and a wide chemical versatility encompassing both vapor and condensed phase chemicals. Additionally, field deployment requires a compact, rugged, power efficient, and cost-effective design. To address these demanding requirements, we have developed the concept of Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS), which can be also described as a middle infrared hyperspectral coherent lidar. Combined with robust spectral unmixing algorithms, inherited from retrievals of information from high-resolution spectral data generated by satellitebased spectrometers, ACLaS has been demonstrated to fulfil the above-mentioned needs. ACLaS prototypes have been so far developed using quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and interband cascade lasers (ICL) to exploit the fast frequency tuning capability of these solid state sources. Using distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, demonstration and performance analysis were carried out on narrow-band absorbing chemicals (N2O, H2O, H2O2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H6) at stand-off distances up to 50 m using realistic non cooperative targets such as wood, painted metal, and bricks. Using more widely tunable external cavity QCL, ACLaS has also been demonstrated on broadband absorbing chemicals (dichloroethane, HFC134a, ethylene glycol dinitrate and 4-nitroacetanilide solid) and on complex samples mixing narrow-band and broadband absorbers together in a realistic atmospheric background.

  14. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhengtao; Yu Gang; Li Shaoxia; He Xiuli; Chen Ru; Zheng Caiyun; Ning Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID) type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO) algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the pro-posed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance). The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID) controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID) controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  15. The significance of feedback control for chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, P.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional way of applying chemical sensors is in an open-loop configuration. A parameter of the chemical domain, such as a gas or ion concentration, is converted into a parameter of the mechanical or electrical domain, often with non-linear transfer characteristics. The paramagnetic oxygen se

  16. Quantum interferences and their classical limit in laser driven coherent control scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Ignacio, E-mail: ifranco@chem.northwestern.edu [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Spanner, Michael; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2010-05-12

    Graphical abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments. - Abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments.

  17. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  18. New Devices For Controlling The Interaction Of High-Power Laser Light With Anorganic And Organic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greguss, Pal

    1989-01-01

    Two unconventional methods, which may be used in some cases to control heat conduction conditions responsible for secondary effects both in laser surgery and in laser material transformation, are presented. The tools developed for this purpose are based either on thermoelectrically controlled (TEC) or on thermodynamically controlled (TDC) temperature pattern generation around the acting laser beam. Using TEC laser scalpel secondary tissue damages may be avoided, while transformation hardening by laser radiation may be controlled through the thermodynamic effect known as Ranque-effect.

  19. Quantum coherent control of the vibrational dynamics of a polyatomic molecule using adaptive feedback control of a femtosecond laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L R Botha; L E De Clercq; A M Smit; N Botha; E Ronander; H J Strydom

    2014-02-01

    We simulate adaptive feedback control to coherently shape a femtosecond infrared laser pulse by means of a 4f-spatial light modulator in order to selectively excite the rovibrational modes of a polyatomic molecule. We preferentially populate an arbitrarily chosen upper rovibrational level by only employing these tailored temporally shaped pulses. A second laser would then allow for mode selective chemistry to interact selectively with the excited population. Alternatively the excited molecules enhanced reactivity could be exploited for selective chemistry.

  20. Analysis of Laser-encoding Remote-control Explosive System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    According to the requirements, an active infrared system is designed, which is composed of the emitting and receiving parts. The emitting part consists of a GaAs semiconductor laser device and binoculars optical system. A Si photodiode is selected as the receiving device, and a preamplifier circuit is designed to match the detector and further improve the signal to noise ratio. The laser-encoding mode is utilized to enhance the anti-disturbance. The theoretical analysis of this system is presented and a system prototype is made according to the requirement. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction.

  1. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ancona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth.

  2. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmm@ukw.edu.pl [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Rytlewski, Piotr [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Malinowski, Rafał [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials and Dyes, ul. M. Skłodowskiej–Curie 55, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Żenkiewicz, Marian [Department of Materials Engineering, Kazimierz Wielki University, Department of Materials Engineering, ul. Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We modified polylactide surface layer with chemical, plasma or laser methods. • We tested selected properties and surface structure of modified samples. • We stated that the plasma treatment appears to be the most beneficial. - Abstract: The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm{sup 2} was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  3. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO2 ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO2 films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO2 based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  4. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: New nanosecond polymer passive switch for neodymium lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrodnyi, V. I.; Vovk, L. V.; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A.; Ishchenko, Aleksandr A.; Karabanova, L. V.; Mushkalo, I. L.

    1995-03-01

    A new nanosecond passive switch for neodymium lasers was developed on the basis of a highly elastic polyurethane matrix with an optical strength of 1200 MW cm-2, containing a photostable organic dye NOK. The switch was investigated under various Q-switching conditions in YAG, GSGG : Cr : Nd, and yttrium aluminate crystal lasers. Nanosecond single giant pulses and bursts of pulses were generated. The service life was 2×106 pulses at a single point of the switch. The energy of giant single pulses was 0.9 J. Repetition of single pulses at 50 Hz was possible.

  5. Laser-Controlled Growth of Needle-Shaped Organic Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2002-01-01

    Arrays of mutually parallel oriented, single-crystalline, needle-like structures of light-emitting p-hexaphenyl molecules are generated in the focus of an argon ion laser. The cross sectional dimensions of the needles are of the order of 100 to 200 nm with lengths up to several hundred micrometers...

  6. Laser system for identification, tracking, and control of flying insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flying insects are common vectors for transmission of pathogens and inflict significant harm on humans in large parts of the developing world. Besides the direct impact to humans, these pathogens also cause harm to crops and result in agricultural losses. Here, we present a laser-based system that c...

  7. Strong-Field Control of Laser Filamentation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, Robert; Romanov, Dmitri; Filin, Aleskey; Compton, Ryan

    2008-05-01

    The propagation of short strong-file laser pulses in gas and solution phases often result in formation of filaments. This phenomenon involves many nonlinear processes including Kerr lensing, group velocity dispersion, multi-photon ionization, plasma defocusing, intensity clamping, and self-steepening. Of these, formation and dynamics of pencil-shape plasma areas plays a crucial role. The fundamental understanding of these laser-induced plasmas requires additional effort, because the process is highly nonlinear and complex. We studied the ultrafast laser-generated plasma dynamics both experimentally and theoretically. Ultrafast plasma dynamics was probed using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering. The measurements were made in a room temperature gas maintained at 1 atm in a flowing cell. The time dependent scattering was measured by delaying the CARS probe with respect to the intense laser excitation pulse. A general trend is observed between the spacing of the ground state and the first allowed excited state with the rise time for the noble gas series and the molecular gases. This trend is consistent with our theoretical model, which considers the ultrafast dynamics of the strong field generated plasma as a three-step process; (i) strong-field ionization followed by the electron gaining considerable kinetic energy during the pulse; (ii) immediate post-pulse dynamics: fast thermalization, impact-ionization-driven electron multiplication and cooling; (iii) ensuing relaxation: evolution to electron-ion equilibrium and eventual recombination.

  8. Optomechatronics Design and Control for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is considered as one of the major advancements in microscopy in the last century and is widely accepted as a 3D fluorescence imaging tool for biological studies. For the emerging biological questions CLSM requires fast imaging to detect rapid biological proc

  9. Interfacing ?Soft? and ?Hard? Matter with Exquisite Chemical Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Y; Camarero, J A

    2006-01-13

    The present paper reviews the recent development of new chemical and biological technologies for the site-specific immobilization of proteins onto inorganic materials and their potential applications to the fields of micro and nanotechnology.

  10. Design and implementation of control system for range-gated underwater laser imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei-long; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Han, Hong-wei; Hua, Liang-hong

    2012-01-01

    There is currently considerable in developing underwater target detection, the underwater imaging system can be divided into active imaging system and passive system. The main feature of the active imaging system is that they use light sources to illuminate the targets and collect the reflection from targets. The advantages of active imaging system over passive imaging systems are high contrast and without the affection of environment sources. In this article, a range-gated underwater laser imaging system is built, which consists of laser illumination system, photoelectric imaging system and control system. The laser illumination system includes a light-pumped solid state doubled ND-YAG laser(532nm) which laser power and frequency can be adjusted and an optics expanding system of variable ratio. The photoelectric imaging system includes a gated Intensified CCD(ICCD) cameras which ICCD scheduling, gate width, delay time and gain can be adjusted and a optics received system of variable ratio. In order to acquire effectual target image using range-gated underwater laser imaging system, appropriate control parameters that include laser power and frequency, ICCD scheduling, gate width, delay time and gain, optics expanding system ratio and optics received system ratio must be given accurately. A control system which used C8051F320 and C8051F040 (MCU) as the core is designed, the control system can effectively control seven parameters that given above. The construction of software and hardware of the control system is introduced. And target image of underwater distance 25 m and 40m is given, Experimental results showed that the control system has high control precision, safe and stable operation and good speed adjusting performance can be achieved. It can be satisfied to apply to underwater target detection.

  11. Significance of the Resonance Condition for Controlling the Seam Position in Laser-assisted TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, B.; Huse, M.; Hermsdorf, J.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    As an energy-preserving variant of laser hybrid welding, laser-assisted arc welding uses laser powers of less than 1 kW. Recent studies have shown that the electrical conductivity of a TIG welding arc changes within the arc in case of a resonant interaction between laser radiation and argon atoms. This paper presents investigations on how to control the position of the arc root on the workpiece by means of the resonant interaction. Furthermore, the influence on the welding result is demonstrated. The welding tests were carried out on a cooled copper plate and steel samples with resonant and non-resonant laser radiation. Moreover, an analysis of the weld seam is presented.

  12. Endoscopic and interstitial Nd:YAG laser therapy to control duodenal and periampullary carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Hugh; Fowler, Aiden L.

    1996-12-01

    Duodenal and periampullary cancer present with jaundice, bleeding and obstruction. Many patients are unsuitable for radical surgery. Endoscopic palliation of jaundice can be achieved using endoscopic sphincterotomy or stent insertion. However, the problems of bleeding and obstruction can be difficult to manage. Ten patients were treated using superficial Nd:YAG laser ablation and lower power interstitial laser therapy. After initial outpatient endoscopic therapy, treatment was repeated at 4 monthly intervals to prevent recurrent symptoms. Bleeding was controlled in all patients and only one patient developed obstructive symptoms between treatment sessions. This responded to further endoscopic laser therapy. The median survival was 21 months. Laser treated patients were compared with a historical series of 22 patients treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy or stent insertion. The complication rate was less in patients treated with the laser.

  13. High power lasers & systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert; Birch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Some laser history; Airborne Laser Testbed & Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL); Laser modes and beam propagation; Fibre lasers and applications; US Navy Laser system – NRL 33kW fibre laser; Lockheed Martin 30kW fibre laser; Conclusions

  14. Modified Smith Predictor Based Control Of Cascaded Chemical Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu P. Mathew

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A cascade control with modified smith predictor is used for controlling an open loop unstable time delay process. It has three controllers, one is for servo response other two are for regulatory response. For two disturbance rejection controllers an analytical design method is used by proposing closed loop complementary sensitivity function. These two controllers are PID controller cascaded with second order lead/lag filter. Setpoint tracking controller is designed by using direct synthesis method. The main advantage of this control scheme is that the servo response can be decoupled from the regulatory response.

  15. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  16. Small laser spot versus standard laser spot photodynamic therapy for idiopathic choroidal neovascularization: a randomized controlled study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-xin; TAO Yong

    2012-01-01

    Backcround Idiopathic choroidal neovascularization (ICNV) affects young patients and thus may have a significant impact on vision and life quality over a patient's lifespan.This study was designed to compare the visual outcome and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage after photodynamic therapy (PDT) with small laser spot and PDT with standard laser spot for idiopathic choroidal neovascularization (ICNV).Methods This was a randomized controlled study.Fifty-two patients with ICNV were enrolled and randomly divided into a study group (small laser spot PDT,n=27) and a control group (standard laser spot PDT,n=25).Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA),optic coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) findings were the main measurements.The patients were followed up 1 week,1,3,6,9 months and 1 year after PDT.Results BCVA improvement was statistically significantly higher in the study group than the control group at 6-month ((25.53±15.01) letters vs.(14.71±11.66) letters,P=0.025) and 9-month follow-ups ((27.53±17.78) letters vs.(15.59±12.21) letters,P=0.039).At 3-and 6-month follow-ups,the quadrants of RPE damage between the two groups varied significantly (P <0.001 and P=0.023,respectively).In each follow-up,the number of cases with decreased or unchanged leakage of choroidal neovascularization by FA and reduced subretinal fluid by OCT did not vary significantly between the two groups.Ten cases (37.0%) in the study group and eight cases (32.0%) in the control group suffered from recurrent CNV (P=0.703).Conclusions Better visual improvements,less RPE damage,a similar recurrent rate of CNV and change of subretinal fluid were observed in the small laser spot PDT group than in the standard laser spot PDT group for ICNV.

  17. Novel Self-Thickening Chemicals for Improved Conformance Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick J. Shuler, Ph.D.

    2011-07-18

    The objective of this project is to identify single chemical agents that exhibit a desirable rheological property whereby if such a chemical is dissolved in salt water it increases the solution viscosity significantly with time. We term that behavior as 'self-thickening' and have nicknamed this as 'T85 technology'. As detailed in the original project proposal, such single chemical products can be applied to advantage as agents for selectively slowing or blocking high flow water channels in subsurface oil reservoirs. The net effect is a decrease in water and an increase in oil flow and production. The initial testing has focused on five different synthetic co-polymers that have two or more chemical groups. These chemicals were dissolved at a concentration of 2500 ppm into different salt solutions (sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride) that encompass a range of dissolved salt concentrations. For the sodium chloride and potassium chloride solutions the salt concentration ranged from 1-5 wt%. The calcium chloride dihydrate sample concentrations ranged from 0.1-1 wt%. One set of samples being aged at 25 C and a second set at 50 C. Viscosity measurements versus aging time show two of these agents may exhibit apparent self-thickening behavior under certain salinity and temperature conditions. Generally the effect is greater in lower salinity NaCl brines and at 25 C. Preliminary flow experiments confirm that the aged fluids exhibit increased effective viscosity while flowing through a porous medium (sand pack). These flow tests include the case of the chemical fluid being aged on the bench before injection into a sand pack, and also a second series of sand packs where fresh chemical fluid is injected and allowed to age in-situ. Thus, the results of the static ageing tests together with the flow tests are a technical validation of the T85 concept.

  18. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  19. Wavefront control of high power laser beams for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, E; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Koch, J; Lund, L; Sacks, R; Smith, D; Stolz, C; Van Atta, L; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1999-09-22

    The use of lasers as the driver for inertial confinement fusion and weapons physics experiments is based on their ability to produce high-energy short pulses in a beam with low divergence. Indeed, the focus ability of high quality laser beams far exceeds alternate technologies and is a major factor in the rationale for building high power lasers for such applications. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large, 192-beam, high-power laser facility under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fusion and weapons physics experiments. Its uncorrected minimum focal spot size is limited by laser system aberrations. The NIF includes a Wavefront Control System to correct these aberrations to yield a focal spot small enough for its applications. Sources of aberrations to be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser amplifiers, previous-shot thermal distortions, beam off-axis effects, and gravity, mounting, and coating-induced optic distortions. Aberrations from gas density variations and optic manufacturing figure errors are also partially corrected. This paper provides an overview of the NIF Wavefront Control System and describes the target spot size performance improvement it affords. It describes provisions made to accommodate the NIF's high fluence (laser beam and flashlamp), large wavefront correction range, wavefront temporal bandwidth, temperature and humidity variations, cleanliness requirements, and exception handling requirements (e.g. wavefront out-of-limits conditions).

  20. Novel hybrid method: pulse CO2 laser-TIG hybrid welding by coordinated control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yanbin; Lei Zhenglong; Li Liqun; Wu Lin; Xie Cheng

    2006-01-01

    In continuous wave CO2 laser-TIG hybrid welding process, the laser energy is not fully utilized because of the absorption and defocusing by plasma in the arc space. Therefore, the optimal welding result can only be achieved in a limited energy range. In order to improve the welding performance further, a novel hybrid welding method-pulse CO2 laser-TIG arc hybrid welding by coordinated control is proposed and investigated. The experimental results indicate that, compared with continuous wave CO2 laser-TIG hybrid welding, the absorption and defocusing of laser energy by plasma are decreased further, and at the same time, the availability ratio of laser and arc energy can be increased when a coordinated frequency is controlled. As a result, the weld appearance is also improved as well as the weld depth is deepened. Furthermore, the effect of frequency and phase of pulse laser and TIG arc on the arc images and welding characteristics is also studied. However, the novel hybrid method has great potentials in the application of industrials from views of techniques and economy.

  1. Laser controlled deposition of metal microstructures via nondiffracting Bessel beam illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drampyan, Rafael; Leonov, Nikita; Vartanyan, Tigran

    2016-04-01

    The technique of the laser controlled deposition of sodium and rubidium deposits on the sapphire substrate is presented. The metals were deposited on the clean sapphire substrate from the vapor phase contained in the evacuated and sealed cell. We use an axicon to produce a non-diffracting Bessel beam out of the beam got from the cw diode laser with 200 mW power at the wavelength of 532 nm. After 30 minutes of the laser-controlled deposition the substrates were examined in the optical microscope. The obtained metal deposits form the sharp-cut circles with the pitch of 10 μm, coincident with the tens of dark rings of the Bessel beam. Reduction of the laser power leads to the build up of the continuous metal film over the whole substrate.

  2. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of the Laser Ablation Plume Controled by RF Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuma; Mizuno, Manabu; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Sakai, Yosuke

    1999-10-01

    Recently, film deposition has been investigated using laser ablation methods which have a lot of advantages. For the purpose of control of the laser ablation plume, we introduced a radio frequency (RF) plasma. In this report we present position resolved optical emission spectra of the plume observed by an OMA (optical multichannel analyzer). The plume current is also measured. The RF plasma is generated in a helical coil installed between the substrate and the target. An ArF excimer laser (wavelength 193 nm, pulse duration time 20 ns) is used as a light source, and the target material is sintered carbon graphite. The laser fluence on the target surface is changed in a range from 1.2 to 6.4 J/cm^2. Ar gas is introduced to sustain the RF plasma. When the plume goes through the RF plasma, interaction of the plume with the plasma is expected. The possibility of control of the plume behavior is discussed.

  3. Chemical and physical analysis on hard tissues after irradiation with short pulse Nd:YAG laser; Alteracoes quimicas e fisicas de tecidos duros irradiados por laser de neodimio chaveado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Andrea Antunes

    2003-07-01

    This work reports on a study that was designed to investigate chemical, physical and morphological alterations in the dental enamel surface. The influence of application of laser in enamel surface by microscopic technical, X-ray fluorescence for chemical analysis, physical property as well as hardness and thermal analysis with Nd:YAG laser is also pointed out. A prototype of Nd:YAG (Q-switched) laser developed at the Center of Lasers and Applications - Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, aiming applications in the Medical Sciences that typical wavelength of 1.064 nm was used. The modifications in human dental enamel chemical composition for major and trace elements are here outlined. The accuracy of procedures was performed by analysis of natural hydroxyapatite as standard reference material. The identification and quantification of the chemical elements presented in the dental tissue samples were performed trough EDS, XRF and INAA. We determined the rate Calcium/Phosphorus (Ca/P) for different techniques. We performed an analysis in different regions of the surface and for different areas allowing a description of the chemical change in the total area of the specimen and the assessment of the compositional homogeneity of the each specimen. A comparison between XRF and INAA is presented. Based on morphological analysis of the irradiated surfaces with short pulse Nd:YAG laser we determined the area surrounded by the irradiation for the parameters for this thesis, and this technique allowed us to visualize the regions of fusion and re-solidification. The energy densities ranged from 10 J/cm{sup 2} to 40 J/cm{sup 2}, with pulse width of 6, 10 e 200 ns, and repetition rates of 5 and 7 Hz. In this thesis, FTIR-spectroscopy is used to analyze powder of mineralized tissue as well as enamel, dentine, root and cementum for human and bovine teeth after irradiation with short-pulse Nd:YAG laser. Characteristic spectra were obtained for the proteins components and

  4. Temporal measures and controls in ultrafast laser domain; Mesures et controles temporels dans le domaine des lasers ultrabrefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksenhendler, Th

    2004-12-15

    This work presents the development of a streak camera 'jitter free' sweep unit synchronized on a femtosecond laser. This application of high voltage photoconductive switches ('High voltage Auston switch') yields subpicosecond resolution for accumulated images on streak camera on a few hundreds micro joule femtosecond laser. Two others applications of these photoconductive switches are studied: - ultrafast optical commutation by a Pockels cell directly driven by a photoconductive switch (rising edge < 100 ps and jitter < 2 ps), - laser pulse energy self-stabilization experimentally proving that driving a Pockels cell by a photoconductive switch can increase the stability of the laser pulse energy from 7 % to 0.7 % rms. Additionally, the application of the acoustic-optical programmable dispersive filter (Dazzler) to the self referenced spectral phase measurement is presented. As these measurements require a linear filter combined with a non linear filter, it is possible to replace the complete linear part (generally a complex optical set-up) by the Dazzler leading to new kind of linear filters and new measurements. Thus base band autocorrelation and time-domain SPIDER (SPIDER by Fourier transform spectroscopy) have been demonstrated experimentally for the first time. (author)

  5. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed

  6. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  7. Chemical process control : present status and future needs ; the view from European industry

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Hans; Allgöwer, Frank; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    1991-01-01

    Not only in Europe, chemical process control is characterized by a broad invasion of distributed control systems into chemical plants. The information integration from process control up to business management is a great challenge of today which follows from the overall computerization of production. Most of the recent progress in process automation results from the application of computer science paradigms to control systems, and of advanced developments in field instrumentation. Despite the...

  8. Control of tribological properties of diamond-like carbon films with femtosecond-laser-induced nanostructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumaru, Naoki; Miyazaki, Kenzo; Kiuchi, Junsuke

    2008-02-01

    This paper reports tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films nanostructured by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation. The nanostructure was formed in an area of more than 15 mm × 15 mm on the DLC surface, using a precise target-scan system developed for the fs-laser processing. The frictional properties of the DLC film are greatly improved by coating a MoS 2 layer on the nanostructured surface, while the friction coefficient can be increased by surface texturing of the nanostructured zone in a net-like patterning. The results demonstrate that the tribological properties of a DLC surface can be controlled using fs-laser-induced nanostructuring.

  9. Chemical kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    IR absorption using tunable diode laser spectroscopy provides a sensitive and quantitative detection method for laboratory kinetic studies of atmospheric trace gases. Improvements in multipass cell design, real time signal processing, and computer controlled data acquisition and analysis have extended the applicability of the technique. We have developed several optical systems using off-axis resonator mirror designs which maximize path length while minimizing both the sample volume and the interference fringes inherent in conventional 'White' cells. Computerized signal processing using rapid scan (300 kHz), sweep integration with 100 percent duty cycle allows substantial noise reduction while retaining the advantages of using direct absorption for absolute absorbance measurements and simultaneous detection of multiple species. Peak heights and areas are determined by curve fitting using nonlinear least square methods. We have applied these techniques to measurements of: (1) heterogeneous uptake chemistry of atmospheric trace gases (HCl, H2O2, and N2O5) on aqueous and sulfuric acid droplets; (2) vapor pressure measurements of nitric acid and water over prototypical stratospheric aerosol (nitric acid trihydrate) surfaces; and (3) discharge flow tube kinetic studies of the HO2 radical using isotopic labeling for product channel and mechanistic analysis. Results from each of these areas demonstrate the versatility of TDL absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric chemistry applications.

  10. Quantum-State Controlled Chemical Reactions of Ultracold KRb Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ospelkaus, S; Wang, D; de Miranda, M H G; Neyenhuis, B; Quéméner, G; Julienne, P S; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Ye, J

    2009-01-01

    How does a chemical reaction proceed at ultralow temperatures? Can simple quantum mechanical rules such as quantum statistics, single scattering partial waves, and quantum threshold laws provide a clear understanding for the molecular reactivity under a vanishing collision energy? Starting with an optically trapped near quantum degenerate gas of polar $^{40}$K$^{87}$Rb molecules prepared in their absolute ground state, we report experimental evidence for exothermic atom-exchange chemical reactions. When these fermionic molecules are prepared in a single quantum state at a temperature of a few hundreds of nanoKelvins, we observe p-wave-dominated quantum threshold collisions arising from tunneling through an angular momentum barrier followed by a near-unity probability short-range chemical reaction. When these molecules are prepared in two different internal states or when molecules and atoms are brought together, the reaction rates are enhanced by a factor of 10 to 100 due to s-wave scattering, which does not ...

  11. STM CONTROL OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Single-Molecule Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hla, Saw-Wai; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-10-01

    The fascinating advances in single atom/molecule manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip allow scientists to fabricate atomic-scale structures or to probe chemical and physical properties of matters at an atomic level. Owing to these advances, it has become possible for the basic chemical reaction steps, such as dissociation, diffusion, adsorption, readsorption, and bond-formation processes, to be performed by using the STM tip. Complete sequences of chemical reactions are able to induce at a single-molecule level. New molecules can be constructed from the basic molecular building blocks on a one-molecule-at-a-time basis by using a variety of STM manipulation schemes in a systematic step-by-step manner. These achievements open up entirely new opportunities in nanochemistry and nanochemical technology. In this review, various STM manipulation techniques useful in the single-molecule reaction process are reviewed, and their impact on the future of nanoscience and technology are discussed.

  12. Control strategies for laser separation of carbon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Parthasarathy; A K Nayak; S K Sarkar

    2002-12-01

    Laser isotope separation (LIS) by infrared laser chemistry of polyatomic molecules has come a long way since its discovery. The last decade has seen considerable efforts in scaling up of the process for light elements like carbon, oxygen and silicon. These efforts aim at ways to improve both the enrichment factor and the throughput. The achievement is quite significant especially for carbon isotope separation wherein macroscopic operating scales have been realized. We report our studies on the IR laser chemistry of two promising systems, viz. neat CF2HCl and CF3Br/Cl2. We have investigated conditions for optimizing the dissociation yield and selectivity using natural samples containing 1.1 % C-13. We also highlight our current efforts for scaling up the process. These include the design aspects of a photochemical reactor with multipass refocusing Herriott optics for efficient photon utilization, development of a cryogenic distillation set up and a preparative gas chromatograph for large scale separation/collection of the isotopically enriched photoproduct in the post-irradiation stage.

  13. Temperature control during diode laser welding in a human cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca

    2007-07-01

    Diode laser welding is a technique proposed in ophthalmic surgery to induce immediate sealing of clear corneal wounds. The welding effect is achieved irradiating the area, previously treated with a chromophore, by the use of a low power diode laser: the resulting thermal effect induces structural modifications in the stromal collagen, that welds upon cooling. We present a study on the temperature dynamics developing during welding in a human eye. An infrared thermocamera was used to measure the temperature variations on the surface of the cornea during clinical penetrating keratoplasty (corneal transplant). The experimental data were used as a starting point for a theoretical investigation of the temperature rising inside the ocular structures: we developed a mathematical model based on the bio-heat equation and solved by the use of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The predictive accuracy was verified by comparing the temperature post-processing description with the results obtained from the thermographic data. The model was then used to study the temperature rise and heat propagation inside the eye. Experimental results and model analysis indicated the occurrence of heat confinement during the treatment procedure and a modest enhancement of the temperature (reaching about 55°C inside the laser treated wound), thus evidencing the safety of the procedure in clinical applications.

  14. Chemical and physical processes for integrated temperature control in microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Rosanne M.; Dodge, Arash; Van Dedem, Gijs W. K.; De Rooij, Nico F.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are a promising new tool for studying and optimizing (bio)chemical reactions and analyses. Many (bio)chemical reactions require accurate temperature control, such as for example thermocycling for PCR. Here, a new integrated temperature control system for microfluidic devices is

  15. Compatible biological and chemical control systems for Rhizoctonia solani in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, van den P.H.J.F.; Luttikholt, A.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    A series of chemical and biological control agents were tested for compatibility with the Rhizoctonia-specific biocontrol fungus Verticillium biguttatum aimed at designing novel control strategies for black scurf (Rhizoctonia solani) and other tuber diseases in potato. The efficacy of chemicals, alo

  16. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  17. Design of optimal laser pulses to control molecular rovibrational excitation in a heteronuclear diatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sitansh Sharma; Gabriel G Balint-Kurti; Harjinder Singh

    2012-01-01

    Optimal control theory in combination with time-dependent quantum dynamics is employed to design laser pulses which can perform selective vibrational and rotational excitations in a heteronuclear diatomic system. We have applied the conjugate gradient method for the constrained optimization of a suitably designed functional incorporating the desired objectives and constraints. Laser pulses designed for several excitation processes of the molecule were able to achieve predefined dynamical goals with almost 100% yield.

  18. Photoelectric detectors used in laser based control and alignment equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some theoretical considerations and practical results regarding the utilization of the ROL 50 photovoltaic cell in a leveling control system and glass quality control equipment are presented. (authors)

  19. Spectral and temporal control of Q-switched solid-state lasers using intracavity MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A.; Bauer, R.; Li, R.; Clark, C.; Lubeigt, W.; Uttamchandani, D.

    2016-03-01

    Active control of the spectral and temporal output characteristics of solid-state lasers through use of MEMS scanning micromirrors is presented. A side-pumped Nd:YAG laser with two intracavity scanning micromirrors, enabling Q-switching operation with controllable pulse duration and pulse-on-demand capabilities, is investigated. Changing the actuation signal of one micromirror allows a variation of the pulse duration between 370 ns and 1.06 μs at a pulse repetition frequency of 21.37 kHz and average output power of 50 mW. Pulse-on-demand lasing is enabled through actuation of the second micromirror. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the use of multiple intracavity MEMS devices as active tuning elements in a single solid-state laser cavity. Furthermore, we present the first demonstration of control over the output wavelength of a solid-state laser using a micromirror and a prism in an intracavity Littman configuration. A static tilt actuation of the micromirror resulted in tuning the output wavelength of an Yb:KGW laser from 1024 nm to 1031.5 nm, with FWHM bandwidths between 0.2 nm and 0.4 nm. These proof-of-principle demonstrations provide the first steps towards a miniaturized, flexible solid-state laser system with potential defense and industrial applications.

  20. Quantum control of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki

    2015-11-01

    In photoexcitation processes, if the motion of excited electrons can be precisely steered by the instantaneous electric field of an arbitrary waveform of a Fourier-synthesized laser field, the resultant matter response can be achieved within one optical cycle, usually within the attosecond (1 as =10-18s) regime. Fourier synthesis of laser fields has been achieved in various ways. However, the general use of Fourier-synthesized laser fields for the control of matter is extremely limited. Here, we report the quantum control of a nonlinear response of a molecular ionization process by using Fourier-synthesized laser fields. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 ×1012W /c m2) Fourier-synthesized laser fields consisting of fundamental, second-, third-, and fourth-harmonic light achieves the orientation-selective ionization; we utilized the orientation-selective ionization for measurement of the relative phase differences between the fundamental and each harmonic light. Our findings impact not only light-wave engineering but also the control of matter, possibly triggering the creation and establishment of a new methodology that uses Fourier-synthesized laser fields.

  1. Chemical instability of pharmaceutical peptides in polymeric controlled release systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shirangi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide and protein drugs are presently an important class of pharmaceuticals due to their favorable properties, i.e. high and selective activity. However, peptides and proteins are relatively sensitive for degradation and therefore there is need for investigation of the chemical stability of these

  2. FPGA-BASED CONTROL OF THERMOELECTRIC COOLERS FOR LASER DIODE TEMPERATURE REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHTESHAM ALI

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The proportional-integral-derivative (PID controller is the most used controller in the industry. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs allow efficient implementation of PID controllers. This paper presents the temperature regulation of a 48W laser diode through thermoelectric coolers (TECs. The temperature regulation system is designed and tested. The results demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of PID control through FPGA.

  3. Effect of Process Parameter in Laser Cutting of PMMA Sheet and ANFIS Modelling for Online Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Anamul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser beam machining (LBM is a promising and high accuracy machining technology in advanced manufacturing process. In LBM, crucial machining qualities of the end product include heat affected zone, surface roughness, kerf width, thermal stress, taper angle etc. It is essential for industrial applications especially in laser cutting of thermoplastics to acquire output product with minimum kerf width. The kerf width is dependent on laser input parameters such as laser power, cutting speed, standoff distance, assist gas pressure etc. However it is difficult to get a functional relationship due to the high uncertainty among these parameters. Hence, total 81 sets of full factorial experiment were conducted, representing four input parameters with three different levels. The experiments were performed by a continuous wave (CW CO2 laser with the mode structure of TEM01 named Zech laser machine that can provide maximum laser power up to 500 W. The polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA sheet with thickness of 3.0 mm was used for this experiment. Laser power, cutting speed, standoff distance and assist gas pressure were used as input parameters for the output named kerf width. Standoff distance, laser power, cutting speed and assist gas pressure have the dominant effect on kerf width, respectively, although assist gas has some significant effect to remove the harmful gas. ANFIS model has been developed for online control purposes. This research is considered important and helpful for manufacturing engineers in adjusting and decision making of the process parameters in laser manufacturing industry of PMMA thermoplastics with desired minimum kerf width as well as intricate shape design purposes.

  4. A Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    A prototype shield gas box with different plasma control nozzles have been investigated for laser welding of stainless steel (AISI 316). Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and gas flows show the impact on process...

  5. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  6. Optical mode control of surface-plasmon quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, V.; Bahriz, M.; Palomo, J.; Wilson, L. R.; Krysa, A. B.; Sirtori, C.; Austin, D. A.; Cockburn, J. W.; Roberts, J. S.; Colombelli, R.

    2007-04-01

    Surface-plasmon waveguides based on metallic strips can provide a two dimensional optical confinement. This concept has been successfully applied to quantum cascade lasers, processed as ridge waveguides, to demonstrate that the lateral extension of the optical mode can be influenced solely by the width of the device top contact. For devices operating at a wavelength of λ ≈7.5 μm, the room-temperature threshold current density was reduced from 6.3 kA/cm2 to 4.4 kA/cm2 with respect to larger devices with full top metallization.

  7. Methods and system for controlled laser-driven explosive bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon

    2015-11-19

    A technique for bonding two dissimilar materials includes positioning a second material over a first material at an oblique angle and applying a tamping layer over the second martial. A laser beam is directed at the second material that generates a plasma at the location of impact on the second material. The plasma generates pressure that accelerates a portion of the second material to a very high velocity and towards the first material. The second material impacts the first material causing bonding of the two materials.

  8. Experimental study and chemical application of GaAs semiconductor laser treating trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ke-Qum; Cao, Shu-Chen; Wang, Hu-Zhong; Wang, Ke-Ning; Xiao, Ton-Ha; Shen, Ke-Wei

    1993-03-01

    GaAs semiconductor laser was used to treat trigeminal neuralgia with an effective rate of 91.1%, and no side effects were found in 67 cases. Changes in and the recovery of the trigeminal nerve cell were studied with light and electromicroscope. Discussed in this article are the time length and quantity of laser treatment with low power. Experimental study and clinical application of the GaAs semiconductor laser have been carried out in our department since 1987. One-hundred-fifteen patients with various diseases in the maxillofacial region (including 67 cases of trigeminal neuralgia) have been treated with satisfactory effects and without any side-effects. The wavelength of the laser is 904 mu, the largest pulse length is 200 mu, and the average power is 2000 HZ.

  9. Improvement of chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle (WSC) of thermal power plants (TPP) is proposed in this paper. Minimization of corrosion effects by the production of ultra pure water and its strict control is the basis of all the investigated processes. The research involved the analysis of water samples in the WSC through key water quality parameters and by the most convenient analytical tools. The necessity for the stricter chemical control is demonstrated through a concrete example of the TPP Nikola Tesla, Serbia. After a thorough analysis of the chemical control system of the WSC, diagnostic and control parameters were chosen for continuous systematic measurements. Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as the ions which indicate the corrosion potential of the water and give insight into the proper production and maintenance of water within the WSC. Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica, were considered and related to their quantitative values. - Research highlights: → The more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plant Nikola Tesla, Serbia. → In chemical control the diagnostic and control parameters were optimized and introduced for the systematic measurements in the water-steam cycle. → Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as ions which indicate corrosion potential of water and give insight to proper function of production and maintenance of water within water-team cycle. Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica are considered and related with their quantitative values.

  10. Development of seam tracking control using monitoring system for laser welding (iL-Viewer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Oowaki, Katsura; Morita, Ichiro; Tsuchiya, Kazuyuki

    2003-03-01

    Automatic or semi-automatic welding methods are required for improving efficiency and safety, then various seam tracking technologies have been developed as an important part of them. For laser welding, although industrial application is magnifying widely, traditional seam-tracking technologies are difficult to apply. We have developed new monitoring system of weld zone and its around at the same time under high luminosity of laser welding, using the 2nd harmonics generator of pulsed YAG laser for illuminating the situation of weld. Using this system, we can observe the welding situations clearly in monitors, even for especially high luminous welding phenomenon, such a laser welding. Using this system, we have developed the seam tracking control system of laser welding by analyzing the images in computer in order to decide the position of the weld line and beam point and conducting tbe feedback coontrol of laser torch position. For examining this system, we conducted the I-bat welding on stainless steel plate changing welding track and welding speed. Through the experiment, followings were understood. This system can use high speed welding and works sufficiently in laser welding.

  11. Development of a dual joystick-controlled laser trapping and cutting system for optical micromanipulation of chromosomes inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsono, Marcellinus S; Zhu, Qingyuan; Shi, Linda Z; Duquette, Michelle; Berns, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    A multi-joystick robotic laser microscope system used to control two optical traps (tweezers) and one laser scissors has been developed for subcellular organelle manipulation. The use of joysticks has provided a "user-friendly" method for both trapping and cutting of organelles such as chromosomes in live cells. This innovative design has enabled the clean severing of chromosome arms using the laser scissors as well as the ability to easily hold and pull the severed arm using the laser tweezers.

  12. Chemical control of Ornithonyssus sylviarum on caged layer hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levot, G W

    1992-04-01

    Manual application of aqueous solutions of malathion, carbaryl and permethrin controlled northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum Canestrini and Fanzago, on caged layer hens for at least 118 days. Azamethiphos sprayed manually provided acceptable control for a shorter period. Machine application, particularly of azamethiphos, but also malathion, provided lesser control. The addition of surfactant increased the wetting ability of the sprays but interfered with the efficacy of azamethiphos. PMID:1421482

  13. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Masataka [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honmachi, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyodai Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  14. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method

  15. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  16. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  17. Transverse-mode controlling of a large-mode-area multimode fiber laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libo Li; Qihong Lou; Jun Zhou; Jingxing Dong; Yunrong Wei; Bing He; Jinyan Li

    2007-01-01

    @@ Coiling technique is used to control the transverse mode of a large-mode-area (LMA) multimode fiber laser. By winding the fiber to a coil with different radius, high-order modes of a multimode fiber laser are suppressed one by one and finally 15.4-W single-transverse-mode output is achieved when the coil radius is 20 mm. It is found that as the coil radius decreases, the beam quality of a multimode fiber laser gets better but the slope efficiency drops for higher-order modes are discriminated. During the experiment, as the coil radius of multimode fiber changes, output characteristic of the laser has been measured. Meanwhile,the mode loss of different modes is calculated theoretically. It is proved that the experimental measured results fit well with the theoretically calculated results.

  18. Laser driven self-assembly of shape-controlled potassium nanoparticles in porous glass

    CERN Document Server

    Marmugi, L; Burchianti, A; Veronesi, S; Moi, L; Marinelli, C

    2014-01-01

    We observe growth of shape-controlled potassium nanoparticles inside a random network of glass nanopores, exposed to low-power laser radiation. Visible laser light plays a dual role: it increases the desorption probability of potassium atoms from the inner glass walls and induces the self-assembly of metastable metallic nanoparticles along the nanopores. By probing the sample transparency and the atomic light-induced desorption flux into the vapour phase, the dynamics of both cluster formation/evaporation and atomic photo-desorption processes are characterized. Results indicate that laser light not only increases the number of nanoparticles embedded in the glass matrix but also influences their structural properties. By properly choosing the laser frequency and the illumination time, we demonstrate that it is possible to tailor the nanoparticles'shape distribution. Furthermore, a deep connection between the macroscopic behaviour of atomic desorption and light-assisted cluster formation is observed. Our result...

  19. Chemical analysis of substrates with controlled release fertilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.

    2004-01-01

    Water-soluble fertilizer added to media containing controlled release fertilizer cannot be analysed with the 1:1.5 volume water extract, because the latter increases the element content in the extract. During storage and stirring or mixing the substrate with the extractant, part of the controlled re

  20. On the design of chemical processes with improved controllability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuse, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Traditionally, process design and control system design are carried out sequentially. The premise underlying this sequential approach is that the decisions made in the process design phase do not limit the control design. However, it is generally known that incongruent designs can occur quite easily

  1. Magneto-optic Crystal Polarization Controller Assisted Mode-Locked Fiber Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guang-Zhen; GUI Li-Li; XIAO Xiao-Sheng; YANG Chang-Xi

    2011-01-01

    We report a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser based on a compact magneto-optic crystal polarization controller. The length of the polarization controller consisting of four magneto-optic crystal rotators and two quarter wave-plates is only 10cm.Adjusting the polarization controller, central wavelength around 1559nm and repetition rate 21.10 MHz mode-locked pulse are obtained. Pulse duration and 3 dB spectrum width are 598.4fs and 6.24nm respectively. Single pulse energy is about 151.7pJ. Because of its small size, low insertion loss,good controllability and negligible dispersion, the magneto-optic crystal polarization controller could be an ideal polarization controller in fiber lasers.

  2. High-power supersonic chemical lasers: gas-dynamic problems of operation of mobile systems with PRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Malkov, V. M.; Savin, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier. This is why they should be resolved anew with consideration of the specific aspects of the SCL processes. This is true for the gas-dynamic problems: new parameter areas, non-traditional channel geometry, consideration of new phenomena, etc.Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier

  3. Indoor SLAM Using Laser and Camera with Closed-Loop Controller for NAO Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhuan Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a SLAM with closed-loop controller method for navigation of NAO humanoid robot from Aldebaran. The method is based on the integration of laser and vision system. The camera is used to recognize the landmarks whereas the laser provides the information for simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM . K-means clustering method is implemented to extract data from different objects. In addition, the robot avoids the obstacles by the avoidance function. The closed-loop controller reduces the error between the real position and estimated position. Finally, simulation and experiments show that the proposed method is efficient and reliable for navigation in indoor environments.

  4. Phase and amplitude feedback control system for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase and amplitude feedback control systems for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) are described. Beam-driven voltages are very high in the buncher cavity because the electron gun is pulsed at the fifth subharmonic of the buncher resonant frequency. The high beam loading necessitated a novel feedback and drive configuration for the buncher. A compensation cirucit has been added to the gun/driver system to reduce observed drift. Extremely small variations in the accelerator gradients had dramatic effects on the laser output power. These problems and how they were solved are described and plans for improvements in the feedback control system are discussed. 5 refs., 7 figs

  5. Advanced design of conductive polymeric arrays with controlled electrical resistance using direct laser interference patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasagni, A.F. [Saarland University, Department of Materials Science, Chair of Functional Materials, Building C 6.3, 7. Stock, P.O. Box 15 11 50, Saarbruecken (Germany); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Acevedo, D.F. [Saarland University, Department of Materials Science, Chair of Functional Materials, Building C 6.3, 7. Stock, P.O. Box 15 11 50, Saarbruecken (Germany); Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Departamento de Quimica, Cordoba (Argentina); Barbero, C.A. [Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Departamento de Quimica, Cordoba (Argentina); Muecklich, F. [Saarland University, Department of Materials Science, Chair of Functional Materials, Building C 6.3, 7. Stock, P.O. Box 15 11 50, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    In this work, we report a simple method for the fabrication of regular conducting polyaniline periodic arrays on large areas of glass or gold substrates using direct laser interference patterning. Additionally, by controlling the laser intensity it is possible to precisely tune the width of the periodic arrays and consequently the electrical resistance of the polyaniline strips. The periodic arrays were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, white light interferometry and cyclic voltametry. The great importance of the method reported lies both in its versatility and the ability to control the properties of the modified polymer electrodes with high precision. This is important for prospective applications such as electrochemical sensors. (orig.)

  6. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Safety and Emission Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensor technology is being developed for leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire safety applications. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Using these technologies, sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  7. Simple locking of infrared and ultraviolet diode lasers to a visible laser using a LabVIEW proportional-integral-derivative controller on a Fabry-Perot signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek, J. M.; Wells, J. E.; Goodman, D. S.; Smith, W. W.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous laser locking of infrared (IR) and ultraviolet lasers to a visible stabilized reference laser is demonstrated via a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. LabVIEW is used to analyze the input, and an internal proportional-integral-derivative algorithm converts the FP signal to an analog locking feedback signal. The locking program stabilized both lasers to a long term stability of better than 9 MHz, with a custom-built IR laser undergoing significant improvement in frequency stabilization. The results of this study demonstrate the viability of a simple, computer-controlled, non-temperature-stabilized FP locking scheme for our applications, laser cooling of Ca+ ions, and its use in other applications with similar modest frequency stabilization requirements.

  8. Locking IR and UV diode lasers to a visible laser using a LabVIEW PID controller on a Fabry-Perot signal

    CERN Document Server

    Kwolek, J M; Goodman, D S; Smith, W W

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous laser locking of IR and UV lasers to a visible reference laser is demonstrated via a Fabry-Perot cavity. LabVIEW is used to analyze the input and an internal PID algorithm converts the Fabry-Perot signal to an analog locking feedback signal. The locking program stabilized both lasers to a long term stability of less than 12 MHz, with the lab-built IR laser undergoing signi?cant improvement in frequency stabilization. The results of this study demonstrate the viability of a simple computer-controlled, non temperature-stabilized Fabry-Perot locking scheme for our applications, laser cooling of Ca+ ions, and its use in other applications with similar modest frequency stabilization requirements.

  9. Simple locking of infrared and ultraviolet diode lasers to a visible laser using a LabVIEW proportional-integral-derivative controller on a Fabry-Perot signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek, J M; Wells, J E; Goodman, D S; Smith, W W

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous laser locking of infrared (IR) and ultraviolet lasers to a visible stabilized reference laser is demonstrated via a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. LabVIEW is used to analyze the input, and an internal proportional-integral-derivative algorithm converts the FP signal to an analog locking feedback signal. The locking program stabilized both lasers to a long term stability of better than 9 MHz, with a custom-built IR laser undergoing significant improvement in frequency stabilization. The results of this study demonstrate the viability of a simple, computer-controlled, non-temperature-stabilized FP locking scheme for our applications, laser cooling of Ca(+) ions, and its use in other applications with similar modest frequency stabilization requirements.

  10. Robust Laser Beam Tracking Control using Micro/Nano Dual-Stage Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Amari, Nabil; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    International audience This paper presents a study of the control problem of a laser beam illuminating and focusing a microobject subjected to dynamic disturbances using light intensity for feedback only. The main idea is to guide and track the beam with a hybrid micro/nanomanipulator which is driven by a control signal generated by processing the beam intensity sensed by a four-quadrant photodiode. Since the pointing location of the beam depends on real-time control issues related to temp...

  11. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided ...

  12. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements.

  13. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements. PMID:27150429

  14. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation and decision making for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials, and energy....

  15. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  16. Distributed Nd-YAG laser welding and process control in inert glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated and assembled a fiber optic delivered ND-YAG laser welding work station that consists of three glove boxes served by a single 1kw laser. Processing considerations related to the welding of special nuclear materials, toxic materials and complex part geometry are addressed within each work cell. We are proceeding with a development effort to integrate the equipment capabilities with remote sensing, process monitoring and control systems. These systems will provide real time data acquisition during welding, monitoring and verification of weld parameters, and CAD/CAM to CNC generated positioning paths. Computerized information storage, retrieval and network methods are used for weld process documentation and data analysis. A virtual control panel is being configured to integrate the monitoring and control operation of individual subsystems, such as laser and motion control into a single graphical interface. Development work on sensors to monitor laser beam characteristics and weld depth in real time with potential for adaptive control is in progress. System capabilities and results of these development efforts are presented

  17. Helium leak and chemical impurities control technology in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has designed and developed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) hydrogen cogeneration system named gas turbine high-temperature reactor (GTHTR300C) as a commercial HTGR. Helium gas is used as the primary coolant in HTGR. Helium gas is easy to leak, and the primary helium leakage should be controlled tightly from the viewpoint of preventing the release of radioactive materials to the environment. Moreover from the viewpoint of preventing the oxidization of graphite and metallic material, the helium coolant chemistry should be controlled tightly. The primary helium leakage and the helium coolant chemistry during the operation is the major factor in the HTGR for commercialization of HTGR system. This paper shows the design concept and the obtained operational experience on the primary helium leakage control and primary helium impurity control in the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) of JAEA. Moreover, the future plan to obtain operational experience of these controls for commercialization of HTGR system is shown. (author)

  18. Development of Chemical Process Design and Control for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes a novel process systems engineering framework that couples advanced control with sustainability evaluation for the optimization of process operations to minimize environmental impacts associated with products, materials and energy. The implemented control strategy combines a biologically-inspired method with optimal control concepts for finding more sustainable operating trajectories. The sustainability assessment of process operating points is carried out by using the U.S. EPA’s Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for the ENvironmental Sustainability of Chemistries with a multi-Objective Process Evaluator (GREENSCOPE tool that provides scores for the selected indicators in the economic, material efficiency, environmental and energy areas. The indicator scores describe process performance on a sustainability measurement scale, effectively determining which operating point is more sustainable if there are more than several steady states for one specific product manufacturing. Through comparisons between a representative benchmark and the optimal steady states obtained through the implementation of the proposed controller, a systematic decision can be made in terms of whether the implementation of the controller is moving the process towards a more sustainable operation. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is illustrated through a case study of a continuous fermentation process for fuel production, whose material and energy time variation models are characterized by multiple steady states and oscillatory conditions.

  19. Electrical control of the chemical bonding of fluorine on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, J. O.; Suarez, A. M.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Cornaglia, P. S.; Hernández-Nieves, A. D.; Balseiro, C. A.

    2011-02-01

    We study the electronic structure of diluted F atoms chemisorbed on graphene using density functional theory calculations. We show that the nature of the chemical bonding of a F atom adsorbed on top of a C atom in graphene strongly depends on carrier doping. In neutral samples the F impurities induce a sp3-like bonding of the C atom below, generating a local distortion of the hexagonal lattice. As the graphene is electron-doped, the C atom retracts back to the graphene plane and for high doping (1014 cm-2) its electronic structure corresponds to a nearly pure sp2 configuration. We interpret this sp3-sp2 doping-induced crossover in terms of a simple tight-binding model and discuss the physical consequences of this change.

  20. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  1. Identification and quantification of selected chemicals in laser pyrolysis products of mammalian tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spleiss, Martin; Weber, Lothar W.; Meier, Thomas H.; Treffler, Bernd

    1995-01-01

    Liver and muscle tissue have been irradiated with a surgical CO2-laser. The prefiltered fumes were adsorbed on different sorbents (activated charcoal type NIOSH and Carbotrap) and desorbed with different solvents (carbondisulphide and acetone). Analysis was done by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. An updated list of identified substances is shown. Typical Maillard reaction products as found in warmed over flavour as aldehydes, aromatics, heterocyclic and sulphur compounds were detected. Quantification of some toxicological relevant substances is presented. The amounts of these substances are given in relation to the laser parameters and different tissues for further toxicological assessment.

  2. Femtosecond laser surface ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate with position control through z-scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial resolution of laser micromachining of polymers can be improved with the use of femtosecond laser pulses. Due to the short interaction time, thermal effects are significantly reduced. Additionally, the non-linear character of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with transparent materials allows the modification inside their bulk also. However, this creates the challenge to accurately focus the laser beam in the surface when only surface ablation is required. Thus, this work presents a study of the laser ablation of a transparent polymer at different pulse energies and focusing positions controlled through z-scan transmittance measurements. Experiments were performed using an Yb:KYW laser with 450 fs pulses and 1027 nm wavelength. Morphological analysis of the polymer surface after irradiation was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Similar ablation craters were found for a range of sample positions around the beam waist. However, focused ion beam cross-sections of the craters unveil significant inner modifications under most of the focusing conditions leading to surface ablation. Hence, surface ablation without damaging the bulk material only occurs at critical positions where the beam waist is located slightly outside the sample. In situ monitoring of the sample position can be made through transmittance measurements. (paper)

  3. Controlling two plasmon decay instability in intense femtosecond laser driven plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Chatterjee, Gourab; Ravindra Kumar, G., E-mail: grk@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Brijesh, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai 400098 (India)

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the onset of the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability in intense femtosecond laser-solid interaction. In particular, this instability, originating at the quarter critical electron density surface in the inhomogeneous plasma, is explored for a wide range of laser parameters-energy, pulse duration, and intensity contrast. By varying these laser parameters, we demonstrate ways to excite and control the growth of the TPD process. The pulse duration scan carried out under a constant laser fluence reveals the pulse width dependent nature of TPD growth. The spectral splitting of the TPD induced three-halves harmonic emission is used to infer the electron temperature near the quarter critical density surface. Moreover, by varying the laser contrast over four orders of magnitude, we find that the intensity threshold of three-halves harmonic emission increases by nearly two orders of magnitude. This contrast dependent intensity threshold for the emission of three-halves harmonic can be a useful diagnostic of the laser contrast.

  4. Optimization of the dynamic wavefront control of a pulsed kilojoule/nanosecond-petawatt laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ji-Ping; Sautivet, Anne-Marie; Fils, Jérôme; Martin, Luc; Abdeli, Kahina; Sauteret, Christian; Wattellier, Benoit

    2008-02-01

    The wavefront aberrations in a large-scale, flash-lamp-pumped, high-energy, high-power glass laser system can degrade considerably the quality of the final focal spot, and limit severely the repetition rate. The various aberrations induced on the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), laser facility (LULI2000) throughout the amplification are identified and analyzed in detail. Based on these analyses, an optimized procedure for dynamic wavefront control is then designed and implemented. The lower-order Zernike aberrations can be effectively reduced by combining an adaptive-optics setup, comprising a bimorph deformable mirror and a four-wave lateral shearing interferometer, with a precise alignment system. This enables the laser chain to produce a reproducible focal spot close to the diffraction limit (Strehl ratio ~0.7). This allows also to increase the repetition rate, initially limited by the recovery time of the laser amplifiers, by a factor of 2 (one shot per hour). The proposed procedure provides an attractive alternative for dynamic correction of the wavefront aberrations of a laser facility as complex as the LULI2000.

  5. Excimer laser recrystallization of nanocrystalline-Si films deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition at 150 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) fabricated at low temperature (under 200 deg. C) have been widely investigated for flexible substrate applications such as a transparent plastic substrate. Unlike the conventional TFT process using glass substrate, the maximum process temperature should be kept less than 200 deg. C in order to avoid thermal damage on flexible substrates. We report the characteristics of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) irradiated by an excimer laser. Nc-Si precursors were deposited on various buffer layers by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at 150 deg. C. We employed various buffer layers, such as silicon nitride (SiNX) and silicon dioxide (SiO2), in order to report recrystallization characteristics in connection with a buffer layer of a different thermal conductivity. The dehydrogenation and recrystallization was performed by step-by-step excimer laser annealing (ELA) (XeCl,λ=308 nm) in order to prevent the explosive release of hydrogen atoms. The grain size of the poly-Si film, which was recrystallized on the various buffer layers, was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at each laser energy density. The process margin of step-by-step ELA employing the SiNX buffer layer is wider than SiO2 and the maximum grain size slightly increased

  6. Excimer laser recrystallization of nanocrystalline-Si films deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition at 150 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joong-Hyun [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Myeon [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Geun [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min-Koo [School of Electrical Engineering (50), Seoul National University, Shinlim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Moon-Young [LTPS Team, AMLCD Business, Samsung Electronics Co., Giheung, Yongin City (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-01

    Polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) fabricated at low temperature (under 200 deg. C) have been widely investigated for flexible substrate applications such as a transparent plastic substrate. Unlike the conventional TFT process using glass substrate, the maximum process temperature should be kept less than 200 deg. C in order to avoid thermal damage on flexible substrates. We report the characteristics of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) irradiated by an excimer laser. Nc-Si precursors were deposited on various buffer layers by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at 150 deg. C. We employed various buffer layers, such as silicon nitride (SiN{sub X}) and silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), in order to report recrystallization characteristics in connection with a buffer layer of a different thermal conductivity. The dehydrogenation and recrystallization was performed by step-by-step excimer laser annealing (ELA) (XeCl,{lambda}=308 nm) in order to prevent the explosive release of hydrogen atoms. The grain size of the poly-Si film, which was recrystallized on the various buffer layers, was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at each laser energy density. The process margin of step-by-step ELA employing the SiN{sub X} buffer layer is wider than SiO{sub 2} and the maximum grain size slightly increased.

  7. Control of dynamical self-assembly of strongly Brownian nanoparticles through convective forces induced by ultrafast laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilday, Serim; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Tokel, Onur; Makey, Ghaith; Yavuz, Ozgun; Yavuz, Koray; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, F. Omer; Gulseren, Oguz

    We report a new dynamical self-assembly mechanism, where judicious use of convective and strong Brownian forces enables effective patterning of colloidal nanoparticles that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the laser beam. Optical trapping or tweezing effects are not involved, but the laser is used to create steep thermal gradients through multi-photon absorption, and thereby guide the colloids through convective forces. Convective forces can be thought as a positive feedback mechanism that helps to form and reinforce pattern, while Brownian motion act as a competing negative feedback mechanism to limit the growth of the pattern, as well as to increase the possibilities of bifurcation into different patterns, analogous to the competition observed in reaction-diffusion systems. By steering stochastic processes through these forces, we are able to gain control over the emergent pattern such as to form-deform-reform of a pattern, to change its shape and transport it spatially within seconds. This enables us to dynamically initiate and control large patterns comprised of hundreds of colloids. Further, by not relying on any specific chemical, optical or magnetic interaction, this new method is, in principle, completely independent of the material type being assembled.

  8. In vitro study of morphological and chemical modification threshold of bovine dental enamel irradiated by the holmium laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the Ho:YLF laser effects on the dental enamel surface with regards to its morphology, thermal variations during its irradiation in the pulp chamber and its increased resistance to demineralization through quantitative analysis of calcium and phosphorous atoms reactive concentrations in samples. Twenty samples of bovine enamel were used and divided in four groups: control - acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) application followed by demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (100 J/cm2) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid; irradiation with Ho:YLF laser (350 J/cm2) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid: and irradiation with Ho:YLF laser ( 450 J/cm2) followed by APF topic application and demineralization treatment with lactic acid. Ali samples were quantified according to their calcium and phosphorous atoms relative concentrations before and after the treatments above. X-Ray fluorescence spectrochemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. It was observed an increase on the calcium and phosphorous atoms concentration ratio and therefore the enamel demineralization reduction as a result of the lactic acid treatment in the samples irradiated with the holmium laser followed by the APF application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this study for clinical purposes, morphological changes caused by the holmium laser irradiation were analyzed. Such modifications were characterized by melted and re-solidified regions of the enamel with consequent changes on its permeability and solubility. Temperature changes of ten human pre-molars teeth irradiated with 350 J/cm2 and 450 J/cm2 were also monitored in the pulp chamber in real time. Temperature increases over 4,20 C did not occur. The results obtained from this study along with the results from previous researches developed at 'Center for

  9. Chemical control of Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozen, van K.; Ester, A.

    2010-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is one of the most important pest species of maize in several countries of Central and Eastern Europe. This pest insect has invaded from the USA and is mainly controlled by insecticides in the EU. In the U

  10. Solution-based Chemical Strategies to Purposely Control the Microstructure of Functional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei LIU; Congting SUN; Chenglin YAN; Dongfeng XUE

    2008-01-01

    Micro/nanostructured crystals with controlled architectures are desirable for many applications in optics, electronics, biology, medicine, and energy conversions. Low-temperature, aqueous chemical routes have been widely investigated for the synthesis of particles, and arrays of oriented nanorods and nanotubes. In this paper, based on the ideal crystal shapes predicted by the chemical bonding theory, we have developed some potential chemical strategies to tune the microstructure of functional materials, ZnS and Nb2O5 nanotube arrays, MgO wiskers and nestlike spheres, and cubic phase Cu2O microcrystals were synthesized here to elucidate these strategies. We describe their controlled crystallization processes and illustrate the detailed key factors controlling their growth by examining various reaction parameters. Current results demonstrate that our designed chemical strategies for tuning microstructure of functional materials are applicable to several technologically important materials, and therefore may be used as a versatile and effective route to the controllable synthesis of other inorganic functional materials.

  11. Environmental Assessment Marsh Vegetation Rehabilitation Chemical Control of Phragmites at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal describes a rehabilitation program for up to 3,000 acres of marsh vegetation. The primary objectives are: 1) to chemically control the dense stands of...

  12. Efficacy and mechanisms of non-antibacterial, chemical plaque control by dentifrices - An in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; White, Don J.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The provision of antiplaque benefits to dentifrices assists patients in improving hygiene and reducing susceptibility to gingivitis and caries. Chemical plaque control involves different mechanisms and is mostly associated with antibacterial effects, but also includes effects on pellicle

  13. Comparison of some effects of modification of a polylactide surface layer by chemical, plasma, and laser methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraczewski, Krzysztof; Rytlewski, Piotr; Malinowski, Rafał; Żenkiewicz, Marian

    2015-08-01

    The article presents the results of studies and comparison of selected properties of the modified PLA surface layer. The modification was carried out with three methods. In the chemical method, a 0.25 M solution of sodium hydroxide in water and ethanol was utilized. In the plasma method, a 50 W generator was used, which produced plasma in the air atmosphere under reduced pressure. In the laser method, a pulsed ArF excimer laser with fluency of 60 mJ/cm2 was applied. Polylactide samples were examined by using the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Images of surfaces of the modified samples were recorded, contact angles were measured, and surface free energy was calculated. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical composition of the PLA surface layer were performed as well. Based on the survey it was found that the best modification results are obtained using the plasma method.

  14. Improved AMOLED with aligned poly-Si thin-film transistors by laser annealing and chemical solution treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFT) were prepared for the active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED). The excimer laser annealing (ELA) recrystallization technique was employed with a chemical solution treatment process to improve the TFT characteristic uniformity and the AMOLED display image quality. The characteristics of the poly-Si array thin films were influenced by XeCl ELA optic module design, TFT device channel direction, and laser irradiation overlap ratio. The ELA system module provided aligned poly-Si grain size of 0.3 μm by the homogenization lens design. The chemical solution treatment process included a dilute HF solution (DHF), ozone (O3) water, and buffer oxide etching solution (BOE). The PMOS TFT showed better field effect mobility of 87.6 cm2/V s, and the threshold voltage was -1.35 V. The off current (Ioff) was 1.25x10-11 A, and the on/off current ratio was 6.27x106. In addition, the image quality of the AMOLED display was highly improved using the 2T1C structure design without any compensation circuit.

  15. Improved AMOLED with aligned poly-Si thin-film transistors by laser annealing and chemical solution treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G. M.; Chen, C. N.; Feng, W. S.; Lu, H. C.

    2009-12-01

    Low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFT) were prepared for the active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED). The excimer laser annealing (ELA) recrystallization technique was employed with a chemical solution treatment process to improve the TFT characteristic uniformity and the AMOLED display image quality. The characteristics of the poly-Si array thin films were influenced by XeCl ELA optic module design, TFT device channel direction, and laser irradiation overlap ratio. The ELA system module provided aligned poly-Si grain size of 0.3 μm by the homogenization lens design. The chemical solution treatment process included a dilute HF solution (DHF), ozone (O 3) water, and buffer oxide etching solution (BOE). The PMOS TFT showed better field effect mobility of 87.6 cm 2/V s, and the threshold voltage was -1.35 V. The off current ( Ioff) was 1.25×10 -11 A, and the on/off current ratio was 6.27×10 6. In addition, the image quality of the AMOLED display was highly improved using the 2T1C structure design without any compensation circuit.

  16. Improved AMOLED with aligned poly-Si thin-film transistors by laser annealing and chemical solution treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.M., E-mail: wu@mail.cgu.edu.t [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Department of Electronic Engineering, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.N.; Feng, W.S.; Lu, H.C. [Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Department of Electronic Engineering, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistors (TFT) were prepared for the active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED). The excimer laser annealing (ELA) recrystallization technique was employed with a chemical solution treatment process to improve the TFT characteristic uniformity and the AMOLED display image quality. The characteristics of the poly-Si array thin films were influenced by XeCl ELA optic module design, TFT device channel direction, and laser irradiation overlap ratio. The ELA system module provided aligned poly-Si grain size of 0.3 mum by the homogenization lens design. The chemical solution treatment process included a dilute HF solution (DHF), ozone (O{sub 3}) water, and buffer oxide etching solution (BOE). The PMOS TFT showed better field effect mobility of 87.6 cm{sup 2}/V s, and the threshold voltage was -1.35 V. The off current (I{sub off}) was 1.25x10{sup -11} A, and the on/off current ratio was 6.27x10{sup 6}. In addition, the image quality of the AMOLED display was highly improved using the 2T1C structure design without any compensation circuit.

  17. Techniques to control and position laser targets. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.B.

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of the work was to investigate the potential role of various electrohydrodynamic phenomena in the fabrication of small spherical particles and shells for laser target applications. A number of topics were considered. These included charged droplet levitation, specifically the combined effects of the Rayleigh limit and droplet elongation in the presence of electric fields. Two new levitation schemes for uncharged dielectric particles were studied. A dynamic dielectrophoretic levitation scheme was proposed and unsuccessful attempts were made to observe levitation with it. Another static dielectrophoretic levitation scheme was studied and used extensively. A theory was developed for this type of levitation, and a dielectric constant measurement scheme proposed. A charged droplet generator for the production of single droplets (< 1 mm dia of insulating liquids was developed. The synchronous DEP pumping of bubbles and spheres has been considered. Finally, some preliminary experiments with SiH/sub 4//O/sub 2/ bubbles in Viscasil silicone fluid were conducted to learn about the possibility of using silane to form SiO/sub 2/ microballons from bubbles.

  18. Chemical Composition of Micrometer-Sized Filaments in an Aragonite Host by a Miniature Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulej, Marek; Neubeck, Anna; Ivarsson, Magnus; Riedo, Andreas; Neuland, Maike B; Meyer, Stefan; Wurz, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Detection of extraterrestrial life is an ongoing goal in space exploration, and there is a need for advanced instruments and methods for the detection of signatures of life based on chemical and isotopic composition. Here, we present the first investigation of chemical composition of putative microfossils in natural samples using a miniature laser ablation/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LMS). The studies were conducted with high lateral (∼15 μm) and vertical (∼20-200 nm) resolution. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the instrument performance on micrometer-sized samples both in terms of isotope abundance and element composition. The following objectives had to be achieved: (1) Consider the detection and calculation of single stable isotope ratios in natural rock samples with techniques compatible with their employment of space instrumentation for biomarker detection in future planetary missions. (2) Achieve a highly accurate chemical compositional map of rock samples with embedded structures at the micrometer scale in which the rock matrix is easily distinguished from the micrometer structures. Our results indicate that chemical mapping of strongly heterogeneous rock samples can be obtained with a high accuracy, whereas the requirements for isotope ratios need to be improved to reach sufficiently large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). PMID:26247475

  19. Contribution to the study of physico-chemical properties of surfaces modified by laser treatment. Application to the enhancement of localized corrosion resistance of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic materials are more and more used in severe conditions with particularly strong request for improving their behavior in aggressive environment and especially over long periods. The objective of this PhD work is to estimate the potentiality of a laser surface melting treatment on the improvement of the stainless steel 304L corrosion resistance, surface treatments by laser can be revisited on the basis of a recent change in the laser technology. In the frame of this work, a nano-pulsed laser fiber was chosen: it allows the treated surface to be melted for few microns in depth, followed by an ultra-fast solidification occurring with cooling rates up to 1011 K/s. The combination of these processes leads to the elimination of the surface defects, the formation (trapping) of metastable phases, the segregation of chemical elements and the growth of a new oxide layer which properties are governed by the laser parameters. To correlate these latter to the electrochemical reactivity of the surface, the influence of two laser parameters on the physico-chemical properties of the surface was studied: the laser power and the overlap of the laser impacts. To support this approach, the pitting corrosion resistance of the samples was determined by standard electrochemical tests. For specific laser parameters, the pitting potential of a 304L stainless steel was increased by more than 500 mV corresponding to an important enhancement in localized corrosion resistance in chloride environment. The interdependence of the different phenomena resulting from the laser treatment lead to a quite complex prioritization of their role on the sensibility of the 304L. However, it was demonstrated that the nature of the thermal oxide formed during the laser surface melting and the induced defects are first-order parameters for the initiation of pits. (author)

  20. Adaptive optics system for fast automatic control of laser beam jitters in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Salvatore; Acernese, Fausto; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems can operate fast automatic control of laser beam jitters for several applications of basic research as well as for the improvement of industrial and medical devices. We here present our theoretical and experimental research showing the opportunity of suppressing laser beam geometrical fluctuations of higher order Hermite Gauss modes in interferometric Gravitational Waves (GW) antennas. This in turn allows to significantly reduce the noise that originates from the coupling of the laser source oscillations with the interferometer asymmetries and introduces the concrete possibility of overcoming the sensitivity limit of the GW antennas actually set at 10-23 1 Hz value. We have carried out the feasibility study of a novel AO System which performs effective laser jitters suppression in the 200 Hz bandwidth. It extracts the wavefront error signals in terms of Hermite Gauss (HG) coefficients and performs the wavefront correction using the Zernike polynomials. An experimental Prototype of the AO System has been implemented and tested in our laboratory at the University of Salerno and the results we have achieved fully confirm effectiveness and robustness of the control upon first and second order laser beam geometrical fluctuations, in good accordance with GW antennas requirements. Above all, we have measured 60 dB reduction of astigmatism and defocus modes at low frequency below 1 Hz and 20 dB reduction in the 200 Hz bandwidth.

  1. Cooling molecular vibrations with shaped laser pulses: Optimal control theory exploiting the timescale separation between coherent excitation and spontaneous emission

    CERN Document Server

    Reich, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling of molecules employing broadband optical pumping involves a timescale separation between laser excitation and spontaneous emission. Here, we optimize the optical pumping step using shaped laser pulses. We derive two optimization functionals to drive population into those excited state levels that have the largest spontaneous emission rates to the target state. We show that, when using optimal control, laser cooling of molecules works even if the Franck-Condon map governing the transitions is preferential to heating rather than cooling. Our optimization functional is also applicable to the laser cooling of other degrees of freedom provided the cooling cycle consists of coherent excitation and dissipative deexcitation steps whose timescales are separated.

  2. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved

  3. Coherent Control of Photofragment Distributions Using Laser Phase Modulation in the Weak-Field Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Vela, Alberto; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of quantum interference control of the final state distributions of photodissociation fragments by means of pure phase modulation of the pump laser pulse in the weak-field regime is demonstrated theoretically for the first time. The specific application involves realistic wave pac...

  4. Twisted Hi-Bi fiber DFB lasers with controllable output polarization

    OpenAIRE

    M. N. Zervas; Wilmshurst, R.; Walker, L.M.B.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that single polarization, hi-bi fiber DFB lasers are in general characterized by elliptical state of polarization, due to the in-built fiber birefringence axis rotation. Externally applied birefringence-axis twist is shown to provide accurate control of the output SOP. Continuous tuning from circular to linear polarization, with PER of ~40dB has been demonstrated.

  5. Process Control of Stainless Steel Laser Welding using an Optical Spectroscopic Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Sibillano, T.; Rizzi, D.; Ancona, A.

    2011-01-01

    The in-process monitoring and real-time control of the penetration depth during laser welding is evaluated. An optical collimator collects the optical emission for measurement with a fast spectrometer. The sensor data are used to calculate the electron temperature and subsequently to determine the w

  6. Real-time seam tracking for robotic laser welding using trajectory-based control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de Menno; Aarts, Ronald; Jonker, Ben; Meijer, Johan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a real-time seam tracking algorithm is proposed that can cope with the accuracy demands of robotic laser welding. A trajectory-based control architecture is presented, which had to be developed for this seam tracking algorithm. Cartesian locations (position and orientation) are added t

  7. Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Petersen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    An integrated plasma nozzle and a shield gas box have been investigated for laser welding of 2 mm stainless steel sheets. Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and coaxial and plasma flow show the impact on process...

  8. Chemical modelling as a management tool for water pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpitlaw, D. [University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1996-12-31

    In a colliery currently being re-mined by opencast methods, the coal seam was originally extracted using bord and pillar mining. Depressions in the seam floor have facilitated the formation of large underground water bodies. This water has become acidic and contaminated by heavy metals. Mine water is treated by a liming plant and then released into evaporation pans. Seepage from the pans enters a natural wetlands. The de-watering of old workings ahead of mining periodically subjects the liming plant to large quantities of low quality water, and a nett export of salts such as sulphate occurs. As the mine is situated in a sensitive river catchment, this pollution is unacceptable. A chemical speciation program developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency was used to analyse effluent from the liming plant and wetland. Liming plant effluent water was found to vary greatly due to the conditions prevalent in the different water bodies. The liming plant and wetland were periodically subjected to pollution loads beyond the wetland`s assimilative capacity, resulting failure of the system. Despite this, the software provided evidence of the wetland`s pollution-ameliorating potential. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Short-lived isotopes in central chemical control of ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central chemical ventilatory drive is dependent on elecrolyte and acid-base status of brain ECF, as well as the interaction between H+ metabolism and CO2 fixation and metabolism of amino acid neutrotransmitters - GABA and glutamate. In the anesthetized dogs, using the short-lived positron emitting isotope of carbon (11C) either in the form of molecular CO2 or as HCO3- injected intraarterially it was demonstrated that there is first pass uptake of 16% of HCO3- from blood into brain and 86% uptake of molecular CO2, thus indicating that the brain-blood barrier is permeable to HCO3-, but that HCO3- content in the CNS is regulated as a function of dissociation of strong ions such as Cl- and Na+. Relationship between CO2 fixations and brain glutamine was studied with intraarterial injection of 13N-ammonia and its turnover into glutamine when PCO2 was increased. Ammonia turnover into glutamine was increased by a factor of 2 when PaCO2 was increased by 35 torr, and this rise in glutamine was linearly related to the rise in CSF [HCO3-]. Glutamine is then converted into the active neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate. Thus, the short-lived isotopes allow for assessment of the interaction of biochemical events in the CNS in the central respiratory drive. (orig.)

  10. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO{sub 2} laser thermal modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubovský, Ivan, E-mail: kubovsky@tuzvo.sk; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Influences of CO{sub 2} laser on lime wood surface were studied. • With growth of the irradiation dose brightness decrease and increase of the total colour difference were observed. • Cellulose degradation and loss of hemicelluloses were observed. • Higher values at the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. • CO{sub 2} laser irradiation can be used as a new colouring method. - Abstract: We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO{sub 2} laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO{sub 2} laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm{sup −2}) lightness (ΔL{sup *}) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE{sup *}) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  11. High-performance laser power feedback control system for cold atom physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Lu; Thibault Vogt; Xinxing Liu; Xiaoji Zhou; Xuzong Chen

    2011-01-01

    @@ A laser power feedback control system that features fast response,large-scale performance,low noise,and excellent stability is presented.Some essential points used for optimization are described.Primary optical lattice experiments are given as examples to show the performance of this system.With these performance characteristics,the power control system is useful for applications in cold atom physics and precision measurements.%A laser power feedback control system that features fast response, large-scale performance, low noise, and excellent stability is presented. Some essential points used for optimization are described. Primary optical lattice experiments are given as examples to show the performance of this system. With these performance characteristics, the power control system is useful for applications in cold atom physics and precision measurements.

  12. Coherent beam combination of adaptive fiber laser array with tilt-tip and phase-locking control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiong; Wang Xiao-Lin; Zhou Pu; Su Rong-Tao; Geng Chao; Li Xin-Yang; Xu Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental study on tilt-tip (TT) and phase-locking (PL) control in a coherent beam combination (CBC) system of adaptive fiber laser array.The TT control is performed using the adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC),and the PL control is realized by the phase modulator (PM).Cascaded and simultaneous controls of TT and PL using stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm are investigated in this paper.Two-fiber-laser-,four-fiber-laser-,and six-fiber-laser-arrays are employed to study the TT and PL control.In the cascaded control system,only one high-speed CMOS camera is used to collect beam data and a computer is used as the controller.In a simultaneous control system one high-speed CMOS camera and one photonic detector (PD) are employed,and a computer and a control circuit based on field programmable gate array (FPGA) are used as the controllers.Experimental results reveal that both cascaded and simultaneous controls of TT using AFOC and PL using PM in fiber laser array are feasible and effective.Cascaded control is more effective in static control situation and simultaneous control can be applied to the dynamic control system directly.The control signals of simultaneous PL and TT disturb each other obviously and TT and PL control may compete with each other,so the control effect is limited.

  13. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  14. Phase control of a Zeeman-split He-Ne gas laser by variation of the gaseous discharge voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, W N; Hunt, R H

    1992-07-20

    Zeeman-split lasers are useful for precise positioning or motion control. In applications that employ such a laser to control closely the position of a moving system, phase noise in the Zeeman frequency is a serious problem. Control of low-frequency phase noise can be obtained through variation of the external magnetic field by way of a solenoid wound around the laser tube. It is the finding in this work that control of the residual higher-frequency noise of a He-Ne laser can be obtained through small variations of the high voltage that is used to effect the gaseous discharge in the laser tube. The application of the present system is to the control of the path difference in a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer. PMID:20725394

  15. Adrenal metastases: CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Lehnert, Thomas; Eichler, Katrin; Proschek, Dirk; Floeter, Julius; Mack, Martin G. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of CT-guided and MR-thermometry-controlled laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) in adrenal metastases. Nine patients (seven male, two female; average age 65.0 years; range 58.7-75.0 years) with nine unilateral adrenal metastases (mean diameter 4.3 cm) from primaries comprising colorectal carcinoma (n = 5), renal cell carcinoma (n = 1), oesophageal carcinoma (n = 1), carcinoid (n = 1), and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1) underwent CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT using a 0.5 T MR unit. LITT was performed with an internally irrigated power laser application system with an Nd:YAG laser. A thermosensitive, fast low-angle shot 2D sequence was used for real-time monitoring. Follow-up studies were performed at 24 h and 3 months and, thereafter, at 6-month intervals (median 14 months). All patients tolerated the procedure well under local anaesthesia. No complications occurred. Average number of laser applicators per tumour: 1.9 (range 1-4); mean applied laser energy 33 kJ (range 15.3-94.6 kJ), mean diameter of the laser-induced coagulation necrosis 4.5 cm (range 2.5-7.5 cm). Complete ablation was achieved in seven lesions, verified by MR imaging; progression was detected in two lesions in the follow-up. The preliminary results suggest that CT-guided, MR-thermometry-controlled LITT is a safe, minimally invasive and promising procedure for treating adrenal metastases. (orig.)

  16. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence compensation through piston-only phase control of a laser phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Jack E.; Van Zandt, Noah; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    Beam propagation from a laser phased array system through the turbulent atmosphere is simulated and the ability of such a system to compensate for the atmosphere via piston-only phase control of the sub-apertures is evaluated. Directed energy (DE) applications demand more power than most lasers can produce, consequently many schemes for high power involve combining the beams from many smaller lasers into one. When many smaller lasers are combined into a phased array, phase control of the individual sub-apertures will be necessary to create a high-quality beam. Phase control of these sub-apertures could then be used to do more, such as focus, steer, and compensate for atmospheric turbulence. Atmospheric turbulence is well known to degrade the performance of both imaging systems and laser systems. Adaptive optics can be used to mitigate this degradation. Adaptive optics ordinarily involves a deformable mirror, but with phase control on each sub-aperture the need for a deformable mirror is eliminated. The simulation conducted here evaluates performance gain for a 127 element phased array in a hexagonal pattern with piston-only phase control on each element over an uncompensated array for varying levels of atmospheric turbulence. While most simulations were carried out against a 10 km tactical scenario, the turbulence profile was adjusted so performance could be evaluated as a function of the Fried Parameter (r0) and the log-amplitude variance somewhat independently. This approach is demonstrated to be generally effective with the largest percentage improvement occurring when r0 is close to the sub-aperture diameter.

  17. Phase-controlled entanglement in a quantum-beat laser: application to quantum lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sete, Eyob A.; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2011-11-01

    We study entanglement generation and control in a quantum-beat laser coupled to a two-mode squeezed vacuum reservoir. We show that the generated entanglement is robust against cavity losses and environmental decoherence and can be controlled by tuning the phases of the microwave and the squeezed input fields. Moreover, we discuss two-photon correlations, absorption and implementations in quantum optical lithography.

  18. Optimizing the electronic control loop of a solid-state ring laser gyroscope

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Rebut, Maxence; Feugnet, Gilles; Colineau, Joseph; Pocholle, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    We study in this Letter the dynamical effects of the limited bandwidth of the control electronics in a solid-state (Nd-YAG) ring laser gyroscope. We derive a stability condition for the rotation-sensing regime in the case of a first-order control loop, showing that the smallest measurable rotation speed depends directly on the cutoff frequency value. Our experimental measurements are in good agreement with this prediction.

  19. Controls on dissolved organic carbon quantity and chemical character in temperate rivers of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kevin W.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Salisbury, Joseph; Huntington, Thomas; Aiken, George

    2013-04-01

    the processes controlling the transfer and chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems is crucial to understanding the carbon cycle and the effects of DOC on water quality. Previous studies have identified watershed-scale controls on bulk DOC flux and concentration among small basins but fewer studies have explored controls among large basins or simultaneously considered the chemical composition of DOC. Because the chemical character of DOC drives riverine biogeochemical processes such as metabolism and photodegradation, accounting for chemical character in watershed-scale studies will improve the way bulk DOC variability in rivers is interpreted. We analyzed DOC quantity and chemical character near the mouths of 17 large North American rivers, primarily between 2008 and 2010, and identified watershed characteristics that controlled variability. We quantified DOC chemical character using both specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254) and XAD-resin fractionation. Mean DOC concentration ranged from 2.1 to 47 mg C L-1 and mean SUVA254 ranged from 1.3 to 4.7 L mg C-1 m-1. We found a significant positive correlation between basin wetland cover and both bulk DOC concentration (R2 = 0.78; p river systems with long surface water residence times. However, synoptic DOC sampling of both quantity and character throughout river networks will be needed to more rigorously test this finding. The inclusion of DOC chemical character will be vital to achieving a more complete understanding of bulk DOC dynamics in large river systems.

  20. Physical and chemical control of released microorganisms at field sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, K.; Seidler, R.; Matyac, C.

    1991-01-01

    An important consideration in the environmental release of a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) is the capability for reduction or elimination of GEM populations once their function is completed or if adverse environmental effects are observed. The decontamination treatments of burning and biocide application, alone and in combination with tilling, were evaluated for their ability to reduce populations of bacteria released on the phylloplane. Field plots of bush beans sprayed with the bacterium Erwinia herbicola, received the following treatments: (1) control, (2) control + till, (3) burn, (4) burn + till, (5) Kocide (cupric hydroxide), (6) Kocide + till, (7) Agri-strep (streptomycin sulfate), and (8) Agri-strept + till. Leaves and soil from the plots were sampled -1, 1, 5, 8, 12, 15, 19, and 27 days after application of the decontamination treatments. Burning produced a significant and persistent reduction in the number of bacteria whereas tilling, alone or in combination with the biocide treatments, stimulated a significant and persistent reduction in the number of bacteria, whereas tilling, alone or in combination with the biocide treatments, stimulated a significant increase in bacterial populations that persisted for several weeks.

  1. Internally coupled Fabry-Perot interferometer for high precision wavelength control of tunable diode lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, M.; Schieder, R.; Clar, H.J.; Winnewisser, G.

    1986-01-01

    An internally coupled confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) has been developed for both high precision wavelength calibration and stabilization of tunable diode lasers (TDL). Our FPI is tunable and thermally stable and works over a large wavelength range (0.6--30 ..mu..m)-characteristics that cannot be simultaneously realized with conventional etalons. As part of a versatile wavelength control system the instrument has already considerably improved the quality of our diode laser spectra and will facilitate the use of TDLs in sub-Doppler spectroscopy and as local oscillators in heterodyne radiometers.

  2. Legal requirements and guidelines for the control of harmful laser generated particles, vapours and gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsey, John

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a review of the Health and Safety laws and guidelines relating to laser generated emissions into the workplace and outside environment with emphasis on the differences between legal requirements and guideline advice. The types and nature of contaminants released by various laser processes (i.e. cutting, coding, engraving, marking etc) are discussed, together with the best methods for controlling them to within legal exposure limits. A brief description of the main extract air filtration techniques, including the principles of particulate removal and the action of activated carbon for gas/vapour/odour filtration, is given.

  3. Control of lateral divergence in high-power, broad-area photonic crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Jiamin; Xing, Enbo; Wang, Lijie; Shu, Shili; Tian, Sicong; Tong, Cunzhu; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    One-dimensional photonic bandgap crystal (PBC) lasers have demonstrated ultra-low vertical divergence and record brightness; however, their future development is limited by their lateral beam quality. In this paper, a fishbone microstructure is proposed to control the lateral modes in broad-area PBC lasers. The findings reveal that the introduction of the microstructure improves the full width at half maximum of the lateral far field by 22.2% and increases the output power to a small extent. The detailed measurements show that the lateral beam parameter product decreases by 15.9%.

  4. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  5. Multivalent protein polymers with controlled chemical and physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Ayben; Kiick, Kristi L

    2010-12-30

    In this review, we describe our work on the design, characterization, and modification of a series of alanine-rich helical polypeptides with novel functions. Glycosylation of the polypeptides has permitted investigation of polymer architecture effects on multivalent interactions. One of the members of this polypeptide family exhibits polymorphological behavior that is easily manipulated via simple changes in solution pH and temperature. Polypeptide-based fibrils formed at acidic pH and high temperature were shown to direct the one-dimensional organization of gold nanoparticles via electrostatic interactions. As a precursor to fibrils, aggregates likely comprising alanine-rich cores form at low temperatures and acidic pH and reversibly dissociate into monomers upon deprotonation. PEGylation of these polypeptides does not alter the self-association or conformational behavior of the polypeptide, suggesting potential applications in the development of assembled delivery vehicles, as modification of the polypeptides should be a useful strategy for controlling assembly. PMID:20562016

  6. PROCESS CONTROL IN THE EDUCATION OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    lstván Csontos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Las prácticas de laboratorio demuestran la importancia de los modernos procesos de control en las tecnologías de química orgánica. Se necesitaba desarrollar un sistema que une las ventajas de los calorímetros de reacción con las de modelo de los reactores controladas de la industria. El diseño de hardware y de software se permite trasladar el programa desarrollado en el laboratorio para el nivel industrial. El algoritmo general para las reacciones de diazotación y clormetilación es aplicado para el sintésis del cloruro de benzo-diazonio y cloruro de dietoxi-benzil en las prácticas de laboratorio.

  7. Surface hardening of steels by alloying under laser heating with subsequent chemical thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of laser alloying of carbon and low-chromium steels (20, 40, 45, 20Kh and 40Kh) with nitride-forming elements (V, Cr, Mo, Al) and subsequent nitriding is under consideration as a promising technology of enhancing wear resistance of steels. It is shown that the technology proposed permits increasing microhardness, wear resistance and favourable distribution of residual stresses in surface layers

  8. Laser-Shot-Induced Chemical Reactions inside Nanotubes: a TDDFT investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2011-03-01

    We present the application of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on ultrafast laser pulse which induces dynamics in molecules encapsulated by a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond-stretch of an HCl molecule inside both C and BN nanotubes. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different. We also observed a radial motion of the nanotube and vacancies appear on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to tube axis. Furthermore, the disintegration of HCl molecules took place when their molecular axis tilted to tube axis. These simulations are important to analyze light-induced nanochemistry and manipulation of nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes. The computational scheme used in present work was a combination of the molecular dynamics and real-time propagation of electron wave functions under presence of strong optical field [2,3]. The energy conservation rule was checked to monitor the numerical stability.

  9. Fast synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by laser-induced chemical liquid deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZnO nanostructures were obtained by directly irradiating a small volume of a solution of precursor on a fused-quartz substrate using an unfocused continuous wave CO2 laser for 2-30 s at laser powers ranging from 20 to 40 W. The laser-based thermochemistry approach allows rapid non-isothermal heating and convection enhanced mass transport which opens new growth mechanisms for the rapid deposition of nanomaterials at predetermined locations on a substrate. The deposits consist of a variety of ZnO nanostructure morphologies, including aggregated nanoparticles, nanorods, faceted nanocrystals and nanowires. The samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy. They were found to exhibit an intense room-temperature photoluminescence, which is characterized by the presence of a strong UV peak around 390 nm and no visible emission. The relationship between the PL signal characteristics and specific ZnO nanostructures was investigated in order to point up optimal nanostructures for possible luminescent devices

  10. Laser-induced thermotherapy of benign and malignant tumors controlled by color-coded duplex sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Carsten M.; Rohde, Ewa; Waldschmidt, Juergen; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1994-12-01

    Since 1984 we use the interstitial application of laser induced thermotherapy (LITT) for the treatment of congenital vascular disorders (CVD) such as hemangiomas and vascular malformations. In most of the procedures a 600 micron core bare fiber is used to deliver the radiation of a cw Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm into the diseased tissue. As most of the CVD treated this way are located subcutaneously, the localization of the fiber and the interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) is controlled by transillumination and palpitation of the heat expansion of the skin surface, this way a crepitation can also be detected during the ILC. As the ILC in deeper body structures cannot be controlled directly we use color coded duplex sonography (CCDS), both for diagnostic and treatment control. In the procedures where we use the B-scan image for puncture control, a color signal is displayed representing tissue movements. These movements caused by degasification and vapor are those detectable as crepitations when using direct control. The color signal starts, changes, and moves in a reproducible pattern following the heat distribution and the subsequently occurring degasification in the tissue. Also the changes in perfusion are detectable by the means of CCDS. The precise extent of the coagulation is visible in the B-scan several minutes after laser exposure. The clinical experience and an extensive experimental evaluation has proven that CCDS is a valuable real time method to monitor the tissue reaction in ILC-procedures. For two years we have performed ILC-procedures with CCDS control in patients with CVD (n equals 65) successfully. Because of its reliable imaging and the clinical advantages recently we applied this type of ILC-control to the palliative treatment of nonresectable primary and secondary liver tumors (n equals 3) and subcutaneous metastases of mamma carcinoma. (n equals 6).

  11. Laser Control of Self-Organization Process in Microscopic Region and Fabrication of Fine Microporous Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimasa Matsumura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a controlling technique of microporous structure by laser irradiation during self-organization process. Self-organization process is fabrication method of microstructure. Polymer solution was dropped on the substrate at high humid condition. Water in air appears dropping air temperature below the dew point. The honeycomb structure with regularly aligned pores on the film was fabricated by attaching water droplets onto the solution surface. We demonstrate that it was possible to prevent forming pores at the region of laser irradiation and flat surface was fabricated. We also demonstrated that a combination structure with two pore sizes and flat surface was produced by a single laser-pulse irradiation. Our method is a unique microfabrication processing technique that combines the advantages of bottom-up and top-down techniques. This method is a promising technique that can be applied to produce for photonic crystals, biological cell culturing, surface science and electronics fields, and so forth.

  12. Production of Transverse Controllable Laser Density Distribution in Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jianliang; Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector laboratory consist of a photoemission electron source based on an L band rf-gun. The CsTe photocathode is illuminated by an ultrashort UV laser. The transport line from the laser to the photocathode was recently upgraded to allow imaging of an object plane located ~20 m from the photocathode. This upgrade allows the generation of transverse laser distributions with controlled nonuniformity, yielding the production of an electron beam with various transverse densities patterns. Measuring the evolution of the artificial pattern on the electron bunch provides information that can be used to benchmark numerical simulations and investigate the impact of space charge. Preliminary data on these investigations are presented in the present paper.

  13. Fractional Nonablative 1540 nm Laser Resurfacing for Thermal Burn Scars: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, M.; Moreau, K.E.R.; Beyer, D.M.;

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective: Burn scars cause permanent and disfiguring problems for many patients and limited treatments are available. Nonablative fractional lasers induce a wound healing response, which may lead to remodeling of burn sear texture. This randomized trial evaluates efficacy...... and adverse effects of 1540 nm fractional laser versus untreated control for burn scars. Materials and Methods: Seventeen adult patients with burn scars of 1 year or older and Fitzpatrick skin types I-III were included in the study. Side-by-side test areas were randomized to (i) three monthly 1540 nm.......0015; 12 weeks: 4 (2-5), P = 0.0007). Patients were satisfied with treatments (week 12: 7 (4-8.5)) and 8/17 patients evaluated burn scars to be moderately or significantly improved. Skin redness increased transiently from laser treatments. No significant differences were found in skin pigmentation...

  14. Control and analysis software for a laser scanning microdensitometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H R Bundel; C P Navathe; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2006-02-01

    A PC-based control software and data acquisition system is developed for an existing commercial microdensitometer (Biomed make model No. SL-2D/1D UV/VIS) to facilitate scanning and analysis of X-ray films. The software is developed in Labview, which includes operation of the microdensitometer in 1D and 2D scans and analysis of spatial or spectral data on X-ray films, such as optical density, intensity and wavelength. It provides a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) to analyse the scanned data and also store the analysed data/image in popular formats like data in Excel and images in jpeg. It has also on-line calibration facility with standard optical density tablets. The control software and data acquisition system is simple, inexpensive and versatile.

  15. Controlling Properties and Cytotoxicity of Chitosan Nanocapsules by Chemical Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteis, Laura; Alleva, Maria; Serrano-Sevilla, Inés; García-Embid, Sonia; Stepien, Grazyna; Moros, María; de la Fuente, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    The tunability of the properties of chitosan-based carriers opens new ways for the application of drugs with low water-stability or high adverse effects. In this work, the combination of a nanoemulsion with a chitosan hydrogel coating and the following poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafting is proven to be a promising strategy to obtain a flexible and versatile nanocarrier with an improved stability. Thanks to chitosan amino groups, a new easy and reproducible method to obtain nanocapsule grafting with PEG has been developed in this work, allowing a very good control and tunability of the properties of nanocapsule surface. Two different PEG densities of coverage are studied and the nanocapsule systems obtained are characterized at all steps of the optimization in terms of diameter, Z potential and surface charge (amino group analysis). Results obtained are compatible with a conformation of PEG molecules laying adsorbed on nanoparticle surface after covalent linking through their amino terminal moiety. An improvement in nanocapsule stability in physiological medium is observed with the highest PEG coverage density obtained. Cytotoxicity tests also demonstrate that grafting with PEG is an effective strategy to modulate the cytotoxicity of developed nanocapsules. Such results indicate the suitability of chitosan as protective coating for future studies oriented toward drug delivery. PMID:27706041

  16. Laser acupuncture in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Guerra; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; De Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz

    2013-11-01

    A prospective, double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial was conducted in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) to check the analgesic efficacy of infrared low-power GaAlAs diode laser applied to acupuncture points. Forty female subjects, ranging in age from 20 to 40 years, with diagnoses of chronic myofascial pain and arthralgia were randomly allocated to two groups: an experimental group (EG) who received the laser acupuncture as adjunct to reversible occlusal splint therapy and a control group (CG) who received a placebo laser associated with occlusal splint therapy. Both approaches were applied once a week for 3 months. Laser acupuncture was defined by the following parameters: 50-mW continuous radiation for 90 s to acupoints ST6, SI19, GB20, GB43, LI4, LR3, NT3, and EX-HN3; defining 4.5-J energy; 1250-W/cm(2) density point; and 112.5-J/cm(2) total density. The outcome measurements included a symptom evolution assessment carried out by checking spontaneous and palpation pain intensity, which was indicated on a visual analog scale (VAS). All evaluations were made by an assessor who was blind to the treatment. The symptom reduction was significant in both groups (EG: VAS = 0, n = 20; CG: VAS between 2 and 4, n = 18). The measurements showed significantly faster and lower pain intensity values in the EG (p ≤ 0.002), where there was a higher proportion of patients with remission of symptoms related to the action of laser acupuncture. For patients in whom conservative treatment was adopted, the laser acupuncture is a secure, noninvasive, and effective treatment modality because it improves the chronic pain associated with TMD and has no side effects. PMID:23380907

  17. Laser-subcycle control of sequential double-ionization dynamics of helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffler, Markus S.; Xie, Xinhua; Wustelt, Philipp; Möller, Max; Roither, Stefan; Kartashov, Daniil; Sayler, A. Max; Baltuska, Andrius; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Kitzler, Markus

    2016-06-01

    We present measured momentum distributions on the double ionization of helium with intense, near-circularly-polarized few-cycle laser pulses with a known carrier-envelope offset phase (CEP). The capability of obtaining CEP-resolved momentum distributions enables us to observe signatures of the various combinations of laser-half-cycle two-electron emissions. By comparison to semiclassical trajectory simulations, we succeed in assigning the corresponding structures in the measured distributions to certain two-electron emission dynamics. Based on this possibility, we demonstrate that the sequential double-ionization dynamics can be sensitively controlled with the pulse duration and the laser peak intensity. For the shortest pulse durations and not too high intensities we find that the two electrons are dominantly emitted with a delay of roughly a laser half cycle. For a just slightly increased intensity we find evidence that at least one of the two electrons is surprisingly likely emitted in between the peaks of the laser field oscillations rather than at the field maxima. The simulations reproduce the signatures of these kinds of two-electron emissions overall relatively well.

  18. A novel laser-based method for controlled crystallization in dental prosthesis materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Peter; Neuenschwander, Beat; Schwaller, Patrick; Köhli, Benjamin; Lüscher, Beat; Senn, Florian; Kounga, Alain; Appert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramic materials are increasingly becoming the material of choice in the field of dental prosthetics, as they can feature both high strength and very good aesthetics. It is believed that their color, microstructure and mechanical properties can be tuned such as to achieve an optimal lifelike performance. In order to reach that ultimate perfection a controlled arrangement of amorphous and crystalline phases in the material is required. A phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline is achieved by a heat treatment at defined temperature levels. The traditional approach is to perform the heat treatment in a furnace. This, however, only allows a homogeneous degree of crystallization over the whole volume of the parent glass material. Here a novel approach using a local heat treatment by laser irradiation is presented. To investigate the potential of this approach the crystallization process of SiO2-Li2O-Al2O3-based glass has been studied with laser systems (pulsed and continuous wave) operating at different wavelengths. Our results show the feasibility of gradual and partial crystallization of the base material using continuous laser irradiation. A dental prosthesis machined from an amorphous glassy state can be effectively treated with laser irradiation and crystallized within a confined region of a few millimeters starting from the body surface. Very good aesthetics have been achieved. Preliminary investigation with pulsed nanosecond lasers of a few hundreds nanoseconds pulse width has enabled more refinement of crystallization and possibility to place start of phase change within the material bulk.

  19. Depth-resolved chemical mapping of rock coatings using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Implications for geochemical investigations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, C.; Catalá-Espí, A.; Sobron, P.; Koujelev, A.; Léveillé, R.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is capable of identifying the presence of natural rock coatings, and we define LIBS signatures of complex multi-layered coatings. This is illustrated by detailed LIBS analysis, in Mars-simulated conditions, of a rock collected in the Svalbard Islands, and which is analogous to some altered Martian rocks. The sample is a basaltic rock with sub-mm Ca-Mg-Fe-Si rich mineral coatings. LIBS elemental analysis of several distinct regions on the surface of the rock demonstrates the variability of chemical compositions of the various coatings, which is confirmed by complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Furthermore, the LIBS analysis as a function of the depth at different locations shows chemical variability, indicative of penetration through thin coatings of varying composition. Fine-scale, three-dimensional LIBS analysis is of interest for identifying and characterizing coatings on martian rocks, likely originating from aqueous processes, providing a rapid chemical composition as a function of the layers and further understanding of the formation of the deposits and on planetary evolution.

  20. Evaluation of Chemical Control of Botrytis Cinerea in Relation to Covering Red Current Shrubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Creemers

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Covering red currant during the development of the fruits guarantees high quality fruits and delays picking time. Because of these reasons, the number of fruit growers using cover production system is increasing. Covering red currant affects fungicide action and efficacy. Furthermore the climate conditions are altered in the shrub resulting in a different infection risk/pressure for certain fungal diseases. The effect of the timing of covering on the control of Botrytis cinerea which is the cause of the mayor fruit rot disease of red currants was studied. The results from the trials clearly show the positive effect of covering during bloom on the chemical control of Botrytis on red currant. The chemical control of plants during bloom which were covered from bloom equals that of a full season chemical control of uncovered plants or plants covered after fruit set. The full season chemical control of plants covered from bloom was only statistically better then all other objects tested in one of the two trials. Covering alone without chemical control had only a limited effect.

  1. Evaluation of Chemical Control of Botrytis Cinerea in Relation to Covering Red Current Shrubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Creemers

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Covering red currant during the development of the fruits guarantees high quality fruits and delays picking time. Because of these reasons, the number of fruit growers using cover production system is increasing. Covering red currant affects fungicide action and efficacy. Furthermore the climate conditions are altered in the shrub resulting in a different infection risk/pressure for certain fungal diseases. The effect of the timing of covering on the control of Botrytis cinerea which is the cause of the mayor fruit rot disease of red currants was studied. The results from the trials clearly show the positive effect of covering during bloom on the chemical control of Botrytis on red currant. The chemical control of plants during bloom which were covered from bloom equals that of a full season chemical control of uncovered plants or plants covered after fruit set. The full season chemical control of plants covered from bloom was only statistically better then all other objects tested in one of the two trials. Covering alone without chemical control had only a limited effect.

  2. Chemical precipitation for controlling nitrogen loss during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li-Mei; Li, Guo-Xue; Shen, Yun-Jun; Schuchardt, Frank; Lu Peng

    2010-05-01

    Aimed at controlling the nitrogen loss during composting, the mixture of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)( 2)) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) (molar ratio 1:2) were utilized as additives to avoid increasing total salinity. In trial TA, the additives were put into absorption bottles connecting with a gas outlet of fermentor (ex situ method); in trial TB, the additives were directly added to the composting materials (in situ method). During the 26 day composting period, the temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP) and germination index (GI) were measured. The experimental results show that the additives reduced the pH, while NH( 4)(+)-N and TN were obviously improved. NH(4)( +)-N was 11.9 g kg(-1) and 3 g kg(- 1) in amended compost trial (TB) and unamended compost trial (TA), respectively; TN increased from 26.5 g kg(-1) to 40.3 g kg(-1) in TB and increased from 26.5 g kg( -1) to 26.8 g kg(-1) in TA. Analysis of the TOC and carbon mass revealed that absorbents accelerated the degradation of organic matter. The germination index test showed the maturity of TB (102%) was better than TA (82%) in final compost. Furthermore, TP and AP were also obviously improved. X-ray diffraction analysis of precipitation showed that the precipitation in absorption bottle of TA was newberyite (MgHPO( 4) 3H(2)O), however, the crystal in the TB compost was struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4) 6H(2)O: magnesium ammonium phosphate). These results indicated that Mg(OH)(2) and H(3)PO( 4) could reduce the ammonia emission by struvite crystallization reaction. Optimal conditions for struvite precipitation should be determined for different systems. PMID:19808738

  3. 77 FR 15234 - Controlled Substances and List I Chemical Registration and Reregistration Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... overall strengths and weaknesses in recovering the full costs of the DCP. Based on the analysis provided... Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (CSIEA) (21 U.S.C. 801-971), as amended (hereinafter, ``CSA'').\\1..., distribute, import, or export controlled substances or List I chemicals, and those persons and entities...

  4. Disruption of the endocrine control of final oocyte maturation in teleosts by xenobiotic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.

    1999-07-01

    Final oocyte maturation (FOM) in fish and other vertebrates is under precise endocrine control and involves changes in hormone secretion at all levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. Several potential sites and mechanisms of chemical disruption of the endocrine system controlling FOM by are discussed. Neurotoxic chemicals such as lead and PCBs can alter monoamine neurotransmitter function and xenoestrogens can interfere with steroid feedback mechanisms at the hypothalamus and pituitary to impair the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion. Chemicals which disrupt calcium homeostasis such as cadmium can interfere with calcium-dependent signal transduction pathway activated by reproductive hormones in the pituitary and gonads. Other xenobiotics may disrupt maturation-inducing steroid (MIS) function by impairing its synthesis or receptor binding. The problems in assessing endocrine disruption of FOM are discussed. The relatively few investigations reported in the literature on endocrine disruption of FOM in fishes by chemicals indicate that organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides at concentrations less than one ppb can impair induction of FOM in response to gonadotropin and the MIS. Moreover, evidence is presented that certain organochlorine pesticides block MIS action by binding to the MIS receptor which is localized on the oocyte plasma membrane. Steroid membrane receptor function may be particularly susceptible to interference by hydrophilic chemicals. Finally, an in vitro bioassay capable of screening many chemicals simultaneously for their ability to disrupt the endocrine control of FOM is described.

  5. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  6. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-07-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions.

  7. Chemical control over the energy-level alignment in a two-terminal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Franco, Carlos; Crivillers, Núria; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Cao, Liang; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The energy-level alignment of molecular transistors can be controlled by external gating to move molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi levels of the source and drain electrodes. Two-terminal molecular tunnelling junctions, however, lack a gate electrode and suffer from Fermi-level pinning, making it difficult to control the energy-level alignment of the system. Here we report an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude of the tunnelling current in a two-terminal junction via chemical molecular orbital control, changing chemically the molecular component between a stable radical and its non-radical form without altering the supramolecular structure of the junction. Our findings demonstrate that the energy-level alignment in self-assembled monolayer-based junctions can be regulated by purely chemical modifications, which seems an attractive alternative to control the electrical properties of two-terminal junctions. PMID:27456200

  8. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an innovative technique that has been used as a method for fast elemental analysis in real time. Conventional ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) LIBS has been applied to detect the elemental composition of different materials, including explosives, pharmaceutical drugs, and biological samples. The extension of conventional LIBS to the infrared region (˜1-12 mum) promises to provide additional information on molecular emission signatures due to rotational-vibrational transitions. In this research, a pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was focused onto several sodium compounds (NaCl, NaClO3, Na2CO3 and NaClO4) and potassium compounds (KCl, KClO3, K2CO3 and KClO4) to produce an intense plasma at the target surface. Several distinct infrared (IR) atomic emission signatures were observed from all sodium and potassium containing compounds. The atomic emission lines observed from the investigated samples matched assigned transitions of neutral sodium and potassium atoms published in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) atomic database. In addition to the intense atomic lines, the rst evidence of molecular LIBS emission structures were observed at ˜10.0 m in KClO3 and NaClO3 for the chlorate anion (ClO3 --1), at ˜6.7 to 8.0 mum in KNO3 and NaNO 3 for the nitrate anion (NO3--1 ), ˜8.0 to 10.0 mum in KClO4 and NaClO4 for perchlorate anion (ClO4--1 ), and ˜6.88 mum and 11.53 mum in Na2CO3 for the carbonate anion (CO3--1 ). The observed molecular emission showed strong correlation with the conventional Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) absorption spectra of the investigated samples. IR LIBS was also applied to determine the limit of detection (LOD) for the perchlorate anion in KClO4 using the 8.0 -11.0 mum IR-LIBS emission band. The calibration curve of ClO4 in KClO4 was constructed using peak and integrated emission intensities for known concentrations of mixed KClO4/NH4NO3 samples. The

  9. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of planetary rocks using a laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The context chemical analysis is of considerable importance in space research. High resolution in situ studies of planetary materials can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1] [2]. A highly heterogeneous sample of Allende meteorite, representative for extraterrestrial material, is investigated by LMS, a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for space research [3]. In the current setup a fs-laser ablation ion source is applied, allowing chemical analysis with lateral resolution of about 10-15 μm and sub-micrometre depth resolution [4]. The reflectron TOF mass analyser is used to measure elemental and isotopic composition of the sampled surface. The LMS instrument supports mass resolution 400 and dynamic range of 108 [5]. In the current studies with the fs-ablation ion source significant improvements in the detection efficiency of several metals e.g., Ni, Co, and non-metals e.g., Si, P, S and O, was achieved comparing to our previous setup [6]. Also the values of sensitivity coefficients for these elements are determined to be close to one, which resulted in the substantial improvements of the quantitative element analysis of the sample. Since the ablation crater depth is expected to be about 1 nm/laser shot also the possible changes of the main element or isotope distribution in depth can be analysed to assess their influence on the mineralogical analysis [7]. Several areas on an Allende sample were investigated and the chemical composition across the surface was determined from the mass spectrometric analysis. Also accurate isotope analysis could be conducted for most of main elements with sufficiently high signal to noise ratio. Correlation of elements was conducted and yielded mineralogical maps

  10. Optical methods for diagnostics and feedback control in laser-induced regeneration of spine disc and joint cartilages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Emil; Sviridov, Alexander; Omeltchenko, Alexander; Baum, Olga; Baskov, Andrey; Borchshenko, Igor; Golubev, Vladimir; Baskov, Vladimir

    2011-03-01

    In 1999 we have introduced a new approach for treatment of spine diseases based on the mechanical effect of nondestructive laser radiation on the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. Laser reconstruction of spine discs (LRD) involves puncture of the disc and non-destructive laser irradiation of the nucleus pulposus to activate reparative processes in the disc tissues. In vivo animal study has shown that LRD allows activate the growth of hyaline type cartilage in laser affected zone. The paper considers physical processes and mechanisms of laser regeneration, presents results of investigations aimed to optimize laser settings and to develop feedback control system for laser reparation in cartilages of spine and joints. The results of laser reconstruction of intervertebral discs for 510 patients have shown substantial relief of back pain for 90% of patients. Laser technology has been experimentally tested for reparation of traumatic and degenerative diseases in joint cartilage of 20 minipigs. It is shown that laser regeneration of cartilage allows feeling large (more than 5 mm) defects which usually never repair on one's own. Optical techniques have been used to promote safety and efficacy of the laser procedures.

  11. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  12. Timing control of an intense picosecond pulse laser to the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Hara, Toru; Kitamura, Hideo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a control system to synchronize intense picosecond laser pulses to the hard x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) pulses of SPring-8. A regeneratively amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is synchronized to 40 ps SR pulses by locking the laser to the radio frequency of the ring. The synchronization of the pulses is monitored by detecting both beams simultaneously on a gold photocathode of a streak camera. This method enabled us to make a precise measurement of the time interval between the beams, even if the trigger of the streak camera drifts. Synchronization between the laser and the SR pulses has been achieved with a precision of ±2 ps for some hours. The stable timing control ensures the possibility of making two-photon excitation and pump-probe experiments with time resolution of a few tens of ps (limited by the pulse duration of the SR). We have used this system to show that closing undulator gaps in the storage ring shifts the arrival time of the SR pulses, in accord with expectations for the increased power loss.

  13. Carrier Envelope Phase Controlled High-Order Harmonic Generation in Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bing-Bing; CHEN Jing; LIU Jie; LI Xiao-Feng; FU Pan-Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the carrier envelope phase (CEP) effects on high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in ultrashort pulses with the pulse duration 2.5fs when the laser intensity is high enough so that the initial state is ionized effectively during the laser pulse but remains about 20% population at the end of the laser pulse. We find that the ionization process of the initial state is very sensitive to the CEP during the laser pulse. The ionization process of the initial state determines the continuum state population and hence influences dramatically the weights of the classical trajectories that contribute to HHG. In such a case we can not predict the cutoff and the structure of the harmonic spectrum only by the number and the kinetic energy of the classical trajectories. The harmonic spectrum exhibits abundant characters for different CEP cases. As a result, we can control the cutoff frequency and the plateau structure of the harmonic spectrum with CEP by controlling the time behaviour of the ionization of the initial state.

  14. Flavin mononucleotide biomolecular laser: longitudinal mode structure, polarization, and temporal characteristics as probes of local chemical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José A; Eden, J Gary

    2016-05-16

    A detailed characterization of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) biomolecular laser, optically pumped in a stable resonator, is reported here. Photoexcitation of the molecule at 355 nm results in lasing over the ~566.5-573.5 nm spectral region, and the threshold pump energy density is measured to be 110 ± 10 µJ/mm2 for a 10 mM FMN/water solution. Over twenty longitudinal modes are observed when the cavity length L and the energy pump fluence Ep are 375 µm and 300 µJ/mm2, respectively. Partial substitution of glycerol for water as the solvent results in a factor of four reduction in the threshold pump energy fluence (to 2) and a quadrupling of the slope efficiency. This effect is attributed to the O2 - mediated photoconversion of FMN molecules in the triplet state to the singlet species. For pump intensities a factor of 2.5 above threshold, the laser pulse width is ~2 ns FWHM, and the output intensity decays exponentially with a photon lifetime of 1.7 ns. The addition of glycerol to a FMN/water solution also suppresses s-polarized emission (yielding P = 0.78 ± 0.08), presumably as a result of the inhibition of FMN rotational diffusion. The sensitivity of the spectral and optical properties of this and other biomolecular lasers to the chemical environment underscores the value of coherent emission as a biochemical or biomedical diagnostic tool, particularly insofar as molecule-molecule interactions are concerned. PMID:27409906

  15. Controlled manufacturing of nanoparticles by the laser pyrolysis: Application to cementite iron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser pyrolysis is an attractive technique for the synthesis of different nanostructures from gas-phase precursors. The characteristics of this synthesized method are here exemplified by the production of almost pure cementite Fe3C nanomaterials, obtained by the pyrolysis of methyl methacrylate and iron pentacarbonyl (vapors). Those nanopowders exhibited core (Fe3C)-shell (MMA polymer-based) morphologies and mean particle diameters of about 8-9 nm. Preliminary magnetic measurements indicate rather high values for the saturation magnetization. By irradiating the same reactive mixture with a lower intensity radiation, the chemical content of nanopowders shifts towards mixtures of iron and maghemite/magnetite iron oxides.

  16. Pulse Operation of Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser by Pulsed Gas Discharge with the Assistance of Spark Pre-ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-Fu; YU Hai-Jun; DUO Li-Ping; JIN Yu-Qi; WANG Jian; SANG Feng-Ting; FANG Ben-Jie; WANG De-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    The continuous wavelength chemical oxygen-iodine laser can be turned into pulse operation mode in order to obtain high energy and high pulse power. We propose an approach to produce iodine atoms instantaneously by pulsed gas discharge with the assistance of spark pre-ionization to achieve the pulsed goal. The influence of spark pre-ionization on discharge homogeneity is discussed. Voltage-current characteristics are shown and discussed in existence of the pre-ionization capacitor and peaking capacitor. The spark pre-ionization and peaking capacitor are very helpful in obtaining a stable and homogeneous discharge. The lasing is achieved at the total pressure of 2.2-2.9 kPa and single pulse energy is up to 180m J, the corresponding specific output energy is 1.0 J/L.

  17. Physico-chemical studies of laser-induced plasmas for quantitative analysis of materials in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a multi-elemental analysis technique very well suited for analysis in hostile environments particularly in the nuclear industry. Quantitative measurements are frequently performed on liquid or solid samples but in some cases, atypical signal behaviors were observed in the LIBS experiment. To avoid or minimize any impact on measurement accuracy, it is necessary to improve the understanding of these phenomena. In the framework of a three-year PhD thesis, the objective was to study the chemical reactions occurring within laser-generated plasma in a LIBS analysis. Experiments on a model material (pure aluminum sample) highlighted the dynamics of molecular recombination according to different ambient gas. The temporal evolution of Al I atomic emission lines and molecular bands of AlO and AlN were studied. A collisional excitation effect was identified for a peculiar electronic energy level of aluminum in the case of a nitrogen atmosphere. This effect disappeared in air. The aluminum plasma was also imaged during its expansion under the different atmospheres in order to localize the areas in which the molecular recombination process takes place. Spectacular particle projections have been highlighted. (author)

  18. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of laser diode facets on nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzky, L. Y.; Becerra, D. L.; Saud Abbas, A.; Nedy, J.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Cohen, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a vertical (beam etching (CAIBE) in Cl2 chemistry that is suitable for forming laser diode (LD) facets on nonpolar and semipolar oriented III-nitride devices. The etch profiles were achieved with photoresist masks and optimized CAIBE chamber conditions including the platen tilt angle and Cl2 flow rate. Co-loaded studies showed similar etch rates of ˜60 nm min-1 for (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}),(20\\bar{2}1), and m-plane orientations. The etched surfaces of LD facets on these orientations are chemically dissimilar (Ga-rich versus N-rich), but were visually indistinguishable, thus confirming the negligible orientation dependence of the etch. Continuous-wave blue LDs were fabricated on the semipolar (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) plane to compare CAIBE and reactive ion etch (RIE) facet processes. The CAIBE process resulted in LDs with lower threshold current densities due to reduced parasitic mirror loss compared with the RIE process. The LER, degree of verticality, and model of the 1D vertical laser mode were used to calculate a maximum uncoated facet reflection of 17% (94% of the nominal) for the CAIBE facet. The results demonstrate the suitability of CAIBE for forming high quality facets for high performance nonpolar and semipolar III-N LDs.

  19. Pulsed Chemical Oxygen Iodine Lasers Excited by Pulse Gas Discharge with the Assistance of Surface Sliding Discharge Pre-ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous-wave chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) can be operated in a pulsed operation mode to obtain a higher peak power. The key point is to obtain a uniform and stable glow discharge in the mixture of singlet delta oxygen and iodide. We propose using an electrode system with the assistance of surface sliding pre-ionization to solve the problem of the stable glow discharge with a large aperture. The pre-ionization unit is symmetrically fixed on the plane of the cathode surface. A uniform and stable glow discharge is obtained in a mixture of iodide (such as CH3I) and nitrogen at the specific deposition energy of 4.5 J/L, pressure of 1.99–3.32 kPa, aperture size of 11 cm × 10 cm. The electrode system is applied in a pulsed COIL. Laser energy up to 4.4 J is obtained and the specific energy output is 2 J/L. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  20. Development of a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for in situ multi-element chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Blair; Takahashi, Tomoko; Sato, Takumi; Sakka, Tetsuo; Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ohki, Toshihiko; Ohki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is emerging as a technique that can expand the envelope of modern oceanographic sensors. The selectivity of spectroscopic techniques enables a single instrument to measure multiple components of the marine environment and can form the basis for versatile tools to perform in situ geochemical analysis. We have developed a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (ChemiCam) and successfully deployed the instrument from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to perform in situ multi-element analysis of both seawater and mineral deposits at depths of over 1000 m. The instrument consists of a long-nanosecond duration pulse-laser, a spectrometer and a high-speed camera. Power supply, instrument control and signal telemetry are provided through a ROV tether. The instrument has two modes of operation. In the first mode, the laser is focused directly into seawater and spectroscopic measurements of seawater composition are performed. In the second mode, a fiber-optic cable assembly is used to make spectroscopic measurements of mineral deposits. In this mode the laser is fired through a 4 m long fiber-optic cable and is focused onto the target's surface using an optical head and a linear stage that can be held by a ROV manipulator. In this paper, we describe the instrument and the methods developed to process its measurements. Exemplary measurements of both seawater and mineral deposits made during deployments of the device at an active hydrothermal vent field in the Okinawa trough are presented. Through integration with platforms such as underwater vehicles, drilling systems and subsea observatories, it is hoped that this technology can contribute to more efficient scientific surveys of the deep-sea environment.