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Sample records for chemical concentration

  1. Experimental study of chemical concentration variation of ASP flooding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JiaLu; YUAN ShiYi; SHI FaShun; JIA Xu

    2009-01-01

    A physical modeling system of long slim tube was established. Several pressure measuring and sampling points were laid out at different positions along the tube. Through real-time measurements of pressures and chemical concentrations at different points, the mass transfer and chemical concentration of ASP flooding in porous media are studied. The concentration of chemicals declines gradually during the fluid flow from the inlet to the outlet of the model. The concentration increases in the front edge of the slug faster than the concentration decreases in the rear edge of the slug. The concentration variation of the chemicals is an asymmetrical and offset process. The order of motion velocities of the chemicals from fast to slow is polymer, alkali and surfactant. The motion lag and comprehensive diffusion are strong in the vicinity of the inlet, the motion velocities of the chemicals are high, the difference of flow velocities among the three chemicals is significant and the chromatographic separation of the chemicals is obvious. In the area near the outlet, the comprehensive diffusion and motion lag become weak, the concentrations of the chemicals decrease, the motion velocities of the chemicals are slow,the difference among the motion velocities of the chemicals becomes small, the chromatographic separation is not obvious, the adsorption and retention of chemicals gradually increase as the chemical slug moves further along the tube, the adsorption and retention of polymer is the most serious.

  2. Experimental study of chemical concentration variation of ASP flooding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A physical modeling system of long slim tube was established. Several pressure measuring and sampling points were laid out at different positions along the tube. Through real-time measurements of pressures and chemical concentrations at different points, the mass transfer and chemical concentration of ASP flooding in porous media are studied. The concentration of chemicals declines gradually during the fluid flow from the inlet to the outlet of the model. The concentration increases in the front edge of the slug faster than the concentration decreases in the rear edge of the slug. The concentration variation of the chemicals is an asymmetrical and offset process. The order of motion velocities of the chemicals from fast to slow is polymer, alkali and surfactant. The motion lag and comprehensive diffusion are strong in the vicinity of the inlet, the motion velocities of the chemicals are high, the difference of flow velocities among the three chemicals is significant and the chromatographic separation of the chemicals is obvious. In the area near the outlet, the comprehensive diffusion and motion lag become weak, the concentrations of the chemicals decrease, the motion velocities of the chemicals are slow, the difference among the motion velocities of the chemicals becomes small, the chromatographic separation is not obvious, the adsorption and retention of chemicals gradually increase as the chemical slug moves further along the tube, the adsorption and retention of polymer is the most serious.

  3. Chemical reactions driven by concentrated solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Moshe

    Solar energy can be used for driving endothermic reactions, either photochemically or thermally. The fraction of the solar spectrum that can be photochemically active is quite small. Therefore, it is desirable to be able to combine photochemical and thermal processes in order to increase the overall efficiency. Two thermally driven reactions are being studied: oil shale gasification and methane reforming. In both cases, the major part of the work was done in opaque metal reactors where photochemical reactions cannot take place. We then proceeded working in transparent quartz reactors. The results are preliminary, but they seem to indicate that there may be some photochemical enhancement. The experimental solar facilities used for this work include the 30 kW Schaeffer Solar Furnace and the 3 MW Solar Central Receiver in operation at the Weizmann Institute. The furnace consists of a 96 sq. m flat heliostat, that follows the sun by computer control. It reflects the solar radiation onto a spherical concentrator, 7.3 m in diameter, with a rim angle of 65 degrees. The furnace was characterized by radiometric and calorimetric measurements to show a solar concentration ratio of over 10,000 suns. The central receiver consists of 64 concave heliostats, 54 sq. m each, arranged in a north field and facing a 52 m high tower. The tower has five target levels that can be used simultaneously. The experiments with the shale gasification were carried out at the lowest level, 20 m above ground, which has the lowest solar efficiency and is assigned for low power experiments. We used secondary concentrators to boost the solar flux.

  4. Ceria concentration effect on chemical mechanical polishing of optical glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was found material removal rate (MRR) sharply increased from 250 to 675 nm/min as the concentration decreased from 1 to 0.25 wt% in optical glass chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) using ceria slurries. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to characterize the ceria abrasive used in the slurry. Atomic force microscopy results showed good surface had been got after CMP. Schematic diagrams of the CMP process were shown. Furthermore, the absorption spectra indicated a sudden change from Ce4+ to Ce3+ of the ceria surface when the concentration decreased, which revealed a quantum origin of the phenomenon

  5. Interactions between concentrations of chemical elements in human femoral heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodziak-Dopierala, Barbara; Kwapulinski, Jerzy; Kusz, Damian; Gajda, Zbigniew; Sobczyk, Krzysztof

    2009-07-01

    Environmental and occupational exposure to various metals has been a major public health concern and the subject of many studies. With the development of industry and transportation, environmental pollution has markedly worsened. As a result, metals are now ubiquitous and are absorbed into the body with food, drinking water, and polluted air. Exposure to these elements leads to numerous health problems, affecting almost every system of the human body, including the skeletal system. Bone is a specific research material that is difficult to obtain, therefore chemical analyses of metal concentrations in this tissue are rarely found in the literature. Nevertheless, bone, due to its long regeneration period, can serve as a biomarker of a long-term metal accumulation resulting from environmental or occupational exposure. Our study was conducted on bone samples harvested from inhabitants of the Upper Silesia region during hip replacement surgery. Femoral heads removed during surgery were sectioned into slices and further subdivided into samples comprising articular cartilage, cortical bone, and trabecular bone. Concentrations of 12 trace elements were measured with an atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. We found significant correlation between concentrations of these metal elements in the samples of cortical bone. This is determined not only by the physiological functions of these metals in hydroxyapatite, but also by the specific mineral structure of the bone tissue. PMID:18776997

  6. Biodegradation of organic chemicals at environmentally relevant concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the estuary of the river Elbe as well as in the North and Baltic Sea, the mineralization of some chemicals in low concentrations by natural microbial communities in water and sediment samples was studied. The following substances were examined: 4-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, phenol, diethylene glycole (DEG), ethylendiamine-tetraacetate (EDTA), thiourea (THIO), 4-chloraniline, 4-naphthalene-1,5-disulfonic acid (NDSS), 2,4,6-trichlorphenol (TCP) and tetrapropylenebenzenesulfonic acid (TPBS). The three first phenolic substances can be biodegraded relatively easy in eutrophicated or already chemically polluted aquatic habitats. In marine habitats there was either no degradation of these substances of it was slow, incomplete or an acclimation period was observed. DEG, THIO and chloraniline often showed longer turnover times at different stations than the phenols. The biodegradability of these substances differed strongly between habitats. EDTA was not mineralized for more than 20%. NDSS, TCP and TPBS were not degraded by natural microbial communities. (orig.). 86 refs., 14 tabs., 38 figs

  7. AMPHOTERIC COLLOIDS : I. CHEMICAL INFLUENCE OF THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, J

    1918-09-20

    1. It has been shown in this paper that while non-ionized gelatin may exist in gelatin solutions on both sides of the isoelectric point (which lies for gelatin at a hydrogen ion concentration of C(H) = 2.10(-5) or pH = 4.7), gelatin, when it ionizes, can only exist as an anion on the less acid side of its isoelectric point (pH > 4.7), as a cation only on the more acid side of its isoelectric point (pH writer's previous papers. 4. The reason for this influence of the hydrogen ion concentration on the stability of the two forms of ionization possible for an amphoteric electrolyte is at present unknown. We might think of the possibility of changes in the configuration or constitution of the gelatin molecule whereby ionized gelatin can exist only as an anion on the alkaline side and as a cation on the acid side of its isoelectric point. 5. The literature of colloid chemistry contains numerous statements which if true would mean that the anions of neutral salts act on gelatin on the alkaline side of the isoelectric point, e.g. the alleged effect of the Hofmeister series of anions on the swelling and osmotic pressure of common gelatin in neutral solutions, and the statement that both ions of a neutral salt influence a protein simultaneously. The writer has shown in previous publications that these statements are contrary to fact and based on erroneous methods of work. Our present paper shows that these claims of colloid chemists are also theoretically impossible. 6. In addition to other physical properties the conductivity of gelatin previously treated with acids has been investigated and plotted, and it was found that this conductivity is a minimum in the region of the isoelectric point, thus confirming the conclusion that gelatin can apparently not exist in ionized condition at that point. The conductivity rises on either side of the isoelectric point, but not symmetrically for reasons given in the paper. It is shown that the curves for osmotic pressure, viscosity

  8. GEOSTATISTICAL INTERPOLATION OF CHEMICAL CONCENTRATION. (R825689C037)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractMeasurements of contaminant concentration at a hazardous waste site typically vary over many orders of magnitude and have highly skewed distributions. This work presents a practical methodology for the estimation of solute concentration contour maps and volume...

  9. Conversion of the chemical concentration of odorous mixtures into odour concentration and odour intensity: a comparison of methods

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, C; Zhao, P; Piringer, M; Schauberger, G

    2015-01-01

    Continuous odour measurements both of emissions as well as ambient concentrations are seldom realised, mainly because of their high costs. They are therefore often substituted by concentration measurements of odorous substances. Then a conversion of the chemical concentrations C (mg m-3) into odour concentrations COD (ouE m-3) and odour intensities OI is necessary. Four methods to convert the concentrations of single substances to the odour concentrations and odour intensities of an odorous mixture are investigated: (1) direct use of measured concentrations, (2) the sum of the odour activity value SOAV, (3) the sum of the odour intensities SOI, and (4) the equivalent odour concentration EOC, as a new method. The methods are evaluated with olfactometric measurements of seven substances as well as their mixtures. The results indicate that the SOI and EOC conversion methods deliver reliable values. These methods use not only the odour threshold concentration but also the slope of the Weber-Fechner law to include...

  10. Concentration of 'forgotten' substances using the XAD concentration method. Suitability of the method for hydrophilic chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collombon MT; LER

    2007-01-01

    Concentration of forgotten substances using the XAD concentration method In the nineties, RIVM developed a method to concentrate toxic substances on XAD (a synthetic resin). Using bioassays, the toxicity can be determined in the concentrate. 'Modern' toxic substances tend to be more polar then 'clas

  11. 76 FR 41365 - Impact of Reducing the Mixture Concentration Threshold for Commercial Schedule 2A Chemical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Regulations (CWCR) to reduce the concentration level below which the CWCR exempt certain mixtures containing a... threshold. Legislative amendment of the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (CWCIA) is required... Impact of Reducing the Mixture Concentration Threshold for Commercial Schedule 2A Chemical...

  12. Using GIS and logistic regression to estimate agricultural chemical concentrations in rivers of the midwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglin, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals (herbicides, insecticides, other pesticides and fertilizers) in surface water may constitute a human health risk. Recent research on unregulated rivers in the midwestern USA documents that elevated concentrations of herbicides occur for 1-4 months following application in spring and early summer. In contrast, nitrate concentrations in unregulated rivers are elevated during the fall, winter and spring. Natural and anthropogenic variables of river drainage basins, such as soil permeability, the amount of agricultural chemicals applied or percentage of land planted in corn, affect agricultural chemical concentrations in rivers. Logistic regression (LGR) models are used to investigate relations between various drainage basin variables and the concentration of selected agricultural chemicals in rivers. The method is successful in contributing to the understanding of agricultural chemical concentration in rivers. Overall accuracies of the best LGR models, defined as the number of correct classifications divided by the number of attempted classifications, averaged about 66%.

  13. Physico-Chemical changes in valencia orange concentrate during commercial scale vacuum concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pruthi

    1959-01-01

    Full Text Available "Changes in the refractometric solids (Brix, viscosity, spectral reflectance (color, pH, acidity, Brix/acid ratio, color, true ascorbic acid and carotene during commercial scale vacuum concentration of Valencia orange juice in a forced circulation, single-pass, falling-film Evaporator have been reported. With the advancing concentration, there was a gradual increase in Brix, acidity, viscosity, color, ascorbic acid and carotene, no change in Brix/acid ratio but a slight fall in pH. Upto 4-fold concentration of the Juice, the increase in viscosity was comparatively slight, but after 5-fold concentration, there was a steep rise in viscosity. There were negligible losses in carotene while the losses in true ascorbic acid were well within 5% during concentration up to 63Degree Brix. Use of mid-season, healthy ripe oranges for juice extraction and concentration of the flash-heated juice (195Degree-200DegreeF for 10-12 seconds upto 5-fold concentration are suggested."

  14. Radiocarbon from Pile Graphite; Chemical Methods for Its Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. R.; Libby, W. F.

    1946-10-10

    Samples of pile graphite, irradiated in a test-hole at Hanford for 15 months, have been assayed for radioactive C{sup 14} yielding 0.38 ± 0.04 microcuries per gram. At this level of activity, the pile graphite contains very valuable amounts of C{sup14}. The relation between the above assay and the probable average assay of pile graphite is discussed, and it is concluded that the latter is almost certainly above 0.3 microcuries/gram. Controlled oxidation of this graphite, either with oxygen at ~750ºC, or with chromic acid "cleaning solution" at room temperature, yields early fractions which are highly enriched in C{sup 14}. Concentrations of 5-fold with oxygen, and 50-fold with CrO{sub 3}, have been observed. The relation between the observed enrichment and the Wigner effect is discussed, and a mechanism accounting for the observations put forward. According to this, about 25% of the stable carbon atoms in the lattice have been displaced by Wigner effect, a large fraction of which have healed by migrating to crystal edges. All the C{sup 14} atoms have been displaced, and the same fraction of these migrate to the edges. The enrichment then results from surface oxidation, in the oxygen case. Predictions are made on the basis of this hypothesis. A technique of counting radioactive CO{sub 2} in the gas phase is described.

  15. Conversion of the chemical concentration of odorous mixtures into odour concentration and odour intensity: A comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Zhao, Peng; Piringer, Martin; Schauberger, Günther

    2016-02-01

    Continuous odour measurements both of emissions as well as ambient concentrations are seldom realised, mainly because of their high costs. They are therefore often substituted by concentration measurements of odorous substances. Then a conversion of the chemical concentrations C (mg m-3) into odour concentrations COD (ouE m-3) and odour intensities OI is necessary. Four methods to convert the concentrations of single substances to the odour concentrations and odour intensities of an odorous mixture are investigated: (1) direct use of measured concentrations, (2) the sum of the odour activity value SOAV, (3) the sum of the odour intensities SOI, and (4) the equivalent odour concentration EOC, as a new method. The methods are evaluated with olfactometric measurements of seven substances as well as their mixtures. The results indicate that the SOI and EOC conversion methods deliver reliable values. These methods use not only the odour threshold concentration but also the slope of the Weber-Fechner law to include the sensitivity of the odour perception of the individual substances. They fulfil the criteria of an objective conversion without the need of a further calibration by additional olfactometric measurements.

  16. Determination of solute organic concentration in contaminated soils using a chemical-equilibrium soil column system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Jesper; Kjeldsen, Peter; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    determination of solute concentration in a contaminated soil were developed; (1) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Volatile organic chemicals (ER-V) and (2) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Hydrophobic organic chemicals (ER-H). The two test systems were evaluated...... 80) an unacceptable recovery was found (9%). The contact time needed for obtaining chemical equilibrium was tested in the ER-H system by performing five test with different duration (1, 2, 4, 7 and 19 days) using the low organic carbon soil. Seven days of contact time appeared sufficient for......Groundwater risk assessment of contaminated soils implies determination of the solute concentration leaching out of the soil. Determination based on estimation techniques or simple experimental batch approach has proven inadequate. Two chemical equilibrium soil column leaching tests for...

  17. [Investigation of stages of chemical leaching and biooxidation during the extraction of gold from sulfide concentrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murav'ev, M I; Fomchenko, N V; Kondrat'eva, T V

    2015-01-01

    We examined the chemical leaching and biooxidation stages in a two-stage biooxidation process of an auriferous sulfide concentrate containing pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite and pyrite. Chemical leaching of the concentrate (slurry density at 200 g/L) by ferric sulfate biosolvent (initial concentration at 35.6 g/L), which was obtained by microbial oxidation of ferrous sulfate for 2 hours at 70°C at pH 1.4, was allowed to oxidize 20.4% ofarsenopyrite and 52.1% of sulfur. The most effective biooxidation of chemically leached concentrate was observed at 45°C in the presence of yeast extract. Oxidation of the sulfide concentrate in a two-step process proceeded more efficiently than in one-step. In a two-step mode, gold extraction from the precipitate was 10% higher and the content of elemental sulfur was two times lower than in a one-step process. PMID:25842906

  18. Field data reveal low critical chemical concentrations for river benthic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Elisabeth; Haase, Peter; Oetken, Matthias; Sundermann, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    River ecosystems are of immense ecological and social importance. Despite the introduction of wastewater treatment plants and advanced chemical authorization procedures in Europe, chemical pollution is still a major threat to freshwater ecosystems. Here, large-scale monitoring data was exploited to identify taxon-specific chemical concentrations beyond which benthic invertebrate taxa are unlikely to occur using Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN). 365 invertebrate taxa and 25 organic chemicals including pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plasticisers, flame retardants, complexing agents, a surfactant and poly- and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a total of 399 sites were analysed. The number of taxa that responded to each of these chemicals varied between 0% and 21%. These sensitive taxa belonged predominantly to the groups Plecoptera, Coleoptera, Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera, Turbellaria, Megaloptera, Crustacea, and Diptera. Strong effects were observed in response to wastewater-associated compounds, confirming that wastewater is an important cause of biological degradation. The majority of change points identified for each compound were well below predicted no-effect concentrations derived from laboratory toxicity studies. Thus, the results show that chemicals are likely to induce effects in the environment at concentrations much lower than expected based on laboratory experiments. Overall, it is confirmed that chemical pollution is still an important factor shaping the distribution of invertebrate taxa, suggesting the need for continued efforts to reduce chemical loads in rivers. PMID:26706759

  19. Effective interactions between concentration fluctuations and charge transfer in chemically ordering liquid alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The correlations between long-wavelength fluctuations of concentration in a liquid binary alloy are determined by a balance between an elastic strain free energy and an Ornstein-Zernike effective interaction. The latter is extracted from thermodynamic data in the case of the Li-Pb system, which is well known to chemically order with stoichiometric composition corresponding to Li4Pb. Strong attractive interactions between concentration fluctuations near the composition of chemical ordering originate from electronic charge transfer, which is estimated from the electron-ion partial structure factors as functions of composition in the liquid alloy. (author). 20 refs, 2 figs

  20. THE SEARCH OF CHEMICAL OXIDATION STAGE OF TWO STAGE PYRITE AND COPPER CONCENTRATE BIOLEACHING TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Scornyacov, A.; Petukhova, N.; Meftakhov, R.; Zorin, V.

    2011-01-01

    The bioleaching stage of two-stage biochemical leaching technology of pyrite and copper concentrate consisted of bornite, chalcopyrite and chalcocite, by moderate thermophiles consortium was searched. It has been shown that at 45 oC the bioleaching of copper concentrate pre-treated by biogenic leaching solution seems to be near 1.7 times faster than the non-treated one. Though the similar chemical pre-treatment of pyrite doesnt show any significant increase of its bioleaching rate.

  1. Perspectives of Siberian chemical plant in increasing volumes of uranium concentrates recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarchuk, V. V.; Shikerun, T. G.; Ryabov, A. S.; Shamin, V. I.; Zhiganov, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    The purification technology of uranium concentrate of natural isotopic composition developed at Siberian chemical enterprise is basically universal, allows recycling uranium concentrates with different content of impurities and obtaining uranium nitrate solutions corresponding by quality to the international standards requirements to uranium hexafluoride preparation for isotopes ASTM C 787-03 separation and to ceramic fuel ASTM C 788-02 preparation. Uranium reserves in Russia and abroad were ...

  2. Arsenic concentrations in Baltic Sea sediments close to chemical munitions dumpsites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełdowski, Jacek; Szubska, Marta; Emelyanov, Emelyan; Garnaga, Galina; Drzewińska, Anna; Bełdowska, Magdalena; Vanninen, Paula; Östin, Anders; Fabisiak, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    In addition to natural sources and land-originated pollution, the Baltic Sea has another anthropogenic source of arsenic in bottom sediments-arsenic-based Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA). To examine the potential usage of arsenic contents results for monitoring the leakage from chemical weapons, sediment samples were collected from officially reported and potential chemical weapon dumpsites located in the Baltic Sea, and total and inorganic arsenic concentrations were analyzed. Results showed an elevated arsenic content in dumpsite areas compared to reference areas. Correlations of arsenic with other metals and organic matter were studied to elucidate any unusual behavior of arsenic in the dumpsites. In the area of the Bornholm Deep, such behavior was observed for inorganic arsenic. It appears that in close vicinity of dumped munitions, the inorganic arsenic concentration of sediments is not correlated with either organic matter content or authigenic minerals formation, as is commonly observed elsewhere. Investigations on CWA concentrations, performed within the CHEMSEA (Chemical Munition Search and Assesment) project, allowed us to compare the results of arsenic concentrations with the occurrence of arsenic-containing CWA.

  3. Relationships between boiling regimes and chemical concentration processes in tube support plate crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a test inter-relating crevice boiling regimes and chemical concentration in tube support plate crevices are presented. Testing of highly soluble, non-volatile autoclave chemistries produced characteristic crevice pH and impedance distributions during nucleate boiling, initiation of dryout, steady-state operation, and following shutdown. However, the patterns changed as a function of the solubility and volatility of the autoclave chemistry, the solute concentration, and the presence of residual solutes from previous testing. The changes were related to variations in the rates of concentrated solution formation, transport, volatilization, and precipitation. (authors)

  4. Morphological and stoichiometric study of chemical bath deposited CdS films by varying ammonia concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of ammonia concentration on stoichiometric, surface morphological, and optical properties of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films has been studied systemically. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS thin films was carried out via using cadmium acetate as the cadmium ion source, thiourea as the sulphur source and ammonia as the complexing agent. Ammonia concentration was changed from 0 to 2.5 M. At ammonia concentration greater than or equal to 0.1 M and lower than 0.6 M, nanowires or flake-like structures were obtained. At ammonia concentration ranging from 0.8 to 2.0 M, uniform, dense, and continuously coated films were obtained. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis revealed that as the ammonia concentration changed from 0.1 to 2.0 M, the Cd/S ratio in the obtained film increased from 0.24 to 2.61. Not only typical cadmium-poor but also unusual sulphur deficiency phenomena were observed for CBD CdS thin films. The films deposited with ammonia concentration of 1.0 M show the highest degree of crystallinity and closest stoichiometry Cd/S≅1, and have a preferred orientation. The direct band energy gaps of as-grown films were found to be 2.23-2.77 eV. The formation mechanism of the films with various morphologies and cadmium and sulphur deficiencies are discussed.

  5. The Polyphenols Stability, Enzyme Activity and Physico-Chemical Parameters During Producing Wild Elderberry Concentrated Juice

    OpenAIRE

    Ante Galić; Verica Dragović-uzelac; Branka Levaj; Danijela Bursać Kovačević; Stjepan Pliestić; Sabina Arnautović

    2009-01-01

    The influence of processing wild elderberry into concentrated juice on polyphenols (total phenols, flavonoids, non-flavonoids, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, hydrolysed tannins) stability, activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD), and changes of physico-chemical parameters (total and soluble dry matter, total acidity, pH, sugars) were investigated. The amounts of total phenols, flavonoids, non-flavonoids, falvan-3-ols and hydrolysed tannins were analyzed using Folin-Ciocalteu co...

  6. The Polyphenols Stability, Enzyme Activity and Physico-Chemical Parameters During Producing Wild Elderberry Concentrated Juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ante Galić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of processing wild elderberry into concentrated juice on polyphenols (total phenols, flavonoids, non-flavonoids, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, hydrolysed tannins stability, activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD, and changes of physico-chemical parameters (total and soluble dry matter, total acidity, pH, sugars were investigated. The amounts of total phenols, flavonoids, non-flavonoids, falvan-3-ols and hydrolysed tannins were analyzed using Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method, while the total anthocyanins were determined by bisulphite bleaching method. Total phenols ranged from 25.87 mg/g DM to 38.87 mg/g DM. Total anthocyanins were the most abundant polyphenols in all investigated samples (raw elderberries, elderberries after blanching, elderberry juice after disintegration and pressing, concentrated elderberry juice and their concentration ranged from 13.12 mg/g DM to 25.67 mg/g DM. Other polyphenols determined in high concentration were hydrolysed tannins, followed by fl avan-3-ols, flavonoids and nonfavonoids. After blanching, the concentration of all polyphenols did not decrease significantly. After disintegration of elderberries the concentration of all polyphenols increased, probably due to inactivation of PPO and POD and better isolation of polyphenols from homogenized puree. During processing of elderberry juice into concentrated juice most polyphenols were stable. Total acidity and pH value were not changed during processing, whereas the amounts of total and reducing sugar increased after pressing and additionally after concentration. The obtained results suggest that raw elderberries as well as elderberry concentrated juice are high potential source of polyphenols especially anthocyanins.

  7. Contact irritant responses of Aedes aegypti Using sublethal concentration and focal application of pyrethroid chemicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortance Manda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated contact irritant and spatial repellent behaviors in Aedes aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentrations of chemicals. These sublethal actions are currently being evaluated in the development of a push-pull strategy for Ae. aegypti control. This study reports on mosquito escape responses after exposure to candidate chemicals for a contact irritant focused push-pull strategy using varying concentrations and focal application. METHODS: Contact irritancy (escape behavior, knockdown and 24 hour mortality rates were quantified in populations of female Ae. aegypti under laboratory conditions and validated in the field (Thailand and Peru using experimental huts. Evaluations were conducted using varying concentrations and treatment surface area coverage (SAC of three pyrethroid insecticides: alphacypermethrin, lambacyhalothrin and deltamethrin. RESULTS: Under laboratory conditions, exposure of Ae. aegypti to alphacypermethrin using the standard field application rate (FAR resulted in escape responses at 25% and 50% SAC that were comparable with escape responses at 100% SAC. Significant escape responses were also observed at <100% SAC using ½FAR of all test compounds. In most trials, KD and 24 hour mortality rates were higher in mosquitoes that did not escape than in those that escaped. In Thailand, field validation studies indicated an early time of exit (by four hours and 40% increase in escape using ½FAR of alphacypermethrin at 75% SAC compared to a matched chemical-free control. In Peru, however, the maximum increase in Ae. aegypti escape from alphacypermethrin-treated huts was 11%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results presented here suggest a potential role for sublethal and focal application of contact irritant chemicals in an Ae. aegypti push-pull strategy to reduce human-vector contact inside treated homes. However, the impact of an increase in escape response on dengue virus transmission is

  8. Concentration of mycotoxins and chemical composition of corn silage: a farm survey using infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P; Novinski, C O; Junges, D; Almeida, R; de Souza, C M

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated the chemical composition and mycotoxin incidence in corn silage from 5 Brazilian dairy-producing regions: Castro, in central-eastern Paraná State (n=32); Toledo, in southwestern Paraná (n=20); southeastern Goiás (n=14); southern Minas Gerais (n=23); and western Santa Catarina (n=20). On each dairy farm, an infrared thermography camera was used to identify 3 sampling sites that exhibited the highest temperature, a moderate temperature, and the lowest temperature on the silo face, and 1 sample was collected from each site. The chemical composition and concentrations of mycotoxins were evaluated, including the levels of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2; zearalenone; ochratoxin A; deoxynivalenol; and fumonisins B1 and B2. The corn silage showed a highly variable chemical composition, containing, on average, 7.1±1.1%, 52.5±5.4%, and 65.2±3.6% crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and total digestible nutrients, respectively. Mycotoxins were found in more than 91% of the samples, with zearalenone being the most prevalent (72.8%). All samples from the Castro region contained zearalenone at a high average concentration (334±374µg/kg), even in well-preserved silage. The incidence of aflatoxin B1 was low (0.92%). Silage temperature and the presence of mycotoxins were not correlated; similarly, differences were not observed in the concentration or incidence of mycotoxins across silage locations with different temperatures. Infrared thermography is an accurate tool for identifying heat sites, but temperature cannot be used to predict the chemical composition or the incidence of mycotoxins that have been analyzed, within the silage. The pre-harvest phase of the ensiling process is most likely the main source of mycotoxins in silage. PMID:26162792

  9. Particulate matter concentration and chemical composition in the metro system of Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, C; Marcovecchio, F; Tofful, L; Canepari, S

    2015-06-01

    Air quality at the main station of the metro system of Rome (Termini hub) has been characterized by the point of view of particulate matter (PM) concentration and chemical composition. Indoor air in different environments (underground train platform and shopping center, metro carriages with and without air conditioning system) has been studied and compared with outdoor air at a nearby urban site. Air quality at the railway station, located outdoor at surface level, has been also considered for comparison. PM chemical characterization included ions, elemental carbon, organic carbon, macro-elements, and the bio-accessible and residual fractions of micro- and trace elements. Train platform and carriages without air conditioning resulted to be the most polluted environments, with indoor/outdoor ratio up to two orders of magnitude for many components. PM mass concentration was determined on filter membranes by the gravimetric procedure as well as from the optical particle counter (OPC) number concentration measurements. The OPC results, taken with the original calibration factor, were below 40 % of the value obtained by the gravimetric measurements. Only a chemical and morphological characterization of the collected dust could lead to a reconciliation of the results yielded by the two methods. Macro-components were used to estimate the strength of the main macro-sources. The most significant contribution is confirmed to derive from wheels, rails, and brakes abrasion; from soil re-suspension (over 50 % at the subway platform); and from organics (about 25 %). The increase in the concentration of elements was mostly due to the residual fraction, but also the bio-accessible fraction showed a remarkable enrichment, particularly in the case of Ba, Zn, Cd, and Ni. PMID:25586611

  10. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  11. New possibilities of chemical concentration in activation analysis of some noble and rare metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of concentrating Pt, Ir, Au, Ag, Re and some other elements from samples of chromites, sulfide ores, laterites, shales, titanium magnetites, and ultrabasic rocks was studied. A new simple procedure is based on sublimation of elements to be determined in air stream at 1200 deg C in the presence of some powdered reagents (e.g., TiO2, Nb2O5, Nb) to enhance the yield, and on the use of chemical filters (CaO, MgO, TiO2, Al2O3, Nb2O5) absorbing the interfering volatile elements from the gas phase. Methods of neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence isotopic excitation were used to analyze the obtained concentrates

  12. Influence of Chemical Oxygen Demand Concentrations on Anaerobi Ammonium Oxidation by Granular Sludge From EGSB Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING KANG; JIAN-LONG WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations on the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX). Methods An Expanded Granular Sludge Bed (EGSB) reactor was used to cultivate the granular sludge and to perform the ANAMMOX reaction in the bench scale experiment. NH4+-N and NO2--N were measured by usingcolorimetric method. NO3--N was analyzed by using the UV spectrophotometric method. COD measurement was based on digestion with potassium dichromate in concentrated sulphuric acid. Results When the COD concentrations in the reactors were 0 mg/L, 200 mg/L, 350 mg/L, and 550 mg/L, respectively, the NH4+-N removal efficiency was 12.5%, 14.2%, 14.3%, and 23.7%; the removal amount of NO2--N was almost the same; the nitrate removal efficiency was 16.8%, 94.5%, 86.6%, and 84.2% and TN removal efficiency was 16.3%, 50.7%, 46.9%, and 50.4%, moreover, the COD removal efficiency concentrations have a significant influence on anaerobic ammonium oxidation by granular sludge.

  13. Kinetics and Modeling of Chemical Leaching of Sphalerite Concentrate Using Ferric Iron in a Redox-controlled Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋健; 高玲; 林建群; 吴洪斌; 林建强

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study for chemical leaching of sphalerite concentrate under various constant Fe3+concentrations and redox potential conditions. The effects of Fe3+ concentration and redox potential on chemical leaching of sphalerite were investigated. The shrinking core model was applied to analyze the experimental results. It was found that both the Fe3+ concentration and the redox potential controlled the chemical leaching rate of sphalerite. A new kinetic model was developed, in which the chemical leaching rate of sphalerite was proportional to Fe3+concentration and Fe3+/Fe2+ratio. All the model parameters were evaluated from the experimental data. The model predictions fit well with the experimental observed values.

  14. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  15. Influence of Different Types and Concentrations of Chemical Catalysts on Dental Bleaching Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Guimarães, Carolina Anne; Ribeiro, Zulene Eveline Abreu; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types and concentrations of chemical catalysts on the efficiency of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on dental bleaching. Enamel-dentin disks were obtained from bovine incisors and the initial color was assessed. The groups were divided according to the type and concentration of catalyst added to an experimental gel: ferrous sulphate (FS) (0.001, 0.002 and 0.003%); ferrous gluconate (Fg) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); ferric chloride (FC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); manganese gluconate (MG) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); and manganese chloride (MC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%). The positive control (PC) group received the bleaching gel without any catalyst, while in the negative control (NC) the specimens remained in artificial saliva. Three applications of the bleaching gels were performed for 10 minutes each, repeated after 7 days. Color assessments were performed 7 days after the first session and 7 days after the second. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva and assessed again after 1 year. The data were analyzed by parametric analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Some of the chemical catalysts tested were effective in reducing the yellowish color of the samples in relation to the positive control group after 1 and 2 applications and diminished the color relapse over time. After 1 year, the FS was the most effective catalyst tested. We concluded that some chemical catalysts increased the efficiency of dental bleaching. PMID:26718298

  16. A toxicokinetic study of specifically acting and reactive organic chemicals for the prediction of internal effect concentrations in Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogs, Carolina; Kühnert, Agnes; Hug, Christine; Küster, Eberhard; Altenburger, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The toxic potency of chemicals is determined by using the internal effect concentration by accounting for differences in toxicokinetic processes and mechanisms of toxic action. The present study examines toxicokinetics of specifically acting and reactive chemicals in the green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus by using an indirect method. Concentration depletion in the exposure medium was measured for chemicals of lower (log KOW  2-naphthylamine) hydrophobicity at 7 to 8 time points over 240 min or 360 min. Uptake and overall elimination rates were estimated by fitting a toxicokinetic model to the observed concentration depletions. The equilibrium of exposure concentrations was reached within minutes to hours or was even not observed within the exposure time. The kinetics of bioconcentration cannot be explained by the chemical's hydrophobicity only, but influential factors such as ionization of chemicals, the ion trapping mechanism, or the potential susceptibility for biotransformation are discussed. Internal effect concentrations associated with 50% inhibition of S. vacuolatus reproduction were predicted by linking the bioconcentration kinetics to the effect concentrations and ranged from 0.0480 mmol/kg wet weight to 7.61 mmol/kg wet weight for specifically acting and reactive chemicals. Knowing the time-course of the internal effect concentration may promote an understanding of toxicity processes such as delayed toxicity, carry-over toxicity, or mixture toxicity in future studies. PMID:25263251

  17. Chemical composition and functional properties of mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) egg protein concentrates and their application in pasta

    OpenAIRE

    Chalamaiah, M.; Balaswamy, K.; Rao, G. Narsing; Rao, P. G. Prabhakara; Jyothirmayi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Protein concentrates were prepared from underutilized mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) roe to produce value added by-products for food applications. Chemical composition and physicochemical properties of protein concentrates prepared from mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) roes were determined. The effects of pH and salt concentration on protein solubility were investigated. The protein content of the concentrates was found to be 75, and 91%, respectively for dehydrated and defatted powders. The maximum pr...

  18. Effects of chemically amended litter on broiler performances, atmospheric ammonia concentration, and phosphorus solubility in litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, J C; Choi, I H; Nahm, K H

    2005-05-01

    The effects of 6 different litter amendments on broiler performance, level of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) concentration, and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in litter was determined. Through 3 experiments conducted on 2 different commercial farms, one chemical amendment was added to the litter and then was compared with a control. Broiler performance was not affected by any of the amendments except the ferrous sulfate amendment for which mortality was 25.5%. Application of aluminum chloride (AlCl3 x 6H2O) to the litter lowered atmospheric ammonia concentrations at 42 d by 97.2%, whereas ferrous sulfate (FeSO4 x 7H2O) lowered it by 90.77%. Ammonia concentrations were reduced by 86.18, 78.66, 75.52, and 69.00% by aluminum sulfate [alum or Al2(SO4)3 x 14H2O)], alum + CaCO3, aluminum chloride + CaCO3, and potassium permanganate (KMnO4), respectively, when compared with each control at 42 d. Each amendment except KMnO4 significantly reduced SRP contents. Alum and aluminum chloride were the effective compounds evaluated on the commercial farms with respect to reducing ammonia contents, phosphorus solubility, and mortality. PMID:15913178

  19. Number concentration and chemical composition of ultrafine and nanoparticles from WTE (waste to energy) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernuschi, Stefano; Giugliano, Michele; Ozgen, Senem; Consonni, Stefano

    2012-03-15

    Stack field testing at four municipal waste-to-energy (WTE) plants was conducted to investigate total number concentrations and size distributions in a size range extended towards the evaluation of ultrafine (UFP) and nanoparticle (NP) fractions with diameters smaller than 100nm and 50nm, respectively. Measurements were performed with a specifically designed sampling line, equipped with a dilution system and a particle counting device for measuring both primary particles in raw flue gases at stack conditions and the contributions of condensable origin, arising from their cooling and dilution immediately following stack release into the atmosphere. Average concentration levels detected ranged between 5×10(3)-6×10(5)cm(-3): for all sampling conditions, ultrafine fractions largely prevailed in number size distributions, with average diameters constantly located in the nanoparticle size range. Stack concentrations appeared to be influenced by the design and process configuration of flue gas cleaning systems, with most significant effects related to the presence of wet scrubbing units and the baghouse operating temperature of dry removal processes. Chemical speciation (i.e., trace metals, anions and cations, carbonaceous compounds) of size-resolved particulate fractions was performed on one of the plants. NP and UFP composition was essentially in accordance with the most important fuel and combustion process characteristics: in particular, the presence of chlorides and metal species was consistent with the respective waste feed content and their expected behavior during combustion and flue gas cleaning processes. PMID:22326138

  20. From hydrodynamic plumes to chemical gardens: the concentration-dependent onset of tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Bruno C; Cruz, Patrick; Steinbock, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    Many inorganic precipitation reactions self-organize macroscopic tubes known as chemical gardens. We study the nonequilibrium formation of these structures by injecting aqueous sodium sulfide solution into a reservoir of iron(II) chloride solution. Our experiments reveal a distinct, concentration-dependent transition from convective plumes of reaction-induced, colloidal particles to mechanically connected, hollow tubes. The transition concentration (0.1 mol/L) is widely independent of the injection rate and causes a discontinuous change from the radius of the plume stalk to the radius of the tube. In addition, tubes have lower growth speeds than plumes. At the transition concentration, one observes the initial formation of a plume followed by the growth of a mechanically weak tube around a jet of upward-moving precipitation particles. We find that the plumes' morphology and geometric scaling are similar to that of laminar starting plumes in nonreactive systems. The characterization of dried tubes by X-ray diffraction indicates the presence of greigite and lepidocrocite. PMID:25014675

  1. Biodegradation of PAHs in soil: Influence of chemical structure, concentration and multiple amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couling, Natalie R.; Towell, Marcie G. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.u [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    The influence of PAH chemical structure and concentration, added in either single (75 or 300 mg kg{sup -1}) or multiple (2 x 75, 2 x 150 or 4 x 75 mg kg{sup -1}) applications as single- or multiple-contaminant systems, on the development of PAH biodegradation in a pristine soil was investigated. Development in microbial catabolic ability was assessed at 0, 28, 56 and 84 d by monitoring {sup 14}C-naphthalene, {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-pyrene mineralisation over 14 d in respirometric assays. The presence of other contaminants influenced the ability of the indigenous microflora to mineralise structurally different contaminants over time. {sup 14}C-Naphthalene mineralisation was inhibited by the presence of other contaminants; whereas the presence of naphthalene significantly enhanced rates of mineralisation in multiple-contaminant systems containing {sup 14}C-phenanthrene and {sup 14}C-pyrene. Generally, increasing the number of contaminant applications has implications for catabolic activity of soil microbes. It is suggested the toxic nature of PAHs retarded mineralisation at increased contaminant concentrations. - The simultaneous effects of PAH concentration, contaminant mixture and repeated application on the development of catabolic activity in soil.

  2. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A;

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations co...

  3. Determining airborne concentrations of spatial repellent chemicals in mosquito behavior assay systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mosquito behavior assays have been used to evaluate the efficacy of vector control interventions to include spatial repellents (SR. Current analytical methods are not optimized to determine short duration concentrations of SR active ingredients (AI in air spaces during entomological evaluations. The aim of this study was to expand on our previous research to further validate a novel air sampling method to detect and quantitate airborne concentrations of a SR under laboratory and field conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A thermal desorption (TD gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS method was used to determine the amount of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT in samples of air. During laboratory experiments, 1 L volumes of air were collected over 10 min intervals from a three-chamber mosquito behavior assay system. Significantly higher levels of airborne DDT were measured in the chamber containing textiles treated with DDT compared to chambers free of AI. In the field, 57 samples of air were collected from experimental huts with and without DDT for onsite analysis. Airborne DDT was detected in samples collected from treated huts. The mean DDT air concentrations in these two huts over a period of four days with variable ambient temperature were 0.74 µg/m(3 (n = 17; SD = 0.45 and 1.42 µg/m(3 (n = 30; SD = 0.96. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results from laboratory experiments confirmed that significantly different DDT exposure conditions existed in the three-chamber system establishing a chemical gradient to evaluate mosquito deterrency. The TD GC-MS method addresses a need to measure short-term (<1 h SR concentrations in small volume (<100 L samples of air and should be considered for standard evaluation of airborne AI levels in mosquito behavior assay systems. Future studies include the use of TD GC-MS to measure other semi-volatile vector control compounds.

  4. Optimization of TiO2 and PMAPTAC Concentrations of a Chemical Humidity Sensing Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Barra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to achieve an optimization of the TiO2 and PMAPTAC concentrations in a chemical resistive-type humidity sensing mechanism (RHSM. Our idea is based primarily on the modeling of the sensing mechanism. This model takes into account the parameters of non-linearity, hysteresis, temperature, frequency, substrate type. Furthermore, we investigated the TiO2 and PMAPTAC effects concentrations on the humidity sensing properties in our model. Secondly, we used the Matlab environment to create a database for an ideal model for the sensing mechanism, where the response of this ideal model is linear for any value of the above parameters. We have done the training to create an analytical model for the sensing mechanism (SM and the ideal model (IM. After that, the SM and IM models are established on PSPICE simulator, where the output of the first is identical to the output of the RHSM used and the output of the last is the ideal response. Finally a “DIF bloc” was realized to make the difference between the SM output and the IM output, where this difference represents the linearity error, we take the minimum error, to identify the optimal TiO2 and PMAPTAC concentrations. However, a compromise between concentrations, humidity and temperature must be performed. The simulation results show that in low humidity and at temperature more than 25 °C, sample 1 is the best (in alumina substrate. However, the sample 9 represents the best sensor (in PET substrate predominately for the lowest humidity and temperature.

  5. Antiscalant removal in accelerated desupersaturation of RO concentrate via chemically-enhanced seeded precipitation (CESP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Brian C; Rahardianto, Anditya; Cohen, Yoram

    2012-09-01

    An experimental study was carried out to demonstrate and quantify the feasibility of antiscalant (AS) removal from brackish water RO concentrate of high gypsum scaling propensity via lime treatment prior to seeded gypsum precipitation. Based on studies with model solutions, it was shown that sufficient AS removal (up to ∼90%) from RO concentrate is feasible via a lime treatment step (at a dose significantly lower than that required for conventional lime softening) to enable effective subsequent seeded gypsum precipitation. This two-step chemically-enhanced seeded precipitation (CESP) treatment of primary RO concentrate is suitable as an intermediate concentrate demineralization (ICD) stage for high recovery desalting employing secondary RO desalination. Analysis of gypsum precipitation and lime treatment kinetic data suggests that, after adequate CaCO(3) precipitation has been induced for effective AS scavenging, CaSO(4) desupersaturation can be achieved via seeded gypsum precipitation without retardation due to seed poisoning by AS. Also, the lime dose required to prevent seed poisoning during subsequent gypsum desupersaturation via seeded gypsum precipitation can be adequately assessed with a precipitation kinetics model that considers AS seed poisoning based on a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The degree of AS removal after lime treatment increased linearly with the logarithm of the single lime dose additions. Staged lime dosing (i.e., multiple lime additions), however, removed a higher degree of AS relative to an equivalent single lime dose addition since a higher driving force for CaCO(3) precipitation could be maintained over the course of the lime treatment period. PMID:22673342

  6. Chemical effects of a high CO2 concentration in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Bentzen, L.L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of methane in an atmospheric-pres sure flow reactor has been studied experimentally under highly diluted conditions in N-2 and CO2, respectively. The stoichiometry was varied from fuel-lean to fuel-rich, and the temperatures covered the range 1200-1800 K. The results were interpreted...... in terms of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrocarbon oxidation. On the basis of results of the present study, it can be expected that oxy-fuel combustion will lead to strongly increased CO concentrations in the near-burner region. The CO2 present will compete with O-2 for atomic hydrogen...... consuming CO2. The high local CO levels may have implications for near-burner corrosion and stagging, but increased problems with CO emission in oxy-fuel combustion are not anticipated....

  7. Physico-chemical investigation of synthesis of lead salts from sulfide lead concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDER G. KHOLMOGOROV

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The leaching of lead from lead–zinc concentrates by iron(III salt solutins in the absence, as well as in the presence of mineral acids (HCl, H2SO4, HNO3 has been investigated. It was shown that the leaching of lead by means of 0.3 M Fe(NO33 at (22 ± 1 ºC leads to practically complete recovery of lead during 1 h. This conclusion was confirmed by data obtained using chemical, thermographical and X-ray photographical methods. Atechnological scheme for the synthesis of lead salts and oxides without the production of metal lead has been developed as a result of the present investigation.

  8. Methodology for uncertainty estimation of Hanford tank chemical and radionuclide inventories and concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exact physical and chemical nature of 55 million gallons of toxic waste held in 177 underground waste tanks at the Hanford Site is not known with sufficient detail to support the safety, retrieval, and immobilization missions presented to Hanford. The Hanford Best Basis team has made point estimates of the inventories in each tank. The purpose of this study is to estimate probability distributions for each of the 71 analytes and 177 tanks that the Hanford Best Basis team has made point estimates for. This will enable uncertainty intervals to be calculated for the Best Basis inventories and should facilitate the safety, retrieval, and immobilization missions. Section 2 of this document describes the overall approach used to estimate tank inventory uncertainties. Three major components are considered in this approach: chemical concentration, density, and waste volume. Section 2 also describes the two different methods used to evaluate the tank wastes in terms of sludges and in terms of supernatant or saltcakes. Sections 3 and 4 describe in detail the methodology to assess the probability distributions for each of the three components, as well as the data sources for implementation. The conclusions are given in Section 5

  9. Optimal voxel size for measuring global gray and white matter proton metabolite concentrations using chemical shift imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Adalsteinsson, E; Pfefferbaum, A; Spielman, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Quantification of gray and white matter levels of spectroscopically visible metabolites can provide important insights into brain development and pathological conditions. Chemical shift imaging offers a gain in efficiency for estimation of global gray and white matter metabolite concentrations co...... concentration error (<15%). Magn Reson Med 44:10-18, 2000....

  10. Morphology, chemical composition, and bacterial concentration of airborne particulate matter in rabbit farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Adell

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Livestock houses are major sources of airborne particulate matter (PM, which can originate from manure, feed, feathers, skin and bedding and may contain and transport microorganisms. Improved knowledge of particle size, morphology, chemical and microbiological composition of PM in livestock houses can help identify major sources of PM and contribute to the development of appropriate source-specific reduction techniques. In rabbit production systems, however, there is limited information on specific particle characteristics. The objective of this study was to characterise airborne PM in rabbit farms in terms of morphology, chemical compositions and bacterial concentration in different size fractions. Size-fractioned PM was sampled in the air of 2 rabbit farms, 1 for fattening rabbits and 1 for reproductive does, using a virtual cascade impactor, which simultaneously collected total suspended PM (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions. Airborne PM samples were examined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Representative samples from potential sources of PM were also collected and examined. Additionally, a methodology to extract bacteria from the collected samples of airborne PM was developed to determine the bacterial concentration per PM size fraction. Results showed that airborne PM in rabbit farms is highly complex in particle morphology, especially in size. Broken skin flakes, disintegrated particles from feed or faecal material from mechanical fracture are the main sources of airborne PM in rabbit farms. Major elements found in rabbit airborne PM were S, Ca, Mg, Na and Cl. Bacterial concentrations ranged from 1.7×104 to 1.6×106 colony forming units (CFU/m3 (TSP; from 3.6×103 to 3.0×104 CFU/m3 (PM10; and from 3.1×103 to 1.6×104 CFU/m3 (PM2.5. Our results will improve the knowledge on essential particle characteristics necessary to understand PM’s origin in rabbit farms and

  11. Sampling and analysis of chemical element concentration distribution in rock units and orebodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. Agterberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing sampling techniques applied within known orebodies, such as sampling along mining drifts, yield element concentration values for larger blocks of ore if they are extended into their surroundings. The resulting average concentration values have relatively small "extension variance". These techniques can be used for multifractal modeling as well as ore reserve estimation approaches. Geometric probability theory can aid in local spatial covariance modeling. It provides information about increase of variability of element concentration over short distances exceeding microscopic scale. In general, the local clustering of ore crystals results in small-scale variability known as the "nugget effect". Parameters to characterize spatial covariance estimated from ore samples subjected to chemical analysis for ore reserve estimation may not be valid at local scale because of the nugget effect. The novel method of local singularity mapping applied within orebodies provides new insights into the nature of the nugget effect. Within the Pulacayo orebody, Bolivia, local singularity for zinc is linearly related with logarithmically transformed concentration value. If there is a nugget effect, moving averages resulting from covariance models or estimated by other methods that have a smoothing effect, such as kriging, can be improved by incorporating local singularities indicating local element enrichment or depletion. Although there have been many successful applications of the multifractal binomial/p model, its application within the Pulacayo orebody results in inconsistencies, indicating some shortcomings of this relatively simple approach. Local singularity analysis and universal multifractal modeling are two promising new approaches to improve upon results obtained by commonly used geostatistical techniques and use of the binomial/p model. All methods in this paper are illustrated using a single example (118 Pulacayo zinc values, and

  12. Determination of sulphide concentrates of ore copper by XRPD and chemical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocić Mira B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Roasting process of sulphide copper concentrates in fluo-solid reactor is an oxidation process, and presents the first stage of copper concentrate processing in Copper Mining and Smelting Complex Bor, RTB Bor. Therefore, the importance of accurate and up to date process control is an apparent precondition for the correct treatment in the following stages and also for of high grade cathode copper. As concentrate is fed into the roaster, it is heated by a stream of hot air to about 590°C. The process takes place between solid and gaseous phases without the appearance of a liquid phase. The heat generated by the exothermic oxidation reaction of sulphur from cooper and iron minerals (chalcopyrite and pyrite is sufficient to carry out the entire process autogenously at temperature from 620 to 670°C. The temperature of sulphur firing which defines the start of roasting depends on physical traits, particle size of sulfides and characteristic product of oxidation. The obtained products of the roasting process are: calcine, ready for smelting in the furnace and gas-rich sulphure dioxide (SO2, well suited for the production of sulfuric acid. The relationship between the quantitative mineral composition of the charge and of the calcine directly points out to the efficiency of the roasting process in fluo-solid reactor. The amount of bornite and magnetite, resulting from the sulfide oxidation is the most important parameter. Hence, quantitative determination of mineral composition is of great interest. In this work, the results of the determination of quantitative mineral composition of the copper sulphide concentrate (charge and products of their roasting (calcine and overflow in fluo-solid reactor in the RTB Bor are presented. The aim was to compare the results of the iron, copper, sulfur and oxygen contents determined by two independent techniques, the chemical (HA and X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRPD that is based on the quantitative mineral

  13. Foundations of modeling in cryobiology-I: concentration, Gibbs energy, and chemical potential relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Daniel M; Benson, James D; Kearsley, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical modeling plays an enormously important role in understanding the behavior of cells, tissues, and organs undergoing cryopreservation. Uses of these models range from explanation of phenomena, exploration of potential theories of damage or success, development of equipment, and refinement of optimal cryopreservation/cryoablation strategies. Over the last half century there has been a considerable amount of work in bio-heat and mass-transport, and these models and theories have been readily and repeatedly applied to cryobiology with much success. However, there are significant gaps between experimental and theoretical results that suggest missing links in models. One source for these potential gaps is that cryobiology is at the intersection of several very challenging aspects of transport theory: it couples multi-component, moving boundary, multiphase solutions that interact through a semipermeable elastic membrane with multicomponent solutions in a second time-varying domain, during a two-hundred Kelvin temperature change with multi-molar concentration gradients and multi-atmosphere pressure changes. In order to better identify potential sources of error, and to point to future directions in modeling and experimental research, we present a three part series to build from first principles a theory of coupled heat and mass transport in cryobiological systems accounting for all of these effects. The hope of this series is that by presenting and justifying all steps, conclusions may be made about the importance of key assumptions, perhaps pointing to areas of future research or model development, but importantly, lending weight to standard simplification arguments that are often made in heat and mass transport. In this first part, we review concentration variable relationships, their impact on choices for Gibbs energy models, and their impact on chemical potentials. PMID:25240602

  14. Development, chemical and sensory characterization of semi skim yogurt added with whey protein concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Regina Antunes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop, to perform the chemical characterization and verify the acceptability of a semi skim yogurt added with whey protein concentrate (WPC 35 %, and compare it to traditional yogurt, without adding any protein source. For this, two formulations were prepared: 1- traditional semi skim and 2: semi skim added with WPC 35 %, with subsequent evaluation of physicochemical characteristics of acidity, pH and viscosity, as well as the compositional analysis of the levels of humidity, full solids, ash, protein, fat and carbohydrates for both formulations. The sensory analysis was performed with 80 untrained tasters, which was based on parameters of appearance, taste, flavor and consistency. The appearance and consistency parameters showed a significant difference between received grades, and the yogurt added with WPC 35 % the most preferred these aspects, as well as the formulation with the highest widespread acceptance among testers. The results indicate that the use of WPC 35 % in foods is a promising alternative, considering the overall acceptance obtained, the protein content beneficial to the consumers health, the improvement of technological properties provided to food coupled to the extent which it is produced, low cost and reducing the damage caused to the environment. 

  15. Preservation of concentrated orange juice by gamma radiation: physical, chemical and sensory characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the conservation of concentrated orange juice, through the synergic action of heat and irradiation in different temperatures and storage periods. A source of cobalt-60, type Gammabean-650, with an activity of approximately 4,912 Ci was utilized at the dose rate of 5.37 kGy/h. The chemical and sensory analyses were done after 1, 30, 60, 90 and 180 days of storage. The irradiation doses effect caused small variations in the total soluble solids, acidity, pH and ascorbic acid. The degradation of ascorbic acid was influenced by temperatures and storage time. Color changes were detected on the juice stored at room temperature. The characteristic of quality received score 5, in a 9-point scale. There were no differences on the color of the juice stored at o sup(0)C and 5 sup(0)C, which remained similar to the control (stored at -18 sup(0)C). (author)

  16. Impact of bioavailability on the correlation between in vitro cytotoxic and in vivo acute fish toxic concentrations of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lower sensitivity of in vitro cytotoxicity assays currently restricts their use as alternative to the fish acute toxicity assays for hazard assessment of chemicals in the aquatic environment. In vitro cytotoxic potencies mostly refer to nominal concentrations. The main objective of the present study was to investigate, whether a reduced availability of chemicals in vitro can account for the lower sensitivity of in vitro toxicity test systems. For this purpose, the bioavailable free fractions of the nominal cytotoxic concentrations (EC50) of chemicals determined with a cytotoxicity test system using Balb/c 3T3 cells and the corresponding free cytotoxic concentrations (ECu50) were calculated. The algorithm applied is based on a previously developed simple equilibrium distribution model for chemicals in cell cultures with serum-supplemented culture media. This model considers the distribution of chemicals between water, lipids and serum albumin. The algorithm requires the relative lipid volume of the test system, the octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow) and the in vitro albumin-bound fraction of the chemicals. The latter was determined from EC50-measurements in the presence of different albumin concentrations with the Balb/c 3T3 test system. Organic chemicals covering a wide range of cytotoxic potency (EC50: 0.16-527000 μM) and lipophilicity (log K ow: -5.0-6.96) were selected, for which fish acute toxicity data (LC50-values) from at least one of the three fish species, medaka, rainbow trout and fathead minnow, respectively, were available. The availability of several chemicals was shown to be extensively reduced either by partitioning into lipids or by serum albumin binding, or due to both mechanisms. Reduction of bioavailability became more important with increasing cytotoxic potency. The sensitivity of the Balb/c 3T3 cytotoxicity assay and the correspondence between in vivo and in vitro toxic potencies were increased when the free cytotoxic

  17. Impact of bioavailability on the correlation between in vitro cytotoxic and in vivo acute fish toxic concentrations of chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelden, Michael [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Street 10, D-24105 Kiel (Germany)]. E-mail: guelden@toxi.uni-kiel.de; Seibert, Hasso [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Street 10, D-24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2005-05-15

    The lower sensitivity of in vitro cytotoxicity assays currently restricts their use as alternative to the fish acute toxicity assays for hazard assessment of chemicals in the aquatic environment. In vitro cytotoxic potencies mostly refer to nominal concentrations. The main objective of the present study was to investigate, whether a reduced availability of chemicals in vitro can account for the lower sensitivity of in vitro toxicity test systems. For this purpose, the bioavailable free fractions of the nominal cytotoxic concentrations (EC{sub 50}) of chemicals determined with a cytotoxicity test system using Balb/c 3T3 cells and the corresponding free cytotoxic concentrations (ECu{sub 50}) were calculated. The algorithm applied is based on a previously developed simple equilibrium distribution model for chemicals in cell cultures with serum-supplemented culture media. This model considers the distribution of chemicals between water, lipids and serum albumin. The algorithm requires the relative lipid volume of the test system, the octanol-water partition coefficient (K {sub ow}) and the in vitro albumin-bound fraction of the chemicals. The latter was determined from EC{sub 50}-measurements in the presence of different albumin concentrations with the Balb/c 3T3 test system. Organic chemicals covering a wide range of cytotoxic potency (EC{sub 50}: 0.16-527000 {mu}M) and lipophilicity (log K {sub ow}: -5.0-6.96) were selected, for which fish acute toxicity data (LC{sub 50}-values) from at least one of the three fish species, medaka, rainbow trout and fathead minnow, respectively, were available. The availability of several chemicals was shown to be extensively reduced either by partitioning into lipids or by serum albumin binding, or due to both mechanisms. Reduction of bioavailability became more important with increasing cytotoxic potency. The sensitivity of the Balb/c 3T3 cytotoxicity assay and the correspondence between in vivo and in vitro toxic potencies were

  18. Changes in blood testosterone concentrations after surgical and chemical sterilization of male free-roaming dogs in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstichel, R; Forzán, M J; Pérez, G E; Serpell, J A; Garde, E

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing interest in chemical sterilization as an alternative to surgical castration in large-scale sterilization campaigns to control canine populations. An important step toward understanding the short-term and long-term effects of chemical sterilants is to determine their impact on blood testosterone concentrations, particularly as these could influence dog behavior after treatment. A field trial was conducted with 118 free-roaming male dogs in the Chilean Patagonia, where 36 dogs were chemically sterilized using EsterilSol, 39 dogs were surgically castrated, and 43 dogs remained intact as controls. Blood testosterone levels were determined at four time periods: on enrollment 6 months before treatment (t-6m), at the time of treatment (t0, within one hour after surgical castration or chemical sterilization and during a concurrent 2-week period for the control group), four (t+4m), and six (t+6m) months after treatment. Intrinsic and temporal factors were evaluated; age was significantly associated with testosterone, where dogs 2- to 4-year-old had the highest testosterone concentrations (P = 0.036), whereas body weight and body condition scores were not associated with testosterone; testosterone concentration was not influenced by time of day, month, or season. After treatment (t+4m and t+6m), all of the surgically castrated dogs had testosterone concentrations below 1.0 ng/mL. On the basis of this cut point (<1 ng/mL), testosterone remained unchanged in 66% of the chemically sterilized dogs at both t+4m and t+6m; it remained low for 22% of dogs at both t+4m and t+6m; it was unchanged at t+4m but low at t+6m in 9% of dogs; and, it was low at t+4m but reverted back to unchanged at t+6m in one dog (3%). Incidentally, testosterone in chemically sterilized dogs increased dramatically within 1 hour of treatment (t0), more than doubling (131%) the concentration of control dogs at the time of treatment (t0), likely because of severe necrosis of

  19. phisco-chemical studies concerning naturally occuring radiocuclides and heavy metal concentrations in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is a comprehensive of drinking water quality from various rural regions of Egypt. People are living in these rural regions have a problem of scarcely water resources. They mainly depend on groundwater resources for drinking. These water resources may be contaminated with both naturally and/or industrial pollutants unexpected. In this study, several groundwater samples are obtained from certain regions in Egypt; physical, chemical and radiological parameters are examined. Then, compared to the standard limits values of the world health organization. A new modified ion exchange resin was prepared in our laboratory with a high efficiency factor which may be used for reducing the heavy metals that are being found in groundwater samples. The removal of heavy metals such as, Pb (II), Co (II) and Mn (II) ions was carried out by the modified ion exchange resin using Batch sorption experiments. The optimum condition of the removal efficiency was conducted under different parameters such as; effect of ph, initial ion concentrations, weight loaded and contact time to determine the optimum conditions for the resin function. Kinetic studies are performed using first and second order kinetic equations. The sorption kinetic experiments are found to be agreeing well with the second order kinetic equation. The particle diffusion model was also studied. three isotherm equations are applied for sorption of the investigated elements at equilibrium are well described by the Freundlich isotherm equation indicating that sorption process of those elements are applied with heterogeneous adsorption reaction. Dubinin and Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm equation is also applied. The free energy of the adsorption process is also given in the range of the ion exchange reaction.

  20. Estimating surface water concentrations of “down-the-drain” chemicals in China using a global model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predictions of surface water exposure to “down-the-drain” chemicals are presented which employ grid-based spatially-referenced data on average monthly runoff, population density, country-specific per capita domestic water and substance use rates and sewage treatment provision. Water and chemical load are routed through the landscape using flow directions derived from digital elevation data, accounting for in-stream chemical losses using simple first order kinetics. Although the spatial and temporal resolution of the model are relatively coarse, the model still has advantages over spatially inexplicit “unit-world” approaches, which apply arbitrary dilution factors, in terms of predicting the location of exposure hotspots and the statistical distribution of concentrations. The latter can be employed in probabilistic risk assessments. Here the model was applied to predict surface water exposure to “down-the-drain” chemicals in China for different levels of sewage treatment provision. Predicted spatial patterns of concentration were consistent with observed water quality classes for China. - Highlights: ► A global-scale model of “down-the-drain” chemical concentrations is presented. ► The model was used to predict spatial patterns of exposure in China. ► Predictions were consistent with observed water quality classes. ► The model can identify hotspots and statistical distributions of concentrations. - A global-scale model was used to predict spatial patterns of “down-the-drain” chemical concentrations in China. Predictions were consistent with observed water quality classes, demonstrating the potential value of the model.

  1. Sorption kinetics and microbial biodegradation activity of hydrophobic chemicals in sewage sludge: Model and measurements based on free concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artola-Garicano, E.; Borkent, I.; Damen, K.; Jager, T.; Vaes, W.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    In the current study, a new method is introduced with which the rate-limiting factor of biodegradation processes of hydrophobic chemicals in organic and aqueous systems can be determined. The novelty of this approach lies in the combination of a free concentration-based kinetic model with measuremen

  2. Modeling effects of abrasive particle size and concentration on material removal at molecular scale in chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel material removal model as a function of abrasive particle size and concentration was established in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) based on molecular scale mechanism, micro-contact mechanics and probability statistics. A close-form equation was firstly developed to calculate the number of effective particles. It found nonlinear dependences of removal rate on the particle size and concentration, being qualitatively agreement with the published experimental data. The nonlinear relation results from the couple relationship among abrasive number, slurry concentration and surface atoms' binding energy with the particle size. Finally, the system parameters such as the operational conditions and materials properties were incorporated into the model as well.

  3. Evaluation of toxicity and estrogenicity of the landfill-concentrated leachate during advanced oxidation treatment: chemical analyses and bioanalytical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifang; Lu, Gang; Zhao, Jiandi; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling

    2016-08-01

    Landfill-concentrated leachate from membrane separation processes is a potential pollution source for the surroundings. In this study, the toxicity and estrogenicity potentials of concentrated leachate prior to and during UV-Fenton and Fenton treatments were assessed by a combination of chemical (di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and dibutyl phthalate were chosen as targets) and biological (Daphnia magna, Chlorella vulgaris, and E-screen assay) analyses. Removal efficiencies of measured di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and dibutyl phthalate were more than 97 % after treatment with the two methods. Biological tests showed acute toxicity effects on D. magna tests in untreated concentrated leachate samples, whereas acute toxicity on C. vulgaris tests was not observed. Both treatment methods were found to be efficient in reducing acute toxicity effects on D. magna tests. The E-screen test showed concentrated leachate had significant estrogenicity, UV-Fenton and Fenton treatment, especially the former, were effective methods for reducing estrogenicity of concentrated leachate. The EEQchem (estradiol equivalent concentration) of all samples could only explain 0.218-5.31 % range of the EEQbio. These results showed that UV-Fenton reagent could be considered as a suitable method for treatment of concentrated leachate, and the importance of the application of an integrated (biological + chemical) analytical approach for a comprehensive evaluation of treatment suitability. PMID:27146535

  4. Size Resolved Mass Concentration and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Eastern Mediterranean Area

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Jiří; Ždímal, Vladimír; Lazaridis, M.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Havránek, Vladimír; Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Nyeki, S.; Housiadas, C.

    Kjeller: Norwegian Institute for Air Research, 2002 - (Kahnert, M.), s. 26-51. (Report.. 4) Grant ostatní: EVK2(XE) CT/1999/000052 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * Mediterranean area * chemical composition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    L. Rondo; Flagan, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantita...

  6. Variation of atmospheric tritium concentration in three chemical forms at Toki, Japan: 2004-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Uda, T

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric tritium concentrations of HTO, HT and CH3T have been measured at Toki, Japan, for the environmental impact assessment of tritium for a fusion test facility. According to the data from 2004 to 2012, the concentrations of HT and HTO in water vapour tend to increase in spring. The seasonal variation in HT concentration at Toki was compared with the H2 concentration between 1990 and 2005 at Tae-ahn Peninsula, Republic of Korea, which is at approximately the same latitude as Toki. The monthly average of HT-specific activity varied from 1.24 × 10(5) to 1.76 × 10(5) TU. The peak of the monthly average H2 concentration did not match that of HT. This indicates that the mechanism of the production or the source of HT might be different from the production mechanism of H2. PMID:25935005

  7. Variation of atmospheric tritium concentration in three chemical forms at Toki, Japan: 2004-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric tritium concentrations of HTO, HT and CH3T have been measured at Toki, Japan, for the environmental impact assessment of tritium for a fusion test facility. According to the data from 2004 to 2012, the concentrations of HT and HTO in water vapour tend to increase in spring. The seasonal variation in HT concentration at Toki was compared with the H2 concentration between 1990 and 2005 at Tae-ahn Peninsula, Republic of Korea, which is at approximately the same latitude as Toki. The monthly average of HT-specific activity varied from 1.24 x 105 to 1.76 x 105 TU. The peak of the monthly average H2 concentration did not match that of HT. This indicates that the mechanism of the production or the source of HT might be different from the production mechanism of H2. (authors)

  8. Determination of sulphide concentrates of ore copper by XRPD and chemical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cocić Mira B.; Logar Mihovil M.; Cocić Saša Lj.; Živković Dragana T.; Matović Branko Ž.; Dević Snežana S.

    2009-01-01

    Roasting process of sulphide copper concentrates in fluo-solid reactor is an oxidation process, and presents the first stage of copper concentrate processing in Copper Mining and Smelting Complex Bor, RTB Bor. Therefore, the importance of accurate and up to date process control is an apparent precondition for the correct treatment in the following stages and also for of high grade cathode copper. As concentrate is fed into the roaster, it is heated by a stream of hot air to about 590°C. The p...

  9. Measuring binding and speciation of hydrophobic organic chemicals at controlled freely dissolved concentrations and without phase separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gouliarmou, Varvara; Smith, K E C; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen;

    2012-01-01

    (dimethylsiloxane) polymer preloaded with the chemicals. The HOC concentrations in the equilibrated solutions [Csolution(eq)] and water [Cwater(eq)] were then measured. Free fractions of the HOCs were determined as Cwater(eq)/Csolution(eq), whereas enhanced capacities (E) of the solutions for HOCs were determined as...... simple linear regression provided precise partition ratios, salting out constants, and critical micelle concentrations. These parameters were generally in good agreement with published values obtained by solid phase microextraction and fluorescence quenching. The very good precision was indicated by the...

  10. Concentrations of Chemical Elements in Willow Biomass Depend on Clone, Site and Management in the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Na; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Eight willow (Salix) clones (Inger, Klara, Linnea, Resolution, Stina, Terra Nova, Tora, Tordis) were planted on two soil types in Denmark. The biomass quality was evaluated after 3 years of growth by measuring differences in concentrations of 14 elements associated with ash behavior during...... 22, 27, 35, and 23 % higher concentrations of K, S, Ca, and total ash than the other clones. In addition to clone and site, appropriate management could further improve the fuel quality of willow biomass. When shoots of Inger were harvested annually (1-year shoots) high concentrations of K and Cl...... were found in all three consecutive harvests, but concentrations decreased significantly when rotation length was extended beyond 1 year of growth. Significant decreases of Mg, Na, P, S, and Zn were also registered from 2- to 3-year-old shoots. No difference in quality of biomass was found between two...

  11. Optimisation of elevated radon concentration measurement by using electro-chemical etching of nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper, two methods for adjusting of passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeters (UFO detector) for enhanced radon concentration measurement are presented. Achieved upper limit of detection is 5.94 MBq m-3 d

  12. 76 FR 41371 - Impact of Reducing the Mixture Concentration Threshold for Commercial Schedule 3 Chemical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... comments on the impact of amending the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR) to reduce the... Implementation Act (CWCIA). Accordingly, publication and implementation of regulatory changes affecting this low... Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) (PRA). Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person...

  13. Concentration of chemicals within crevice between tubing and tube support plate in steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of process of concentration of impurities within a crevice simulating the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) steam generator heat transfer tubing and the tube support plate has been conducted using directly sampling. The concentration of solutes within the crevice is analyzed by means of ion exchange chromatography. In short time, the concentration of solutes within the crevice approximate to a constant, and the deposits on the In-800 tube outer surface has formed in the crevice region. In the test process, the electrochemical potential of In-800 in crevice region is on-line measured. After the test, a lot of pitting corrosion holes appear in the material for the tube support plate

  14. Molecular Simulation of Polarizable Models of Electrolytes: Concentration Dependence of the Chemical Potentials, Density and Solubility.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, W.R.

    Lyngby : DTU Chemical Engineering, 2015 - (Kontogeorgis, G.), s. 89 ISBN N. [Thermodynamics 2015. Copenhagen (DK), 15.09.2015-18.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19542S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : simulation * solutions of electrolytes * electrolytes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://www.thermodynamics2015.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Thermodynamics2015.pdf

  15. The Steel Helmet Project: Canine Olfactory Detection of Low Concentrations of a Surrogate Chemical Warfare Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    The Steel Helmet project was meant to assess the feasibility of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) detector dog concept. A relatively benign organophosphate pesticide called dichlorvos was used as a surrogate for CWAs. Using conventional training techniques, U.S. Department of Defense military working dogs were taught to discriminate scent boxes containing dichlorvos from “vehicle” scent boxes. Experiment 1 appeared to show that two out of three subjects were capable of criterion accuracy (0.95...

  16. Chemical concentrations and instantaneous loads, Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway near Seattle, Washington, 2013–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Black, Robert W.; Vanderpool-Kimura, Ann M.; Foreman, James R.; Peterson, Norman T.; Senter, Craig A.; Sissel, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    In November 2013, U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging equipment was installed at a historical water-quality station on the Duwamish River, Washington, within the tidal influence at river kilometer 16.7 (U.S. Geological Survey site 12113390; Duwamish River at Golf Course at Tukwila, WA). Publicly available, real-time continuous data includes river streamflow, stream velocity, and turbidity. Between November 2013 and March 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected representative samples of water, suspended sediment, or bed sediment from the streamgaging station during 28 periods of differing flow conditions. Samples were analyzed by Washington-State-accredited laboratories for a large suite of compounds, including metals, dioxins/furans, semivolatile compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, butytins, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) Aroclors and the 209 PCB congeners, volatile organic compounds, hexavalent chromium, and total and dissolved organic carbon. Metals, PCB congeners, and dioxins/furans were frequently detected in unfiltered-water samples, and concentrations typically increased with increasing suspended-sediment concentrations. Chemical concentrations in suspendedsediment samples were variable between sampling periods. The highest concentrations of many chemicals in suspended sediment were measured during summer and early autumn storm periods.

  17. Effect of gadolinium concentration on radiation chemical yields and its corrosion compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Gd+3 ion concentration on the radiolysis of aqueous gadolinium nitrate solutions and its corrosion compatibility with SS 304 LN were determined by measurement of radiolytic yields of H2, H2O2 and NO2- produced by gamma-irradiation of deaerated solutions of gadolinium nitrate, and electrochemical measurements respectively in the concentration range of 20-100 ppm. An increase in the production of H2O2, H2 and NO2- yield was observed. The corrosion rates were comparable and the average corrosion rate was ∼ 0.16 mpy. (author)

  18. Chemical perspectives on alkali and earth alkaline nitrate and nitrite salts for concentrated solar power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph G. [Sandia National Labsoratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Molten salts have been widely considered as the leading candidate heat transfer fluids (HTF) used in high temperature, concentrated solar power plants. Specifically, nitrate and nitrite based salts have been investigated as a HTF and even deployed in pilot plants generating up to 19.9 MW of electricity at operating temperatures above 500 C. New plant designs requiring higher operating temperatures for better efficiencies are pushing the stability limit of HTF. This paper presents an overview of the thermophysical properties of nitrate and nitrite salts and discusses thermodynamic and kinetic stability limitations as they relate to concentrated solar power generation. (orig.)

  19. Method for relating suspended-chemical concentrations to suspended-sediment particle-size classes in storm-water runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    A method has been developed to relate suspended-chemical concentrations (associated with suspended sediments) in storm-water runoff to suspended-sediment particle-size classes. These classes are based on settling velocities in quiescent native water. This method requires processing 20 liters of water having a suspended-sediment concentration greater than 500 milligrams per liter. However, samples with suspended-sediment concentrations as low as 250 milligrams per liter may be analyzed, if sample volumes are increased to 50 liters. The time required for one person to separate suspended sediments into particle-size classes ranges from 6 to 14 hours. This report outlines procedures for processing metal, nutrient, and organic samples.

  20. Field evaluation of a new particle concentrator- electrostatic precipitator system for measuring chemical and toxicological properties of particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakbin Payam

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A newly designed electrostatic precipitator (ESP in tandem with Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (VACES was developed by the University of Southern California to collect ambient aerosols on substrates appropriate for chemical and toxicological analysis. The laboratory evaluation of this sampler is described in a previous paper. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the new VACES-ESP system in the field by comparing the chemical characteristics of the PM collected in the ESP to those of reference samplers operating in parallel. Results The field campaign was carried out in the period from August, 2007 to March, 2008 in a typical urban environment near downtown Los Angeles. Each sampling set was restricted to 2–3 hours to minimize possible sampling artifacts in the ESP. The results showed that particle penetration increases and ozone concentration decreases with increasing sampling flow rate, with highest particle penetration observed between 100 nm and 300 nm. A reference filter sampler was deployed in parallel to the ESP to collect concentration-enriched aerosols, and a MOUDI sampler was used to collect ambient aerosols. Chemical analysis results showed very good agreement between the ESP and MOUDI samplers in the concentrations of trace elements and inorganic ions. The overall organic compound content of PM collected by the ESP, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, hopanes, steranes, and alkanes, was in good agreement with that of the reference sampler, with an average ESP -to -reference concentration ratio of 1.07 (± 0.38. While majority of organic compound ratios were close to 1, some of the semi-volatile organic species had slightly deviated ratios from 1, indicating the possibility of some sampling artifacts in the ESP due to reactions of PM with ozone and radicals generated from corona discharge, although positive and negative sampling artifacts in the

  1. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemistry of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions was monitored to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. WPC34 (34.9 g protein/100 g) and WPC80 (76.8 g protein/100 g) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and...

  2. Micropower chemical fuel-to-electric conversion : a "regenerative flip" hydrogen concentration cell promising near carnot efficiency.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally, Karl

    2006-05-01

    Although battery technology is relatively mature, power sources continue to impose serious limitations for small, portable, mobile, or remote applications. A potentially attractive alternative to batteries is chemical fuel-to-electric conversion. Chemical fuels have volumetric energy densities 4 to 10 times those of batteries. However, realizing this advantage requires efficient chemical fuel-to-electric conversion. Direct electrochemical conversion would be the ideal, but, for most fuels, is generally not within the state-of-the-science. Next best, chemical-to-thermal-to-electric conversion can be attractive if efficiencies can be kept high. This small investigative project was an exploration into the feasibility of a novel hybrid (i.e., thermal-electrochemical) micropower converter of high theoretical performance whose demonstration was thought to be within near-term reach. The system is comprised of a hydrogen concentration electrochemical cell with physically identical hydrogen electrodes as anode and cathode, with each electrode connected to physically identical hydride beds each containing the same low-enthalpy-of-formation metal hydride. In operation, electrical power is generated by a hydrogen concentration differential across the electrochemical cell. This differential is established via coordinated heating and passive cooling of the corresponding hydride source and sink. Heating is provided by the exothermic combustion (i.e., either flame combustion or catalytic combustion) of a chemical fuel. Upon hydride source depletion, the role of source and sink are reversed, heating and cooling reversed, electrodes commutatively reversed, cell operation reversed, while power delivery continues unchanged. This 'regenerative flip' of source and sink hydride beds can be cycled continuously until all available heating fuel is consumed. Electricity is efficiently generated electrochemically, but hydrogen is not consumed, rather the hydrogen is regeneratively

  3. Characteristics of concentrations and chemical compositions for PM2.5 in the region of Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Z. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the temporal and spatial variations of PM2.5 and its chemical compositions in the region of Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei (BTH, PM2.5 samples were collected at four urban sites in Beijing (BJ, Tianjin (TJ, Shijiazhuang (SJZ, and Chengde (CD and one site at Shangdianzi (SDZ regional background station over four seasons from 2009 to 2010. The samples were weighted for mass concentrations and analyzed in laboratory for chemical profiles of 19 elements (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn, eight water-soluble ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl−, NO3−, and SO42−, and carbon fractions (OC and EC. The concentrations of PM2.5 and its major chemical species were season-dependent and showed spatially similar characteristics in the plain area of BTH. The average annual concentrations of PM2.5 were 71.8–191.2 μg m−3 at five sites, with more than 90 % sampling days exceeded 50 μg m−3 at BJ, TJ, and SJZ. PM2.5 pollution was most serious at SJZ, and the annual concentrations of PM2.5, secondary ions, OC, EC, and most of crustal elements were all highest. Due to stronger photochemical oxidation, the sum of concentrations of secondary ions (NH4+, NO3−, and SO42− was highest in the summer at SDZ, BJ, TJ, and CD. Analysis of electric charges of water-soluble ions indicated the existence of nitric acid or hydrochloric acid in PM2.5. For all five sites, the concentrations of OC, EC and also secondary organic carbon (SOC in the spring and summer were lower than those in the autumn and winter. Stable atmosphere and low temperatures appearing more frequently during autumn and winter facilitated the formation of SOC. The sums of crustal elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Ti, Ba, and Sr were higher in the spring and autumn owing to more days with blowing or floating dust. The concentrations of heavy metals were at higher levels in the BTH area by comparison with other studies. In Shijiazhuang and Chengde

  4. Mixtures of chemical pollutants at European legislation safety concentrations: how safe are they?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Raquel N.; Arukwe, Augustine; Ait-Aissa, Selim;

    2014-01-01

    , polyaromatic hydrocarbons, a surfactant, and a plasticizer), each present at its safety limit concentration imposed by the European legislation, were prepared and tested for their toxic effects. The effects of the mixtures were assessed in 35 bioassays, based on 11 organisms representing different trophic...... levels. A consortium of 16 laboratories was involved in performing the bioassays. The mixtures elicited quantifiable toxic effects on some of the test systems employed, including i) changes in marine microbial composition, ii) microalgae toxicity, iii) immobilization in the crustacean Daphnia magna, iv......) fish embryo toxicity, v) impaired frog embryo development, and vi) increased expression on oxidative stress-linked reporter genes. Estrogenic activity close to regulatory safety limit concentrations was uncovered by receptor-binding assays. The results highlight the need of precautionary actions on the...

  5. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to understand how energy is dissipated in both the electronic and atomic subsystems in irradiated materials, and how related non-equilibrium processes may affect defect dynamics and microstructure evolution. Here we show that alloy complexity in concentrated solid solution alloys having both an increasing number of principal elements and altered concentrations of specific elements can lead to substantial reduction in the electron mean free path and thermal conductivity, which has a significant impact on energy dissipation and consequentially on defect evolution during ion irradiation. Enhanced radiation resistance with increasing complexity from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed under ion irradiation up to an average damage level of 1 displacement per atom. Understanding how materials properties can be tailored by alloy complexity and their influence on defect dynamics may pave the way for new principles for the design of radiation tolerant structural alloys

  6. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol's ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  7. Divergent variations in concentrations of chemical elements among shrub organs in a temperate desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingzhu; Song, Xin; Tian, Fuping; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Zhishan; Chen, Ning; Li, Xinrong

    2016-01-01

    Desert shrubs, a dominant component of desert ecosystems, need to maintain sufficient levels of nutrients in their different organs to ensure operation of various physiological functions for the purpose of survival and reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed 10 elements in leaves, stems, and roots of 24 dominant shrub species from 52 sites across a temperate desert ecosystem in northwestern China. We found that concentrations of all 10 elements were higher in leaves than in stems and roots, that non-legumes had higher levels of leaf Na and Mg than did legumes, and that Na was more concentrated in C4 leaves than in C3 leaves. Scaling relationships of elements between the photosynthetic organ (leaf) and non-photosynthetic organs (stem and root) were allometric. Results of principal components analysis (PCA) highlighted the important role of the elements responsible for osmoregulation (K and Na) in water utilization of desert shrubs. Soil properties and taxonomy explained most variation of element concentrations in desert shrubs. Desert shrubs may not be particularly susceptible to future change in climate factors, because most elements (including N, P, K, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu) associated with photosynthesis, osmoregulation, enzyme activity, and water use efficiency primarily depend on soil conditions.

  8. The effect of concentration and chemical form on the gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal absorption of neptunium at low mass concentrations as 239Np nitrate (0.5-1 ng Np; 2-5 μg 1-1) has been found to be 0.03, 0.02 and 0.18% in adult rats, hamsters and rabbits, respectively. Administration as 239Np bicarbonate increased uptake in the rat to 0.15% but had no significant effect on uptake in either the hamster or the rabbit. Absorption in the rat was also increased to 0.14% for 239Np citrate but not for either 239Np phytate (0.04%) or 239Np incorporated into rat liver (0.01%). The fasting of rats for 8 hours increased their subsequent absorption of 239Np as the bicarbonate to 0.25%. The absorption of neptunium at high mass concentrations as 237Np nitrate (0.5 mg Np, 5 g 1-1) was increased to 0.26% in the rat compared with the value of 0.03% for 239Np (0.5 ng, 5 μg 1-1) but a similar effect of concentration was not observed in the hamster. The results support the use of a value of absorption of 0.1% instead of 1% in calculations of annual limits on intake of radioisotopes of neptunium by workers and in estimates of radiation doses resulting from the ingestion of contaminated food and water by adult members of the public. (author)

  9. Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the blood of pregnant hamsters during critical embryogenesis. 2. Acute exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration and chemical composition of arsenic has been determined in the blood of pregnant hamsters between 0.2 and 6 hr after an intraperitoneal injection of a teratogenic dose of radiolabeled sodium arsenate on the morning of the eighth day of gestation. Arsenic was present in plasma and red cells 0.20 hr postinjection. The plasma arsenic concentration reached a maximum of 220 μmole/kg blood near 0.5 hr postinjection. Plasma arsenic existed entirely as low-molecular-weight species. Both arsenite and dimethylarsinate (DMA) were present in plasma 0.20 hr postinjection, indicating that arsenate reduction and methylation of arsenic are rapidly initiated. However, the arsenite contribution remained small while the DMA contribution increased with time. Red cells arsenic included macromolecular arsenic (AsP) as well as three low-molecular-weight forms. The contribution of DMA remained small, but arsenite and AsP contributions increased with time. These findings identify the maternal blood concentration and chemical status of arsenic following the administration of a teratogenic dose of arsenate during the period of organogenesis. They could prove useful for predicting the likelihood of a teratogenic outcome in other mammalian species

  10. Real-time measurement of sub-PPM concentrations of airborne chemicals in semiconductor manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, M; Cohen, R

    1993-01-01

    Real-time mass spectroscopy (ICAMS) can provide hourly or daily estimates of employee exposure. Field calibration of the unit indicated essentially linear response from 0.01 (Cellosolve Acetate) and 0.03 ppm (Diglyme) to 1 ppm in semiconductor cleanrooms. The instrument can be programmed for 4 minute readings on a single compound, or for rotation among several chemicals, each requiring 4 minute dwell times for analysis. In contrast to full shift personal sampling methods to measure exposure, ICAMS offers insights into the occurrence of peak exposures. In addition, in the occupational environment ICAMS results can be integrated to estimate full-shift within a zone exposures. Thus, the ICAMS extends measurement sensitivities below those currently available and offers a viable alternative to personal sampling in the semiconductor industry. PMID:9857292

  11. Development of catalysts for chemical reactions driven by concentrated solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this phase of the work is to study commercially available low priced catalysts, for the methanation and reforming processes in the closed-loop solar chemical heat pipe. This report summarized some long term tests of commercially available methanation catalysts and the measurement of their active surface before and after reaction. It was found that the 1%Ru on alumina stars catalysts (prepared by Englehard Company according to our request) is very active and stable at 350-750 C. The catalyst 'A' produced in Russia, is less active, however, did not lose the mechanical strength. The 50% Ni/SiO2 catalyst is active as the 'A' catalyst but loses its activity after treatment at temperature > 600 C, its geometrical size shrinked. (authors). 25 refs., 25 figs., 36 tabs

  12. Chemical Effects of CO2 Concentration on Soot Formation in Jet-stirred/Plug-flow Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张引弟; 娄春; 刘德华; 李勇; 阮龙飞

    2013-01-01

    Soot formation was investigated numerically with CO2 addition in a jet-stirred/plug-flow reactor (JSR/PFR) C2H4/O2/N2 reactor (C/O ratio of 2.2) at atmospheric pressure. An updated Kazakov mechanism empha-sizes the effect of the O2/CO2 atmosphere instead of an O2/N2 one in the premixed flame. The soot formation was taken into account in the JSR/PFR for C2H4/O2/N2. The effects of CO2 addition on soot formation in different C2H4/O2/CO2/N2 atmospheres were studied, with special emphasis on the chemical effect. The simulation shows that the endothermic reaction CO2+H CO+OH is responsible of the reduction of hydrocarbon intermediates in the CO2 added combustion through the supplementary formation of hydroxyl radicals. The competition of CO2 for H radical through the above forward reaction with the single most important chain branching reaction H+O2 O+OH reduces significantly the fuel burning rate. The chemical effects of CO2 cause a significant increase in residence time and mole fractions of CO and OH, significant decreases in some intermediates (H, C2H2), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, C6H6 and C16H10, etc.) and soot volume fraction. The CO2 addition will leads to a decrease by only about 5%to 20%of the maximum mole fractions of some C3 to C10 hydrocarbon intermediates. The sensitivity analysis and reaction-path analysis results show that C2H4 reaction path and products are altered due to the CO2 addition.

  13. Heavy Metal Concentration and Physico-Chemical Parameters in Koder Kamza Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRENA DUKA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide information on some physicochemical parameters and some heavy metals concentration in Koder Kamza soils. The sample was taken in 0-30 cm depth. Characterization of soil parameters included moisture content, particle size, electrical conductivity, pH, iron (Fe, nitrogen (N, phosphorous (P, potassium (K and heavy metals like cadmium (Cd copper (Cu, Cobalt (Co, nickel (Ni lead (Pb, zinc (Zn. Particle size analysis was determined via the hydrometer method of Bouyoucous (1951; EC and TDS were determined by using Conductivity meter Cond 7110; soil pH was measured electrometrically with a glass electrode pH meter Sartorius Basic Meter PB- 11; the concentrations of Fe and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Co, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS. N and P total presence in the soil were determined by colorimetric method, total K was determined by Flame Photometer Models PFP7. Total carbon (C and total organic matter (OM were also determined by modified Walkley and Black method. Moisture content results ranged from 4.35% to 4.38%, the values of soil pH ranged from 6.33 to 6.52, i.e. within the range for optimal growth of plants, total carbon ranged between 1.16 and 1.17%, total organic matter content between 2 and 2.02 %, an electrical conductivity between 75.6 and 93.5μS/cm. The texture resulted to be sandy loam with average composition of 61.83 % sand, 21.77 % silt and 16.4 % clay. Nitrogen 0.13 and 0.14 % is slightly higher than that of the control soil. Phosphorus 0.09 and 0.1% contents were low and high respectively. Total concentration of Fe ranged between 3083.07-3263.10 mg/kg. Cd and Cu was found in lower levels (<0.001 mg/kg dry soil. Total concentration Co, Ni, Pb and Zn ranged between 8.41-16.45, 28.65-28.69, 109.29-121.06, 12.9-13.7mg/kg dry soil and were all below the recommended limits by the European Community. In conclusion, this study serves as baseline data toward future

  14. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-01

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions. PMID:18537227

  15. Physico-Chemical, Functional and Antioxidant Properties of Roe Protein Concentrates from Cyprinus carpio and Epinephelus tauvina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galla Narsing Rao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Roe protein concentrates prepared from Cyprinus carpio (CRPC and Epinephelus tauvina (ERPC were investigated for physico-chemical characteristics, functional properties and antioxidant activity. Cyprinus and Epinephelus roes yielded 19.5% and 21.5% of protein concentrates possessing 70.71% and 85.9% protein, respectively. Moisture sorption isotherms of roe protein concentrates indicated the non-hygroscopic nature of CRPC with initial moisture content (IMC of 8%, which equilibrated at 63% RH and hygroscopic nature of ERPC with IMC of 4.9%, which equilibrated at 42% RH. Water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity, foam capacity and lower foam stability and emulsifying capacity were found in ERPC than in CRPC respectively. Maximum solubility of protein was 17.79% and 16.89% at pH 12, observed in CRPC and ERPC respectively. Higher buffer capacity was observed in both roe protein concentrates in alkali medium. Antioxidant activity determined by the DPPH radical scavenging activity was higher, and ferric reducing power was observed to be lower in ERPC.

  16. A system for vertical profile measurements of sensible heat and chemical concentrations near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyppoenen, M.; Walden, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The design, construction and measurements of a computer controlled system applicable to flux measurements of a scalar quantity by the gradient technique are described. Accuracy requirements for the measured variables which are used for flux calculations are considered, together with some practical aspects concerning data storage and control. The construction includes the hardware and the data acquisition, sample intake, and temperature measurement systems. The measurements comprise laboratory tests of the temperature probes and the hardware as well as field tests over wheat and grass land for temperature and wind speed and ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentration profiles. The hardware takes care of most of the operation and only the necessary part is done by the software. The data acquisition system is flexible, accepting the input of either digital and/or analog signals. It also controls the whole system, storing all the data in a single data file. The sample intake unit is designed to take continuous samples in to the monitors as well as grab samples into the canisters. Samples can be selected from one to four levels with no dead volumes in the sampling tubes. The temperature measurement system is constructed using a pair of temperature probes, Pt-100, which are connected to the same signal processing card, in order to remove the offset of the electronic components as well as the bias associated with single probes. This ensures the accuracy of the probes down to 0.005 deg C. According to the field measurements, the relative error limits for the sensible heat fluxes varied from 7 to 20 % in an unstable atmospheric situation. For the ozone flux, the error limits varied from 20 to 100 %, indicating a much poorer accuracy of the monitor compared to the temperature probes. (orig.) 16 refs.

  17. Concentrations and chemical compositions of fine particles (PM2.5) during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Cai, Tianqi; Fang, Dongqing; Wang, Yuqin; Song, Jian; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanxun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the chemical properties of PM2.5 and put forward reasonable control measures, daily samples of PM2.5 were collected at an urban site in Beijing from August 4 to September 3 of 2012 using two 2-channel samplers. Chemical analysis was conducted for eight water soluble inorganic ions (WSII, including Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42 -), organic carbon (OC) and elementary carbon (EC). PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 8.8 to 218.6 μg m- 3, with an average concentration of 80.6 ± 57.3 μg m- 3. WSII, the most dominant PM2.5 constituents contributing 60 ± 18% of its mass, ranged from 3.1 to 172.2 μg m- 3. SO42 -, NO3-, and NH4+ dominated WSII (90 ± 28%) and their concentrations were 1.3-105.7 μg m- 3, 0.5-52.7 μg m- 3 and 0.3-33.5 μg m- 3, respectively. The concentrations of OC and EC were 3.0-28.8 μgC m- 3 and 0.8-7.4 μgC m- 3, constituting 17.6% and 4.9% of PM2.5, respectively. Three serious pollution episodes (haze days) occurred during the campaign. PM2.5 and its chemical species showed substantial increases during haze episodes. The greater enhancement factors for SO42 - (4.5), NO3- (4.0), and NH4+ (4.2) during haze days compared to non-haze days were obtained, suggesting that these secondary inorganic ions play important roles in the formation of haze. The average ratio of NO3-/SO42 - was 0.52. Ion balance calculations showed that PM2.5 samples were acidic during haze periods and close to neutral during non-haze days. Correlation analysis between the major ions was conducted and the results suggested that the main forms of NH4+ might be (NH4)2SO4. In addition, the variations between haze days and non-haze days for OC, EC, and the ratio of OC/EC were discussed.

  18. Role of primary substrate composition and concentration on attenuation of trace organic chemicals in managed aquifer recharge systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alidina, Mazahirali

    2014-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the role of primary substrate composition and concentration on the attenuation of biodegradable emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) in simulated managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems. Four sets of soil columns were established in the laboratory, each receiving synthetic feed solutions comprising different ratios and concentrations of peptone-yeast and humic acid as the primary substrate to investigate the effect on removal of six TOrCs (atenolol, caffeine, diclofenac, gemfibrozil, primidone, and trimethoprim). Based on abiotic control experiments, adsorption was not identified as a significant attenuation mechanism for primidone, gemfibrozil and diclofenac. Caffeine, atenolol and trimethoprim displayed initial adsorptive losses, however, adsorption coefficients derived from batch tests confirmed that adsorption was limited and in the long-term experiment, biodegradation was the dominant attenuation process. Within a travel time of 16h, caffeine - an easily degradable compound exhibited removal exceeding 75% regardless of composition or concentration of the primary substrate. Primidone - a poorly degradable compound, showed no removal in any column regardless of the nature of the primary substrate. The composition and concentration of the primary substrate, however, had an effect on attenuation of moderately degradable TOrCs, such as atenolol, gemfibrozil and diclofenac, with the primary substrate composition seeming to have a larger impact on TOrC attenuation than its concentration. When the primary substrate consisted mainly of refractory substrate (humic acid), higher removal of the moderately degradable TOrCs was observed. The microbial communities in the columns receiving more refractory carbon, were noted to be more diverse and hence likely able to express a wider range of enzymes, which were more suitable for TOrC transformation. The effect of the primary substrate on microbial community composition, diversity

  19. Characteristics of concentrations and chemical compositions for PM2.5 in the region of Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the temporal and spatial variations of PM2.5 and its chemical compositions in the region of Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei (BTH, PM2.5 samples were collected at four urban sites in Beijing (BJ, Tianjin (TJ, Shijiazhuang (SJZ, and Chengde (CD, and also one site at Shangdianzi (SDZ regional background station over four seasons from 2009 to 2010. The samples were weighted for mass concentrations and analyzed in the laboratory for chemical profiles of 19 elements (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn, eight water-soluble inorganic ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl−, NO3−, and SO42−, and carbon fractions (OC and EC. The concentrations of PM2.5 and its major chemical species were season dependent and showed spatially similar characteristics in the plain area of BTH. The average annual concentrations of PM2.5 were 71.8–191.2 μg m−3 at the five sites, with more than 90% of sampling days exceeding 50 μg m−3 at BJ, TJ, and SJZ. PM2.5 pollution was most serious at SJZ, and the annual concentrations of PM2.5, secondary inorganic ions, OC, EC, and most crustal elements were all highest. Due to stronger photochemical oxidation, the sum of concentrations of secondary inorganic ions (NH4+, NO3−, and SO42− was highest in the summer at SDZ, BJ, TJ, and CD. Analysis of electric charges of water-soluble inorganic ions indicated the existence of nitric acid or hydrochloric acid in PM2.5. For all five sites, the concentrations of OC, EC and also secondary organic carbon (SOC in the spring and summer were lower than those in the autumn and winter. SOC had more percentages of increase than primary organic carbon (POC during the winter. The sums of crustal elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Ti, Ba, and Sr were higher in the spring and autumn owing to more days with blowing or floating dust. The concentrations of heavy metals were at higher levels in the BTH area by comparison with other studies. In

  20. Chemical composition, molecular weight distribution, secondary structure and effect of NaCl on functional properties of walnut (Juglans regia L) protein isolates and concentrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Xiao-Ying; Hua, Yu-Fei

    2012-01-01

    Chemical composition, molecular weight distribution, secondary structure and effect of sodium chloride concentration on functional properties of walnut protein isolates, concentrates and defatted walnut flour were study. Compared with walnut protein concentrates (75.6%) and defatted walnut flour (52.5%), walnut protein isolates contain a relatively high amount of protein (90.5%). The yield of walnut protein isolates and concentrates was 43.2% and 76.6%, respectively. In molecular weight distr...

  1. Temperature varying photoconductivity of GeSn alloys grown by chemical vapor deposition with Sn concentrations from 4% to 11%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John; Adam, Thomas; Kim, Yihwan; Huang, Yi-Chiau; Reznicek, Alexander; Hazbun, Ramsey; Gupta, Jay; Kolodzey, James

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomorphic GeSn layers with Sn atomic percentages between 4.5% and 11.3% were grown by chemical vapor deposition using digermane and SnCl4 precursors on Ge virtual substrates grown on Si. The layers were characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking curves and reciprocal space maps. Photoconductive devices were fabricated, and the dark current was found to increase with Sn concentration. The responsivity of the photoconductors was measured at a wavelength of 1.55 μm using calibrated laser illumination at room temperature and a maximum value of 2.7 mA/W was measured for a 4.5% Sn device. Moreover, the responsivity for higher Sn concentration was found to increase with decreasing temperature. Spectral photoconductivity was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photoconductive absorption edge continually increased in wavelength with increasing tin percentage, out to approximately 2.4 μm for an 11.3% Sn device. The direct band gap was extracted using Tauc plots and was fit to a bandgap model accounting for layer strain and Sn concentration. This direct bandgap was attributed to absorption from the heavy-hole band to the conduction band. Higher energy absorption was also observed, which was thought to be likely from absorption in the light-hole band. The band gaps for these alloys were plotted as a function of temperature. These experiments show the promise of GeSn alloys for CMOS compatible short wave infrared detectors.

  2. Effect of reducing the top concentration used in the in vitro chromosomal aberration test in CHL cells on the evaluation of industrial chemical genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Honma, Masamitsu; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2012-01-24

    A current concern with in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity testing is the high frequency of false or misleading positive results caused in part by the past use of excessively high test concentrations. A dataset of 249 industrial chemicals used in Japan and tested for genotoxicity was analyzed. Of these, 116 (46.6%) were positive in the in vitro chromosomal aberration (CA) test, including 6 that were positive only at test concentrations >10mM. There were 59 CA-positive chemicals at test concentrations ≤ 1mM. At >1mM, 51 chemicals were CA-positive, including 13 Ames-positive chemicals, which were therefore not "missed" by the test battery. Thus, 38 potentially positive chemicals would not have been detected in the test battery if the top test concentration was limited to 1mM in CA test. Analysis of the relevance of CA results on the 38 missed chemicals was conducted based on a weight of evidence approach, including evaluations of effects of extreme culture conditions (low pH, high toxicity, or precipitation), in silico structural alert analysis, in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity test data (where available), mode of action, or information from closely related chemicals. After an exhaustive review, there were four chemicals with some concern for human health risk assessment, nine with minimal concern, and the remaining 25 with negligible concern. We apply different top concentrations to the 38 missed chemicals to identify the most accurate approach for predicting the genotoxicity of industrial chemicals. Of these 2mM or 1mg/mL, whichever is higher, was the most effective in detecting these chemicals, i.e., relatively higher (8/13) or lower (17/25) detection among 13 chemicals with some or minimal concern, or 25 with negligible concern, respectively. Lower top concentration limits, 1mM or 0.5mg/mL, whichever is higher, are not as effective (2/13) for detecting these chemicals with concern. Therefore, we conclude 2mM or 1mg/mL, whichever is higher, would be an

  3. Organic production in corn: impact of fertilization with landfill leachate in chemical composition, productivity and concentration of metals in grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Ezequiel Risso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of landfill leachate in agricultural soils as fertilizer emerges as an alternative for the disposal of this effluent, however presence of heavy metals may be a limiting factor for that use. Fertilization with five doses of landfill leachate (0, 32.7, 65.4, 98.1 and 130.8 m3 ha-1 and urea (120 kg ha-1 was evaluated in productivity, chemical composition and metal content of corn in crops 2010 and 2012. The accumulation of metals in leaf tissue was also evaluated in oats grown in the winter period, in the same experimental field. Productivity, besides the content proteins, lipids and ashes in grains increased with increasing doses of leachate. Concentration of Ca, Mg, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Ni and Pb in corn fertilized with landfill leachate did not differ from control without fertilization, except for Mn, which increased by applying leachate (p > 0.05. Increasing doses of leachate tended to raise the level of Pb (2010 crop were not observed in the same crop later, indicating that Pb concentration is dependent on intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the soil. However, content of Cu, Mn and Pb in leaf tissue oat increased with doses of leachate, suggesting potential use as phytoremediation system. Results show the need for further investigation before safe use of landfill leachate in agricultural soil.

  4. Modeling TiO2 nanoparticle phototoxicity: The importance of chemical concentration, ultraviolet radiation intensity, and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a semiconductor with wide band gap energy, TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are highly photoactive, and recent efforts have demonstrated phototoxicity of nano-TiO2 to aquatic organisms. However, a dosimetry model for the phototoxicity of nanomaterials that incorporates both direct UV and photo-activated chemical toxicity has not yet been developed. In this study, a set of Hyalella azteca acute toxicity bioassays at multiple light intensities and nano-TiO2 concentrations, and with multiple diel light cycles, was conducted to assess how existing phototoxicity models should be adapted to nano-TiO2. These efforts demonstrated (a) adherence to the Bunsen-Roscoe law for the reciprocity of light intensity and time, (b) no evidence of damage repair during dark periods, (c) a lack of proportionality of effects to environmental nano-TiO2 concentrations, and (d) a need to consider the joint effects of nano-TiO2 phototoxicity and direct UV toxicity. - Highlights: • A predictive model for phototoxicity is developed. • A lack of proportionality exists for dose response of nano-TiO2 phototoxicity. • Joint effects exist of photo-activated nano-TiO2 toxicity and direct UV exposure. - A dosimetry model was developed to evaluate critical aspects of phototoxicity of nanomaterials

  5. Concentrations and chemical forms of potentially toxic metals in road-deposited sediments from different zones of Hangzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mingkui; WANG Hao

    2009-01-01

    The 25 road-deposited sediments were collected from five different land-use zones (industrial, residential, commercial, park, and countryside) in Hangzhou, China. The concentrations of metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in these samples were determined using the ICP-AES after digestion with the mixture of HNO3-HF-HCl (aqua regia), and chemically fractionated using the modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. The highest metal concentration level was detected in the sample from industrial zone and commercial zone having heavy traffic. While the lowest metal level was noted in the street dust sample from residential zone, park, and countryside zone. The mobility sequence based on the sum of the BCR sequential extraction stages was: Zn (80.28%), Pb (78.68%), Cd (77.66%) > Cu (73.34%) > Mn (67.92%) > Co (41.66%) > Ni (30.36%) > Cr (21.56%), Fe (20.86%). Correlation analysis and principal component analysis were applied to the data matrix to evaluate the analytical results and to identify the possible pollution sources of metals. Factor analysis showed that these areas were mainly contaminated by three sources, namely lithology, traffic, and industry.

  6. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  7. Effect of test concentration in the ready biodegradability test for chemical substances: Improvement of OECD test guideline 301C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeoka, Ryosuke; Taruki, Masanori; Kayashima, Takakazu; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Kameya, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, understanding the environmental persistence of chemicals is very important for risk assessment, and ready biodegradability tests are mainly conducted according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development test guideline 301C. However, the highest test concentration specified in test guideline 301C, 100 mg/L, may cause microbial toxicity and incomplete biodegradation. The authors performed test guideline 301C tests at test concentrations of 30 mg/L for 13 substances that were readily biodegradable in ready biodegradability tests but not in test guideline 301C tests. Of the 5 substances with potential to cause microbial toxicity at 100 mg/L, the percentage of biodegradation of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate, 4-chloro-3-cresol (CC), thymol (THY), and p-tert-butyl-α-methylbenzenepropionaldehyde measured by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) increased in the test guideline 301C test at 30 mg/L, suggesting a reduction in toxicity effects. Furthermore, CC and THY met the criteria for ready biodegradability, which are more than 60% of biodegradation by BOD and a 10-d window. Of the 8 substances with a low potential for causing microbial toxicity at 100 mg/L, the percentage of biodegradation of only 2-(diethylamino)ethanol increased in the test guideline 301C test at 30 mg/L. Employing a lower test concentration in the standard test guideline 301C test will contribute to improvement of consistency between results of a test guideline 301C test and other ready biodegradability tests. PMID:26211908

  8. Variability of pesticides and nitrates concentrations along a river transect: chemical and isotopic evidence of groundwater - surface water interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole; Petelet-Giraud, Emmanuelle; Saplairoles, Maritxu

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality is increasingly monitored in Europe where various levels of nitrate and pesticide and/or metabolite contamination have been demonstrated (Loos et al., 2010, Stuart et al., 2012). The Groundwater Daughter Directive (2006/118/EC) to Water Framework Directive (WFD) particularly requires measures to prevent or limit inputs of pollutants into groundwater and compliance with good chemical status criteria (based on EU standards of nitrate and pesticides). The WFD mentioned the need to protect groundwater but also to have a particular regard to its impact and interrelationship with associated surface waters and directly dependent terrestrial Ecosystems. The Ariège river basin (SW France - 538 km²) is an alluvial plain under high agricultural pressure leading to a contamination of the aquifer by several pesticides and metabolites (Amalric et al., 2013). The Crieu is an allochtone river, crossing the plain (~ 10 km length) before joining the Ariège River. The Crieu is often dry in its middle section suggesting water leakage from surface water towards groundwater. At the opposite, the permanent flow observed downstream suggests an input of groundwater into surface water. In May 2014, while the Crieu flow was continuous through the plain, 7 river samples were collected and analyzed for pesticides, major ions, strontium concentration and isotopes. In situ measurements of electric conductivity were also performed as well as flow gauging. Two groundwaters close to the river were also sampled. The flow gauging measurements show a decreasing river discharge in the central area of the Crieu River, suggesting surface water leakage towards groundwater. Nevertheless, the electric conductivity increases along the river flow as well as some pesticides and nitrates concentrations. This chemical evolution of the river water is thus inconsistent with a simple water infiltration and another source of dissolved solutes is required to explain the increased of

  9. Bayesian probabilistic approach for inverse source determination from limited and noisy chemical or biological sensor concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Eugene

    2007-04-01

    Although a great deal of research effort has been focused on the forward prediction of the dispersion of contaminants (e.g., chemical and biological warfare agents) released into the turbulent atmosphere, much less work has been directed toward the inverse prediction of agent source location and strength from the measured concentration, even though the importance of this problem for a number of practical applications is obvious. In general, the inverse problem of source reconstruction is ill-posed and unsolvable without additional information. It is demonstrated that a Bayesian probabilistic inferential framework provides a natural and logically consistent method for source reconstruction from a limited number of noisy concentration data. In particular, the Bayesian approach permits one to incorporate prior knowledge about the source as well as additional information regarding both model and data errors. The latter enables a rigorous determination of the uncertainty in the inference of the source parameters (e.g., spatial location, emission rate, release time, etc.), hence extending the potential of the methodology as a tool for quantitative source reconstruction. A model (or, source-receptor relationship) that relates the source distribution to the concentration data measured by a number of sensors is formulated, and Bayesian probability theory is used to derive the posterior probability density function of the source parameters. A computationally efficient methodology for determination of the likelihood function for the problem, based on an adjoint representation of the source-receptor relationship, is described. Furthermore, we describe the application of efficient stochastic algorithms based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) for sampling from the posterior distribution of the source parameters, the latter of which is required to undertake the Bayesian computation. The Bayesian inferential methodology for source reconstruction is validated against real

  10. Comparison between the polar organic chemical integrative sampler and the solid-phase extraction for estimating herbicide time-weighted average concentrations during a microcosm experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzella, N.; Debenest, T.; Delmas, F.

    2008-01-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) were exposed for 9 days in two different microcosms that contained river waters spiked with deethylterbuthylazine, terbuthylazine and isoproturon. The experiment was performed with natural light and strong turbulence (flow velocities of about 1550 cm/s) for reproducing natural conditions. The concentrations were kept relatively constant in the first microcosm (2.63.6 µg/L) and were variable in the second microcosm (peak concentrations ranged...

  11. Analytical studies of chemical and physical properties of concentrated plutonium solutions in nitric acid medium and their variations during long time storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of concentrated solutions of PuIV (250 and 500g/l) in HNO3 5M during long time storage is investigated. Metals are tested for their resistance to corrosion (Zr, Ti, steels: ZZCND17-12, ZZCND18-10, Uranus S). Physical and chemical properties (density, viscosity, radiolytic gas evolution) of the solutions are studied

  12. Impact of Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in Life Cycle Assessment: A Novel Characterization Model Based on Measured Concentrations and Labor Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijko, Gaël; Margni, Manuele; Partovi-Nia, Vahid; Doudrich, Greg; Jolliet, Olivier

    2015-07-21

    According to Lim et al., based on World Health Organization (WHO) data, hazardous chemicals in the workplace are responsible for over 370,000 premature deaths annually. Despite these high figures, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) does not yet include a fully operational method to consider occupational impacts in its scope over the entire supply chain. This paper describes a novel approach to account for occupational exposure to chemicals by inhalation in LCA. It combines labor statistics and measured occupational concentrations of chemicals from the OSHA database to calculate operational LCIA characterization factors (i.e., intakes per hour worked and impact intensities for 19,069 organic chemical/sector combinations with confidence intervals across the entire U.S. manufacturing industry). For the seven chemicals that most contribute to the global impact, measured workplace concentrations range between 5 × 10(-4) and 3 × 10(3) mg/m(3). Carcinogenic impacts range over 4 orders of magnitude, from 1.3 × 10(-8) and up to 3.4 × 10(-4) DALY per blue-collar worker labor hour. The innovative approach set out in this paper assesses health impacts from occupational exposure to chemicals with population exposure to outdoor emissions, making it possible to integrate occupational exposure within LCIA. It broadens the LCIA scope to analyze hotspots and avoid impact shifting. PMID:26079305

  13. PM10 mass concentration, chemical composition, and sources in the typical coal-dominated industrial city of Pingdingshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shushen; Shao, Longyi; Fan, Jingsen; Liu, Yanfei

    2016-11-15

    The atmospheric pollution created by coal-dominated industrial cities in China cannot be neglected. This study focuses on the atmospheric PM10 in the typical industrial city of Pingdingshan City in North China. A total of 44 PM10 samples were collected from three different sites (power plant, mining area, and roadside) in Pingdingshan City during the winter of 2013, and were analyzed gravimetrically and chemically. The Pingdingshan PM10 samples were composed of mineral matter (average of 118.0±58.6μg/m(3), 20.6% of the total PM10 concentration), secondary crystalline particles (338.7±122.0μg/m(3), 59.2%), organic matter (77.3±48.5μg/m(3), 13.5%), and elemental carbon (38.0±28.3μg/m(3), 6.6%). Different sources had different proportions of these components in PM10. The power plant pollutant source was characterized by secondary crystalline particles (377.1μg/m(3)), elemental carbon (51.5μg/m(3)), and organic matter (90.6μg/m(3)) due to coal combustion. The mining area pollutant source was characterized by mineral matter (124.0μg/m(3)) due to weathering of waste dumps. The roadside pollutant source was characterized by mineral matter (130.0μg/m(3)) and organic matter (81.0μg/m(3)) due to road dust and vehicle exhaust, respectively. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis was performed for PM10 source apportionment to identify major anthropogenic sources of PM10 in Pingdingshan. Six factors-crustal matter, coal combustion, vehicle exhaust and abrasion, local burning, weathering of waste dumps, and industrial metal smelting-were identified and their contributions to Pingdingshan PM10 were 19.0%, 31.6%, 7.4%, 6.3%, 9.8%, and 25.9%, respectively. Compared to other major cities in China, the source of PM10 in Pingdingshan was characterized by coal combustion, weathering of waste dumps, and industrial metal smelting. PMID:27450962

  14. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from animal buildings: Part 5 - Correlations between odor intensities and chemical concentrations (GC-MS/O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simultaneous chemical and sensory analysis based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) of air samples from livestock operations is a very useful approach for quantification of target odorous gases and also for ranking of odorous compounds. This information can help link spec...

  15. Understanding and modeling of chemical transition of nitrate accompanied with corrosion of carbon steel under hyper-alkaline and high nitrate concentration conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactions between metal and nitrate ion have been studied to determine their roles in chemical conditioning of a radioactive waste disposal repository and its surrounding environment. Immersion tests and rest potential measurements under hyper-alkaline and high NaNO3 concentration conditions were conducted to elucidate and improve model predictions of chemical interactions between carbon steel and NO3- in highly concentrated solutions of nitrate salts. Potentiostatic electrolysis experiments in the concentrated solution with a carbon steel electrode, as the working electrode, were also conducted to determine the electrochemical rate equation for NO3- reduction to NO2-. Experimental results of potentiostatic electrolysis of the concentrated solutions showed that a linear electrochemical rate equation for NO3- reduction to NO2-, as used in the previous model, gave too high a rate under the conditions of high NaNO3 concentration (≥1 mol dm-3). To ameliorate this effect, a non-linear equation was derived assuming a Langmuir type adsorption process of NO3- as a precursor process of discharge, and the parameter for the equation was determined by curve fitting using the data acquired under the conditions of potential -0.85 V vs. SHE and pH 12.5. The equation was incorporated in the model, and was used to analyze the results of ampul tests and rest potential measurements. The modified model can estimate the tendency of time dependent variation of chemical species and of rest potentials in the highly concentrated solution of NaNO3. (author)

  16. The effects of soil chemical characteristics on the 134Cs concentrations in earthworms. Uptake from liquid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of potassium, stable cesium, calcium and ammonium in soil, and of the pH are known to affect the uptake of 134Cs by plants and soil organisms. It is uncertain as to which extent this is a direct effect on the uptake of 134Cs (e.g. through competition for binding sites) or an indirect effect through a changing distribution of the 134Cs between the solid and liquid phase of the soil. Studying the effect of both varying concentrations of potassium, stable cesium, calcium and ammonium and the pH on the uptake of 134Cs by the earthworms Eisenia foetida and Lumbricus rubellus from solution was, therefore, a means to investigate this effect. The concentrations of 134Cs in the earthworms were found to differ by a factor of three between the species. Highest and lowest 134Cs concentration differed by a factor of five within each species. Potassium affected the 134Cs concentration in the earthworms significantly in contrast to stable cesium. However, the effects expressed per millimole added, were comparable for both elements. The non-significance of stable cesium might have been caused by the small concentration range used. Considering the natural concentrations of potassium and stable cesium in soil solution, addition of potassium was shown to be a more realistic countermeasure. No significant effects from varying pH or calcium and ammonium concentrations were observed. The internal calcium concentration increased with increasing calcium concentration in solution, whereas the internal potassium concentration was independent of the potassium concentration in the solution. (author)

  17. Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the blood of pregnant hamsters during critical embryogenesis. 1. Subchronic exposure to arsenate utilizing constant rate administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration, availability, and chemical status of radiolabeled arsenic has been determined in the blood of pregnant hamsters at the beginning (morning of Day 8) and the end (morning of Day 9) of the critical period of embryogenesis. Hamster dams were exposed to teratogenic doses of arsenate by means of osmotic minipumps implanted on the morning of Day 6 of the gestation period. Whole blood arsenic concentrations were the same for 48 and 72 hr postimplant. The arsenic concentration of plasma equaled that of red cells. Plasma arsenic was not bound to macromolecules and had the same chemical status 48 and 72 hr postimplant. Arsenate was the dominant form (67% of the total). However, the presence of dimethylarsinic acid and arsenite indicates that the pentavalent species was metabolized. Red cell arsenic was bound to macromolecules in the cell sap. Seventy percent of red cell sap arsenic was dialyzable 48 hr postimplant, but only 56% 72 hr postimplant. Arsenate was the dominant dialyzable red cell species on Day 8 and arsenite was the major dialyzable form on Day 9. The authors findings demonstrate a relationship between the maternal blood concentration and chemical status of arsenic and the presence of malformations resulting from a constant rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate via the osmotic minipump

  18. Rumen papillae keratinization, cell glycogen and chemical composition of the meat from young bulls fed different levels of concentrate and babassu mesocarp bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Santos Barros

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the rumen papillae keratinization, cellular levels of liver and muscle glycogen, and the chemical composition of meat from feedlot-finished Nellore young bulls fed with levels of concentrate and babassu mesocarp bran. Twenty-eight animals with initial age of 21 months and initial body weight of 356.7 ± 19 kg were randomized to the following treatments: two levels of concentrate in the diet (65% and 71%, with or without inclusion of 35% of babassu mesocarp bran. Fragments of liver, muscle and rumen were obtained after slaughter of the animals. Levels of concentrate and babassu mesocarp bran in the diet did not affect the quantities of liver and muscle glycogen, and did not induce hyperkeratinization of rumen papillae. The chemical composition of the meat was not affected by the studied factors. The inclusion of 35% babassu mesocarp bran in high concentrate diets does not induce hyperkeratinization of rumen papillae, and does not change the amount of muscle and liver glycogen or the chemical characteristics of meat of Nellore young bulls.

  19. Determination of boron concentration in borosilicate glass, boron carbide and graphite samples by conventional wet-chemical and nuclear analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron is an important element in nuclear technology. A comparative study was carried out for the determination of boron in borosilicate glass, boron carbide and graphite samples by wet-chemical and nuclear analytical methods. Wet chemical methods namely titrimetry, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and ICP Optical Emission Spectrometry and nuclear analytical methods namely Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission and Nuclear Reaction Analysis were used. Boron concentrations were in trace (mg kg-1) level in graphite and percentage level in borosilicate glass and boron carbide. (author)

  20. Equilibrium sampling of environmental pollutants in fish: Comparison with lipid- normalized concentrations and homogenization effects on chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha;

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling of organic pollutants into the silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has recently been applied in biological tissues including fish. Pollutant concentrations in PDMS can then be multiplied with lipid/PDMS distribution coefficients (DLipid,PDMS) to obtain concentrations in fish...

  1. Chemical composition, molecular weight distribution, secondary structure and effect of NaCl on functional properties of walnut (Juglans regia L) protein isolates and concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Ying; Hua, Yu-Fei

    2014-08-01

    Chemical composition, molecular weight distribution, secondary structure and effect of sodium chloride concentration on functional properties of walnut protein isolates, concentrates and defatted walnut flour were study. Compared with walnut protein concentrates (75.6%) and defatted walnut flour (52.5%), walnut protein isolates contain a relatively high amount of protein (90.5%). The yield of walnut protein isolates and concentrates was 43.2% and 76.6%, respectively. In molecular weight distribution study, Walnut protein isolates showed one peak with molecular weight of 106.33 KDa (100%) and walnut protein concentrates showed four peaks with molecular weight of 16,725 KDa (0.8%),104.943 KDa(63.9%), 7.3 KDa (11.4%), 2.6 KDa (23.9%). The secondary structure of walnut protein isolates was similar to that of walnut protein concentrates, but was differ from that of defatted walnut flour. The addition of sodium chloride (0 ~ 1 M) could improve the functionality of walnut protein concentrates, isolates and defatted walnut flour. The maximum solubility, water absorption capacity, emulsifying properties and foaming properties of walnut protein isolates, concentrates and defatted walnut flour were at sodium chloride solutions of 1.0 M, 0.6 M, 0.4 M, 0.6 M, respectively. The solubility of walnut protein concentrates (32.5%) in distilled water with 0 M sodium chloride was lower than that of walnut protein isolates (35.2%). The maximum solubility of walnut protein isolates, concentrates and defatted walnut flour in solution were 36.8%, 33.7% and 9.6% at 1.0 M sodium chloride solutions, respectively. As compared with other vegetable proteins, walnut protein isolates and concentrates exhibited better emulsifying properties and foam stability. PMID:25114337

  2. Rumen papillae keratinization, cell glycogen and chemical composition of the meat from young bulls fed different levels of concentrate and babassu mesocarp bran

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Santos Barros; Rossini Sôffa da Cruz; Lázaro Moreira de Melo Junior; Domenica Palomaris Mariano de Souza; Sandro Estevan Moron; Emerson Alexandrino; Regis Luis Missio; José Neuman Miranda Neiva; João Restle; Viviane Mayumi Maruo; Luciano Fernandes Sousa; Adriano Tony Ramos

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the rumen papillae keratinization, cellular levels of liver and muscle glycogen, and the chemical composition of meat from feedlot-finished Nellore young bulls fed with levels of concentrate and babassu mesocarp bran. Twenty-eight animals with initial age of 21 months and initial body weight of 356.7 ± 19 kg were randomized to the following treatments: two levels of concentrate in the diet (65% and 71%), with or without inclusion of 35% of babassu mesocarp bran. Fra...

  3. Passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures to terrestrial springtails: Linking mixture toxicity to chemical activities, equilibrium lipid concentrations, and toxic units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Holmstrup, Martin; Smith, Kilian E. C.; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    treatments, containing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. Springtail lethality was then linked to sum chemical activities (∑a), sum equilibrium lipid concentrations (∑Clipid eq.), and sum toxic units (∑TU). In each case, the effects of all 12 mixture treatments...... could be fitted to one sigmoidal exposure-response relationship. The effective lethal chemical activity (La50) of 0.027 was well within the expected range for baseline toxicity of 0.01-0.1. Linking the effects to the lipid-based exposure parameter yielded an effective lethal concentration (LClipid eq....... 50) of 133 mmol kg-1 lipid in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg-1 lipid). Finally, the effective lethal toxic unit (LTU50) of 1.20 was rather close to the expected value of 1. Altogether, passive dosing provided tightly controlled mixture...

  4. Shake-flask test for determination of biodegradation rates of 14C-labelled chemicals at low concentrations in surface water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, F.; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    ) concentrations in surface water systems. The basic principle of measurement was to determine evolved CO2 indirectly from measurements of total organic activity in subsamples after stripping off their content of CO2, Used with surface water alone the test simulates a pelagic environment and amended with sediments......A simple shake-flask surface water biodegradability die away test with C-14-labeled chemicals added to microgram per liter concentrations (usually 1-100 mu g/L) is described and evaluated. The aim was to provide information on biodegradation behavior and kinetic rates at environmental (low...... (0.1-1 dry weight/L) the test is intended to simulate a water environment with suspended solids (e.g., resuspended sediments). A protocol of the test used with the C-14 technique or with specific chemical analysis was recently developed by the International Organization for Standardization. Practical...

  5. Influence of ethanol concentration, addition of spices extract, and level of sweetness on physico-chemical characteristics and sensory quality of apple vermouth

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi Vinod K.; Sandhu Danwant K.

    2000-01-01

    The composition of apple base wine was found to be suitable for conversion into vermouth. The spices extract contained more TSS, tannins, esters, volatile acid but lower titrable acid than apple base wine. To optimize and develop apple vermouth with different ethanol concentrations (12%, 15%, 18%), sugar content (4%, 8%) and spices extract (2.5% and 5.0%) was prepared and was evaluated. Significant differences in physico-chemical characteristics and sensory quality amongst the vermouths havin...

  6. In vitro protein digestibility and physico-chemical properties of flours and protein concentrates from two varieties of lentil (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbana, Chockry; Boye, Joyce Irene

    2013-02-01

    The chemical composition of whole lentil flours and lentil protein concentrates prepared by alkaline extraction and iso-electric precipitation from Blaze and Laird varieties of lentil were studied. The protein composition of the flours and concentrates, determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) showed that the extracted proteins were composed mainly of globulins and albumins. Trypsin inhibitor activity ranged between 0.94 and 1.94 trypsin inhibitor units (TIU) mg(-1) for the flours, but was markedly lower in the protein concentrates ranging between 0.17 and 0.66 TIU mg(-1). In vitro protein digestibility ranged between 75.90 and 77.05% for the flours, whereas significantly (P flours and the concentrates from both varieties. Thermal properties of both flours as studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were comparable. However, the endothermic parameters of the two protein concentrates were significantly (P lentil protein concentrates is higher than that of the flours, however, both lentil flours and protein concentrates contain useful proteins that could serve as value-added ingredients in food formulations. PMID:23151538

  7. Some factors determining the concentration of liver proteins for optimal mutagenicity of chemicals in the Salmonella/microsome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaveille, C; Kuroki, T; Brun, G; Hautefeuille, A; Camus, A M; Bartsch, H

    1979-12-01

    In plate assays in the presence of S. typhimurium TA100 and various amounts of liver 9000 X g supernatant (S9) from either untreated, phenobarbitone- (PB) or Aroclor-treated rats, the S9 concentration required for optimal mutagenicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB) depended both on the source of S9 and on the concentration of the test compound. In these assays, the water-soluble procarcinogen, dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was mutagenic in S. typhimurium TA1530 only in the presence of a 35-fold higher concentration of liver S9 from PB-treated rats than that required for AFB, a lipophilic compound. In liquid assays, a biphasic relationship was observed in the mutagenicities in S. typhimurium TA100 of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and AFB and the concentration of liver S9. For optimal mutagenesis of BP, the concentration of liver S9 from rats treated with methylcholanthrene (MC) was 4.4% (v/v); for AFB it was 2.2% (v/v) liver S9 from either Aroclor-treated or untreated rats. At higher concentrations of S9 the mutagenicity of BP and of AFB was related inversely to the amount of S9 per assay. The effect of Aroclor treatment on the microsomemediated mutagenicity of AFB was assay-dependent: in the liquid assay, AFB mutagenicity was decreased, whereas in the plate assay it did not change or was increased. As virtually no bacteria-bound microsomes were detected by electron microscopy, after the bacteria had been incubated in a medium containing 1-34% (v/v) MC-treated rat-liver S9, it is concluded that, in mutagenicity assays, mutagenic metabolites generated by microsomal enzymes from certain pro-carcinogens have to diffuse through the assay medium before reaching the bacteria. Thus the mutagenicity of BP was dependent on both the concentration of rat-liver microsomes and that of total cytosolic proteins and other soluble nucleophiles such as glutathione. At a concentration of 4.4% (v/v) liver S9, the mutagenicity of BP was about 3.6 times higher than in assays containing a 4-fold higher

  8. Physico-Chemical parameters and trace-metals concentration in effluents from various industries in vicinity of Lahore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing problem of pollution has become serious in almost all big cities of Pakistan. The industrial effluents (Liquid waste) discharged by different industries are drained into streams/nallahs, which ultimately join the waterways (streams, lakes, rivers or sea). The effluent samples from five industries, like Tanneries, Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, Fertilizers and metal/electroplating, working in Lahore, Sheikhupura and Kalashahkaku were selected for analysis. The parameters, like Temperature, pH, conductivity, hardness, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, chemical oxygen demands, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, major cations (Na, K, Ca, Mg) and heavy/trace metals, were studied. The results were compared with National environmental Quality standards (NEQS). It was further observed that when effluents of industries join fresh water of stream, lakes or rivers, this causes severe water-pollution and damages the flora and fauna. Suggestions for effective control of water-pollution are also given. (author)

  9. Comparing three vegetation monoterpene emission models to measured gas concentrations with a model of meteorology, air chemistry and chemical transport

    OpenAIRE

    S. Smolander; Q. He; D. Mogensen; Zhou, L; Bäck, J.; T. Ruuskanen; Noe, S.; A. Guenther; Aaltonen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are essential in atmospheric chemistry because of their chemical reactions that produce and destroy tropospheric ozone, their effects on aerosol formation and growth, and their potential influence on global warming. As one of the important BVOC groups, monoterpenes have been a focus of scientific attention in atmospheric research. Detailed regional measurements and model estimates are needed to study emission potential and the mono...

  10. The physical and chemical stability of cisplatin (Teva) in concentrate and diluted in sodium chloride 0.9%

    OpenAIRE

    Karbownik, Agnieszka; Szałek, Edyta; Urjasz, Hanna; Głęboka, Aleksandra; Mierzwa, Emilia; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The subject of study was the stability of cisplatin in concentrate in glass vials and diluted in polyethylene (PE) bags stored at 15–25°C for up to 30 days. Material and methods Original vials of cisplatin injection (1 mg/ml, Teva) were stored at room temperature and subjected to re-piercing after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 30 days following the initial piercing. Cisplatin infusions at nominal concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml were prepared in 0.9% sodium chloride (1000 ml) in PE b...

  11. Influence of anionic concentration and deposition temperature on formation of wurtzite CdS thin films by in situ chemical reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We have deposited nanocrystalline CdS thin films on glass substrates by a new in situ chemical reaction synthesis. ► This method used cadmium precursor solid films as reaction source and sodium sulfide based solutions as anionic reaction medium. ► The influence of the S:Cd molar concentrations in separate cationic and anionic precursor solutions on CdS films was investigated. ► The influence of the deposition temperature on crystallized structure and morphologies of the deposited CdS films were investigated. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline CdS thin films were deposited on glass substrates by a new in situ chemical reaction synthesis using cadmium precursor solid films as reaction source and sodium sulfide based solutions as anionic reaction medium. The influence of the S:Cd molar concentrations in separate cationic and anionic precursor solutions and the deposition temperature on the crystallized structure, morphologies, chemical component and optical properties of the deposited CdS films was investigated by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and UV–Vis spectra measurements. The results show that CdS thin films deposited by the in situ chemical reaction synthesis have wurtzite structure with (0 0 2) plane preferential orientation and this tendency gradually enhances with increase of S:Cd molar concentration ratio. The deposition rate was 80–100 nm thickness per cycle in the range of deposition temperature from 20 °C to 60 °C.

  12. Atmospheric mercury concentration and chemical speciation at a rural site in Beijing, China: implications of mercury emission sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of atmospheric mercury concentration and speciation play a key role in identifying mercury sources and its behavior in the atmosphere. In this study, speciated atmospheric mercury including gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and particle-bound mercury (PBM were continuously measured at Miyun, a rural site in Beijing, China, from December 2008 to November 2009. The average GEM, RGM and PBM concentrations were found to be 3.22 ± 1.74, 10.1 ± 18.8 and 98.2 ± 112.7 pg m−3, respectively, about 2–20 times higher than the background concentration of the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicated that atmospheric mercury concentrations in northern China were highly affected by anthropogenic emissions. The atmospheric mercury showed obvious seasonal variations, with the highest seasonal average GEM concentration in summer (3.48 ng m−3 and the lowest value in winter (2.66 ng m−3. In autumn and winter a diurnal variation of GEM was observed, with peak levels in the late afternoon till midnight. Most of the high RGM concentration values occurred in the afternoon of all seasons due to the higher oxidation. The PBM concentration was higher in early morning of all seasons because of the the temperature inversion that increases in depth as the night proceeds. The ratio of GEM to CO indicates that residential boilers play an important role in the elevation of GEM in winter. The ratio of RGM to O3 could be an indicator of the contribution of local primary sources. The ratio of PBM to PM2.5 reveals that the air mass from the east and southwest of the site in spring and summer carries more atmospheric mercury. The HYSPLIT back-trajectory analysis indicated that the monitoring site is affected by local, regional and interregional sources simultaneously during heavy pollution episodes. The results from the potential source contribution function (PSCF model indicate that the atmospheric transport

  13. Organic production in corn: impact of fertilization with landfill leachate in chemical composition, productivity and concentration of metals in grain

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Ezequiel Risso; Suzy Sayuri Sassamoto Kurokawa; Diva de Souza Andrade; Elisa Yoko Hirooka

    2015-01-01

    The use of landfill leachate in agricultural soils as fertilizer emerges as an alternative for the disposal of this effluent, however presence of heavy metals may be a limiting factor for that use. Fertilization with five doses of landfill leachate (0, 32.7, 65.4, 98.1 and 130.8 m3 ha-1) and urea (120 kg ha-1) was evaluated in productivity, chemical composition and metal content of corn in crops 2010 and 2012. The accumulation of metals in leaf tissue was also evaluated in oats grown in the w...

  14. Comparing three vegetation monoterpene emission models to measured gas concentrations with a model of meteorology, air chemistry and chemical transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolander, S.; He, Q.; Mogensen, Ditte; Zhou, L.; Back, J.; Ruuskanen, T.; Noe, S.; Guenther, Alex B.; Aaltonen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, Michael

    2014-10-07

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are essential in atmospheric chemistry because of their chemical reactions that produce and destroy tropospheric ozone, their effects on aerosol formation and growth, and their potential influence on global warming. As one of the important BVOC groups, monoterpenes have been a focus of scientific attention in atmospheric research. Detailed regional measurements and model estimates are needed to study emission potential and the monoterpene budget on a global scale. Since the use of empirical measurements for upscaling is limited by many physical and biological factors such as genetic variation, temperature and light, water availability, seasonal changes, and environmental stresses, comprehensive inventories over larger areas are difficult to obtain.

  15. Chemical Swarming: Depending on Concentration, an Amphiphilic Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complex Induces Cell Death via Two Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Bianka; van Rixel, Vincent H S; van Rooden, Eva J; Hopkins, Samantha L; Moester, Miriam J B; Ariese, Freek; Siegler, Maxime A; Bonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-07-25

    The crystal structure and in vitro cytotoxicity of the amphiphilic ruthenium complex [3](PF6 )2 are reported. Complex [3](PF6 )2 contains a Ru-S bond that is stable in the dark in cell-growing medium, but is photosensitive. Upon blue-light irradiation, complex [3](PF6 )2 releases the cholesterol-thioether ligand 2 and an aqua ruthenium complex [1](PF6 )2 . Although ligand 2 and complex [1](PF6 )2 are by themselves not cytotoxic, complex [3](PF6 )2 was unexpectedly found to be as cytotoxic as cisplatin in the dark, that is, with micromolar effective concentrations (EC50 ), against six human cancer cell lines (A375, A431, A549, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and U87MG). Blue-light irradiation (λ=450 nm, 6.3 J cm(-2) ) had little influence on the cytotoxicity of [3](PF6 )2 after 6 h of incubation time, but it increased the cytotoxicity of the complex by a factor 2 after longer (24 h) incubation. Exploring the unexpected biological activity of [3](PF6 )2 in the dark elucidated an as-yet unknown bifaceted mode of action that depended on concentration, and thus, on the aggregation state of the compound. At low concentration, it acts as a monomer, inserts into the membrane, and can deliver [1](2+) inside the cell upon blue-light activation. At higher concentrations (>3-5 μm), complex [3](PF6 )2 forms supramolecular aggregates that induce non-apoptotic cell death by permeabilizing cell membranes and extracting lipids and membrane proteins. PMID:27373895

  16. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards. - Highlights: • A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique is introduced for composition monitoring in industrial copper concentrates. • Calibration samples consisted of pellets produced from the tested materials. • The proposed method of post-processing significantly minimizes matrix effects. • The possible uses of this technique are limited mainly by accurate characterization of the standard samples

  17. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Łazarek, Łukasz, E-mail: lukasz.lazarek@pwr.wroc.pl [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Drzymała, Jan [Faculty of Geoengineering, Mining and Geology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Abramski, Krzysztof M. [Laser and Fiber Electronics Group, Faculty of Electronics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards. - Highlights: • A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique is introduced for composition monitoring in industrial copper concentrates. • Calibration samples consisted of pellets produced from the tested materials. • The proposed method of post-processing significantly minimizes matrix effects. • The possible uses of this technique are limited mainly by accurate characterization of the standard samples.

  18. Simulation of the Two-Dimensional Gasdynamic, Temperature, and Concentration Fields in an Injection Reactor of Chemical Vapor Deposition for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futko, S. I.; Chornyi, A. D.; Shulitskii, B. G.; Labunov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional axisymmetric gasdynamic, concentration, and heat fields arising in an injection reactor of chemical vapor deposition in the process of synthesis of arrays of carbon nanotubes in it from hydrocarbons and organometallic compounds were numerically simulated for the purpose of investigating the features of these fields. It was established that, even in the case of laminar flow of a gas mixture over the surface of a substrate positioned in this reactor, in it there arise vortices introducing a significant heterogeneity into the gas flow. The influence of changes in the gasdynamic and temperature fields in the indicated reactor on the characteristics of an array of carbon nanotubes grown on the surface of the substrate was analyzed. Parametric calculations of the dependences of the velocity of the gas flow, the gas temperature, and the concentration of reagents in the reactor on the hydrocarbon flow rate, the temperature of the process, and the length of the injection needle have been performed. These calculations have shown that the regimes of heating and mixing of reagents in an injection reactor of chemical vapor deposition correspond to those of an ideal-mixing reactor. The results obtained can be used for determining the conditions necessary for the growth of homogeneous arrays of carbon nanotubes with a high rate on the surface of a substrate in a reactor of chemical vapor deposition.

  19. Pretreatment of ultra-high concentrated wastewater from phthalonitrile resin manufacturing by chemical precipitation, reduction and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qingqing; Yuan, Yue; Lai, Bo; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Yuexi

    2016-05-01

    To remove the toxic and refractory pollutants in the phthalonitrile resin wastewater and improve its biodegradability, a combined process (i.e., CaCl2+AA+Fe/Cu/air) was developed to pretreat this wastewater obtained from a phthalonitrile resin manufacturing plant in southwestern China. First, CO3(2-) was precipitated and removed by adding CaCl2. Furthermore, its ultra-high concentrated NO2(-) (22.7±0.1g/L) was reduced into N2 by adding amidosulphonic acid (AA). Meanwhile, two control experiments were setup to confirm the superiority of the combined process (i.e., CaCl2+AA). Subsequently, the wastewater was further treated by Fe/Cu/air process after the removal of CO3(2-) and NO2(-). The results suggest that the developed method not only could effectively remove the ultra-high concentrated CO3(2-) (>99%) and NO2(-) (>99%), but also could obtain high COD (58.8%) and colority (95.2%) removal efficiencies. Meanwhile, B/C ratio of this wastewater increased from 0.19 to 0.45, which suggests the biodegradability also was improved significantly. Finally, the high treatment efficiency was mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of CaCl2, AA and Fe/Cu/air. Therefore, the combined process is a promising pretreatment process for the ultra-high concentrated wastewater from phthalonitrile resin manufacturing. PMID:26848825

  20. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated lake ecosystem: Combining equilibrium passive sampling of sediment and water with total concentration measurements of biota:Chemical equilibrium status of an aquatic ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T.; Figueiredo, Kaisa; Mayer, Philipp; Gilbert, Dorothea; Jahnke, Annika; Gil-Allué, Carmen; Akkanen, Jarkko; Nybom, Inna; Herve, Sirpa

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling devices can be applied to study and monitor the exposure and fate of hydrophobic organic chemicals on a thermodynamic basis. They can be used to determine freely dissolved concentrations and chemical activity ratios and to predict equilibrium partitioning concentrations of hydrophobic organic chemicals in biota lipids. The authors' aim was to assess the equilibrium status of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated lake ecosystem and along its discharge course u...

  1. Spatial variation of PM 2.5 chemical species and source-apportioned mass concentrations in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazuhiko; Xue, Nan; Thurston, George

    2004-10-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a chemically non-specific pollutant, and may originate or be derived from different emission source types. Thus, its toxicity may well vary depending on its chemical composition. If the PM toxicity could be determined based on source types, the regulation of PM may be implemented more effectively. A large number of monitors began collecting PM less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) mass samples for subsequent chemical speciation starting 2000-2001 in the US. The data from this chemical speciation network can be useful for source-oriented evaluations of PM health effects. However, there are several issues that need to be considered in the analysis and interpretation of these data. One major issue is a monitor's representation of regional, sub-regional, and local air pollution exposures to the population in a city or metropolitan area. Because health outcomes in time-series air pollution epidemiological studies are aggregated over a wide geographical area, regional PM pollution may have smaller errors in exposure estimates than more spatially varying local pollution. However, the relative strength of association between source-apportioned PM and health outcomes may not be interpretable as the relative causal role of the source types. To our knowledge, there has not yet been a systematic and quantitative evaluation of this issue. In this study, we attempt to evaluate this issue by analyzing newly available PM2.5 speciation data from three monitors (a few miles apart) in New York City during 2001-2002. The strongest temporal correlations across the three monitors were found for the individual PM components that are related to secondary aerosols (e.g., S, NH4). We also conducted source-apportionment of the data using absolute principal component analysis and positive matrix factorization. We identified four major source/pollution types: (1) secondary (largely regional) aerosols; (2) soil; (3) traffic-related; and (4) residual oil burning

  2. Effect of vacuum conditions and plasma concentration on the chemical composition and adhesion of vacuum-plasma coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, D. P.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Slabodchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper reports on the chemical composition of titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon (Si) coatings deposited with a new technological vacuum plasma setup which comprises magnetron sputtering systems, arc evaporators, and an efficient plasma generator. It is shown that due to highly clean vacuum conditions and highly clean surface treatment in the gas discharge plasma, both the coating-substrate interface and the coatings as such are almost free from oxygen and carbon. It is found that the coating-substrate interface represents a layer of thickness ≥ 60 nm formed through vacuum plasma mixing of the coating and substrate materials. The TiN coatings obtained on the new equipment display a higher adhesion compared to brass coatings deposited by industrial technologies via intermediate titanium oxide layers. It is concluded that the designed vacuum plasma equipment allows efficient surface modification of materials and articles by vacuum plasma immersion processes.

  3. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2015-03-01

    This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.

  4. Validation of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition on forested sites in Europe: 2. DOC concentration as an estimator of the organic ion charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti-Jussi LINDROOS

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A Working Group on Quality Assurance/Quality Control of analyses in laboratories active in the chemical analysis of atmospheric deposition and soil water has been created within the framework of the Integrated Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (UN-ECE/ICP Forests and the EU/Forest Focus Programme (Regulation 2152/2003. This paper is a follow up to an earlier paper dealing with the validation of chemical analyses, in which validation techniques (ion balance, comparison between measured and calculated conductivity, Na/Cl ratio and relationship between different forms of N were tested on a set of real analysis data obtained from different laboratories. This paper focuses on the validation of chemical analysis of samples containing high dissolved organic carbon (DOC concentrations (> 5 mg C L-1, where the ion balance criterion fails because of the presence of weak organic acids. About 6000 chemical analyses of bulk open field, throughfall and stemflow samples, which contained complete sets of all ion concentrations, conductivity and DOC, produced in 8 different laboratories, were used to calculate empirical relationships between DOC and the difference between the sum of cations and the sum of anions, with the aim to evaluate a formal charge per mg of organic C. Regression coefficients were obtained for data from each laboratory, as well as for all the data combined. The coefficients were further tested using an independent set of data from each country. The differences between the individual laboratory and the overall regression coefficients are discussed. The results are also considered in the light of formal charge values for DOC/TOC obtained in studies on freshwater. The formal DOC charge proved to be useful for estimating the contribution of organic acids in the ion balance test, thus considerably improving the applicability of the ion balance as a validation criterion for samples with high

  5. The long shadow of our chemical past - High DDT concentrations in fish near a former agrochemicals factory in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Monika D; Crosse, John; Hamilton, Patrick B; Johnson, Andrew C; Jones, Kevin C

    2016-11-01

    A total of 81 roach (Rutilus rutilus) collected from 13 southern English river sites between 2007 and 2012, were analysed for organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, PBDEs and some metals. Unexpectedly high concentrations of the banned insecticide DDT and its degradation products DDE and DDD (∑DDTs) were found in the 10 fish from the river Lee (or Lea) which averaged 88 ± 70 (standard deviation) μg/kg ww, almost 20 times higher than the average for the remaining sites (4.8 ± 3.1 μg/kg). All fish from that site exceeded the Canadian Tissue Residue Guideline (environmental quality standard) of 14 μg/kg ∑DDTs. Concentrations of the insecticides chlordane and lindane as well as copper, which is often used as a fungicide, were also elevated in fish from the Lee, though not as much as those of DDTs. A likely explanation for these observations was found in a nearby former pesticide factory, which had stopped production about three decades earlier. An extensive review of recent literature data on DDT in wild European fish found that, while levels are now generally low, there were several other hotspots with ∑DDTs levels that may still be of concern. PMID:27518925

  6. Fast preparation of Na0.44MnO2 nanorods via a high NaOH concentration hydrothermal soft chemical reaction and their lithium storage properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a high NaOH concentration hydrothermal soft chemical reaction to prepare Na0.44MnO2 nanorods. In this process, Na-birnessite precursors and concentrated NaOH solution are introduced into the hydrothermal reaction. As a result, the hydrothermal time can be significantly shortened from 96 to 24 h, the hydrothermal temperature can be reduced from 205 to 180 °C and the yield of Na0.44MnO2 can be increased from about 0.6 to about 2.4 g/(mL.day), respectively. Furthermore, the obtained Na0.44MnO2 nanorods with one-dimensional tunnel structures exhibit favorable electrochemical lithium storage properties, which make them promising for the cathode materials of lithium-ion batteries

  7. Shake-flask test for determination of biodegradation rates of 14C-labelled chemicals at low concentrations in surface water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, F.; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    A simple shake-flask surface water biodegradability die away test with C-14-labeled chemicals added to microgram per liter concentrations (usually 1-100 mu g/L) is described and evaluated. The aim was to provide information on biodegradation behavior and kinetic rates at environmental (low......) concentrations in surface water systems. The basic principle of measurement was to determine evolved CO2 indirectly from measurements of total organic activity in subsamples after stripping off their content of CO2, Used with surface water alone the test simulates a pelagic environment and amended with sediments...... regular reinoculation with freshly collected surface water could, however, overcome the problems of false-negative results. (C) 2000 Academic Press....

  8. Predicting the concentration range of unmonitored chemicals in wastewater-dominated streams and in run-off from biosolids-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Bipin P; Halden, Rolf U

    2012-12-01

    Organic compounds such as sterols and hormones have been detected in surface waters at ecologically relevant concentrations with sources including effluent discharged from publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) as well as leachate and runoff from land amended with municipal sludge (biosolids). Greater than 20% of regulated effluents discharged into U.S. surface waters experience in-stream dilution of effluents. The increasing use of biosolids on agricultural land exerts additional stress, thereby necessitating environmental monitoring for potential ecological and human health effects. Alternatively or in addition to monitoring efforts, screening for potentially hazardous chemicals can be performed using empirical models that are scalable and can deliver results rapidly. The present study makes use of data from U.S. EPA's Targeted National Sewage Sludge Survey (TNSSS) to predict the aqueous-phase concentrations and removal efficiencies of 10 sterols (campesterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, β-stigmastanol, cholesterol, desmosterol, cholestanol, coprostanol, epicoprostanol, and ergosterol) as well as the putative toxicity posed by four specific hormones based on their reported biosolids concentrations using published empirical models. Model predictions indicate that removal efficiencies for sterols are uniformly high (~99%) and closely match removal rates calculated from chemical monitoring at POTWs (paired t-test; p=0.01). Results from toxicity modeling indicate that the hormones estrone, estradiol and estriol had the highest leaching potentials amongst the compounds considered here and that 17 β-ethinylestradiol was found to pose a potentially significant threat to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) via run-off or leaching from biosolids-amended fields. This study exemplifies the use of in silico analysis to (i) identify potentially problematic organic compounds in biosolids, (ii) predict influent and effluent levels for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs

  9. Effects of copper precursor concentration on the growth of cupric oxide nanorods for photoelectrode using a modified chemical bath deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CuO nanorod photoelectrodes were prepared by modified CBD method. • The CuO nanorods were vertically grown with a high growth rate. • Effects of precursor concentration on the CuO nanorods were investigated. - Abstract: In this study, vertically aligned CuO nanorods were grown using a modified chemical bath deposition method with various copper precursor concentrations. The morphological, structural, optical and photoelectrochemical properties of the synthesized CuO samples were characterized using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, an X-ray diffractometer, a UV–visible spectrometer and a three-electrode potentiostat, respectively. The growth rates of the samples varied from 4.3 to 500 nm/min with the varying precursor concentrations. The vertically well-grown CuO nanorods exhibited one-dimensional growth along the (0 2 0) plane. We obtained a maximum photocurrent density of −1.05 mA/cm2 at −0.6 V (vs. SCE) from the CuO nanorod photoelectrode grown using the 10 mM copper precursor concentration

  10. Hole traps associated with high-concentration residual carriers in p-type GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuch, Omar; Wang, Li; Lee, Kan-Hua; Demizu, Koshiro; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The hole traps associated with high background doping in p-type GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy are studied based on the changes of carrier concentration, junction capacitance, and hole traps properties due to the annealing. The carrier concentration was increased dramatically with annealing time, based on capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. In addition, the temperature dependence of the junction capacitance (C-T) was increased rapidly two times. Such behavior is explained by the thermal ionization of two acceptor states. These acceptors are the main cause of high background doping in the film, since the estimated carrier concentration from C-T results explains the measured carrier concentration at room temperature using C-V method. The acceptor states became shallower after annealing, and hence their structures are thermally unstable. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) showed that the HC2 hole trap was composed of two signals, labeled HC21 and HC22. These defects correspond to the acceptor levels, as their energy levels obtained from DLTS are similar to those deduced from C-T. The capture cross sections of HC21 and HC22 are larger than those of single acceptors. In addition, their energy levels and capture cross sections change in the same way due to the annealing. This tendency suggests that HC21 and HC22 signals originate from the same defect which acts as a double acceptor.

  11. Effects of copper precursor concentration on the growth of cupric oxide nanorods for photoelectrode using a modified chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hee-bong [Department of Nano Science and Engineering, High Safety Vehicle Core Technology Research Center, Inje University, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hyukhyun, E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Engineering, High Safety Vehicle Core Technology Research Center, Inje University, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Jae [Department of Materials and Components Engineering, Dong-Eui University, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • CuO nanorod photoelectrodes were prepared by modified CBD method. • The CuO nanorods were vertically grown with a high growth rate. • Effects of precursor concentration on the CuO nanorods were investigated. - Abstract: In this study, vertically aligned CuO nanorods were grown using a modified chemical bath deposition method with various copper precursor concentrations. The morphological, structural, optical and photoelectrochemical properties of the synthesized CuO samples were characterized using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, an X-ray diffractometer, a UV–visible spectrometer and a three-electrode potentiostat, respectively. The growth rates of the samples varied from 4.3 to 500 nm/min with the varying precursor concentrations. The vertically well-grown CuO nanorods exhibited one-dimensional growth along the (0 2 0) plane. We obtained a maximum photocurrent density of −1.05 mA/cm{sup 2} at −0.6 V (vs. SCE) from the CuO nanorod photoelectrode grown using the 10 mM copper precursor concentration.

  12. Structural and optical properties of silicon thin-films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition: The effects of silane concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the structural and optical properties of a series of silicon (Si) thin-films deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition with different silane concentrations (SCs) are presented. All the films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL). In the Raman analysis, the first order and specifically the second order Raman spectra indicate increase in crystalline grain size as well as crystalline volume fraction in the films with a reduction in SC, which is also confirmed by the SEM analysis. At the higher SC, the Si microcrystalline grains get embedded in the nanocrystalline Si network. The Gaussian fitted peaks in the PL analysis reveal the emission due to either band to band tail-state transitions or tail-state to mid-gap defect-state transitions due to Si-dangling bonds present in the films. - Highlights: • Growth of silicon (Si) thin-films using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition. • Scanning Electron Microscopy, Raman and Photoluminescence Spectropscopy characterization. • Increment in Si crystalline volume fraction with decrease in Silane concentration. • Microcrystalline Si grains embedded in nanocrystalline Si tissues

  13. Effects of Exogenous Jasmonic Acid on Concentrations of Direct-Defense Chemicals and Expression of Related Genes in Bt(Bacillus thuringiensis)Corn(Zea mays)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yuan-jiao; WANG Jian-wu; LUO Shi-ming

    2007-01-01

    Bt corn is one of the top three large-scale commercialized transgenic crops around the world.It is increasingly clear that the complementary durable approaches for pest control,which combine the endogenous defense of the crop with the introduced foreign genes,are promising alternative strategies for pest resistance management and the next generation of insect-resistant transgenic crops.In the present study,we tested the inducible effects of exogenous jasmonic acid(JA) on direct-defense chemical content,Bt protein concentration,and related gene expression in the leaves of Bt corn cultivar 34B24 and non-Bt cultivar 34B23 by chemical analysis,ELISA,and RT-PCR.The results show that the expression of LOX,PR-2αMPI,and PR-1 genes in the treated leaf(the first leaf)was promoted by exogenous JA both in 34B24 and 34B23.As compared with the control,the concentration of DIMBOA in the treated leaf was significantly increased by 63 and 18% for 34B24 and 34B23,respectively.The total phenolic acid was also increased by 24 and 12% for both 34B24 and 34B23.The Bt protein content of 34B24 in the treated leaf was increased by 13% but decreased significantly by 27% in the second leaf.The induced response of 34B24 was in a systemic way and was much stronger than that of 34B23.Those findings indicated that there is a synergistic interaction between Bt gene and internally induced chemical defense system triggered by externally applied JA in Bt corn.

  14. Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnoor, Hatim, E-mail: hatim.alnoor@liu.se; Chey, Chan Oeurn; Pozina, Galia; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping (Sweden); Liu, Xianjie; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-583 81 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 °C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (μ-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions.

  15. Simultaneous enhancement of carrier mobility and concentration via tailoring of Al-chemical states in Al-ZnO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneously achieving higher carriers concentration and mobility is a technical challenge against up-scaling the transparent-conductive performances of transparent-conductive oxides. Utilizing one order higher dense (∼1 × 1011 cm−3) plasmas (in comparison to the conventional direct current plasmas), highly c-axis oriented Al-doped ZnO films have been prepared with precise control over relative composition and chemical states of constituting elements. Tailoring of intrinsic (O vacancies) and extrinsic (ionic Al and zero-valent Al) dopants provide simultaneous enhancement in mobility and concentration of charge carriers. Room-temperature resistivity as low as 4.89 × 10−4 Ω cm along the carrier concentration 5.6 × 1020 cm−3 is obtained in 200 nm thick transparent films. Here, the control of atomic Al reduces the charge trapping at grain boundaries and subdues the effects of grain boundary scattering. A mechanism based on the correlation between electron-hole interaction and carrier mobility is proposed for degenerately doped wide band-gap semiconductors

  16. Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 °C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (μ-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions

  17. Organic Chemical Concentrations and Reproductive Biomarkers in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) Collected from Two Areas in Lake Mead, Nevada, May 1999-May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodbred, Steven L.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Jenkins, Jill A.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Orsak, Erik; Rosen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Reclamation, and Nevada Department of Wildlife, collected and assessed data to determine the general health and reproductive status of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) at two study areas in Lake Mead, Nevada, during May 1999-May 2000. These data will form the basis of interpretations and provide a comparison for continuing studies on the health of the ecosystem in Lake Mead. One study area, Las Vegas Bay, is in the western part of Lake Mead. Las Vegas Bay receives inflows from Las Vegas Wash, which is predominantly tertiary-treated wastewater effluent, and to a lesser extent stormwater runoff from Las Vegas, Henderson, and other nearby communities, and from ground water underlying Las Vegas Valley. The other study area, Overton Arm, is in the northern extent of Lake Mead. Overton Arm receives inflow from the Virgin and Muddy Rivers, which historically are not influenced by wastewater effluent. Both sexes of common carp were collected bimonthly for 12 months using boat-mounted electrofishing gear (a direct electric current is used to temporarily immobilize fish for capture) to determine their health and reproductive status and any relation between these factors and environmental contaminants. This report presents fish tissue chemistry, organic chemical compound concentrations, and biomarker data for 83 male common carp collected from Las Vegas Bay, similar organic chemistry results for 15 male common carp, and similar biomarker measures for 80 male common carp collected from Overton Arm. Tissue chemistry results also are presented for 16 female common carp and biomarker measures for 79 female common carp collected from Las Vegas Bay, and tissue chemistry results for 15 female common carp and biomarker measures for 81 female common carp collected from Overton Arm. Thirty-three organic chemical compounds plus total concentrations for four groups of

  18. Identification of critical cell concentrations with in-situ and ex-situ characterization of physico-chemical properties of broth during oxidative axenic cultures of Yarrowia lipolytica in fed-batch mode

    OpenAIRE

    Kraiem, Hazar; Manon, Yannick; Anne-Archard, Dominique; Fillaudeau, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Identification of critical cell concentrations with in-situ and ex-situ characterization of physico-chemical properties of broth during oxidative axenic cultures of Yarrowia lipolytica in fed-batch mode

  19. The relationship between chemical concentration and odor activity value explains the inconsistency in making a comprehensive surrogate scent training tool representative of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Somchai; Koziel, Jacek A

    2015-12-01

    This report highlights the importance of an individual chemical's odor impact in the olfactory identification of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. There are small amounts of highly odorous compounds present in headspace of these drugs, with very low odor detection thresholds, that are more likely responsible for contributing to the overall odor of these drugs. Previous reports of the most abundant compounds in headspace can mislead researchers when dealing with whole odor of these drugs. Surrogate scent formulations, therefore, must match the odor impact of key compounds and not just the chemical abundance of compounds. The objective of this study was to compare odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from illicit drug samples of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin to surrogate smell formulations using simultaneous sensory (via human olfaction) and chemical analyses. Use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) allowed VOCs in drug headspace to be extracted and pre-concentrated on site, and analyzed by multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (MDGC-MS-O). Use of MDGC-MS-O allowed for further separation of odorous compounds and simultaneous detection by the human nose of the separate odor parts that make up the total aroma of these drugs. The compounds most abundant in headspace were not the most odor impactful when ranked by odor activity values (OAVs) (defined as ratio of concentration to odor detection threshold, ODT). There were no apparent correlations between concentrations and OAVs. A 1g marijuana surrogate lacked in odor active acids, aldehydes, ethers, hydrocarbons, N-containing, and S-containing VOCs and was overabundant in odor active alcohols and aromatics compared with real marijuana. A 1g cocaine surrogate was overabundant in odor active alcohols, aldehydes, aromatics, esters, ethers, halogenates, hydrocarbons, ketones and N-containing compounds compared with real. A 1g heroin surrogate should contain less odor active acids

  20. Nature of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Desert Areas in the Asian Continent: Chemical State and Number Concentration of Particles Measured at Dunhuang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of aerosol were made in August and October 2001, and January 2002, at Dunhuang, China (40o00'N, 94o30'E), to understand the nature of atmospheric particles over the desert areas in the Asian continent. Balloon-borne measurements with an optical particle counter suggested that particle size and concentration had a noticeable peak in size range of super micron in not only the boundary mixing layer but also the free troposphere. Thickness of the boundary mixing layer, from distributions of particle concentration, was about 4 km in summer (17 August 2001), about2.5 km in fall (17 October 2001), and about 3 km in winter (11 January 2002), which suggest active mixing of particles near the boundary in summer. Number-size distribution of particle showed a noticeable peak in the super micron particles size range in the mixing boundary layer: 0.4-2 particles cm-3 at diameter>1.2 μm in summer, 0.05-4 particles cm-3 at diameter >1.2 μm in fall, and 0.1-5 particles cm-3 at diameter>1.2 μm in winter. In winter strong inversion of atmospheric temperature was found in the height range from the boundary to about 3 km and vertical distribution of particle concentration well corresponded with the temperature distribution. Chemical elements of individual aerosols, which were collected in the boundary layer atmosphere at Dunhuang (18 October 2001) were analyzed with an electron microscope equipped with EDX. Those single particle analysis suggested that most of the particles with supermicron size were soil particles, and those particles had little sulfate on its surface. This is a very important different point,comparing with the chemical state of soil particles, which were transported from the desert area of China to Japan, and showed frequently the existence of sulfate on the particle surface. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that dust particles can be chemically modified during their long-range transport from desert areas to Japan

  1. Comparison of sewage sludge and chemical fertilizer application on yield and concentration of some nutrients in spinach (Spinosa olerace L. in three textural classes of a calcareous soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ronaghi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sewage sludge (SS in soil causes increasing soil organic matter, which in turn improves soil physical properties, and could supply part of the nutrients required by plants. For comparison of SS application and chemical fertilizer treatment (CFT on yield and concentration of some macro and micro nutrients in spinach, a greenhouse factorial experiment, arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD, was conducted with three replications. The first factor included SS levels (0, 10, 20, 40 and 80 gr kg-1 and the second factor was soil textural classes (clay loam, sandy loam and sandy. A CFT was also used to compare its affect with that of SS levels. Results showed that addition of all levels of SS caused significant increase in the weight of spinach shoots in three soil textures. Application of all SS levels caused significant increase of nitrogen (N, phosphorous (P, iron (Fe, zinc (Zn, copper (Cu and manganese (Mn concentration in spinach shoots. With SS application, none of the nutrients’ concentration in spinach reached the toxic level. The amounts of cadmium (Cd and lead (Pb were not detectable in shoots. However, in frequent application of SS, especially at high levels, it is necessary to measure and detect these elements in plants. Effect of fertilizer in increasing yield and concentration of nutrients was less than the 40 and 80 gr kg-1 SS treatments. Considering the Fe and Zn deficiency in calcareous soils, application of SS can be effective for combating this deficiency. Prior to any recommendation of SS application, the results of this research need to be verified under field conditions.

  2. A Greenhouse Study on Lead Uptake and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Vetiver Grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) as a Function of Lead Concentration and Soil Physico-Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andra, S. P.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.; Saminathan, S. K.

    2006-05-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic non-essential metal that can cause permanent learning disabilities, retardation, mental and behavioral problems in children. Lead accumulation in soils result from weathering, chipping, scraping, sanding and sand blasting of housing structures constructed prior to 1978, bearing lead-based paint. The primary objective of this study is to develop a cost-effective, chelate-assisted phytoremediation for cleaning up lead contaminated soils. Soils are a unique environment of diverse physical and chemical characteristics that influence the extent of phytoavailable (labile) Pb forms. The success of phytoremediation strategy depends on the physiological/ biochemical tolerance of the plants to lipid peroxidation induced by Pb at sub-lethal levels. Oxidative challenge is alleviated by antioxidant compounds, but more importantly by the induction of antioxidant enzymes, which are crucial for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and terminating lipid peroxidation chain reaction. A column study was conducted in a temperature and humidity-controlled greenhouse setting to assess the extent of Pb phytoextraction and antioxidant response in a lead accumulator, vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides). Treatments consisted of a randomized block arrangement of 4 soil types (Immokalee, Pahokee Muck, Tobosa, and Millhopper) and 3 soil Pb concentrations [normal - 400 mg/kg lead (following federal soil standards for lead), moderate - 800 mg/kg lead, and excessive - 1200 mg/kg lead] in 4 replicates. At the end of 6 months, selected columns were amended with a biodegradable chelating agent, ethylenediamene disuccinate (10 mmol/ kg EDDS), to mobilize Pb and enhance Pb uptake by vetiver. Total and exchangeable (labile) Pb were correlated with phytoextracted Pb, and levels of antioxidant enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the root and shoot tissues of vetiver grass. Results indicate that Pb uptake and antioxidant

  3. Electron donor concentrations in sediments and sediment properties at the agricultural chemicals team research site near New Providence, Iowa, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Bijesh; Korom, Scott F.; Smith, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of electron donors in aquifer sediments are important to the understanding of the fate and transport of redox-sensitive constituents in groundwater, such as nitrate. For a study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 50 sediment samples were collected from below the water table from 11 boreholes at the U.S. Geological Survey Agricultural Chemicals Team research site near New Providence, Iowa, during 2006-07. All samples were analyzed for gravel, sand (coarse, medium, and fine), silt, clay, Munsell soil color, inorganic carbon content, and for the following electron donors: organic carbon, ferrous iron, and inorganic sulfide. A subset of 14 sediment samples also was analyzed for organic sulfur, but all of these samples had concentrations less than the method detection limit; therefore, the presence of this potential electron donor was not considered further. X-ray diffraction analyses provided important semi-quantitative information of well-crystallized dominant minerals within the sediments that might be contributing electron donors.

  4. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles prepared by chemical vapor condensation method with different precursor concentration and residence time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Sungmin; Park, Eunseuk; Kim, Minsu; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jurng, Jongsoo

    2011-10-15

    Nanosized TiO(2) photocatalysts were synthesized using a chemical vapor condensation method under a range of synthesis conditions (precursor vapor concentration and residence time in a tubular electric furnace). X-ray diffraction showed that the prepared TiO(2) powders consisted mainly of anatase (>94%) with a small amount of rutile. The mean particle diameter from the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and transmission electron microscopy measurements ranged from 9.4 to 16.6 nm. The specific surface area (92.5-163.5 m(2) g(-1)) of the prepared TiO(2) powders was found to be dependent on the synthesis conditions. The content of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the prepared TiO(2) sample was higher than those on commercial TiO(2), resulting in increased photocatalytic oxidation. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO(2) samples prepared in a methylene blue solution was strongly dependent on the crystallinity and specific surface area, which were affected by the TTIP vapor concentration and residence time. PMID:21802692

  5. Integrated chemical/biochemical sample collection, pre-concentration, and analysis on a digital microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Richard B.; Khlystov, A.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Pamula, Vamsee K.; Weaver, Kathryn N.

    2004-12-01

    An ideal on-site chemical/biochemical analysis system must be inexpensive, sensitive, fully automated and integrated, reliable, and compatible with a broad range of samples. The advent of digital microfluidic lab-on-a-chip (LoC) technology offers such a detection system due to the advantages in portability, reduction of the volumes of the sample and reagents, faster analysis times, increased automation, low power consumption, compatibility with mass manufacturing, and high throughput. We describe progress towards integrating sample collection onto a digital microfluidic LoC that is a component of a cascade impactor device. The sample collection is performed by impacting airborne particles directly onto the surface of the chip. After the collection phase, the surface of the chip is washed with a micro-droplet of solvent. The droplet will be digitally directed across the impaction surface, dissolving sample constituents. Because of the very small droplet volume used for extraction of the sample from a wide colection area, the resulting solution is realatively concentrated and the analytes can be detected after a very short sampling time (1 min) due to such pre-concentration. After the washing phase, the droplet is mixed with specific reagents that produce colored reaction products. The concentration of the analyte is quantitatively determined by measuring absorption at target wavelengths using a simple light emitting diode and photodiode setup. Specific applications include automatic measurements of major inorganic ions in aerosols, such as sulfate, nitrate and ammonium, with a time resolution of 1 min and a detection limit of 30 nm/m3. We have already demonstrated the detection and quantification of nitroaromatic explosives without integrating the sample collection. Other applications being developed include airborne bioagent detection.

  6. Application of WRF/Chem-MADRID and WRF/Polyphemus in Europe – Part 2: Evaluation of chemical concentrations, sensitivity simulations, and aerosol-meteorology interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Seigneur

    2013-02-01

    better the observations of PM10 concentrations at all sites. The differences between model predictions and observations are mostly caused by inaccurate representations of emissions of gaseous precursors and primary PM species, as well as biases in the meteorological predictions. The differences in model predictions are caused by differences in the heights of the first model layers and thickness of each layer that affect vertical distributions of emissions, model treatments such as dry/wet deposition, heterogeneous chemistry, and aerosol and cloud, as well as model inputs such as emissions of soil dust and sea-salt and chemical boundary conditions of CO and O3 used in both models. WRF/Chem-MADRID shows a higher sensitivity to grid resolution than WRF/Polyphemus at all sites. For both models, the use of a finer grid resolution generally leads to an overall better statistical performance for most variables, with greater spatial details and an overall better agreement in temporal variations and magnitudes at most sites. The use of online BVOC emissions gives better statistical performance for hourly and max 8-h O3 and PM2.5 and generally better agreement with their observed temporal variations at most sites. Because it is an online model, WRF/Chem-MADRID offers the advantage to account for various feedbacks between meteorology and chemical species. The simulations show that aerosol leads to reduced net shortwave radiation fluxes, 2-m temperature, 10-m wind speed, PBL height, and precipitation and increases aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei, cloud optical depth, and cloud droplet number concentrations over most of the domain. However, this model comparison suggests that atmospheric pollutant concentrations are most sensitive in state-of-the-science air quality models to vertical structure, inputs, and parameterizations for dry/wet removal of gases and particles in the model.

  7. Achieving low effluent NO3-N and TN concentrations in low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio without using external carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiashun; Oleyiblo, Oloche James; Xue, Zhaoxia; Otache, Y. Martins; Feng, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Two mathematical models were used to optimize the performance of a full-scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated treatment plant, a plug-flow bioreactors operated in a 3-stage phoredox process configuration, anaerobic anoxic oxic (A2/O). The ASM2d implemented on the platform of WEST2011 software and the BioWin activated sludge/anaerobic digestion (AS/AD) models were used in this study with the aim of consistently achieving the designed effluent criteria at a low operational cost. Four ASM2d parameters (the reduction factor for denitrification , the maximum growth rate of heterotrophs (µH), the rate constant for stored polyphosphates in PAOs ( q pp), and the hydrolysis rate constant ( k h)) were adjusted. Whereas three BioWin parameters (aerobic decay rate ( b H), heterotrophic dissolved oxygen (DO) half saturation ( K OA), and Y P/acetic) were adjusted. Calibration of the two models was successful; both models have average relative deviations (ARD) less than 10% for all the output variables. Low effluent concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) were achieved in a full-scale BNR treatment plant having low influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) ratio (COD/TKN). The effluent total nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen concentrations were improved by 50% and energy consumption was reduced by approximately 25%, which was accomplished by converting the two-pass aerobic compartment of the plug-flow bioreactor to anoxic reactors and being operated in an alternating mode. Findings in this work are helpful in improving the operation of wastewater treatment plant while eliminating the cost of external carbon source and reducing energy consumption.

  8. Up-to-date concentrations of long-lived artificial radionuclides in the Tom and Ob rivers in the area influenced by discharges from Siberian chemical combine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Siberian Chemical Combine (SCC) is located in Seversk (formerly known as Tomsk-7) in the Tomsk Region of the Russian Federation. The main contribution of radionuclides in the SCC process water discharged into the Tom River was from the single-pass reactors, now removed from service (the last SCC reactor was shutdown on June 5, 2008). The data on the concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs, 239,240Pu and other artificial radionuclides in water, bottom sediments and flood-plain soils of the Tom and Ob rivers from Tomsk to the confluence of the rivers, are presented and discussed. The results of measurements carried out after shutdown of the last SCC single-pass reactor indicated no radiologically significant consequences of SCC activities for the studied water environment compartments. Contemporary activity concentrations of long-lived artificial radionuclides 3H, 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in river water were below the intervention levels established by current regulations of the Russian Federation for these radionuclides. The results of 3H analysis in water from the Tom and Samuska rivers demonstrated no inflow of contaminated formation water to surface water from the sites where liquid radioactive wastes of the SCC were injected below the surface. However, the density of flood-plain soil contamination by long-lived 137Cs in the area influenced by SCC liquid discharges was higher than regional technogenic background. There were local flood-plain areas contaminated not only by 137Cs, but also other gamma-emitters, such as 60Co and 152Eu.

  9. Physicochemical variations in atmospheric aerosols recorded at sea onboard the Atlantic-Mediterranean 2008 Scholar Ship cruise (Part I): Particle mass concentrations, size ratios, and main chemical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Noemí; Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Bhatia, Ravinder; Spiro, Baruch; Hanvey, Melanie

    2010-07-01

    We report on ambient atmospheric aerosols present at sea during the Atlantic-Mediterranean voyage of Oceanic II (The Scholar Ship) in spring 2008. A record was obtained of hourly PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 particle size fraction concentrations and 24-h filter samples for chemical analysis which allowed for comparison between levels of crustal particles, sea spray, total carbon, and secondary inorganic aerosols. On-board monitoring was continuous from the equatorial Atlantic to the Straits of Gibraltar, across the Mediterranean to Istanbul, and back via Lisbon to the English Channel. Initially clean air in the open Atlantic registered PM 10 levels polluted by increasingly coarse PM as the ship approached land. Away from major port cities, the main sources of atmospheric contamination identified were dust intrusions from North Africa (NAF), smoke plumes from biomass burning in sub-Saharan Africa and Russia, industrial sulphate clouds and other regional pollution sources transported from Europe, sea spray during rough seas, and plumes emanating from islands. Under dry NAF intrusions PM 10 daily mean levels averaged 40-60 μg m -3 (30-40 μg m -3 PM 2.5; c. 20 μg m -3 PM 1), peaking briefly to >120 μg m -3 (hourly mean) when the ship passed through curtains of higher dust concentrations amassed at the frontal edge of the dust cloud. PM 1/PM 10 ratios ranged from very low during desert dust intrusions (0.3-0.4) to very high during anthropogenic pollution plume events (0.8-1).

  10. ANALYSIS OF DEPENDENCE OF THE FLOW TEMPERATURE OF THE PLASTICIZED POLYMER ON THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURE AND CONCENTRATION OF THE POLYMER AND THE PLASTICIZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askadskiy Andrey Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials are widely used in construction. The properties of polymeric construction materials vary to a substantial extent; their durability, thermal stability, frost resistance, waterproof and dielectric properties are particularly pronounced. Their properties serve as the drivers of the high market demand for these products. These materials are applied as finishing materials, molded sanitary engineering products and effective thermal insulation and water proofing materials. The authors analyze the influence of the chemical structure and structural features of polymers on their properties. The authors consider flow and vitrification temperatures of polymers. These temperatures determine the parameters of polymeric products, including those important for the construction process. The analysis of influence of concentration of the plasticizer on the vitrification temperature is based on the two basic theories. In accordance with the first one, reduction of the vitrification temperature is proportionate to the molar fraction of the injected plasticizer. According to the second concept, reduction of the vitrification temperature is proportionate to the volume fraction of the injected solvent. Dependencies of the flow temperature on the molecular weight and the molar fraction of the plasticizer are derived for PVC. As an example, two plasticizers were considered, including dibutyl sebacate and dioctylftalatalate. The basic parameters of all mixtures were calculated through the employment of "Cascade" software programme (A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelemental Connections, Russian Academy of Sciences.

  11. Application of INAA for chemical quality control analysis of C-C composite and high purity graphite by determining trace elemental concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon based materials like graphite and C-C composites are used for various scientific and technological applications. Owing to its low neutron capture cross section and good moderating properties, graphite is used as a moderator or reflector in nuclear reactors. For high temperature reactors like CHTR, graphite and C-C composites are proposed as structural materials. Studies are in progress to use C-C composites as prospective candidate instead of graphite due to their excellent mechanical and thermal properties. The advantage of carbon-carbon composite is that the microstructure and the properties can be tailor made. Impurities like rare earth elements and neutron poisons which have high neutron absorption cross section and elements whose activation products of have longer half-lives like 60Co (5.27 y), 65Zn (244.3 d) and 59Fe (44.5 d) are not desired in structural materials. For chemical quality control (CQC) it is necessary to evaluate accurately the impurity concentrations using a suitable non-destructive analytical technique. In the present work, two carbon/carbon composite samples and two high purity graphite samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using high-flux reactor neutrons. Samples, sealed in Al foil, were irradiated in tray-rod position of Dhruva reactor, BARC at a neutron flux of ∼ 5 x 1013cm-2s-1. Radioactive assay was carried out using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry using 40% HPGe detector

  12. The chemical behaviour of the hexavalent plutonium in concentrated NaCl solutions under the impact of its own alpha radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R + D work was to verify whether the laboratory data on the solubility and sorption of radionuclides are in compliance with natural conditions, as studied in the aquifer system of the Gorleben site. The progress report in hand deals with the behaviour of the hexavalent plutonium in strongly salty (5 M NaCl), CO2-free, aqueous solutions under the effects of its own alpha radiation. Profound knowledge of the chemistry of plutonium, one of the major radionuclides in the high-level active waste from nuclear installations, and its behaviour in the natural aquatic environment is a fundamental requirement for any safety analysis of repositories for ultimate disposal of heat producing, radioactive waste. The following studies were performed in order to allow a quantitative assessment of the complex nature of the chemical reactions to be expected in a repository: radiolysis in concentrated NaCl solutions induced by alpha radiation, and the resulting redox reactions of the Cl--ion; radiolysis-induced redox behaviour of the Pu ions; stabilisation of the hexavalent plutonium by way of complexation with anionic ligands of the system (Cl-, OH-, and ClO-); solubility of the solid phase of PuO2(OH)2 in 5 M NaCl under conditions including and not including radiolytic reactions. Absorption spectroscopy and radiometric techniques were the major methods applied. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of atmospheric hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides in Beijing before and during the 2008 Olympic Games: Chemical and physical factors influencing their concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S. Z.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D. M.; Zhao, J. N.; Zhu, T.; Hu, M.; Zeng, L. M.

    2010-09-01

    volatile organic compound-sensitive area. Although the time period from 29 July to 15 August fell within the FSC, the concentrations of H2O2, MHP, and PAA decreased significantly. This can be explained by a combination of chemical and physical factors during this period, when rainy- and cloudy-day weather dominated. Weaker irradiation and lower temperatures resulted in a lower photochemical production of peroxides; the higher humidity resulted in their greater loss through their aqueous-phase oxidation of S(IV) and through heterogeneous removal, and lower temperatures and higher nighttime humidity resulted in a quicker surface deposition of peroxides. Furthermore, our observations seem to imply that the heterogeneous removal of H2O2 is faster than that of MHP, as indicated by the strong negative correlation between the H2O2-to-MHP ratio and the aerosol surface area.

  14. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  15. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a

  16. Seasonal and spatial variation of trace elements in multi-size airborne particulate matters of Beijing, China: Mass concentration, enrichment characteristics, source apportionment, chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiajia; Tian, Hezhong; Cheng, Ke; Lu, Long; Wang, Yuxuan; Wu, Ye; Zhu, Chuanyong; Liu, Kaiyun; Zhou, Junrui; Liu, Xingang; Chen, Jing; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    The seasonal and spatial variation characteristics of 19 elements (Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Zn) in TSP/PM10/PM2.5 samples were investigated, which were collected from April 2011 to January 2012 simultaneously at an urban downtown site, a traffic roadside site, a suburban site, and a rural site in Beijing. The elevated concentrations of several toxic trace elements (As, Cd, Mn, Ni, Pb, etc.) in particles revealed that the contamination of toxic elements in Beijing could not be neglected. Positive matrix factorization method (PMF) was applied for source apportionment of trace elements in PM, and three factors (crust related sources, combustion sources, and traffic and steel industrial related sources) were identified. Furthermore, the chemical speciation and bioavailability of various elements were identified by applying European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) procedure. Our results showed that eight toxic elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn) exhibited higher mobility in PM2.5 than in PM10. Notably, elements of As, Cd, Pb and Zn were presented with higher mobility than the other elements, and these elements were lightly to release into the environment and easily available to human body. Additionally, As, Cd, Pb and Zn also accounted for higher percentages in the bound to mobile fractions at the central urban areas of Beijing. Therefore, special concerns should be paid to these toxic trace elements which had relatively high mobility in fine particles, when planning and implementing the comprehensive air pollution mitigation policies in Beijing.

  17. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  18. The influence of polymer concentration on the radiation-chemical yield of intermolecular crosslinking of poly(vinyl alcohol) by γ-rays in deoxygenated aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of polymer concentration on G value of intermolecular crosslinking of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) during γ-ray irradiation is reported here. The G value, determined by the measurement of weight average molecular weight (Mw) from static light scattering, increased initially due to the polymer concentration and approached a maximum value of 0.5x10-7 molJ-1. It then markedly decreased for the more concentrated water-swollen PVA film (polymer concentration Cp>300 g dm-3). Our results suggest that polymer concentration plays an important role in the crosslinking and degradation reactions of PVA during γ-ray irradiation.

  19. Food and chemical industry. Concentration and drying in the manufacture of instant coffee; Shokuhinn to kagaku kogaku. Insutanto coffee no seizo ni okeru noshuku to kanso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imura, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    In this paper, the history and manufacturing method of instant coffee are introduced emphasizing the concentration and drying technology in the manufacturing process of instant coffee. Instant coffee can be roughly classified into three kinds as those respectively made from freeze drying, spray drying and the agglomeration after drying, which are different in shapes and properties from each other. For obtaining quality instant coffee remaining more aroma of coffee extract, it is extremely effective and important to increase the concentration of solid component of coffee in extract simultaneously with the setting of conditions of drying process. Thermal concentration, freeze concentration and membrane concentration are used in the concentration of coffee. Spray drying and freeze drying are executed to remove water from concentrated coffee liquid as the finishing step of the manufacture of instant coffee. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Organic Carbon--water Concentration Quotients (IIsocS and [pi]pocS): Measuring Apparent Chemical Disequilibria and Exploring the Impact of Black Carbon in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    When black carbon (bc) and biologically derived organic carbon (bioc) phases are present in sediments or suspended particulates, both forms of carbon act additively to sorb organic chemicals but the bc phase has more sorption capacity per unit mass. . . .

  1. Validation of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition on forested sites in Europe: 2. DOC concentration as an estimator of the organic ion charge

    OpenAIRE

    Antti-Jussi LINDROOS; Ulrich, Erwin; Thimonier, Anne; Tiziana AMORIELLO; Gabriele TARTARI; Arianna ORRÙ; Nils KOENIG; Genouw, Gerrit; Benham, Sue; Derome, Kirsti; Clarke, Nicholas; John DEROME; Rosario MOSELLO

    2008-01-01

    A Working Group on Quality Assurance/Quality Control of analyses in laboratories active in the chemical analysis of atmospheric deposition and soil water has been created within the framework of the Integrated Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (UN-ECE/ICP Forests) and the EU/Forest Focus Programme (Regulation 2152/2003). This paper is a follow up to an earlier paper dealing with the validation of chemical analyses, in which validation tech...

  2. Mixed convective MHD flow of a micropolar fluid with ohmic heating, radiation and viscous dissipation over a chemically reacting porous plate subjected to a constant heat flux and concentration gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Hitesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper analysis of a chemically reacting mixed convection MHD micropolar flow, heat and mass transfer in porous medium with the effects of ohmic heating, radiation and viscous dissipation past an infinite vertical plate which is subjected to a constant heat flux and the concentration gradient. The non-linear coupled partial differential equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme known as Keller-box method. The results for concentration, transverse velocity, angular velocity and temperature are obtained and illustrated graphically to observe the effects of various parameters, and the numerical discussion is presented with physical interpretations.

  3. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part 1: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with co-located instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for 3 weeks during the late-fall - early-winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to the tuning and calibration of each instrument, whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical, and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual Q-ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three Q-ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025, 1999) and were found to be 9, 15, 19, 28, and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate, and ammonium, respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of Q-ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented, along with a discussion of some

  4. 煤化工反渗透浓盐水处理和回用的探讨%On the Coal Chemical iIndustry of Reverse Osmosis Concentrated Water Treatment and Reuse of

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海斌

    2012-01-01

      This paper explores how to study for coal chemical reverse osmosis concentrated brine was effective for treatment and reuse of wastewater, further improve the comprehensive reuse rate, greatly reduce discharge of wastewater and waste water discharged together with the chemical oxygen demand (COD)aggregates, which for the coal chemical industry and long-term development has important sense.%  研究探讨如何针对煤化工反渗透浓盐水进行有效处理回用,进一步提高废水的综合回用率,大幅度减少废水排放量以及随废水一同排放的化学耗氧量(COD)总量,这对于煤化工行业的长远发展具有重要意义。

  5. Electronic tongue response to chemicals in orange juice that change concentration in relation to harvest maturity and citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an earlier study, the electronic tongue system (etongue) was used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an etongue system to the main chemicals in orange ...

  6. Mixed convective MHD flow of a micropolar fluid with ohmic heating, radiation and viscous dissipation over a chemically reacting porous plate subjected to a constant heat flux and concentration gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Hitesh

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper analysis of a chemically reacting mixed convection MHD micropolar flow, heat and mass transfer in porous medium with the effects of ohmic heating, radiation and viscous dissipation past an infinite vertical plate which is subjected to a constant heat flux and the concentration gradient. The non-linear coupled partial differential equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme known as Keller-box method. The ...

  7. Influence of ethanol concentration, addition of spices extract, and level of sweetness on physico-chemical characteristics and sensory quality of apple vermouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Joshi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The composition of apple base wine was found to be suitable for conversion into vermouth. The spices extract contained more TSS, tannins, esters, volatile acid but lower titrable acid than apple base wine. To optimize and develop apple vermouth with different ethanol concentrations (12%, 15%, 18%, sugar content (4%, 8% and spices extract (2.5% and 5.0% was prepared and was evaluated. Significant differences in physico-chemical characteristics and sensory quality amongst the vermouths having different levels of alcohol, sugar and spices extract were noted. Generally, increasing ethanol content decreased titrable acidity, tannins, macroelements and colour units while micro-elements, viscosity and total esters were increased. Increased sugar level affected TSS, apparent viscosity, pH, esters, free aldehyde, total sugar, K, Cu and Mn contents. Level of spices extract (2.5 & 5.0 did not effect TSS (ºB, titrable acidity, colour, total sugar, total tannins, volatile acidity, increased mineral contents except for K, esters and aldehyde contents. Increase in alcohol content upto 15% increased the sensory score of the product. Increased quantity of spices extract, however, decreased the mean sensory quality of vermouth. However, sensory scores for 4 or 8% sugar and 2.5 or, 5.0% spices extracted were similar. A product with 15% alcohol, 4% sugar and 2.5% spices extract was preferred the most in overall sensory quality. The studies revealed that apple fruit is suitable for making vermouth by the method described. The spices, herbs, their parts and the quantities used are also reported.A composição de vinho de maçã demonstrou ser satisfatório para se convertido em vermute. O extrato de especiarias apresentou mais TSS, taninos, esters, porém os ácido volátil titulaveis foi mais baixo que no vinho de maçã. Estudos foram realizados para aperfeiçoar e desenvolver vermute de maçã contendo diferentes concentrações de ethanol (12%, 15%, 18%, de a

  8. Effect of Catchment Area Activities on the Physico – Chemical Characteristics of Water of Upper Lake, Bhopal with Special Reference to Nitrate and Phosphate Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Talwar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the tremendous influx of people and consequent urban development, increased anthropogenic activities in the catchment, inflow of untreated sewage, nutrients and pesticides from urban and rural areas, the water quality of Upper Lake, Bhopal has deteriorated significantly. An attempt has been made to study various physico – chemical parameters, specifically nitrates and phosphates of five different sampling sites of Upper Lake and to study the effect of catchment area activities on these sites.

  9. A Review on Some Chemical Engineering and Microbiological Aspects Considered in the Production of Highly Concentrated Probiotic Cultures and Bacteriocins by Lactococci and Lactobacilli

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Pérez Guerra

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to give an overview on the chemical engineering aspects related with the production of probiotic cultures and bacteriocins. Firstly, some evidence of the potential of different Lactococci and Lactobacilli strains for prevention or treatment of different human diseases, or as growth promoters in farm animals is given. In addition, examples of different commercial dietary supplements containing probiotic lactoccocci and lactobacilli in combination or not with ot...

  10. Predicting the concentration range of unmonitored chemicals in wastewater-dominated streams and in run-off from biosolids-amended soils

    OpenAIRE

    Chari, Bipin P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    Organic compounds such as sterols and hormones have been detected in surface waters at ecologically relevant concentrations with sources including effluent discharged from publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) as well as leachate and runoff from land amended with municipal sludge (biosolids). Greater than 20% of regulated effluents discharged into U.S. surface waters experience in-stream dilution of

  11. Electronic Tongue Response to Chemicals in Orange Juice that Change Concentration in Relation to Harvest Maturity and Citrus Greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smita Raithore; Jinhe Bai; Anne Plotto; John Manthey; Mike Irey; Elizabeth Baldwin

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier study, an electronic tongue system (e-tongue) has been used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an e-tongue system to the main chemicals in orange juice that impact flavor and health benefits and are also impacted by HLB. Orange juice was spiked with sucrose (0.2–5.0 g/100 mL), citric acid (0.1%–3.0% g/100 mL) and potassium chloride (0....

  12. Non-refractory PM1 in SE Asia: Chemically speciated aerosol fluxes and concentrations above contrasting land-uses in SE Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gavin; Farmer, Delphine; di Marco, Chiara; Misztal, Pawel; Sueper, Donna; Kimmel, Joel; Jimenez, Jose; Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko

    2010-05-01

    New measurements of VOC emissions (measured with leaf cuvettes, and ecosystem fluxes obtained from eddy covariance measurements) suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest, in Borneo. These larger sources of isoprene measured over oil palm, allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions, contrasts with the composition of the atmosphere in the semi-remote tropical forest environment. The difference in the atmospheric composition above different land-uses has the potential to lead to contrasting chemistry and physics controlling the formation and processing of particulate matter. Thus land use changes, driven by the economics of biofuels, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions, chemical processing and composition of organic aerosol over both (semi-)natural and anthropogenic land uses in the tropical environment. Ecosystem flux measurements of chemically-speciated non-refractory PM1 were made over two contrasting land uses in the Malaysian state of Sabah, on the island of Borneo during 2008. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) site at a tropical rain forest location as well as the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as a collaboration between three UK NERC funded projects (OP3, APPRAISE/ACES and DIASPORA). Recent technical developments using ToF detectors allow us to record 10 Hz full mass spectra at both high resolution (HR) and unit-mass resolution (UMR), suitable for the calculation of local eddy-covariance fluxes. The measurements provide information on the deposition rate of anthropogenic aerosol components (e.g. sulphate, nitrate, ammonium and hydrocarbon-like aerosol) to tropical forest and oil palm. At the same time, any biogenic secondary organic

  13. Chemical and Sensory Quantification of Geosmin and 2-Methylisoborneol in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from Recirculated Aquacultures in Relation to Concentrations in Basin Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mikael A.; Hyldig, Grethe; Strobel, Bjarne W.;

    2011-01-01

    Globally, aquaculture systems with water recirculation experience increasing problems with microbial taste and odor compounds (TOCs) such as geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB). This study investigated the content of geosmin and MIB in water and the flesh of 200 rainbow trouts from eight...... recirculated aquaculture systems in Denmark. TOC content in the fish flesh was measured by a dynamic headspace extraction method and was evaluated by a sensory panel. The results showed significant correlations between TOC content in water and fish and between chemical analysis and sensory perception. When...... geosmin exceeded 20 ng/L in the water, 96% of the fish had an intense muddy flavor, but below 10 ng geosmin/L, 18% of the fish (only 3% in special depuration ponds) had an intense muddy flavor. The results indicate that TOC levels...

  14. Enhancement of flexural stress and reduction of surface roughness through changes in gas concentrations during high-speed chemical dry thinning of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional packaging using through silicon via of ultra-thin Si wafers requires very low residual stress. In this study, the effects of additive gases on root-mean-squared (RMS) surface roughness and flexural stress of Si wafers thinned by the high-speed chemical dry etching (CDE) process were investigated. Direct injection of Ar with NO gases into the reactor during the supply of F radicals from NF3 remote plasmas was effective in increasing the Si wafer thinning rate and in reducing significant surface roughness. Reduced RMS surface roughness of the thinned Si wafer resulted in high flexural stress. The additional injection of N2 gas further decreased the surface roughness of the thinned Si wafer and, in turn, increased the flexural stress of the thinned wafers. By adjusting the Ar flow and Q ratio, Q(N2) = N2/(N2 + NO), Si wafer thinning rates as high as 23 μm/min and RMS surface roughnesses as small as 10 nm were obtained. Furthermore, it was found that the surface roughness is a critical factor affecting the flexural stress of the thinned Si wafer. These results indicate that the high-speed CDE process using F radicals and directly injected NO/Ar/N2 gases can be applied to ultra-thin Si wafer thinning with controlled RMS surface roughness and low residual stress. - Highlights: • Chemical dry etching of Si wafers affected by N2/(N2 + NO) flow ratio. • Increasing the flow ratio decreased the thinning rate and surface temperature. • Si wafer thinning rate as high as 23 mm/ min was obtained. • Root mean square surface roughness value drastically decreased from 91 to 1.21 nm. • The strength value of flexural stress increased from 162 to 756 MPa

  15. Fano-like resonances in split concentric nanoshell dimers in designing negative-index metamaterials for biological-chemical sensing and spectroscopic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Pala, Nezih

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated numerically the plasmon response of a dimer configuration composed of a couple of split and concentric Au nanoshells in a complex orientation. We showed that an isolated composition of two concentric split nanoshells could be tailored to support strong plasmon resonant modes in the visible wavelengths. After determining the accurate geometric dimensions for the presented antisymmetric nanostructure, we designed a dimer array that shows complex behavior during exposure to different incident polarizations. We verified that the examined dimer was able to support destructive interference between dark and bright plasmon modes, which resulted in a pronounced Fano-like dip. Observation of a Fano minimum in such a simple molecular orientation of subwavelength particles opens new avenues for employing this structure in designing various practical plasmonic devices. Depositing the final dimer in a strong coupling condition on a semiconductor metasurface and measuring the effective refractive index at certain wavelengths, we demonstrate that each one of dimer units can be considered a meta-atom due to the high aspect ratio in the geometric parameters. Using this method, by extending the number of dimers periodically and illuminating the structure, we examined the isotropic, polarization-dependent, and transmission behavior of the metamaterial configuration. Using numerical methods and calculating the effective refractive indices, we computed and sketched corresponding figure of merit over the transmission window, where the maximum value obtained was 42.3 for Si and 54.6 for gallium phosphide (GaP) substrates. PMID:25811974

  16. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) b...

  17. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic ac...

  18. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  19. Gamma-irradiation of liposomes composed of saturated phospholipids: effect of bilayer composition, size, concentration and absorbed dose on chemical degradation and physical destabilization of liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidam, N J; Versluis, C; Vernooy, E A; Crommelin, D J

    1996-04-01

    Liposomes composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), or mixtures of these two phospholipids were exposed to gamma-irradiation in an air environment. Disappearance of the mother compounds was monitored by HPLC analysis. Plotting of the logarithmic values of residual DPPC or DPPG concentration versus irradiation dose resulted in straight lines. The slopes of these lines (overall degradation constants) depended on the type of phospholipids, concentration of the liposomes and the size of the liposomes. Under the chosen conditions, addition of DPPG in DPPC-liposomes did not affect the degradation rate constant of DPPC and vice versa. The presence of phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), pH or presence of sodium chloride did not affect the irradiation damage either. Minor changes were found upon analysis of total fatty acids by GLC and upon measurement of water soluble phosphate compounds. These changes were less pronounced than the changes monitored by HPLC of phospholipids, because the HPLC analysis monitored the overall degradation of the liposomal phospholipids. Thin-layer chromatography/fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (TLC/FAB-MS) analysis of irradiated and non-irradiated DPPC or DPPG provided information on the structure of several degradation products. Degradation routes which include these degradation products are proposed. Gamma-irradiation neither affected the size of the liposomes nor the bilayer rigidity as determined by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence anisotropy of the probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), respectively. However, upon gamma-irradiation, changes in the melting characteristics of the liposomes were found by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The pre-transition melting enthalpy of the liposomal bilayer decreased or disappeared and the main-transition broadened. The changes found in DSC scans correlated qualitatively well with the changes recorded after HPLC analysis

  20. Electronic Tongue Response to Chemicals in Orange Juice that Change Concentration in Relation to Harvest Maturity and Citrus Greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithore, Smita; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Manthey, John; Irey, Mike; Baldwin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier study, an electronic tongue system (e-tongue) has been used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an e-tongue system to the main chemicals in orange juice that impact flavor and health benefits and are also impacted by HLB. Orange juice was spiked with sucrose (0.2-5.0 g/100 mL), citric acid (0.1%-3.0% g/100 mL) and potassium chloride (0.1-3.0 g/100 mL) as well as the secondary metabolites nomilin (1-30 µg/mL), limonin (1-30 µg/mL), limonin glucoside (30-200 µg/mL), hesperidin (30-400 µg/mL) and hesperetin (30-400 µg/mL). Performance of Alpha MOS sensor sets #1 (pharmaceutical) and #5 (food) were compared for the same samples, with sensor set #1 generally giving better separation than sensor set #5 for sucrose, sensor set #5 giving better separation for nomilin and limonin, both sets being efficient at separating citric acid, potassium chloride, hesperitin and limonin glucoside, and neither set discriminating hesperidin efficiently. Orange juice made from fruit over the harvest season and from fruit harvested from healthy or HLB-affected trees were separated by harvest maturity, disease state and disease severity. PMID:26633411

  1. Electronic Tongue Response to Chemicals in Orange Juice that Change Concentration in Relation to Harvest Maturity and Citrus Greening or Huanglongbing (HLB Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Raithore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier study, an electronic tongue system (e-tongue has been used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB disease. This study investigated the reaction of an e-tongue system to the main chemicals in orange juice that impact flavor and health benefits and are also impacted by HLB. Orange juice was spiked with sucrose (0.2–5.0 g/100 mL, citric acid (0.1%–3.0% g/100 mL and potassium chloride (0.1–3.0 g/100 mL as well as the secondary metabolites nomilin (1–30 µg/mL, limonin (1–30 µg/mL, limonin glucoside (30–200 µg/mL, hesperidin (30–400 µg/mL and hesperetin (30–400 µg/mL. Performance of Alpha MOS sensor sets #1 (pharmaceutical and #5 (food were compared for the same samples, with sensor set #1 generally giving better separation than sensor set #5 for sucrose, sensor set #5 giving better separation for nomilin and limonin, both sets being efficient at separating citric acid, potassium chloride, hesperitin and limonin glucoside, and neither set discriminating hesperidin efficiently. Orange juice made from fruit over the harvest season and from fruit harvested from healthy or HLB-affected trees were separated by harvest maturity, disease state and disease severity.

  2. Effect of pentachlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand mass concentrations in influent on operational behaviors of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Dongsheng [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China)]. E-mail: shends@zju.edu.cn; He Ruo [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China); Liu Xinwen [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China); Department of Chemical engineering, Ningbo University of Technology, 20 Cuibai Road, NingBo 315016 (China); Long Yan [Department of Environmental engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, HangZhou 310029 (China)

    2006-08-25

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that was seeded with anaerobic sludge acclimated to chlorophenols was used to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of synthetic wastewater containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) with additional sucrose as carbon source. Two sets of UASB reactors were operated at one time. But the seeded sludge for the two reactors was different and Reactor I was seeded with the sludge that was acclimated to PCP completely for half a year, and Reactor II was seeded with the mixed sludge that was acclimated for half a year to PCP, 4-CP, 3-CP or 2-CP, respectively. The degradation of PCP and the operation fee treating the wastewater are affected by the concentration of MEDS (microorganism easily degradable substrate). So the confirmation of the suitable ratio of [COD] and [PCP] was the key factor of treating the wastewater containing PCP economically and efficiently. During the experiment, the synthetic wastewater with 180.0 mg L{sup -1} PCP and 1250-10000 mg L{sup -1} COD could be treated steadily in the experimental Reactor I. The removal efficiency of PCP was more than 99.5% and the removal efficiency of COD was up to 90%. [PCP] (concentration of PCP) in effluent was less than 0.5 mg L{sup -1}. [PCP] in influent could affect proper [COD] (concentration of COD) range in influent that was required for maintenance of steady running of the experimental reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 20 to 22 h. [PCP] in influent would directly affect the necessary [COD] in influent when the UASB reactor ran normally and treated the wastewater containing PCP. When [PCP] was 100.4, 151.6 and 180.8 mg L{sup -1} in influent, respectively, [COD] in influent had to be controlled about 1250-7500, 2500-5000 and 5000 mg L{sup -1} to maintain the UASB reactor steady running normally and contemporarily ensure that [COD] and [PCP] in effluent were less than 300 and 0.5 mg L{sup -1}, respectively. With the increase of [PCP] in influent

  3. Effect of pentachlorophenol and chemical oxygen demand mass concentrations in influent on operational behaviors of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that was seeded with anaerobic sludge acclimated to chlorophenols was used to investigate the feasibility of anaerobic biotreatment of synthetic wastewater containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) with additional sucrose as carbon source. Two sets of UASB reactors were operated at one time. But the seeded sludge for the two reactors was different and Reactor I was seeded with the sludge that was acclimated to PCP completely for half a year, and Reactor II was seeded with the mixed sludge that was acclimated for half a year to PCP, 4-CP, 3-CP or 2-CP, respectively. The degradation of PCP and the operation fee treating the wastewater are affected by the concentration of MEDS (microorganism easily degradable substrate). So the confirmation of the suitable ratio of [COD] and [PCP] was the key factor of treating the wastewater containing PCP economically and efficiently. During the experiment, the synthetic wastewater with 180.0 mg L-1 PCP and 1250-10000 mg L-1 COD could be treated steadily in the experimental Reactor I. The removal efficiency of PCP was more than 99.5% and the removal efficiency of COD was up to 90%. [PCP] (concentration of PCP) in effluent was less than 0.5 mg L-1. [PCP] in influent could affect proper [COD] (concentration of COD) range in influent that was required for maintenance of steady running of the experimental reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 20 to 22 h. [PCP] in influent would directly affect the necessary [COD] in influent when the UASB reactor ran normally and treated the wastewater containing PCP. When [PCP] was 100.4, 151.6 and 180.8 mg L-1 in influent, respectively, [COD] in influent had to be controlled about 1250-7500, 2500-5000 and 5000 mg L-1 to maintain the UASB reactor steady running normally and contemporarily ensure that [COD] and [PCP] in effluent were less than 300 and 0.5 mg L-1, respectively. With the increase of [PCP] in influent, the range of variation of [COD] in

  4. Analysis of the influence and optimization of concentration of organic acids on chemical and physical properties of wheat dough using a response surface methodology and desirability function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimurina Olivera D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve physical and chemical properties of dough produced from wheat flour of suboptimal quality (protein content 10.7% dry basis, dough energy 4.0 cm2, optimal doses of ascorbic and citric acid were evaluated using a response surface methodology and desirability function. The paper brings the analysis of the main effects as well as their interactions. The effect of organic acids was evident in relation to pH lowering and decrease in free thiol groups, which consequently changed the physical properties of dough (increased dough energy, extensibility and resistance. The well known oxidative effect of ascorbic acid which is manifested as increase in dough energy and resistance, was enhanced by the addition of citric acid i.e. their synergistic action. Contribution of citric acid was the donation of hydrogen ions which changed the pH, lowered the content of free -SH groups and increased protein aggregation. Ascorbic acid individually significantly increased energy (linear regression coefficient b1 = 4.010-4 but higher effect was exerted by the addition of ascorbic and citric acid mixture as seen through higher interaction regression coefficient (b12 = 0.076. Dough resistance was significantly affected only by ascorbic acid due to its oxidizing action whereas dough extensibility was affected by both acids (main effects at all applied doses and their mixtures. The effect on dough extensibility depends on the dose of acids but resistance decreased with quadratic increase of acid doses. Second-order polynomials were used in modeling of responses (dough energy, resistance and extensibility which showed a good fit with experimental data as shown by high values of the coefficients of determination R2 for energy, resistance and extensibility (0.953, 0.976 and 0.996, respectively. Based on F value, it could be concluded that the model gave good prediction of experimental data while p-values for all responses showed that the models were

  5. Perfil aromático e qualidade química da carne de caprinos Saanen alimentados com diferentes níveis de concentrado Aroma profile and chemical quality of goat Saanen meat fed with different levels of concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Suely Madruga

    2008-05-01

    levels used in the feeding of male kid Saanen goats did not influenced the chemical and physical-chemical parameters of humidity, ashes, proteins, cholesterol, phospholipids, pH, Aw, a*, b*, L* of goat meat. However, the concentration of fat, the percentages of unsaturated fatty acid (mono and poly and the texture of meat were affected by the used concentrate levels. In both qualitative and quantitative of volatile components analysis, the extract of the goat meat fed with 50% of concentrate showed better aromatic quality. The use of 50:50 forage to concentre ratio was most viable for the feeding male kid Saanen goats slaughtered at 22 kg BW, considering both the aspects of reducing cost of production and chemical and aromatic quality of the produced goat meat.

  6. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  7. Chemical and Isotopic Composition and Gas Concentrations of Ground Water and Surface Water from Selected Sites At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Busenberg; L. N. Plummer; M. W. Doughten; P. K. Widman; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

    2000-05-30

    >From May 1994 through May 1997, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, collected water samples from 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents including all major elements and 22 trace elements. Concentrations of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanide series were measured in samples from 11 wells and 1 hot spring. The data will be used to determine the fraction of young water in the ground water. The fraction of young water must be known to calculate the ages of ground water using chlorofluorocarbons. The concentrations of the isotopes deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13, carbon-14, and tritium were measured in many ground water, surface-water and spring samples. The isotopic composition will provide clues to the origin and sources of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Concentrations ! of helium-3 , helium-4, total helium, and neon were measured in most groundwater samples, and the results will be used to determine the recharge temperature, and to date the ground waters.

  8. Concentrated Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2014-01-01

    This entry summarizes the main theoretical contributions and empirical findings in relation to concentrated ownership from a law and economics perspective. The various forms of concentrated ownership are described as well as analyzed from the perspective of the legal protection of investors......, especially minority shareholders. Concentrated ownership is associated with benefits and costs. Concentrated ownership may reduce agency costs by increased monitoring of top management. However, concentrated ownership may also provide dominating owners with private benefits of control....

  9. Significant concentration changes of chemical components of PM1 in the Yangtze River Delta area of China and the implications for the formation mechanism of heavy haze-fog pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y W; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y M; Shen, X J; Sun, J Y; Ma, Q L; Yu, X M; Zhu, J L; Zhang, L; Che, H C

    2015-12-15

    Since the winter season of 2013, a number of persistent haze-fog events have occurred in central-eastern China. Continuous measurements of the chemical and physical properties of PM1 at a regional background station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China from 16 Nov. to 18 Dec., 2013 revealed several haze-fog events, among which a heavy haze-fog event occurred between 6 Dec. and 8 Dec. The mean concentration of PM1 was 212μgm(-3) in the heavy haze-fog period, which was about 10 times higher than on clean days and featured a peak mass concentration that reached 298μgm(-3). Organics were the largest contributor to the dramatic rise of PM1 on heavy haze-fog days (average mass concentration of 86μgm(-3)), followed by nitrate (58μgm(-3)), sulfate (35μgm(-3)), ammonium (29μgm(-3)), and chloride (4.0μgm(-3)). Nitrate exhibited the largest increase (~20 factors), associated with a significant increase in NOx. This was mainly attributable to increased coal combustion emissions, relative to motor vehicle emissions, and was caused by short-distance pollutant transport within surrounding areas. Low-volatility oxidized organic aerosols (OA) (LV-OOA) and biomass-burning OA (BBOA) also increased sharply on heavy haze-fog days, exhibiting an enhanced oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and increased emissions from biomass burning. The strengthening of the oxidation capacity during the heavy pollution episode, along with lower solar radiation, was probably due to increased biomass burning, which were important precursors of O3. The prevailing meteorological conditions, including low wind and high relative humidity, and short distance transported gaseous and particulate matter surrounding of the sampling site, coincided with the increased pollutant concentrations mainly from biomass-burning mentioned above to cause the persistent haze-fog event in the YRD area. PMID:26298245

  10. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation. PMID:26118803

  11. Control of residual carbon concentration in GaN high electron mobility transistor and realization of high-resistance GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.G. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, D.G., E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, D.S.; Liu, Z.S.; Chen, P.; Le, L.C.; Yang, J.; Li, X.J. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, S.M.; Zhu, J.J.; Wang, H.; Yang, H. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2014-08-01

    GaN films were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under various growth conditions. The influences of MOCVD growth parameters, i.e., growth pressure, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) flux, growth temperature, trimethyl-gallium flux and H{sub 2} flux, on residual carbon concentration ([C]) were systematically investigated. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that [C] can be effectively modulated by growth conditions. Especially, it can increase by reducing growth pressure up to two orders of magnitude. High-resistance (HR) GaN epilayer with a resistivity over 1.0 × 10{sup 9} Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. The mechanism of the formation of HR GaN epilayer is discussed. An Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure with a HR GaN buffer layer and an additional low-carbon GaN channel layer is presented, exhibiting a high two dimensional electron gas mobility of 1815 cm{sup 2}/Vs. - Highlights: • Influence of MOCVD parameters on residual carbon concentration in GaN is studied. • GaN layer with a resistivity over 1 × 10{sup 9} Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. • High electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures were prepared. • Control of residual carbon content results in HEMT with high 2-D electron gas mobility.

  12. Study the Experiment of High Concentration Containing Salt Wastewater Nanofiltration Separation in Coal Chemical Industry%煤化工行业高浓度含盐废水纳滤分离实验探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕龙; 杜再娟; 王禹淇

    2014-01-01

    由于反渗透浓水处理技术在国内尚未具有成熟的工程应用,尤其采用纳滤和盐水分离器工艺还未有实质性的工程案例,通过各项中试试验,分析比较系统运行过程中出现的问题,总结经验和方法,为后续的工业化应用提供参考性建议。最终,能够让煤化工行业浓水回用处理,作为循环水补水。%Due to the reverse osmosis concentrated water treatment technology, currently in the country has not yet has the engi-neering application of mature, especially by nanofiltration and water separator process has not been substantial project case, through the test, analysis of problems in the process of system operation, and summarize the experience and method, and provid-ing reference advice for industrial application subsequent. Finally, to make the coal chemical industry concentrated water reuse treatment as make-up water for circulating water.

  13. The mixture toxicity of environmental contaminants containing sulfonamides and other antibiotics in Escherichia coli: Differences in both the special target proteins of individual chemicals and their effective combined concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xi; Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Qin, Mengnan; Song, Chunlei; Liu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Organisms in the environment are exposed to mixtures of multiple contaminants, leading to serious environmental harm. These mixtures pose an ecological risk and have attracted an increasing amount of attention; however there has been little in-depth research the toxicity of mixtures, such as antibiotics. To determine how different mixtures of antibiotics affect organisms, the individual and mixture toxicity of sulfonamides and several antibiotics were determined using Escherichia coli as a target organism in our study. The results show that additive effects occur between sulfonamides and quinolones or with a portion of β-lactams, synergistic effects appear between sulfonamides and their potentiators or cefotaxime sodium, and antagonistic effects arise between sulfonamides and tetracyclines or penicillin V potassium salt. In addition, the toxicity mechanism of binary mixtures is further discussed and the results reveal that the joint effect differences depend not only the target proteins of individual chemicals but also on their effective combined concentration based on the approach of Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) and molecular docking. This study introduces the concept of the "effective concentration" to provide insight into understanding the mechanism of binary mixtures, which will be beneficial for evaluating the ecological risk of antibiotics. PMID:27269994

  14. Control of residual carbon concentration in GaN high electron mobility transistor and realization of high-resistance GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GaN films were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under various growth conditions. The influences of MOCVD growth parameters, i.e., growth pressure, ammonia (NH3) flux, growth temperature, trimethyl-gallium flux and H2 flux, on residual carbon concentration ([C]) were systematically investigated. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that [C] can be effectively modulated by growth conditions. Especially, it can increase by reducing growth pressure up to two orders of magnitude. High-resistance (HR) GaN epilayer with a resistivity over 1.0 × 109 Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. The mechanism of the formation of HR GaN epilayer is discussed. An AlxGa1−xN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure with a HR GaN buffer layer and an additional low-carbon GaN channel layer is presented, exhibiting a high two dimensional electron gas mobility of 1815 cm2/Vs. - Highlights: • Influence of MOCVD parameters on residual carbon concentration in GaN is studied. • GaN layer with a resistivity over 1 × 109 Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. • High electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures were prepared. • Control of residual carbon content results in HEMT with high 2-D electron gas mobility

  15. Concentrator Photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio L

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar-energy conversion is one of the most promising technologies for generating renewable energy, and conversion of concentrated sunlight can lead to reduced cost for solar electricity. In fact, photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight insures an efficient and cost-effective sustainable power resource. This book gives an overview of all components, e.g. cells, concentrators, modules and systems, for systems of concentrator photovoltaics. The authors report on significant results related to design, technology, and applications, and also cover the fundamental physics and market considerations. Specific contributions include: theory and practice of sunlight concentrators; an overview of concentrator PV activities; a description of concentrator solar cells; design and technology of modules and systems; manufacturing aspects; and a market study.

  16. Impact of maritime transport on particulate matter concentrations and chemical compositions in four port-cities of the Adriatic/Ionian area: an overview of the results of POSEIDON project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Daniele; Gambaro, Andrea; Argiriou, Athanasios; Alebic-Juretic, Ana; Barbaro, Elena; Cesari, Daniela; Dimopoulos, Spiros; Dinoi, Adelaide; Donateo, Antonio; Gregoris, Elena; Karagiannidis, Athanasios; Ivosevic, Tatjana; Liora, Natalia; Melas, Dimitrios; Merico, Eva; Mifka, Boris; Orlic, Ivo; Poupkou, Anastasia; Sarovic, Kristina

    2015-04-01

    Pollutant emissions from ships and harbour activities constitute an important source of pollution of coastal areas with potential influences on the climate and the health of their inhabitants. A recent review (Viana et al., 2014) shows that these emissions could have an important impact on the Mediterranean and that there is a lack of data for the Eastern and South-Eastern part of this area. This work presents an analysis of the impact of ship emissions to atmospheric particle concentrations (PM) in four important port-cities (Patras Greece, Brindisi and Venice Italy, and Rijeka Croatia) of the Adriatic/Ionian area. The study was performed within the POSEIDON project (Pollution monitoring of ship emissions: an integrated approach for harbours of the Adriatic basin, funded within the MED Programme 2007-2013). The study uses an integrated approach using emission inventories, dispersion modelling and measurements taken at high temporal resolution (1 min) and low temporal resolution for chemical characterization of PM. The emission inventories of the four port-cities show that ships contribute between 11.7% and 31.0% of the total PM emissions being a source locally comparable with road traffic (ranging between 11.8% and 26.6%). The source apportionment using the receptor model PMF showed an oil combustion source (that includes ship emissions), characterized by V and Ni, in Brindisi, Venice and Rijeka with V/Ni ratio ranging between 1.4 and 4.2 indicating local differences in chemical profiles of the emissions. The V concentrations were used to evaluate the contributions of primary ship emissions to PM (Agrawal et al., 2009) that resulted between 1.3% and 2.8%. The contribution to secondary sulphate was 11% of PM2.5 in Brindisi (Cesari et al., 2014). The analysis of high-temporal resolution measurements taken near the harbour areas of Venice, Patras and Brindisi showed a contribution of ship emissions to PM2.5 varying between 3.5% and 7.4%. The relative contribution to

  17. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  18. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  19. Measurements of the concentration of major chemical species in the flame of a test burner with a air swirling system; Mesures de concentration d`especes chimiques majoritaires dans la flamme d`un bruleur modele avec mise en rotation de l`air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, St. [Gaz de France (GDF), 93 - La Plaine-Saint-Denis (France); Most, J.M.; Poireault, B. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 86 - Poitiers (France)

    1996-12-31

    The study of combustion in industrial burners remains difficult because of the complexity of the equipments used: materials geometry, tri-dimensional flows etc.. The phenomena that control the combustion in a gas burner with a swirl air system has been studied thanks to a collaboration between the Direction of Research of Gaz de France (GdF) and the Laboratory for Combustion and Detonation Research (LCD) of the French National Centre of Scientific Research (CNRS). The burner used is developed by the LCD and the measurements of stable chemical species were performed by the CERSTA centre of GdF. These series of tests, performed in confined environment, have permitted to identify some of the parameters that influence combustion chemistry. Mapping of chemical species allows to distinguish 5 zones of flame development and also the zones of nitrogen oxides formation. Methane is rapidly centrifuged a few millimeters above the injection pipe and centrifuged with rotating combustion air. Carbon monoxide occurs immediately in the central recirculation zone which is weakly reactive (no oxygen and no methane). Oxygen content increases downflow from this area and carbon dioxide reaches its concentration maxima. CO formation decreases when the swirl number increases and CO{sub 2} formation occurs earlier. On the contrary, the emissions of CO and CH{sub 4} do not depend on the swirl value and the NO{sub x} values are only slightly dependent on this value. (J.S.)

  20. An experimental study of magnesite dissolution rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 150 and 200 °C as a function of pH, total dissolved carbonate concentration, and chemical affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2010-11-01

    Steady-state magnesite dissolution rates were measured in mixed-flow reactors at 150 and 200 °C and 4.6 dissolution rates are found to be consistent with r=k{>MgOH2+}41-exp (-4ART), where rd represents the BET surface area normalized dissolution rate, {>MgOH2+} stands for the concentration of hydrated magnesium centers on the magnesite surface, kMg designates a rate constant, A refers to the chemical affinity of the overall reaction, R denotes the gas constant, and T symbolizes absolute temperature. Within this model decreasing rates at far-from-equilibrium conditions (1) at constant pH with increasing temperature and (2) at constant temperature with increasing pH and ΣCO 2 stem from a corresponding decrease in {>MgOH2+}. This decrease in {>MgOH2+} results from the increasing stability of the >MgCO3- and >MgOH° surface species with increasing temperature, pH and CO 32- activity. The decrease in constant pH dissolution rates yields negative apparent activation energies. This behavior makes magnesite resistant to re-dissolution if formed as part of mineral carbon sequestration efforts in deep geologic formations.

  1. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  2. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Lambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm−3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm−3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94 and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58 of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm−3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed

  3. Combined effect of chemical pressure and valence electron concentration through the electron-deficient Li substitution on the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Gnu; Jeon, Jieun; Kim, Youngjo [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon Kang, Sung [Department of Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Chungnam 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kyunghan [Advanced Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); You, Tae-Soo, E-mail: tsyou@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Four members of the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system have been prepared by high-temperature reaction method and characterized by X-ray diffractions. All compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type structure (space group Pnma, Pearson code oP16) with bonding interactions for interslab Ge{sub 2} dimers. The Li substitution for rare-earth elements in the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} system leads to a combined effect of the increased chemical pressure and the decreased valance electron concentration (VEC), which eventually results in the structure transformation from the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type with all broken interslab Ge–Ge bond for the parental RE{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} to the Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type structure for the ternary RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system. Site-preference between rare-earth metals and Li is proven to generate energetically the most favorable atomic arrangements according to coloring-problem, and the rationale is provided using both the size-factor and the electronic-factor related, respectively, to site-volume and electronegativity as well as QVAL values. Tight-binding, linear-muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) calculations are performed to investigate electronic densities of states (DOS) and crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) curves. The influence of reduced VEC for chemical bonding including the formation of interslab Ge{sub 2} dimers is also discussed. The magnetic property measurements prove that the non-magnetic Li substitution leads to the ferromagnetic (FM)-like ground state for Ce{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} and the co-existence of antiferromagntic (AFM) and FM ground states for Sm{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: Reported is a combined effect of the chemical pressure and the reduced VEC caused by the smaller monovalent non-magnetic Li substitution for the larger trivalent magnetic rare-earth metals in the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system. This results in the structure

  4. Chemical characterization of Brazilian hulless barley varieties, flour fractionation, and protein concentration Caracterização química de variedades brasileiras de cevada nua, fracionamento da farinha e concentração de proteína

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane Vieira Helm; Alicia de Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Even though hulless barley is widely known due to its nutritional potential, in Brazil it is only grown at a few agricultural experimental stations. There is no published data about the chemical composition of Brazilian hulless barley varieties; however, research laboratories have studied their agronomical characteristics. The objectives of this study were to present the chemical characterization and effect of flour fractionation on protein concentration of six Brazilian hulless barley variet...

  5. Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  6. Multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Kupers, Ron;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent, non-specific symptoms in response to chemically unrelated exposures in non-toxic concentrations. Although the pathophysiology of MCS remains unknown, central sensitization may be an important factor...

  7. Composição centesimal do fruto, extrato concentrado e da farinha da uva-do-japão Chemical composition of fruit, concentrated extract and flour from "Japanese grape"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Bampi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A Hovenia dulcis, mais conhecida como uva-do-japão, pertence à família Rhamnaceae, é natural da China, Japão e Coréia, sendo largamente difundida no sul do Brasil. Rica em açúcares e bem aceita para consumo humano, pode ser consumida in natura ou processada. Não há na literatura relatos de seu aproveitamento em produtos alimentícios. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo determinar a composição centesimal do fruto, do extrato concentrado e da farinha. Foram obtidos teores em torno de 54,08, 52,44 e 19,08g 100g-1 para umidade; 2,16, 4,09 e 4,48g 100g-1 para cinzas; 3,74, 2,77 e 5,73g 100g-1 para proteína bruta; 1,42, 0,37 e 1,82g 100g-1 para extrato etéreo; 12,56, 3,33 e 25,62g 100g-1 para fibra alimentar; 19,46, 37,34 e 42,53g 100g-1 para açúcares totais, além do valor calórico de 105,56, 165,14 e 216,09kcal 100g-1, respectivamente, em fruto, extrato concentrado e farinha. A quantificação por cromatografia líquida confirmou o conteúdo dos açúcares redutores (frutose, 6,15g 100g-1 e glicose, 6,57g 100g-1 superior ao teor de açúcares não redutores no fruto (sacarose, 3,56g 100g-1. A farinha é rica em açúcares e possui elevado teor de fibra alimentar, podendo ser utilizada como um ingrediente alternativo em produtos de panificação. Em termos sensoriais, o extrato concentrado obteve um índice de aceitabilidade de 82% entre os julgadores, apresentando bom potencial para elaboração de geleias.Hovenia dulcis, whose popular name is Japanese grape, belongs to the family Rhamnaceae, native of China, Japan and Korea, is widely distributed in southern Brazil. Rich in sugar and with good acceptance for human consumption it can be consumed fresh or processed. There are no literature reports of its use in food products. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of the Japanese grape fruit, concentrated extract and flour. The contents for moisture (54.08, 52.44 e 19.08g 100g-1, ash (2.16, 4.09 e 4.48g

  8. Dissolved and labile concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the South Fork Coeur d'Alene River, Idaho: Comparisons among chemical equilibrium models and implications for biotic ligand models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Blank, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate thermodynamic speciation calculations inherent in biotic ligand models, the speciation of dissolved Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in aquatic systems influenced by historical mining activities is examined using equilibrium computer models and the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique. Several metal/organic-matter complexation models, including WHAM VI, NICA-Donnan, and Stockholm Humic model (SHM), are used in combination with inorganic speciation models to calculate the thermodynamic speciation of dissolved metals and concentrations of metal associated with biotic ligands (e.g., fish gills). Maximum dynamic metal concentrations, determined from total dissolved metal concentrations and thermodynamic speciation calculations, are compared with labile metal concentrations measured by DGT to assess which metal/organic-matter complexation model best describes metal speciation and, thereby, biotic ligand speciation, in the studied systems. Results indicate that the choice of model that defines metal/organic-matter interactions does not affect calculated concentrations of Cd and Zn associated with biotic ligands for geochemical conditions in the study area, whereas concentrations of Cu and Pb associated with biotic ligands depend on whether the speciation calculations use WHAM VI, NICA-Donnan, or SHM. Agreement between labile metal concentrations and dynamic metal concentrations occurs when WHAM VI is used to calculate Cu speciation and SHM is used to calculate Pb speciation. Additional work in systems that contain wide ranges in concentrations of multiple metals should incorporate analytical speciation methods, such as DGT, to constrain the speciation component of biotic ligand models. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Radiolabelling of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeling of chemical additives with radioactive isotopes can solve numerous problems in geothermal operations. The physical and chemical behavior of many chemicals slated for geothermal operations can be studied with the required detail at the extremely low concentration of the commercially available (non-labeled) compounds. The problems of labeling and the basics of these radioactively labeled chemicals are described in this report. Conclusions of this study are: (1) chemicals labeled with radioactive isotopes can be used to investigate the chemical and physical behavior of chemical additives used in geothermal operations. The high detection limits make this technology superior to conventional analytical and monitoring methods; (2) severe difficulties exist for utilizing of radioactively labeled chemicals in geothermal operations. The labeling itself can cause technical problems. Another host of problems is caused by the reluctance of chemical manufacturers to release the necessary proprietary information on their chemicals required for proper labeling; and (3) previous attempts to manufacture radioactively labeled flocculants and to utilize them in a geothermal operation were prematurely abandoned for a number of reasons

  10. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part I: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with Time-of-Flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), High Resolution ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and other co-located instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-07-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for three weeks during the late fall-early winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to tuning and calibration of each instrument whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025) and were found to be of 9, 15, 19, 28 and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate and ammonium respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented as well as a discussion of some recommendations

  11. Integration approach of the Couette inverse problem of powder-type self-compacting concrete in a wide-gap concentric cylinder rheometer Part II. Influence of mineral additions and chemical admixtures on the shear thickening flow behaviour of powder type self-compacting concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Heirman, Gert; Hendrickx, Roel; Vandewalle, Lucie; Gemert, Dionys van; Feys, Dimitri; De Schutter, Geert; Desmet, Bram; Vantomme, John

    2009-01-01

    The influence of mineral additions and chemical admixtures on the shear thickening flow behaviour of powder type self-compacting concrete (SCC) is studied by means of a wide-gap concentric cylinder rheometer. The Couette inverse problem is treated by means of the integration method in order to derive the flow curve tau(gamma_dot) from the torque measurements. According to the experimental results, the shear thickening effect is found to be strongly influenced by the addition of the chemica...

  12. Chemical use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of research and activities related to chemical use on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge between 1992 and 2009. The chemicals used on the Refuge...

  13. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  14. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  15. Chemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yardimeden

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials. Advantages and disadvantages of the chemical machining are mentioned.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, chemical machining process was described its importance as nontraditional machining process. The steps of process were discussed in detail. The tolerances of machined parts were examined.Findings: Paper describes the chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and machined materials.Practical implications: The machining operation should be carried out carefully to produce a desired geometry. Environmental laws have important effects when chemical machining is used.Originality/value: The importance of nontraditional machining processes is very high.

  16. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  17. Chemical networks*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One o...

  18. Uranium recovery from phosphate rocks concentrated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reserves, geological data, chemical data and technical flowsheet from COPEBRAS and Goiasfertil ores are described, including the process of mining ore concentration. Samples of Goiasfertil ores are analysed by gravimetric analysis, for phosphate, and spectrofluorimetry for uranium. (author)

  19. Chemical machining

    OpenAIRE

    A. Yardimeden; T. Ozben; O. Cakir

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Nontraditional machining processes are widely used to manufacture geometrically complex and precision parts for aerospace, electronics and automotive industries. There are different geometrically designed parts, such as deep internal cavities, miniaturized microelectronics and fine quality components may only be produced by nontraditional machining processes. This paper is aiming to give details of chemical machining process, industrial applications, applied chemical etchants and mac...

  20. Chemical Radioprotectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Upadhyay

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection of biological systems against radiation damage is of paramount importance during accidental and unavoidable exposure to radiation. Several physico-chemical and biological factors collectively contribute to the damage caused by radiation and are, therefore, targets for developing radioprotectors. Work on the development of chemicals capable of protecting biological systemsfrom radiation damage was initiated nearly six decades ago with cysteine being the first molecule to be reported. Chemicals capable of scavenging free radicals, inducing oxygen depletion,antioxidants and modulators of immune response have been some of the radioprotectors extensively investigated with limited success. Mechanism of action of some chemical radioprotectors and their combinations have been elucidated, while further understanding is required in many instances. The present review elaborates on structure-activity relationship of some of the chemical radioprotectors, their evaluation, and assessment, limitation, and future prospects.

  1. Aqueous uranium concentrations in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published geochemical data from groundwater and surface water throughout the world has been compiled in order to compare the concentration of naturally occurring dissolved uranium to lithology, sampling depth, pH, Eh, HCO3, SO4 and PO4 concentrations. The sole criterion used for the selection of data from the review articles was that each article contain raw data on naturally occurring uranium concentrations relative to other groundwater chemical components. A total of 1286 chemical data entries were used in the statistical comparisons. Although this database is not exhaustive, it is likely that the ranges of uranium concentrations in the data set are representative of the ranges occurring in nature. Finally, the observed uranium concentration distributions were compared with published results of model calculations and of used nuclear fuel leach tests. Models tend to predict a wider range of concentrations than observed (particularly the high values), and the leach test concentrations tend to fall within the upper half of the observations

  2. Obtenção e caracterização química e nutricional de diferentes concentrados de caseína Obtention and chemical and nutritional characterization of different bovine casein concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janesca Alban Roman

    2005-02-01

    aos demais concentrados, quanto aos índices quociente de eficiência líquida da proteína e quociente de eficiência protéica operacional.OBJETIVE: The objective of the present work was to evaluate the centesimal composition, the amino acid profile and the the composition and nutritive value of three casein concentrates, obtained by different methods. METHODS: The casein concentrates were analysed according to the following methods: a commercial casein obtained by acid precipitation (pI followed by neutralization; an enzyme coagulated casein obtained by rennet coagulation; and a casein micelles concentrate obtained by microlfiltration and diafiltration. The Centesimal composition was determined by the procedures described in the manual Official Methods of Analysis. The amino acid profiles were determined after the protein acid hydrolysis (HCl 6N, 105°C, 22h in an amino acid autoanalyzer by cation exchange chromatography and post-column ninhydrin reaction. The essential amino acids were in accordance with Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization recommendation for children 2 to 5 years of age. The nutritive value was determined on 21-day old rats of the Wistar strain through apparent net protein ratio, and protein efficiency ratio operational. RESULTS: Commercial casein presented higher protein concentration (92.0% than micellar casein (86.0% and casein clot (72.0%. The animals in the various protein diets did not show significant differences as to body weight gain and diet consumption. The highest digestibility was that of commercial casein (93.8%, compared to the other two concentrates (91.0%. CONCLUSION: The casein concentrates showed differences related to the centesimal composition, since the commercial casein presented a higher protein concentration. The casein clot was inferior to the other protein concentrates regarding net protein ratio and protein efficiency ratio operational.

  3. Effect of using aqueous/alcohol solution during solution doping on the physical and chemical characteristics of pre-sintered silica soot and the resultant native glass species concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the effect of solution doping on pre-sintered silica soot prepared by flame hydrolysis deposition. Additionally, the effects of using either an aqueous or alcohol solution on the soot layer, and the resultant concentration of native glass species (pre- and post-consolidation) are also discussed. Soot consisting native glass species such as SiO2, GeO2, P2O5, and B2O3 was pre-sintered with temperatures ranging from 550 deg. C to 950 deg. C before undergoing solution doping. Cross-sectional thickness of the soot layer following solution doping was measured via optical microscopy and subsequently compared with those prior to solution doping. Significant variations of GeO2 and P2O5 concentration in the soot layer after solution doping were detected via energy dispersive X-ray analysis. It was found that apart from the pre-sintered soot layer integrity during solution doping, the type of solution used plays an essential role in ensuring retention of native glass species both prior to, and following consolidation. Measurements using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy confirmed that significant amounts of GeO2 and P2O5 were lost during the immersion in solution stage of the process.

  4. Magnetic chemically peculiar stars

    CERN Document Server

    Schöller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Chemically peculiar (CP) stars are main-sequence A and B stars with abnormally strong or weak lines for certain elements. They generally have magnetic fields and all observables tend to vary with the same period. Chemically peculiar stars provide a wealth of information; they are natural atomic and magnetic laboratories. After a brief historical overview, we discuss the general properties of the magnetic fields in CP stars, describe the oblique rotator model, explain the dependence of the magnetic field strength on the rotation, and concentrate at the end on HgMn stars.

  5. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  6. REM-containing silicate concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, V. F.; Shabanova, O. V.; Pavlov, I. V.; Pavlov, M. V.; Shabanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    A new method of advanced complex processing of ores containing rare-earth elements (REE) is proposed to obtain porous X-ray amorphous aluminosilicate material with a stable chemical composition which concentrates oxides of rare-earth metals (REM). The ferromanganese oxide ores of Chuktukon deposit (Krasnoyarsk Region, RF) were used for the experiment. The obtained aluminosilicate material is appropriate for treatment with 5 - 15% solutions of mineral acids to leach REM.

  7. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pills, who subsequently become pregnant or have a history of brownish facial discoloration. Scarring Reactivation of cold sores What can I expect after having a chemical peel? All peels require some follow-up care: ...

  8. Unnecessary Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  9. Chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of chemical kinetics. It starts summary of chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism, and explains basic velocity law, experiment method for determination of reaction velocity, temperature dependence of reaction velocity, theory of reaction velocity, theory on reaction of unimolecular, process of atom and free radical, reaction in solution, catalysis, photochemical reaction, such as experiment and photochemical law and rapid reaction like flame, beam of molecule and shock tube.

  10. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP). The use of selected safety indicators (concentrations, fluxes) in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal. Report 5: Chemical weathering rates on the Baltic Shield of Finland for use as indicators of nuclear waste repository safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the available information from the literature on chemical erosion and weathering rates in Finland and northern Sweden is reviewed and experimental data from recent followup studies in defined catchments is discussed. In glaciated terrain as in Finland the best estimates of chemical erosion rates are obtained when geochemical data of glacial till is used. Elemental fluxes in free-flowing rivers and river-lake systems have been studied in greater detail only in a few case studies. The Kalix river drainage basin investigations gave evidence that the mobilization of rare earth elements (REE) is determined by weathering processes in the upper till layers and that the C-horizon below about 0.75 m depth or generally below the groundwater table is practically unaffected by weathering. Also the removal of U from the watershed was found to happen mostly by groundwater flow through predominantly shallow aquifers. Another type of case study is constrained to regions where certain phenomena cause enhanced trace metal mobilization, as in a region stretched along the western coast of Finland where land-uplift exposes clay sediments rich in sulphides above the groundwater level, with the consequence of increased mobilization of a number of heavy metals. Very little quantitative information on elemental flux balances is available from river-lake systems. Some modelling has been attempted on one great lake system the lake Paeijaenne by use of fall-out nuclides. From the same lake a detailed record of sedimentation rates covering the whole period from the end of the latest glaciation to present is available and erosion rate variations since the end of the latest glaciation can be assessed. The main part of this study focusses on investigations of well-defined small catchments over a longer time period, where groundwater is discharging in springs. Geochemical fluxes worth mentioning seem to be constrained to the surficial geological layers which include overburden and

  11. Study on magnetic concentration of Nigerian Itakpe sinter concentrate to a Midrex-grade concentrate

    OpenAIRE

    Adewale O. Adeleke

    2009-01-01

    The sinter grade of the Nigerian Itakpe iron ore that assayed 63.63% Fe and 6.62% total acid gangue was subjected to both wet low-intensity magnetic separation (LIMS) and wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS) to upgrade it to Midrex-grade super-concentrate. Chemical analysis conducted on the super-concentrate samples from LIMS and WHIMS gave Fe content of 67.59% and 68.70%, and lower acid gangue of 1.55% and 3.22% respectively. However, screen distribution analysis results showed tha...

  12. Chemical sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A chemical sensing apparatus and method for the detection of sub parts-per-trillion concentrations of molecules in a sample by optimizing electron utilization in the formation of negative ions is provided. A variety of media may be sampled including air, seawater, dry sediment, or undersea sediment. An electrostatic mirror is used to reduce the kinetic energy of an electron beam to zero or near-zero kinetic energy.

  13. A statistical proxy for sulphuric acid concentration

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mikkonen; S. Romakkaniemi; J. N. Smith; Korhonen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; M. Boy; P. H. McMurry; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Joutsensaari, J.; Hamed, A.(Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843, USA); R. L. Mauldin III; Birmili, W.; Spindler, G; Arnold, F.

    2011-01-01

    Gaseous sulphuric acid is a key precursor for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Previous experimental studies have confirmed a strong correlation between the number concentrations of freshly formed particles and the ambient concentrations of sulphuric acid. This study evaluates a body of experimental gas phase sulphuric acid concentrations, as measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) during six intensive measurement campaigns and one long-term observational period. The...

  14. Chemical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, Wing-Fai

    2015-09-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental ideas of how chemical networks are build, their strengths and limitations. The chemical reactions that occur in disks combine the cold phase reactions used to model cold molecular clouds with the hot chemistry applied to planetary atmosphere models. With a general understanding of the different types of reactions that can occur, one can proceed in building a network of chemical reactions and use it to explain the abundance of species seen in disks. One on-going research subject is finding new paths to synthesize species either in the gas-phase or on grain surfaces. Specific formation routes for water or carbon monoxide are discussed in more details. 13th Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  15. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    chemical activity, as opposed to e.g. the total concentration. Baseline toxicity (narcosis) for neutral hydrophobic organic compounds has been shown to initiate in the narrow chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0.1. This presentation focuses on linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity with the...

  16. Chemical oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    to strong thermohaline stratification resulting from enormous river runoff. Both regions experience severe depletion of oxygen at mesopelagic depths. However, while the lowest oxygen concentrations in the Bay of Bengal are just above the threshold value...

  17. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  18. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  19. Chemical Mahjong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  20. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  1. Monitoring presence of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specification describes a case for use with a hand-portable chemical agent detector for continuously monitoring an atmosphere for the presence of predetermined chemical agents. The detector having means for ionizing air samples and providing at an output terminal electrical signals representative of the mobility spectrum of ionized chemical vapours produced by the ionizing means. The case comprises means for defining a chamber in the case for supporting and removably enclosing the detector, means for communicating ambient atmosphere to the chamber, electrical circuit means in the case, the circuit means being adapted to be detachably connected to the detector output terminal when the detector is positioned in the chamber and being responsive to the electrical signals for producing an alarm signal when the signals detect a chemical agent concentration in the atmosphere exceeding a predetermined concentration level, and alarm means responsive to the alarm signal. (author)

  2. Liquid radioactive waste concentration methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for concentrating liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) - an important step in waste processing procedures aimed at reducing hazards to personnel and the public - are reviewed, and some of their advantages and drawbacks pointed out. Chemical LRW-treatment methods include coagulation (by aluminium sulfate, ferric chloride, etc.), soda-lime softening of water, as well as techniques based on specific reactions with particular nuclides. By addition of sorbents (clay, activated charcoal, etc.) the chemical scavenging effect is enhanced, while use of flocculating agents (sodium polyalginate, polyacrylamide, synthetic polymers, etc.) produces accelerated deposition of resulting precipitates. A second major LRW-concentration method is evaporation, which is relatively expensive and, moreover, inapplicable in the case of volatile radionuclides escaping into the fume-and-vapor phase. It is emphasized that to overcome difficulties due to presence of contaminants such as saponaceous, organic or mineral oil matter, use of defoaming agents is indicated. A third important LRW-concentration method is that by ion exchange; synthetic is well as natural organic ion exchan.gers are in use. There are a number of other methods that also find application, such as biological techniques, electrodialysis, embedding in bitumen or asphalt, sand filtration, etc. (A.B.)

  3. Chemical flashlamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have characterized the optical output and Nd:glass pumping performance of large-scale (120-cm-long, 1.2-cm-inner-diam), metal-oxidizer chemical flashlamps supplied to us by G.T.E. Sylvania. The experimental results were obtained on the same test bed that was used to study xenon electrical flashlamps, as described in Dependence of Flashlamp Performance on Gas Fill and Bore Size, earlier in this section. The peak Nd inversion levels produced by the chemical lamps were less than or equal to 10% of those generated by a xenon lamp of similar size and energy loading. The Peak Nd levels are in good agreement with predictions for the pumping rates in Nd:glass by a blackbody at the color temperatures of 30000 to 50000C, which they have measured during the burn of the pyrotechnic lamp

  4. Photovoltaic concentrator module technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elizabeth H.; Chamberlin, Jay L.; Boes, Eldon C.

    Significant developments in the development of photovoltaic (PV) concentrator technology are described. Concentrator cell research, advances in PV concentrator cell technology, and PV concentrator module development are described. Reliability issues currently of concern, including the applicability of wet insulation resistance tests to concentrator modules, correlation of accelerated thermal cycling tests with life expectancy in the field, and the importance of quality assurance during manufacture, are discussed. Two PV concentrator power systems installed in 1989 are discussed. A PV concentrator initiative program established by the DOE is given, and the results of the latest cost study are presented.

  5. RESTAURANT CONCENTRATION IN LOUISIANA

    OpenAIRE

    Schupp, Alvin R.; Dennis, Winston

    1990-01-01

    Growth of the franchise restaurant industry and merger activity among restaurants raise questions concerning concentration in the Louisiana restaurant industry. Firm employment data from the Louisiana Department of Labor for selected urban and rural parishes for 1975-86 and the concentration ratio, herfindahl index and the entropy measure were used for these concentration estimates. Concentration was, in general, low in urban parishes and higher in rural parishes. Concentration decreased from...

  6. Study on magnetic concentration of Nigerian Itakpe sinter concentrate to a Midrex-grade concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale O. Adeleke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The sinter grade of the Nigerian Itakpe iron ore that assayed 63.63% Fe and 6.62% total acid gangue was subjected to both wet low-intensity magnetic separation (LIMS and wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS to upgrade it to Midrex-grade super-concentrate. Chemical analysis conducted on the super-concentrate samples from LIMS and WHIMS gave Fe content of 67.59% and 68.70%, and lower acid gangue of 1.55% and 3.22% respectively. However, screen distribution analysis results showed that the cumulative fractions passing 45-m sieve were 0.88% and 0.38% for LIMS and WHIMS super-concentrates respectively. These results indicate that the Fe and acid content determined for both LIMS and WHIMS meets the requirement for a Midrex-grade super-concentrate, while the fractions of the concentrate passing 45-m sieve are below the 30% upper limit for transportation to the reduction plant.

  7. Pesticides: chemicals for survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesticides are chemicals used to control pests such as insects, weeds, plant diseases, nematodes, and rodents. The increased use of pesticides since 1945 has greatly aided the increase in crop production, protected livestock from diseases such as trypanosomiasis, protected man from diseases such as malaria and filarisis, decreased losses of stored grain, and has generally improved man's welfare. Despite the enormous benefits derived from pesticides these chemicals are not problem-free. Many pesticides are toxic to living organisms and interfere with specific biochemical systems. To measure the very small quantities of a pesticide radiolabelled chemicals are frequently essential, particularly to measure changes in the chemical structure of the pesticide, movement of the pesticide in soil, plants, or animals, amounts of pesticide going through various steps in food processing, etc. The use of radiolabelled pesticides is shortly shown for metabolism of the pesticide in crop species, metabolism in ruminant, in chickens and eggs, in soil, and possibly leaching and sorption in soil, hydrolysis, bio-concentration, microbial and photodegradation, and toxicity studies

  8. Chemical plume source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shuo; Farrell, Jay A

    2006-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the dispersion of the chemical is dominated by turbulence, resulting in an intermittent chemical signal. The vehicle is capable of detecting above-threshold chemical concentration and sensing the fluid flow velocity at the vehicle location. This paper reviews instances of biological plume tracing and reviews previous strategies for a vehicle-based plume tracing. The main contribution is a new source-likelihood mapping approach based on Bayesian inference methods. Using this Bayesian methodology, the source-likelihood map is propagated through time and updated in response to both detection and nondetection events. Examples are included that use data from in-water testing to compare the mapping approach derived herein with the map derived using a previously existing technique. PMID:17036813

  9. Thermodynamic chemical energy transfer mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical energy transfer mechanisms at finite temperature are explored by a chemical energy transfer theory which is capable of investigating various chemical mechanisms of non-equilibrium, quasi-equilibrium, and equilibrium. Gibbs energy fluxes are obtained as a function of chemical potential, time, and displacement. Diffusion, convection, internal convection, and internal equilibrium chemical energy fluxes are demonstrated. The theory reveals that there are chemical energy flux gaps and broken discrete symmetries at the activation chemical potential, time, and displacement. The statistical, thermodynamic theory is the unification of diffusion and internal convection chemical reactions which reduces to the non-equilibrium generalization beyond the quasi-equilibrium theories of migration and diffusion processes. The relationship between kinetic theories of chemical and electrochemical reactions is also explored. The theory is applied to explore non-equilibrium chemical reactions as an illustration. Three variable separation constants indicate particle number constants and play key roles in describing the distinct chemical reaction mechanisms. The kinetics of chemical energy transfer accounts for the four control mechanisms of chemical reactions such as activation, concentration, transition, and film chemical reactions. - Highlights: • Chemical energy transfer theory is proposed for non-, quasi-, and equilibrium. • Gibbs energy fluxes are expressed by chemical potential, time, and displacement. • Relationship between chemical and electrochemical reactions is discussed. • Theory is applied to explore nonequilibrium energy transfer in chemical reactions. • Kinetics of non-equilibrium chemical reactions shows the four control mechanisms

  10. Aerosol chemical elemental mass concentration at lower free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo Freitas, Maria; Dionísio, Isabel; Fialho, Paulo; Barata, Filipe

    2007-08-01

    This paper shows the use of Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique to determine elemental masses collected by a seven-wavelength Aethalometer instrument at the summit of Pico mountain in the Azorean archipelago, situated in the Central North Atlantic Ocean. Each sample corresponds to air particulate matter measured continuously for periods of approximately 24 h taken from 14th July 2001 through 14th July 2002. The statistical analysis of the coefficients of correlation between all the elements identified, permitted to establish six groups that could potentially be associated with the type of source responsible for the aerosol sampled in the lower free troposphere at the Azorean archipelago. Calculation of the synoptic back trajectories helped to corroborate the use of the iron/cesium relation as a tracer for the Saharan dust aerosol. It was demonstrated that INAA constituted an important tool to identify these events.

  11. Chemical treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third manual of three commissioned by the IAEA on the three principal techniques used in concentrating radioactive liquid wastes, namely chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion exchange. The present manual deals with chemical precipitation by coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation, commonly called ''chemical treatment'' of low-activity wastes. Topics discussed in the manual are: (i) principles of coagulation on flocculation and sedimentation and associated processes; (ii) process and equipment; (iii) conditioning and disposal of flocculation sludge; (iv) sampling and the equipment required for experiments; and (v) factors governing the selection of processes. 99 refs, 17 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  13. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.A.; McAtee, R.E.

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  14. Determination of the chemical composition and functional properties of shrimp waste protein concentrate and lyophilized flour Determinação da composição química e das propriedades funcionais de concentrado protéico e de farinha liofilizada de resíduos de camarão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivaldo Lacerda Brasileiro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Wastes from the seafood industry can be easily processed into products with new forms of use. The present study was aimed at determining the chemical composition and functional properties of shrimp waste protein concentrate and lyophilized flour. The raw material used in this study consisted of waste (head of Litopenaeus vannamei. The protein concentrate was obtained by ethanolic extraction, being subsequently submitted to drying in oven at 70° C, while the flour was obtained by lyophilization of shrimp wastes. Moisture, ash, protein and calcium contents showed significant difference between fresh shrimp head waste samples (IN and protein concentrate and lyophilized flour samples. The protein content for protein concentrate (PC and lyophilized flour (LF showed significant increase in relation to protein content in the waste (IN, thus showing that the process for obtaining the protein concentrate was efficient.Resíduos provenientes da indústria do pescado podem ser facilmente transformados em produtos com novas formas de aproveitamento. No presente estudo, objetivou-se determinar a composição química e as propriedades funcionais de farinha liofilizada e concentrado proteico provenientes de resíduos de camarão. A matéria-prima empregada neste estudo foi constituída de resíduos (cabeça de camarão Litopenaeus vannamei. O concentrado proteico foi obtido por extração etanólica e, posteriormente, submetido à secagem em estufa a 70° C, enquanto a farinha foi obtida pelo processo de liofilização do resíduo. Os teores de umidade, cinzas, proteínas e cálcio apresentaram diferença significativa entre as amostras de resíduo de cabeça de camarão in natura (IN e as amostras de concentrado proteico e farinha liofilizada. O teor de proteínas para concentrado protéico (CP e para a farinha liofilizada (FL apresentou aumento significativo em relação ao teor proteico do resíduo (IN, mostrando, assim, que o processo de elaboração do

  15. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  16. Chemical sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the author focuses on chemical sputtering by keV ions, treating two specific examples: the chemical effects occurring when bombarding simple condensed gases and the mechanisms of the ion-assisted etching process. First, however, the mechanism of sputtering of condensed gases in general is discussed. These mechanisms have been investigated using condensed noble gases as target material. The thesis is a compilation of articles published elsewhere. Contents: sputtering of condensed noble gases by keV heavy ions; surface distribution as an observable factor in the energy distribution of sputtered particles; reactive sputtering of simple condensed gases by keV heavy ion bombardment; mass spectra of nozzle-produced small molecular clusters of H2O, NH3, CO and CH4; mass and energy distribution of particles sputter-etched from Si in a XeF2 environment; argon-ion assisted etching of silicon by molecular chlorine; energy distribution of sputtered poly-atomic molecules. (Auth.)

  17. Highly concentrating Fresnel lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of concave Fresnel lens capable of concentrating solar radiation very near the ultimate concentration limit is considered. The differential equations that describe the lens are solved to provide computed solutions which are then checked by ray tracing techniques. The performance (efficiency and concentration) of the lens is investigated and compared to that of a flat Fresnel lens, showing that the new lens is preferable for concentrating solar radiation. (author)

  18. Solar cell concentrating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews fabrication techniques and testing facilities for different solar cells under concentration which have been developed and tested. It is also aimed to examine solar energy concentrators which are prospective candidates for photovoltaic concentrator systems. This may provide an impetus to the scientists working in the area of solar cell technology

  19. Recommended Inorganic Chemicals for Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, John R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to instrumental parameters. Discusses the preparation of standard solutions and provides a critical evaluation of available materials. Lists elements by group and discusses the purity and uses of each. (MVL)

  20. Radiometric chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiometric method of analysis is noted for its sensitivity and its simplicity in both apparatus and procedure. A few inexpensive radioactive reagents permit the analysis of a wide variety of chemical elements and compounds. Any particular procedure is generally applicable over a very wide range of concentrations. It is potentially an analytical method of great industrial significance. Specific examples of analyses are cited to illustrate the potentialities of ordinary equipment. Apparatus specifically designed for radiometric chemistry may shorten the time required, and increase the precision and accuracy for routine analyses. A sensitive and convenient apparatus for the routine performance of radiometric chemical analysis is a special type of centrifuge which has been used in obtaining the data presented in this paper. The radioactivity of the solution is measured while the centrifuge is spinning. This device has been used as the basis for an automatic analyser for phosphate ion, programmed to follow a sequence of unknown sampling, reagent mixing, centrifugation, counting data presentation, and phosphate replenishment. This analyser can repeatedly measure phosphate-concentration in the range of 5 to 50 ppm with an accuracy of ±5%. (author)

  1. Cosmic chemical memory: a new astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is presented of the study of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy through measurements on meteoritic samples in terrestrial laboratories. This includes the evolution of the chemical forms within the interstellar medium and of the isotopic structures that they contain. The measuring techniques described include mass spectrometry, microscopic chemical analysis, and chemical concentration in residues. Astrophysical topics under observation in the chemical constitution of meteoritic samples are discussed under the headings: nucleosynthesis; origin and evolution of interstellar dust; origin of the solar system; interstellar conditions and history. (U.K.)

  2. Illustrating Chemical Concepts through Food Systems: Introductory Chemistry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E., IV; Setser, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrations involving foods that illustrate chemical concepts are described, including vaporization of liquids and Graham's law of diffusion, chemical reaction rates, adsorption, properties of solutions, colloidal dispersions, suspensions, and hydrogen ion concentration. (CS)

  3. Mixture toxicity of PBT-like chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Kristian; Dai, Lina; Ramskov, Tina;

    Even though most chemicals regulation is still conducted on a chemical by chemical basis, mixture toxicity is achieving increasing attention. The scientific understanding has increased substantially in the last decades, and a general consensus now seems to have been acieved that concentration...... addition is a suitable model for default estimations of mixture effects. One of the major challenges is therefore how to select specific chemicals for actual mixture toxicity assessments. Persistant chemicals are likely to be present in the environment for an extended period of time, thus increasing the...... likelihood of them being present in environmentally found mixtures. Persistant, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemicals are therefore a highly relevant group of chemicals to consider for mixture toxicity regulation. The present study evaluates to what extent a number of PBT-like chemicals posess concern...

  4. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  5. The Chemical Composition of Maple Syrup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Maple syrup is one of several high-sugar liquids that humans consume. However, maple syrup is more than just a concentrated sugar solution. Here, we review the chemical composition of maple syrup. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.)

  6. Potential Impacts of Spilled Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Chemicals on Water Resources: Types, volumes, and physical-chemical properties of chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid chemicals spilled on-site may impact drinking water resources. While chemicals generally make up <2% of the total injected fluid composition by mass, spills may have undiluted concentrations. HF fluids typically consist of a mixture of base flui...

  7. Analysis of cream formation in green tea concentrates with different solid concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yong-Quan; Chen, Su-Qin; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Tang, Ping; Yin, Jun-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The formation of tea cream in the green tea concentrates of different solid concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60°Brix) was investigated. The results showed a good positive correlation (γ = 0.98, p ≤ 0.05) between the amount of tea cream and the solid concentrations from 5 to 40°Brix, while the amount of tea cream in the tea concentrates of 50 and 60°Brix decreased acutely. Total sugar, caffeine and catechins were found to be the main chemical components of tea cream in the green tea c...

  8. Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  9. Controlling the interfacial concentrations of I3− and Li+ ions in illuminated ruthenium (II) complex-sensitized nanoparticulate TiO2 photoanodes chemically coated by poly(amidoamide) dendrimers generation 4.0 for enhancing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthenium (II) complex-sensitized TiO2 electrodes were chemically coated with NH2-terminated poly(amidoamide) dendrimers generation 4.0 in order to improve the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells using these photoanodes. The presence of dendrimers in these photodevices produced a global photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 6.78%, which was higher than that obtained for photocells without them (5.43%). The experimental results indicated that this treatment of the dye-sensitized TiO2 electrodes allowed for controlling the concentrations of I3− anions and Li+ cations into the dendrimers-modified dyed-TiO2 pores during operation of the photocells. Consequently, the charge interception reaction and the charge accumulation process at the conduction band of the TiO2 electrodes were simultaneously balanced by the establishment of I2···NH2, NH···I− and C = O···Li+ bonds at the branches of the confined dendrimers for increasing their global conversion efficiency

  10. Automated solvent concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Stuart, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Designed for automated drug identification system (AUDRI), device increases concentration by 100. Sample is first filtered, removing particulate contaminants and reducing water content of sample. Sample is extracted from filtered residue by specific solvent. Concentrator provides input material to analysis subsystem.

  11. Toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recommendations of a subcommittee of the Westinghouse M ampersand 0 Nuclear Facility Safety Committee concerning toxic chemical risk acceptance criteria. Two sets of criteria have been developed, one for use in the hazard classification of facilities, and the second for use in comparing risks in DOE non-reactor nuclear facility Safety Analysis Reports. The Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG) values are intended to provide estimates of concentration ranges for specific chemicals above which exposure would be expected to lead to adverse heath effects of increasing severity for ERPG-1, -2, and -3s. The subcommittee recommends that criteria for hazard class or risk range be based on ERPGs for all chemicals. Probability-based Incremental Cancer Risk (ICR) criteria are recommended for additional analyses of risks from all known or suspected human carcinogens. Criteria are given for both on-site and off-site exposure. The subcommittee also recommends that the 5-minute peak concentration be compared with the relevant criterion with no adjustment for exposure time. Since ERPGs are available for only a limited number of chemicals, the subcommittee has developed a proposed hierarchy of concentration limit parameters for the different criteria

  12. Uranium Ore and Concentrate Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grand Junction Office of the United States Atomic Energy Commission has been responsible for procuring large quantities of natural uranium in both ores and concentrates. The techniques used for sampling ores are necessarily different from those used for concentrates. Each step in the overall measurement and sampling systems for both ores and concentrates is discussed, giving particular attention to the accuracy and precision of that step. During the years 1948-1964, a total of 58 million tons of ore was sampled in about 40 different mechanical sampling plants in the western United States. All plants have been required to weigh, sample and analyse ore in accordance with practices satisfactory to the USAEC. The ordinary principles of ore sampling, as used for years in the mining industry, have been followed. However, sufficient check sampling and other tests were performed to ensure that the uranium content of the variety of ores sampled was as accurately determined as economically feasible. Concentrates containing about 129 000 t of U3O8 were purchased from domestic producers during the last 17 years. This uranium was contained in approximately 10 000 lots, each of which was weighed, sampled, and analysed in accordance with carefully controlled procedures. These lots were received at USAEC-owned sampling facilities at Grand Junction or Weldon Spring, Missouri, both of which are contractor operated. The average lot consists of about 50 drums (55-gallon size) and weighs approximately 35 000 lb. Because concentrate varies so much in both physical and chemical characteristics, it is necessary to sample each drum. Through the years, various sampling systems were used, such as pipes, open auger, enclosed augers, and falling stream sampling. Falling stream sampling is the most accurate, provided precautions are taken to prevent changes in weight due to exposure to the atmosphere. Because of the tendency of concentrates to sorb or desorb moisture, depending upon the

  13. Generation of tunable and pulsatile concentration gradients via microfluidic network

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu

    2014-06-04

    We demonstrate a compact Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip which can quickly generate ten different chemical concentrations simultaneously. The concentration magnitude of each branch can be flexibly regulated based on the flow rate ratios of the two injecting streams. The temporal/pulsatile concentration gradients are achieved by integrating on-chip pneumatic actuated valves controlled by the external signals. The temporal concentration gradients can also be tuned precisely by varying applied frequency and duty cycle of the trigger signal. It is believed that such microdevice will be potentially used for some application areas of producing stable chemical gradients as well as allowing fast, pulsatile gradient transformation in seconds.

  14. Concentrating solar power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual evaluation is a synthesis of works published in 2006. Comparisons are presented between the wind power performances and European Commission White Paper and Biomass action plan objectives. After having been blocked for a long time in its development, the concentrating solar power sector is undergoing a full revival today due to the falling costs, more effective technologies and policies sensitive to environmental questions. The USA concentrates today practically all of the installed concentrating solar power capacity in the world. But the sector is now also being carried by Spain. (A.L.B.)

  15. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  16. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  17. Numerical simulation of concentrating solar collector P2CC with a small concentrating ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanović Velimir P.; Pavlović Saša R.; Ilić Marko N.; Apostolović Nenad S.; Kuštrimović Dragan D.

    2012-01-01

    Solar energy may be practically utilized directly through transformation into heat, electrical or chemical energy. A physical and mathematical model is presented, as well as a numerical procedure for predicting thermal performances of the P2CC solar concentrator. The demonstrated prototype has the reception angle of 110° at concentration ratio CR = 1.38, with the significant reception of diffuse radiation. The solar collector P2CC is designed for the area of middle temperature conversio...

  18. Concentration and content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Arderiu, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    One of the more frequent activities in health sciences is the measurement of biological quantities. Frequently, when reading biomedical books and journals some confusion on the metrological meaning of biological quantities related to the concepts 'concentration' and 'content' may be observed. Classically, a concentration is an amount of any type per volume of liquid or gas system, whereas content is an amount of any type per mass of liquid or gas or solid system. However the concepts 'concentration' and 'content' alone are still ambiguous because, depending on the type of amount of the component (analyte) per volume or mass of a system, there are different types of concentrations and contents. This article attempts to give a clarification of these concepts, mainly based on international recommendations about nomenclature and terminology of metrology, chemistry and clinical laboratory sciences. PMID:23894859

  19. Censored correlated cytokine concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas; Benn, Christine Stabell; Jørgensen, Mathias J;

    2013-01-01

    Interest in cytokines as markers for the function of the immune system is increasing. Methods quantifying cytokine concentrations are often subject to detection limits, which lead to non-detectable observations and censored distributions. When distributions are skewed, geometric mean ratios (GMRs......) can be used to describe the relative concentration between two cytokines, and the GMR ratio (GMRR) can be used to compare two groups. The problem is how to estimate GMRRs from censored distributions.We evaluated methods, including simple deletion and substitution, in simulated and real data. One...... method applies Tobit directly to the censored difference between the two cytokine log-concentrations (Diff). However, censoring is correlated to the outcome and is therefore not independent. The correlation increases as the correlation between the two log-concentrations decreases. We propose a Tobit...

  20. Concentrator silicon cell research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

    1992-04-01

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  1. Rheology of concentrated biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniuk, J. R.; Wang, J.; Root, T. W.; Scott, C. T.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Economic processing of lignocellulosic biomass requires handling the biomass at high solids concentration. This creates challenges because concentrated biomass behaves as a Bingham-like material with large yield stresses. Here we employ torque rheometry to measure the rheological properties of concentrated lignocellulosic biomass (corn stover). Yield stresses obtained using torque rheometry agree with those obtained using other rheometric methods, but torque rheometry can be used at much larger solids concentration (weight fractions of insoluble solids greater than 0.2). Yield stresses decrease with severity of hydrolysis, decrease when water-soluble polymers are added (for nonhydrolyzed biomass), and increase with particle length. Experimental results are qualitatively consistent with those obtained from particle-level simulations.

  2. Workplace Concentration of Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Monica I. Garcia-Perez; Fredrik Andersson; John Haltiwanger; Fredrik Kristin McCue; Seth Sanders

    2014-01-01

    To what extent do immigrants and the native-born work in separate workplaces? Do worker and firm characteristics explain the degree of workplace concentration? We explore these questions using a matched employer-employee database that extensively covers employers in selected MSAs. We find that immigrants are much more likely to have immigrant coworkers than are natives, and are particularly likely to work with their compatriots. We find much higher levels of concentration for small businesses...

  3. Test bed concentrator mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoud, M. J.

    1980-05-01

    The test bed concentrator (TBC) was des point focusing distributed receiver (PFDR) systems. The reflective surface of the concentrator was fabricated using mirror facet designs and techniques. The facets are made by bonding mirrored glass to spherically-conducted substrates. Several aspects of earlier work were reevaluated for application to the TBC: optimum glass block size, material selection, environmental test, optical characteristics, and reliability. A detailed explanation of tooling, substrate preparation, testing techniques, and mirror assembly is presented.

  4. FK concentrator outdoor measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Sanz, Maikel; Vilaplana, J.; Benitez Gimenez, Pablo; Mohedano,, Rubén; Zamora Herranz, Pablo; Miñano Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Mendes Lopes, Joao

    2013-01-01

    The FK is a two-stage optical concentrator for CPV, composed by a Fresnel lens working as POE and a refractive element working as SOE. Both elements perform Köhler integration, for uniform irradiance purposes. The FK has demonstrated that compares very well with other Fresnel-based concentrator optics. Recent on-sun measurements carried out on an FK mono-module prototype have already shown outstanding results, achieving electrical efficiencies over 34%. Further optimization of optical design ...

  5. Concentrated poverty in Milwaukee

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremiah P. Boyle

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath created a renewed awareness of the unique isolation and vulnerability of people who live in communities where poverty concentrates and persists. The Federal Reserve’s Community Affairs staff partnered with the Brookings Institution to re-examine our understanding of concentrated poverty – defined as areas where at least 40 percent of the population lives below the poverty line.

  6. Leaching of copper concentrates using NaCl and soluble copper contributed by the own concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of copper concentrates using cupric chloro complexes, generated in situ by the reaction between Cu(II), aported by the soluble copper content of the concentrate, and sodium chloride in acid media was studied. The concentrate samples were obtained from mineral processing plants from Antofagasta, Chile. Chemical and mineralogical characterization from original concentrates was made. Typical variable such as a chloride concentration, soluble copper concentration, leaching time, solid percentage and temperature were studied. DRX and EDS analyzed some of the residues. the experimental results indicated that it is possible to obtain solutions having high copper content (15 to 35 g/L) and 2 to 5 g/L free acid in order to submit this solution directly to a solvent extraction stage. The leaching tests use common reactive and low cost such as sodium chloride and sulfuric acid. (Author) 16 refs

  7. Optical detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Michael E.; Pushkarsky, Michael B.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analytical model evaluating the suitability of optical absorption based spectroscopic techniques for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) in ambient air. The sensor performance is modeled by simulating absorption spectra of a sample containing both the target and multitude of interfering species as well as an appropriate stochastic noise and determining the target concentrations from the simulated spectra via a least square fit (LSF) algorithm. The distribution of the LSF target concentrations determines the sensor sensitivity, probability of false positives (PFP) and probability of false negatives (PFN). The model was applied to CO2 laser based photoacosutic (L-PAS) CWA sensor and predicted single digit ppb sensitivity with very low PFP rates in the presence of significant amount of interferences. This approach will be useful for assessing sensor performance by developers and users alike; it also provides methodology for inter-comparison of different sensing technologies.

  8. Study on the variation of arsenic concentration in groundwater and chemical characteristics of arsenic in sediment cores at the areas with endemic arsenic poison disease in Jianghan Plain%江汉平原地方性砷中毒病区地下水砷含量变化及沉积物砷化学特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周素华; 叶恒朋; 李明健; 熊培生; 杜冬云; 王靖文

    2015-01-01

    目的 了解江汉平原地方性砷中毒(地砷病)病区地下水砷含量变化,探讨该区域高砷水赋存环境、地下水系统砷的来源.方法 在湖北省仙桃市和洪湖市分别以地砷病患者家为中心点,在3km半径内各采集30份地下水样品和3个地质钻孔沉积物样芯;水砷含量比较采用配对t检验或配对符号秩和检验进行分析.结果 仙桃市南洪村2011-2012年水砷浓度低于2006-2007年(t=4.645 3,P<0.000 1),洪湖市姚河村2011-2012年水砷浓度高于2006-2007年(S=-150,P<0.000 1);高砷水呈弱酸、弱氧化性,水砷浓度与水样C1-、HCO3-、Fe、Mn浓度正相关,与水样SO42-、NO3-浓度负相关;研究区沉积物中砷浓度为1.500~ 17.289mg/kg,砷含量最大值均出现在泥土层,最小值均出现在沙层.结论 江汉平原地砷病病区高砷水砷含量的时空间变化程度较大,与中国山西大同盆地、山阴地区、内蒙古河套平原等原生高砷水地区有明显差异,为典型的高砷水赋存环境;研究区沉积物样品中砷含量与岩性结构有密切关系.%Objective To understand the variation of arsenic concentration in underground water at the endemic arsenic poison disease area of Jianghan Plain so as to better understand the spatial distribution of high arsenic groundwater,hydro-chemical evolution and source of arsenic in this region.Methods Thirty underground water samples were collected respectively around 3 km radius of the two houses where arsenic poisoning patients lived,in Xiantao and Honghu.Sediment cores of three drillings were collected as well.Both paired t-test or paired Wilcoxon Signed Ranking Test were used to compare the arsenic concentration of water.Results The arsenic concentration in 2011-2012 appeared lower than that in 2006-2007 at the Nanhong village of Xiantao (t=4.645 3,P<0.000 1),but was higher(S=-150,P<0.000 1) in the Yaohe village of Honghu.The pH value showed weak acidity with Eh as weak oxidated

  9. Chemical simulation of greywater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Suhail Najem; Scholz, Miklas

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable water resources management attracts considerable attention in today's world. Recycling and reuse of both wastewater and greywater are becoming more attractive. The strategy is to protect ecosystem services by balancing the withdrawal of water and the disposal of wastewater. In the present study, a timely and novel synthetic greywater composition has been proposed with respect to the composition of heavy metals, nutrients and organic matter. The change in water quality of the synthetic greywater due to increasing storage time was monitored to evaluate the stability of the proposed chemical formula. The new greywater is prepared artificially using analytical-grade chemicals to simulate either low (LC) or high (HC) pollutant concentrations. The characteristics of the synthetic greywater were tested (just before starting the experiment, after two days and a week of storage under real weather conditions) and compared to those reported for real greywater. Test results for both synthetic greywater types showed great similarities with the physiochemical properties of published findings concerning real greywater. Furthermore, the synthetic greywater is relatively stable in terms of its characteristics for different storage periods. However, there was a significant (p change was also noted for the reduction (70%) of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concerning HC greywater after seven days of storage. PMID:26745659

  10. Chemical characterization of Brazilian hulless barley varieties, flour fractionation, and protein concentration Caracterização química de variedades brasileiras de cevada nua, fracionamento da farinha e concentração de proteína

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Vieira Helm

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though hulless barley is widely known due to its nutritional potential, in Brazil it is only grown at a few agricultural experimental stations. There is no published data about the chemical composition of Brazilian hulless barley varieties; however, research laboratories have studied their agronomical characteristics. The objectives of this study were to present the chemical characterization and effect of flour fractionation on protein concentration of six Brazilian hulless barley varieties, namely IAC IBON 214/82, IAC 8612/421, IAC 8501/31, IAC 8501/12, IAPAR 39-Acumaí, and IAC 8501/22. The analyses included: ash, ether extract, total protein, starch, total insoluble and soluble dietary fiber, and beta-glucans. Flour fractionation was carried out by sieving. The flour fractions were evaluated for crude protein, protein, and protein and non-protein nitrogen. Chemical composition varied (P Apesar de a cevada nua ser amplamente conhecida por seu potencial nutricional, no Brasil é apenas cultivada em poucas estações experimentais agronômicas. Em relação as variedades brasileiras de cevada nua, não se têm dados sobre a composição química, entretanto instituições de pesquisa têm estudado suas características agronômicas. Os objetivos deste estudo foram apresentar a caracterização química e o efeito no fracionamento da farinha obtida visando à concentração de proteína de seis variedades brasileiras de cevada nua: IAC IBON 214/82, IAC 8612/421, IAC 8501/31, IAC 8501/12, IAPAR 39-Acumaí, e IAC 8501/22. Foram realizadas análises de: cinzas, extrato etéreo, proteína total, amido, fibra alimentar total, solúvel e insolúvel e beta-glucanas. As frações das farinhas foram obtidas por peneiramento e avaliadas quanto aos teores de proteína bruta, proteína, nitrogênio protéico e não protéico. Houve variação entre as variedades testadas (P < 0,05. As variedades IAC 8501/22, IAC 8501/31 e IAC 8501/12 apresentaram o

  11. Chemical Implementation of Finite-State Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmfelt, Allen; Weinberger, Edward D.; Ross, John

    1992-01-01

    With methods developed in a prior article on the chemical kinetic implementation of a McCulloch-Pitts neuron, connections among neurons, logic gates, and a clocking mechanism, we construct examples of clocked finite-state machines. These machines include a binary decoder, a binary adder, and a stack memory. An example of the operation of the binary adder is given, and the chemical concentrations corresponding to the state of each chemical neuron are followed in time. Using these methods, we can, in principle, construct a universal Turing machine, and these chemical networks inherit the halting problem

  12. The Microwave Concentrator Design and Study on Concentrating Apple Juice

    OpenAIRE

    Geng Yuefeng; Ge Xinfeng

    2014-01-01

    Microwave concentrating device on fresh apple juice is designed in order to increase concentrating fresh apple juice efficiency and microwave concentrating process on fresh apple juice were studied. The designed microwave concentrator contains microwave generator, dehumidification system, electrical cabinet, parabolic waveguide, control system, microwave leakage inhibited mechanism and other components. The concentrating experiment is carried by the designed concentrator, from the setting-to-...

  13. 西安市秋季大气细粒子(PM2.5)中化学元素的浓度特征和来源%Concentration Characteristics and Sources of Chemical Elements in Atmospheric Fine Particles ( PM2.5 ) in Autumn in Xi' an City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘小凤; 曹军骥; 王启元; 沈振兴; 徐红梅

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] The aim was to study the concentration characteristics and sources of chemical elements in atmospheric fine particles (PM2.5 ) in autumn in Xi'an City. [ Method ] By means of min-volume sampler, PM2.5 samples in atmosphere in Xi'an were collected in October 2009, and the concentration characteristics and sources of elements in PM2 5 were analyzed. [ Result] The average mass concentration of PM2 5 in atmosphere in autumn in Xi' an City was 168.44 μg/m3 which was higher than that of Beijing and Pearl River Delta area, and the minimum and maximum value were 53.29 and 358.16 μg/m3, respectively. The mass concentration of S, Zn, K, Cl, Ca and Fe in PM2. 5 was above 1.0 μg/m3, with high pollution level. In addition, K had obvious correlation with organic carbon (OC) and element carbon (EC),with the correlation coefficients of 0.76 and 0. 75 (P <0.000 1 ) respectivdly, andit showed that OC and EC had the same source as K,namely biomass burning had certain contribution on OC and EC. Enrichment factors analysis revealed that K, Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn and Cr came from earth crust, rock weathering and other natural sources, while anthropogenic pollution sources had great effects on S, Zn, Cl, Pb, Br,Mo, Cd and As which were affected by soil dust and other natural sources slightly, among them, Cd had the highest enrichment factor and mainly came from metal smelting. Besides, coal combustion, biomass burning, vehicle emissions, metallurgical and chemical industry and dust were the main sources of PM2. 5 in autumn in Xi' an. [ Conclusion] The study could provide theoretical foundation for the control of urban environmental pollution.%[目的]研究西安市秋季大气细粒子(PM2.5)中化学元素的浓度特征及来源.[方法]于2009年10月利用微流量采样器采集西安大气中PM2.5样品,分析其元素浓度特征及来源.[结果]西安市秋季大气中PM2.5质量浓度的平均值为168.44μg/m3,最小值为53.29μg/m3,最大值达358.16μg/m3,高

  14. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2016-03-15

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  15. Thermal cloak-concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiangying; Li, Ying; Jiang, Chaoran; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    For macroscopically manipulating heat flow at will, thermal metamaterials have opened a practical way, which possesses a single function, such as either cloaking or concentrating the flow of heat even though environmental temperature varies. By developing a theory of transformation heat transfer for multiple functions, here we introduce the concept of intelligent thermal metamaterials with a dual function, which is in contrast to the existing thermal metamaterials with single functions. By assembling homogeneous isotropic materials and shape-memory alloys, we experimentally fabricate a kind of intelligent thermal metamaterials, which can automatically change from a cloak (or concentrator) to a concentrator (or cloak) when the environmental temperature changes. This work paves an efficient way for a controllable gradient of heat, and also provides guidance both for arbitrarily manipulating the flow of heat and for efficiently designing similar intelligent metamaterials in other fields.

  16. Solar concentrator protective system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A mechanism that blocks concentrated sunlight from reaching a receiver, in the event of a tracking failure or loss of coolant is described. Sunlight is normally concentrated by a dish reflector onto the opening of a receiver. A faceplate surrounds the opening, and coolant carrying tubes, line the receiver. If the concentrated sunlight wanders so it begins to fall on the faceplate, then the sunlight will melt a portion of a fuse wire portion will break. The wire is attached to a flange on a shutter frame, and breaking of the fuse wire allows the frame to fall. Normally, the shutter frame supports shutter elements that are held open by cam followers that bear against cams.

  17. Pollutant concentrations in placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leino, O.; Kiviranta, H.; Karjalainen, A. K.;

    2013-01-01

    Unborn children are exposed to environmental pollutants via the placenta, and there is a causal relationship between maternal intake of pollutants and fetal exposure. Placental examination is an effective way for acquiring data for estimating fetal exposure. We analyzed the concentrations of 104...... congeners of persistent organic pollutants, seven organotin compounds, five heavy metals, and methylmercury in 130 randomly selected placentas. Additionally, we examined similarities between pollutant concentrations by analyzing correlations between their placental concentrations. Our results yield new...... information for conducting contaminant risk assessments for the prenatal period. Out of the 117 individual persistent organic pollutants or metals assayed, 46 could be detected in more than half of the placentas. Moreover, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was found in all placentas. The data...

  18. The complex chemical Langevin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical Langevin equation (CLE) is a popular simulation method to probe the stochastic dynamics of chemical systems. The CLE’s main disadvantage is its break down in finite time due to the problem of evaluating square roots of negative quantities whenever the molecule numbers become sufficiently small. We show that this issue is not a numerical integration problem, rather in many systems it is intrinsic to all representations of the CLE. Various methods of correcting the CLE have been proposed which avoid its break down. We show that these methods introduce undesirable artefacts in the CLE’s predictions. In particular, for unimolecular systems, these correction methods lead to CLE predictions for the mean concentrations and variance of fluctuations which disagree with those of the chemical master equation. We show that, by extending the domain of the CLE to complex space, break down is eliminated, and the CLE’s accuracy for unimolecular systems is restored. Although the molecule numbers are generally complex, we show that the “complex CLE” predicts real-valued quantities for the mean concentrations, the moments of intrinsic noise, power spectra, and first passage times, hence admitting a physical interpretation. It is also shown to provide a more accurate approximation of the chemical master equation of simple biochemical circuits involving bimolecular reactions than the various corrected forms of the real-valued CLE, the linear-noise approximation and a commonly used two moment-closure approximation

  19. Chemical Industry Waste water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of chemical industrial wastewater from building and construction chemicals factory and plastic shoes manufacturing factory was investigated. The two factories discharge their wastewater into the public sewerage network. The results showed the wastewater discharged from the building and construction chemicals factory was highly contaminated with organic compounds. The average values of COD and BOD were 2912 and 150 mg O2/l. Phenol concentration up to 0.3 mg/l was detected. Chemical treatment using lime aided with ferric chloride proved to be effective and produced an effluent characteristics in compliance with Egyptian permissible limits. With respect to the other factory, industrial wastewater was mixed with domestic wastewater in order to lower the organic load. The COD, BOD values after mixing reached 5239 and 2615 mg O2/l. The average concentration of phenol was 0.5 mg/l. Biological treatment using activated sludge or rotating biological contactor (RBe) proved to be an effective treatment system in terms of producing an effluent characteristic within the permissible limits set by the law

  20. Vacancy Concentration in Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1977-01-01

    Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10.......Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10....

  1. Concentration among the rich

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the concentration of wealth among the group of top wealth holders, defined as those with wealth in excess of a high cut off. The paper begins by considering the definition of this cut off, analogous to the definition of a poverty line at the other end of the distribution. It then considers what can be learned about the proportion classified as ‘rich’ and about the concentration among the rich from four non-survey sources: journalists’ lists, estate data, we...

  2. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  3. Concentration of lemon pectin extract by ultrafiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Damián Stechina; Miguel Pauletti; Claudia Lesa; Rodolfo Hugo Maffioly; Nicolas Bogdanoff; Oscar Iribarren

    2012-01-01

    Current annual lemon production in Argentina is about 900 thousand t. 75% is used industrially to obtain pasteurized juice concentrate. Since 40 - 45 % of citrus fruit content is peel and seeds, the annual lemon residue yield is 360 thousand t. Lemon peel contains about 30% (B.S.) of peptic substances with an important commercial value due to its gelling and thickening properties for food, chemical, pharmacological and cosmetic products. Membrane processes have many applications in food manuf...

  4. Concentrated loads on concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Karen Grøndahl; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas are...

  5. Theory of Concentrated Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alekseenko, Sergey; Kuibin, Pavel; Okulov, Valery

    This book presents comprehensive and authoritative coverage of the wide field of concentrated vortices observed in nature and technique. The methods for research of their kinematics and dynamics are considered. Special attention is paid to the flows with helical symmetry. The authors have described...

  6. Dilution, Concentration, and Flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling; Schmuckler, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    As both classroom teaching practice and literature show, many students have difficulties learning science concepts such as density. Here are some investigations that identify the relationship between density and floating through experimenting with successive dilution of a liquid, or the systematic change of concentration of a saltwater solution.…

  7. Chemical treatments and usage in offshore oil and gas production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the uses of production treating chemicals, gas processing chemicals, and stimulation and workover chemicals in U.S. offshore oil and gas production operations. The purpose, solubility properties, primary generic chemical types, treatment methods, and typical use concentrations of each chemical group are discussed. Acute aquatic toxicity data and solubility information are presented

  8. The determination of oxygen high concentration by polarographic method lodging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the article there are investigated matters of carrying out the polarographic lodging for the oxygen in the wide range concentration. The construction of graduating installation is described. The data of compared polarographic definitions in wells with the results of chemical analysis of samples are given. The possibility of the oxygen concentration measuring in solutions with different-acidity is shown

  9. Chemical Sensing for Buried Landmines - Fundamental Processes Influencing Trace Chemical Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-05-01

    Mine detection dogs have a demonstrated capability to locate hidden objects by trace chemical detection. Because of this capability, demining activities frequently employ mine detection dogs to locate individual buried landmines or for area reduction. The conditions appropriate for use of mine detection dogs are only beginning to emerge through diligent research that combines dog selection/training, the environmental conditions that impact landmine signature chemical vapors, and vapor sensing performance capability and reliability. This report seeks to address the fundamental soil-chemical interactions, driven by local weather history, that influence the availability of chemical for trace chemical detection. The processes evaluated include: landmine chemical emissions to the soil, chemical distribution in soils, chemical degradation in soils, and weather and chemical transport in soils. Simulation modeling is presented as a method to evaluate the complex interdependencies among these various processes and to establish conditions appropriate for trace chemical detection. Results from chemical analyses on soil samples obtained adjacent to landmines are presented and demonstrate the ultra-trace nature of these residues. Lastly, initial measurements of the vapor sensing performance of mine detection dogs demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of dogs in sensing landmine signature chemicals; however, reliability at these ultra-trace vapor concentrations still needs to be determined. Through this compilation, additional work is suggested that will fill in data gaps to improve the utility of trace chemical detection.

  10. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  11. Concentration addition, independent action and generalized concentration addition models for mixture effect prediction of sex hormone synthesis in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated...... and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast...

  12. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the

  13. Concentrated solar thermoelectric generators

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Toberer, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from concentrated sunlight. In this paper, we develop a novel detailed balance model for STEGs and apply this model to both state-of-the-art and idealized materials. This model uses thermoelectric compatibility theory to provide analytic solutions to device efficiency in idealized materials with temperature-dependent properties. The results of this modeling allow us to predict maximum theoretical ST...

  14. Chlorination of zirconyte concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments with zirconyte concentrate were carried out in order to study the effects of temperature, percentage of reducing agent and porosity on the gasification of ZrO2 for 10 and 20 minutes of reaction. Factorial analysis was applied and the results indicated that temperature and percentage of reducing agent were the two only variables effecting the ZrO2 gasification. (author)

  15. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  16. Zirconia concentrate chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorination experiments were conducted in order to study the kinetics of gasification of the zirconium oxide present in the zirconia concentrate. The variables studied are temperature (1173 to 1373 K), percentage of reducing agent (12 to 36%) and porosity (22 to 30%). The results indicated a greater influence of temperature and percentage of reducing agent as well as allowed the conclusion that a balance between the levels of these variables is an important factor in the appropriate chlorination conditions. (author)

  17. Polycarbonate Bottle Use and Urinary Bisphenol A Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Carwile, Jenny L.; Luu, Henry T.; Bassett, Laura S.; Driscoll, Daniel A.; Yuan, Caterina; Chang, Jennifer Y.; Ye, Xiaoyun; Calafat, Antonia M.; Michels, Karin B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production-volume chemical commonly used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic. Low-level concentrations of BPA in animals and possibly in humans may cause endocrine disruption. Whether ingestion of food or beverages from polycarbonate containers increases BPA concentrations in humans has not been studied. Objectives We examined the association between use of polycarbonate beverage containers and urinary BPA concentrations in humans. Methods We con...

  18. Design of chemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes design of chemical plant, which includes chemical engineer and plan for chemical plant, development of chemical process, cost engineering pattern, design and process development, general plant construction plan, project engineering, foundation for economy on assets and depreciation, estimation for cost on capital investment and manufacturing cost, design with computers optimal design and method like fluid mechanics design chemical device and estimation for cost, such as dispatch of material and device writing on design report and appendixes.

  19. Concentration of trace elements in marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the quality and quantity of stable trace elements in marine environments is frequently required to analyze the radioecological behavior of radionuclides released from nuclear facilities into the sea. In the present work, special attention was concentrated in determination of stable Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Rb and Cs in marine organisms to estimate the concentration factors for these elements and corresponding radionuclides. Marine organisms (fishes, marine invertebrates and seaweeds) were collected at the seashore of Ibaragi prefecture and provided for chemical analysis after dry-ashing and wet-ashing. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry and neutron activation analysis were applied to determine the concentration of elements. The concentration of stable elements in fish muscle was independent on species of the fishes though slightly higher trends were observed in ''Usumebaru'', Sebastes nivosus for Cs, ''Ishimochi'', Nibea mitsukurii for Zn and Fe compared with other species. The concentration of Co, Zn and Fe in muscle of marine invertebrates was one order of magnitude higher than fish muscles especially in shellfishes for Co. Seaweeds showed peculiar species specificity for the concentration of stable trace elements and remarkable differences was observed between the species even among the same genus. (auth.)

  20. Maximum work configurations of finite potential capacity reservoir chemical engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An isothermal endoreversible chemical engine operating between the finite potential capacity high-chemical-potential reservoir and the infinite potential capacity low-chemical-potential reservoir has been studied in this work.Optimal control theory was applied to determine the optimal cycle configurations corresponding to the maximum work output per cycle for the fixed total cycle time and a universal mass transfer law.Analyses of special examples showed that the optimal cycle configuration with the mass transfer law g∝△μ,where△μis the chemical potential difference,is an isothermal endoreversible chemical engine cycle,in which the chemical potential(or the concentration) of the key component in the working substance of low-chemical-potential side is a constant,while the chemical potentials(or the concentrations) of the key component in the finite potential capacity high-chemical-potential reservoir and the corresponding side working substance change nonlinearly with time,and the difference of the chemical potentials(or the ratio of the concentrations) of the key component between the high-chemical-potential reservoir and the working substance is a constant.While the optimal cycle configuration with the mass transfer law g∝△μc,where △μc is the concentration difference,is different from that with the mass transfer law g∝△μ significantly.When the high-chemical-potential reservoir is also an infinite potential capacity chemical potential reservoir,the optimal cycle configuration of the isothermal endoreversible chemical engine consists of two constant chemical potential branches and two instantaneous constant mass-flux branches,which is independent of the mass transfer law.The object studied in this paper is general,and the results can provide some guidelines for optimal design and operation of real chemical engines.

  1. The Impact of Price on Chemical Fertilizer Demand in China

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wen-fang; Du, Cheng; John K. Dagsvik

    2012-01-01

    Since 1998, the national policies on chemical fertilizer in China have been concentrated in limiting price plus subsidizing, abolishing agricultural tax, giving direct subsidies to farmers, and other aspects. In order to analyze the impact of national policies on the consumption of chemical fertilizer, this article selects the consumption of chemical fertilizer per unit, chemical fertilizer price index and farmers' net income in different provinces during the period 1998-2007 as variables, to...

  2. Purification of zirconium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial grade ZrO2 and an ammonium uranate (yellow cake) are obtained from the caldasito ore processing. This ore is found in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Caldasito is an uranigerous zirconium ore, a mixture of zircon and baddeleyite and contains 60% ZrO2 and 0,3% U3O8. The chemical opening of the ore was made by alkaline fusion with NaOH at controlled temperature. The zirconium-uranium separation took place by a continuous liquid-liquid extraction in TBP-varsol-HNO3-H2O system. The raffinate containing zirconium + impurities (aluminium, iron and titanium) was purified by an ion exchange operation using a strong cationic resin

  3. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Gang [MIT; Ren, Zhifeng [University of Houston

    2015-07-09

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate in the lab that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) can exceed 10% solar-to-electricity efficiency, and STEGs can be integrated with phase-change materials (PCM) for thermal storage, providing operation beyond daylight hours. This project achieved significant progress in many tasks necessary to achieving the overall project goals. An accurate Themoelectric Generator (TEG) model was developed, which included realistic treatment of contact materials, contact resistances and radiative losses. In terms of fabricating physical TEGs, high performance contact materials for skutterudite TE segments were developed, along with brazing and soldering methods to assemble segmented TEGs. Accurate measurement systems for determining device performance (in addition to just TE material performance) were built for this project and used to characterize our TEGs. From the optical components’ side, a spectrally selective cermet surface was developed with high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance, with thermal stability at high temperature. A measurement technique was also developed to determine absorptance and total hemispherical emittance at high temperature, and was used to characterize the fabricated spectrally selective surfaces. In addition, a novel reflective cavity was designed to reduce radiative absorber losses and achieve high receiver efficiency at low concentration ratios. A prototype cavity demonstrated that large reductions in radiative losses were possible through this technique. For the overall concentrating STEG system, a number of devices were fabricated and tested in a custom built test platform to characterize their efficiency performance. Additionally, testing was performed with integration of PCM thermal storage, and the storage time of the lab scale system was evaluated. Our latest testing results showed a STEG efficiency of 9.6%, indicating promising potential for high performance concentrated STEGs.

  4. Concentration and content

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes-Arderiu, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    One of the more frequent activities in health sciences is the measurement of biological quantities. Frequently, when reading biomedical books and journals some confusion on the metrological mea-ning of biological quantities related to the concepts ‘concentration’ and ‘content’ may be observed. Classically, a concentration is an amount of any type per volume of liquid or gas system, whereas content is an amount of any type per mass of liquid or gas or solid system. However the concepts ‘concen...

  5. Concentration and content

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes-Arderiu, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    One of the more frequent activities in health sciences is the measurement of biological quantities. Frequently, when reading biomedical books and journals some confusion on the metrological meaning of biological quantities related to the concepts ‘concentration’ and ‘content’ may be observed. Classically, a concentration is an amount of any type per volume of liquid or gas system, whereas content is an amount of any type per mass of liquid or gas or solid system. However the concepts ‘concent...

  6. Boric acid concentration monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boric acid concentration was measured by thermal neutron absorption in the study of the boric acid sorption and desorption curves on an anion exchange resin. Ra-Be 18.5 GBq and Am-Be 111 GBq sources and water as a moderator were used. The SNM 12 cylindrical corona detector with 10B placed in the middle of the measuring cell was used for neutron flux measurement. The HP 9600 E computer system was used for measured data collection and evaluation. (Ha)

  7. Membrane distillation for milk concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moejes, S.N.; Romero Guzman, Maria; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Barrera, K.H.; Feenstra, L.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an emerging technology to concentrate liquid products while producing high quality water as permeate. Application for desalination has been studied extensively the past years, but membrane distillation has also potential to produce concentrated food products like concentrate

  8. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  9. A statistical proxy for sulphuric acid concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mikkonen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous sulphuric acid is a key precursor for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Previous experimental studies have confirmed a strong correlation between the number concentrations of freshly formed particles and the ambient concentrations of sulphuric acid. This study evaluates a body of experimental gas phase sulphuric acid concentrations, as measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS during six intensive measurement campaigns and one long-term observational period. The campaign datasets were measured in Hyytiälä, Finland, in 2003 and 2007, in San Pietro Capofiume, Italy, in 2009, in Melpitz, Germany, in 2008, in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, in 2002, and in Niwot Ridge, Colorado, USA, in 2007. The long term data were obtained in Hohenpeissenberg, Germany, during 1998 to 2000. The measured time series were used to construct proximity measures ("proxies" for sulphuric acid concentration by using statistical analysis methods. The objective of this study is to find a proxy for sulfuric acid that is valid in as many different atmospheric environments as possible. Our most accurate and universal formulation of the sulphuric acid concentration proxy uses global solar radiation, SO2 concentration, condensation sink and relative humidity as predictor variables, yielding a correlation measure (R of 0.87 between observed concentration and the proxy predictions. Interestingly, the role of the condensation sink in the proxy was only minor, since similarly accurate proxies could be constructed with global solar radiation and SO2 concentration alone. This could be attributed to SO2 being an indicator for anthropogenic pollution, including particulate and gaseous emissions which represent sinks for the OH radical that, in turn, is needed for the formation of sulphuric acid.

  10. A statistical proxy for sulphuric acid concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mikkonen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous sulphuric acid is a key precursor for new particle formation in the atmosphere. Previous experimental studies have confirmed a strong correlation between the number concentrations of freshly formed particles and the ambient concentrations of sulphuric acid. This study evaluates a body of experimental gas phase sulphuric acid concentrations, as measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS during six intensive measurement campaigns and one long-term observational period. The campaign datasets were measured in Hyytiälä, Finland, in 2003 and 2007, in San Pietro Capofiume, Italy, in 2009, in Melpitz, Germany, in 2008, in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, in 2002, and in Niwot Ridge, Colorado, USA, in 2007. The long term data were obtained in Hohenpeissenberg, Germany, during 1998 to 2000. The measured time series were used to construct proximity measures ("proxies" for sulphuric acid concentration by using statistical analysis methods. The objective of this study is to find a proxy for sulfuric acid that is valid in as many different atmospheric environments as possible. Our most accurate and universal formulation of the sulphuric acid concentration proxy uses global solar radiation, SO2 concentration, condensation sink and relative humidity as predictor variables, yielding a correlation measure (R of 0.87 between observed concentration and the proxy predictions. Interestingly, the role of the condensation sink in the proxy was only minor, since similarly accurate proxies could be constructed with global solar radiation and SO2 concentration alone. This could be attributed to SO2 being an indicator for anthropogenic pollution, including particulate and gaseous emissions which represent sinks for the OH radical that, in turn, is needed for the formation of sulphuric acid.

  11. Chemical and mechanical signaling in epithelial spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a minimal mathematical model to explain long-range coordination of dynamics of multiple cells in epithelial spreading, which may be induced, under different conditions, by a chemical signal, or mechanically induced strain, or both. The model is based on chemo-mechanical interactions including a chemical effect of strain, chemically induced polarization and active traction, and interaction between polarized cells. The results, showing kinase concentration distribution and cell displacement, velocity, and stress fields, allow us to reproduce qualitatively available experimental data and distinguish between distinct dynamical patterns observed under conditions of injury or unconstraining. (paper)

  12. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  13. Plasma concentrations of misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma concentrations of misonidazole doses between 0.6 and 2.0 g/m2 were analyzed in respect to the variation within the same patient and between different patients. Peak plasma levels were observed after 2 hours. The mean plasma levels of misonidazole only at 3 hours were 23.8, 47.0 and 76.5 μg/ml after misonidazole doses of 0.6, 1.2 g/m2, respectively. The half-life of misonidazole only was found to be 8.2 hours for women and 10.5 for men. Good linearity between plasma levels and drug doses was observed after administration of different single doses to the same patient within the dose range 0.6 to 2.0 g/m2. (orig.)

  14. Concentration solar thermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the production of electricity by concentration solar power (CSP) installations is said to be a source of energy for the future, the author discusses past experiments (notably the French Thermis project), and the different techniques which are currently being used. He indicates the regions which appear to be the most appropriate for this technique. He presents the three main techniques: parabolic cylinder, tower, and Stirling cycle installations. He discusses the issue of intermittency. He proposes an assessment of prices and of their evolution, and indicates the investments made in different installations (in Italy, Spain, Germany and Portugal). He comments the case of hybrid installations (sun and gas), evokes the Desertec project proposed by the German industry which comprises a set of hybrid installations. He notices that there is no significant technological evolution for this process

  15. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept. PMID:23816910

  16. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  17. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  18. Personal Chemical Exposure informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical Exposure science is the study of human contact with chemicals (from manufacturing facilities, everyday products, waste) occurring in their environments and advances knowledge of the mechanisms and dynamics of events that cause or prevent adverse health outcomes. (adapted...

  19. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  20. Chemical Search Web Utility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chemical Search Web Utility is an intuitive web application that allows the public to easily find the chemical that they are interested in using, and which...

  1. Capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  2. Chemicals Industry Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  3. Milho úmido, bagaço de cana e silagem de milho em dietas de alto teor de concentrado: 2. composição corporal e taxas de deposição dos tecidos High moisture corn, sugarcane bagasse and corn silage in high concentrate diets: 2. empty body chemical composition and tissues deposition rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Berndt

    2002-09-01

    245 kg were fed an adaptation diet for 33 days. After that period four animals were slaughtered to obtain initial body composition. The other 28 animals were allotted to the four treatments for a 124 days experimental feeding period. The experimental design was randomized blocks in 2 X 2 factorial arrangement (two roughage sources X two corn grain sources with seven replicates, testing the following treatments: corn silage+high moisture corn (Si-MU; corn silage+dry corn grain (Si-MS; sugarcane bagasse+high moisture corn (Ba-MU and sugarcane bagasse+dry corn grain (Ba-MS. There were no interactions between roughage and grain source for any variable evaluated. Corn silage was superior than sugarcane bagasse for daily empty body gain, and for deposition rates of all chemical components and energy. High moisture corn increased fat and energy content in the gain as well as the rate of lipid deposition. Data demonstrated that sugarcane bagasse is a poor roughage source in high concentrate diets when compared to whole plant corn silage. Results are also consistent with an increase in net energy content of ensiled corn grain.

  4. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics.

  5. Models of Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    The basic principles underlying galactic chemical evolution and the most important results of chemical evolution models are discussed. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, for which we possess the majority of observational constraints, is described. Then, it is shown how different star formation histories influence the chemical evolution of galaxies of different morphological type. Finally, the role of abundances and abundance ratios as cosmic clocks is emphasized an...

  6. Chemical evolution and life

    OpenAIRE

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before na...

  7. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  8. Hybrid chemical and nondestructive-analysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsue, S.T.; Marsh, S.F.; Marks, T.

    1982-01-01

    A hybrid chemical/NDA technique has been applied at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the assay of plutonium in ion-exchange effluents. Typical effluent solutions contain low concentrations of plutonium and high concentrations of americium. A simple trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) separation can remove 99.9% of the americium. The organic phase that contains the separated plutonium can be accurately assayed by monitoring the uranium L x-ray intensities.

  9. Hybrid chemical and nondestructive analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid chemical/NDA technique has been applied at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to the assay of plutonium in ion-exchange effluents. Typical effluent solutions contain low concentrations of plutonium and high concentrations of americium. A simple trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) separation can remove 99.9% of the americium. The organic phase that contains the separated plutonium can be accurately assayed by monitoring the uranium L x-ray intensities

  10. Chemical deacetylation natural xanthan (Jungbunzlauer®)

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen P. Pinto; Lígia Furlan; Claire T. Vendruscolo

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of adapting a method for removal of acetyl groups from xanthan, reactions of chemical deacetylation were carried out with natural xanthan (Jungbunzlauer®) with variations on the following parameters: biopolymer and alkali concentration (sodium and potassium hydroxide). The deacetylation reaction was performed at 25 ºC for three hours. The proposed methodology was efficient to promote the deacetylation reaction. The viscosity of xanthan increased when the alkali concentration was ...

  11. What Is Chemical Stoichiometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William R.; Missen, Ronald W.

    1979-01-01

    Chemical stoichiometry is discussed free from kinetic or thermodynamic considerations. The means for determining the following are presented: the number of stoichiometric degrees of freedom, the number of components, a permissible set of chemical equations, and a permissible set of components, for a closed system undergoing chemical reaction.…

  12. Chemical Recycle of Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Fatima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Various chemical processes currently prevalent in the chemical industry for plastics recycling have been discussed. Possible future scenarios in chemical recycling have also been discussed. Also analyzed are the effects on the environment, the risks, costs and benefits of PVC recycling. Also listed are the various types of plastics and which plastics are safe to use and which not after rcycle

  13. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Tatsuo; Sasa, Shin-ichi

    1997-01-01

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  14. Chemical and Environmental Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheather, Harry

    The two-year curriculum in chemical technology presented in the document is designed to prepare high school graduates for technical positions in the chemical industry. Course outlines are given for general chemistry, chemical calculations, quantitative analysis, environmental chemistry, organic chemistry 1 and 2, instrumental analysis, and…

  15. Foundational aspects of the concept of chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp

    The chemical activity of an organic chemical quantifies its potential for spontaneous physicochemical processes, such as diffusion, sorption, and partitioning. For instance, the chemical activity of a sediment contaminant determines its equilibrium partitioning concentration in sediment......-dwelling organisms and differences in chemical activity determine the direction and extent of diffusion between environmental compartments [1,2]. This makes chemical activity a meaningfull and well-defined exposure parameter that is closely linked to fugacity and freely dissolved concentration [2]. Classical...... toxicological studies have provided the first indication that narcosis occurs within a relatively narrow band of chemical activity [3-5], and during the last 10 years several studies have confirmed this for the „baseline toxicity“ of non-polar organic chemicals and their mixtures [6-8]. The first aim of this...

  16. Mineralogical characterization of uranium yellow cake concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium yellow cake concentrates have been analyzed and characterized mineralogically by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra and wet chemical methods. On the basis of mineralogical methods of characterization, the following four major structural types of yellow cake may be classified: Uranyl Hydroxide Hydrate, UO2(OH)2nH2O; Basic Uranyl Sulfate Hydrate, (UO2)x(SO4)y(OH)s(x-y).nH2O; Sodium Para-Uranate, Na5U7O24 and Uranyl Peroxide Hydrate, UO4.nH2O. In this paper conditions of yellow cake preparation and characterization are described, along with discussion of significance of structural types to the physical and chemical properties of yellow cake production

  17. Concentrators Enhance Solar Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    "Right now, solar electric propulsion is being looked at very seriously," says Michael Piszczor, chief of the photovoltaic and power technologies branch at Glen Research Center. The reason, he explains, originates with a unique NASA mission from the late 1990s. In 1998, the Deep Space 1 spacecraft launched from Kennedy Space Center to test a dozen different space technologies, including SCARLET, or the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology. As a solar array that focused sunlight on a smaller solar cell to generate electric power, SCARLET not only powered Deep Space 1 s instruments but also powered its ion engine, which propelled the spacecraft throughout its journey. Deep Space 1 was the first spacecraft powered by a refractive concentrator design like SCARLET, and also utilized multi-junction solar cells, or cells made of multiple layers of different materials. For the duration of its 38-month mission, SCARLET performed flawlessly, even as Deep Space 1 flew by Comet Borrelly and Asteroid Braille. "Everyone remembers the ion engine on Deep Space 1, but they tend to forget that the SCARLET array powered it," says Piszczor. "Not only did both technologies work as designed, but the synergy between the two, solar power and propulsion together, is really the important aspect of this technology demonstration mission. It was the first successful use of solar electric propulsion for primary propulsion." More than a decade later, NASA is keenly interested in using solar electric propulsion (SEP) for future space missions. A key issue is cost, and SEP has the potential to substantially reduce cost compared to conventional chemical propulsion technology. "SEP allows you to use spacecraft that are smaller, lighter, and less costly," says Piszczor. "Even though it might take longer to get somewhere using SEP, if you are willing to trade time for cost and smaller vehicles, it s a good trade." Potentially, SEP could be used on future science missions

  18. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  19. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series presents contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study o

  20. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  1. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  2. Advances in chemical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  3. Development of chemical dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical dosimeter is a system that measures the energy by virtue of chemical changes from ionizing absorbed radiation produced unit when it is exposed to ionizing radiation. In all chemical dosimeters radiation induced chemical reaction produces at least one, initially absent species, which is properties long lived enough to determine its quantity or the change in the initial systems. Different types of chemical dosimeters were discussed such as aqueous, gaseous and solid, but the great consideration was given to aqueous systems because of their vital role in setting many processes.(Author)

  4. Workplace concentration of immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik; García-Pérez, Mónica; Haltiwanger, John; McCue, Kristin; Sanders, Seth

    2014-12-01

    Casual observation suggests that in most U.S. urban labor markets, immigrants have more immigrant coworkers than native-born workers do. While seeming obvious, this excess tendency to work together has not been precisely measured, nor have its sources been quantified. Using matched employer-employee data from the U.S. Census Bureau Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) database on a set of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with substantial immigrant populations, we find that, on average, 37 % of an immigrant's coworkers are themselves immigrants; in contrast, only 14 % of a native-born worker's coworkers are immigrants. We decompose this difference into the probability of working with compatriots versus with immigrants from other source countries. Using human capital, employer, and location characteristics, we narrow the mechanisms that might explain immigrant concentration. We find that industry, language, and residential segregation collectively explain almost all the excess tendency to work with immigrants from other source countries, but they have limited power to explain work with compatriots. This large unexplained compatriot component suggests an important role for unmeasured country-specific factors, such as social networks. PMID:25425452

  5. Scandium concentration from wastes of titanium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigations concerning the establishment of physical and chemical regularities of behaviour of scandium and its accompanying metals in sorption processes, extraction with hard extractants, deposition etc. are generalized. The row of technological schemes for scandium extraction out of processed melt of production of titanium tetrachloride with obtaining of scandium concentrates (up to 95% of scandium oxide) is developed. These schemes are tested in pilot-industrial conditions and put into practice. It is shown that improved deposition-sorption (extraction) technology for scandium extraction with accompanied utilization of iron, chromium and manganese compounds as commercial products is the most effective one

  6. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This

  7. 6th International Symposium on Solar Thermal Concentrating Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings book contains the papers presented at 6th International Symposium on solar Thermal Concentrating Technologies held at Mojacar (Almeria) in September 28-October 2, 1992, The sessions were: 1.- Advanced components and systems: - Concentrators, - Volumetric and direct absorption receivers - Dish/Stirling 2.- Electricity Generation: - Central receiver systems - Distributed collector systems - Dish/Stirling systems - Economics - Potential for improvement 3.- Thermal/Chemical applications: - Chemical production - Detoxification of Hazardous waste and Solar desalination - Materials testing 4.- Long term research 5.- Test facilities

  8. Bioleaching of marmatite in high concentration of iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱冠周; 吴伯增; 覃文庆; 蓝卓越

    2002-01-01

    Bioleaching of marmatite with a culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans in high concentration of iron was studied, the results show that the zinc leaching rate of the mixed culture is faster than that of the sole Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the increasing iron concentration in leaching solution enhances the zinc leaching rate. The SEM analysis indicates that the chemical leaching residues is covered with porous solid layer of elemental sulfur, while elemental sulfur is not found in the bacterial leaching residues. The primary role of bacteria in bioleaching of sphalerite is to oxidize the chemical leaching products of ferrous ion and elemental sulfur, thus the indirect mechanism prevails in the bioleaching of marmatite.

  9. Study of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Juvancz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC cause more and more seriousenvironmental pollutions. The EDCs show only ng-μg/l concentration level in theenvironment, therefore their determinations require multistep sample preparationprocesses and highly sophisticated instrumentation. This paper discuss the EDC effects,and show examples for determination of such compounds.

  10. Copper elimination during secondary side chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory tests have been carried out to evaluate the capability of EDF chemical cleaning solution to dissolve copper. If laboratory air bubbling is not efficient, oxygen bubbling was used in these tests with success. The results concerning the copper dissolution capacity of the gluconic-citric solution are very interesting: the copper concentration can reach the value of 15 g/l. (author)

  11. Chemical Stability of Telavancin in Elastomeric Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sand, MSc

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that telavancin remains chemically stable when diluted in the Intermate Infusion System and the Homepump Eclipse elastomeric pumps and stored at 2°C to 8°C for up to 8 days protected from light at the concentration range and dilution schemes evaluated.

  12. Exploring the planetary boundary for chemical pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Miriam L; de Wit, Cynthia A; Molander, Sverker; Scheringer, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Lohmann, Rainer; Arvidsson, Rickard; Bergman, Åke; Hauschild, Michael; Holoubek, Ivan; Persson, Linn; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Vighi, Marco; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2015-05-01

    Rockström et al. (2009a, 2009b) have warned that humanity must reduce anthropogenic impacts defined by nine planetary boundaries if "unacceptable global change" is to be avoided. Chemical pollution was identified as one of those boundaries for which continued impacts could erode the resilience of ecosystems and humanity. The central concept of the planetary boundary (or boundaries) for chemical pollution (PBCP or PBCPs) is that the Earth has a finite assimilative capacity for chemical pollution, which includes persistent, as well as readily degradable chemicals released at local to regional scales, which in aggregate threaten ecosystem and human viability. The PBCP allows humanity to explicitly address the increasingly global aspects of chemical pollution throughout a chemical's life cycle and the need for a global response of internationally coordinated control measures. We submit that sufficient evidence shows stresses on ecosystem and human health at local to global scales, suggesting that conditions are transgressing the safe operating space delimited by a PBCP. As such, current local to global pollution control measures are insufficient. However, while the PBCP is an important conceptual step forward, at this point single or multiple PBCPs are challenging to operationalize due to the extremely large number of commercial chemicals or mixtures of chemicals that cause myriad adverse effects to innumerable species and ecosystems, and the complex linkages between emissions, environmental concentrations, exposures and adverse effects. As well, the normative nature of a PBCP presents challenges of negotiating pollution limits amongst societal groups with differing viewpoints. Thus, a combination of approaches is recommended as follows: develop indicators of chemical pollution, for both control and response variables, that will aid in quantifying a PBCP(s) and gauging progress towards reducing chemical pollution; develop new technologies and technical and social

  13. Concentration of lemon pectin extract by ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián Stechina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Current annual lemon production in Argentina is about 900 thousand t. 75% is used industrially to obtain pasteurized juice concentrate. Since 40 - 45 % of citrus fruit content is peel and seeds, the annual lemon residue yield is 360 thousand t. Lemon peel contains about 30% (B.S. of peptic substances with an important commercial value due to its gelling and thickening properties for food, chemical, pharmacological and cosmetic products. Membrane processes have many applications in food manufacture. The objective of this study is to analyze the influence of ultrafiltration operating variables on instant permeate flow (Fp and on the energy requirement for pectin extract concentration from lemon peel. A DDS lab module was used, lab 20-772 model with synthetic material membranes, 9 kDa, shear force, the intrinsic membrane resistance (Rm being 3*1013 m -1 . Results show that Fp decrease caused by polarization induced resistance occurrence and the influence of operating variables on Fp offer relevant data to estimate the energy requirement in relation to feeding flow at constant temperature, which may be compared to pectin concentration increase in the retained flow in relation to initial extract concentration.

  14. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  15. Atlantic Forest. A natural reservoir of chemical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of chemical elements in biological compartments is one of the strategies of tropical species to adapt to a low-nutrient soil. This study focuses on the Atlantic Forest because of its eco-environmental importance as a natural reservoir of chemical elements. About 20 elements were determined by INAA in leaf, soil, litter and epiphyte compartments. There was no seasonality for chemical element concentrations in leaves, which probably indicated the maintenance of chemical elements in this compartment. Considering the estimated quantities, past deforestation events could have released large amounts of chemical elements to the environment. (author)

  16. The State of Chemical Pollution in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review draws attention to natural or biological sources of chemical release into the atmosphere. The magnitude of such a release may sometimes be higher than chemicals released into the environment by man's activities. Measurements of CO2, CH4, SO4=,Cl-, pH and O3 (please note that, the numerals are supposed to be under the alphabet formulas) concentrations in the Kenyan atmosphere reveal that the first two and last compounds are at the globally accepted concentration levels. The rest are below the world accepted levels. However more research is needed in measurement of atmospheric constituents. The determination of heavy metals concentrations in water, sediments, plants and fish reveal that sediments have the highest level of any concentration followed by plants, fish and water. The source of the metals in water and fish is mainly geological. However, higher concentrations of these metals in and around industrial centres have been noted. In all cases the concentration of metals Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn,Cd, Hg and Pb in water and fish are below the FAO/WHO recommended maxium units. Measurement of fluoride content in borehole water, rivers and lakes in Kenya show that, 21% of 865 borholes have a high concentration of fluorides. Kerio River also has a high content of fluoride and all lakes except for Naivasha and Victoria have nitrate content between 6.1 and 6.6. ppm. The nitrite content was undetected in all rivers and only 2 boreholes waters had nitrate content above 62 ppm (Author)

  17. Plasmonic gas and chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald; Liu, Na

    2014-06-01

    Sensitive and robust detection of gases and chemical reactions constitutes a cornerstone of scientific research and key industrial applications. In an effort to reach progressively smaller reagent concentrations and sensing volumes, optical sensor technology has experienced a paradigm shift from extended thin-film systems towards engineered nanoscale devices. In this size regime, plasmonic particles and nanostructures provide an ideal toolkit for the realization of novel sensing concepts. This is due to their unique ability to simultaneously focus light into subwavelength hotspots of the electromagnetic field and to transmit minute changes of the local environment back into the farfield as a modulation of their optical response. Since the basic building blocks of a plasmonic system are commonly noble metal nanoparticles or nanostructures, plasmonics can easily be integrated with a plethora of chemically or catalytically active materials and compounds to investigate processes ranging from hydrogen absorption in palladium to the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT). In this review, we will discuss a multitude of plasmonic sensing strategies, spanning the technological scale from simple plasmonic particles embedded in extended thin films to highly engineered complex plasmonic nanostructures. Due to their flexibility and excellent sensing performance, plasmonic structures may open an exciting pathway towards the detection of chemical and catalytic events down to the single molecule level.

  18. Passive sampling of perfluorinated chemicals in water: Flow rate effects on chemical uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Kaserzon, S.L.; Vermeirssen, E.L.M.; Hawker, D.W.; Kennedy, K; Bentley, C.; Thompson, J.; Booij, K.; Mueller, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    A recently developed modified polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) provides a means for monitoring perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in water. However, changes in external flow rates may alter POCIS sampling behaviour and consequently affect estimated water concentrations of analytes. In this work, uptake kinetics of selected PFCs, over 15 days, were investigated. A flow-through channel system was employed with spiked river water at flow rates between 0.02 and 0.34 m s(-1). PFC sa...

  19. Distribution of chemical elements in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical data on the distribution of chemical elements in the biosphere is promptly increasing in numbers. A method of data analysis which can arrange these data in accordance with a definite principle has been proposed. In our laboratory, systematic study of chemical elements in various Japanese seaweeds has been carried out and a relationship between the concentration factor for elements on a seaweed and its oceanic residence time emerged from the results: the logarithm of the concentration factor(y) tends to be inversely proportional to the logarithm of the residence time(x). Consequently the following rormula can be assumed: log y = log a + b log x. The values of log a, b, and the correlation coefficient r are calculated from the individual data. Usually the value of +r+ was more than 0.8. And in general the larger value of log a the sample has, the larger one of +b+ it has. This regularity between residence time and concentration factor was observed also in other phyla of marine organisms such as marine zoo plankton. Furthermore, since the ocean is closely connected with each of geochemical spheres, there is a tendency that the value of oceanic residence time has similar relation with the concentration ratio of many other geochemical abundance to oceanic chemical abundance as well as with concentration factor of marine organisms. In connection with these results it was found that there is close correlation between the two of each ratio of geochemical abundance to oceanic abundance. On the other hand, it was seen that there are no close correlation between ratios of geochemical abundance to crustal chemical abundance or other ones. Therefore it is again presumed that the ocean gives important contributions on the distribution of chemical elements in many kinds of substances in biosphere. (author)

  20. Riparian zone controls on base cation concentrations in boreal streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. J. Ledesma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest riparian zones are a major in control of surface water quality. Base cation (BC concentrations, fluxes, and cycling in the riparian zone merit attention because of increasing concern of negative consequences for re-acidification of surface waters from future climate and forest harvesting scenarios. We present a two-year study of BC and silica (Si flow-weighted concentrations from 13 riparian zones and 14 streams in a boreal catchment in northern Sweden. The Riparian Flow-Concentration Integration Model (RIM was used to estimate riparian zone flow-weighted concentrations and tested to predict the stream flow-weighted concentrations. Spatial variation in BC and Si concentrations as well as in flow-weighted concentrations was related to differences in Quaternary deposits, with the largest contribution from lower lying silty sediments and the lowest contribution from wetland areas higher up in the catchment. Temporal stability in the concentrations of most elements, a remarkably stable Mg / Ca ratio in the soil water and a homogeneous mineralogy suggest that the stable patterns found in the riparian zones are a result of distinct mineralogical upslope groundwater signals integrating the chemical signals of biological and chemical weathering. Stream water Mg / Ca ratio indicates that the signal is subsequently maintained in the streams. RIM gave good predictions of Ca, Mg, and Na flow-weighted concentrations in headwater streams. The difficulty in modelling K and Si suggests a stronger biogeochemical influence on these elements. The observed chemical dilution effect with flow in the streams was related to variation in groundwater levels and element concentration profiles in the riparian zones. This study provides a first step toward specific investigations of the vulnerability of riparian zones to changes induced by forest management or climate change, with focus on BC or other compounds.

  1. Study on Behavior of Carbon Reduction of Monazite Concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of monazite concentrate reduced by carbon, especially the decomposed procedure of rare earth phosphates, was investigated by X-ray diffraction , electron probe, TG method and chemical analysis. The results show that rare earth phosphates in monazite concentrate can be reduced to their oxides, among them the decomposition processes of cerium phosphate are not in step with lanthanum phosphate, neodymium phosphate and so on, and the phosphorus was volatilized into air in simple form.

  2. Geographic Concentration in China's Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tongsheng; Gan Guohui

    2006-01-01

    This paper empirically examines variations and changes in manufacturing concentration and their determinants in China over the 1980-2003period with a sample of 26 industries. The analysis indicates that average industrial concentration has increased during the 1990s. Studies show that scale economies and industry policies are important determinants for industries geographical concentration; factor endowments and the location of foreign direct investment are also found to have a positive effect on concentration.

  3. Ethics of Chemical Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Schummer

    2001-01-01

    Unlike other branches of science, the scientific products of synthetic chemistry are not only ideas but also new substances that change our material world, for the benefit or harm of living beings. This paper provides for the first time a systematical analysis of moral issues arising from chemical synthesis, based on concepts of responsibility and general morality. Topics include the questioning of moral neutrality of chemical synthesis as an end in itself, chemical weapons research, moral ob...

  4. Modelling the chemical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their...

  5. Polymers for chemical sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna C. Persaud

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical sensors play an increasingly important role in monitoring the environment we live in, providing information on industrial manufacturing processes and their emissions, quality control of foods and beverages, and a host of other applications. Electrically conductive plastics are being developed for many useful applications. Improvement in understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms by which electrical conduction occurs in these materials is now leading to a new generation of chemical sensors, which are reviewed in this article.

  6. Chemical and biological weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the prospects of the multilateral negotiations aimed at achieving a complete and total ban on chemical weapons the Chemical Weapons convention (CWC). The control of the proliferation of chemical weapons is no longer just on East-West issue; it is also an issue of concern in Third World Countries, and in some of the wealthier middle eastern nations, such as Kuwait

  7. INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATION UNIT CONVERSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which can migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying buil...

  8. Bronchial secretion concentrations of tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M R; Schoell, J; Hicklin, G; Kasik, J E; Coleman, D

    1982-02-01

    The mean concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions from patients with pneumonia were almost two times greater than secretions from patients free of lung infection. Mean tobramycin bronchial secretion to serum concentration ratios also were higher when obtained from infected lungs (0.66 versus 0.17) These data suggest that lung infection enhances the concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions. PMID:7065524

  9. From Chemical Forces to Chemical Rates: A Historical/Philosophical Foundation for the Teaching of Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quílez, Juan

    2009-09-01

    With this paper, our main aim is to contribute to the realisation of the chemical reactivity concept, tracing the historical evolution of the concept of chemical affinity that eventually supported the concept of chemical equilibrium. We will concentrate on searching for the theoretical grounds of three key chemical equilibrium ideas: ‚incomplete reaction’, ‚reversibility’ and ‚dynamics’. In addition, the paper aims to promote teachers’ philosophical/historical chemical knowledge. The starting point of this historical reconstruction will be the state of the art in the construction of the first affinity tables, based on the concept of elective affinities, during the 18th century. Berthollet reworked this idea, considering that the amount of the substances involved in a reaction was a key factor accounting for the chemical forces. Guldberg and Waage attempted to measure those forces, formulating the first affinity mathematical equations. Afterwards, the first ideas providing a molecular interpretation of the macroscopic properties of equilibrium reactions are presented. Eventually, theoretical chemists integrated previous findings into a new field: thermodynamics. This historical approach may serve as a base for an appropriate sequencing of the teaching and learning of chemical equilibrium. Hence, this paper tries to go beyond the simple development of teachers’ conceptions of the nature of chemistry, for it gives suggestions about how teachers may translate such understandings into classroom practice.

  10. Treatment of biomass to obtain a target chemical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Elander, Richard T.; Hennessey, Susan Marie

    2010-08-24

    Target chemicals were produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  11. 21 CFR 1310.12 - Exempt chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Ergotamine and its salts 8676 Not exempt at any concentration Chemical mixtures containing amount of any ergotamine, including its salts, are not exempt. Ethylamine and its salts 8678 20% by Weight or...

  12. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  13. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  14. Which chemicals drive biological effects in wastewater and recycled water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Janet Y M; Busetti, Francesco; Charrois, Jeffrey W A; Escher, Beate I

    2014-09-01

    Removal of organic micropollutants from wastewater during secondary treatment followed by reverse osmosis and UV disinfection was evaluated by a combination of four in-vitro cell-based bioassays and chemical analysis of 299 organic compounds. Concentrations detected in recycled water were below the Australian Guidelines for Water Recycling. Thus the detected chemicals were considered not to pose any health risk. The detected pesticides in the wastewater treatment plant effluent and partially advanced treated water explained all observed effects on photosynthesis inhibition. In contrast, mixture toxicity experiments with designed mixtures containing all detected chemicals at their measured concentrations demonstrated that the known chemicals explained less than 3% of the observed cytotoxicity and less than 1% of the oxidative stress response. Pesticides followed by pharmaceuticals and personal care products dominated the observed mixture effects. The detected chemicals were not related to the observed genotoxicity. The large proportion of unknown toxicity calls for effect monitoring complementary to chemical monitoring. PMID:24874944

  15. Chemical characteristic of respirable particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respirable particulates are particulates which having diameter size at 2-5 µm, due to aerodynamically may be inhaled through respiratory tract and having ability to deposit into lungs, causing damage of the alveolar tissues and inducing health problems. Health Department of Bandung have reported that prevalency of acute respiratory tract infection disease having increasing tendency every year. Measurement of PM10 in period of 2002-2005 have done by BPLH Bandung city which pointed that in some places the concentration of PM10 was higher than daily threshold limit values. This research having intend to understand of respirable particulates exposure in society with characterization of chemical materials contained as hazard identification. Location of research have done in four regions of Bandung City. Personal sampler has used for collection of respirable particulates from human breathing zone. Chemical characteristic were done using neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometer and reflectance methods. The useful of this procedure as the baseline to calculate IEC (Inhalation Exposure Concentration) values for estimate the exposure of respirable particulates which inhaled during period of time. Calculating of IEC is the earlier step from epidemiological study or risk assessment which connecting prevalency of tract respiratory disease with characteristic of respirable particulates. Elements Br, Mn, Al, I, V, Cl, Ti, Na, Hg, Pb, and black carbon (BC), are the elements which identified. The results showed that respirable particulates which inhaled by citizen as receptor at Tegalega, Aria Graha, Dago Pakar, and Cisaranten Wetan are relatively higher than PM2,5 ambient air at the same places. Almost whole of such elements which contained in respirable particulates was found in highest concentration at Cisaranten Wetan. (author)

  16. The Sorption of Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals to Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Lunsman, Tamara

    2004-01-01

    The toxicity and time-dependent sorption of three hydrophobic organic chemicals to Rhodococcus rhodochrous bacteria were investigated. In experiments, environmentally relevant concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and dichlorobiphenyl (DPCB) were applied to living (both growing and non-growing) bacteria as well as to dead bacteria. For PCP (an ionizing chemical), bacterial growth decreased and death increased as the PCP concentration increased. In sorption exp...

  17. Denitrification of reprocessing concentrates of middle activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the releases from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, the treatment of liquid waste of low and medium level activity by chemical precipitation has been replaced by evaporation. Due to the high nitrate content of liquid waste, encapsulation in bitumen of the concentrate leads to considerable volumes of waste to be stored in geological formation. For safety reasons and so as to reduce the volume of waste, the elimination of the nitrates is essential: there exist various means: electrodialysis, biological denitration, chemical denitration and incineration. In view of the very high sodium nitrate content of the concentrate, electrodialysis and biological denitration were discarded. Preliminary experiments carried out at Cadarache led us to choose calcination in a fluidized bed rather than chemical denitration using a mixture of formic and phosphoric acids. Tests on a low temperature mock-up have determined the choice of an injection system that operates with liquid under pressure with the nozzle situated inside the fluidized layer. So as to avoid the vaporization of the liquid within, the injection piping also requires a cooling system using air, with a double casing. Under these conditions, liquid can be injected into the reactor without encountering any special difficulty: no plugging of the nozzle, a regular flow and liquid, stable temperature and pressure levels from top to bottom of the reactor. Differential thermogravimetric and heat analyses have led to the following conclusions: - at temperatures below 500 deg C, the nitric acid, then the aluminium nitrate decompose and produce alumina. -between approximately 570 deg C and 630 deg C, the sodium nitrate in turn decomposes and reacts with the alumina to produce a sodium aluminate. -finally, these tests enabled a reaction kinetics low of sodium nitrate decomposition in the temperature range of 500 deg C to 1000 deg C to be established. (author)

  18. Chemical modeling of waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.

    1996-10-01

    The processing of waste from underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and other facilities will require an understanding of the chemical interactions of the waste with process chemicals. Two aspects of sludge treatment should be well delineated and predictable: (1) the distribution of chemical species between aqueous solutions and solids, and (2) potential problems due to chemical interactions that could result in process difficulties or safety concerns. It is likely that the treatment of waste tank sludge will begin with washing, followed by basic or acidic leaching. The dissolved materials will be in a solution that has a high ionic strength where activity coefficients are far from unity. Activity coefficients are needed in order to calculate solubilities. Several techniques are available for calculating these values, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. The techniques adopted and described here is the Pitzer method. Like any of the methods, prudent use of this approach requires that it be applied within concentration ranges where the experimental data were fit, and its use in large systems should be preceded by evaluating subsystems. While much attention must be given to the development of activity coefficients, other factors such as coprecipitation of species and Ostwald ripening must also be considered when one aims to interpret results of sludge tests or to predict results of treatment strategies. An understanding of sludge treatment processes begins with the sludge tests themselves and proceeds to a general interpretation with the aid of modeling. One could stop with only data from the sludge tests, in which case the table of data would become an implicit model. However, this would be a perilous approach in situations where processing difficulties could be costly or result in concerns for the environment or health and safety.

  19. Detection of Chemical Precursors of Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Certain selected chemicals associated with terrorist activities are too unstable to be prepared in final form. These chemicals are often prepared as precursor components, to be combined at a time immediately preceding the detonation. One example is a liquid explosive, which usually requires an oxidizer, an energy source, and a chemical or physical mechanism to combine the other components. Detection of the oxidizer (e.g. H2O2) or the energy source (e.g., nitromethane) is often possible, but must be performed in a short time interval (e.g., 5 15 seconds) and in an environment with a very small concentration (e.g.,1 100 ppm), because the target chemical(s) is carried in a sealed container. These needs are met by this invention, which provides a system and associated method for detecting one or more chemical precursors (components) of a multi-component explosive compound. Different carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are loaded (by doping, impregnation, coating, or other functionalization process) for detecting of different chemical substances that are the chemical precursors, respectively, if these precursors are present in a gas to which the CNTs are exposed. After exposure to the gas, a measured electrical parameter (e.g. voltage or current that correlate to impedance, conductivity, capacitance, inductance, etc.) changes with time and concentration in a predictable manner if a selected chemical precursor is present, and will approach an asymptotic value promptly after exposure to the precursor. The measured voltage or current are compared with one or more sequences of their reference values for one or more known target precursor molecules, and a most probable concentration value is estimated for each one, two, or more target molecules. An error value is computed, based on differences of voltage or current for the measured and reference values, using the most probable concentration values. Where the error value is less than a threshold, the system concludes that the target

  20. Comparative study on the selective chalcopyrite bioleaching of a molybdenite concentrate with mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P; Blázquez, M L; Alguacil, F J; Muñoz, J A; Ballester, A; González, F

    2001-03-01

    This study evaluates different bioleaching treatments of a molybdenite concentrate using mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial cultures. Further studies on the chemical leaching and the electrochemical behavior of the MoS(2) concentrate were carried out. Bioleaching tests showed a progressive removal of chalcopyrite from the molybdenite concentrate with an increase in temperature. Chemical leaching tests support the idea of an indirect attack of the concentrate. Electrochemical tests indicate that chalcopyrite dissolution is favored when molybdenite is present. Therefore, this type of bioleaching treatment could be applied to purify molybdenite flotation concentrates by selectively dissolving chalcopyrite. PMID:11257551

  1. Testing and evaluation of eight decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers experimental work comparing eight different decontamination chemicals. Seven of these chemicals have some novelty, or are not currently in use at the ICPP. The eighth is a common ICPP decontamination reagent used as a baseline for effective comparison. Decontamination factors, waste generation values, and corrosion rates are tabulated for these chemicals. Recommendations are given for effective methods of non-sodium or low-sodium decontamination chemicals. The two most effective chemical for decontamination found in these test were a dilute hydrofluoric and nitric acid (HF/HNO3) mixture and a fluoroboric acid solution. The fluoroboric acid solution (1 molar) was by far the most effective decontamination reagent, but suffered the problem of generating significant final calcine volume. The HF/HNO3 solution performed a very good decontamination of the SIMCON coupons while generating only small amounts of calcine volume. Concentration variables were also tested, and optimized for these two solutions. Several oxidation/reduction decon chemical systems were also tested. These systems were similar to the TURCO 4502 and TURCO 4521 solutions used for general decontamination at the ICPP. A low sodium alternative, nitric acid/potassium permanganate, to the ''high sodium'' TURCO 4502 was tested extensively, optimized and recommended for general ICPP use. A reductive chemical solution, oxalic acid/nitric acid was also shown to have significant advantages

  2. Characteristics and chemical compositions of propolis from Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Adgaba, Nuru; Bayaqoob, Noofal I M; Al-Khazim, Ahmed; Simoneit, Bernd I T; El-Mubarak, Aarif H.; Al-Mutlaq, Khalid F

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Propolis is a sticky material mixed by honeybees to utilize it in protecting their hives from infection by bacteria and fungi. The therapeutic properties of propolis are due to its chemical composition with bio-active compounds; therefore, researchers are interested in studying its chemical constituents and biological properties. The main objective of this study is to determine the chemical compositions, characteristics and relative concentrations of organic compounds in the extr...

  3. The significance of feedback control for chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, P.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional way of applying chemical sensors is in an open-loop configuration. A parameter of the chemical domain, such as a gas or ion concentration, is converted into a parameter of the mechanical or electrical domain, often with non-linear transfer characteristics. The paramagnetic oxygen se

  4. Chemical defences against herbivores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavia, Henrik; Baumgartner, Finn; Cervin, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the recent and emerging research involving chemical defences against herbivory in aquatic primary producers. It provides an overview of plant chemical defence theories and highlights recent research on aquatic primary producers addressing a number of aspects of these...

  5. Chemical warfare in freshwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulderij, Gabi

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field expe

  6. Microorganisms and Chemical Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the importance of microorganisms in chemical pollution and pollution abatement. Selected chemical pollutants are chosen to illustrate that microorganisms synthesize hazardous substances from reasonably innocuous precursors, while others act as excellent environmental decontaminating agents by removing undesirable natural and synthetic…

  7. Pilot tests of application of cryolite-alumina concentrate in aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of pilot tests of obtaining method and application of cryolite-alumina concentrate obtained from sludge in aluminium production are considered. Chemical and mineralogical composition of initial raw material and cryolite-alumina concentrate are studied. The tests are shown that concentrate can be used as anode cover of electrolytic cells.

  8. Chemical Product Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    2004-01-01

    This paper highlights for a class of chemical products, the design process, their design with respect to the important issues, the need for appropriate tools and finally, lists some of the challenges and opportunities for the process systems engineering (PSE)/computer-aided process engineering...... (CAPE) community. The chemical products considered belong to the following types: chemical/biochemical/agrochemical products, coatings and solvents, food (nutraceuticals), HIM (household, industrial and institutional), personal care, pharmaceuticals and drugs. The challenges and opportunities are...... highlighted in terms of the needs for multi-level modeling with emphasis on property models that are suitable for computer-aided applications, flexible solution strategies that are able to solve a large range of chemical product design problems and finally, a systems chemical product design framework with the...

  9. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  10. AIRCRAFT OBSERVATIONS OF EXTREME OZONE CONCENTRATIONS NEAR THUNDERSTORMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anomalously large short-term ozone concentrations were observed on several occasions by aircraft during an experiment on August 5, 1980, to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the Baltimore urban plume. The ozone 'spikes' of about 500 ppb were traversed by aircra...

  11. SEX-STEROID AND THYROID HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM CONTAMINATED AND REFERENCE LAKES IN FLORIDA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex-steroid and thyroid hormones are critical regulators of growth and reproduction in all vertebrates, and several recent studies suggest that environmental chemicals can alter circulating concentrations of these hormones. This study examines plasma concentrations of estradiol-...

  12. Radiation treatment of toxic chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were commercially produced from 1920s as complex mixtures containing multiple isomers for a variety of applications. They are very toxic, chemically stable and resist microbial, photochemical, chemical, and thermal degradation. The public, legal, and scientific concerns about PCBs arose from research indicating they were environmental contaminants that had a potential to adversely impact the environment, and, therefore, were undesirable as commercial products. Eventually, most producers reduced or stopped production of PCBs in the 1970s. Stockholm convention on POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants), which was effective on May 2004 and 151 nations including Korea were joined on June 2005, asked to dispose of PCBs by 2028 with environmental friendly methods. Korean government also has declared to conduct by 2015. According to the Environmental law of Korea, over 2 ppm of PCBs has to be decomposed by legal methods of incineration and thermal destruction. But those are inapplicable owing to the environmental groups. KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has recently developed a remarkable technology for radiation treatment of toxic chemicals including chlorides using an electron beam accelerator. Electron beam accelerator of 2.5 MeV energy and 100 kW power capacity was used to decompose of PCBs having been used as a commercial transformer oil for more than 30 years. The oil were irradiated with ∼ 0.1 percent of TEA (Triethyl Amin) to make chloride ion aparted off from the PCBs into precipitate at the conditions of normal temperature and pressure. The concentrations of PCBs were measured by GC (Gas Chromatography) with ECD (Electron Capture Detector) following the KS (Korean Standard) test procedure. Electron beam should be a useful tool for environmental conservation. Residual concentrations of PCBs after irradiation were depended on the absorption dose of electron beam energy. Advantages comparing to other methods such as

  13. Concentrado e isolado protéico de torta de castanha do pará: obtenção e caracterização química e funcional Brazil nut protein concentrate and isolate production: chemical and functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana M. da GLÓRIA

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram determinadas as melhores condições para a obtenção de um concentrado e um isolado protéicos, a partir da torta desengordurada da castanha do Pará. O pH de precipitação protéica foi 3,5 - 4,0 e o de extração protéica foi 9,0. A produção do concentrado resultou num rendimento de 70% e a do isolado, de 35%. Estes foram caracterizados quanto às suas propriedades de solubilidade, absorção de água e óleo (%CAA e %CAO e capacidade de formação de espuma. As %CAA e %CAO do concentrado foram cerca de duas vezes maiores do que as do isolado. Tanto o concentrado como o isolado protéico obtido da torta desengordurada de castanha do Pará apresentaram boas condições de funcionalidade, com exceção da capacidade de formação de espuma em que o isolado foi muito superior.The best conditions for producing Brazil nut protein concentrate and isolate from defatted cake were determined. Protein precipitation pH was 3.5-4.0 and protein extraction pH was 9.0. Protein concentrate and isolate yields were 70% and 35%, respectively. They were evaluated according to their properties of solubility, oil and water absorption (%WAC and %OAC, and foaming capacity. They presented high protein solubility in pH 12. Concentrate %WAC and %OAC were twice higher than the isolate. Brazil nut protein concentrate and isolate presented both good functionality, except for a good foaming capacity that was presented only by the isolate.

  14. MARKET CONCENTRATION AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Nikolaevna Lyubyaschenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the trend of market concentration, the formation of strategic groups in Russian industry, principles of integration of firms in strategic groups, and the reasons for increase of market concentration. Purpose - to propose the methods of measuring industry concentration in terms of coordination.   Methodology: methods of system analysis, economic analysis, the methodological approaches of the theory of industrial organization, regression analysis.Results: Authors provide the methods of measuring industry concentration in terms of coordination. Authors established laws of formation of strategic groups (coalitions. The relationship between the concentration rate and business cycle sensitivity of firms in Russian industry was described.Practical implications: The methods of measuring industry concentration is of interest to economists, business strategists, and government agencies.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-36

  15. Determining concentration inhomogeneity inside liquid holding tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporating concentration measurements of special nuclear material (SNM) in a chemical processing accountability program requires uncertainty data for three types of errors: mixing, sampling, and analytical. Usually, the analytical measurement uncertainties - both random and systematic - are routinely determined for the laboratory instruments and procedures being used to measure the concentration of withdrawn liquid samples. However, little data currently exists to determine how representative the withdrawn liquid sample is in relation to the true average bulk concentration within the tank itself. This sample representativeness depends upon uncertainties associated with the tank mixing and sampling procedures. Both types of uncertainties are investigated. Mixing uncertainty or inhomogeneity has been found to be primarily a fluid mechanics problem while sampling uncertainty involves mostly chemistry. Experimental results are presented along with the early developments of a scaling analysis for future process design and accountability work. Tests were performed on full size pencil, double pencil, and annular tanks using saltwater solutions to achieve various levels of density stratifications within the tanks analogous to nitric acids solutions of different normalities

  16. Mechanisms of Chemical Carcinogenesis in the Kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara McMorrow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical carcinogens are substances which induce malignant tumours, increase their incidence or decrease the time taken for tumour formation. Often, exposure to chemical carcinogens results in tissue specific patterns of tumorigenicity. The very same anatomical, biochemical and physiological specialisations which permit the kidney to perform its vital roles in maintaining tissue homeostasis may in fact increase the risk of carcinogen exposure and contribute to the organ specific carcinogenicity observed with numerous kidney carcinogens. This review will address the numerous mechanisms which play a role in the concentration, bioactivation, and uptake of substances from both the urine and blood which significantly increase the risk of cancer in the kidney.

  17. Chemical emission rates from personal computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, T.; Wargocki, Pawel; Tanabe, S.;

    2003-01-01

    Chemical emission measurements from different brands of personal computers (PCs) were conducted in a 1 m3 glass chamber. Eight PCs were tested individually. Each consisted of the same brand of PC tower and one of the 4 different brands of PC monitors. Within each brand both cathode-ray tube (CRT...... greater quantities of C3-C6 aldehydes having low odor thresholds and had higher emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons. Emission rates of aliphatic hydrocarbons were low for both PCs with CRT and TFT monitors. However, estimated concentrations of these chemicals in a normal office space based on the measured...

  18. Chemical process hazards analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  19. Chemical properties of transactinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäggeler, H. W.

    2005-09-01

    First investigations of chemical properties of bohrium (Z = 107) and hassium (Z = 108) showed an expected behaviour as ordinary members of groups 7 and 8 of the periodic table. Two attempts to study element 112 yielded some indication for a behaviour like a very volatile noble metal. However, a very recent experiment to confirm this preliminary observation failed. Two examples are described how chemical studies may help to support element discovery claims from purely physics experiments. The two examples are the discovery claims of the elements 112 and 115, respectively, where the progenies hassium and dubnium were chemically identified.

  20. Chemical properties of transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First investigations of chemical properties of bohrium (Z = 107) and hassium (Z = 108) showed an expected behaviour as ordinary members of groups 7 and 8 of the periodic table. Two attempts to study element 112 yielded some indication for a behaviour like a very volatile noble metal. However, a very recent experiment to confirm this preliminary observation failed. Two examples are described how chemical studies may help to support element discovery claims from purely physics experiments. The two examples are the discovery claims of the elements 112 and 115, respectively, where the progenies hassium and dubnium were chemically identified. (orig.)

  1. Chemical properties of transactinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    First investigations of chemical properties of bohrium (Z = 107) and hassium (Z = 108) showed an expected behaviour as ordinary members of groups 7 and 8 of the periodic table. Two attempts to study element 112 yielded some indication for a behaviour like a very volatile noble metal. However, a very recent experiment to confirm this preliminary observation failed. Two examples are described how chemical studies may help to support element discovery claims from purely physics experiments. The two examples are the discovery claims of the elements 112 and 115, respectively, where the progenies hassium and dubnium were chemically identified. (orig.)

  2. The possible role of soluble salts in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, N.; Chang, S.

    1982-01-01

    A model for a prebiotic environment in which concentration, condensation, and chemical evolution of biomolecules could have occurred is proposed. The principal reactions expected of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and some of their precursors in this environment are discussed. The model is based on the concept of a fluctuating system in which hydration and dehydration processes occur in a cyclic manner, with allowance for high concentrations of soluble salts, such as chlorides and sulfates. It is concluded that the proposed prebiotic environment with its dynamical characteristics is a plausible model for the chemical evolution from biomonomers through random oligomers toward self-replicating chemical systems.

  3. Study on scattering properties of tissues with hyperosmotic chemical agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Optical properties of biological tissue are variable due to the changes of micro-structures and scattering constituents after hyperosmotic chemical agents permeates into tissue. The changes of optical properties of biological tissue are due to the refractive indices matching between the scatterers with high refractive index and the ground substances, which reduce scattering of tissue. The main reasons are that permeated semipermeable chemical agents with higher refractive index than the ground substances of tissuemakes the refractive index of ground substances of tissue higher by the enhancement of the permeated concentration. We studied on the collimated transmittance changes of light penetrating biological tissue after the hyperosmotic chemical agents administrates with different concentration.

  4. Comparison of the radiological and chemical toxicity of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report estimates the worst-case radiological dose to an individual from ingested lead containing picocurie levels of radionuclides and then compares the calculated radiological health effects to the chemical toxic effects from that same lead. This comparison provides an estimate of the consequences of inadvertently recycling, in the commercial market, lead containing nominally undetectable concentrations of radionuclides. Quantitative expressions for the radiological and chemical toxicities of lead are based on concentrations of lead in the blood stream. The result shows that the chemical toxicity of lead is a greater health hazard, by orders of magnitude, than any probable companion radiation dose

  5. Comparison of the radiological and chemical toxicity of lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitel, G.A.; Mott, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report estimates the worst-case radiological dose to an individual from ingested lead containing picocurie levels of radionuclides and then compares the calculated radiological health effects to the chemical toxic effects from that same lead. This comparison provides an estimate of the consequences of inadvertently recycling, in the commercial market, lead containing nominally undetectable concentrations of radionuclides. Quantitative expressions for the radiological and chemical toxicities of lead are based on concentrations of lead in the blood stream. The result shows that the chemical toxicity of lead is a greater health hazard, by orders of magnitude, than any probable companion radiation dose.

  6. Does ultrafiltration have a lasting effect on the physico-chemical properties of the casein micelles?

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, Mary Ann; Alexander, Marcela; Corredig, Milena

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine if concentration of milk using ultrafiltration (in the absence of diafiltration) affects the physico-chemical properties of the casein micelles. The milk, once concentrated, was brought back to its original concentration and the physico-chemical properties as well as its susceptibility to rennet induced gelation were assessed. Although much is understood on the renneting behavior of concentrated milk, no information is available on how (or if) ultra...

  7. Heavy ion measurement by chemical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In testing the applicability of the threshold system polyvinyl alcohol/methyl orange/chloral hydrate/sodium tetraborate to the quantitative detection of single particles, the chemical detector was irradiated with 4He, 12C, 18O, 22He ions of different LET. Detectors with 4 different borax concentrations (chloral hydrate concentration kept constant) have been irradiated. The dose causing the colour change increased linearly with the borax concentration. For equal borax concentrations this dose increases with increasing LET due to the decreasing G value of the HCl. The fluence ranges measurable with the various detector compositions are given. 4He and 18O ion ranges have been determined. The measured depth dose curves have been corrected because the dose is LET-dependent. The experimentally determined ranges are in good agreement with values calculated for the detector material

  8. Chemical analysis by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This state art report consists of four parts, production of micro-particles, analysis of boron, alpha tracking method and development of neutron induced prompt gamma ray spectroscopy (NIPS) system. The various methods for the production of micro-paticles such as mechanical method, electrolysis method, chemical method, spray method were described in the first part. The second part contains sample treatment, separation and concentration, analytical method, and application of boron analysis. The third part contains characteristics of alpha track, track dectectors, pretreatment of sample, neutron irradiation, etching conditions for various detectors, observation of track on the detector, etc. The last part contains basic theory, neutron source, collimator, neutron shields, calibration of NIPS, and application of NIPS system

  9. Chemical Data Access Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This tool is intended to aid individuals interested in learning more about chemicals that are manufactured or imported into the United States. Health and safety...

  10. Ethics of Chemical Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Schummer

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other branches of science, the scientific products of synthetic chemistry are not only ideas but also new substances that change our material world, for the benefit or harm of living beings. This paper provides for the first time a systematical analysis of moral issues arising from chemical synthesis, based on concepts of responsibility and general morality. Topics include the questioning of moral neutrality of chemical synthesis as an end in itself, chemical weapons research, moral objections against improving material conditions of life by chemical means, and freedom of research. The paper aims at providing both a sound basis for moral judgements of chemistry in a public discourse and a framework for chemists to reflect on the moral relevance of their activity.

  11. Chemical allergy in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimber, Ian; Basketter, David A; Thyssen, Jacob P;

    2014-01-01

    reaction; that is, allergic contact dermatitis or sensitization of the respiratory tract associated with occupational asthma. Studies in rodents have revealed that differential forms of allergic sensitization to chemicals are, in large part at least, a function of the selective development of discrete......Abstract There is considerable interest in the immunobiological processes through which the development of allergic sensitization to chemicals is initiated and orchestrated. One of the most intriguing issues is the basis for the elicitation by chemical sensitizers of different forms of allergic...... functional sub-populations of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes. Evidence for a similar association of chemical allergy in humans with discrete T-lymphocyte populations is, however, limited. It is of some interest, therefore, that two recent articles from different teams of investigators have shed new light on...

  12. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and buy only as much as needed. Many household products are made of toxic chemicals. It is important ... follow label instructions, including any precautions. Never store household products in food or drink containers. Leave them in ...

  13. Biotechnology for renewable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Jensen, Niels Bjerg;

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the industrial organic chemicals are derived from fossil sources. With the oil and gas resources becoming limiting, biotechnology offers a sustainable alternative for production ofchemicals from renewable feedstocks. Yeast is an attractive cell factory forsustainable production...

  14. Household Chemical Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and disposing of the material according to the manufacturer’s directions. It is critical to store household chemicals in places where children cannot access them. Remember that products such as aerosol cans of hair spray and deodorant, nail polish ...

  15. Chemical Physics Summer School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-06-28

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Physics Summer School was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  16. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  17. Chemical evolution and life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaterre Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In research on the origins of life, the concept of “chemical evolution” aims at explaining the transition from non-living matter to living matter. There is however strong disagreement when it comes to defining this concept more precisely, and in particular with reference to a chemical form of Darwinian evolution: for some, chemical evolution is nothing but Darwinian evolution applied to chemical systems before life appeared; yet, for others, it is the type of evolution that happened before natural selection took place, the latter being the birthmark of living systems. In this contribution, I review the arguments defended by each side and show how both views presuppose a dichotomous definition of “life”.

  18. School concentration and school travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the research as described in this Doctor’s thesis is twofold. Firstly it is to define in how far Dutch facilities for primary and secondary education were subjected to spatial concentration during recent decades. Secondly it is intended to assess what this concentration implied for th

  19. Radon concentration in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1000 dwellings, which can be assumed to be an reasonable representation of the average Dutch dwellings, time averaged radon concentrations, radon daughter concentrations and gamma-exposure tempi are determined during a year with passive dosemeters. They are also determined outdoor at circa 200 measure points. (Auth.)

  20. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bryan; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-04-21

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media. PMID:25903905

  1. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Bryan, E-mail: bryan.robertson@mail.utoronto.ca; Kapral, Raymond, E-mail: rkapral@chem.utoronto.ca [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2015-04-21

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media.

  2. Nanomotor dynamics in a chemically oscillating medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic nanomotors powered by chemical reactions have potential uses as cargo transport vehicles in both in vivo and in vitro applications. In many situations, motors will have to operate in out-of-equilibrium complex chemically reacting media, which supply fuel to the motors and remove the products they produce. Using molecular simulation and mean-field theory, this paper describes some of the new features that arise when a chemically powered nanomotor, operating through a diffusiophoretic mechanism, moves in an environment that supports an oscillatory chemical reaction network. It is shown how oscillations in the concentrations in chemical species in the environment give rise to oscillatory motor dynamics. More importantly, since the catalytic reactions on the motor that are responsible for its propulsion couple to the bulk phase reaction network, the motor can change its local environment. This process can give rise to distinctive spatiotemporal structures in reaction-diffusion media that occur as a result of active motor motion. Such locally induced nonequilibrium structure will play an important role in applications that involve motor dynamics in complex chemical media

  3. [Cutaneous absorption of chemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, J

    1986-09-01

    Chemicals have become indispensible for the maintenance of health in animals and man. The route of administration of each medicament is decided by factors such as site of desired action, chemistry of the active ingredient, age and species of the patient, and frequency of administration (or desired duration of activity). In situations where the oral and hypodermic routes, which are used most frequently, are inadequate or unsatisfactory, dermal application can provide a valuable alternative method to achieve systemic activity. Examples of formulations currently available for dermal application contain diverse chemicals and are intended for a variety of purposes, such as crufomate against cattle grubs, fenthion against cattle lice, levamisole against gastrointestinal nematodes, nitroglycerine for angina pectoris, and scopolamine for motion sickness. The skin acts as a barrier to penetration by chemicals and micro-organisms by virtue of its morphology and chemical composition. Chemicals which do penetrate, do not necessarily pass through the appendages (hair follicles and gland ducts), but mostly penetrate through the interjacent epidermis, either through the cells, or via the intracellular spaces. These spaces have recently been shown by electron microscopy to be filled by an amorphous substance which exudes on the skin surface in convex ridges. This substance has a lipid nature, but is not hydrophobic as is often accepted. For a chemical to be able to penetrate the skin, it must be partially water and lipid soluble, polar, and weakly ionizing. A variety of factors can possibly affect the permeability of skin for a chemical. These include species differences in morphology (skin thickness, tightness of intercellular junctions, density of hair follicles and other appendages), biochemistry, and physiology; seasonal and climatic variations; and differences between breeds and genders. Species differences in skin permeability are largely unpredictable and inconsistent. An

  4. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007).

  5. Chemical functionalization of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Katsnelson, M I

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on chemical functionalization of graphene are reviewed. Using hydrogenated graphene as a model system, general principles of the chemical functionalization are formulated and discussed. It is shown that, as a rule, 100% coverage of graphene by complex functional groups (in contrast with hydrogen and fluorine) is unreachable. A possible destruction of graphene nanoribbons by fluorine is considered. The functionalization of infinite graphene and graphene nan...

  6. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  7. Polymers for chemical sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Persaud, Krishna C.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical sensors play an increasingly important role in monitoring the environment we live in, providing information on industrial manufacturing processes and their emissions, quality control of foods and beverages, and a host of other applications. Electrically conductive plastics are being developed for many useful applications. Improvement in understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms by which electrical conduction occurs in these materials is now leading to a new generation of ...

  8. Chemical warfare in freshwater

    OpenAIRE

    Mulderij, Gabi

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes can excrete chemical substances into their enviroment and these compounds may inhibit the growth of phytoplankton. This process is defined as allelopathy: one organism has effects on another via the excretion of a (mixture of) chemical substance(s). With laboratory and field experiments we studied the allelopathic effects of the aquatic macrophytes, Chara and Stratiotes. Laboratory experiments showed that the aquatic macrophytes had allelopathic effects. Phytoplankton grow...

  9. Interactive Chemical Reactivity Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Haag, Moritz P.; Vaucher, Alain C.; Bosson, Mael; Redon, Stephane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. ...

  10. Controlled Chemical Patterns with ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Keith; Giordano, Anthony; Wang, Debin; Kodali, Vamsi; King, W. P.; Marder, S. R.; Riedo, E.; Curtis, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    Many research areas, both fundamental and applied, rely upon the ability to organize non-trivial assemblies of molecules on surfaces. In this work, we introduce a significant extension of ThermoChemical NanoLithography (TCNL), a high throughput chemical patterning technique that uses temperature-driven chemical reactions localized near the tip of a thermal cantilever. By combining a chemical kinetics based model with experiments, we have developed a protocol for varying the concentration of surface bound molecules. The result is an unprecedented ability to fabricate extremely complex patterns comprised of varying chemical concentrations, as demonstrated by sinusoidal patterns of amine groups with varying pitches (˜5-15 μm) and the replication of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa with dimensions of ˜30 x 40 μm^2. Programmed control of the chemical reaction rate should have widespread applications for a technique which has already been shown to nanopattern various substrates including graphene nanowires, piezoelectric crystals, and optoelectronic materials.

  11. Inflatable Solar Thermal Concentrator Delivered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1999-01-01

    Space-based solar thermal power systems are very appealing as a space power source because they generate power efficiently. However, solar thermal (dynamic) systems currently incorporate rigid concentrators that are relatively heavy and require significant packaging volume and robust deployment schemes. In many ways, these requirements make these systems less appealing than photovoltaic systems. As an alternative to solar thermal power systems with rigid concentrators, solar thermal power systems with thin film inflation-deployed concentrators have low cost, are lightweight, and are efficiently packaged and deployed. Not only are inflatable concentrators suitable for low Earth orbit and geosynchronous orbit applications, but they can be utilized in deep space missions to concentrate solar energy to high-efficiency solar cells.

  12. Flame Propagation Through Concentration Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunyaIINO; MitsuakiTANABE; 等

    2000-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in homogeneous propane-air mixture and in several concentration gradient of mixture.Igniter is put on the upper side of the combustion chamber,In concentration gradient experiment.ixture was ignited from lean side.An experimental study was conducted in a combustion chamber.The combustion chamber has glass windows for optical measurements at any side.For the measurement of distribution of fuel concentration,infraed absorption method using 3.39μm He-Ne laser was used,and for the observation of proagating flams,Schlieren method was employed.As a measurment result of flame propagation velocity and flammable limit,for a mixture of an identical local equivalence ratio.flame propagation velocity in concentration gradient is faster than that in homogeneous mixture,and rich flammable limit in concentration gradient shows a tendency to be higher than that in homogeneous mixture.

  13. Arsenic concentrations in groundwaters of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidou, M.; Charalambous, C.; Aletrari, M.; Nicolaidou Kanari, P.; Petronda, A.; Ward, N. I.

    2012-10-01

    SummaryCyprus being a Mediterranean island with long dry summers and mild winters suffers from water deficiency and over exploitation of its water resources. Groundwater in Cyprus is a valuable natural resource as approximately 50% of the total water needs come from underground water supplies. According to the Directive 118/2006/EC, groundwater should be protected from deterioration and chemical pollution, this is particularly important for groundwater dependent ecosystems and for the use of groundwater as a water supply for human consumption. During 2007 to 2009, as part of a national monitoring programme, 84 boreholes were sampled in Cyprus and subsequently analysed for total arsenic by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The groundwater concentrations ranged from <0.3 to 41 μg/L As. Several boreholes located in a rural farming district near Nicosia had concentrations above the World Health Organisation (WHO) Drinking Water Guideline limit of 10 μg/L As. Evaluation of the groundwater sampling procedure for boreholes provided data recommending that water samples should be collected after an initial borehole washout for 5 min. Further sampling of these boreholes in 2010, revealed total arsenic concentrations of <0.3-64.2 μg/L As, with the predominant arsenic species (determined using a novel field-based methodology) being arsenate (AsV). The maximum total arsenic concentration is 6-fold higher than the WHO Drinking Water Guideline limit (10 μg/L As) and approximately half of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (UN-FAO) irrigational limit of 100 μg/L As.

  14. Environmental/chemical thesaurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, C.R.; Dailey, N.S.; Jordan, A.C.; Miller, K.C.; Owens, E.T.; Rickert, L.W.

    1978-06-01

    The Environmental/Chemical Thesaurus approaches scientific language control problems from a multidisciplinary view. The Environmental/Biomedical Terminology Index (EBTI) was used as a base for the present thesaurus. The Environmental/Chemical Thesaurus, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, used as its source of new terms those major terms found in 13 Environmental Protection Agency data bases. The scope of this thesaurus includes not only environmental and biomedical sciences, but also the physical sciences with emphasis placed on chemistry. Specific chemical compounds are not included; only classes of chemicals are given. To adhere to this level of classification, drugs and pesticides are identified by class rather than by specific chemical name. An attempt was also made to expand the areas of sociology and economics. Terminology dealing with law, demography, and geography was expanded. Proper names of languages and races were excluded. Geographic terms were expanded to include proper names for oceans, continents, major lakes, rivers, and islands. Political divisions were added to allow for proper names of countries and states. With such a broad scope, terminology for specific sciences does not provide for indexing to the lowest levels in plant, animal, or chemical classifications.

  15. Environmental/chemical thesaurus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental/Chemical Thesaurus approaches scientific language control problems from a multidisciplinary view. The Environmental/Biomedical Terminology Index (EBTI) was used as a base for the present thesaurus. The Environmental/Chemical Thesaurus, funded by the Environmental Protection Agency, used as its source of new terms those major terms found in 13 Environmental Protection Agency data bases. The scope of this thesaurus includes not only environmental and biomedical sciences, but also the physical sciences with emphasis placed on chemistry. Specific chemical compounds are not included; only classes of chemicals are given. To adhere to this level of classification, drugs and pesticides are identified by class rather than by specific chemical name. An attempt was also made to expand the areas of sociology and economics. Terminology dealing with law, demography, and geography was expanded. Proper names of languages and races were excluded. Geographic terms were expanded to include proper names for oceans, continents, major lakes, rivers, and islands. Political divisions were added to allow for proper names of countries and states. With such a broad scope, terminology for specific sciences does not provide for indexing to the lowest levels in plant, animal, or chemical classifications

  16. Chemical Characterization of Marajoara Pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project was to find a fingerprinting of the archaeological Marajoara pottery. For that, 330 archaeological and 36 contemporary samples were analysed using two techniques: INAA for elemental chemical analysis and ESR (Electron spin resonance) to determine the burning temperature. The results were studied by means of principal component and discriminant analysis using the SEARCH Programme from H. Mommsen from University of Bonn, Germany, showed the existence of two groups for the archaeological samples indicating that different raw material was used in the manufacturing of the prehistoric artifacts. Meanwhile, the clay used in the contemporary Marajoara ceramics is very different from the clay used in the archaeological. The temper effect in the concentration data was studied by means of correlation coefficient and showed that the tempering problem does not exist in the ceramics. The Procrustes analysis showed that the reduction of variable is viable and the chemical elements Eu, K, Yb, Cr, Fe and Th are sufficient in order to do the fingerprinting of the Marajoara pottery. The ESR studies showed that there is no difference in the burning temperature between the Marajoara's ceramics (the archaeological and contemporary ones). This Project was made in collaboration with the Museu de Arquelogia e Etnologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil and University of Bonn, Germany by means a fellowship of IAEA in the training on the use of the SEARCH Programme. (author)

  17. Kinetic study on pressure leaching of high iron sphalerite concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ke-qiang; YANG Xian-wan; WANG Ji-kun; YAN Jiang-feng; SHEN Qing-feng

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate was studied. The effects of agitation rate, temperature, oxygen partial pressure, initial acid concentration, particle size, iron content in the concentrate and concentration of Fe2+ added into the solution on the leaching rate of zinc were examined. The experiment results indicate that if the agitation rate is greater than 600 r/min, its influence on Zn leaching rate is not substantial. A suitable rise in temperature can facilitate the leaching reaction, and the temperature should be controlled at 140-150 ℃. The increase trend of Zn leaching rate becomes slow when pressure is greater than 1.2 MPa, so the pressure is controlled at 1.2-1.4 MPa. Under the conditions of this study, Zn leaching rate decreases with a rise in the initial sulfuric acid concentration; and Zn leaching rate increases with a rise of iron content in the concentrate and Fe2+ concentration in the solution. Moreover, the experiment demonstrates that the leaching process follows the surface chemical reaction control kinetic law of "shrinking of unreacted core". The activation energy for pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate is calculated, and a mathematical model for this pressure leaching is obtained. The model is promising to guide the practical operation of pressure leaching high iron sphalerite concentrate.

  18. Complex concentrate pretreatment FY 1986 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After of the transuranic elements are removed from complex concentrate waste by the TRUEX process, the remaining waste will be grouted for final storage. The purpose of this project, conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is to support a future decision to grout the complexant waste without destroying the organic contents. In work performed this year, it has been demonstrated that grouts with acceptable parameters for the Transportable Grout Facility can be made using actual waste. The acceptability of these grouts from a regulatory view seems to be less of a problem than was thought at this time last year. None of the organics found in the waste are included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Chemicals List. 7 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Efficient implementations of hyperspectral chemical-detection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Cory J. C.; DiPietro, Robert S.; Manolakis, Dimitris G.; Ingle, Vinay K.

    2013-10-01

    Many military and civilian applications depend on the ability to remotely sense chemical clouds using hyperspectral imagers, from detecting small but lethal concentrations of chemical warfare agents to mapping plumes in the aftermath of natural disasters. Real-time operation is critical in these applications but becomes diffcult to achieve as the number of chemicals we search for increases. In this paper, we present efficient CPU and GPU implementations of matched-filter based algorithms so that real-time operation can be maintained with higher chemical-signature counts. The optimized C++ implementations show between 3x and 9x speedup over vectorized MATLAB implementations.

  20. The Electrostatic Screening Length in Concentrated Electrolytes Increases with Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Alexander M.; Lee, Alpha A.; Perkin, Susan

    2016-01-01

    According to classical electrolyte theories interactions in dilute (low ion density) electrolytes decay exponentially with distance, with the Debye screening length the characteristic length-scale. This decay length decreases monotonically with increasing ion concentration, due to effective screening of charges over short distances. Thus within the Debye model no long-range forces are expected in concentrated electrolytes. Here we reveal, using experimental detection of the interaction betwee...

  1. Properties of chemically modified gelatin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. de Carvalho

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Edible and/or biodegradable films usually have limited water vapor barriers, making it difficult to use them. Thus, the objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of a chemical reticulation treatment with formaldehyde and glyoxal on the mechanical properties, water vapor permeability, solubility and color parameters of gelatin-based films. Formaldehyde and glyoxal were added to the filmogenic solution in concentrations ranging from 3.8 to 8.8 mmoles/100 mL of filmogenic solution and 6.3 to 26.3 mmoles/100 mL of filmogenic solution, respectively. The treatments caused a reduction in permeability to water vapor and in solubility. Only the treatment with formaldehyde caused a significant increase in rupture tension for concentrations above 6.3 mmoles/100 mL of filmogenic solution. Scanning electron microscopy indicated a loss of matrix orientation due to the chemical reticulation treatment.

  2. Chemical-Sensing Cables Detect Potential Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Intelligent Optical Systems Inc. (IOS) completed Phase I and II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA's Langley Research Center to develop moisture- and pH-sensitive sensors to detect corrosion or pre-corrosive conditions, warning of potentially dangerous conditions before significant structural damage occurs. This new type of sensor uses a specially manufactured optical fiber whose entire length is chemically sensitive, changing color in response to contact with its target, and demonstrated to detect potentially corrosive moisture incursions to within 2 cm. After completing the work with NASA, the company received a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Phase III SBIR to develop the sensors further for detecting chemical warfare agents, for which they proved just as successful. The company then worked with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to fine tune the sensors for detecting potential threats, such as toxic industrial compounds and nerve agents. In addition to the work with government agencies, Intelligent Optical Systems has sold the chemically sensitive fiber optic cables to major automotive and aerospace companies, who are finding a variety of uses for the devices. Marketed under the brand name Distributed Intrinsic Chemical Agent Sensing and Transmission (DICAST), these unique continuous-cable fiber optic chemical sensors can serve in a variety of applications: Corrosive-condition monitoring, aiding experimentation with nontraditional power sources, as an economical means of detecting chemical release in large facilities, as an inexpensive "alarm" systems to alert the user to a change in the chemical environment anywhere along the cable, or in distance-resolved optical time domain reflectometry systems to provide detailed profiles of chemical concentration versus length.

  3. Dilute chemical decontamination program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of dilute chemical decontamination technology for Boiling Water Reactor (BWRs) was completed under the Dilute Chemical Decontamination Program. An integrated process was developed and demonstrated under simulated BWR decontamination chemical conditions using a 76 cm long section of 15 cm piping removed from an operating BWR. Reasonable process conditions are: 0.012 M oxalic acid and 0.005 M citric acid at pH 3.0 and 900C with a controlled dissolved oxygen concentration of 0.75 ppM. A novel reagent regeneration process using anion-exchange resin preloaded with oxalate and citrate anions was developed to remove the dissolved corrosion products, including Fe(III), from solution during the decontamination. A limited corrosion testing program was completed and no severe adverse effects were identified

  4. Autonomous Chemical Vapour Detection by Micro UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Rosser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to remotely detect and map chemical vapour clouds in open air environments is a topic of significant interest to both defence and civilian communities. In this study, we integrate a prototype miniature colorimetric chemical sensor developed for methyl salicylate (MeS, as a model chemical vapour, into a micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, and perform flights through a raised MeS vapour cloud. Our results show that that the system is capable of detecting MeS vapours at low ppm concentration in real-time flight and rapidly sending this information to users by on-board telemetry. Further, the results also indicate that the sensor is capable of distinguishing “clean” air from “dirty”, multiple times per flight, allowing us to look towards autonomous cloud mapping and source localization applications. Further development will focus on a broader range of integrated sensors, increased autonomy of detection and improved engineering of the system.

  5. Treatment of radioactive wastes from uranium concentrating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes from uranium and thorium ore processing pose potential environmental and public health problems because of their radioactivity and chemical composition. The radionuclides exist in these wastes are those resulting from the uranium 238, uranium 235 and thorium 232 decay series. The most important radionuclide in U 238 decay series are uranium 234, thorium 230, radium 226 and some short lived radionuclides such as radon-222. Radium 226 is the nuclide of principal concern from the standpoint of the assessment and control of the radiological hazard associated with the wastes. Thus determination of uranium, thorium and radium concentration in wastes resulting from nuclear fuel cycle is very important because of its potential hazard. Various analytical methods such as fluorimetry, neutron activation analysis, radon emanation, spectrophotometry and spectroscopy are used for determination of these radionuclides. Uranium and thorium are separated from interfering element by ion exchange chromatography and measured by spectrophotometry method using arsenazo III and thorin as indicator. Radium is separated from interfering elements and α-emitters by coprecipitation of radium barium sulphate and measured by counting α-particles with surface barrier detector. Regarding to physical and chemical characteristic of waste being investigated, decontamination factors and treatment methods, chemical precipitation and coprecipitation procedure were carried out in this research work. By adding barium chloride, radium is separated from liquid waste and optimum condition were determined. Precipitation with lime and sodium-hydroxide were also studied and good result were obtained. The results show that by neutralization of waste by lime and sodium hydroxide more than 99.9% of activity was removed from stream. Advantage and disadvantage of each methods were studied and finally, effluent resulted from treatment were discharged after analysis with γ-spectroscopy and

  6. Peanut cake concentrations in massai grass silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano S. Lima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the best concentration of peanut cake in the ensiling of massai grass of the chemical-bromatological composition, fermentative characteristics, forage value rate, ingestion estimates, and digestibility of dry matter in the silage. Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out at the Experimental Farm of São Gonçalo dos Campos at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil. The treatments consisted of massai grass that was cut at 40 days and dehydrated, in addition to 0%, 8%, 16%, and 24% peanut cake in the fresh matter and treatment without cake. The material was compressed in experimental silos (7 liter that were opened after 76 days. Results. The addition of 8-24% peanut cake improved the silage’s chemical-bromatological parameters, increased the dry matter and non-fiber carbohydrates and reduced the fibrous components. There was a linear increase in the estimated values of digestibility and the ingestion of dry matter depending on the levels of peanut cake in the silage. There was an improvement in the fermentative characteristics, with a quadratic effect positive for levels of ammoniacal nitrogen. The forage value rate increased linearly with the inclusion of peanut cake. Conclusions. The inclusion of up to 24% peanut cake during ensiling of massai grass increases the nutritive value of silage and improves fermentation characteristics.

  7. Tank waste concentration mechanism study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities

  8. Biodegradation kinetics at low concentrations (

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toräng, Lars; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Nyholm, Niels

    2000-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in groundwater added sediment fines. At concentrations at or below 1 mu g/L of 2,4-D degradation kinetic was of true first order without significant growth of specific degraders and with half-life for mineralization in the...... order of 200 days. Higher concentrations of 2,4-D resulted in a grossly overestimate of the actual degradation rate for concentrations characteristic for Danish found in groundwater....

  9. Qualification testing of photovoltaic concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, E. H.; Barlow, R. S.

    Sandia has developed a revised set of specifications for qualification testing of passively-cooled photovoltaic concentrator modules. The purpose of the tests is to screen new concentrator designs and new production runs for susceptibility to known failure mechanisms; concentrator hardware must be qualified prior to array-level installation at Sandia's Photovoltaic Advanced System Test Facility (PASTF). Tests for cell assemblies and receiver sections, as well as for complete modules, are specified. They include ultraviolet radiation testing of materials, characterization of electrical performance checks to assure safety and structural integrity of modules, and accelerated environmental aging or cycling.

  10. Qualification testing of photovoltaic concentrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia has developed a revised set of specifications for qualification testing of passively-cooled photovoltaic concentrator modules. The purpose of the tests is to screen new concentrator designs and new production runs for susceptibility to known failure mechanisms; concentrator hardware must be qualified prior to array-level installation at Sandia's Photovoltaic Advanced System Test Facility (PASTF). Tests for cell assemblies and receiver sections, as well as for complete modules, are specified. They include ultraviolet radiation testing of materials, characterization of electrical performance, checks to assure safety and structural integrity of modules, and accelerated environmental aging or cycling

  11. Impact of oil on groundwater chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakorenko, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the paper is to characterize the chemical composition of groundwater samples from the monitoring wells drilled in the petrol station areas within the vicinity of Tomsk. The level of contamination has increased since many macro - and microcomponent concentrations (such as petroleum products, chlorine, sulphates, carbon dioxide and lead, etc.) in groundwater samples of the present study is higher than that in previous period samples.

  12. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2015-11-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a “worship”. Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In contrast, situations where the central flames are suppressed are also found. The phenomena leads to in-phase synchronised states emerging between periods of anti-phase synchronisation for arrays with different columnar sizes of candle and positioning.

  13. Arrays of coupled chemical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Forrester, Derek Michael

    2016-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions result from complex periodic changes in the concentration of the reactants. In spatially ordered ensembles of candle flame oscillators the fluctuations in the ratio of oxygen atoms with respect to that of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen produces an oscillation in the visible part of the flame related to the energy released per unit mass of oxygen. Thus, the products of the reaction vary in concentration as a function of time, giving rise to an oscillation in the amount of soot and radiative emission. Synchronisation of interacting dynamical sub-systems occurs as arrays of flames that act as master and slave oscillators, with groups of candles numbering greater than two, creating a synchronised motion in three-dimensions. In a ring of candles the visible parts of each flame move together, up and down and back and forth, in a manner that appears like a "worship". Here this effect is shown for rings of flames which collectively empower a central flame to pulse to greater heights. In ...

  14. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  15. Islamic State and Chemical Weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Rafay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with topic of Islamic State and chemical weapons. The issue is analysed in three dimensions: origin of used chemical weapons and possibility of independent production; known chemical attacks and tactical regularities in their execution; and traits of future chemical terrorist attacks. By providing a thorough examination of the problem, the article aims at predicting the future development of the group’s chemical program as well as describing any prospective chemical terrorist attacks in Europe

  16. Recovery of uranium mineral concentrate from copper tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the studies conducted on the samples of copper tailings from Surda Copper Concentrator plant, wet concentrating table (Diaster Diagonal Deck) was found most suitable for recovering uranium mineral concentrate. Based on this technique, uranium recovery plants were set up at Surda, Rakha and Mosabani. The recoveries obtained from Surda Uranium Recovery Plant and Rakha Uranium Recovery Plant were in the range of 40-50%. But in Mosaboni Uranium Recovery Plant which is treating copper tailings from Mosaboni Copper Concentrator Plant, the biggest concentrator plant processing nearly 2,700 MT/day of copper ore, the recovery by wet concentrating tables was found to be around 22%. Low recovery was mainly due to low concentration of uranium in ore and as well as more percentage of uranium distribution in fines which tables were unable to recover. Studies were done to recover uranium mineral concentrate from the fines with new set of equipment viz. Curved Static Screen/Bartles Mozley Separator/Cross Belt Concentrator. This gave an improvement of 14-16% only. Studies by low acid leaching in chemical process side have shown that an overall recovery of 68% can be achieved. Though the chemical process is best as far as recovery is concerned but there are several constraints. The major constraint is pertaining to environmental and pollution control. Depending on the results of studies to overcome the constraints decision for the process to be adopted will be taken up and executed. The test results and plant performance data have also been included in the paper. (author). 8 figs., 11 tabs., 1 appendix

  17. Chemical speciation of Pu in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of plutonium in natural waters is determined to a major degree by the chemical forms which are present. We have characterized the ambient Pu in a number of surface waters with regard to its oxidation state and association with natural colloidal organic carbon compounds using a combination of field measurements and laboratory experiments. Both of these factors are shown to have a profound effect on the adsorption of Pu to natural sediments, since both complexation with organic matter and oxidation compete with adsorption. The concentration of organic carbon in the water is the key variable influencing both oxidation state and organic binding. The adsorption process conforms to the laws applicable to a reversible equilibrium with values of the distribution coefficient, K/sub D/, measured in laboratory experiments being similar to those observed for ambient Pu. Experiments using natural waters and sediments in which the Pu concentration was varied show the forms present at typical ambient concentrations (10-17 - 10-14 M) are the same as those found at concentrations up to 10-7 M. Moreover, the affinity for sediments did not change with concentration indicating the binding sites for Pu had not become saturated. Thus, the behavior observed for Pu at ultratrace concentrations should remain unchanged throughout this concentration range. The studies in this report all deal with Pu in exchangeable (and hence source independent) forms and should therefore reflect the behavior toward which the plutonium from any source will tend with time. 13 references, 7 figures, 10 tables

  18. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F.; Adams, Rachel G.;

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive upta...

  19. Chemical toxicity approach for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of an airborne release of chemical agent or toxic industrial chemical by accidental or intentional means, emergency responders must have a reasonable estimate of the location and size of the resulting hazard area. Emergency responders are responsible for warning persons downwind of the hazard to evacuate or shelter-in-place and must know where to look for casualties after the hazard has passed or dissipated. Given the same source characterization, modern hazard assessment models provide comparable concentration versus location and time estimates. Even urban hazard assessment models often provide similar predictions. There is a major shortcoming, though, in applying model output to estimating human toxicity effects. There exist a variety of toxicity values for non-lethal effects ranging from short-term to occupational to lifetime exposures. For health and safety purposes, these estimates are all safe-sided in converting animal data to human effects and in addressing the most sensitive subset of the population. In addition, these values are usually based on an assumed 1 hour exposure duration at constant concentration and do not reflect either a passing clouds concentration profile or duration. Emergency responders need expected value toxicity parameters rather than the existing safe-sided ones. This presentation will specify the types of toxicity values needed to provide appropriate chemical hazard estimates to emergency responders and will demonstrate how dramatically their use changes the hazard area.(author)

  20. Protein Chemical Shift Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    The protein chemical shifts holds a large amount of information about the 3-dimensional structure of the protein. A number of chemical shift predictors based on the relationship between structures resolved with X-ray crystallography and the corresponding experimental chemical shifts have been developed. These empirical predictors are very accurate on X-ray structures but tends to be insensitive to small structural changes. To overcome this limitation it has been suggested to make chemical shift predictors based on quantum mechanical(QM) calculations. In this thesis the development of the QM derived chemical shift predictor Procs14 is presented. Procs14 is based on 2.35 million density functional theory(DFT) calculations on tripeptides and contains corrections for hydrogen bonding, ring current and the effect of the previous and following residue. Procs14 is capable at performing predictions for the 13CA, 13CB, 13CO, 15NH, 1HN and 1HA backbone atoms. In order to benchmark Procs14, a number of QM NMR calculatio...