WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical cleaning methods

  1. Method of cleaning oil slicks and chemical spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of cleaning a floating chemical spill on a body of water. It comprises: providing a quantity of popular bark-based pelleted or granular product, flotation means and a flexible net having openings generally smaller than the smallest whole pellet dimension of the pelleted product, spreading the net over a chemical spill on the body of water, connecting the floatation means to the net thereby supporting the net adjacent the surface of the body of water, placing the poplar bark-based product on the net, absorbing the floating chemical spill into the product, and removing the chemical soaked product from the body of water

  2. Chemical cleaning review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, B.L.; Thomas, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Three main chemical processes for cleaning steam generators have evolved from the early work of the industry. Of the more than 50 chemical cleanings carried out to date most have been considered a success by the utilities performing them. (author)

  3. Reactive Ion Etching as Cleaning Method Post Chemical Mechanical Polishing for Phase Change Memory Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Zhong; Zhi-Tang, Song; Bo, Liu; Song-Lin, Feng; Bomy, Chen

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve nano-scale phase change memory performance, a super-clean interface should be obtained after chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase change films. We use reactive ion etching (RIE) as the cleaning method. The cleaning effect is analysed by scanning electron microscopy and an energy dispersive spectrometer. The results show that particle residue on the surface has been removed. Meanwhile, Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 material stoichiometric content ratios are unchanged. After the top electrode is deposited, current-voltage characteristics test demonstrates that the set threshold voltage is reduced from 13 V to 2.7V and the threshold current from 0.1mA to 0.025mA. Furthermore, we analyse the RIE cleaning principle and compare it with the ultrasonic method

  4. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Simulant Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-19

    Solubility testing with simulated High Level Waste tank heel solids has been conducted in order to evaluate two alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge washing efforts. Tests were conducted with non-radioactive pure phase metal reagents, binary mixtures of reagents, and a Savannah River Site PUREX heel simulant to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent and pure, dilute nitric acid toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. A focus of this testing was on minimization of oxalic acid additions during tank cleaning. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid which is the current baseline chemical cleaning reagent. In a separate study, solubility tests were conducted with radioactive tank heel simulants using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for Savannah River Site tank closure Performance Assessments. Permanganate-based cleaning methods were evaluated prior to and after oxalic acid contact.

  5. Processing method for chemical cleaning liquid on the secondary side of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Yukio; Inagaki, Yuzo.

    1993-01-01

    Upon processing nitrilotriacetate (NTA), Fe liquid wastes mainly comprising Fe and Cu liquid wastes mainly comprising ethylene diamine and Cu generated upon chemical cleaning on the secondary side of a steam generator, pH of the Fe liquid wastes is lowered to deposit and separate NTA. Then, Fe ions in a filtrates are deposited on a cathode by electrolysis, as well as remaining NTA is decomposed by oxidation at an anode by O 2 gas. Cu liquid wastes are reacted with naphthalene disulfate and Ba ions and the reaction products are separated by deposition as sludges. Remaining Cu ions in the filtrates are deposited on the cathode by electrolysis. With such procedures, concentration of COD(NTA), Fe ions and Cu ions can greatly be reduced. Further, since capacity of the device can easily be increased in this method, a great amount of liquid wastes can be processed in a relatively short period of time. (T.M.)

  6. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  7. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Actual Waste Testing with SRS Tank 5F Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, Michael S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Solubility testing with actual High Level Waste tank sludge has been conducted in order to evaluate several alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge sluicing efforts. Tests were conducted with archived Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive sludge solids that had been retrieved from Tank 5F in order to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. Solubility tests were performed by direct sludge contact with the oxalic/nitric acid reagent and with sludge that had been pretreated and acidified with dilute nitric acid. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid following current baseline tank chemical cleaning methods. One goal of testing with the optimized reagent was to compare the total amounts of oxalic acid and water required for sludge dissolution using the baseline and optimized cleaning methods. A second objective was to compare the two methods with regard to the dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for SRS tank closure Performance Assessments (PA). Additionally, solubility tests were conducted with Tank 5 sludge using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species.

  8. Method of and apparatus for cleaning garments and soft goods contaminated with nuclear, chemical and/or biological contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for decontaminating garments, soft good or mixtures thereof contaminated with radioactive particulates, toxin, chemical, and biological contaminants comprising the steps of: (a) depositing contaminated garments, soft goods or mixtures thereof in a cleaning drum; (b) charging the drum with a cleaning solvent in which the chemical contaminants are soluble; (c) agitating the drum during a wash cycle to separate radioactive, toxin, biological particulate matter of mixtures thereof from the garments; (d) draining the drum of the dry cleaning solvent which contains suspended particulate contaminants and dissolved chemical contaminants; (e) contacting the drained solvent with both a neutralizing agent and an oxidizing agent, the neutralizing agent being selected from the group consisting of sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and mixtures thereof and having a concentration greater than one (1.0) normal; (f) rinsing the garments, soft goods or mixtures thereof by circulating clean solvent from a solvent tank through the drum thereby effecting additional removal and flushing of particulate and chemical contaminants; (g) filtering the circulated solvent to remove the particulate material suspended in the solvent prior to addition to the drum; and (h) preferentially adsorbing the chemical contaminants dissolved in the circulated solvent prior to addition to the drum

  9. Pickering Unit 1 chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, J.L.; Fiola, R.J.; Brennenstuhl, K.R.; Zerkee, D.D.; Daniel, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    The secondary sides of all 12 boilers at Pickering Unit 1 were chemically cleaned in 1994 by the team of Ontario Hydro, B and W International (Cambridge, Ontario) and B and W Nuclear Technologies (Lynchburg, Virginia). A multi-step EPRI/SGOG process was employed in a similar manner to previous clearings at Units 5 and 6 in 1992 and 1993, respectively. A major innovation with the Unit 1 cleaning was the incorporation of a crevice cleaning step, the first time this had been done on Ontario Hydro plants. In addition, six boilers were cleaned in parallel compared to three at a time in previous Pickering cleanings. This significantly reduced cleaning time. A total of 6,770 kg of sludge was removed through direct chemical dissolution. It consisted of 66% iron/nickel oxides and 28% copper metal. A total of 1,600,000 L (420,000 US gallons) of liquid waste was produced. It was processed through the spent solvent treatment facility located at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site. Visual inspection performed after the cleaning indicated that the crevices between the boiler tubes and the tube support structure were completely clear of deposit and the general condition of the tubing and lattice bars appeared to be in 'as new' condition. (author)

  10. A novel surface cleaning method for chemical removal of fouling lead layer from chromium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholivand, Kh.; Khosravi, M.; Hosseini, S.G.; Fathollahi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Most products especially metallic surfaces require cleaning treatment to remove surface contaminations that remain after processing or usage. Lead fouling is a general problem which arises from lead fouling on the chromium surfaces of bores and other interior parts of systems which have interaction with metallic lead in high temperatures and pressures. In this study, a novel chemical solution was introduced as a cleaner reagent for removing metallic lead pollution, as a fouling metal, from chromium surfaces. The cleaner aqueous solution contains hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as oxidizing agent of lead layer on the chromium surface and acetic acid (CH 3 COOH) as chelating agent of lead ions. The effect of some experimental parameters such as acetic acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and temperature of the cleaner solution during the operation on the efficiency of lead cleaning procedure was investigated. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that using this procedure, the lead pollution layer could be completely removed from real chromium surfaces without corrosion of the original surface. Finally, the optimum conditions for the complete and fast removing of lead pollution layer from chromium surfaces were proposed. The experimental results showed that at the optimum condition (acetic acid concentration 28% (V/V), hydrogen peroxide 8% (V/V) and temperature 35 deg. C), only 15-min time is needed for complete removal of 3 g fouling lead from a chromium surface.

  11. Standard Test Method for Effects of Cleaning and Chemical Maintenance Materials on Painted Aircraft Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers determination of the effects of cleaning solutions and liquid cleaner concentrates on painted aircraft surfaces (Note 1). Streaking, discoloration, and blistering may be determined visually. Softening is determined with a series of specially prepared pencils wherein determination of the softest pencil to rupture the paint film is made. Note 1—This test method is applicable to any paint film that is exposed to cleaning materials. MIL-PRF-85285 has been selected as a basic example. When other paint finishes are used, refer to the applicable material specification for panel preparation and system curing prior to testing. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user ...

  12. Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadiyar, H.S.; Das Chintamani; Gaonkar, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  13. Chemical cleaning specification: few tube test model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, L.V.; Simpson, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The specification is for the waterside chemical cleaning of the 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steel steam generator tubes. It describes the reagents and conditions for post-chemical cleaning passivation of the evaporator tubes

  14. Development of clean chemical mechanical polishing systems; Clean CMP system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, M.; Hosokawa, M. [Ebara Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-20

    Described herein are clean chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) systems developed by Ebara. A CMP system needs advanced peripheral techniques, in addition to those for grinding adopted by the conventional system, in order to fully exhibit its inherent functions. An integrated design concept is essential for the CMP steps, including slurry supplying, polishing, washing, process controlling and waste fluid treatment. The Ebara has adopted a standard concept `Clean CMP, dry-in and dry-out of wafers,` and provided world`s highest grades of techniques for inter-layer insulating film, shallow trench isolation, plug and wiring. The head for the polishing module is specially designed by FEM, to improve homogeneity of wafers from the center to edges. The dresser is also specially designed, to improve pad surface topolody after dressing. A slurry dipsersing method is developed to reduce slurry consumption. Various washing modules, designed to have the same external shape, can be allocated to various functions. 10 figs.

  15. Chemical cleaning of AGR boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, S.V.; Moore, W.; Rantell, A.

    1978-01-01

    AGR boilers are likely to require post service chemical cleaning to remove accumulated oxides at intervals of 15 - 35 kh. The need to clean will be based on an assessment of such factors as the development of flow imbalances through parallel tubes induced by the formation of rough oxide surfaces, an increasing risk of localised corrosion as the growth of porous oxides proceeds and the risk of tube blockage caused by the exfoliation of steam-grown oxides. The study has shown what heterogeneous multilayer oxides possessing a range of physical and chemical properties form on the alloy steels. They include porous and compact magnetites, chromium spinels and sesquioxide. Ammoniated citric acid has been shown to remove deposited and water-grown magnetites from the carbon and alloy steels but will not necessarily remove the substituted spinels grown on the alloy steels or the potentially spalling steam-grown magnetite on the A1SI 316 superheater. Citric acid supplemented with the reducing agent glyoxal completely removes all oxides from the boiler except the protective inner spinel formed on the 316. Removal of the spinels and compact magnetites occurs more by undercutting and physical detachment than by the dissolution. (author)

  16. Waste processing of chemical cleaning solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on chemical cleaning solutions containing high concentrations of organic chelating wastes that are difficult to reduce in volume using existing technology. Current methods for evaporating low-level radiative waste solutions often use high maintenance evaporators that can be costly and inefficient. The heat transfer surfaces of these evaporators are easily fouled, and their maintenance requires a significant labor investment. To address the volume reduction of spent, low-level radioactive, chelating-based chemical cleaning solutions, ECOSAFE Liquid Volume Reduction System (LVRS) has been developed. The LVRS is based on submerged combustion evaporator technology that was modified for treatment of low-level radiative liquid wastes. This system was developed in 1988 and was used to process 180,000 gallons of waste at Oconee Nuclear Station

  17. Chemical cleaning of UK AGR boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, A.; Turner, P.; Ghosh, A.; Clary, W.; Tice, D.

    2002-01-01

    For the first time in their operational lives, UK advanced gas-cooled reactor once-through boilers have been chemically cleaned. Chemical cleaning was necessary to avoid lost output resulting from boiler pressure drops, which had been increasing for a number of years. Chemical cleaning of these boilers presents a number of unique difficulties. These include lack of access to the boilers, highly sensitised 316H superheater sections that cannot be excluded from the cleaning flow path, relatively thin boiler tube walls and an intolerance to boiler tube failure because of the role of the boilers in nuclear decay heat removal. The difficulties were overcome by implementing the clean in a staged manner, starting with an extensive materials testwork programme to select and then to substantiate the cleaning process. The selected process was based on ammoniated citric acid plus formic acid for the principal acid cleaning stage. Materials testwork was followed by an in-plant trial clean of six boiler tubes, further materials testwork and the clean of a boiler tube in a full-scale test rig. An overview is presented of the work that was carried out to demonstrate that the clean could be carried out safely, effectively and without leading to unacceptable corrosion losses. Full-scale chemical cleaning was implemented by using as much of the existing plant as possible. Careful control and monitoring was employed to ensure that the cleaning was implemented according to the specified design, thus ensuring that a safe and effective clean was carried out. Full-scale cleaning has resulted in significant boiler pressure drop recovery, even though the iron burden was relatively low and cleaning was completed in a short time. (orig.)

  18. Chemical cleaning an essential part of steam generator asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amman, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Chemical Cleaning an essential part of Steam Generator asset management accumulation of deposits is intrinsic for the operation of Steam Generators in PWRs. Such depositions often lead to reduction of thermal performance, loss of component integrity and, in some cases to power restrictions. Accordingly removal of such deposits is an essential part of the asset management of the Steam Generators in a Nuclear Power Plant. Every plant has its individual condition, history and constraints which need to be considered when planning and performing a chemical cleaning. Typical points are: - Sludge load amount and constitution of the deposits - Sludge distribution in the steam generator - Existing or expected corrosion problems - Amount and tendency of fouling for waste treatment Depending on this points the strategy for chemical cleaning shall be evolved. the range of treatment starts with very soft cleanings with a removal of approx 100 kg per steam generator and goes to a full scale cleaning which can remove up to several thousand kilograms of deposits from a steam generator. Depending on the goal to be achieved and the steam generator present an adequate cleaning method shall be selected. This requires flexible and 'customisable' cleaning methods that can be adapted to the individual needs of a plant. Such customizing of chemical cleaning methods is an essential factor for an optimized asset management of the steam generator in a nuclear power plant

  19. Chemical cleaning - essential for optimal steam generator asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammann, Franz

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of deposits in Steam Generator is intrinsic during the operation of Pressurized Water Reactors. Such depositions lead to reduction of thermal performance, loss of component integrity and, in some cases, to power restrictions. Accordingly, removal of such deposits is an essential part of the asset management program of Steam Generators. Every plant has specific conditions, history and constraints which must be considered when planning and performing a chemical cleaning. Typical points are: -Constitution of the deposits or sludge - Sludge load - Sludge distribution in the steam generator - Existing or expected corrosion problems - Amount and tendency of fouling for waste treatment The strategy for chemical cleaning is developed from these points. The range of chemical cleaning treatments starts with very soft cleanings which can remove approximately 100kg per steam generator and ends with full scale, i.e., hard, cleanings which can remove several thousand kilograms of deposits from a steam generator. Dependent upon the desired goal for the operating plant and the steam generator material condition, the correct cleaning method can be selected. This requires flexible cleaning methods that can be adapted to the individual needs of a plant. Such customizing of chemical cleaning methods is a crucial factor for an optimized asset management program of steam generators in a nuclear power plant

  20. Efficient methods of piping cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Vladimir Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the analysis of the efficient methods of piping cleaning of water supply and sanitation systems. Special attention is paid to the ice cleaning method, in course of which biological foil and various mineral and organic deposits are removed due to the ice crust buildup on the inner surface of water supply and drainage pipes. These impurities are responsible for the deterioration of the organoleptic properties of the transported drinking water or narrowing cross-section of drainage pipes. The co-authors emphasize that the use of ice compared to other methods of pipe cleaning has a number of advantages due to the relative simplicity and cheapness of the process, economical efficiency and lack of environmental risk. The equipment for performing ice cleaning is presented, its technological options, terms of cleansing operations, as well as the volumes of disposed pollution per unit length of the water supply and drainage pipelines. It is noted that ice cleaning requires careful planning in the process of cooking ice and in the process of its supply in the pipe. There are specific requirements to its quality. In particular, when you clean drinking water system the ice applied should be hygienically clean and meet sanitary requirements.In pilot projects, in particular, quantitative and qualitative analysis of sediments adsorbed by ice is conducted, as well as temperature and the duration of the process. The degree of pollution of the pipeline was estimated by the volume of the remote sediment on 1 km of pipeline. Cleaning pipelines using ice can be considered one of the methods of trenchless technologies, being a significant alternative to traditional methods of cleaning the pipes. The method can be applied in urban pipeline systems of drinking water supply for the diameters of 100—600 mm, and also to diversion collectors. In the world today 450 km of pipelines are subject to ice cleaning method.Ice cleaning method is simple

  1. ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM TANK 5F CHEMICAL CLEANING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-03-07

    measured by different methods, and the differences in the fraction removed are not statistically significant. (10) Chemical cleaning removed 10-50% of the barium, chromium, iron, magnesium, manganese, and silicon. (11) Chemical cleaning removed only {approx}1% of the nickel.

  2. CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS IN WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newer green chemistry approach to accomplish chemical synthesis in water is summarized. Recent global developments pertaining to C-C bond forming reactions using metallic reagents and direct use of the renewable materials such as carbohydrates without derivatization are described...

  3. Chemical cleaning of nuclear (PWR) steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.S. Jr.; Mundis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant research program sponsored by a group of utilities (the Steam Generator Owners Group), which was undertaken to develop a process to chemically remove corrosion product deposits from the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant steam generators. Results of this work have defined a process (solvent system and application methods) that is capable of removing sludge and tube-to-tube support plate crevice corrosion products generated during operation with all-volatile treatment (AVT) water chemistry. Considers a plant-specific test program that includes all materials in the steam generator to be cleaned and accounts for the physical locations (proximity and contact) of those materials. Points out that prior to applying the process in an operational unit, the utility, with the participation of the NSSR vendor, must define allowable total corrosion to the materials of construction of the unit

  4. Chemical cleaning of UK AGR boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, A.; Turner, P.; Ghosh, S.; Clary, W.; Tice, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    For a number of years, the waterside pressure drops across the advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) pod boilers have been increasing. The pressure drop increases have accelerated with time, which is the converse behaviour to that expected for rippled magnetite formation (rapid initial increase slowing down with time). Nonetheless, magnetite deposition remains the most likely cause for the increasing boiler resistances. A number of potential countermeasures have been considered in response to the boiler pressure drop increases. However, there was no detectable reduction in the rate of pressure drop increase. Chemical cleaning was therefore considered and a project to substantiate and then implement chemical cleaning was initiated. (authors)

  5. Chemical cleaning for sludge in steam generator of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Lu Yucheng; Zhang Binyong; Yu Jinghua

    2002-01-01

    The sludge induced corrosion damage to secondary side of tubes of Steam Generator (SG), effect of chemical cleaning technique on maintenance integrity of tubes of SG NPP and use of chemical cleaning technique in SG NPP have been summarized. The engineering technique of chemical cleaning for removing sludge in secondary side of SG NPP has been studied and qualified by CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy). Chemical cleaning engineering technique is introduced (main agent is EDTA, temp. <100 degree C), including chemical cleaning technology for tube plate and full tube nest of secondary side of SG, the monitoring technique of chemical cleaning process (effectiveness and safety), the disposal method of wastage of chemical cleaning, the system of chemical cleaning. The method for preventing sludge deposition in secondary side and the research on advanced water chemistry of secondary loop are introduced

  6. Corrosion monitoring during a chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delepine, J.; Feron, D.; Roy, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to estimate the possible corrosion induced by the chemical cleaning, a corrosion monitoring has been realized during the cleaning of the secondary circuit (including the model boiler) of ORION loop. It included coupons and electrodes and has required a preliminary setting in laboratory. The electrochemical device which was used during the chemical cleaning included two reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) and eight metallic electrodes (carbon steel, stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 690) for free corrosion potential monitoring, three other carbon steel electrodes for instantaneous corrosion rate measurements by polarization resistance and three coupling devices with different surface ratios between carbon steel and Alloy 600. The results showed a good agreement between corrosion rates measured by weight losses on coupons or by electrochemistry (polarization resistance), and an increase of the carbon steel corrosion rate when it was coupled with Alloy 600. (authors). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  7. Effect of Time in Chemical Cleaning of Ultrafiltration Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levitsky, I.; Naim, R.; Duek, A.; Gitis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes is often considered successful when the flux through a cleaned membrane is much higher than through a pristine one. Here, a novel definition of cleaning intensity is proposed as the product of the concentration of the cleaning agent and the cleaning

  8. Method of cleaning alkaline metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yukio; Naito, Kesahiro; Iizawa, Katsuyuki; Nakasuji, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of used sodium and aqueous alkaline solution when cleaning used sodium and metallic sodium adhering to equipment with an aqueous alkaline solution. Method: A sodium treating container is filled with an aqueous alkaline solution, and stainless steel gauze is sunk in the container. Equipment to be cleaned such as equipment with sodium adhering to it are retained under the gauze and are thus cleaned. On the other hand, the surface of the aqueous alkaline solution is covered with a fluid paraffin liquid covering material. Thus, the hydrogen produced by the reaction of the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution will float up, pass through the liquid covering material and be discharged. The sodium will pass through the gauze and float upwardly while reacting with the aqueous alkaline solution in a partic ulate state to the boundary between the aqueous alkaline solution and up to the covering material, and thus the theratment reaction will continue. Thus, the cover material prevents the sodium and the aqueous alkaline solution from scattering. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Evaluation of boiler chemical cleaning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The EPRI/SGOG process, which has been selected by Ontario Hydro for use at the Bruce A station, is described. This process consists of alternating iron removal and copper removal steps, the two metals which comprise the bulk of the deposit in the Bruce A SGs. The iron removal solvent consists of ethylenediameinetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydrazine, ammonium hydroxide and a proprietary corrosion inhibitor CCI-801. The copper removal solvent consists of EDTA, ethylene diamine and hydrogen peroxide. Ontario Hydro proposes to clean a bank of four SGs in parallel employing a total of six copper removal steps and four iron removal steps. Cleaning all eight SGs in a single Bruce A unit will generate 2,200 m 3 of liquid waste which will be treated by a wet air oxidation process. The iron and copper sludges will be buried in a landfill site while the liquid waste will be further treated by the Bruce sewage treatment plant. Some ammonia vapour will be generated through the wet air oxidation process and will be vented through a stack on top of the high bay of the spent solvent treatment plant. With the exception of the proprietary corrosion inhibitor, all chemicals that will be employed in the cleaning and waste treatment operations are standard industrial chemicals which are well characterized. No extraordinary hazards are anticipated with their use as long as adequate safety precautions are taken

  10. Method of continuously cleaning condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Akira; Takahashi, Sankichi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent marine livings from depositing to the inside of ball recycling pipeways. Method: Copper electrodes are provided to the downstream of a sponge ball collector in a sponge ball recycling pipeways for cleaning through the cooling pipes of a condenser. Electrical current is supplied by way of a variable resister to the electrodes and copper ions resulted from the dissolution of the electrodes are fed in the pipes to kill the marine livings such as barnacles and prevent the marine livings from depositing to the inside of the sponge ball recycling pipeways. (Seki, T.)

  11. Disposal and handling of nuclear steam generator chemical cleaning wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1978-01-01

    A large number of pressurized water nuclear reactor electrical generating plants have experienced a corrosion-related problem with their steam generators known as denting. Denting is a mechanical deformation of the steam generator tubes that occurs at the tube support plates. Corrosion of the tube support plates occurs within the annuli through which the tubes pass and the resulting corrosion oxides, which are larger in volume than the original metal, compress and deform the tubes. In some cases, the induced stresses have been severe enough to cause tube and/or support cracking. The problem was so severe at the Turkey Point and Surrey plants that the tubing is being replaced. For less severe cases, chemical cleaning of the oxides, and other materials which deposit in the annuli from the water, is being considered. A Department of Energy-sponsored program was conducted by Consolidated Edison Co. of New York which identified several suitable cleaning solvents and led to in-plant chemical cleaning pilot demonstrations in the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Current programs to improve the technology are being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the three PWR NSSS vendors with the assistance of numerous consultants, vendors, and laboratories. These programs are expected to result in more effective, less corrosive solvents. However, after a chemical cleaning is conducted, a large problem still remains- that of disposing of the spent wastes. The paper summarizes some of the methods currently available for handling and disposal of the wastes

  12. The Synthesis of Anatase Nanoparticles and the Preparation of Photocatalytically Active Coatings Based on Wet Chemical Methods for Self-Cleaning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Verhovšek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on an improved sol-gel method for the production of highly photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2 anatase nanoparticles which can provide appropriate control over the final characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as particle size, crystallinity, crystal structure, morphology, and also the degree of agglomeration. The synthesized anatase nanoparticles were characterized using various techniques, such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and were tested in coatings for self-cleaning glass and ceramic surfaces. The coatings were prepared using a soft chemistry route and are completely transparent to visible light and exhibit a high photocatalytic effect, which was determined by contact-angle measurements. Finally, it is worth mentioning that both the sol-gel synthesis method and the coating-preparation method are based on a wet chemical process, thus presenting no risk of handling the TiO2 anatase nanoparticles in their potentially hazardous powder form at any stage of our development. Low-price, easy-to-handle, and nontoxic materials were used. Therefore, our work represents an important contribution to the development of TiO2 anatase nanoparticle coatings that provide a high photocatalytic effect and can thus be used for numerous applications.

  13. Medium scale test study of chemical cleaning technique for secondary side of SG in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Zhang Shufeng; Yu Jinghua; Hou Shufeng

    1997-08-01

    The medium scale test study of chemical cleaning technique for removing corrosion product (Fe 3 O 4 ) in secondary side of SG in PWR has been completed. The test has been carried out in a medium scale test loop. The medium scale test evaluated the effect of the chemical cleaning technique (temperature, flow rate, cleaning time, cleaning process), the state of corrosion product deposition on magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) solubility and safety of materials of SG in cleaning process. The inhibitor component of chemical cleaning agent has been improved by electrochemical linear polarization method, the effect of inhibitor on corrosion resistance of materials have been examined in the medium scale test loop, the most components of chemical cleaning agent have been obtained, the EDTA is main component in cleaning agent. The electrochemical method for monitor corrosion of materials during cleaning process has been completed in the laboratory. The study of the medium scale test of chemical cleaning technique have had the optimum chemical cleaning technique for remove corrosion product in SG secondary side of PWR. (9 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.)

  14. Chemical cleaning of Dresden Unit 1: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The introduction of NS-1 solvent into the full primary system of Dresden Unit-1 nuclear power reactor on September 12, 1984, represented the culmination of several years of development, testing, planning, and construction. The requirement was to dissolve the highly radioactive deposits of primarily nickel ferrite without any corrosion which might compromise the reactor systems. During the actual cleaning with the NS-1 solvent, the chemical condition of the circulating solvent was measured. Iron, nickel, and radioactive cobalt all dissolved smoothly. The amount of copper in solution decreased in concentration, verifying expectations that metallic copper would plate on to clean metal surfaces. A special rinse formulation was employed after the primary cleaning steps and the ''lost'' copper was thus redissolved and removed from the system. After the cleaning was complete and the reactor had been refilled with pure water, radiation levels were measured. The most accurate of these measurements gave decontamination factors ranging well above 100, which indicated a significant removal of the radioactive deposits, and demonstrated the success of this project. Treatment of the radioactive liquid wastes from this operation required volume reduction and water purification. The primary method of processing the spent cleaning solvent and rinse water was evaporation. The resulting concentrate has been stored as a liquid, awaiting solidification to allow burial at a designated site. Water which was separated during evaporation, along with the dilute rinses, was processed by various chemical means, reevaporated, treated with activated carbon, and/or demineralized before its radionuclide and chemical content was low enough to allow it to be returned to Dresden Station for treatment or disposal. 60 figs., 31 tabs

  15. Chemical Agents: Personal Cleaning and Disposal of Contaminated Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters Chemical Agents: Facts About Personal Cleaning and Disposal of ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some kinds of chemical accidents or attacks may cause you to come ...

  16. Apparatuses, Systems and Methods for Cleaning Photovoltaic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Eitelhuber, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Embodiments of solar panel cleaning apparatuses, solar panel cleaning systems, and solar panel cleaning methods are disclosed. In certain embodiments, the disclosed solar panel cleaning apparatuses, systems and methods do may not require any water

  17. Chemical cleaning of the Bruce A steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Surf, J.E.; Mason, J.B.; Symmons, W.R.; Yee, F.

    1992-01-01

    Deposits consisting mostly of oxides and salts and copper metal in the secondary side of the steam generators at the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station have caused instability in the steam flow and loss of heat capacity, resulting in derating of the units and reduction in power production. Attempts to remove the deposits by pressure pulsing were unsuccessful. Water lancing succeeded in restoring stability, but restrictions on access prevented complete lancing of the tube support plate holes. Chemical cleaning using a modified EPRI-SGOG process has been selected as the best method of removing the deposits. A complete chemical cleaning system has been designed and fabricated for Ontario Hydro by Pacific Nuclear, with support from AECL CANDU and their suppliers. The system consists of self contained modules which are easily interconnected on site. The whole process is controlled from the Control Module, where all parameters are monitored on a computer video screen. The operator can control motorized valves, pumps and heaters from the computer key board. This system incorporates all the advanced technologies and design features that have been developed by Pacific Nuclear in the design, fabrication and operation of many systems for chemical decontamination and cleaning of nuclear systems. 2 figs

  18. Risk in cleaning: chemical and physical exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkoff, P; Schneider, T; Kildesø, J; Degerth, R; Jaroszewski, M; Schunk, H

    1998-04-23

    Cleaning is a large enterprise involving a large fraction of the workforce worldwide. A broad spectrum of cleaning agents has been developed to facilitate dust and dirt removal, for disinfection and surface maintenance. The cleaning agents are used in large quantities throughout the world. Although a complex pattern of exposure to cleaning agents and resulting health problems, such as allergies and asthma, are reported among cleaners, only a few surveys of this type of product have been performed. This paper gives a broad introduction to cleaning agents and the impact of cleaning on cleaners, occupants of indoor environments, and the quality of cleaning. Cleaning agents are usually grouped into different product categories according to their technical functions and the purpose of their use (e.g. disinfectants and surface care products). The paper also indicates the adverse health and comfort effects associated with the use of these agents in connection with the cleaning process. The paper identifies disinfectants as the most hazardous group of cleaning agents. Cleaning agents contain evaporative and non-evaporative substances. The major toxicologically significant constituents of the former are volatile organic compounds (VOCs), defined as substances with boiling points in the range of 0 degree C to about 400 degrees C. Although laboratory emission testing has shown many VOCs with quite different time-concentration profiles, few field studies have been carried out measuring the exposure of cleaners. However, both field studies and emission testing indicate that the use of cleaning agents results in a temporal increase in the overall VOC level. This increase may occur during the cleaning process and thus it can enhance the probability of increased short-term exposure of the cleaners. However, the increased levels can also be present after the cleaning and result in an overall increased VOC level that can possibly affect the indoor air quality (IAQ) perceived by

  19. Combustion behaviour of ultra clean coal obtained by chemical demineralisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Rubiera; A. Arenillas; B. Arias; J.J. Pis; I. Suarez-Ruiz; K.M. Steel; J.W. Patrick [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-10-01

    The increasing environmental concern caused by the use of fossil fuels and the concomitant need for improved combustion efficiency is leading to the development of new coal cleaning and utilisation processes. However, the benefits achieved by the removal of most mineral matter from coal either by physical or chemical methods can be annulled if poor coal combustibility characteristics are attained. In this work a high volatile bituminous coal with 6% ash content was subjected to chemical demineralisation via hydrofluoric and nitric acid leaching, the ash content of the clean coal was reduced to 0.3%. The original and treated coals were devolatilised in a drop tube furnace and the structure and morphology of the resultant chars was analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopies. The reactivity characteristics of the chars were studied by isothermal combustion tests in air at different temperatures in a thermogravimetric system. Comparison of the combustion behaviour and pollutant emissions of both coals was conducted in a drop tube furnace operating at 1000{sup o}C. The results of this work indicate that the char obtained from the chemically treated coal presents very different structure, morphology and reactivity behaviour than the char from the original coal. The changes induced by the chemical treatment increased the combustion efficiency determined in the drop tube furnace, in fact higher burnout levels were obtained for the demineralised coal.

  20. Field experience with KWU SG chemical cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odar, S.

    1989-01-01

    The ingress of corrosion products into PWR steam generators (SG's) their deposition and the subsequent concentration of salt impurities can induce a variety of mechanisms for corrosion attack on SG tubing. Already, some plants have had to replace their steam generators due to severe corrosion damage and others are seriously considering the same costly action in the near future. One of the most effective ways to counteract corrosion mechanisms and thus to reduce the likelihood of SG replacement becoming necessary is to clean the SG's and to keep them clean. For many years, the industry has been involved in developing different types of cleaning techniques. Among these, chemical cleaning has been shown to be especially effective. In this article, the KWU chemical cleaning process, for which there is considerable application experience, is described. The results of field applications will be presented together with material compatibility data and information on cleaning effectiveness. (author)

  1. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning, Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, S.

    1978-07-01

    United Nuclear Industries (UNI) entered into a subcontract with Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Ed) on August 8, 1977, for the purpose of developing methods to chemically clean the secondary side tube to tube support crevices of the steam generators of Indian Point Nos. 1 and 2 PWR plants. This document represents the first reporting on activities performed for Phase I of this effort. Specifically, this report contains the results of a literature search performed by UNI for the purpose of determining state-of-the-art chemical solvents and methods for decontaminating nuclear reactor steam generators. The results of the search sought to accomplish two objectives: (1) identify solvents beyond those proposed at present by UNI and Con Ed for the test program, and (2) confirm the appropriateness of solvents and methods of decontamination currently in use by UNI

  2. Three Mile Island Nuclear Station steam generator chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Three Mile Island-1 steam generators were chemically cleaned in 1991 by the B and W Nuclear Service Co. (BWNS). This secondary side cleaning was accomplished through application of the EPRI/SGOG (Electric Power Research Institute - Steam Generator Owners Group) chemical cleaning iron removal process, followed by sludge lancing. BWNS also performed on-line corrosion monitoring. Corrosion of key steam generator materials was low, and well within established limits. Liquid waste, subsequently processed by BWNS was less than expected. 7 tabs

  3. Effectuality of Cleaning Workers' Training and Cleaning Enterprises' Chemical Health Hazard Risk Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulqadir M. Suleiman

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Training of cleaning workers lacks the prerequisite for suitability and effectiveness to counter risks of chemical health hazards. There is dereliction of duty by management in the sector resulting in a lack of competence among the cleaning workers. Instituting acceptable easily attainable safety competence level for cleaners will conduce to risk reduction, and enforcement of attainment of the competence level would be a positive step.

  4. PROBIOTIC CLEANING PREPARATIONS VERSUS CHEMICAL DISINFECTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Luepcke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic detergents are increasingly used and are a real alternative for limiting the use of chemical cleaners, chemical disinfectants and antibiotics. They therefore have a great future because they contribute to animal health, to the hygienic production of food products of animal origin and to their harmlessness and to consumer health and environmental protection where they even have a beneficial effect on the microflora apart from chemical disinfectants that have a negative impact and destroy the beneficial microflora.

  5. EM-31 Alternative and Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Bill

    2010-01-01

    King's introduction to his presentation made 5 important points: (1) Numerous SRS tanks scheduled for closure (contract commitments); (2) Cannot remove all sludge by mechanical means due to obstructions; (3) Chemical removal technology needed (likely oxalic acid); (4) Post - dissolution neutralization required prior to transfer to compliant tanks; (5) Sodium oxalate salts precipitate on neutralization and have negative downstream impacts. There were three SRS chemical cleaning programs in 2010: Baseline: 8wt percent OA batch contact, ECC: 1-3 wt. percent OA with oxalate destruction, and the Alternative/Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (EM-31). This talk is on the EM-31 program.

  6. Contemporary technology of enrichment of kaolins of Angren deposit. II. Removal of impurities and whitening of kaolins: using electrophysical and chemical methods of cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivorotov, V.F.; Usmanov, ZH.M.; Fridman, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The contemporary methods of enrichment of Angren kaolins have been described. The electrophoresis and chemical whitening are demonstrated to be the most effective methods of scavenging. Application of ultrasonic dispersion, electrophoresis and chemical whitening methods allows one to obtain kaolin with whiteness ≅ 88% and content of iron oxides ≅ 0.4%. Using such kaolin as a sorbent at de coloration of plant oil have been shown good adsorption properties, meeting the level of world-wide standards for such class of materials. (authors)

  7. Oxalate Mass Balance During Chemical Cleaning in Tank 5F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 5F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate.

  8. Chemical cleaning's role in tube failure prevention and correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, K.J.; Dooley, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Properly applied, chemical cleaning is a valuable tool used to prevent tube failures involving overheating and corrosion due to waterside deposits. In many cases, however, cleaning becomes yet an additional cost associated with correction of tube failure incidents. Discussion is focused on approaches taken to appraise tube waterside cleanliness and determine the need to clean, as typically practiced in conventional fossil plants. Also presented is an assessment of the suitability and limitations of these approaches to plants with heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) units. (orig.)

  9. Chemical-cleaning process evaluation: Westinghouse steam generators. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, W.F.; Gockley, G.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG)/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Generator Secondary Side Chemical Cleaning Program, under develpment since 1978, has resulted in a generic process for the removal of accumulated corrosion products and tube deposits in the tube support plate crevices. The SGOG/EPRI Project S150-3 was established to obtain an evaluation of the generic process in regard to its applicability to Westinghouse steam generators. The results of the evaluation form the basis for recommendations for transferring the generic process to a plant specific application and identify chemical cleaning corrosion guidelines for the materials in Westinghouse Steam Generators. The results of the evaluation, recommendations for plant-specific applications and corrosion guidelines for chemical cleaning are presented in this report

  10. Effectuality of Cleaning Workers' Training and Cleaning Enterprises' Chemical Health Hazard Risk Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Abdulqadir M; Svendsen, Kristin V H

    2015-12-01

    Goal-oriented communication of risk of hazards is necessary in order to reduce risk of workers' exposure to chemicals. Adequate training of workers and enterprise priority setting are essential elements. Cleaning enterprises have many challenges and the existing paradigms influence the risk levels of these enterprises. Information on organization and enterprises' prioritization in training programs was gathered from cleaning enterprises. A measure of enterprises' conceptual level of importance of chemical health hazards and a model for working out the risk index (RI) indicating enterprises' conceptual risk level was established and used to categorize the enterprises. In 72.3% of cases, training takes place concurrently with task performances and in 67.4% experienced workers conduct the trainings. There is disparity between employers' opinion on competence level of the workers and reality. Lower conceptual level of importance was observed for cleaning enterprises of different sizes compared with regional safety delegates and occupational hygienists. Risk index values show no difference in risk level between small and large enterprises. Training of cleaning workers lacks the prerequisite for suitability and effectiveness to counter risks of chemical health hazards. There is dereliction of duty by management in the sector resulting in a lack of competence among the cleaning workers. Instituting acceptable easily attainable safety competence level for cleaners will conduce to risk reduction, and enforcement of attainment of the competence level would be a positive step.

  11. Screening of pollution control and clean-up materials for river chemical spills using the multiple case-based reasoning method with a difference-driven revision strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rentao; Jiang, Jiping; Guo, Liang; Shi, Bin; Liu, Jie; Du, Zhaolin; Wang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    In-depth filtering of emergency disposal technology (EDT) and materials has been required in the process of environmental pollution emergency disposal. However, an urgent problem that must be solved is how to quickly and accurately select the most appropriate materials for treating a pollution event from the existing spill control and clean-up materials (SCCM). To meet this need, the following objectives were addressed in this study. First, the material base and a case base for environment pollution emergency disposal were established to build a foundation and provide material for SCCM screening. Second, the multiple case-based reasoning model method with a difference-driven revision strategy (DDRS-MCBR) was applied to improve the original dual case-based reasoning model method system, and screening and decision-making was performed for SCCM using this model. Third, an actual environmental pollution accident from 2012 was used as a case study to verify the material base, case base, and screening model. The results demonstrated that the DDRS-MCBR method was fast, efficient, and practical. The DDRS-MCBR method changes the passive situation in which the choice of SCCM screening depends only on the subjective experience of the decision maker and offers a new approach to screening SCCM.

  12. Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Basic Studies Results FY09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2010-05-05

    Due to the need to close waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the effective removal of the heels. Oxalic acid is the preferred cleaning reagent for sludge heel dissolution, particularly for iron-based sludge, due to the strong complexing strength of the oxalate. However, the large quantity of oxalate added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based chemical cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acid systems may be required for specific waste components with low solubility in oxalic acid and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Solubility tests were conducted using non-radioactive, pure metal phases known to be the primary phases present in High Level Waste sludge. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phases gibbsite and boehmite and the iron phases magnetite and hematite. Hematite and boehmite are expected to be the most difficult iron and aluminum phases to dissolve. These mineral phases have been identified in both SRS and Hanford High Level Waste sludge. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that oxalic and sulfuric acids are more effective for the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. For boehmite, elevated temperature will be required to promote effective phase dissolution in the acids studied. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control using a supplemental proton source (additional acid) is critical for minimization of oxalic acid usage during the dissolution of hematite. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing hematite dissolution in oxalic acid and may explain the somewhat

  13. Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Basic Studies Results FY09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the need to close waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the effective removal of the heels. Oxalic acid is the preferred cleaning reagent for sludge heel dissolution, particularly for iron-based sludge, due to the strong complexing strength of the oxalate. However, the large quantity of oxalate added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based chemical cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acid systems may be required for specific waste components with low solubility in oxalic acid and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Solubility tests were conducted using non-radioactive, pure metal phases known to be the primary phases present in High Level Waste sludge. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phases gibbsite and boehmite and the iron phases magnetite and hematite. Hematite and boehmite are expected to be the most difficult iron and aluminum phases to dissolve. These mineral phases have been identified in both SRS and Hanford High Level Waste sludge. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that oxalic and sulfuric acids are more effective for the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. For boehmite, elevated temperature will be required to promote effective phase dissolution in the acids studied. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control using a supplemental proton source (additional acid) is critical for minimization of oxalic acid usage during the dissolution of hematite. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing hematite dissolution in oxalic acid and may explain the somewhat

  14. Service water chemical cleaning at River Bend gets results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, T.O.; Glover, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    The largest known Service Water System (SWS) chemical cleaning ever performed at a nuclear plant was successfully completed at, River Bend Station. Corrosion product buildup was observed during system inspections in the first operating cycle and the first refueling outage in 1987. Under deposit corrosion was followed with microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) occurring as a later stage under deposits. The heavy corrosion caused blockage of heat exchanger tubes, fouling of valve seats, and general flow blockage throughout the system. Various options were evaluated for restoring the SWS back to an acceptable long term operating condition. The large scale chemical cleaning performed arrested the corrosion by removing the deposits down to the bare metal surfaces and leaving behind a protective passivation layer. After the cleaning, the open recirculating SWS was converted to a closed system. The implementation of a molybdate/nitrate water treatment program with a copper corrosion inhibitor maintained at a high pH (8.5--10.5) has significantly reduced corrosion rates in the closed system. This should extend the life of the SWS piping for the remaining life of the plant. Several field tests were conducted to qualify the process and demonstrate its ability to achieve acceptable cleaning results prior to being used on a larger scale. In the summer of 1992, temporary and permanent modifications were installed to divide the SWS into two separate cleaning loops for the system wide cleaning. The SWS chemical was successfully performed and completed on schedule during the fourth refueling outage. Post cleaning inspections at various locations throughout the Service Water System showed the process to be very effective at complete deposit removal

  15. Laser paper cleaning: the method of cleaning historical books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekou, Evangelini; Tsilikas, Ioannis; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of cultural heritage treasures is the most important issue for transferring knowledge to the public through the next generation of students, academics, and researchers. Although this century is authenticating e-books and information by means of electronic text, still historical manuscripts as content as well as objects are the main original recourses of keeping a record of this transformation. The current work focuses on cleaning paper samples by the application of pulsed light, which is interventional. Experiments carried out using paper samples that are artificially colonized with Ulocladium chartarum. Paper is treated by Nd:YAG laser light. The available wavelength is 1064 nm, at various fluences, repetition rates and number of pulses. Two types of paper are stained with fungi colonies, which grow on substrates of clean paper, as well as on paper with ink text. The first type of paper is Whatman No.1056, which is closer to pure cellulose. The second type of paper is a page of a cultural heritage book published in 1926. Cleaning is performed using laser irradiation, thus defining the damage threshold of each sample. The treatment on paper Watman showed a yellowing, especially on areas with high concentration of fungi. The second sample was more durable to the exposure, performing the best results at higher fluences. Eventually, the paper samples are characterized, with optical microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses, prior to and after cleaning.

  16. Chemical cleaning as an essential part of steam generator asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, C.; Ammann, F.; Jones, D.; Evans, S.; Harper, K.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of deposits is intrinsic for the operation of Steam Generators in PWRs. Such depositions often lead to reduction of thermal performance, loss of component integrity and, in some cases to power restrictions. Accordingly removal of such deposits is an essential part of the asset management of the Steam Generators in a Nuclear Power Plant. Every plant has its individual condition, history and constraints which need to be considered when planning and performing a chemical cleaning. Typical points are: Sludge load amount and constitution of the deposits; Sludge distribution in the steam generator; Existing or expected corrosion problems; Amount and treatment possibilities for the waste generated. Depending on these points the strategy for chemical cleaning shall be evolved. The range of treatment starts with very soft cleanings with a removal of approx 100 kg per steam generator and goes to a full scale cleaning which can remove up to several thousand kilograms of deposits from a steam generator. Depending on the goal to be achieved and the steam generator present an adequate cleaning method shall be selected. Flexible and 'customizable' cleaning methods that can be adapted to the individual needs of a plant are therefore a must. Particular for the application of preventive cleanings where repeated or even regular application are intended, special focus has to be put on low corrosion and easy waste handling. Therefore AREVA has developed the 'C3' concept, Customized Chemical Cleaning concept. This concept covers the entire range of steam generator cleaning. Particular for the preventive maintenance cleanings processes with extreme low corrosion rates and easy waste handling are provided which make repeated applications safe and cost efficient. (author)

  17. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: solvent and process development. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Paasch, R.A.; Hall, T.M.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1979-01-01

    A program to demonstrate chemical cleaning methods for removing magnetite corrosion products from the annuli between steam generator tubes and the tube support plates in vertical U-tube steam generators is described. These corrosion products have caused steam generator tube ''denting'' and in some cases have caused tube failures and support plate cracking in several PWR generating plants. Laboratory studies were performed to develop a chemical cleaning solvent and application process for demonstration cleaning of the Indian Point Unit 2 steam generators. The chemical cleaning solvent and application process were successfully pilot-tested by cleaning the secondary side of one of the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Although the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators do not have a tube denting problem, the pilot test provided for testing of the solvent and process using much of the same equipment and facilities that would be used for the Indian Point Unit 2 demonstration cleaning. The chemical solvent selected for the pilot test was an inhibited 3% citric acid-3% ascorbic acid solution. The application process, injection into the steam generator through the boiler blowdown system and agitation by nitrogen sparging, was tested in a nuclear environment and with corrosion products formed during years of steam generator operation at power. The test demonstrated that the magnetite corrosion products in simulated tube-to-tube support plate annuli can be removed by chemical cleaning; that corrosion resulting from the cleaning is not excessive; and that steam generator cleaning can be accomplished with acceptable levels of radiation exposure to personnel

  18. Use of a fluorescent chemical as a quality indicator for a hospital cleaning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Jennifer; O'Neill, Cindy; Speziale, Paul; Revill, Jeff; Ramage, Lee; Ballantyne, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Hamilton Health Sciences is a large teaching hospital with over 1,000 beds and consists of three acute care sites, one Regional Cancer Center and two Rehabilitation/Chronic Care facilities. An environmental cleaning pilot project was initiated at the acute care Henderson site, following an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) due to antibiotic-resistant organisms are increasing in Southern Ontario. Environmental cleaning plays a key role in eradicating resistant organisms that live in hospital environments, thereby helping to reduce HAIs. The environmental cleaning practices on the Orthopaedic Unit were identified as a contributing factor to the VRE outbreak after visual assessments were completed using a Brevis GlitterBug product, a chemical that fluoresces under an ultraviolet (UV) lamp. These findings led to a hospital-wide cleaning improvement initiative on all units except critical care areas. The GlitterBug potion was employed by Infection Control and Customer Support Services (CSS) as a tool to evaluate the daily cleaning of patient washrooms as well as discharge cleaning of contact precaution isolation rooms. Over a four-week period, the GlitterBug potion was applied to seven frequently touched standard targets in randomly selected patient bathrooms on each unit and 14 frequently touched targets prior to cleaning in the rooms used for isolation. The targets were then evaluated using the UV lamp to detect objects that were not cleaned and the results were recorded on a standardized form. The rate of targets cleaned versus the targets missed was calculated. The overall rate for daily cleaning of bathrooms and cleaning of isolation rooms was poor with only 23% of the targets cleaned. Based on these findings, several interventions were implemented. This resulted in a significant improvement in cleaning practices during the pilot project. Greater than 80% of the targets were cleaned compared to the baseline

  19. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Nucleation as a Novel Cleaning Method for Sodium Alginate Fouling Removal from Reverse Osmosis Membranes desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Heba

    2017-01-01

    in foulants aggregates formation. Although there are some physical techniques that can maintain the membrane performance without reducing its lifetime, only chemical cleanings are still commonly used in RO plants. In this study, a novel cleaning method

  1. Chemical cleaning of steam generators: application to Nogent 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiquet, J.M.; Veysset, J.P.; Esteban, L.; Saurin, P.

    1991-01-01

    EDF has patented a chemical cleaning process for PWR steam generators, based on the use of a mixture or organic acids in order to dissolve iron oxides and copper with a single solution and clean dented crevices. Qualification tests have permitted to demonstrate effectiveness of the solution and its innocuousness related to steam generator materials. The process, the licence of which belongs to SOMAFER RA and Framatome has been implemented in France at Nogent. The goal was to dissolve iron oxides allowing metallic particles, aggregated on the tubesheet, to be released and mechanically removed. The effectiveness was satisfactory and this treatment is to be extended to other units. (author)

  2. Chemical cleaning of PWR steam generators: application at Nogent 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiquet, J.M.; Veysset, J.P.; Esteban, L.; Saurin, P.

    1990-01-01

    EDF has developed and patented a chemical cleaning process for PWR steam generators, based on the use of a mixture of organic acids in order to: - dissolve iron oxides and copper with a single solution; - clean dented crevices. Qualification tests have permitted to demonstrate effectiveness of the solution and its inocuousness related to steam generator materials. The process, the license of which belongs to SOMAFER R.A. and FRAMATOME, has been implemented in France at Nogent. The goal was to dissolve iron oxides allowing metallic particles, aggregated on the tubesheet, to be released and mechanically removed. The effectiveness was satisfactory and this treatment is to be extended to other units [fr

  3. CHEMICAL CLEANING OF NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANES FOULED BY ORGANIC MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLENE C. H. KOO

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Membrane fouling is a term to describe non-integral substance on membrane surface which results in rapid decline of permeation flux and deteriorate the performance of membrane. Chemical cleaning agents especially like alkaline cleaners are most widely employed to restore the membrane performance. This research mainly investigated the potential use of sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl as the chemical cleaning agents to restore the permeate flux of organically fouled nanofiltration (NF membranes under varying applied pressure and flow condition. The performances of the cleaning protocols were quantified using flux recovery and resistance removal. The results demonstrated that NaOCl is more effective than NaOH. This observation is also in line with FTIR analysis in which the transmittance intensity showed by FTIR spectra of NaOCl is higher than that of NaOH. The results also reported that higher flux recovery and resistance removal were achieved when the fouled NF membranes were cleaned with higher concentration of chemical agents and applied pressure. However, the improvements of flux recovery and resistance removal by increasing the applied pressure were found insignificant at higher applied pressure range (16 to 18 bar than the lower applied pressure range (i.e. 12 to 14 bar. This research plays an important role by identifying the key parameters that could restore the flux of organically fouled NF membranes significantly.

  4. Steam Generator Chemical Cleaning Application: Korean Experience in PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In-Ho; Varrin-Jr, Robert-D.; Little, Michael-J.; Oh, Yeon-Ok; Choo, Seong-Jib; Park, Jin-Hyeok

    2012-09-01

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) performed an EPRI/SGOG chemical cleaning of the secondary side of the steam generators at Ulchin Unit 3 (UCN3) in March 2011 and at Ulchin Unit 4 (UCN4) in September 2011. The steam generator chemical cleaning (SGCC) was performed with venting at the top-of-tube sheet (TTS) and at tube support plates (TSPs) 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. A primary objective of this SGCC was to address outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC), which has been observed at the TTS and TSPs in the UCN3 SGs. The EPRI/SGOG process has been shown to effectively reduce prevailing ODSCC rates at the TTS and TSPs, particularly when applied with periodic venting in this application. This was the first full-length SGCC campaign with venting performed in Korea. Ulchin Unit 3 commenced commercial operation in August 1998 and Ulchin Unit 4 commenced commercial operation in December 1999. UCN3 and UCN4 are a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) of the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP) design. The SGs contain high-temperature mill annealed (HTMA) Alloy 600 tubing and are similar in design to the Combustion Engineering CE-80. The KSNP SGs have been susceptible to outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC), which is consistent with operating experience for other SGs containing Alloy 600HTMA tubing material. The UCN3/4 SGs have recently begun to experience ODSCC. Hankook Jungsoo Industries Co., Ltd (HaJI) was selected as the cleaning vendor by KHNP. To date, HaJI has completed five Advanced Scale Conditioning Agent (ASCA) cleaning applications and two EPRI/SGOG Steam Generator Chemical Cleaning (SGCC) campaigns for KHNP. The goal of total deposit removal of the applications were successfully achieved and the amounts are 3,579 kg at UCN3 and 3,786 kg at UCN4 which values were estimated before each cleaning by analysing ECT signal and liquid samples from the SGs. The deposits from the SGs were primarily composed of magnetite. There were no chemical

  5. The AREVA customized chemical cleaning C3-concept as part of the steam generator asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Steffen; Drexler, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    In pressurized water reactors corrosion products and impurities are transported into the steam generators by feed water. Corrosion products and impurities are accumulated in the SGs as deposits and scales on the tubes, the tube support structures and the tube sheet. Depending on the location, the composition and the morphology such deposits may negatively affect the performance of the steam generators by reducing the thermal performance, changing the flow patterns and producing localized corrosion promoting conditions. Accordingly removal of deposits or deposit minimization strategies are an essential part of the asset management program of the steam generators in Nuclear Power Plants. It is evident that such a program is plant specific, depending on the individual condition prevailing. Parameters to be considered are for example: - Steam generator and balance of plant design; - Secondary side water chemistry treatment; - Deposit amount and constitution; - Deposit distribution in the steam generator; - Existing or expected corrosion problems. After evaluation of the steam generator condition a strategy for deposit minimization has to be developed. Depending on the individual situation such strategies may span from curative full scale cleanings which are capable of removing the entire sludge inventory in the range of several 1000 kg per SG to preventive cleanings that remove only a portion of the deposits in the range of several 100 kg per SG. But also other goals depending on the specific plant situation, like tube sheet sludge piles or hard scale removal, may be considered. Beside the chemical cleaning process itself also the integration of the process into the outage schedule and considerations about its impact on other maintenance activities is of great importance. It is obvious that all these requirements cannot be met easily by a standardized cleaning method, thus a customisable chemical cleaning technology is required. Based on its comprehensive experience

  6. Steam generator secondary side chemical cleaning at Gentilly-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plante, S.

    2006-01-01

    After more than 20 years of operation, the secondary side of the four steam generators at Gentilly-2 were chemically cleaned during the 2005 annual outage. The FRAMATOME ANP high temperature cleaning process used to remove magnetite loading involved stepwise injection of solvent with PHT temperature in the range 160 o C to 175 o C. The heat required to maintain the PHT temperature was provided by the operation of the main PHT pumps and the reactor core residual heat. The temperature control was accomplished by the shutdown cooling system heat exchangers. A total of 1280 kg of magnetite was removed from the four steam generators. A copper-cleaning step was applied after the iron step. The PHT has been cooled down and the steam generators drained to temporary tanks and dried in preparation of the copper step. The process has been applied at room temperature, two boilers at a time. The solvent removed a total of 116 kg of copper. During the iron step, steam flow to the feedwater tank chemically contaminate the Balance Of Plant (BOP) systems. The isolation of this path should have been part of the G2 procedures. Around 700 m3 of water had to be drained to interim storage tanks for subsequent resin treatment before disposal. Visual inspection of BO1 tubesheet and first support plate showed clean surfaces without measurable sludge pile. Upper support plates visual inspection of BO4 revealed that broach holes blockage reported in 2000 is still present in peripheral area. Following the plant restart, the medium range level measurement instability observed since several years for BO3 was no more present. As anticipated, it also has been observed that the medium and wide range level measurements have shifted down as a result of downcomer flow increase after the cleaning. The cleaning objectives were achieved regarding the fouling reduction on the steam generators secondary side but broach holes blockage of the upper support plate is still present in periphery. (author)

  7. Efficient methods of nanoimprint stamp cleaning based on imprint self-cleaning effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Fantao; Chu Jinkui [Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 Dalian (China); Luo Gang; Zhou Ye; Carlberg, Patrick; Heidari, Babak [Obducat AB, SE-20125 Malmoe (Sweden); Maximov, Ivan; Montelius, Lars; Xu, H Q [Division of Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Lars, E-mail: ivan.maximov@ftf.lth.se [Department of Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University, Box 117, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-05-06

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a nonconventional lithographic technique that promises low-cost, high-throughput patterning of structures with sub-10 nm resolution. Contamination of nanoimprint stamps is one of the key obstacles to industrialize the NIL technology. Here, we report two efficient approaches for removal of typical contamination of particles and residual resist from stamps: thermal and ultraviolet (UV) imprinting cleaning-both based on the self-cleaning effect of imprinting process. The contaminated stamps were imprinted onto polymer substrates and after demolding, they were treated with an organic solvent. The images of the stamp before and after the cleaning processes show that the two cleaning approaches can effectively remove contamination from stamps without destroying the stamp structures. The contact angles of the stamp before and after the cleaning processes indicate that the cleaning methods do not significantly degrade the anti-sticking layer. The cleaning processes reported in this work could also be used for substrate cleaning.

  8. Methods of industrial waste water cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Brehuv

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The issue of „acid mine water“ (or AMD is well known in the world for some centuries. In the Eastern Slovakia, the most acid surface water occurs in the area of the old mine Smolník, which is closed and submerged for 15 years. The submitted contribution deals with the sulphateelimination at this locality. Recently, several methods of the sulphate-elimination from the mine water are applied. The best-known methods are the biological and physical-chemical oness and the chemical precipitation. The method described in this contribution deals with the chemical precipitation by polyaluminium chloride and calcium hydrate. By appliying of this method, very interesting results were obtained. The amount of SO42- anions decreased to almost zero-value, using optimal doses of the chemical reagents.

  9. Modified cleaning method for biomineralized components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hideto; Jordan, Richard W.

    2018-02-01

    The extraction and concentration of biomineralized components from sediment or living materials is time consuming and laborious and often involves steps that remove either the calcareous or siliceous part, in addition to organic matter. However, a relatively quick and easy method using a commercial cleaning fluid for kitchen drains, sometimes combined with a kerosene soaking step, can produce remarkable results. In this study, the method is applied to sediments and living materials bearing calcareous (e.g., coccoliths, foraminiferal tests, holothurian ossicles, ichthyoliths, and fish otoliths) and siliceous (e.g., diatom valves, silicoflagellate skeletons, and sponge spicules) components. The method preserves both components in the same sample, without etching or partial dissolution, but is not applicable to unmineralized components such as dinoflagellate thecae, tintinnid loricae, pollen, or plant fragments.

  10. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively

  11. Review of cleaning techniques and their effects on the chemical composition of foliar samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini Oliva, S.; Raitio, H.

    2003-07-01

    Chemical foliar analysis is a tool widely used to study tree nutrition and to monitor the impact and extent of air pollutants. This paper reviews a number of cleaning methods, and the effects of cleaning on foliar chemistry. Cleaning may include mechanical techniques such as the use of dry or moistened tissues, shaking, blowing, and brushing, or use various washing techniques with water or other solvents. Owing to the diversity of plant species, tissue differences, etc., there is no standard procedure for all kinds of samples. Analysis of uncleaned leaves is considered a good method for assessing the degree of air contamination because it provides an estimate of the element content of the deposits on leaf surfaces or when the analysis is aimed at the investigation of transfer of elements along the food chain. Sample cleaning is recommended in order (1) to investigate the transfer rate of chemical elements from soil to plants, (2) to qualify the washoff of dry deposition from foliage and (3) to separate superficially absorbed and biomass-incorporated elements. Since there is not a standard cleaning procedure for all kinds of samples and aims, it is advised to conduct a pilot study in order to be able to establish a cleaning procedure to provide reliable foliar data. (orig.)

  12. Qualification test of chemical cleaning for secondary side of steam generator in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Zhang Shufeng; Yu Jinghua; Hou Shufeng

    1997-07-01

    The chemical cleaning technique for removing sludge on the secondary side in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant has been qualified. The chemical cleaning process will carry out during shutdown refuelling. The qualification test has studied the effect of chemical cleaning agent component, cleaning time on dissolution effectiveness of sludge (Fe 3 O 4 ) and to evaluate corrosion situation of main materials of SG in the cleaning process. The main component of cleaning agent is EDTA. The cleaning temperature is 20∼30 degree C. It is determined that allowable remains amount of cleaning agent (EDTA). The technique of cleaning, rinse, passivation for the chemical cleaning in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant has been made. The qualification test shown that the technique can dissolve Fe 3 O 4 >1 g/L, the corrosion of materials is in allowable value, the allowable remains of EDTA is <0.01%. The technique character is static, ambient temperature. (9 refs., 12 tabs.)

  13. Chemical cleaning/disinfection and ageing of organic UF membranes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regula, C; Carretier, E; Wyart, Y; Gésan-Guiziou, G; Vincent, A; Boudot, D; Moulin, P

    2014-06-01

    Membrane separation processes have become a basic unit operation for process design and product development. These processes are used in a variety of separation and concentration steps, but in all cases, the membranes must be cleaned regularly to remove both organic and inorganic material deposited on the surface and/or into the membrane bulk. Cleaning/disinfection is a vital step in maintaining the permeability and selectivity of the membrane in order to get the plant to its original capacity, to minimize risks of bacteriological contamination, and to make acceptable products. For this purpose, a large number of chemical cleaning/disinfection agents are commercially available. In general, these cleaning/disinfection agents have to improve the membrane flux to a certain extent. However, they can also cause irreversible damages in membrane properties and performances over the long term. Until now, there is considerably less literature dedicated to membrane ageing than to cleaning/disinfection. The knowledge in cleaning/disinfection efficiency has recently been improved. But in order to develop optimized cleaning/disinfection protocols there still remains a challenge to better understand membrane ageing. In order to compensate for the lack of correlated cleaning/disinfection and ageing data from the literature, this paper investigates cleaning/disinfection efficiencies and ageing damages of organic ultrafiltration membranes. The final aim is to provide less detrimental cleaning/disinfection procedures and to propose some guidelines which should have been taken into consideration in term of membrane ageing studies. To carry out this study, this article will detail the background of cleaning/disinfection and aging membrane topics in a first introductive part. In a second part, key factors and endpoints of cleaning/disinfection and aging membranes will be discussed deeply: the membrane role and the cleaning parameters roles, such as water quality, storing conditions

  14. Apparatuses, Systems and Methods for Cleaning Photovoltaic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Eitelhuber, Georg

    2013-02-14

    Embodiments of solar panel cleaning apparatuses, solar panel cleaning systems, and solar panel cleaning methods are disclosed. In certain embodiments, the disclosed solar panel cleaning apparatuses, systems and methods do may not require any water or other cleaning liquids in the whole cleaning process, which makes them prominent well suited in for water-deficit environments such as deserts. In one embodiment, the solar panel cleaning apparatus comprises one or more rotatable brushes each having a rotational axis and a drive configured to move each of the one or more rotatable brushes in a direction that is not perpendicular to the rotational axis. The solar panel cleaning apparatus is may be configured such that the angle of the rotational axis of at least one of the one or more rotatable brushes is adjustable relative to the direction of travel.

  15. Power generation from chemically cleaned coals: do environmental benefits of firing cleaner coal outweigh environmental burden of cleaning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Morten W.; Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Laurent, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Power generation from high-ash coals is a niche technology for power generation, but coal cleaning is deemed necessary to avoid problems associated with low combustion efficiencies and to minimize environmental burdens associated with emissions of pollutants originating from ash. Here, chemical...... beneficiation of coals using acid and alkali–acid leaching procedures is evaluated as a potential coal cleaning technology employing life cycle assessment (LCA). Taking into account the environmental benefits from firing cleaner coal in pulverized coal power plants and the environmental burden of the cleaning...... itself, it is demonstrated that for a wide range of cleaning procedures and types of coal, chemical cleaning generally performs worse than combustion of the raw coals and physical cleaning using dense medium separation. These findings apply for many relevant impact categories, including climate change...

  16. Influence of wet chemical cleaning on quantum efficiency of GaN photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiao-Hui; Gao Pin; Wang Hong-Gang; Li Biao; Chang Ben-Kang

    2013-01-01

    GaN samples 1–3 are cleaned by a 2:2:1 solution of sulfuric acid (98%) to hydrogen peroxide (30%) to de-ionized water; hydrochloric acid (37%); or a 4:1 solution of sulfuric acid (98%) to hydrogen peroxide (30%). The samples are activated by Cs/O after the same annealing process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy after the different ways of wet chemical cleaning shows: sample 1 has the largest proportion of Ga, N, and O among the three samples, while its C content is the lowest. After activation the quantum efficiency curves show sample 1 has the best photocathode performance. We think the wet chemical cleaning method is a process which will mainly remove C contamination. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase I: Final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Two chemical cleaning solvent systems and two application methods were developed to remove the sludge in nuclear steam generators and to remove the corrosion products in the annuli between the steam generator tubes and the support plates. Laboratory testing plus subsequent pilot testing has demonstrated that, in a reasonable length of time, both solvents are capable of dissolving significant amounts of sludge, and of dissolving tightly packed magnetite in tube/support plate crevices. Further, tests have demonstrated that surface losses of the materials of construction in steam generators can be controlled to acceptable limits for the duration of the required cleaning period. Areas requiring further study and test have been identified, and a preliminary procedure for chemical cleaning nuclear steam generators has been chosen subject to quantification based on additional tests prior to actual in-plant demonstration

  18. The impact of chemical cleaning on separation efficiency and properties of reverse osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Baatiyyah, Hani

    2018-04-01

    surface. The experimental results showed that both the physical and chemical surface properties of the membranes do not significantly alter under standard industrial conditions. These results shed some light on the effects of chemical cleaning in a pilot-scale RO plant and improve our understanding to provide a potential research direction for cleaning methods of membranes.

  19. Method of cleaning pipeline in control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Mikiya.

    1993-01-01

    A step of filtering cleaning water by a provisional filter unit and a step of returning filtered cleaning water to a provisional tank are disposed. That is, purified water is stored in the provisional tank and it is sucked by a driving pump under pressure by way of a suction filter into the pipelines in a control rod drive system to clean them. Purified water after the cleaning is filtered by the provisional filter unit and returned to the provisional tank by way of provisional pipelines to form a closed loop. A great amount of purified water to be used is no more necessary by thus changing the water passing cleaning method to the recycling cleaning method, which moderate influences on other steps using purified water and ensure a cleaning step for pipelines in a CRD system, in addition, save the steps for plant construction greatly. (N.H.)

  20. Decrudding and chemical cleaning of carbon steel components - an evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaonkar, K.B.; Elayathu, N.S.D.; Shibad, P.R.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    Corrosion and accumulation of corrosion products on the surfaces of structural components and plant equipments can cause se vereoperational problems during service. An illustration is the heat exchanger systems in nuclear power stations. Development and standardisation of appropriate chemical cleaning and decontamination procedures and their evaluation hence merit serious consideration. A number of chemical cleaning procedures using formulations based on hydrochloric and citric acid solutions have been examined to study their crud dissolving and derusting ability in addition to the attack on base material. The compositions were chosen: (1) along with complexing agents EDTA and ammonium citrate, (2) with pH control, and (3) with the use of inhibitors acridine, rhodine, hexamine and phenyl-thiourea. The evaluations have been made at 28 and 60 deg C. Rusted carbon steel coupons having a rust of 10-12 mg/cm 2 on the surface have been used for the purpose of the above evaluations. Data on corrosion rates of monel and cupronickel (70:30) in the descaling solutions have also been presented. Results on the above evaluation studies have been discussed. (author)

  1. Carbon steel corrosion prevention during chemical cleaning of steam generator secondary side components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulger, M.; Lucan, D.; Velciu, L.

    2009-01-01

    therefore added to protect them. For this purpose, experiments were conducted on two organic corrosion inhibitors added in the solvent based on EDTA, citric acid and hydrazine. Efficiency of corrosion inhibitors was determined by the same surface analysis methods. Also electrochemical measurements (potentiodynamic analysis, free corrosion potential measurement) were performed to assess the efficiency of inhibitors added in chemical cleaning solutions. The results showed a good agreement of samples corrosion behavior estimated by weight losses and by electrochemical methods. (authors)

  2. Development of contaminated concrete removing system 'Clean cut method'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Takehiko; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Funakawa, Naoyoshi; Idemura, Hajime; Sakashita, Fumio; Tajitsu, Yoshiteru

    1989-01-01

    In the case of decommissioning nuclear facilities such as nuclear power stations, nuclear fuel facilities and RI handling facilities and carrying out reconstruction works, if there is radioactive contamination on the surfaces of concrete structures such as the floors and walls of the buildings for nuclear facilities, it must be removed. Since concrete is porous, contamination infiltrates into the inside of concrete, and the wiping of surfaces only or chemical decontamination cannot remove it, therefore in most cases, contaminated concrete must be removed. The removal of concrete surfaces has been carried out with chipping hammers, grinders and so on, but many problems arise due to it. In order to solve these problems, the mechanical cutting method was newly devised, and clean cut method (CCRS) was completed. The depth of cutting from concrete surface is set beforehand, and the part to be removed is accurately cut, at the same time, the concrete powder generated is collected nearly perfectly, and recovered into a drum. The outline of the method and the constitution of the system, the features of the clean cut method, the development of the technology for cutting concrete and the technology for recovering concrete powder, and the test of verifying decontamination are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Carbon dioxide nucleation as a novel cleaning method for ultrafiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ghamdi, Mohanned

    2016-12-08

    The use of low-pressure membranes, mainly ultrafiltration (UF), has emerged in the last decade and began to show acceptance as a novel pretreatment process for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination. This is mainly due to the superior water quality provided by these membranes, in addition to reduction in chemicals consumption compared to conventional methods. However, membrane fouling remains the main drawback of this technology. Therefore, frequent cleaning of these membranes is required to maintain water flux and its quality. Usually, after a series of backwash using UF permeate chemical cleaning is required under some conditions to fully recover the operating flux. Frequent chemical cleaning will probably decrease the life time of the membrane, increase costs, and will have some effects on the environment. The new cleaning method proposed in this study consists of using a solution saturated with carbon dioxide (CO2) to clean UF membranes. Under the drop in pressure, this solution will become in a supersaturated state and bubbles will start to nucleate on the surface of the membrane and its pores from this solution resulting in the removal of the fouling material deposited on the membrane. Different compositions of fouling solutions including the use of organic compounds such as sodium alginate and colloidal 5 silica with different concentrations were studied using synthetic seawater with different concentrations. This cleaning method was then compared to the backwash using Milli-Q water and showed an improved performance compared to it. An operational modification to this cleaning technique was then investigated which includs a series of sudden pressure drop during the backwash process. This enhanced technique showed an even better performance in cleaning the membrane, especially at severe fouling conditions. In most cases, the membrane permeability was fully recovered even at harsh conditions where conventional backwash failed to maintain a stable

  4. ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: BASIC STUDIES RESULTS FY2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W.; Hay, M.

    2011-01-24

    In an effort to develop and optimize chemical cleaning methods for the removal of sludge heels from High Level Waste tanks, solubility tests have been conducted using nonradioactive, pure metal phases. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phase gibbsite and the iron phases hematite, maghemite, goethite, lepidocrocite, magnetite, and wustite. Many of these mineral phases have been identified in radioactive, High Level Waste sludge at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids and a variety of other complexing organic acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that mixtures of oxalic acid with either nitric or sulfuric acid are the most effective cleaning solutions for the dissolution of the primary metal phases in sludge waste. Based on the results, optimized conditions for hematite dissolution in oxalic acid were selected using nitric or sulfuric acid as a supplemental proton source. Electrochemical corrosion studies were also conducted (reported separately; Wiersma, 2010) with oxalic/mineral acid mixtures to evaluate the effects of these solutions on waste tank integrity. The following specific conclusions can be drawn from the test results: (1) Oxalic acid was shown to be superior to all of the other organic acids evaluated in promoting the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. (2) All iron phases showed similar solubility trends in oxalic acid versus pH, with hematite exhibiting the lowest solubility and the slowest dissolution. (3) Greater than 90% hematite dissolution occurred in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures within one week for two hematite sources and within three weeks for a third hematite sample with a larger average particle size. This dissolution rate appears acceptable for waste tank cleaning applications. (4) Stoichiometric dissolution of iron phases in oxalic acid (based on the oxalate concentration) and the formation of the preferred 1:1 Fe to oxalate complex

  5. Processing method for cleaning water waste from cement kneader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Kenzo; Fujita, Hisao; Nakajima, Tadashi.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of processing cleaning water wastes from a cement kneader in a case of processing liquid wastes containing radioactive wastes or deleterious materials such as heavy metals by means of cement solidification. Cleaning waste wastes from the kneader are sent to a cleaning water waste tank, in which gentle stirring is applied near the bottom and sludges are retained so as not to be coagulated. Sludges retained at the bottom of the cleaning water waste tank are sent after elapse of a predetermined time and then kneaded with cements. Thus, since the sludges in the cleaning water are solidified with cement, inhomogenous solidification products consisting only of cleaning sludges with low strength are not formed. The resultant solidification product is homogenous and the compression strength thereof reaches such a level as capable of satisfying marine disposal standards required for the solidification products of radioactive wastes. (I.N.)

  6. REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OPTIONS FOR SRS WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; Koopman, D.

    2009-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to support the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (AECC) for sludge heel removal funded as part of the EM-21 Engineering and Technology program. The goal was to identify potential technologies or enhancements to the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process for chemically dissolving or mobilizing Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge heels. The issues with the potentially large volume of oxalate solids generated from the baseline process have driven an effort to find an improved or enhanced chemical cleaning technology for the tank heels. This literature review builds on a previous review conducted in 2003. A team was charged with evaluating the information in these reviews and developing recommendations of alternative technologies to pursue. The new information in this report supports the conclusion of the previous review that oxalic acid remains the chemical cleaning agent of choice for dissolving the metal oxides and hydroxides found in sludge heels in carbon steel tanks. The potential negative impact of large volumes of sodium oxalate on downstream processes indicates that the amount of oxalic acid used for chemical cleaning needs to be minimized as much as possible or the oxalic acid must be destroyed prior to pH adjustment in the receipt tank. The most straightforward way of minimizing the volume of oxalic acid needed for chemical cleaning is through more effective mechanical cleaning. Using a mineral acid to adjust the pH of the sludge prior to adding oxalic acid may also help to minimize the volume of oxalic acid used in chemical cleaning. If minimization of oxalic acid proves insufficient in reducing the volume of oxalate salts, several methods were found that could be used for oxalic acid destruction. For some waste tank heels, another acid or even caustic treatment (or pretreatment) might be more appropriate than the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process. Caustic treatment of high

  7. Shoreline clean-up methods : biological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoura, S.T. [Oil Spill Response Limited, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The cleanup of oil spills in shoreline environments is a challenging issue worldwide. Oil spills receive public and media attention, particularly in the event of a coastal impact. It is important to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of cleanup methods when defining the level of effort and consequences that are appropriate to remove or treat different types of oil on different shoreline substrates. Of the many studies that have compared different mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for their effectiveness on various types of oil, biological techniques have received the most attention. For that reason, this paper evaluated the effectiveness and effects of shoreline cleanup methods using biological techniques. It summarized data from field experiments and oil spill incidents, including the Exxon Valdez, Sea Empress, Prestige, Grand Eagle, Nakhodka, Guanabara Bay and various Gulf war oil spills. Five major shoreline types were examined, notably rocky intertidal, cobble/pebble/gravel, sand/mud, saltmarsh, and mangrove/sea-grass. The biological techniques that were addressed were nutrient enrichment, hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria, vegetable oil biosolvents, plants, surf washing, oil-particle interactions and natural attenuation. The study considered the oil type, volume and fate of stranded oil, location of coastal materials, extent of pollution and the impact of biological techniques. The main factors that affect biodegradation of hydrocarbons are the volume, chemical composition and weathering state of the petroleum product as well as the temperature, oxygen availability of nutrients, water salinity, pH level, water content, and microorganisms in the shoreline environment. The interaction of these factors also affect the biodegradation of oil. It was concluded that understanding the fate of stranded oil can help in the development of techniques that improve the weathering and degradation of oil on complex shoreline substrates. 39 refs.

  8. Effectiveness of bone cleaning process using chemical and entomology approaches: time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Poh Soon; Khoo, Lay See; Mohd Hilmi, Saidin; Ahmad Hafizam, Hasmi; Mohd Shah, Mahmood; Nurliza, Abdullah; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal examination is an important aspect of forensic pathology practice, requiring effective bone cleaning with minimal artefact. This study was conducted to compare between chemical and entomology methods of bone cleaning. Ten subjects between 20 and 40 years old who underwent uncomplicated medico-legal autopsies at the Institute of Forensic Medicine Malaysia were randomly chosen for this descriptive cross sectional study. The sternum bone was divided into 4 parts, each part subjected to a different cleaning method, being two chemical approaches i.e. laundry detergent and a combination of 6% hydrogen peroxide and powder sodium bicarbonate and two entomology approaches using 2nd instar maggots of Chrysomyia rufifacies and Ophyra spinigera. A scoring system for grading the outcome of cleaning was used. The effectiveness of the methods was evaluated based on average weight reduction per day and median number of days to achieve the average score of less than 1.5 within 12 days of the bone cleaning process. Using maggots was the most time-effective and costeffective method, achieving an average weight reduction of 1.4 gm per day, a median of 11.3 days to achieve the desired score and an average cost of MYR 4.10 per case to reach the desired score within 12 days. This conclusion was supported by blind validation by forensic specialists achieving a 77.8% preference for maggots. Emission scanning electron microscopy evaluation also revealed that maggots especially Chrysomyia rufifacies preserved the original condition of the bones better allowing improved elucidation of bone injuries in future real cases.

  9. A study on the chemical cleaning process and its qualification test by eddy current testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ki Seok; Cheon, Keun Young; Nam, Min Woo [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyoung Mahn [UMI Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Steam Generator (SG) tube, as a barrier isolating the primary coolant system from the secondary side of nuclear power plants (NPP), must maintain the structural integrity for the public safety and their efficient power generation. So, SG tubes are subject to the periodic examination and the repairs if needed so that any defective tubes are not in service. Recently, corrosion related degradations were detected in the tubes of the domestic OPR-1000 NPP, as a form of axially oriented outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC). According to the studies on the factors causing the heat fouling as well as developing corrosion cracking, densely scaled deposits on the secondary side of the SG tubes are mainly known to be problematic causing the adverse impacts against the soundness of the SG tubes. Therefore, the processes of various cleaning methods efficiently to dissolve and remove the deposits have been applied as well as it is imperative to maintain the structural integrity of the tubes after exposing to the cleaning agent. So qualification test (QT) should be carried out to assess the perfection of the chemical cleaning and QT is to apply the processes and to do ECT. In this paper, the chemical cleaning processes to dissolve and remove the scaled deposits are introduced and results of ECT on the artificial crack specimens to determine the effectiveness of those processes are represented.

  10. Standard Test Method for Preparing Aircraft Cleaning Compounds, Liquid Type, Water Base, for Storage Stability Testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the stability in storage, of liquid, water-base chemical cleaning compounds, used to clean the exterior surfaces of aircraft. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. A study of drying and cleaning methods used in preparation for fluorescent penetrant inspection - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasche, L.; Lopez, R.; Larson, B.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection is the most widely used method for aerospace components such as critical rotating components of gas turbine engines. Successful use of FPI begins with a clean and dry part, followed by a carefully controlled and applied FPI process, and conscientious inspection by well trained personnel. A variety of cleaning methods are in use for cleaning of titanium and nickel parts with selection based on the soils or contamination to be removed. Cleaning methods may include chemical or mechanical methods with sixteen different types studied as part of this program. Several options also exist for use in drying parts prior to FPI. Samples were generated and exposed to a range of conditions to study the effect of both drying and cleaning methods on the flaw response of FPI. Low cycle fatigue (LCF) cracks were generated in approximately 40 nickel and 40 titanium samples for evaluation of the various cleaning methods. Baseline measurements were made for each of the samples using a photometer to measure sample brightness and a UVA videomicroscope to capture digital images of the FPI indications. Samples were exposed to various contaminants, cleaned and inspected. Brightness measurements and digital images were also taken to compare to the baseline data. A comparison of oven drying to flash dry in preparation for FPI has been completed and will be reported in Part I. Comparison of the effectiveness of various cleaning methods for the contaminants will be presented in Part II. The cleaning and drying studies were completed in cooperation with Delta Airlines using cleaning, drying and FPI processes typical of engine overhaul processes and equipment. The work was completed as part of the Engine Titanium Consortium and included investigators from Honeywell, General Electric, Pratt and Whitney, and Rolls Royce

  12. A study of drying and cleaning methods used in preparation for fluorescent penetrant inspection - Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasche, L.; Lopez, R.; Larson, B.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection is the most widely used method for aerospace components such as critical rotating components of gas turbine engines. Successful use of FPI begins with a clean and dry part, followed by a carefully controlled and applied FPI process, and conscientious inspection by well trained personnel. A variety of cleaning methods are in use for cleaning of titanium and nickel parts with selection based on the soils or contamination to be removed. Cleaning methods may include chemical or mechanical methods with sixteen different types studied as part of this program. Several options also exist for use in drying parts prior to FPI. Samples were generated and exposed to a range of conditions to study the effect of both drying and cleaning methods on the flaw response of FPI. Low cycle fatigue (LCF) cracks were generated in approximately 40 nickel and 40 titanium samples for evaluation of the various cleaning methods. Baseline measurements were made for each of the samples using a photometer to measure sample brightness and a UVA videomicroscope to capture digital images of the FPI indications. Samples were exposed to various contaminants, cleaned and inspected. Brightness measurements and digital images were also taken to compare to the baseline data. A comparison of oven drying to flash dry in preparation for FPI has been completed and will be reported in Part I. Comparison of the effectiveness of various cleaning methods for the contaminants will be presented in Part II. The cleaning and drying studies were completed in cooperation with Delta Airlines using cleaning, drying and FPI processes typical of engine overhaul processes and equipment. The work was completed as part of the Engine Titanium Consortium and included investigators from Honeywell, General Electric, Pratt and Whitney, and Rolls Royce

  13. On-line chemical cleaning of pipelines; Limpieza quimica de ductos en linea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Michael Brent [Brenntag Stinnes Logistics, Muelheim/Ruhr (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The concern of efficiency and maintenance in the pipeline industry, due to fluids and sediments, has led the development of new methods of cleaning. Some methods of cleaning are described in this work with their advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Material compatibility and corrosion control of the KWU chemical cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odar, S.

    1994-01-01

    The concentrations of salt impurities within the deposits on the tube sheet and in the tube to tube-support-plate crevices can induce a variety of corrosion mechanisms on steam generator tubes. One of the most effective ways of counteracting corrosion mechanisms and thus of improving steam generator performance is to clean the steam generators and keep them in a clean condition. As shown by field results chemical cleaning is a way of removing hazardous deposits from steam generators. All available chemical cleaning processes use inhibitors to control the corrosion except the KWU chemical cleaning process. In this article the corrosion control technique of KWU Chemical Cleaning Process without using conventional inhibitors will be explained and the state of the field experience with respect to material compatibility will be presented. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  15. Steam generators secondary side chemical cleaning at Point Lepreau using the Siemen's high temperature process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, K.; MacNeil, C.; Odar, S.

    1996-01-01

    The secondary sides of all four steam generators at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Stations were cleaned during the 1995 annual outage run-down using the Siemens high temperature chemical cleaning process. Traditionally all secondary side chemical cleaning exercises in CANDU as well as the other nuclear power stations in North America have been conducted using a process developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The Siemens high temperature process was applied for the first time in North America at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station (PLGS). The paper discusses experiences related to the pre and post award chemical cleaning activities, chemical cleaning application, post cleaning inspection results and waste handling activities. (author)

  16. Processing method of radioactive cleaning drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Shigemitsu; Murakami, Tadashi; Kitao, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Upon processing of radioactive cleaning drains, contained Co-60 is removed by a selectively adsorbing adsorbent. In addition, after removing suspended materials by a filtering device, Co-60 as predominant nuclides in the drain is selectively adsorbed. The concentration of objective Co-60 is in the order of 0.1 Bq/cc, and non-radioactive metal ions such as Na + ions are present in the order of ppm in addition to Co-60. A granular adsorbent for selectively adsorbing Co-60 is oxine-added activated carbon, and has a grain size of from 20 to 48 mesh. The granular adsorbent is used while being filled in an adsorbing tower. Since a relatively simple device comprising the filtering device and the adsorbing tower in combination is provided, the reduction of the construction cost can be expected. In addition, since no filtering aid is used in the filtering device, the amount of secondary wastes is small. (N.H.)

  17. [Comprehension of hazard pictograms of chemical products among cleaning workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí Fernández, Francesc; van der Haar, Rudolf; López López, Juan Carlos; Portell, Mariona; Torner Solé, Anna

    2015-01-01

    To assess the comprehension among cleaning workers of the hazard pictograms as defined by the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of the United Nations, concerning the classification, labeling and packaging of substances and mixtures. A sample of 118 workers was surveyed on their perception of the GHS hazard pictograms. Comprehensibility was measured by the percentage of correct answers and the degree to which they reflected International Organization for Standardization and American National Standards Institute standards for minimum level of comprehension. The influence of different variables to predict comprehension capacity was assessed using a logistic regression model. Three groups of pictograms could be distinguished which were statistically differentiated by their comprehensibility. Pictograms reflecting "acute toxicity" and "flammable", were described correctly by 94% and 95% of the surveyed population, respectively. For pictograms reflecting "systemic toxicity", "corrosive", "warning", "environment" and "explosive" the frequency of correct answers ranged from 48% to 64%, whereas those for pictograms "oxidizing" and "compressed gas" were interpreted correctly by only 7% of respondents. Prognostic factors for poor comprehension included: not being familiar with the pictograms, not having received training on safe use of chemical products, being an immigrant and being 54 years of age or older. Only two pictograms exceeded minimum standards for comprehension. Training, a tool proven to be effective to improve the correct interpretation of danger symbols, should be encouraged, especially in those groups with greater comprehension difficulties. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Salut Laboral.

  18. Is dry cleaning all wet?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical solvents from dry cleaning, particularly perchloroethylene (perc), have contributed to groundwater contamination, significant levels of air pollution in and around cleaners, and chemical accumulation in food. Questions are being raised about the process of cleaning clothes with chemical, and other less toxic cleaning methods are being explored. The EPA has focused attention on the 50 year old Friedburg method of cleaning, Ecoclean, which uses no dangerous chemicals and achieves comparable results. Unfortunately, the cleaning industry is resistant to change, so cutting back on amount of clothes that need dry cleaning and making sure labels aren't exaggerating when they say dry clean only, is frequently the only consumer option now

  19. Chemical cleaning the service water system at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, T.O.; Glover, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical cleaning a large cooling water system in a nuclear power plant presented many unique problems. The selection, qualification, and performance of the cleaning process were done using a phased approach. The piping was inspected to determine the extent of the problem. Deposit samples were removed from the service water system pipe and tested in the laboratory to determine the most effective cleaning solvent for deposit removal. An engineering study was performed to define the design parameters required to implement the system-wide chemical cleaning

  20. Do new wipe materials outperform traditional lead dust cleaning methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Roger D; Ong, Kee Hean; Emo, Brett; Kennedy, Jason; Brown, Christopher A; Condoor, Sridhar; Thummalakunta, Laxmi

    2012-01-01

    Government guidelines have traditionally recommended the use of wet mopping, sponging, or vacuuming for removal of lead-contaminated dust from hard surfaces in homes. The emergence of new technologies, such as the electrostatic dry cloth and wet disposable clothes used on mopheads, for removal of dust provides an opportunity to evaluate their ability to remove lead compared with more established methods. The purpose of this study was to determine if relative differences exist between two new and two older methods for removal of lead-contaminated dust (LCD) from three wood surfaces that were characterized by different roughness or texture. Standard leaded dust, coefficient of friction was performed for each wipe material. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the surface and cleaning methods. There were significant interactions between cleaning method and surface types, p = 0.007. Cleaning method was found be a significant factor in removal of lead, p coefficient of friction, significantly different among the three wipes, is likely to influence the cleaning action. Cleaning method appears to be more important than texture in LCD removal from hard surfaces. There are some small but important factors in cleaning LCD from hard surfaces, including the limits of a Swiffer mop to conform to curved surfaces and the efficiency of the wetted shop towel and vacuuming for cleaning all surface textures. The mean percentage reduction in lead dust achieved by the traditional methods (vacuuming and wet wiping) was greater and more consistent compared to the new methods (electrostatic dry cloth and wet Swiffer mop). Vacuuming and wet wiping achieved lead reductions of 92% ± 4% and 91%, ± 4%, respectively, while the electrostatic dry cloth and wet Swiffer mops achieved lead reductions of only 89 ± 8% and  81 ± 17%, respectively.

  1. Corrosion Behavior of SA508 Coupled with and without Magnetite in Chemical Cleaning Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Yeong-Ho; Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Song, Geun Dong; Hur, Do Haeng; Lee, Jong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    To mitigate these problems, chemical cleaning process has been widely used. However, the chemical cleaning solution can affect the corrosion of SG structural materials as well as the magnetite dissolution. During the chemical cleaning process, the galvanic corrosion between SG materials and magnetite is also anticipated because they are in electrical connection. However, the corrosion measurement or monitoring for the materials has been performed without consideration of galvanic effect coupled with magnetite during the chemical cleaning process. In this study, the effect of temperature and EDTA concentration on the corrosion behavior of SA508 tubesheet material with and without magnetite was studied in chemical cleaning solutions. The galvanic corrosion behavior between SA508 and magnetite is predicted by using the mixed potential theory and its effect on the corrosion rate of SA508 is also discussed. By newly designed immersion test, it was confirmed that the extent of galvanic corrosion effect between SA508 and magnetite increased with increasing temperature and EDTA concentration. The galvanic corrosion behavior of SA508 coupled with magnetite in chemical cleaning environments was predicted by the mixed potential theory and verified by ZRA and LP technique. Galvanic coupling increased the corrosion rate of SA508 due to the shift in its potential to the anodic direction. Therefore, the galvanic corrosion effect between SA508 and magnetite should be considered when the corrosion measurement is performed during the chemical cleaning process in steam generators.

  2. Method and apparatus for a self-cleaning filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, James P.; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, III, Kingsbury; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael

    2010-11-16

    A method and apparatus for removing fine particulate matter from a fluid stream without interrupting the overall process or flow. The flowing fluid inflates and expands the flexible filter, and particulate is deposited on the filter media while clean fluid is permitted to pass through the filter. This filter is cleaned when the fluid flow is stopped, the filter collapses, and a force is applied to distort the flexible filter media to dislodge the built-up filter cake. The dislodged filter cake falls to a location that allows undisrupted flow of the fluid after flow is restored. The shed particulate is removed to a bin for periodic collection. A plurality of filter cells can operate independently or in concert, in parallel, or in series to permit cleaning the filters without shutting off the overall fluid flow. The self-cleaning filter is low cost, has low power consumption, and exhibits low differential pressures.

  3. Method and apparatus for a self-cleaning filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, James P.; Lilley, Arthur; Browne, III, Kingsbury; Walt, Robb Ray; Duncan, Dustin; Walker, Michael; Steele, John; Fields, Michael

    2013-09-10

    A method and apparatus for removing fine particulate matter from a fluid stream without interrupting the overall process or flow. The flowing fluid inflates and expands the flexible filter, and particulate is deposited on the filter media while clean fluid is permitted to pass through the filter. This filter is cleaned when the fluid flow is stopped, the filter collapses, and a force is applied to distort the flexible filter media to dislodge the built-up filter cake. The dislodged filter cake falls to a location that allows undisrupted flow of the fluid after flow is restored. The shed particulate is removed to a bin for periodic collection. A plurality of filter cells can operate independently or in concert, in parallel, or in series to permit cleaning the filters without shutting off the overall fluid flow. The self-cleaning filter is low cost, has low power consumption, and exhibits low differential pressures.

  4. Commercial Cleaning Products for Chemical Decontamination: A Scoping Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    and may injure human skin without dilution), although this approach is less favoured in a mass casualty decontamination situation than soap and water...commercial cleaning products, full strength K-O-K® liquid bleach (5.25% aqueous solution of NaOCl), dish-washing detergent Cascade® with Extra...Bleach Action Gel, OxiClean® Versatile Stain Remover Powder, and ZEP® Industrial Purple liquid cleaner (proprietary caustic cleaner containing

  5. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning: Effectiveness Of The UV Lamp To Decompose Oxalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Huff, T.; Sudduth, C.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning is a new process scheduled to begin cleaning Savannah River Site High Level Waste Tanks in 2012. It is an improvement over the current chemical cleaning method, in that it minimizes downstream impacts on the High Level Waste System. It is based on a state of the art scale removal process used on the secondary side of nuclear power plants, with modifications to accommodate the unique constraints created by the tanks. Both Enhanced Chemical Cleaning and the scale removal process are founded on dissolving metal oxides/hydroxides using oxalic acid, with subsequent oxalate decomposition via hydroxylation using ozone or peroxide, and UV light as a catalyst. A divergence Enhanced Chemical Cleaning has from nuclear power scale removal is the significantly increased solids concentration during oxalate decomposition. These solids can limit the ability of the UV light to create hydroxyl radicals, either by limiting the ability of the light to penetrate through the solution, or by increasing the fouling rate on the UV light. Both will decrease the overall catalytic effectiveness, thereby decreasing the concentration of formed hydroxyl radicals. The hydroxyl radicals are the driving force behind the oxalate decomposition. To understand the impact of increased solids, testing was performed using a medium pressure UV light inside an ozone supplied Oxalate Decomposition Reactor. Using a dissolved metal sludge simulant with an initial oxalate concentration greater than 12,000 ppm, and an initial pH of about 2.0, the spent acid solution was recirculated through the reactor, while the UV light was allowed to foul. For the first few hours, the oxalate decomposition rate was about 1,300 ppm/hour. After about 3 hours, enough time for the UV lamp to foul, the oxalate decomposition rate decreased to about 500 ppm/hour. The decomposition rate then remained roughly constant for the next 16 hours. Overall, testing showed that the oxalate destruction rate decreased

  6. ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UV LAMP TO DECOMPOSE OXALATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Huff, T.; Sudduth, C.

    2010-01-19

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning is a new process scheduled to begin cleaning Savannah River Site High Level Waste Tanks in 2012. It is an improvement over the current chemical cleaning method, in that it minimizes downstream impacts on the High Level Waste System. It is based on a state of the art scale removal process used on the secondary side of nuclear power plants, with modifications to accommodate the unique constraints created by the tanks. Both Enhanced Chemical Cleaning and the scale removal process are founded on dissolving metal oxides/hydroxides using oxalic acid, with subsequent oxalate decomposition via hydroxylation using ozone or peroxide, and UV light as a catalyst. A divergence Enhanced Chemical Cleaning has from nuclear power scale removal is the significantly increased solids concentration during oxalate decomposition. These solids can limit the ability of the UV light to create hydroxyl radicals, either by limiting the ability of the light to penetrate through the solution, or by increasing the fouling rate on the UV light. Both will decrease the overall catalytic effectiveness, thereby decreasing the concentration of formed hydroxyl radicals. The hydroxyl radicals are the driving force behind the oxalate decomposition. To understand the impact of increased solids, testing was performed using a medium pressure UV light inside an ozone supplied Oxalate Decomposition Reactor. Using a dissolved metal sludge simulant with an initial oxalate concentration greater than 12,000 ppm, and an initial pH of about 2.0, the spent acid solution was recirculated through the reactor, while the UV light was allowed to foul. For the first few hours, the oxalate decomposition rate was about 1,300 ppm/hour. After about 3 hours, enough time for the UV lamp to foul, the oxalate decomposition rate decreased to about 500 ppm/hour. The decomposition rate then remained roughly constant for the next 16 hours. Overall, testing showed that the oxalate destruction rate decreased

  7. Efficacy of low-pressure foam cleaning compared to conventional cleaning methods in the removal of bacteria from surfaces associated with convenience food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, A A; Human, I S; Doughari, J H; Lues, J F R

    2014-09-01

    Food borne illnesses and food poisoning are cause for concern globally. The diseases are often caused by food contamination with pathogenic bacteria due largely to poor sanitary habits or storage conditions. Prevalence of some bacteria on cleaned and sanitised food contact surfaces from eight convenience food plants in Gauteng (South Africa) was investigated with the view to evaluate the efficacy of the cleaning methods used with such food contact surfaces. The microbial load of eight convenience food manufacturing plants was determined by sampling stainless steel food contact surfaces after they had been cleaned and sanitised at the end of a day's shift. Samples were analysed for Total Plate Count (TPC), Escherichia coli, Salmonella species, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria species. Results showed that 59 % of the total areas sampled for TPC failed to comply with the legal requirements for surfaces, according to the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act ( 0.05) in terms of Listeria species isolates obtained from both cleaning methods. The LPF method proved to be the superior cleaning option for lowering TPC counts. Regardless of cleaning method used, pathogens continued to flourish on various surfaces, including dry stainless steel, posing a contamination hazard for a considerable period depending on the contamination level and type of pathogen. Intensive training for proper chemical usage and strict procedural compliance among workers for efficient cleaning procedures is recommended.

  8. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Tested Disposal Methods for Chemical Wastes from Academic Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, M. A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes procedures for disposing of dichromate cleaning solution, picric acid, organic azides, oxalic acid, chemical spills, and hydroperoxides in ethers and alkenes. These methods have been tested under laboratory conditions and are specific for individual chemicals rather than for groups of chemicals. (JN)

  9. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  10. Annual Report, Fall 2016: Alternative Chemical Cleaning of Radioactive High Level Waste Tanks - Corrosion Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrwas, R. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel exposed to two proposed chemical cleaning solutions: acidic permanganate (0.18 M nitric acid and 0.05M sodium permanganate) and caustic permanganate. (10 M sodium hydroxide and 0.05M sodium permanganate). These solutions have been proposed as a chemical cleaning solution for the retrieval of actinides in the sludge in the waste tanks, and were tested with both HM and PUREX sludge simulants at a 20:1 ratio.

  11. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt % or 2 wt %) were used at 55 deg C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results

  12. Fabrication of superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic self-cleaning metal surfaces using picosecond laser pulses and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-05-01

    Bioinspired superhydrophilic/phobic self-cleaning surfaces have recently drawn a lot of interest in both fundamental and applied research. A hybrid method to produce the self-cleaning property of micro/nanostructured surface using ultra-fast laser pulses followed by chemical fluorination is proposed. The typical micro/nanocomposite structures that form from microporous arrays and microgroove groups have been processed by picosecond laser on titanium alloy surface. The surface hydrophilic/phobic and self-cleaning properties of micro/nanostructures before and after fluorination with fluoroalkyl-silane were investigated using surface contact angle measurements. The results indicate that surface properties change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic after fluorination, and the micro/nanostructured surface with increased roughness contributes to the improvement of surface hydrophobicity. The micro/nanomodification can make the original hydrophilic titanium alloy surface more hydrophilic or superhydrophilic. It also can make an originally hydrophobic fluorinated titanium alloy surface more hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. The produced micro/nanostructured titanium alloy surfaces show excellent self-cleaning properties regardless of the fluorination treatment, although the fluorinated surfaces have slightly better self-cleaning properties. It is found that surface treatment using ultra-fast laser pulses and subsequent chemical fluorination is an effective way to manipulate surface wettability and obtain self-cleaning properties.

  13. Chemical decontamination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Susumu; Ikehara, Fumiaki; Miyazaki, Atsuo

    1994-04-12

    Pipelines and equipments deposited with cruds undergo an oxidative dissolving treatment by a cleaning liquid using persulfuric acid and persulfate. Then a reducing agent is added to cleaning liquid wastes by an excess amount than required for decomposing and reducing the remaining persulfuric acid and persulfate. As the reducing agent, one or more of materials selected from ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid, oxalic acid, salts and derivatives thereof are used. Further, if required, sulfuric acid or sulfuric acid is also added. This can effectively dissolve even less soluble cruds to shorten the processing time, thereby reducing the operators' exposure dose and attaining devoluming of the wastes. (T.M.).

  14. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Susumu; Ikehara, Fumiaki; Miyazaki, Atsuo.

    1994-01-01

    Pipelines and equipments deposited with cruds undergo an oxidative dissolving treatment by a cleaning liquid using persulfuric acid and persulfate. Then a reducing agent is added to cleaning liquid wastes by an excess amount than required for decomposing and reducing the remaining persulfuric acid and persulfate. As the reducing agent, one or more of materials selected from ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid, oxalic acid, salts and derivatives thereof are used. Further, if required, sulfuric acid or sulfuric acid is also added. This can effectively dissolve even less soluble cruds to shorten the processing time, thereby reducing the operators' exposure dose and attaining devoluming of the wastes. (T.M.)

  15. Method and device for cleaning fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Oohigashi, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To remove clads or scales deposited on the outer surface of fuel pins in BWR type reactors. Method: A fuel assembly taken out of a reactor core is vertically contained without detaching a channel box in a scrubber tower disposed in a liquid tight manner within a fuel pool. Then, a specifically prepared slurry is caused to flow and uprise from the bottom of the scrubber tower into the channel box and then discharged from the top of the tower. The slurry is prepared by mixing pure water and granules (for example, as activated carbon, ion exchanger resin, iron and molecular sieve) of such a granular size as not causing clogging in the channel box of the fuel assembly and having a larger specific gravity than pure water. The slurry flown into the channel box scrubs the surface of fuel pins to scrape off clads or scales. Then, discharged slurry is sent to a hydraulic cyclone to separate the granules from the clads or scales. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Steam generator chemical cleaning demonstration test No. 1 in a pot boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, G.L.; Helyer, M.H.

    1981-04-01

    The effectiveness of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI Mark I) chemical cleaning solvent process was tested utilizing a 12 tube pot boiler that had previously been fouled and dented under 30 days of high chloride fault chemistry operation. Specifically, the intent of this chemical cleaning test was to: (1) dissolve sludge from the tubesheet, (2) remove non-protective magnetite from dented tube/support crevice regions, and (3) quantify the extent of corrosion of steam generator material during the test. Two laboratory cleaning demonstrations of 191 and 142 hours were performed

  17. Comparative study of aqueous and solvent methods for cleaning metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Goad, H.A.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the comparative effectiveness of solvent and aqueous detergent methods for cleaning various metals. The metals investigated included 304L stainless steel, beryllium, uranium-6.5 wt percent niobium alloy, and unalloyed uranium ( 238 U). The studies were initiated in response to governmental regulations restricting the use of some chlorinated solvents. Results showed that aqueous detergent cleaning was more effective than solvents, i.e. trichloroethylene and methyl chloroform, for the removal of light industrial soils. The subsequent adoption of aqueous cleaning at this plant has facilitated waste disposal, which contributed to recorded economic savings. The controlled use of aqueous detergents is environmentally acceptable and has decreased the hazards of fire and toxicity that are generally associated with solvents. 8 tables, 15 figures

  18. The efficacy of chemical agents in cleaning and disinfection programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Martins Alzira

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the growing number of outbreaks of infection in hospital nurseries, it becomes essential to set up a sanitation program that indicates that the appropriate chemical agent was chosen for application in the most effective way. Method For the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of a chemical agent, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was reached by the classic method of successive broth dilutions. The reference bacteria utilized were Bacillus subtilis var. globigii ATCC 9372, Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The strains of Enterobacter cloacae IAL 1976 (Adolfo Lutz Institute, Serratia marcescens IAL 1478 and Acinetobactev calcoaceticus IAL 124 (ATCC 19606, were isolated from material collected from babies involved in outbreaks of infection in hospital nurseries. Results The MIC intervals, which reduced bacteria populations over 08 log10, were: 59 to 156 mg/L of quaternarium ammonium compounds (QACs; 63 to 10000 mg/L of chlorhexidine digluconate; 1375 to 3250 mg/L of glutaraldehyde; 39 to 246 mg/L of formaldehyde; 43750 to 87500 mg/L of isopropanol or ethanol; 1250 to 6250 mg/L of iodine in polyvinyl-pyrolidone complexes, 150 to 4491 mg/L of chlorine-releasing-agents (CRAs; 469 to 2500 mg/L of hydrogen peroxide; and, 2310 to 18500 mg/L of peracetic acid. Conclusions Chlorhexidine showed non inhibitory activity over germinating spores. A. calcoaceticus, was observed to show resistance to the majority of the agents tested, followed by E. cloacae and S. marcescens.

  19. Wavelet imaging cleaning method for atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, R. W.; Cayón, L.; Sembroski, G. H.; Gaidos, J. A.

    2002-07-01

    We present a new method of image cleaning for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The method is based on the utilization of wavelets to identify noise pixels in images of gamma-ray and hadronic induced air showers. This method selects more signal pixels with Cherenkov photons than traditional image processing techniques. In addition, the method is equally efficient at rejecting pixels with noise alone. The inclusion of more signal pixels in an image of an air shower allows for a more accurate reconstruction, especially at lower gamma-ray energies that produce low levels of light. We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray and hadronic air showers which show improved angular resolution using this cleaning procedure. Data from the Whipple Observatory's 10-m telescope are utilized to show the efficacy of the method for extracting a gamma-ray signal from the background of hadronic generated images.

  20. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  1. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  2. Treatment Tank Corrosion Studies For The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  3. Aquaporin based biomimetic membrane in forward osmosis: Chemical cleaning resistance and practical operation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenyu

    2017-07-27

    Aquaporin plays a promising role in fabricating high performance biomimetic forward osmosis (FO) membranes. However, aquaporin as a protein also has a risk of denaturation caused by various chemicals, resulting in a possible decay of membrane performance. The present study tested a novel aquaporin based biomimetic membrane in simulated membrane cleaning processes. The effects of cleaning agents on water flux and salt rejection were evaluated. The membrane showed a good resistance to the chemical agents. The water flux after chemical cleaning showed significant increases, particularly after cleaning with NaOCl and Alconox. Changes in the membrane structure and increased hydrophilicity in the surrounding areas of the aquaporin may be accountable for the increase in water permeability. The membrane shows stable salt rejection up to 99% after all cleaning agents were tested. A 15-day experiment with secondary wastewater effluent as the feed solution and seawater as the draw solution showed a stable flux and high salt rejection. The average rejection of the dissolved organic carbon from wastewater after the 15-day test was 90%. The results demonstrated that the aquaporin based biomimetic FO membrane exhibits chemical resistance for most agents used in membrane cleaning procedures, maintaining a stable flux and high salt rejection.

  4. Aquaporin based biomimetic membrane in forward osmosis: Chemical cleaning resistance and practical operation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhenyu; Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Bucs, Szilard; Fortunato, Luca; Hé lix-Nielsen, Claus; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Leiknes, TorOve; Amy, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporin plays a promising role in fabricating high performance biomimetic forward osmosis (FO) membranes. However, aquaporin as a protein also has a risk of denaturation caused by various chemicals, resulting in a possible decay of membrane performance. The present study tested a novel aquaporin based biomimetic membrane in simulated membrane cleaning processes. The effects of cleaning agents on water flux and salt rejection were evaluated. The membrane showed a good resistance to the chemical agents. The water flux after chemical cleaning showed significant increases, particularly after cleaning with NaOCl and Alconox. Changes in the membrane structure and increased hydrophilicity in the surrounding areas of the aquaporin may be accountable for the increase in water permeability. The membrane shows stable salt rejection up to 99% after all cleaning agents were tested. A 15-day experiment with secondary wastewater effluent as the feed solution and seawater as the draw solution showed a stable flux and high salt rejection. The average rejection of the dissolved organic carbon from wastewater after the 15-day test was 90%. The results demonstrated that the aquaporin based biomimetic FO membrane exhibits chemical resistance for most agents used in membrane cleaning procedures, maintaining a stable flux and high salt rejection.

  5. In-Situ Ion Source Cleaning: Review of Chemical Mechanisms and Evaluation Data at Production Fabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaim, R.; Bishop, S.; Byl, O.; Eldridge, D.; Marganski, P.; Mayer, J.; Sweeney, J.; Yedave, S.; Fuchs, D.; Spreitzer, S.; Vogel, J.; Dunn, J.; Lundquist, P.; Rolland, J.; Romig, T.; Newman, D.; Mitchell, M.; Ditzler, K.

    2008-01-01

    Since the concept of chemical in-situ ion implanter cleaning was introduced at IIT2006 [1], evaluations of the XeF 2 cleaning technology have taken place or are ongoing at more than 40 production fabs worldwide. Testing has been focused on assessing effects of cleaning in the source arc chamber and extraction regions. In this paper we describe use of the cleaning technology in a production environment and summarize evaluation data showing advantages of the technology for improving ion source life, reducing glitching, improving beam auto-tuning and avoiding species cross-contamination. More details of the evaluations are given in several separate papers submitted to this Conference. We have supplemented the fab production data with laboratory experiments designed to investigate the reactivity of XeF 2 and fundamental aspects of the source deposition and cleaning processes. These experiments are summarized here, and more details can be found in separate papers submitted to this Conference

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSOLUBLE SALT SIMULANT TO SUPPORT ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING TESTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R

    2008-01-01

    The closure process for high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site will require dissolution of the crystallized salts that are currently stored in many of the tanks. The insoluble residue from salt dissolution is planned to be removed by an Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process. Development of a chemical cleaning process requires an insoluble salt simulant to support evaluation tests of different cleaning methods. The Process Science and Engineering section of SRNL has been asked to develop an insoluble salt simulant for use in testing potential ECC processes (HLE-TTR-2007-017). An insoluble salt simulant has been developed based upon the residues from salt dissolution of saltcake core samples from Tank 28F. The simulant was developed for use in testing SRS waste tank chemical cleaning methods. Based on the results of the simulant development process, the following observations were developed: (1) A composition based on the presence of 10.35 grams oxalate and 4.68 grams carbonate per 100 grams solids produces a sufficiently insoluble solids simulant. (2) Aluminum observed in the solids remaining from actual waste salt dissolution tests is probably precipitated from sodium aluminate due to the low hydroxide content of the saltcake. (3) In-situ generation of aluminum hydroxide (by use of aluminate as the Al source) appears to trap additional salts in the simulant in a manner similar to that expected for actual waste samples. (4) Alternative compositions are possible with higher oxalate levels and lower carbonate levels. (5) The maximum oxalate level is limited by the required Na content of the insoluble solids. (6) Periodic mixing may help to limit crystal growth in this type of salt simulant. (7) Long term storage of an insoluble salt simulant is likely to produce a material that can not be easily removed from the storage container. Production of a relatively fresh simulant is best if pumping the simulant is necessary for testing purposes. The insoluble

  7. Chemical-Cleaning Demonstration Test No. 2 in a mock-up steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevec, J.M.; Leedy, W.S.

    1983-04-01

    This report describes the results of the mockup demonstration test of the first modified baseline process under Contract S-127, Chemical Cleaning of Nuclear Steam Generators. The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of cleaning the secondary side of nuclear steam generators with state-of-the-art chemical cleaning technology. The first step was to benchmark a baseline process. This process was then modified to attempt to eliminate the causes of unacceptable cleaning performance. The modified baseline process consists of an EDTA/H 2 O 2 -based copper solvent and a near-neutral, EDTA/N 2 H 4 -based magnetite and crevice solvent. This report also presents the results of three inhibitor evaluation mockup runs used in the evaluation of the modified baseline process

  8. Re-establishing filtering capabilities of machined porous beryllium via chemical reduction and cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Porous beryllium is furnished in sheets of varying sizes and thickness; it is therefore necessary that it be machined into specified sizes. A chemical reduction and cleaning procedure was devised to remove the disrupted surface, open the sealed pores of the material, and clean entrapped contaminates from the internal structure. Dimensional stability can be closely controlled and material size is of no consequence. (U.S.)

  9. Sodium cleaning and disposal methods in experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, K.K.; Gurumoorthy, K.; Rajan, M.; Kale, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    At Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, major sodium facilities are designed and operated at Engineering Development Group as a part of development programme towards experimental and Prototype Fast Reactor. After the test programme many equipment and components were removed from the sodium facilities and sodium removal and disposal was carried out. The experience gained in different cleaning methods and waste sodium disposal are discussed. (author)

  10. Evaluation of 5 Cleaning and Disinfection Methods for Nets Used to Collect Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    OpenAIRE

    Collymore, Chereen; Porelli, Gina; Lieggi, Christine; Lipman, Neil S

    2014-01-01

    Few standardized methods of cleaning and disinfecting equipment in zebrafish facilities have been published, even though the effectiveness of these procedures is vital to preventing the transmission of pathogenic organisms. Four chemical disinfectants and rinsing with municipal tap water were evaluated for their ability to disinfect nets used to capture zebrafish. The disinfectants included benzalkonium chloride+methylene blue, sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and potassium peroxymonosu...

  11. The AREVA C3 concept. Customized chemical cleaning as an essential part of steam generator asset management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    As the nuclear industry moves forward and the world's power demand increases, the continued safe, reliable, and efficient operation of existing plants has become indispensable. For these plants asset management is an essential factor. A crucial part of the plant assets are the steam generators (SG). Not only that the SG tubes are by far the largest boundary between the primary and secondary sides, they are also instrumental in the overall performance of the plant. The main concern for operational lifetime is tube degradation due to either ID or OD corrosion. At the secondary side, sludge and corrosion products accumulate in the SG resulting in the buildup of secondary side deposits. Such deposits can negatively affect the SG performance in different ways, not only by reduction of the heat transfer rates and, thus, by reducing the efficiency of the SG but also as cause or promotion of different types of corrosion phenomena. The cleanliness of the secondary side of SG is of essential interest to all utilities. There is not just one solution for SG asset optimization. The utilities must weigh the pros and cons of SG cleaning, with the associated impact on outage time and cost, versus the potential benefits. Each plant that considers a SG chemical cleaning has different objectives and goals. AREVA has developed the C 3 (Customized Chemical Cleaning - or in short 'C cubed') concept in order to provide the utility with a chemical cleaning method that is tailored to the needs of the individual units and that addresses them directly. (orig.)

  12. A Study on an Executive Technique and Activation of Clean Production in Chemical Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Seong Yong; Lee, Hee Seok; Kim, Kang Seok [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    Clean production does not only make the sustainable development possible through preventing the deterioration of the environmental pollution from the expansion of industrialization but also enhance the company's competitiveness. Clean production is required by all industrial fields but is the most important in chemical industry. The Government has made efforts to change the domestic industrial structure to the environmental-friendly structure through developing the research. However, the domestic industry has not yet activated overall except some large companies, which has concretized the activation of clean production. Especially, the medium and small companies are more sluggish due to the inferiority of capital and technology. With recognizing that the main body of clean production is a company, the effort based on the Government and the academic world, without companies' positive, will cannot help being limited in effects. Therefore, it is necessary to trigger the schemes that urge the companies' motivation to show the effects from the support that have concentrated in hardware like technology until now. It seems to be very important that the guidebook for clean production, which a company can easily adopt, is developed and spread. This report provides the guidebook for clean production that managers and engineers can easily understand and approach in a producing field and presents the scheme to promote clean production, for chemical industry that is seriously required clean production. Even if the presented contents are not perfect, they can be applied to the development of the Government's policy and the administrative activities of companies for clean production as a useful data. 53 refs., 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  13. Study of chemical cleaning technique for removing sludge in secondary side of PWR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mengqin; Zhang Shufeng; Pan Qingchun; Yu Jinghua; Hou Shufeng

    1993-12-01

    The effect of components, concentration, pH, temperature, cleaning time and flowrate of chemical cleaning solvent made from EDTA mainly on Fe 3 O 4 solubility and corrosion rate of A3 carbon steel, S271 low alloy steel and 800 alloy are introduced. A small chemical cleaning test loop (30L) was built to study the cleaning technique. The effect of residue of chemical cleaning solvent on anti-corrosion performance of materials has been studied under the simulation condition of PWR (pressure water reactor) SG (steam generator) secondary side. The results show that the chemical solvent (pH = 7, 10% EDTA, 1% assistance solvent and 0.25% inhibitor A) can dissolve Fe 3 O 4 18 ∼23 g/L under the conditions of 93 +- 5 degree C, 8 hours and 112 r/min (1.8 ∼ 2.0 t/h). The corrosion rate of material is low. When the residue of EDTA is less than 0.01% there is no impact on the anti-corrosion performance of materials in PWR SG secondary side at normal operation condition (260 +- 5 degree C)

  14. Methods for air cleaning system design and accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, W.S.; Nichols, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes methods, in the form of a handbook and five computer codes, that can be used for nuclear facility air cleaning system design and accident analysis. Four of the codes were developed primarily at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and one was developed in France. Tools such as these are used to design ventilation systems in the mining industry but do not seem to be commonly used in the nuclear industry. For example, the Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook is an excellent design reference, but it fails to include information on computer codes that can be used to aid in the design process. These computer codes allow the analyst to use the handbook information to form all the elements of a complete system design. Because these analysis methods are in the form of computer codes they allow the analyst to investigate many alternative designs. In addition, the effects of many accident scenarios on the operation of the air cleaning system can be evaluated. These tools originally were intended for accident analysis, but they have been used mostly as design tools by several architect-engineering firms. The Cray, VAX, and personal computer versions of the codes, an accident analysis handbook, and the codes availability will be discussed. The application of these codes to several design operations of nuclear facilities will be illustrated, and their use to analyze the effect of several accident scenarios also will be described

  15. Characterization and electrolytic cleaning of poly(methyl methacrylate) residues on transferred chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Finklea, Harry O.; Liu, Yuxin

    2017-03-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) residue has long been a critical challenge for practical applications of the transferred chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene. Thermal annealing is empirically used for the removal of the PMMA residue; however experiments imply that there are still small amounts of residues left after thermal annealing which are hard to remove with conventional methods. In this paper, the thermal degradation of the PMMA residue upon annealing was studied by Raman spectroscopy. The study reveals that post-annealing residues are generated by the elimination of methoxycarbonyl side chains in PMMA and are believed to be absorbed on graphene via the π-π interaction between the conjugated unsaturated carbon segments and graphene. The post-annealing residues are difficult to remove by further annealing in a non-oxidative atmosphere due to their thermal and chemical stability. An electrolytic cleaning method was shown to be effective in removing these post-annealing residues while preserving the underlying graphene lattice based on Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy studies. Additionally, a solution-gated field effect transistor was used to study the transport properties of the transferred CVD graphene before thermal annealing, after thermal annealing, and after electrolytic cleaning, respectively. The results show that the carrier mobility was significantly improved, and that the p-doping was reduced by removing PMMA residues and post-annealing residues. These studies provide a more in-depth understanding on the thermal annealing process for the removal of the PMMA residues from transferred CVD graphene and a new approach to remove the post-annealing residues, resulting in a residue-free graphene.

  16. Decontamination issues for chemical and biological warfare agents: how clean is clean enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raber, E; Jin, A; Noonan, K; McGuire, R; Kirvel, R D

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this assessment is to determine what level of cleanup will be required to meet regulatory and stakeholder needs in the case of a chemical and/or biological incident at a civilian facility. A literature review for selected, potential chemical and biological warfare agents shows that dose information is often lacking or controversial. Environmental regulatory limits or other industrial health guidelines that could be used to help establish cleanup concentration levels for such agents are generally unavailable or not applicable for a public setting. Although dose information, cleanup criteria, and decontamination protocols all present challenges to effective planning, several decontamination approaches are available. Such approaches should be combined with risk-informed decision making to establish reasonable cleanup goals for protecting health, property, and resources. Key issues during a risk assessment are to determine exactly what constitutes a safety hazard and whether decontamination is necessary or not for a particular scenario. An important conclusion is that cleanup criteria are site dependent and stakeholder specific. The results of a modeling exercise for two outdoor scenarios are presented to reinforce this conclusion. Public perception of risk to health, public acceptance of recommendations based on scientific criteria, political support, time constraints, and economic concerns must all be addressed in the context of a specific scenario to yield effective and acceptable decontamination.

  17. The importance of chemical components in cleaning agents for the indoor environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejrup, Karl Ventzel

    In order to evaluate the importance for the indoor environment of chemical compounds in cleaning agents, the emission of VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) from 10 selected cleaning agents and the content of LAS (Linear AlkanbenzeneSulfonate) in dust samples from 7 buildings were investigated.The...... of LAS between smooth floored corridors to carpeted offices, are apparently also of importance for the LAS content in individual rooms.The amounts of LAS found in the dust samples indicated that LAS may be of importance for the indoor environment, but inadequate knowledge about how low concentrations...... investigation of VOC emission from 10 selected cleaning agents showed that it was useful to classify the VOCs into two groups: nonpolar VOCs and polar VOCs.The nonpolar VOCs consisted of several hundred different compounds, mainly terpenes typically used as perfume in cleaning agents. The nonpolar VOC...

  18. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.W.; Li, J.X.; Gao, C.Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of Key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  19. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.W., E-mail: lynnww@sohu.com [School of Electronic and Information Engieering, Tianjin university, Tianjin, 300072 (China); School of Electronics Information Engieering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin, 300384 (China); Li, J.X. [Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Gao, C.Y. [Chinese Peoples Armed Police Forces Academy, Langfang 065000 (China); Chang, M. [School of Electronic and Information Engieering, Tianjin university, Tianjin, 300072 (China); School of Electronics Information Engieering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin, 300384 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of Key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  20. Chemical kinetics of flue gas cleaning by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maetzing, H.

    1989-02-01

    By electron beam treatment of flue gases, NO x and SO 2 are converted to nitric and sulfuric acids simultaneously. Upon ammonia addition, the corresponding salts are collected in solid state and can be sold as fertilizer. Both homogeneous gas phase reactions and physico-chemical aerosol dynamics are involved in product formation. These processes have been analyzed by model calculations. In part 1, the present report summarizes the model results and gives an account of the theoretical understanding of the EBDS process and its performance characteristics. Part 2 of this report gives a complete listing of the reactions used in the AGATE code. (orig.) [de

  1. Cleaning of spent solvent and method of processing cleaning liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Masaki; Kawada, Tomio; Tamura, Nobuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    Spent solvents discharged from a solvent extracting step mainly comprise n-dodecane and TBP and contain nuclear fission products and solvent degradation products. The spent solvents are cleaned by using a sodium chloride free detergent comprising hydrazine oxalate and hydrazine carbonate in a solvent cleaning device. Nitric acid is added to the cleaning liquid wastes containing spent detergents extracted from the solvent cleaning device, to control an acid concentration. The detergent liquid wastes of controlled acid concentration are sent to an electrolysis oxidation bath as electrolytes and electrochemically decomposed in carbonic acid gas, nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas. The decomposed gases are processed as off gases. The decomposed liquid wastes are processed as a waste nitric acid solution. This can provide more effective cleaning. In addition, the spent detergent can be easily decomposed in a room temperature region. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  2. CHEMICAL AND ENERGETIC CONTENT OF CORN BEFORE AND AFTER PRE-CLEANING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Iara Furtado Costa Rodrigues

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The poultry industry normally has little control over the raw material that arrives at the processing plant. This experiment aimed to evaluate chemical and energetic quality of corn obtained in a feed mill before and after pre-cleaning. Twenty samples of 30 kg of corn each were taken from trucks delivering corn to the mill. The trucks were then unloaded and the material passed through a pre-cleaning process when another sample was taken. Samples were graded and physical properties evaluated: density (g/L, grain percentages of foreign material, impurities, fragments, broken, soft, insect damaged, fire-burnt, fermented, damaged, cracked and fine particles, as well as chemical composition analysis: Apparent metabolizable energy for poultry (AME, ether extract (EE, crude fiber (CF, starch (STA, water activity (WA, crude protein (CP, digestible and total lysine, methionine, cystine, threonine, tryptophan, valine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, histidine and arginine. The experiment was a randomized design with two treatments (before and after pre-cleaning and twenty replications. Data was analyzed using SAS ® and treatment differences obtained using F test. Correlations and principal components were calculated. There was a decrease in density after the pre-cleaning process, which was probably due to the removal of earth and stones rather than grain and its fractions. Significant increases were found for insect damage, fermented and damaged grain while fire-burn was significantly reduced after the pre-cleaning process. Starch increased after pre-cleaning which is a result of contaminants that normally are poor in this carbohydrate, but fiber levels increased too. Apparent metabolizable energy, aminoacids, digestible (P<0.05 and total (P<0.05 histidine, total lysine and methionine (P<0.1 levels were reduced after pre-cleaning. Density was higher when there were fewer impurities such as straw, husk or small grains. Broken corn was positively

  3. Tube micro-fouling, boiling and steam pressure after chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents steam pressure trends after chemical cleaning of steam generator tubes at four plants. The paper also presents tube fouling factor that serves as an objective parameter to assess tubing boiling conditions for understanding the steam pressure trend. Available water chemistry data helps substantiate the concept of tube micro-fouling, its effect on tubing boiling, and its impact on steam pressure. All four plants experienced a first mode of decreasing steam pressure in the post-cleaning operation. After 3 to 4 months of operation, the decreasing trend stopped for three plants and then restored to a pre-cleaning value or better. The fourth plant is soil in decreasing trend after 12 months of operation. Dissolved chemicals, such as silica, titanium can precipitate on tube surface. The precipitate micro-fouling can deactivate or eliminate boiling nucleation sites. Therefore, the first phase of the post-cleaning operation suffered a decrease in steam pressure or an increase in fouling factor. It appears that micro fouling by magnetite deposit can activate or create more bubble nucleation sites. Therefore, the magnetite deposit micro-fouling results in a decrease in fouling factor, and a recovery in steam pressure. Fully understanding the boiling characteristics of the tubing at brand new, fouled and cleaned conditions requires further study of tubing surface conditions. Such study should include boiling heat transfer tests and scanning electronic microscope examination. (author)

  4. Development of chemical cleaning formulation for service water system of FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Das, P.C.; Mathur, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Service water system of Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) was found to be corroded and at few locations, the corrosion product oxides were choking the smaller diameter pipelines. An attempt was made to develop a chemical cleaning formulation to chemically remove the oxides using a surface conditioner and chelating agents. Of the several complexants tested, hydroxyethylethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (HEDTA) was found to be better than other complexants from the point of view of oxide dissolution efficiency, solubility etc. A two stage chemical cleaning process involving conditioning of the oxide layer with 0.1% tannic acid followed by exposure of the conditioned oxide layer with a formulation containing 1% HEDTA + 0.5% Sodium Gluconate +0.2% hexamine was recommended to remove the corrosion product oxide present in the service water system. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Method for Cleaning Laser-Drilled Holes on Printed Wiring Boards by Plasma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirogaki, Toshiki; Aoyama, Eiichi; Minagi, Ryu; Ogawa, Keiji; Katayama, Tsutao; Matsuoka, Takashi; Inoue, Hisahiro

    We propose a new method for cleaning blind via holes after laser drilling of PWBs using oxygen plasma treatment. This report dealt with three kinds of PWB materials: epoxy resin and two kinds of aramid fiber reinforced plastics (AFRP: Technora or Kevlar fiber reinforcement). We observed the drilled holes after plasma treatment using both an optical and a scanning electric microscope (SEM). It was confirmed that adequate etching took place in the drilled holes by plasma treatment. We also compared the hole wall and hole bottom after plasma treatment with ones after chemical etching. It was clear that there was no damage to the aramid fiber tip on the hole wall, and that a smooth roughness of the hole wall was obtained by means of plasma treatment. As a result, we demonstrated that the plasma treatment is effective in cleaning the laser drilled holes of PWBs.

  6. Chemical control methods and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Manning; James. Miller

    2011-01-01

    After determining the best course of action for control of an invasive plant population, it is important to understand the variety of methods available to the integrated pest management professional. A variety of methods are now widely used in managing invasive plants in natural areas, including chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods. Once the preferred...

  7. Mathematical modelling of flux recovery during chemical cleaning of tubular membrane fouled with whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Jelena Đ.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane process efficiency in the dairy industry is impaired by the formation of deposits during filtration processes. This work describes cleaning procedures for ceramic tubular membrane (50 nm fouled with whey proteins. Also, mathematical modelling was performed to obtain models which allow deeper insight into the mechanisms involved during cleaning procedures. The caustic solutions (0.2%w/w, 0.4%w/w and 1.0%w/w NaOH and the mixture of two commercial detergents (0.8%w/w P3-ultrasil 69+0.5% w/w P3-ultrasil 67 and 1.2% P3-ultrasil 69+0.75 P3-ultrasil 67 were used as chemical cleaning agents. The results showed that the best flux recovery was achieved with 0.4%w/w NaOH solution. After analyzing the experimental data, five parameter and six parameter kinetic models were suggested for alkali and detergent cleaning, respectively. The changes of total and specific resistances, as well as the change of the effective pore diameter and deposit thickness during cleaning are estimated by applying these models.

  8. Benefits of integrating chemical and mechanical cleaning processes for steam generator sludge removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varrin, R.D.; Ferriter, A.M.; Oliver, T.W.; Le Surf, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefits of performing in-bundle tubesheet lancing in conjunction with chemical cleaning of PWR and PHWR steam generators in which a hard sludge pile is known to exist. The primary benefits of in-bundle lancing are to: (1) increase the exposed area of the sludge pile by cutting furrows in the surface thereby enhancing dissolution of sludge, (2) reduce the volume of solvents required since material removed by lancing does not have to be dissolved chemically, (3) improve rinsing and removal of residual solvent between iron and copper dissolution steps, and (4) allow for verification of process effectiveness by providing high quality in-bundle visual inspection. The reduction in solvent volumes can lead to a significant reduction in solvent costs and waste processing. A case study which includes an economic evaluation for a combined chemical and mechanical cleaning shows a potential cost saving of up to US$ 300,000 over use of chemical cleaning alone. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  9. Air and gas cleaning methods for reactor containment vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, L.

    1963-11-15

    In this paper, a survey is made of the existing and some proposed new methods for the control and purification of air and gases which might be released from a reactor contained or confined for protection of the health and safety of the public from potential accidents. The difference between confinement and containment concepts must be considered. The problems involved and the need for decontamination, site selection, exclusion area, population density, distance, etc., have been discussed elsewhere. We propose to discuss here the safety measures necessary to control the release of radioactive materials to the environment. This requires special systems which must function effectively to minimize loss of fission products such as halogens and particulates. These can penetrate the confinement filters or the containment vessel to a limited extent even after cleaning.

  10. Postprocessing method to clean up streaks due to noisy detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuy, H.K.; Mattson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that occasionally, one of the thousands of detectors in a CT scanner will intermittently produce erroneous data, creating streaks in the reconstructed image. The authors propose a method to identify and clean up the streaks automatically. To find the rays along which the data values are bad, a binary image registering the edges of the original image is created. Forward projection is applied to the binary image to single out edges along rays. Data along views containing the identified bad rays are estimated by means of forward projecting the original image. Back projection of the negative of the estimated convolved data along these views onto the streaky image will remove streaks from the image. Image enhancement is achieved by means of back projecting the convolved data estimated from the image after the streak removal along views of bad rays

  11. Materials and boiler rig testing to support chemical cleaning of once-through AGR boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Platts, N.; Raffel, A.S.; Rudge, A.

    2002-01-01

    An extensive programme of work has been carried out to evaluate two candidate inhibited cleaning solutions for possible implementation on plant, which would be the first chemical clean of an AGR boiler. The two candidate cleaning solutions considered were a Stannine-inhibited citric acid/formic acid mixture (GOM106) and inhibited hydrofluoric acid. Citric acid-based cleaning processes are widely used within the UK Power Industry. The GOM106 solution, comprising a mixture of 3% citric acid, 0.5% formic acid and 0.05% Stannine LTP inhibitor, buffered with ammonia to pH 3.5, was developed specifically for the AGR boilers during the 1970's. Although a considerable amount of materials testing work was carried out by British Energy's predecessor companies to produce a recommended cleaning procedure there were some remaining concerns with the use of GOM106, from these earlier studies, for example, an increased risk of pitting attack associated with the removal of thick 9Cr oxide deposits and a risk of unacceptable damage in critical locations such as the upper transition joints and other weld locations. Hence, additional testing was still required to validate the solution for use on plant. Inhibited hydrofluoric acid (HFA) was also evaluated as an alternative reagent to GOM106. HFA has been used extensively for cleaning mild and low'alloy steel boiler tubes in fossil-fired plant in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and is known to remove oxide quickly. Waste treatment is also easier than for the GOM106 process and some protection against damage to the boiler tube materials is provided by complexing of fluoride with ferric ion. Validation of the potential reagents and inhibitors was achieved by assessing the rate and effectiveness of oxide removal from specimens of helical boiler tubing and welds, together with establishing the extent of any metal loss or localised damage. The initial materials testing resulted in the inhibited ammoniated citric / formic acid reagent being

  12. Plasma Cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  13. Effectiveness of aged graffiti cleaning on granite by chemical and mechanical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Vera; Dionísio, Amélia; Santiago Pozo-Antonio, José

    2017-04-01

    Granite is one of the most common building stones in the European Cultural Heritage mainly in Northwest Iberian Peninsula. Nowadays, graffiti when a result of an act of vandalism is one of the most important threat, involving a serious risk to heritage sustainability. The cleaning is expensive and in most of the cases, the complete removal is not achieved. Many cities worldwide spend huge amounts of money in cleaning campaigns and European Commission started to create urban environment policies to prevent and eliminate graffiti and also finance projects to develop new cleaning procedures and antigraffiti coatings1,2. However, in many cases graffiti is applied in monuments and façades without antigraffiti and in real practice, they are only cleaned after being long exposure to the atmosphere, reaction with the environment (rain and atmospheric pollutants) and also with the substrate, leading changes in their physical and chemical properties. However, no scientific studies focused on graffiti aging were found and also on the influence of the aging on the cleaning effectiveness, which is always evaluated with fresh graffiti. Therefore, the need to optimize the cleaning of aged graffiti is urgent. This paper aims to study the influence of the exposition of graffiti paintings to one of the most important urban contaminant SO2 on the cleaning effectiveness of graffiti on the valuable ornamental granite Rosa Porriño. Two different chemical products and two different mechanical procedures based on low pressure projection (wet and dry) were evaluated. Four different colour graffiti paintings (red, black, blue and silver) with different compositions were tested. The criteria for assessing the global cleaning effectiveness was considering the graffiti extraction and also the damage induced on the substrate through changes in the chromatic parameters, static contact angle and surface roughness of the stones, identification of deleterious products and modification of the

  14. Chemical microreactor and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan [Livermore, CA

    2011-08-09

    A method for forming a chemical microreactor includes forming at least one capillary microchannel in a substrate having at least one inlet and at least one outlet, integrating at least one heater into the chemical microreactor, interfacing the capillary microchannel with a liquid chemical reservoir at the inlet of the capillary microchannel, and interfacing the capillary microchannel with a porous membrane near the outlet of the capillary microchannel, the porous membrane being positioned beyond the outlet of the capillary microchannel, wherein the porous membrane has at least one catalyst material imbedded therein.

  15. Cheap non-toxic non-corrosive method of glass cleaning evaluated by contact angle, AFM, and SEM-EDX measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Tania; Naughton, Daragh

    2017-05-01

    Glass surface cleaning is the very first step in advanced coating deposition and it also finds use in conserving museum objects. However, most of the wet chemical methods of glass cleaning use toxic and corrosive chemicals like concentrated sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ), piranha (a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and 30% hydrogen peroxide), and hydrogen fluoride (HF). On the other hand, most of the dry cleaning techniques like UV-ozone, plasma, and laser treatment require costly instruments. In this report, five eco-friendly wet chemical methods of glass cleaning were evaluated in terms of contact angle (measured by optical tensiometer), nano-scale surface roughness (measured by atomic force microscopy or AFM), and elemental composition (measured by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy or SEM-EDX). These glass cleaning methods are devoid of harsh chemicals and costly equipment, hence can be applied in situ in close proximity with plantation such as greenhouse or upon subtle objects such as museum artifacts. Out of these five methods, three methods are based on the chemical principle of chelation. It was found that the citric acid cleaning method gave the greatest change in contact angle within the hydrophilic regime (14.25° for new glass) indicating effective cleansing and the least surface roughness (0.178 nm for new glass) indicating no corrosive effect. One of the glass sample showed unique features which were traced backed to the history of the glass usage.

  16. Final status report in preparation for the chemical cleaning of Dresden-1, DNS-D1-034

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report discusses the status of all of the activities conducted in preparation for the chemical cleaning of the Dresden-1 Nuclear Power Plant of Commonwealth Edison of Illinois. The metallurgical testing of a solvent and its ability to remove radioactivity are reviewed. Included are all engineering details relating to the modifications to the primary system to be able to perform the chemical cleaning and to rinse the cleaning solvent out of the equipment. A facility to store and process spent cleaning solutions is described in detail. Construction activities and preoperational activities are recounted. Licensing activities, quality assurance, safety, and radiation protection are discussed. The report includes recommendations for future actions for restarting the project when approval is received. All of the efforts discussed in this Final Status Report led to the conclusion that the chemical cleaning, as planned, was feasible. All of the necessary modifications and new equipment are in place and are operational

  17. Evaluation of 5 cleaning and disinfection methods for nets used to collect zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collymore, Chereen; Porelli, Gina; Lieggi, Christine; Lipman, Neil S

    2014-11-01

    Few standardized methods of cleaning and disinfecting equipment in zebrafish facilities have been published, even though the effectiveness of these procedures is vital to preventing the transmission of pathogenic organisms. Four chemical disinfectants and rinsing with municipal tap water were evaluated for their ability to disinfect nets used to capture zebrafish. The disinfectants included benzalkonium chloride+methylene blue, sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and potassium peroxymonosulfate+sodium chloride for a soak time of 5 or 30 min. Disinfection effectiveness was evaluated by using an ATP-based system that measured the reduction in absolute number and percentage of relative light units. In addition, nets were cultured aerobically on blood and MacConkey agar plates to determine the number of bacteria remaining after disinfection procedures. Soaking nets in sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and in potassium peroxymonosulfate+sodium chloride for 5 or 30 min were effective means of disinfection, according to at least 90% reduction in the number of relative light units and no bacterial growth after cleaning. These results will aid facility managers, veterinarians and investigators in selecting net cleaning and disinfection protocols.

  18. Importance of deposit information in the design and execution of steam generator chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, O.; Remark, J.

    1997-01-01

    During the planning stages of the chemical cleaning of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) units 2 and 3 steam generators, it was determined that an understanding of the steam generator deposit loading and composition was essential to the design and success of the project. It was also determined that qualification testing, preferably with actual deposits from the SONGS steam generators, was also essential. SONGS units 2 and 3 have Combustion Engineering (CE)-designed pressurized water reactors. Each unit has two CE model 3410 steam generators. Each steam generator has 9350 alloy 600 tubes with 1.9-cm (3/4 in.) outside diameter. Unit 2 began commercial operation in 1983, and unit 3, in 1984. The purpose of this technical paper is to explain the effort and methodology for deposit composition, characterization, and quantification. In addition, the deposit qualification testing and design of the cleaning are discussed

  19. Preventive acid chemical cleaning operation (PACCO) on steam generator in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traino, Jules; Ruiz Martinez, Jose Thomas; Rottner, Bernard; Vedova, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Steam Generators (SG) usually present important deposit loading and Tube Support Blockage, resulting from Secondary Side corrosion products. These phenomena modify SG behavior which can lead to safety, heat exchange performance and lifetime problems. In this context, a Chemical Cleaning Process (PACCO) was designed to solve the issue. After almost two years of intensive lab tests, pilot simulation and mock-ups, the chemical process was finally qualified by EDF. The aim of the work was firstly the development in laboratory of a chemical process that could eliminate partially the deposit loading, respecting the integrity of materials and gas emission limits. Secondly, the objective was the design and the implementation of the process on-site. The process has been applied successfully in 3 SG in Dampierre nuclear power plant in France on July 2013. The main results were: - Corrosion < 100 μm. - 40% of the initial deposit loading, removed by SG. (authors)

  20. Evaluating clean energy alternatives for Jiangsu, China: An improved multi-criteria decision making method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Peng; Newton, Sidney; Fang, Jian-xin; Zhou, De-qun; Zhang, Lu-ping

    2015-01-01

    Promoting the utilization of clean energy has been identified as one potential solution to addressing environmental pollution and achieving sustainable development in many countries around the world. Evaluating clean energy alternatives includes a requirement to balance multiple conflict criteria, including technology, environment, economy and society, all of which are incommensurate and interdependent. Traditional MCDM (multi-criteria decision making) methods, such as the weighted average method, often fail to aggregate such criteria consistently. In this paper, an improved MCDM method based on fuzzy measure and integral is developed and applied to evaluate four primary clean energy options for Jiangsu Province, China. The results confirm that the preferred clean energy option for Jiangsu is solar photovoltaic, followed by wind, biomass and finally nuclear. A sensitivity analysis is also conducted to evaluate the values of clean energy resources for Jiangsu. The ordered weighted average method is also applied to compare the method mentioned above in our empirical study. The results show that the improved MCDM method provides higher discrimination between alternative clean energy alternatives. - Highlights: • Interactions among evaluation criteria of clean energy resources are taken into account. • An improved multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) method is proposed based on entropy weight method, fuzzy measure and integral. • Clean energy resources of Jiangsu are evaluated with the improved MCDM method, and their ranks are identified.

  1. Evaluation of EDTA based chemical formulations for the cleaning of monel-400 tubed steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velmurugan, S.; Rufus, A.L.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Kumar, P.S.; Veena, S.N.; Srinivasan, M.P.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Steam Generator (SG) is an important component in any nuclear power plant which contributes significantly for the over all performance of the reactor. The failure of SG tubes occurs mainly by corrosion under accelerated conditions caused by fouling. There is continuous ingress of the corrosion products and ionic impurities from the condenser and feed train of the secondary heat transfer system. The corrosion products accumulate in the stagnant areas near the tube sheet, over the tube support plates and in the tube to tube support plate crevices. These accumulated deposits help to concentrate the aggressive impurities and induce a variety of corrosion processes affecting the structural materials and finally leading to failure of the SG tube. Scale forming impurities can deposit over the tube surfaces and result in reduction of heat transfer efficiency and over heating of the surfaces. Every effort is being made to control the transport of impurities to the steam generator. Increased blow down, installation of condensate polishers and use of all volatile amines have helped to reduce the corrosion product and ionic impurities input into the steam generators of PHWRs. Despite these efforts, failures of SG tubes in PHWRs have been reported. Hence, attempts are being made to develop chemical formulations to clean the deposits accumulated in the steam generators. The EPRI-SGOG chemical cleaning process has been tried with good success in steam generators of different designs including the steam generators of PHWRs. This paper discusses the work on the evaluation of EDTA based chemical cleaning formulations for monel-400 tubed steam generators of PHWRs. (author)

  2. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material

  3. Carbon Dioxide Nucleation as a Novel Cleaning Method for Sodium Alginate Fouling Removal from Reverse Osmosis Membranes desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Heba

    2017-05-01

    The use of Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes have been significantly increasing in water desalination, and the main operational obstacle in RO desalination plants is membrane fouling. Among other solutes, dissolved biopolymers, such as polysaccharides can lead to severe membrane fouling especially with the addition of calcium ions because of the complexation formation between the surface of membrane and foulants materials. However, this complexation can also take place in the feed bulk, resulting in foulants aggregates formation. Although there are some physical techniques that can maintain the membrane performance without reducing its lifetime, only chemical cleanings are still commonly used in RO plants. In this study, a novel cleaning method is proposed to restore the membrane performance by removing the deposited foulants without reducing the membrane lifetime. The cleaning method is based on using water saturated with dissolved CO2 gas, and its principle is based on producing spontaneous CO2 bubbles due to local pressure difference leading to nucleation of bubbles throughout the membrane surface, especially at nucleation sites, which improve the cleaning efficiency. Alginic acid sodium salt was used as a model of polysaccharides foulants in presence of different concentrations of NaCl and calcium ions aiming to enhance membrane fouling, and then CO2 cleaning solution efficiency, in terms flux recovery (FR), was tested under different operating conditions and compared to other cleaning methods. Average FR of 20%±3, 25%±3 and 80%±3 for MilliQ water, a cleaning solution at pH4, and CO2 solution at 6 bar, 0.17 m/s, and 23 ̊C ±0.2 for 6 minutes were obtained, respectively. The efficiency of this novel cleaning method was also compared to direct osmosis overnight, and the average flux was comparable (about 60%±3), though that the cleaning time was significantly different. Various calcium concentrations (0-10 mM) were added in the alginate solution to study the

  4. Decreasing Beam Auto Tuning Interruption Events with In-Situ Chemical Cleaning on Axcelis GSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Dieter; Spreitzer, Stefan; Vogl, Josef; Bishop, Steve; Eldridge, David; Kaim, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Ion beam auto tuning time and success rate are often major factors in the utilization and productivity of ion implanters. Tuning software frequently fails to meet specified setup times or recipe parameters, causing production stoppages and requiring manual intervention. Build-up of conductive deposits in the arc chamber and extraction gap can be one of the main causes of auto tuning problems. The deposits cause glitching and ion beam instabilities, which lead to errors in the software optimization routines. Infineon Regensburg has been testing use of XeF 2 , an in-situ chemical cleaning reagent, with positive results in reducing auto tuning interruption events.

  5. NEW POSSIBILITIES OF ENVIRONMENTALY FRIENDLY CLEANING METHOD BY LASER TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lýdia Sobotová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Still deteriorating environment, requirements for reducing of production waste, requirements for the protection of the working environment, the formation of new technologies and materials, as well as the economic conditions are forcing manufacturers to use the environmentally friendly technology. The contribution deals with new progressive possibilities of cleaning products, raw materials and with the establishment of a minimum production waste. The research focuses on the possibilities of laser cleaning of materials, under defined technological conditions. In the contribution is presented the results of realized experiments in Technical University of Kosice, together created in cooperation with Trumpf Slovakia, s.r.o

  6. New Test Method for Rotating Spray Head Performance in Tank Cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby, Mette; Dethlefsen, Markus Wied; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk

    2011-01-01

    on a standardised stainless steel plate; positioning the steel plate in tank; record total cleaning time. The method was tested on four different RSHs from Alfa Laval. Cleaning times were recorded at different distances and flow rates. Using the new method, it is possible to distinguish between RSHs based...

  7. Substrate Effect on Plasma Clean Efficiency in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ko JangJian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma clean in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD system plays an important role to ensure the same chamber condition after numerous film depositions. The periodic and applicable plasma clean in deposition chamber also increases wafer yield due to less defect produced during the deposition process. In this study, the plasma clean rate (PCR of silicon oxide is investigated after the silicon nitride deposited on Cu and silicon oxide substrates by remote plasma system (RPS, respectively. The experimental results show that the PCR drastically decreases with Cu substrate compared to that with silicon oxide substrate after numerous silicon nitride depositions. To understand the substrate effect on PCR, the surface element analysis and bonding configuration are executed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS is used to analyze microelement of metal ions on the surface of shower head in the PECVD chamber. According to Cu substrate, the results show that micro Cu ion and the CuOx bonding can be detected on the surface of shower head. The Cu ion contamination might grab the fluorine radicals produced by NF3 ddissociation in the RPS and that induces the drastic decrease on PCR.

  8. Data Cleaning Methods for Client and Proxy Logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinreich, H.; Obendorf, H.; Herder, E.; Edmonds, A.; Hawkey, K.; Kellar, M.; Turnbull, D.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present our experiences with the cleaning of Web client and proxy usage logs, based on a long-term browsing study with 25 participants. A detailed clickstream log, recorded using a Web intermediary, was combined with a second log of user interface actions, which was captured by a

  9. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  10. EM-31 Alternative And Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Program For Sludge Heel Removal - 11220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.; Hay, M.; Wiersma, B.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-01-01

    Mixtures of oxalic acid with nitric acid have been shown to be superior to oxalic acid alone for the dissolution of iron-rich High Level Waste sludge heels. Optimized conditions resulting in minimal oxalate usage and stoichiometric iron dissolution (based on added oxalate ion) have been determined for hematite (a primary sludge iron phase) in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures. The acid mixtures performed better than expected based on the solubility of hematite in the individual acids through a synergistic effect in which the preferred 1:1 Fe:oxalate complex is formed. This allows for the minimization of oxalate additions to the waste stream. Carbon steel corrosion rates were measured in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures to evaluate the impacts of chemical cleaning with these solutions on waste tank integrity. Manageable corrosion rates were observed in the concentration ranges of interest for an acid contact timescale of 1 month. Kinetics tests involving hematite and gibbsite (a primary sludge aluminum phase) have confirmed that (ge)90% solids dissolution occurs within 3 weeks. Based on these results, the chemical cleaning conditions recommended to promote minimal oxalate usage and manageable corrosion include: 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid/0.175 M nitric acid mixture, 50 C, 2-3 week contact time with agitation.

  11. TESTING OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS ACTUAL WASTE TANK 5F AND TANK 12H SLUDGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.; King, W.

    2011-08-22

    Forty three of the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have internal structures that hinder removal of the last approximately five thousand gallons of waste sludge solely by mechanical means. Chemical cleaning can be utilized to dissolve the sludge heel with oxalic acid (OA) and pump the material to a separate waste tank in preparation for final disposition. This dissolved sludge material is pH adjusted downstream of the dissolution process, precipitating the sludge components along with sodium oxalate solids. The large quantities of sodium oxalate and other metal oxalates formed impact downstream processes by requiring additional washing during sludge batch preparation and increase the amount of material that must be processed in the tank farm evaporator systems and the Saltstone Processing Facility. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) was identified as a potential method for greatly reducing the impact of oxalate additions to the SRS Tank Farms without adding additional components to the waste that would extend processing or increase waste form volumes. In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate an alternative to the baseline 8 wt. % OA chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. The baseline OA technology results in the addition of significant volumes of oxalate salts to the SRS tank farm and there is insufficient space to accommodate the neutralized streams resulting from the treatment of the multiple remaining waste tanks requiring closure. ECC is a promising alternative to bulk OA cleaning, which utilizes a more dilute OA (nominally 2 wt. % at a pH of around 2) and an oxalate destruction technology. The technology is being adapted by AREVA from their decontamination technology for Nuclear Power Plant secondary side scale removal. This report contains results from the SRNL small scale testing of the ECC process

  12. 太阳能硅料化学清洗研究进展%Development of chemical cleaning for solar energy silicon material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申燕; 贾艳飞; 姚旭; 张健; 廉佳林

    2016-01-01

    Silicon as the main material of solar photovoltaic power generation in the solar photovoltaic industry, the demand for silicon material cleanliness also gradualy increases under the background of the rapid development of the market. Chemical cleaning is the main method of silicon material cleaning. In this paper, the research progress of the standard cleaning method ( RCA ) and depending on the silicon material by RCA method to develop other chemical cleaning method was reviewed.%多晶硅作为太阳能光伏发电的主要材料,在太阳能光伏产业市场迅速发展的大背景下,对硅料清洁度的需求也逐步增加。化学清洗是目前硅料清洗的主要方法。本文综述了近年来硅料化学清洗的基本方法(RCA)及根据硅料的不同由RCA法发展出的其他化学清洗方法。

  13. Evaluation of Various Cleaning Methods to Remove Bacillus Spores from Spacecraft Hardware Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm × 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 × 103 cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  14. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Cynthia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy’s release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  15. Fast New Method for Temporary Chemical Passivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Solčanský

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The main material parameter of silicon, that influences the effectiveness of photovoltaic cells, is the minority carrier bulk lifetime.It may change in the technological process especially during high temperature operations. Monitoring of the carrier bulk-lifetimeis necessary for modifying the whole technological process of production. For the measurement of the minority carrier bulk-lifetimethe characterization method MW PCD (Microwave Photoconductance Decay is used, where the result of measurement is the effectivecarrier lifetime, which is very dependent on the surface recombination velocity and therefore on the quality of a silicon surfacepassivation.This work deals with an examination of a different solution types for the chemical passivation of a silicon surface. Varioussolutions are tested on silicon wafers for their consequent comparison. The main purpose of this work is to find optimal solution, whichsuits the requirements of a time stability and start-up velocity of passivation, reproducibility of the measurements and a possibilityof a perfect cleaning of a passivating solution remains from a silicon surface. Another purpose of this work is to identify the parametersof other quinhydrone solutions with different concentrations as compared with the quinhydrone solution in methanol witha concentration of 0.07 mol/dm³ marked QM007 (referential solution.The method of an effective chemical passivation with a quinhydrone in methanol solution was suggested. The solution witha concentration of 0.07 mol /dm3 fulfills all required criteria. The work also confirms the influence of increased concentrationquinhydrone on the temporal stability of the passivation layer and the effect for textured silicon wafers. In conclusion, the influenceof an illumination and the temperature on the properties of the passivating solution QM007 is discussed.

  16. Processes of elimination of activated corrosion products. Chemical decontamination - fuel cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, C.; Brun, C.; Neuhaus, R.; Richier, S.; Bachet, M.

    2007-01-01

    The abatement of the individual and collective dose of a PWR imposes to control the source term through different processes implemented during the plant exploitation. When the limits of these different optimization processes are reached, the abatement of dose rates requires the implementation of curative processes. The objective is thus to eliminate the contaminated oxides and deposits present on surfaces free of radiation flux, and eventually on surfaces under radiation flux and on the fuel itself. The chemical decontamination of equipments and systems is the main and universal remedy implemented at different levels. On the other hand, the ultrasonic cleaning of fuel assemblies is a promising process. This paper aims at illustrating these different techniques using concrete examples of application in France and abroad (decontamination during steam generator replacement, decontamination of primary pump scroll in hot workshop, decontamination of loop sections, ultrasonic cleaning of fuel). The description of these different operations stresses on their efficiency in terms of dosimetric gain, duration of implementation, generation of wastes, and recontamination following their implementation. (J.S.)

  17. Steam generators secondary side chemical cleaning at Point Lepreau using the Siemens high temperature process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, K.; MacNeil, C.; Odar, S.; Kuhnke, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the chemical cleaning of the four steam generators at the Point Lepreau facility, which was accomplished as a part of a normal service outage. The steam generators had been in service for twelve years. Sludge samples showed the main elements were Fe, P and Na, with minor amounts of Ca, Mg, Mn, Cr, Zn, Cl, Cu, Ni, Ti, Si, and Pb, 90% in the form of Magnetite, substantial phosphate, and trace amounts of silicates. The steam generators were experiencing partial blockage of broached holes in the TSPs, and corrosion on tube ODs in the form of pitting and wastage. In addition heat transfer was clearly deteriorating. More than 1000 kg of magnetite and 124 kg of salts were removed from the four steam generators

  18. Anaerobic microbiological method of cleaning water contaminated by metallurgical slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Леонідівна Дан

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of environmental protection and rational use of water resources is one of the most important problems of environmental policy in Ukraine. This problem in Mariupol is particularly acute as metallurgical and coke industries cause significant damage to adjacent water bodies (the Kalchyk, the Kalmius and coastal zone of the Sea of Azov. One of the most harmful components of wastewater of these enterprises are sulfide-containing compounds. These compounds in water can cause great harm to both human health and the environment. For example, in 1999 the main city enterprises (AZOVSTAL IRON & STEEL WORKS and ILYICH IRON AND STEEL WORKS discharged 885,0 million m³ of wastewater (including 403,9 million m³ of polluted waste water into water bodies. The slag dumps and landfills in close proximity to the sea form a source of dangerous pollution, because contaminated water infiltration washed out here in the groundwater and surface water, get into the Sea of Azov later on. There are 97 mg/l of sulfides in the protective dam of AZOVSTAL IRON & STEEL WORKS, what exceeds the standards (MPC = 10 mg/l. It makes it possible for us to put forward biochemical purification processes. Anaerobic microbiological method proposed in the article has several advantages (compact hardware design, a minimum amount of activated sludge and lack of energy consumption for aeration over the existing wastewater treatment (chemical, mechanical, biological. The experimental procedure consisted in introducing the medium to be purified purified into microbial communities of high concentration (Thiobacillus «X», Thiobacillus concretivorus, which assimilated organic substances of the medium as a primary energy source. The kinetics of sulfide compounds removal by means of anaerobic microbiological method was considered. The effectiveness of wastewater treatment with changing purification process conditions has been also assessed (concentration of sulfides, reactor type, p

  19. Study on effective laser cleaning method to remove carbon layer from a gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H; Lodha, G S; Choubey, A K; Upadhyaya, B N

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon cracking and carbon contamination is a common problem in soft x-ray Synchrotron Radiation (SR) beamlines. Carbon contamination on optics is known to absorb and scatter radiation close to the C K-edge (284 eV) spectral region. The purpose of this work is to study and develop a laser cleaning method that can effectively remove the carbon contaminations without damaging the underneath gold-coated optics. The laser cleaning process is a non-contact, accurate, efficient and safe. Nd:YAG laser of 100 ns pulse duration is used for carbon cleaning. The effect of laser pulse duration, laser fluence, number of laser passes, angle of incidence and spot overlapping on the cleaning performance is studied. Cleaning effect and subsequent film quality after laser irradiation is analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray reflectivity (SXR) techniques.

  20. Effects of physical and chemical aspects on membrane fouling and cleaning using interfacial free energy analysis in forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanzhu; Dong, Bingzhi

    2018-05-20

    Natural organic matter (NOM) in micro-polluted water purification using membranes is a critical issue to handle. Understanding the fouling mechanism in the forward osmosis (FO) process, particularly identifying the predominant factor that controls membrane fouling, could have significant effects on exerting the advantages of FO technique. Cellulose triacetate no-woven (CTA-NW) membrane is applied to experiments with a high removal efficiency (> 99%) for the model foulant. Tannic acid (TA) is used as a surrogate foulant for NOM in the membrane fouling process, thus enabling the analysis of the effects of physical and chemical aspects of water flux, retention, and adsorption. The membrane fouling behavior is affected mainly by the combined effects of the osmotic dragging force and the interaction of the pH in the working solution, foulants, and calcium ions, as demonstrated by the water flux loss and the changes of membrane retention and adsorption. The fouled CTA-NW membrane (in PRO mode) could be flux-recovered by > 85% through physical cleaning methods. The interfacial free energy analysis theory was used to analyze the membrane fouling behavior with calculating the interfacial cohesion and adhesion free energies. The cohesion free energy refers to the deposition of foulants (TA or TA combined with calcium ions) on a fouled membrane. In addition, the adhesion free energy could be used to evaluate the interaction between foulants and a clean membrane.

  1. Raman enhancement on ultra-clean graphene quantum dots produced by quasi-equilibrium plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Donghua; Chen, Xiaosong; Hu, Yibin; Sun, Tai; Song, Zhibo; Zheng, Yujie; Cao, Yongbin; Cai, Zhi; Cao, Min; Peng, Lan; Huang, Yuli; Du, Lei; Yang, Wuli; Chen, Gang; Wei, Dapeng; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Wei, Dacheng

    2018-01-15

    Graphene is regarded as a potential surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate. However, the application of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) has had limited success due to material quality. Here, we develop a quasi-equilibrium plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method to produce high-quality ultra-clean GQDs with sizes down to 2 nm directly on SiO 2 /Si, which are used as SERS substrates. The enhancement factor, which depends on the GQD size, is higher than conventional graphene sheets with sensitivity down to 1 × 10 -9  mol L -1 rhodamine. This is attributed to the high-quality GQDs with atomically clean surfaces and large number of edges, as well as the enhanced charge transfer between molecules and GQDs with appropriate diameters due to the existence of Van Hove singularities in the electronic density of states. This work demonstrates a sensitive SERS substrate, and is valuable for applications of GQDs in graphene-based photonics and optoelectronics.

  2. Evaluation of methods for cleaning low carbon uranium metal and alloy samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, K.; Dixon, M.

    1979-01-01

    Several methods for cleaning uranium samples prior to carbon analysis, using a Leco Carbon Analyzer, were evaluated. Use of Oakite Aluminum NST Cleaner followed by water and acetone rinse was found to be the best overall technique

  3. The measurement of surface roughness to determine the suitability of different methods for stone cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Calvo, Carmen; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Fort, Rafael; Varas-Muriel, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    The roughness of stone surface was measured, before and after bead blasting-based cleaning methods, to select the most efficient one to be used in masonry and stonework of specific areas of the Cathedral of Segovia (Spain). These types of cleaning methods can, besides the removal of soiling and surface deposits, leave a rougher surface, which would mean higher and more rapid water retention and deposit accumulation due to a specific surface increase, therefore accelerating stone decay. Or, in contrast, the cleaning method can be so aggressive that it can smooth the surface by reducing its roughness, a fact that usually corresponds to excessive material removal—soot and deposits–-but also part of the stone substrate. Roughness results were complemented with scanning electron microscopy observations and analyses and colour measurements. Finally, it was possible to select the best cleaning method among the six that were analysed, for different areas and different stone materials. Therefore, this study confirms the measurement of surface roughness as a reliable test to determine the suitability of stone cleaning methods; it is a non-destructive technique, portable and friendly to use, which can help us to rapidly assess—together with other techniques—the efficacy and aggressiveness of the stone cleaning method. (paper)

  4. Evaluation of cleaning methods applied in home environments after renovation and remodeling activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiin, L.-M.; Lu, S.-E.; Sannoh, Sulaiman; Lim, B.S.; Rhoads, G.G.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a cleaning trial in 40 northern New Jersey homes where home renovation and remodeling (R and R) activities were undertaken. Two cleaning protocols were used in the study: a specific method recommended by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in the 1995 'Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing', using a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered vacuum cleaner and a tri-sodium phosphate solution (TSP); and an alternative method using a household vacuum cleaner and a household detergent. Eligible homes were built before the 1970s with potential lead-based paint and had recent R and R activities without thorough cleaning. The two cleaning protocols were randomly assigned to the participants' homes and followed the HUD-recommended three-step procedure: vacuuming, wet washing, and repeat vacuuming. Wipe sampling was conducted on floor surfaces or windowsills before and after cleaning to evaluate the efficacy. All floor and windowsill data indicated that both methods (TSP/HEPA and non-TSP/non-HEPA) were effective in reducing lead loading on the surfaces (P<0.001). When cleaning was applied to surfaces with initial lead loading above the clearance standards, the reductions were even greater, above 95% for either cleaning method. The mixed-effect model analysis showed no significant difference between the two methods. Baseline lead loading was found to be associated with lead loading reduction significantly on floors (P<0.001) and marginally on windowsills (P=0.077). Such relations were different between the two cleaning methods significantly on floors (P<0.001) and marginally on windowsills (P=0.066), with the TSP/HEPA method being favored for higher baseline levels and the non-TSP/non-HEPA method for lower baseline levels. For the 10 homes with lead abatement, almost all post-cleaning lead loadings were below the standards using either cleaning method. Based on our results, we recommend that

  5. Investigation of the Pulsed Annular Gas Jet for Chemical Reactor Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvegintsev Valery Ivanovich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most economical technology for production of titanium dioxide pigment is plasma-chemical syntheses with the heating of the oxygen. The highlight of the given reaction is formation of a solid phase as a result of interactions between two gases, thus brings the formation of particle deposits on the reactor walls, and to disturbing the normal operation of the technological process. For the solving of the task of reactor internal walls cleaning the pulsed gaseous system was suggested and investigated, which throws circular oxygen jet along surfaces through regular intervals. Study of aerodynamic efficiency of the impulse system was carried by numerical modeling and experimentally with the help of a specially created experimental facility. The distribution of the pulsed flow velocity at the exit of cylindrical reactor was measured. The experimental results have shown that used impulse device creates a pulsed jet with high value of the specified flow rate. It allows to get high velocities that are sufficient for the particle deposits destruction and their removal away. Designed pulsed peelings system has shown high efficiency and reliability in functioning that allows us to recommend it for wide spreading in chemical industry.

  6. Study of surface cleaning methods and pyrolysis temperatures on nanostructured carbon films using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerber, Pranita; Porter, Lisa M.; McCullough, Lynne A.; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Engelhard, Mark; Baer, Donald [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chemistry Department, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Nanostructured carbon (ns-C) films fabricated by stabilization and pyrolysis of diblock copolymers are of interest for a variety of electrical/electronic applications due to their chemical inertness, high-temperature insensitivity, very high surface area, and tunable electrical resistivity over a wide range [Kulkarni et al., Synth. Met. 159, 177 (2009)]. Because of their high porosity and associated high specific surface area, controlled surface cleaning studies are important for fabricating electronic devices from these films. In this study, quantification of surface composition and surface cleaning studies on ns-C films synthesized by carbonization of diblock copolymers of polyacrylonitrile-b-poly(n-butyl acrylate) at two different temperatures were carried out. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis and to determine the efficacy of various surface cleaning methods for ns-C films and to examine the polymer residues in the films. The in-situ surface cleaning methods included HF vapor treatment, vacuum annealing, and exposure to UV-ozone. Quantitative analysis of high-resolution XPS scans showed 11 at. % nitrogen was present in the films pyrolyzed at 600 Degree-Sign C, suggesting incomplete denitrogenation of the copolymer films. The nitrogen atomic concentration decreased significantly for films pyrolyzed at 900 Degree-Sign C confirming extensive denitrogenation at that temperature. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nitrogen subpeaks indicated higher loss of nitrogen atoms residing at the edge of graphitic clusters relative to that of nitrogen atoms within the graphitic clusters, suggesting higher graphitization with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Of the surface cleaning methods investigated, in-situ annealing of the films at 300 Degree-Sign C for 40 min was found to be the most efficacious in removing adventitious carbon and oxygen impurities from the surface.

  7. Assessment of test methods for evaluating effectiveness of cleaning flexible endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Rebecca E; Pietsch, Jennifer J

    2018-06-01

    Strict adherence to each step of reprocessing is imperative to removing potentially infectious agents. Multiple methods for verifying proper reprocessing exist; however, each presents challenges and limitations, and best practice within the industry has not been established. Our goal was to evaluate endoscope cleaning verification tests with particular interest in the evaluation of the manual cleaning step. The results of the cleaning verification tests were compared with microbial culturing to see if a positive cleaning verification test would be predictive of microbial growth. This study was conducted at 2 high-volume endoscopy units within a multisite health care system. Each of the 90 endoscopes were tested for adenosine triphosphate, protein, microbial growth via agar plate, and rapid gram-negative culture via assay. The endoscopes were tested in 3 locations: the instrument channel, control knob, and elevator mechanism. This analysis showed substantial level of agreement between protein detection postmanual cleaning and protein detection post-high-level disinfection at the control head for scopes sampled sequentially. This study suggests that if protein is detected postmanual cleaning, there is a significant likelihood that protein will also be detected post-high-level disinfection. It also infers that a cleaning verification test is not predictive of microbial growth. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Method for cleaning the filter pockets of dust gas filter systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margraf, A

    1975-05-07

    The invention deals with a method to clean filter pockets filled with dust gas. By a periodic to and fro air jet attached to a scavenging blower, a pulsed fluttering movement of the filter surface is obtained which releases the outer layers of dust. The charging of the filter pockets with scavenging air to clean the filter material can be carried out immediately on the pulsed admission with suitable time control.

  9. Self-cleaning Foliar Surfaces Characterization using RIMAPS Technique and Variogram Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosi, Pablo E.

    2002-01-01

    Along the last ten years many important studies about characterization of self-cleaning foliar surfaces have been done and focused new interest on this kind of surfaces.These studies were possible due to the development of a novel preparation technique for this biological material that let us observe the delicate structures of a foliar surface under scanning electron microscope (S.E.M.).This technique consists of replacing the natural water of the specimen by glycerol. Digital S.E.M. images from both self-cleaning and non-self-cleaning foliar surfaces were obtained and analyzed using RIMAPS technique and Variograms method. Our results revealed the existence of a common and exclusive geometrical pattern that is found in species which present self-cleaning foliar surfaces.This pattern combines at least nine different directions.The results from the Variograms method showed that the stomata play a key role in the determination of foliar surface roughness. In addition, spectra from RIMAPS technique constitute a fingerprint of a foliar surface so they can be used to find evolutionary relationships among species.Further studies will provide more detailed information to fully elucidate the self-cleaning pattern, so it might be possible to reproduce it on an artificial surface and make it self-cleaning

  10. Low-temperature wafer direct bonding of silicon and quartz glass by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxi; Xu, Jikai; Zeng, Xiaorun; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Chunqing; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile bonding process for combining silicon and quartz glass wafers by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning. After a post-annealing at 200 °C, strong bonding interfaces with no defects or microcracks were obtained. On the basis of the detailed surface and bonding interface characterizations, the bonding mechanism was explored and discussed. The amino groups terminated on the cleaned surfaces might contribute to the bonding strength enhancement during the annealing. This cost-effective bonding process has great potentials for silicon- and glass-based heterogeneous integrations without requiring a vacuum system.

  11. SBR treatment of tank truck cleaning wastewater: sludge characteristics, chemical and ecotoxicological effluent quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caluwé, Michel; Dobbeleers, Thomas; Daens, Dominique; Geuens, Luc; Blust, Ronny; Dries, Jan

    2017-08-02

    A lab-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was used to treat tank truck cleaning (TTC) wastewater with different operational strategies (identified as different stages). The first stage was an adaptation period for the seed sludge that originated from a continuous fed industrial plant treating TTC wastewater. The first stage was followed by a dynamic reactor operation based on the oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Thirdly, dynamic SBR control based on OUR treated a daily changing influent. Lastly, the reactor was operated with a gradually shortened fixed cycle. During operation, sludge settling evolved from nearly no settling to good settling sludge in 16 days. The sludge volume index improved from 200 to 70 mL gMLSS -1 in 16 days and remained stable during the whole reactor operation. The average soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) removal varied from 87.0% to 91.3% in the different stages while significant differences in the food to mass ratio were observed, varying from 0.11 (stage I) to 0.37 kgCOD.(kgMLVSS day) -1 (stage III). Effluent toxicity measurements were performed with Aliivibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Low sensitivity of Aliivibrio was observed. A few samples were acutely toxic for Daphnia; 50% of the tested effluent samples showed an inhibition of 100% for Pseudokirchneriella.

  12. EM-21 Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Program For Sludge Heel Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, M.; King, W.; Martino, C.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  13. Method for producing chemical energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2004-09-21

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles having a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer are prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  14. Nondestructive evaluation of the QT on the SG tubes affected by chemical cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ki Seok Shin; Cheon, Keun Young; Kim, Wang Bae [Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyong Mahn [UMI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The major mechanisms of flaws detected on the currently operating steam generator(SG) tubes are wear and stress corrosion cracking(SCC) defects. Wear defect has continuously occurred in the upper tube bundle imposed to the flow induced vibration at the interaction between tube and its support structure. Meanwhile, SCC has been formed by a variety of mixed mode, such as the corrosion susceptible material, residual stress and secondary side chemical environment of the SG tubes. Recently, corrosion related defects were detected in the domestic OPR 1000 model SG tubes especially in the egg crate tube support plate(TSP), as a form of axially oriented outer diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC). Therefore, the need to take corrective measures against the corrosion defects is required and various studies have been conducted to clarify the main causes of the defects. In general, as a representing SG tube materials, Ni based alloy 600 tubes have been widely applied and also adversely shown weak properties on the corrosion cracking resistivity. According to the studies on the factors developing corrosion cracking, densely accumulated sludge pile on the secondary side of the SG tubes have been mainly attributed to the formation of the corrosion defects. Therefore, it is imperative to secure applicable and efficient sludge removal process. In this paper, the chemical cleaning processes to dissolve and remove the sludge, thus promote the integrity of the SG tubes were introduced and eddy current testing(ECT) results on the pre cracked SG tubes to determine the effectiveness of those processes were represented as well.

  15. Evaluation of surface sampling method performance for Bacillus Spores on clean and dirty outdoor surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Einfeld, Wayne; Boucher, Raymond M.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Tezak, Matthew Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Recovery of Bacillus atrophaeous spores from grime-treated and clean surfaces was measured in a controlled chamber study to assess sampling method performance. Outdoor surfaces investigated by wipe and vacuum sampling methods included stainless steel, glass, marble and concrete. Bacillus atrophaeous spores were used as a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores in this study designed to assess whether grime-coated surfaces significantly affected surface sampling method performance when compared to clean surfaces. A series of chamber tests were carried out in which known amounts of spores were allowed to gravitationally settle onto both clean and dirty surfaces. Reference coupons were co-located with test coupons in all chamber experiments to provide a quantitative measure of initial surface concentrations of spores on all surfaces, thereby allowing sampling recovery calculations. Results from these tests, carried out under both low and high humidity conditions, show that spore recovery from grime-coated surfaces is the same as or better than spore recovery from clean surfaces. Statistically significant differences between method performance for grime-coated and clean surfaces were observed in only about half of the chamber tests conducted.

  16. Effects of cleaning methods upon preservation of stable isotopes and trace elements in shells of Cyprideis torosa (Crustacea, Ostracoda): Implications for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L. R.; Holmes, J. A.; Leng, M. J.; Sloane, H. J.; Horne, D. J.

    2018-06-01

    The trace element (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) geochemistry of fossil ostracod valves provide valuable information, particularly in lacustrine settings, on palaeo-water composition and palaeotemperature. The removal of sedimentary and organic contamination prior to geochemical analysis is essential to avoid bias of the results. Previous stable isotope and trace element work on ostracod shells has, however, employed different treatments for the removal of contamination beyond simple 'manual' cleaning using a paint brush and methanol under a low-power binocular microscope. For isotopic work pre-treatments include chemical oxidation, vacuum roasting and plasma ashing, and for trace element work sonication, chemical oxidation and reductive cleaning. The impact of different treatments on the geochemical composition of the valve calcite has not been evaluated in full, and a universal protocol has not been established. Here, a systematic investigation of the cleaning methods is undertaken using specimens of the ubiquitous euryhaline species, Cyprideis torosa. Cleaning methods are evaluated by undertaking paired analyses on a single carapace (comprising two valves); in modern ostracods, whose valves are assumed to be unaltered, the two valves should have identical geochemical and isotopic composition. Hence, when one valve is subjected to the chosen treatment and the other to simple manual cleaning any difference in composition can confidently be assigned to the treatment method. We show that certain cleaning methods have the potential to cause alteration to the geochemical signal, particularly Mg/Ca and δ18O, and hence have implications for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. For trace-element determinations we recommend cleaning by sonication and for stable isotope analysis, oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. These methods remove contamination, yet do not significantly alter the geochemical signal.

  17. ANALYSIS OF A NEW DIAFILTRATION METHOD OF CLEANING BUTTERMILK FROM LACTOSE WITH MINERAL COMPOSITION PRESERVED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bondar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Removing lactose from buttermilk and other dairy products is a topical problem, as there is a significant increase in morbidity rates due to lactose intolerance. In many cases, milk and dairy products containing lactose can not be completely excluded from the diet. These products have a number of valuable components. There are several ways to remove lactose from milk or other dairy products. They are based on separation methods of processing and on the use of enzymes. Among the separation methods, membrane treatment, including diafiltration, is of particular importance. A technique of engineering calculation of cleaning an ultrafiltration buttermilk concentrate is suggested. As a solvent that reduces the concentration of lactose, a nanofiltrate permeate of buttermilk ultrafiltration is used. This method allows preserving the chemical composition of the concentrate with lactose effectively removed. Basing on the experimental data of membrane productivity and their selectivity for lactose, the main characteristics of diafiltration are calculated for various practical applications. For practical purposes, it is advisable to use a buttermilk permeate nanofiltrate using highly selective lactose membranes. Selectivity for salts should be minimal. When comparing the different diafiltration variants, the most suitable is a periodic method, with continuous dilution, and a continuous method with a crossflow and reverse flow of the nanofiltrate. The smallest аmount of a nanofiltrate is observed in the case of a continuous countercurrent. The time for diafiltration treatment depends on the membrane’s specific parameters, process operating parameters, and the selected lactose purification variant. The most cost-effective is the continuous variant with a countercurrent nanofiltrate. However, it can not be recommended because of the considerable duration of the process. The suggested technique for calculating diafiltration allows quick evaluation of

  18. Evaluation of two recommended disinfection methods for cleaning cloths used in food services of southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Sabrina; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    In the State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Southern Brazil, a good manufacturing practices regulation was published recommending two disinfection methods for cleaning cloths used in food services. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of those methods. Cleaning cloths were sampled without prior notice at food services, on common working days. For the analyses, the cloths were divided in two sub-samples, being one of them microbiologically analyzed. The second sub-sample was further divided in two pieces and submitted to hand washing for two minutes. After that, one piece was boiled in water for 15 min and the other one was soaked in a 200 ppm sodium hypochlorite solution for 15 min. Both pieces of cloth were submitted to microbiological analyses. Cleaning cloths presented total aerobic mean counts of 6.9 ± 6.7 log/cm(2). All cleaning cloths presented coliform contamination, and 40% demonstrated mean counts of 6.2 ± 5.6 log/cm(2). Presumptive S. aureus mean counts of 5.5 ± 4.9 log/cm(2) were found. No statistic correlation was observed among the number of meals served daily in the food services and the microbiological contamination levels. After washing and disinfection, microbiological counts were significantly (p disinfect cleaning cloths used in food services.

  19. Chemical cleaning and decontamination of equipments in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station-2, Kota, NPCIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, P.K.; Saini, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Heat exchanger of End Shield Cooling System of RAPS-2 made up of 70:30 cupronickel was cleaned with a cleaning solution containing 5% sulphamic acid for periods of around 10 hours at a temperature of 60 deg C. The cleaning was attempted to remove the deposit inside the tube of heat exchanger to make a path of the probe to go inside the tube for eddy current testing for measurement of wall thinning. During the campaign 20 kg of CaCO 3 and 5 kg of SiO 2 were removed. Pre-cooler of heat transport system of RAPS-2 made up of monel was cleaned with a cleaning solution containing 5% citric acid, 1% ascorbic acid and 1% NTA at 50-60 deg C temperature for about 20 hours. The cleaning was attempted to remove the deposit inside the tube of pre cooler to make a path of the probe to go inside the tube for eddy current testing for measurement of wall thinning. For the pre-cooler a decontamination factor of 2 to 3 was obtained. The paper describes about the analysis of the deposit, the cleaning process, and schematic diagram of the process. (author)

  20. Chemical methods of rock analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeffery, P. G; Hutchison, D

    1981-01-01

    .... Such methods include those based upon spectrophotometry, flame emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, as well as gravimetry, titrimetry and the use of ion-selective electrodes...

  1. Investigation of effective forensic cleaning methods for bullet and cartridge case samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuherk, Cassie Marie

    Bullet and cartridge case evidence may potentially link weapons and crimes through the comparison of toolmark patterns. This analysis relies on the clarity of the toolmarks and the ability of the examiner to identify patterns on the evidence. These patterns may be distorted by debris such as soil, blood, cyanoacrylate, and construction materials. Despite the potential importance of bullet and cartridge case evidence, few investigations of proper cleaning methods have been conducted. The present study was designed to examine the effects of various cleaning solutions and application methods on copper and brass bullets and cartridge cases. Additionally, this research investigated the efficacy of these cleaning protocols on the common evidence contaminants blood and cyanoacrylate. No cleaning method was found to be universally effective on both contaminant types and nondestructive to the metal surface. Ultrasonication was the most efficient application method employed when used in conjunction with an appropriate cleaning solution. Acetone proved to be safe and successful at removing heavy cyanoacrylate deposits from brass cartridge cases without damaging the metal. Although sulfuric acid removed most of the cyanoacrylate from the brass cartridge case, ultrasonication of the fumed cartridge cases in sulfuric acid caused the nickel-plated primer caps to turn black. Additionally, etching occurred when sulfuric acid was allowed to dry on the cartridge case surface. Citric acid, salt-flour-vinegar paste, TergazymeRTM, and water did not effectively remove the cyanoacrylate from the cartridge cases, but the solutions were safe to use on the brass and sometimes resulted in a shinier surface. Regardless of the cleaning method employed, the bloodstained bullets retained most or all of the underlying brown tarnish. Ultrasonication with sulfuric acid was successful at removing some blood-initiated tarnishing; however, the removal of residues was not complete, making it difficult

  2. Brush head composition, wear profile, and cleaning efficacy: an assessment of three electric brush heads using in vitro methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Eva; Meyners, Michael; Markgraf, Dirk; Stoerkel, Ulrich; von Koppenfels, Roxana; Adam, Ralf; Soukup, Martin; Wehrbein, Heinrich; Erbe, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate a current store brand (SB) brush head for composition/physical characteristics, Wear Index (WI), and cleaning efficacy versus the previous SB brush head refill design (SB control) and the Oral-B Precision Clean brush head (positive control, PC). This research consisted of three parts: 1) Analytical analysis using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry to evaluate the chemical composition of the current SB brush head bristles relative to the SB control. In addition, physical parameters such as bristle count and diameter were determined. 2) Wear Index (WI) investigation to determine the Wear Index scores of in vitro-aged brush heads at four weeks (one month) and 13 weeks (three months) by a trained investigator. To "age" the brush heads, a robot system was used as a new alternative in vitro method to simulate aging by consumer use. 3) Robot testing to determine the cleaning performance of in vitro-aged brush heads, comparing one month-aged current SB brush heads with the SB control (one and three months-aged) and the PC brush heads (three months-aged) in a standardized fashion. 1) FT-IR analysis revealed that the chemical composition of the current and control SB refill brush heads is identical. In terms of physical parameters, the current SB brush head has 12% more bristles and a slightly oval brush head compared to the round brush head of the SB control. 2) Wear Index analysis showed there was no difference in the one month-aged current SB brush head versus the one month-aged SB control (1.67 vs. 1.50, p = 0.65) or versus the three months-aged PC brush head (1.67 vs. 1.50, p = 0.65). The one month-aged current SB brush head demonstrated statistically significantly less wear than the three months-aged SB control (1.67 vs. 2.67, p = 0.01). 3) Analysis of cleaning efficacy shows that the one month-aged current SB brush head had improved cleaning performance over the one month-aged SB control brush head (p < 0

  3. Results of the secondary side chemical cleaning of the steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doma, A.; Patek, G.

    2001-01-01

    A significant amount of deposit has developed on the secondary side of the heat transfer tubes of the steam generators (SG) of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant units in course of the years. More than 99.5% of the deposit is made up of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) generated in the secondary circuit of the power plant. Those deposits lead to the decrease of the heat transfer. Even more important is its role from the point of view of operational reliability of the steam generators, leak tightness between the primary and secondary sides. The first series of cleaning took place following 8-9 years of operation of the units. Following the first cleaning cycle the transport of the corrosion products into the steam generators did not change, and thus obviously new cleaning was required. Periodical cleaning of the steam generators shall be assured. (R.P.)

  4. Survey of Nuclear Methods in Chemical Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1966-01-01

    An attempt is made to classify nuclear methods on a logical basis to facilitate assimilation by the technologist. The three main groups are: (I) Tracer methods, (II) Methods based on the influence of absorbers on radiations to be measured, and (III) Radiation chemical methods. The variants of the first two groups are discussed in some detail, and typical examples are given. Group I can be subdivided into (1) Indicator methods, (2) Emanation methods, (3) Radioreagent methods, and (4) Isotope dilution methods, Group II into (5) Activation methods, (6) Absorption methods, (7) Induced Nuclear Reaction methods, (8) Scattering methods, and (9) Fluorescence methods. While the economic benefits due to nuclear methods already run into hundreds of millions of dollars annually, owing to radiation protection problems radiochemical methods in the strict sense are not widely used in actual production. It is suggested that more use should be made of pilot plant tracer studies of chemical processes as used in industry. (author)

  5. Chemical methods of rock analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeffery, P. G; Hutchison, D

    1981-01-01

    A practical guide to the methods in general use for the complete analysis of silicate rock material and for the determination of all those elements present in major, minor or trace amounts in silicate...

  6. Evaluation of two recommended disinfection methods for cleaning cloths used in food services of southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bartz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the State of Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Southern Brazil, a good manufacturing practices regulation was published recommending two disinfection methods for cleaning cloths used in food services. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of those methods. Cleaning cloths were sampled without prior notice at food services, on common working days. For the analyses, the cloths were divided in two sub-samples, being one of them microbiologically analyzed. The second sub-sample was further divided in two pieces and submitted to hand washing for two minutes. After that, one piece was boiled in water for 15 min and the other one was soaked in a 200 ppm sodium hypochlorite solution for 15 min. Both pieces of cloth were submitted to microbiological analyses. Cleaning cloths presented total aerobic mean counts of 6.9 ± 6.7 log/cm². All cleaning cloths presented coliform contamination, and 40% demonstrated mean counts of 6.2 ± 5.6 log/cm². Presumptive S. aureus mean counts of 5.5 ± 4.9 log/cm² were found. No statistic correlation was observed among the number of meals served daily in the food services and the microbiological contamination levels. After washing and disinfection, microbiological counts were significantly (p < 0.05 reduced by both methods, achieving an approximately 5 log reduction. The reductions achieved by the sodium hypochlorite soaking method and the boiling method were not significantly different. Thus, it was possible to conclude that both recommended methods were suitable to disinfect cleaning cloths used in food services.

  7. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  8. Technological procedure for chemical cleaning prior to re-pyritization of H2O-H2S isotopic exchange installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, I.; Smaranda, D.; Titescu, Gh.

    1996-01-01

    In normal operation the anti-corrosive shielding of the GS installations undergo a slow, irreversible degradation in time so that after 6 - 8 years their protection characteristics break down. In order to put them back in operation the regeneration of anti-corrosive is required. The procedure achieved at ICIS - Rm.Valcea consists in chemical cleaning of the impaired layers and re-pyritization of the interior surface of installations. Chemical cleaning include the following operations: - mechanical cleaning; - water washing; - alkaline washing with sodium hydroxide, tri-sodium phosphate and sodium tri-polyphosphate; - final mechanical cleaning; - neutralizing washing; - chemical cleaning with phosphoric acid solution; - neutralizing washing. After applying this procedure, the surface is prepared for the pyritization regeneration of the anti-corrosive shielding which ensures the prolongation of the equipment service lifetime with another six year period

  9. Validation of the cleaning and sanitization method for radiopharmaceutical production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Anita; Morote, Mario; Moore, Mariel; Castro, Delcy; Paragulla, Wilson; Novoa, Carlos; Otero, Manuel; Miranda, Jesus; Herrera, Jorge; Gonzales, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A protocol for the cleaning and sanitization method for radiopharmaceutical production facilities has been designed and developed for the inner surface of the hot cells for the production of Sodium Pertechnetate Tc-99m and Sm-153 EDTMP, considering an extreme situation for each hot cell. Cleaning is performed with double-distilled water and sanitation with two disinfectant solutions, 70 % isopropyl alcohol and 3 % hydrogen peroxide in alternate weeks. Microbiological analysis of sanitized surfaces were made after 20 minutes and 48 hours for the hot cell of Tc-99m and 72 hours for the hot cell of EDTMP Sm-153 in 3 consecutive tests by the method of direct contact with plates containing culture medium, made for each sampling point (6 in the first and five in the second). The results showed that the microbial load on surfaces sanitized was below acceptable limits and that the lifetime of cleaning and sanitization is 48 hours for the hot cell of Tc-99m and 72 hours for the one of EDTMP-Sm-153. As a conclusion, the method of cleaning and sanitization is effective to reduce or eliminate microbial contamination therefore, the process is validated. (authors).

  10. Development of durable self-cleaning coatings using organic–inorganic hybrid sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wu, Xinghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute at NTU - ERI@N, 1 CleanTech Loop, #06-04, CleanTech One, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); Fu, Qitao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ho, Jeffrey Weng Chye [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute at NTU - ERI@N, 1 CleanTech Loop, #06-04, CleanTech One, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); Kanhere, Pushkar D. [Energy Research Institute at NTU - ERI@N, 1 CleanTech Loop, #06-04, CleanTech One, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); Li, Lin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chen, Zhong, E-mail: ASZChen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute at NTU - ERI@N, 1 CleanTech Loop, #06-04, CleanTech One, Singapore 637141 (Singapore)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • A facile method to produce sol–gel based self-cleaning coatings is described. • Effect of filler size and content is evaluated via contact angle, sliding angle, and surface morphology. • Coating with 15 wt.% nano-sized silica fillers exhibits the best self-cleaning performance. • The coatings are resistant to UV radiation and retain the functionality after the abrasion test. • A self-cleaning test and scheme to quantify the self-cleaning efficiency are described in this work. - Abstract: Self-cleaning coatings with excellent water-repellence and good mechanical properties are in high demand. However, producing such coatings with resistance to mechanical abrasion and environmental weathering remains a key challenge. Mechanically robust coatings based on tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and glycidoxypropyltriethoxysilane (Glymo) have been prepared using a sol–gel method. Emphasis is given to the addition of Glymo, an epoxy silane which creates an organic matrix that blends with the inorganic Si−O−Si matrix formed from the TEOS. The combination of the blended matrix produced coatings with good adhesion to substrates and improved mechanical properties. Fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) and silica fillers were introduced to increase the hydrophobicity of the coating. It was found that the water contact angle (CA) of these coatings increases from 115° to 164° upon decreasing filler size from 1–5 μm to 10–20 nm. The sliding angle (SA) for coatings with 15 wt.% loading of 10–20 nm silica is around 2°. UV weathering does not show significant effect on the properties of the coatings. Mechanical properties and performances including hardness, Young's modulus, coating adhesion and abrasion resistance were systematically analyzed. In the current work, a simple self-cleaning test, which measures the extent of dirt accumulation and subsequent removal by water spray, was performed. The coatings with 15 wt.% loading of 10–20 nm silica particles

  11. Comparison of Chemical and Physical-chemical Wastewater Discoloring Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durašević, V.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Today's chemical and physical-chemical wastewater discoloration methods do not completely meet demands regarding degree of discoloration. In this paper discoloration was performed using Fenton (FeSO4 . 7 H2O + H2O2 + H2SO4 and Fenton-like (FeCl3 . 6 H2O + H2O2 + HCOOH chemical methods and physical-chemical method of coagulation/flocculation (using poly-electrolyte (POEL combining anion active coagulant (modified poly-acrylamides and cationic flocculant (product of nitrogen compounds in combination with adsorption on activated carbon. Suitability of aforementioned methods was investigated on reactive and acid dyes, regarding their most common use in the textile industry. Also, investigations on dyes of different chromogen (anthraquinone, phthalocyanine, azo and xanthene were carried out in order to determine the importance of molecular spatial structure. Oxidative effect of Fenton and Fenton-like reagents resulted in decomposition of colored chromogen and high degree of discoloration. However, the problem is the inability of adding POEL in stechiometrical ratio (also present in physical-chemical methods, when the phenomenon of overdosing coagulants occurs in order to obtain a higher degree of discoloration, creating a potential danger of burdening water with POEL. Input and output water quality was controlled through spectrophotometric measurements and standard biological parameters. In addition, part of the investigations concerned industrial wastewaters obtained from dyeing cotton materials using reactive dye (C. I. Reactive Blue 19, a process that demands the use of vast amounts of electrolytes. Also, investigations of industrial wastewaters was labeled as a crucial step carried out in order to avoid serious misassumptions and false conclusions, which may arise if dyeing processes are only simulated in the laboratory.

  12. Development of Chemical and Mechanical Cleaning Procedures for Genesis Solar Wind Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, M.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Gonzalez, C.; Allums, K. K.; Allton, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    The Genesis mission was the only mission returning pristine solar material to Earth since the Apollo program. Unfortunately, the return of the spacecraft on September 8, 2004 resulted in a crash landing shattering the solar wind collectors into smaller fragments and exposing them to desert soil and other debris. Thorough surface cleaning is required for almost all fragments to allow for subsequent analysis of solar wind material embedded within. However, each collector fragment calls for an individual cleaning approach, as contamination not only varies by collector material but also by sample itself.

  13. Development of a method to determine the effectiveness of cleaning agents in removal of biofilm derived spores in milking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgeniia Ostrov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial damages caused by biofilm forming bacteria in the dairy industry are a fundamental threat to safety and quality of dairy products. In order to ensure the optimal level of equipment hygiene in the dairy industry, it is necessary to determine the biofilm removal efficiency of cleaning agents used for cleaning-in-place procedures. However, currently there is no standard method available for evaluating and comparing cleaning agents for use in cleaning-in-place procedures in the dairy industry under realistic conditions. The present study aims to establish a cleaning-in-place model system to evaluate the effectiveness of cleaning agents in removal of biofilm derived spores from the surfaces of stainless steel which is the predominant substrate in milking equipment on dairy farms. The system is based on Bacillus subtilis spores surrounded with exopolymeric substances produced by bacteria during biofilm formation. The spores applied on sampling plates were mounted on T-junctions protruding 1.5 – 11-times the milk pipe diameter from the main loop to resemble different levels of cleaning difficulty. The cleaning tests were conducted using commercial alkaline detergents and caustic soda at conditions which are relevant to actual farm environment. The spores removal effect was evaluated by comparing the number of viable spores (attached to sampling plates before and after cleaning. Evaluation of the cleaning and disinfecting effect of cleaning agents towards biofilm derived spores was further performed, which indicates whether spores elimination effect of an agent is due to killing the spores or removing them from the surfaces of dairy equipment. Moreover, it was established that the presence of extracellular matrix is an important factor responsible for high level of cleaning difficulty characteristic for surface attached spores. In overall, the results of this study suggest that the developed model system simulates actual farm conditions for

  14. Distribution Route Planning of Clean Coal Based on Nearest Insertion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunrui

    2018-01-01

    Clean coal technology has made some achievements for several ten years, but the research in its distribution field is very small, the distribution efficiency would directly affect the comprehensive development of clean coal technology, it is the key to improve the efficiency of distribution by planning distribution route rationally. The object of this paper was a clean coal distribution system which be built in a county. Through the surveying of the customer demand and distribution route, distribution vehicle in previous years, it was found that the vehicle deployment was only distributed by experiences, and the number of vehicles which used each day changed, this resulted a waste of transport process and an increase in energy consumption. Thus, the mathematical model was established here in order to aim at shortest path as objective function, and the distribution route was re-planned by using nearest-insertion method which been improved. The results showed that the transportation distance saved 37 km and the number of vehicles used had also been decreased from the past average of 5 to fixed 4 every day, as well the real loading of vehicles increased by 16.25% while the current distribution volume staying same. It realized the efficient distribution of clean coal, achieved the purpose of saving energy and reducing consumption.

  15. Are safety data sheets for cleaning products used in Norway a factor contributing to the risk of workers exposure to chemicals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulqadir M. Suleiman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cleaning products are considered less hazardous than those used in other sectors. Suppliers and distributors are less conscientious when it comes to informing users on health risks. The aim of the study was to elaborate on the usefulness and clarity of information in the safety data sheets (SDS for cleaning products, and considering if the use of these SDSs can be seen as a risk factor towards occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in the sector. Material and Methods: Safety data sheets were selected based on the risk level of the product assigned in an industrial sector scheme. 320 SDSs for cleaning products were reviewed. Constituent components found in the products over a given threshold were listed and available information thereof used to assess the perceived non-hazard consideration of the chemicals. Results: The contents of the SDSs was generic and mostly incomplete. Safety measures and health information lacked sufficient specificity despite varying compositions and concentrations of components. There is generally incompatibility between mentioned sections on the suggested non-hazardous nature of the products and health effects. Not all substances used in these products have harmonized classifications, which makes them open to various classification of the products and the suggested safety measures. This results in different companies classifying similar products differently. Risk management measures and suggested personal protective equipment (PPEs are given haphazardly. Physical properties relevant to risk assessment are not included. Conclusions: The safety data sheets are ambiguous, and they lack relevant and important information. Inadequate information and risk assessment concerning the products can lead to workers being exposed to hazardous chemicals. Underestimation of the hazard contribution of the components of the products and the insufficient, non-objective mention of appropriate control and protective

  16. Improvement of training set structure in fusion data cleaning using Time-Domain Global Similarity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Lan, T.; Qin, H.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional data cleaning identifies dirty data by classifying original data sequences, which is a class-imbalanced problem since the proportion of incorrect data is much less than the proportion of correct ones for most diagnostic systems in Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) devices. When using machine learning algorithms to classify diagnostic data based on class-imbalanced training set, most classifiers are biased towards the major class and show very poor classification rates on the minor class. By transforming the direct classification problem about original data sequences into a classification problem about the physical similarity between data sequences, the class-balanced effect of Time-Domain Global Similarity (TDGS) method on training set structure is investigated in this paper. Meanwhile, the impact of improved training set structure on data cleaning performance of TDGS method is demonstrated with an application example in EAST POlarimetry-INTerferometry (POINT) system.

  17. Radiological pathways analysis for spent solvents from the boiler chemical cleaning at the Pickering Nuclear Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.; Eslami, Z.; Hodgins, S.; Beaman, T.; Von Svoboda, S.; Marczak, J.

    2006-01-01

    Spent solvents are generated as a result of Boiler Chemical Cleanings (BCC) at CANDU reactor sites. These solutions contain small amount of radioactivity from a number of different sources including: Cut tubes - short sections of boiler tubes are infrequently removed from the boilers for a detailed characterization. These tubes are typically only plugged at the tubesheet allowing the primary side deposits to be exposed to BCC solvents. Tube leaks - primary to secondary side leaks also occur infrequently as a result of tube degradation. Radioactivity from the leaking fluid can consequently be deposited in the sludge on the secondary side of the tubes. Diffusion of tritium - during normal operation of the reactor units, tritium slowly diffuses from the heavy water in the primary heat-transfer system to the light-water coolant on the secondary side. Some of this tritium is retained in the secondary side deposits. The Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) would like the flexibility to have several options for handling the spent solvent waste and associated rinse water from BCC. To this end, a radiological pathways analysis was undertaken to determine dose consequences associated with each option. Sample results from this study are included in this paper. The pathways analysis is used in this study to calculate dose to hypothetical receptors including individuals such as truck drivers, incinerator workers, residue (ash) handlers, residents who live near the landfill, inadvertent intruders into the landfill after closure and residents who live near the outfall. This dose is compared to a de minimis dose. A de minimis dose or dose rate represents a level of risk, which is generally accepted as being of no significance. Shipments of spent solvents and rinse water with corresponding doses below de minimis can be sent to conventional (i.e., non-radioactive) landfills for incineration and disposal as the radioactive dose associated with them is much less than natural

  18. Comparative study of oxalic and malonic acid behaviour in the chemical cleaning of alloy 800 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Damian A.; Bruyere, Vivienne I.E.; Bordoni, Roberto A.; Olmedo, Ana M.; Morando, Pedro J.

    2004-01-01

    This work consisted, in a first stage, on a basic study of the dissolution mechanism of nickel ferrite in aqueous malonic acid. Powdered oxides (Ni x Fe 3-x O 4 ) were synthesized by wet procedures and heated at 750 C degrees. These oxides were characterized by conventional methods and dissolved under different experimental conditions (pH, reagent concentration, temperature, etc.) in order to determine the dissolution rates. Optimal dissolution conditions were explored and compared to the corresponding oxalic acid ones. In a second stage, these conditions were applied to oxides grown on Alloy 800 coupons. Before oxidation, all coupons were ground polished and then were exposed to hydrothermal conditions (350 C degrees, pH 25Cdegrees ≅ 10.4 -LiOH-, 20-22 days) in static autoclaves. Finally, oxidized and unoxidized coupons were treated with chemical solutions containing oxalic or malonic acid at conditions optimized in the first stage. These results were also compared to those obtained on coupons exposed to a commercial formulation, APAC (Alkaline Permanganate Ammonium Citrate), as a reference. The results on coupon descaling using APMAL (AP + Malonic), APOX (AP + oxalic) and the comparison with APAC leads to conclude that malonic acid is a reagent whose chemical behavior is much better than oxalic acid and comparable to commercial formulations. (author) [es

  19. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  20. VBSCF Methods: Classical Chemical Concepts and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research has been to extend the ab initio Valence Bond Self-Consistent Field (VBSCF) methodology and to apply this method to the electronic structure of molecules. The valence bond method directly deals with the chemical structure of molecules in a pictorial language, which chemists

  1. Cleaning verification: A five parameter study of a Total Organic Carbon method development and validation for the cleaning assessment of residual detergents in manufacturing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Ahmad, Imad A Haidar; Tam, James; Wang, Yan; Dao, Gina; Blasko, Andrei

    2018-02-05

    A Total Organic Carbon (TOC) based analytical method to quantitate trace residues of clean-in-place (CIP) detergents CIP100 ® and CIP200 ® on the surfaces of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment was developed and validated. Five factors affecting the development and validation of the method were identified: diluent composition, diluent volume, extraction method, location for TOC sample preparation, and oxidant flow rate. Key experimental parameters were optimized to minimize contamination and to improve the sensitivity, recovery, and reliability of the method. The optimized concentration of the phosphoric acid in the swabbing solution was 0.05M, and the optimal volume of the sample solution was 30mL. The swab extraction method was 1min sonication. The use of a clean room, as compared to an isolated lab environment, was not required for method validation. The method was demonstrated to be linear with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9999. The average recoveries from stainless steel surfaces at multiple spike levels were >90%. The repeatability and intermediate precision results were ≤5% across the 2.2-6.6ppm range (50-150% of the target maximum carry over, MACO, limit). The method was also shown to be sensitive with a detection limit (DL) of 38ppb and a quantitation limit (QL) of 114ppb. The method validation demonstrated that the developed method is suitable for its intended use. The methodology developed in this study is generally applicable to the cleaning verification of any organic detergents used for the cleaning of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment made of electropolished stainless steel material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. EDF feedback on recent EPRI SGOG SG chemical cleanings applications for TSP blockage reduction and heat transfer recover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijoux, M.; De Bouvier, O.; Mercier, S.; Pages, D.; Bretelle, J.-L.; Leclercq, P.; Mermillod, A.

    2010-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2008, six Steam Generators Chemical Cleanings (SGCC) with the inhibitor free high temperature process were applied on EDF PWR units. The main goal was to reduce the excessive Tube Support Plate blockages observed on several units of the EDF fleet and the consequences on wide range levels and the risk of tube cracks. The heat transfer recovery was the second objective. Despite the correct results obtained, the corrosion impact of the high temperature process on internal metallic surfaces, higher than expected, and the environmental issues led EDF to move to a new cleaning process. The low temperature process developed by EPRI SGOG and applied for many years was selected for the same purpose. Some qualification laboratory tests were performed by Dominion Engineering Inc (DEI) to demonstrate the innocuousness an the efficiency of the process to achieve these goals. The EPRI SGOG process was then applied seven times by Westinghouse on the EDF units Cruas 3, Cruas 2, Belleville 1, Cattenom 1, Cattenom 3, Chinon B3 and Cattenom 4 between 2008 and 2010. All these units operate from the initial start at low AVT pH 25 o C (9,2) in the secondary circuit. Due to copper presence in the deposits to remove, the cleaning sequence 'Copper - Iron - Copper steps' was performed each time. After a short description of the process, including the specific adaptation in France, lessons learned are reported in this paper in the following areas: process monitoring, corrosion, efficiency, liquid and gaseous wastes, chemical pollution during start-up. Based on the 3 first applications in 2008, some modifications of the process were implemented, particularly for the copper step. For the units cleaned, 1100 to 4500 kg of deposits per SG have been removed, including TS sludge lancing. The reduction of TSP blockages was satisfying. The effect on steam pressure improvement and the wide range level is then discussed. The paper concludes on EDF perspectives for soft

  3. Mechanical and chemical cleaning of the tubes bundles of the moisture separator reheaters (GSS) of Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Patrice; Ruiz, Jose T.; Ureta, Roman; Carreres, Cristina; Virginie, Le-Guerroue

    2012-09-01

    The cleaning operation concerns the 'GSS' system (GSS stands for moisture separator reheaters, MSR) which are classified as 'watch quality guarantee', not classified as safety facility and subjected to Pressure Equipment regulations. The follow-up of the operational GSS (steel carbon) of EDF nuclear power plants CP0 group reveals a clog rate due to a relevant magnetite deposits that could result in equipment damage, loss of availability and loss of plant productivity. The pressure drop between inlet and outlet of the heating steam is close to maximum design criterion. The service consisted in designing, developing, qualifying and carrying out a process which removes clog from the inside of GSS U-tubes bundle located in the vapor circuit and which respects the equipment integrity and ensures the process harmlessness. This cleaning has to enable the complete removal of deposits and oxides (magnetite) in order to recover a passage diameter and a surface finish equivalent to the origin, thus avoiding the replacement of the GSS and obtaining a considerable reduction of costs. To do so, LAINSA and SOLARCA designed, developed, qualified and operated on 14 GSS bundles, by carrying out the following operations: - Cartography of the GSS tubes bundles clogging state; - Pre-Mechanical cleaning to un-block the sealed tubes and release the inside tubes passing; - Isolation of the bundle and check of leaks of the system; - Chemical cleaning with the efficiency and harmlessness parameters follow-up: - Acid Phase by means of weak organic acids to eliminate all the deposits; - Passivation phase; - Final Rinsing respecting the customer criteria; - Drying; - Waste management and waste treatment. The implementation of this operation enables the elimination of the whole deposits (magnetite) and oxides located inside the GSS tube bundle and thus to recover a passage diameter inside the tubes, and a pressure drop close to a new system and therefore to enables the

  4. Impact of operation conditions, foulant adsorption, and chemical cleaning on the nanomechanical properties of ultrafiltraion hollow fiber membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2018-04-06

    This study analyzed the change in nanomechanical properties of ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes harvested from pilot-scale units after twelve months of operation. Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping technique was used to distinguish between adhesion, dissipation, deformation, and modulus while simultaneously generating a topographic image of membranes. Nanomechanical maps of virgin membranes evidenced surfaces of heterogeneous properties and were described by probability density functions. Operating conditions and feed quality exerted an impact on membranes. Clean harvested membranes showed a higher mean modulus and dissipation, and a lower deformation than virgin membranes, indicating stiffer membranes of lower elastic deformation. A significant fraction of these measurements displayed peak values deviating from the distribution; which represents regions of the membrane with properties highly differing from the probability density function. The membrane polymeric material experienced severe physicochemical changes by foulant adsorption and reaction with cleaning agents. Foulant adsorption on membranes was heterogeneous in both morphology and mechanical properties and could not be statistically described. Foulants, i.e., mainly consisting of polysaccharides and proteinaceous structures, displayed low elastic deformation and high roughness and adhesion. The presence of foulants after chemical cleaning and their high adhesion would be a direct nanoscale evidence of irreversible fouling. By the end of the operation, the Trans-Membrane Pressure experienced a 40% increase. The cleaning process was not able to fully recover the initial TMP, indicating irreversible fouling, i.e., permanent change in membrane characteristics and decrease in performance. These results suggest a link between the macroscopic properties and nanomechanical characteristics of membranes. This study advances our nanoscale understanding of the impact of fouling and operating conditions on

  5. Accelerated solvent extraction method with one-step clean-up for hydrocarbons in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Huda Mamat Ghani; Norashikin Sain; Rozita Osman; Zuraidah Abdullah Munir

    2007-01-01

    The application of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) using hexane combined with neutral silica gel and sulfuric acid/ silica gel (SA/ SG) to remove impurities prior to analysis by gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) was studied. The efficiency of extraction was evaluated based on the three hydrocarbons; dodecane, tetradecane and pentadecane spiked to soil sample. The effect of ASE operating conditions (extraction temperature, extraction pressure, static time) was evaluated and the optimized condition obtained from the study was extraction temperature of 160 degree Celsius, extraction pressure of 2000 psi with 5 minutes static extraction time. The developed ASE with one-step clean-up method was applied in the extraction of hydrocarbons from spiked soil and the amount extracted was comparable to ASE extraction without clean-up step with the advantage of obtaining cleaner extract with reduced interferences. Therefore in the developed method, extraction and clean-up for hydrocarbons in soil can be achieved rapidly and efficiently with reduced solvent usage. (author)

  6. Standard Test Method for Stress-Corrosion of Titanium Alloys by Aircraft Engine Cleaning Materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method establishes a test procedure for determining the propensity of aircraft turbine engine cleaning and maintenance materials for causing stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloy parts. 1.2 The evaluation is conducted on representative titanium alloys by determining the effect of contact with cleaning and maintenance materials on tendency of prestressed titanium alloys to crack when subsequently heated to elevated temperatures. 1.3 Test conditions are based upon manufacturer's maximum recommended operating solution concentration. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see and .

  7. Development of a laser cleaning method for the first mirror surface of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostics on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, A. P., E-mail: APKuznetsov@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzinskij, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Gubsky, K. L.; Nikitina, E. A.; Savchenkov, A. V.; Tarasov, B. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Tugarinov, S. N. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A set of optical diagnostics is expected for measuring the plasma characteristics in ITER. Optical elements located inside discharge chambers are exposed to an intense radiation load, sputtering due to collisions with energetic atoms formed in the charge transfer processes, and contamination due to recondensation of materials sputtered from different parts of the construction of the chamber. Removing the films of the sputtered materials from the mirrors with the aid of pulsed laser radiation is an efficient cleaning method enabling recovery of the optical properties of the mirrors. In this work, we studied the efficiency of removal of metal oxide films by pulsed radiation of a fiber laser. Optimization of the laser cleaning conditions was carried out on samples representing metal substrates polished with optical quality with deposition of films on them imitating the chemical composition and conditions expected in ITER. It is shown that, by a proper selection of modes of radiation exposure to the surface with a deposited film, it is feasible to restore the original high reflection characteristics of optical elements.

  8. Development of a laser cleaning method for the first mirror surface of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostics on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A. P.; Buzinskij, O. I.; Gubsky, K. L.; Nikitina, E. A.; Savchenkov, A. V.; Tarasov, B. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of optical diagnostics is expected for measuring the plasma characteristics in ITER. Optical elements located inside discharge chambers are exposed to an intense radiation load, sputtering due to collisions with energetic atoms formed in the charge transfer processes, and contamination due to recondensation of materials sputtered from different parts of the construction of the chamber. Removing the films of the sputtered materials from the mirrors with the aid of pulsed laser radiation is an efficient cleaning method enabling recovery of the optical properties of the mirrors. In this work, we studied the efficiency of removal of metal oxide films by pulsed radiation of a fiber laser. Optimization of the laser cleaning conditions was carried out on samples representing metal substrates polished with optical quality with deposition of films on them imitating the chemical composition and conditions expected in ITER. It is shown that, by a proper selection of modes of radiation exposure to the surface with a deposited film, it is feasible to restore the original high reflection characteristics of optical elements

  9. Chemical decontaminating method for stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive metal wastes comprising passivated stainless steels are chemically decontaminated to such a radioactivity level as that of usual wastes. The present invention for chemically decontaminating stainless steels comprises a first step of immersing decontaminates into a sulfuric acid solution and a second step of immersing them into an aqueous solution prepared by adding oxidative metal salts to sulfuric acid, in which a portion of the surface of stainless steels as decontaminates are chemically ground to partially expose substrate materials and then the above-mentioned decontamination steps are applied. More than 90% of radioactive materials are removed in this method by the dissolution of the exposed substrate materials and peeling of cruds secured to the surface of the materials upon dissolution. This method is applicable to decontamination of articles having complicate shapes, can reduce the amount of secondary wastes after decontamination and also remarkably shorten the time required for decontamination. (T.M.)

  10. Efficiency of cleaning and disinfection of surfaces: correlation between assessment methods

    OpenAIRE

    Frota, Oleci Pereira; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Guerra, Odanir Garcia; Rigotti, Marcelo Alessandro; Andrade, Denise de; Borges, Najla Moreira Amaral; Almeida, Margarete Teresa Gottardo de

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the correlation among the ATP-bioluminescence assay, visual inspection and microbiological culture in monitoring the efficiency of cleaning and disinfection (C&D) of high-touch clinical surfaces (HTCS) in a walk-in emergency care unit. Method: a prospective and comparative study was carried out from March to June 2015, in which five HTCS were sampled before and after C&D by means of the three methods. The HTCS were considered dirty when dust, waste, humidity an...

  11. A novel In-situ Enzymatic Cleaning Method for Reducing Membrane Fouling in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Bilad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel in-situ enzymatic cleaning method was developed for fouling control in membrane bioreactors (MBRs. It is achieved by bringing the required enzymes near the membrane surface by pulling the enzymes to a magnetic membrane (MM surface by means of magnetic forces, exactly where the cleaning is required. To achieve this, the enzyme was coupled to a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP and the membrane it self was loaded with MNP. The magnetic activity was turned by means of an external permanent magnet. The effectiveness of concept was tested in a submerged membrane filtration using the model enzyme-substrate of Bacillus subitilis xylanase-arabinoxylan. The MM had almost similar properties compared to the unloaded ones, except for its well distributed MNPs. The enzyme was stable during coupling conditions and the presence of coupling could be detected using a high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The system facilitated an in-situ enzymatic cleaning and could be effectively applied for control fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs.

  12. Efficiency of cleaning and disinfection of surfaces: correlation between assessment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleci Pereira Frota

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the correlation among the ATP-bioluminescence assay, visual inspection and microbiological culture in monitoring the efficiency of cleaning and disinfection (C&D of high-touch clinical surfaces (HTCS in a walk-in emergency care unit. Method: a prospective and comparative study was carried out from March to June 2015, in which five HTCS were sampled before and after C&D by means of the three methods. The HTCS were considered dirty when dust, waste, humidity and stains were detected in visual inspection; when ≥2.5 colony forming units per cm2 were found in culture; when ≥5 relative light units per cm2 were found at the ATP-bioluminescence assay. Results: 720 analyses were performed, 240 per method. The overall rates of clean surfaces per visual inspection, culture and ATP-bioluminescence assay were 8.3%, 20.8% and 44.2% before C&D, and 92.5%, 50% and 84.2% after C&D, respectively (p<0.001. There were only occasional statistically significant relationships between methods. Conclusion: the methods did not present a good correlation, neither quantitative nor qualitatively.

  13. Clean Air Act Standards and Guidelines for Chemical Production and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the stationary sources of air pollution for the chemical production & distribution industries, and their corresponding air pollution regulations. To learn more about the regulations for each industry, click on the links below.

  14. Keeping condensers clean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  15. Modern efficient methods of steel vertical oil tanks clean-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekrasov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The legislative base of the Russian Federation operating in the field of operation of tanks and tank parks is considered, and consecutive stages of technological process of cleaning of vertical steel tanks from oil ground deposits are presented. In work shortcomings of existing most widespread electromechanical mixers are described when using a hydraulic method of removal and prevention of formation of ground deposits in tanks with oil and oil products. For the purpose of increase of efficiency, reliability and decrease in power consumption of washout of oil ground deposits in tanks the new design of system of funneled washout and prevention of formation of deposits is offered.

  16. Chemical cleaning-associated generation of dissolved organic matter and halogenated byproducts in ceramic MBR: Ozone versus hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huifang; Liu, Hang; Han, Jiarui; Zhang, Xiangru; Cheng, Fangqin; Liu, Yu

    2018-04-24

    This study characterized the dissolved organic matter (DOM) and byproducts generated after the exposure of activated sludge to ozone and NaClO in ceramic MBR. It was found that NaClO triggered more significant release of DOM than ozone. Proteins with the molecular weight greater than 20 kDa and humic acid like-substances were the principal components of DOM generated by NaClO, while ozone was found to effectively degrade larger biopolymers to low molecular weight substances. The results showed that more than 80% of DOM generated by NaClO and ozone could pass through the 0.2-μm ceramic membrane. Furthermore, total organic chlorine (TOCl) was determined to be the principal species of halogenated byproducts in both cases, while the generation of TOCl by NaClO was much more significant than that by ozone. Only a small fraction of TOCl was removed by the 0.2-μm ceramic membrane. More importantly, the toxic bioassays further revealed that the supernatant of sludge suspension and permeate in the MBR with NaClO cleaning exhibited higher developmental toxicity to the polychaete embryos than those by ozone. The results clearly showed that on-line chemical cleaning with ozone should be a more eco-friendly and safer approach for sustaining long-term membrane permeability in ceramic MBR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt (Sorensen), B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  18. Aquaporin based biomimetic membrane in forward osmosis: Chemical cleaning resistance and practical operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhenyu; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Bucs, Szilard

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporin plays a promising role in fabricating high performance biomimetic forward osmosis (FO) membranes. However, aquaporin as a protein also has a risk of denaturation caused, by various chemicals, resulting in a possible decay of membrane performance. The present study tested a novel aquaporin...

  19. Aquaporin based biomimetic membrane in forward osmosis: Chemical cleaning resistance and practical operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhenyu; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Bucs, Szilard

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporin plays a promising role in fabricating high performance biomimetic forward osmosis (FO) membranes. However, aquaporin as a protein also has a risk of denaturation caused, by various chemicals, resulting in a possible decay of membrane performance. The present study tested a novel aquapor...

  20. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  1. Change Semantic Constrained Online Data Cleaning Method for Real-Time Observational Data Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yulin; Lin, Hui; Li, Rongrong

    2016-06-01

    to large estimation error. In order to achieve the best generalization error, it is an important challenge for the data cleaning methodology to be able to characterize the behavior of data stream distributions and adaptively update a model to include new information and remove old information. However, the complicated data changing property invalidates traditional data cleaning methods, which rely on the assumption of a stationary data distribution, and drives the need for more dynamic and adaptive online data cleaning methods. To overcome these shortcomings, this paper presents a change semantics constrained online filtering method for real-time observational data. Based on the principle that the filter parameter should vary in accordance to the data change patterns, this paper embeds semantic description, which quantitatively depicts the change patterns in the data distribution to self-adapt the filter parameter automatically. Real-time observational water level data streams of different precipitation scenarios are selected for testing. Experimental results prove that by means of this method, more accurate and reliable water level information can be available, which is prior to scientific and prompt flood assessment and decision-making.

  2. CHANGE SEMANTIC CONSTRAINED ONLINE DATA CLEANING METHOD FOR REAL-TIME OBSERVATIONAL DATA STREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ding

    2016-06-01

    data streams, which may led to large estimation error. In order to achieve the best generalization error, it is an important challenge for the data cleaning methodology to be able to characterize the behavior of data stream distributions and adaptively update a model to include new information and remove old information. However, the complicated data changing property invalidates traditional data cleaning methods, which rely on the assumption of a stationary data distribution, and drives the need for more dynamic and adaptive online data cleaning methods. To overcome these shortcomings, this paper presents a change semantics constrained online filtering method for real-time observational data. Based on the principle that the filter parameter should vary in accordance to the data change patterns, this paper embeds semantic description, which quantitatively depicts the change patterns in the data distribution to self-adapt the filter parameter automatically. Real-time observational water level data streams of different precipitation scenarios are selected for testing. Experimental results prove that by means of this method, more accurate and reliable water level information can be available, which is prior to scientific and prompt flood assessment and decision-making.

  3. Chemical analysis by nuclear methods. v. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B.

    1998-01-01

    'Chemical analysis by Nuclear Methods' is an effort of some renowned authors in field of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry which is compiled by Alfassi, Z.B. and translated into Farsi version collected in two volumes. The second volume consists of the following chapters: Detecting ion recoil scattering and elastic scattering are dealt in the eleventh chapter, the twelfth chapter is devoted to nuclear reaction analysis using charged particles, X-ray emission is discussed at thirteenth chapter, the fourteenth chapter is about using ion microprobes, X-ray fluorescence analysis is discussed in the fifteenth chapter, alpha, beta and gamma ray scattering in chemical analysis are dealt in chapter sixteen, Moessbauer spectroscopy and positron annihilation are discussed in chapter seventeen and eighteen; The last two chapters are about isotope dilution analysis and radioimmunoassay

  4. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  5. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Steven B.; Miller, David J.; Yang, Yu; Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

  6. Method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of chemically decontaminating radioactive metal wastes of passivated stainless steels to a radioactivity level identical with usual wastes, in which the amount of oxidizable metal salts used is decreased. Metal wastes of stainless steels contaminated at their surface with radioactive materials are immersed in a sulfuric acid solution. In this case, a voltage is applied for a certain period of time so that the potential of the stainless steels comes to an active region. Then, oxidizable metal salt (tetravalent cerium) is added into the sulfuric acid solution. According to this method, since most of radioactive materials are removed in the immersing step to the sulfuric acid solution, the amount of the tetravalent cerium used is as less as 1/700 and the decontamination time is as short as 1/4 as compared with those in the conventional method. (K.M.)

  7. Permeability recovery of fouled forward osmosis membranes by chemical cleaning during a long-term operation of anaerobic osmotic membrane bioreactors treating low-strength wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhua; Hu, Taozhan; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2017-10-15

    Anaerobic osmotic membrane bioreactor (AnOMBR) has gained increasing interests in wastewater treatment owing to its simultaneous recovery of biogas and water. However, the forward osmosis (FO) membrane fouling was severe during a long-term operation of AnOMBRs. Here, we aim to recover the permeability of fouled FO membranes by chemical cleaning. Specifically speaking, an optimal chemical cleaning procedure was searched for fouled thin film composite polyamide FO (TFC-FO) membranes in a novel microfiltration (MF) assisted AnOMBR (AnMF-OMBR). The results indicated that citric acid, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA-2Na), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) had a low cleaning efficiency of less than 15%, while hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) could effectively remove foulants from the TFC-FO membrane surface (almost 100%) through oxidizing the functional group of the organic foulants and disintegrating the colloids and microbe flocs into fine particles. Nevertheless, the damage of H 2 O 2 to the TFC-FO membrane was observed when a high cleaning concentration and a long duration were applied. In this case, the optimal cleaning conditions including cleaning concentration and time for fouled TFC-FO membranes were selected through confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and the flux recovery rate. The results suggested that the optimal cleaning procedure for fouled TFC-FO membranes was use of 0.5% H 2 O 2 at 25 °C for 6 h, and after that, the cleaned TFC-FO membrane had the same performance as a virgin one including water flux and rejection for organic matters and phosphorus during the operation of AnMF-OMBR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clean Transformation of Ethanol to Useful Chemicals. The Behavior of a Gold-Modified Silicalite Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falletta, Ermelinda; Rossi, Michele; Teles, Joaquim Henrique; Della Pina, Cristina

    2016-03-19

    Upon addition of gold to silicalite-1 pellets (a MFI-type zeolite), the vapor phase oxidation of ethanol could be addressed to acetaldehyde or acetic acid formation. By optimizing the catalyst composition and reaction conditions, the conversion of ethanol could be tuned to acetaldehyde with 97% selectivity at 71% conversion or to acetic acid with 78% selectivity at total conversion. Considering that unloaded silicalite-1 was found to catalyze the dehydration of ethanol to diethylether or ethene, a green approach for the integrated production of four important chemicals is herein presented. This is based on renewable ethanol as a reagent and a modular catalytic process.

  9. Clean Transformation of Ethanol to Useful Chemicals. The Behavior of a Gold-Modified Silicalite Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermelinda Falletta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Upon addition of gold to silicalite-1 pellets (a MFI-type zeolite, the vapor phase oxidation of ethanol could be addressed to acetaldehyde or acetic acid formation. By optimizing the catalyst composition and reaction conditions, the conversion of ethanol could be tuned to acetaldehyde with 97% selectivity at 71% conversion or to acetic acid with 78% selectivity at total conversion. Considering that unloaded silicalite-1 was found to catalyze the dehydration of ethanol to diethylether or ethene, a green approach for the integrated production of four important chemicals is herein presented. This is based on renewable ethanol as a reagent and a modular catalytic process.

  10. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  11. Innovative method and apparatus for the deep cleaning of soluble salts from mortars and lithic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Ferretti, Maurizio; Torrielli, Giulia; Caratto, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    Porous materials (e.g. plasters, mortars, concrete, and the like) used in the building industry or in artworks fail to develop, after their genesis, salts such as nitrates, carbonates (e.g. potassium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, calcium carbonate), chlorides (e.g. sodium chloride) and/or others, which are a concurrent cause of material deterioration phenomena. In the case of ancient or cultural heritage buildings, severe damage to structures and works of art, such as fresco paintings are possible. In general, in situ alteration pattern in mortars and frescoes by crystallization of soluble salts from solutions is caused by capillar rise or circulation in damp walls. Older buildings can be more subject to capillary rise of ion-rich waters, which, as water evaporates, create salt crystals inside the walls. If this pattern reveals overwhelming upon other environmental decay factors, the extraction of salts is the first restoration to recover the artpiece after the preliminary assessment and mitigation of the causes of soaking. A new method and apparatus, patented by University of Genoa [1] improves the quality and durability of decontamination by soluble salts, compared with conventional application of sepiolite or cellulose wraps. The conventional application of cellulose or sepiolite requires casting a more or less thick layer of wrap on the mortar, soaking with distilled water, and waiting until dry. The soluble salts result trapped within the wrap. A set of artificial samples reproducing the stratigraphy of frescoes was contaminated with saline solution of known concentration. The higher quality of the extraction was demonstrated by trapping the salts within layers of Japanese paper juxtaposed to the mortar; the extraction with the dedicated apparatus was operated in a significantly shorter time than with wraps (some hours vs. several days). Two cycles of about 15 minutes are effective in the deep cleaning from contaminant salts. The decontamination was

  12. Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR [pressurized-water reactor] steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, J.L.; Bozeka, S.A.; Jevec, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting of essentially pure magnetite. A corrosion monitoring technique was developed and qualified. In this technique free corrosion rates measured by linear polarization techniques are added to corrosion rates calculated from galvanic current measured using a zero resistance ammeter to give an estimate of total corrosion rate for a galvanically corroding material. An analytic modeling technique was developed and proved useful in determining the size requirements for the weld region mockup used in the corrosion assessment test facility. The technique predicted galvanic corrosion rates consistent with that observed in a corrosion assessement test when polarization data used as model input were obtained on-line during the test. The test results obtained during this investigation indicated that chemical cleaning using the SGOG magnetite dissolution solvent can be performed with a small amount of corrosion of secondary side internals and pressure boundary welds. The maximum weld region corrosion measured during a typical chemical cleaning cycle to remove essentially pure magnetite sludge was about 8 mils. However, additional site specific weld region corrosion assessment testing and qualification will be required prior to chemical cleaning steam generators at a specific plant. Recommendations for site specific qualification of chemical cleaning processes and for use of process monitors and on-line corrosion instrumentation are included in this report

  13. THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANING PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.

    2011-10-20

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 16 years of gamma irradiation and several months of exposures to caustic solution, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, PPS is remarkably stable to the new solvent.

  14. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Sei; Miura, Haruki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal wastes, which are generated from radioactive material handling facilities and the surfaces of which are contaminated by radioactive materials. That is, it has a feature of applying acid dissolution simultaneously with mechanical grinding. The radioactive metal wastes are contained in a vessel such as a barrel together with abrasives in a sulfuric acid solution and rotated at several tens rotation per minute. By such procedures for the radioactive metal wastes, (1) cruds and passive membranes are mechanically removed, (2) exposed mother metal materials are uniformly brought into contact with sulfuric acid and further (3) the mother metal materials dissolve the cruds and the passive membranes also chemically by a reducing dissolution (so-called local cell effect). According to the method of the present invention, stainless steel metal wastes having cruds and passive membranes can rapidly and efficiently be decontaminated to a radiation level equal with that of ordinary wastes. (I.S.)

  15. Cleaning method of aluminium surface by argon discharge for photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Watabe, Hiromi; Horikoshi, Gen-ichi; Mathewson, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    In the Photon Factory program of High Energy Research Laboratory, in which the electron storage ring as a photon source stores the electron beam of 2.5 GeV and 500 mA, beam intensity the probability of gas discharge from the inner surface of doughnut wall due to electron bombardment (for 100 eV electorns) must be limited to 1 x 10 -6 or less, according to the estimation by A.G. Mathewson and others. The pressure inside the ring can be maintained at 1 x 10 -9 Torr only with the above probability value. The standard surface treatment of degreasing and evacuation for 24 hours with heating at 150 deg. C can be of no practical use. Since the ion bombardment of surfaces by argon glow discharge is effective for decreasing the probability, the reduction of the probability by argon discharge cleaning was measured with the surface of aluminium, which is planned to be used as the doughnut material. Two methods were employed for the measurement; the one is analysis of gases being discharged, by introducting them to the analyzing chamber during argon discharge and the other is the measurement of the probability when bombardment with electrons of 100 eV is applied, after stopping argon introduction and evacuating after argon discharge had been performed for a definite period. As a result, the probability of approximately 2 x 10 -5 at the beginning of electron beam incidence was obtained by adding argon discharge cleaning to the standard method. This is estimated to correspondent to approximately 25 mA of beam intensity, which is equivalent to 1/20 of the planned value. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Gas stream clean-up filter and method for forming same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, J.S.; DeVault, J.; Halow, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas cleaning filter is formed in-situ within a vessel containing a fluidizable bed of granular material of a relatively large size fraction. A filter membrane provided by a porous metal or ceramic body or such a body supported a perforated screen on one side thereof is coated in-situ with a layer of the granular material from the fluidized bed by serially passing a bed-fluidizing gas stream through the bed of granular material and the membrane. The layer of granular material provides the filtering medium for the combined membrane-granular layer filter. The filter is not blinded by the granular material and provides for the removal of virtually all of the particulates from a process gas stream. The granular material can be at least partially provided by a material capable of chemically reacting with and removing sulfur compounds from the process gas stream. Low level radioactive waste containing organic material may be incinerated in a fluidized bed in communication with the described filter for removing particulates from the gaseous combustion products

  17. A study for estimate of contamination source with numerical simulation method in the turbulent type clean room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Mok; Hwang, Young Kyu; Kim, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Contamination in a clean room may appear even more complicated by the effect of complicated manufacturing processes and indoor equipment. For this reason, detailed information about the concentration of pollutant particles in the clean room is needed to control the level of contamination financially and efficiently without any problem in manufacturing process. Allocation method has been developed as one of main ideas to fulfill a function of controlling contamination under the situation. By using this method, weighting factor can be predicted based on cleanliness on sampling spots and the values based on numerical analysis. In this point, the weighting factor indicates how each of contaminant sources influences the concentration of pollutant in the clean room. In this paper, when applied allocation method, we propose zoning method to accelerate the calculation time. And it was applied to cleanliness the actual improvement of the turbulent type clean room. As a result, we could estimate quantitatively the amount of contamination generated from the pollution sources. And was proved by experiments that it is possible to improve the level of cleanliness of the clean rooms by using these results.

  18. Generation of dissolved organic matter and byproducts from activated sludge during contact with sodium hypochlorite and its implications to on-line chemical cleaning in MBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiwei; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiangru; Ng, Wun Jern; Liu, Yu

    2016-11-01

    On-line chemical cleaning of membranes with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) has been commonly employed for maintaining a constant permeability of membrane bioreactor (MBR) due to its simple and efficient operation. However, activated sludge is inevitably exposed to NaClO during this cleaning process. In spite of the broad applications of on-line chemical cleaning in MBR such as chemical cleaning-in-place (CIP) and chemical enhanced backwash (CEB), little information is currently available for the release of emerging dissolved organic matter (DOM) and byproducts from this prevalent practice. Therefore, in this study, activated sludge suspended in a phosphate buffered saline solution was exposed to different doses of NaClO in order to determine the generation of potential DOM and byproducts. The results showed the occurrence of significant DOM release (up to 24.7 mg/L as dissolved organic carbon) after exposure to NaClO for 30 min. The dominant components of the released DOM were characterized to be humic acid-like as well as protein-like substances by using an excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectrophotometer. Furthermore, after the contact of activated sludge with NaClO, 19 kinds of chlorinated and brominated byproducts were identified by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, eight of which were confirmed and characterized with standard compounds. Many byproducts were found to be halogenated aromatic compounds, including halopyrroles and halo(hydro)benzoquinones, which had been reported to be significantly more toxic than the halogenated aliphatic ones. Consequently, this study offers new insights into the practice of on-line chemical cleaning, and opens up a window to re-examine the current operation of MBR by looking into the generation of micropollutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How Do Polyethylene Glycol and Poly(sulfobetaine) Hydrogel Layers on Ultrafiltration Membranes Minimize Fouling and Stay Stable in Cleaning Chemicals?

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu

    2017-05-18

    We compare the efficiency of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer on poly(ether imide) (PEI) hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane surfaces in terms of filtration performance, fouling minimization and stability in cleaning solutions. Two previously established different methods toward the two different chemistries (and both had already proven to be suited to reduce fouling significantly) are applied to the same PEI membranes. The hydrophilicity of PEI membranes is improved by the modification, as indicated by the change of contact angle value from 89° to 68° for both methods, due to the hydration layer formed in the hydrogel layers. Their pure water flux declines because of the additional permeation barrier from the hydrogel layers. However, these barriers increase protein rejection. In the exposure at a static condition, grafting PEG or poly(sulfobetaine) reduces protein adsorption to 23% or 11%, respectively. In the dynamic filtration, the hydrogel layers minimizes the flux reduction and increases the reversibility of fouling. Compared to the pristine PEI membrane that can recover its flux to 42% after hydraulic cleaning, the PEG and poly(sulfobetaine) grafted membranes can recover their flux up to 63% and 94%, respectively. Stability tests show that the poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer is stable in acid, base and chlorine solutions, whereas the PEG hydrogel layer suffers alkaline hydrolysis in base and oxidation in chlorine conditions. With its chemical stability and pronounced capability of minimizing fouling, especially irreversible fouling, protective poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layers have great potential for various membrane-based applications.

  20. Chemical Compounds and Extraction Methods of "Maollahm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghpoor, Omid; Dayeni, Manijeh; Razi, Samane

    2016-05-01

    Maollahm or meat juice, a by-product of meat, is a traditional remedy in Persian medicine. This product was used as a nourishment or treatment substance for sick people. According to the ancient Persian medicine, animal meat has more affinity with the human body and the body easily absorbs its nutrition. Therefore, one could resort to maollahm for patients requiring urgent nourishment to boost and strengthen their body. In this work, different ways of preparing maollahm from poultry, goat, cow, and sheep meat are studied. Most of these methods are based on distillation or barbecue before distillation, as prescribed by traditional medicine books. The reactions, chemical processes, and volatile compounds related to different types of cooked meat are also compared with the outcome of recent research studies. The difference between various types of meat is related to their compounds. Different cooking processes such as barbecuing, roasting, cooking, and boiling have an effect on the taste, smell and the chemical constituents of maollahm. Additionally, the type of meat, animal feed, as well as using or removing the fat during the cooking process, have an effect on the produced volatile compounds. Cooking process and the type of meat have a direct effect on the compounds of maollahm. Possible reactions in the preparation process of maollahm are investigated and presented according to the new research studies.

  1. ATP Bioluminometers Analysis on the Surfaces of Removable Orthodontic Aligners after the Use of Different Cleaning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim was to quantify the bacteria concentration on the surface of orthodontic clear aligners using three different cleaning methods. Furthermore the objective was to validate the efficacy of the bioluminometer in assessing the bacteria concentration. Materials and Methods. Twenty subjects (six males and fourteen females undergoing orthodontic therapy with clear aligners (Invisalign® Align Technology, Santa Clara, California were enrolled in this study. The observation time was of six weeks. The patients were instructed to use different cleaning methods (water, brushing with toothpaste, and brushing with toothpaste and use of sodium carbonate and sulphate tablet. At the end of each phase a microbiological analysis was performed using the bioluminometer. Results. The highest bacteria concentration was found on aligners cleaned using only water (583 relative light units; a value of 189 relative light units was found on aligners cleaned with brushing and toothpaste. The lowest bacteria concentration was recorded on aligners cleaned with brushing and toothpaste and the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate tablet. Conclusions. The mechanical removal of the bacterial biofilm proved to be effective with brushing and toothpaste. The best results in terms of bacteria concentration were achieved adding the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate tablet.

  2. ATP Bioluminometers Analysis on the Surfaces of Removable Orthodontic Aligners after the Use of Different Cleaning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Margherini, Silvia; Tenconi, Camilla; Vigetti, Davide; Muollo, Raffaele; Marco Abbate, Gian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim was to quantify the bacteria concentration on the surface of orthodontic clear aligners using three different cleaning methods. Furthermore the objective was to validate the efficacy of the bioluminometer in assessing the bacteria concentration. Materials and Methods. Twenty subjects (six males and fourteen females) undergoing orthodontic therapy with clear aligners (Invisalign® Align Technology, Santa Clara, California) were enrolled in this study. The observation time was of six weeks. The patients were instructed to use different cleaning methods (water, brushing with toothpaste, and brushing with toothpaste and use of sodium carbonate and sulphate tablet). At the end of each phase a microbiological analysis was performed using the bioluminometer. Results. The highest bacteria concentration was found on aligners cleaned using only water (583 relative light units); a value of 189 relative light units was found on aligners cleaned with brushing and toothpaste. The lowest bacteria concentration was recorded on aligners cleaned with brushing and toothpaste and the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate tablet. Conclusions. The mechanical removal of the bacterial biofilm proved to be effective with brushing and toothpaste. The best results in terms of bacteria concentration were achieved adding the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate tablet.

  3. Investigation of cleaning and regeneration methods for reliable construction of DNA cantilever biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Xueling; Yi, Sun; Heiskanen, Arto

    to clean and regenerate the sensing surface of cantilever biosensors. Perchloric acid potential sweep, potassium hydroxide-hydrogen peroxide, and piranha cleaning are investigated here. Peak-current potential differences from cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy and fluorescence detection...

  4. Standard Test Method for Sizing and Counting Particulate Contaminant In and On Clean Room Garments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of detachable particulate contaminant 5 m or larger, in and on the fabric of clean room garments. 1.2 This test method does not apply to nonporous fabrics such as Tyvek or Gortex. It only applies to fabrics that are porous such as cotton or polyester. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This test method provides not only the traditional optical microscopic analysis but also a size distribution and surface obscuration analysis for particles on a fine-textured membrane filter or in a tape lift sample. It utilizes transmitted illumination to render all particles darker than the background for gray level detection. Particles collected on opaque plates must be transferred to a suitable membrane filter. This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associat...

  5. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  6. Chemical methods for peptide and protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrudu, Saranya; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2013-04-12

    Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  7. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a decontamination method for radioactive metal waste products derived from equipment that handles radioactive materials whose surfaces have been contaminated; in particular it concerns a decontamination method that reduces the amount of radioactive waste by decontaminating radioactive waste substances to a level of radioactivity in line with normal waste products. In order to apply chemical decontamination to metal waste products whose surfaces are divided into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste; the carbon steel waste is treated using only a primary process in which the waste is immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, while the stainless steel waste must be treated with both the primary process and then electrolytically reduces it for a specific length of time and a secondary process that uses a solution of sulfuric acid mixed with oxidizing metal salts. The method used to categorize metal waste into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste involves determining the presence, or absence, of magnetism. Voltage is applied for a fixed duration; once that has stopped, electrolytic reduction repeats the operative cycle of applying, then stopping voltage until the potential of the radioactive metal waste is retained in the active region. 1 fig. 2 tabs

  8. Thermalhydraulic assessment of the Pickering NGS 'B' feed and bleed system for the hot boiler chemical clean (Siemens Process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorencez, Carlos M.

    2000-01-01

    The Hot Boiler Chemical Clean (HBCC) process from Siemens, to be used in PNGS, requires that the Heat Transport System (HTS) temperature be maintained in the range 160 to 170 o C for several days. To achieve these thermalhydraulic condition, the core decay power and the pump power of the main circulating pumps in a 3-3 configuration are employed to warm up the HTS from approximately 38 o C to 170 o C. At this point, high Bleed bias is applied to the signal of the HTS pressure controller to provide high Feed and Bleed flows, which are used to control the HTS temperature by means of the Bleed Cooler. To address any concern posed by these infrequently used HTS thermalhydraulic conditions, a detailed thermalhydraulic model of the Feed and Bleed System, that also includes the Gland Supply, Gland Return and Purification systems, was developed for the TUF code to determine the suitability of the Feed and Bleed System to conduct the HBCC. The model was then used to estimate the parameters such as Feed and Bleed flows, valve openings, pressure and temperature distributions throughout the Feed and Bleed System required for the application of HBCC. (author)

  9. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods for air cleaning and protection of building occupants from airborne pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolashikov, Z.D.; Melikov, A.K. [International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Alle, building 402, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-07-15

    This article aims to draw the attention of the scientific community towards the elevated risks of airborne transmission of diseases and the associated risks of epidemics or pandemics. The complexity of the problem and the need for multidisciplinary research is highlighted. The airborne route of transmission, i.e. the generation of pathogen laden droplets originating in the respiratory tract of an infected individual, the survivability of the pathogens, their dispersal indoors and their transfer to a healthy person are reviewed. The advantages and the drawbacks of air dilution, filtration, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), photocatalytic oxidation (PCO), plasmacluster ions and other technologies for air disinfection and purification from pathogens are analyzed with respect to currently used air distribution principles. The importance of indoor air characteristics, such as temperature, relative humidity and velocity for the efficiency of each method is analyzed, taking into consideration the nature of the pathogens themselves. The applicability of the cleaning methods to the different types of total volume air distribution used at present indoors, i.e. mixing, displacement and underfloor ventilation, as well as advanced air distribution techniques (such as personalized ventilation) is discussed. (author)

  11. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavamurthy, S.

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems

  12. Semiclassical methods in chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshavamurthy, Srihari [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Semiclassical approximations, simple as well as rigorous, are formulated in order to be able to describe gas phase chemical reactions in large systems. We formulate a simple but accurate semiclassical model for incorporating multidimensional tunneling in classical trajectory simulations. This model is based on the existence of locally conserved actions around the saddle point region on a multidimensional potential energy surface. Using classical perturbation theory and monitoring the imaginary action as a function of time along a classical trajectory we calculate state-specific unimolecular decay rates for a model two dimensional potential with coupling. Results are in good comparison with exact quantum results for the potential over a wide range of coupling constants. We propose a new semiclassical hybrid method to calculate state-to-state S-matrix elements for bimolecular reactive scattering. The accuracy of the Van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator and the short time dynamics of the system make this method self-consistent and accurate. We also go beyond the stationary phase approximation by doing the resulting integrals exactly (numerically). As a result, classically forbidden probabilties are calculated with purely real time classical trajectories within this approach. Application to the one dimensional Eckart barrier demonstrates the accuracy of this approach. Successful application of the semiclassical hybrid approach to collinear reactive scattering is prevented by the phenomenon of chaotic scattering. The modified Filinov approach to evaluating the integrals is discussed, but application to collinear systems requires a more careful analysis. In three and higher dimensional scattering systems, chaotic scattering is suppressed and hence the accuracy and usefulness of the semiclassical method should be tested for such systems.

  13. The estimation possibility of cleaning from radionuclides for the coast parts of drainage system by the soil fractionating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, Y.V.; Chuikov, V.Y.; Belianina, N.G.; Barinov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper is considered the possibility of the cleaning from the radionuclides for the coast parts of the drainage system at the Moscow SIA open-quotes Radonclose quotes by the soil fractionating treatment. It is showed that this method cannot to be used for the cleaning of the soils near water flowing (a river, a spring or a open drainage system) because the most part of the soil size-fractions is the fine fractions and the main contaminant radionuclide ( 137 Cs) is distributed among the different soil components homogeneously

  14. Monitor Clean and Efficient. Background information. Methods and references as applied in the Monitor in April 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdes, J.; De Ligt, T.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains background information about the Monitor Clean and Efficient that was published in April 2009. The goal and approach of the Monitor are clarified, as well as the methods and data that are used. The structure of this report resembles the structure of the Monitor. Sources and dates of availability are mentioned along with the data, as are the parties collecting and processing the information. The results that were found using this methodology have been published in the Monitor Clean and Efficient. [nl

  15. Gold cleaning methods for preparation of cell culture surfaces for self-assembled monolayers of zwitterionic oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Junko; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Myasnikova, Dina; Onishi, Kisaki; Kobayashi, Yuka; Taruno, Yoko; Kanai, Takahiro; Fukuda, Junji

    2018-05-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been used to elucidate interactions between cells and material surface chemistry. Gold surfaces modified with oligopeptide SAMs exhibit several unique characteristics, such as cell-repulsive surfaces, micropatterns of cell adhesion and non-adhesion regions for control over cell microenvironments, and dynamic release of cells upon external stimuli under culture conditions. However, basic procedures for the preparation of oligopeptide SAMs, including appropriate cleaning methods of the gold surface before modification, have not been fully established. Because gold surfaces are readily contaminated with organic compounds in the air, cleaning methods may be critical for SAM formation. In this study, we examined the effects of four gold cleaning methods: dilute aqua regia, an ozone water, atmospheric plasma, and UV irradiation. Among the methods, UV irradiation most significantly improved the formation of oligopeptide SAMs in terms of repulsion of cells on the surfaces. We fabricated an apparatus with a UV light source, a rotation table, and HEPA filter, to treat a number of gold substrates simultaneously. Furthermore, UV-cleaned gold substrates were capable of detaching cell sheets without serious cell injury. This may potentially provide a stable and robust approach to oligopeptide SAM-based experiments for biomedical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic change of surface microbiota with different environmental cleaning methods between two wards in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Tu, Chi-Chao; Kuo, Han-Yueh; Zeng, Rong-Fong; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Liou, Ming-Li

    2017-01-01

    Terminal disinfection and daily cleaning have been performed in hospitals in Taiwan for many years to reduce the risks of healthcare-associated infections. However, the effectiveness of these cleaning approaches and dynamic changes of surface microbiota upon cleaning remain unclear. Here, we report the surface changes of bacterial communities with terminal disinfection and daily cleaning in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) and only terminal disinfection in a respiratory care center (RCC) using 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) metagenomics. A total of 36 samples, including 9 samples per sampling time, from each ward were analysed. The clinical isolates were recorded during the sampling time. A large amount of microbial diversity was detected, and human skin microbiota (HSM) was predominant in both wards. In addition, the colonization rate of the HSM in the MICU was higher than that in the RCC, especially for Moraxellaceae. A higher alpha-diversity (p = 0.005519) and a lower UniFrac distance was shown in the RCC due to the lack of daily cleaning. Moreover, a significantly higher abundance among Acinetobacter sp., Streptococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. was shown in the RCC compared to the MICU using the paired t test. We concluded that cleaning changes might contribute to the difference in diversity between two wards.

  17. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products

  18. Preliminary cleaning tests on candidate materials for APS beamline and front end UHV components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, R.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Comparative cleaning tests have been done on four candidate materials for use in APS beamline and front-end vacuum components. These materials are 304 SS, 304L SS, OFHC copper, and Glidcop* (Cu-Al 2 O 3 )- Samples of each material were prepared and cleaned using two different methods. After cleaning, the sample surfaces were analyzed using ESCA (Electron Spectography for Chemical Analysis). Uncleaned samples were used as a reference. The cleaning methods and surface analysis results are further discussed

  19. A validated RP-HPLC method for the determination of Irinotecan hydrochloride residues for cleaning validation in production area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Reddy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: cleaning validation is an integral part of current good manufacturing practices in pharmaceutical industry. The main purpose of cleaning validation is to prove the effectiveness and consistency of cleaning in a given pharmaceutical production equipment to prevent cross contamination and adulteration of drug product with other active ingredient. Objective: a rapid, sensitive and specific reverse phase HPLC method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of irinotecan hydrochloride in cleaning validation swab samples. Method: the method was validated using waters symmetry shield RP-18 (250mm x 4.6mm 5 µm column with isocratic mobile phase containing a mixture of 0.02 M potassium di-hydrogen ortho-phosphate, pH adjusted to 3.5 with ortho-phosphoric acid, methanol and acetonitrile (60:20:20 v/v/v. The flow rate of mobile phase was 1.0 mL/min with column temperature of 25°C and detection wavelength at 220nm. The sample injection volume was 100 µl. Results: the calibration curve was linear over a concentration range from 0.024 to 0.143 µg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.997. The intra-day and inter-day precision expressed as relative standard deviation were below 3.2%. The recoveries obtained from stainless steel, PCGI, epoxy, glass and decron cloth surfaces were more than 85% and there was no interference from the cotton swab. The detection limit (DL and quantitation limit (QL were 0.008 and 0.023 µg ml-1, respectively. Conclusion: the developed method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection and quantification, accuracy, precision and solution stability. The overall procedure can be used as part of a cleaning validation program in pharmaceutical manufacture of irinotecan hydrochloride.

  20. Gas plant cleaning case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, B

    1971-03-22

    Basic steps to be taken before using any cleaning method are select a responsible group and give it full responsibility; know the problem, what type of fouling, lab samples, amount of material, time and cost; sell the idea to management; maintain the cleaning equipment; and follow up each cleaning operation. These principles have been applied to advantage in the amine contractor at Taylor, a vessel 60 ft high with 78-in. OD, containing carbon steel deck trays with stainless steel caps. The original attempt to clean with wire scrapers manually involved much lost time and several crews. There was limited space in the tray vessels, design created areas difficult to clean, working conditions were unpleasant, equipment downtime was extended, labor cost was high, and the final result was not satisfactory. Chemical cleaning was substituted, preceded by a water wash. Five hours of caustic wash with a 3% solution at 170$F were followed by a water wash, an acid wash, 1-hr neutralization with a weak soda ash solution, and finally passivation to eliminate iron oxide. For the acid wash, sulfamic acid was found best, in 10% concentration for 4 hr. Cascading was most economical, but flooding has been employed sometimes at 2-1/2 times the cost, to reach all the dark corners.

  1. Chemical Reactivity as Described by Quantum Chemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Proft

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Density Functional Theory is situated within the evolution of Quantum Chemistry as a facilitator of computations and a provider of new, chemical insights. The importance of the latter branch of DFT, conceptual DFT is highlighted following Parr's dictum "to calculate a molecule is not to understand it". An overview is given of the most important reactivity descriptors and the principles they are couched in. Examples are given on the evolution of the structure-property-wave function triangle which can be considered as the central paradigm of molecular quantum chemistry to (for many purposes a structure-property-density triangle. Both kinetic as well as thermodynamic aspects can be included when further linking reactivity to the property vertex. In the field of organic chemistry, the ab initio calculation of functional group properties and their use in studies on acidity and basicity is discussed together with the use of DFT descriptors to study the kinetics of SN2 reactions and the regioselectivity in Diels Alder reactions. Similarity in reactivity is illustrated via a study on peptide isosteres. In the field of inorganic chemistry non empirical studies of adsorption of small molecules in zeolite cages are discussed providing Henry constants and separation constants, the latter in remarkable good agreement with experiments. Possible refinements in a conceptual DFT context are presented. Finally an example from biochemistry is discussed : the influence of point mutations on the catalytic activity of subtilisin.

  2. ATP Bioluminometers Analysis on the Surfaces of Removable Orthodontic Aligners after the Use of Different Cleaning Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Margherini, Silvia; Tenconi, Camilla; Vigetti, Davide; Muollo, Raffaele; Marco Abbate, Gian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim was to quantify the bacteria concentration on the surface of orthodontic clear aligners using three different cleaning methods. Furthermore the objective was to validate the efficacy of the bioluminometer in assessing the bacteria concentration. Materials and Methods. Twenty subjects (six males and fourteen females) undergoing orthodontic therapy with clear aligners (Invisalign® Align Technology, Santa Clara, California) were enrolled in this study. The observation time was o...

  3. Cleaning of Sodium in the Cold Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Choi, Byung Hae; Nam, Ho Yun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of a cleaning process is to remove the residual sodium adhering to the component walls once it has been properly drained. It is necessary to clean and decontaminate a component, especially the large components of the primary coolant system; such as the intermediate heat exchangers and the primary pump. Improper and inadequate cleaning has in a number of cases resulted in problems in the storage, handling, and reuse of components. Several types of failures due to improper cleaning procedures have been defined in the past. Inadequate and incomplete removal of sodium results in residues which may contain metallic sodium and alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide, sodium oxide, sodium carbonate, and various types of alcoholates. Reinsertion of components containing these compounds into a high-temperature sodium system can result in either the intergranular penetration characteristic of a high- oxygen sodium or an accelerated corrosion due to oxygen. The methods used for cleaning sodium equipment depend on the condition and types of equipment to be cleaned and whether the equipment is to be reused. Cleaning methods are needed that will avoid a deleterious local overheating, material surface degradation or deposits, chemical, physical, or mechanical damage, and external effects. This paper discusses a steam-nitrogen gas cleaning method for the routine applications that permits the reuse of the cold trap in sodium

  4. Controlling the clean room atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    Several types of clean rooms are commonly in use. They include the conventional clean room, the horizontal laminar flow clean room, the vertical laminar flow clean room and a fourth type that incorporates ideas from the previous types and is known as a clean air bench or hood. These clean rooms are briefly described. The origin of contamination and methods for controlling the contamination are discussed

  5. Laser ablation method for cleaning of mirror surfaces for optical diagnostic systems at the ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrova, A.S.; Kuznetsov, A.P.; Gubskij, K.L.; Petrovskij, V.N.; Savelov, A.S.; Shtamm, V.G.; Buzhinskij, O.I.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of cleaning metallic mirrors from films with complex composition by pulsed radiation from a fiber laser has been experimentally examined. It has been shown that the high initial reflection characteristics of optical elements can be recovered by choosing regimes of the action of radiation on the surface with a deposited film [ru

  6. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  7. Assessment of chemical exposures: calculation methods for environmental professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daugherty, Jack E

    1997-01-01

    ... on by scientists, businessmen, and policymakers. Assessment of Chemical Exposures: Calculation Methods for Environmental Professionals addresses the expanding scope of exposure assessments in both the workplace and environment...

  8. Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  9. Chemical Method of Urine Volume Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrack, P.

    1967-01-01

    A system has been developed and qualified as flight hardware for the measurement of micturition volumes voided by crewmen during Gemini missions. This Chemical Urine Volume Measurement System (CUVMS) is used for obtaining samples of each micturition for post-flight volume determination and laboratory analysis for chemical constituents of physiological interest. The system is versatile with respect to volumes measured, with a capacity beyond the largest micturition expected to be encountered, and with respect to mission duration of inherently indefinite length. The urine sample is used for the measurement of total micturition volume by a tracer dilution technique, in which a fixed, predetermined amount of tritiated water is introduced and mixed into the voided urine, and the resulting concentration of the tracer in the sample is determined with a liquid scintillation spectrometer. The tracer employed does not interfere with the analysis for the chemical constituents of the urine. The CUVMS hardware consists of a four-way selector valve in which an automatically operated tracer metering pump is incorporated, a collection/mixing bag, and tracer storage accumulators. The assembled system interfaces with a urine receiver at the selector valve inlet, sample bags which connect to the side of the selector valve, and a flexible hose which carries the excess urine to the overboard drain connection. Results of testing have demonstrated system volume measurement accuracy within the specification limits of +/-5%, and operating reliability suitable for system use aboard the GT-7 mission, in which it was first used.

  10. Quality Control Guidelines for SAM Chemical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about quality control guidelines and recommendations for the analysis of samples using the chemistry methods listed in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM).

  11. Field theoretical methods in chemical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.

    1982-01-01

    Field theory will become an important tool for the chemist, and this book presents a clear and thorough account of the theory itself and its applications for solving a wide variety of chemical problems. The author has brought together the foundations upon which the many and varied applications of field theory have been built, giving more intermediate steps than is usual in the derivations. This makes the book easily accessible to anyone with a background of calculus, statistical thermodynamics and elementary quantum chemistry. (orig./HK)

  12. Chemical decontamination method in nuclear facility system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi; Oka, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    Pumps and valves in a closed recycling loop system incorporating materials to be chemically decontaminated are decomposed, a guide plate having the decomposed parts as an exit/inlet of a decontaminating liquid is formed, and a decontaminating liquid recycling loop comprising a recycling pump and a heater is connected to the guide plate. Decontaminating liquid from a decontaminating liquid storage tank is supplied to the decontaminating liquid recycling loop. With such constitutions, the decontaminating liquid is filled in the recycling closed loop system incorporating materials to be decontaminated, and the materials to be decontaminated are chemically decontaminated. The decontaminating liquid after the decontamination is discharged and flows, if necessary, in a recycling system channel for repeating supply and discharge. After the decontamination, the guide plate is removed and returned to the original recycling loop. When pipelines of a reactor recycling system are decontaminated, the amount of decontaminations can be decreased, and reforming construction for assembling the recycling loop again, which requires cutting for pipelines in the system is no more necessary. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased, and therefore, the decontamination operation is facilitated and radiation dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  13. Evaluation of Two Surface Sampling Methods for Microbiological and Chemical Analyses To Assess the Presence of Biofilms in Food Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Sharon; Huu, Son Nguyen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Weyenberg, Stephanie van; Steenackers, Hans; Verplaetse, Alex; Vackier, Thijs; Sampers, Imca; Raes, Katleen; Reu, Koen De

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms are an important source of contamination in food companies, yet the composition of biofilms in practice is still mostly unknown. The chemical and microbiological characterization of surface samples taken after cleaning and disinfection is very important to distinguish free-living bacteria from the attached bacteria in biofilms. In this study, sampling methods that are potentially useful for both chemical and microbiological analyses of surface samples were evaluated. In the manufacturing facilities of eight Belgian food companies, surfaces were sampled after cleaning and disinfection using two sampling methods: the scraper-flocked swab method and the sponge stick method. Microbiological and chemical analyses were performed on these samples to evaluate the suitability of the sampling methods for the quantification of extracellular polymeric substance components and microorganisms originating from biofilms in these facilities. The scraper-flocked swab method was most suitable for chemical analyses of the samples because the material in these swabs did not interfere with determination of the chemical components. For microbiological enumerations, the sponge stick method was slightly but not significantly more effective than the scraper-flocked swab method. In all but one of the facilities, at least 20% of the sampled surfaces had more than 10 2 CFU/100 cm 2 . Proteins were found in 20% of the chemically analyzed surface samples, and carbohydrates and uronic acids were found in 15 and 8% of the samples, respectively. When chemical and microbiological results were combined, 17% of the sampled surfaces were contaminated with both microorganisms and at least one of the analyzed chemical components; thus, these surfaces were characterized as carrying biofilm. Overall, microbiological contamination in the food industry is highly variable by food sector and even within a facility at various sampling points and sampling times.

  14. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Shibuya, Sadao.

    1991-01-01

    When contaminants mainly composed of copper remained on the surface of stainless steel wastes sent from an electrolytic reduction as a first step are chemically decontaminated, metal wastes are discriminated to carbon steel wastes and stainless steel wastes. Then, the carbon steel wastes are applied only with the first step of immersing in a sulfuric acid solution, and stainless steel wastes are applied with a first step of immersing into a sulfuric acid solution for electrolytic reduction for a predetermined period of time and a second step of immersing into a liquid in which an oxidative metal salt is added to sulfuric acid. The decontamination liquid which is used for immersing the stainless steel wastes in the second step and the oxidation force of which is lowered is used as the sulfuric acid solution in the first step for the carbon steel wastes. In view of the above, the decontamination liquid of the second step can be utilized most effectively, enabling to greatly decrease the secondary wastes and to improve decontamination efficiency. (T.M.)

  15. Chemical Reactions Triggered Using Electrons Photodetached from "Clean" Distributions of Anions Deposited in Cryogenic Matrices via Counterion Codeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Ryan M; Moore, David T

    2014-09-04

    Application of matrix isolation spectroscopy to ionic species is typically complicated by the presence of neutral contaminants during matrix deposition. Herein we demonstrate that simultaneous deposition of balanced currents of counterions with mass-selected ions of interest generates "clean" distributions of matrix-isolated metal carbonyl anions, where the only bands appearing in the CO-stretching region of the vibrational spectrum arise from ions. (Neutrals are initially absent.) Photodetachment by mild irradiation with visible light leads to complete conversion of the anions into their corresponding neutral species. The photodetached electrons, in turn, initiate covalent chemistry, inducing C-C bond formation following electron-capture by CO van der Waals dimers to produce trans-OCCO(-). The initial clean distribution of ions enables clear connections to be drawn between the spectral changes occurring at each experimental step, thus demonstrating the potential of the counterion codeposition technique to facilitate detailed studies of chemistry involving ions and electron transfer in cryogenic matrices.

  16. Characterization of Carbon-Contaminated B4C-Coated Optics after Chemically Selective Cleaning with Low-Pressure RF Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Fernández, H; Rogler, D; Sauthier, G; Thomasset, M; Dietsch, R; Carlino, V; Pellegrin, E

    2018-01-22

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is one of the few materials that is expected to be most resilient with respect to the extremely high brilliance of the photon beam generated by free electron lasers (FELs) and is thus of considerable interest for optical applications in this field. However, as in the case of many other optics operated at light source facilities, B 4 C-coated optics are subject to ubiquitous carbon contaminations. Carbon contaminations represent a serious issue for the operation of FEL beamlines due to severe reduction of photon flux, beam coherence, creation of destructive interference, and scattering losses. A variety of B 4 C cleaning technologies were developed at different laboratories with varying success. We present a study regarding the low-pressure RF plasma cleaning of carbon contaminated B 4 C test samples via inductively coupled O 2 /Ar, H 2 /Ar, and pure O 2 RF plasma produced following previous studies using the same ibss GV10x downstream plasma source. Results regarding the chemistry, morphology as well as other aspects of the B 4 C optical coating before and after the plasma cleaning are reported. We conclude that among the above plasma processes only plasma based on pure O 2 feedstock gas exhibits the required chemical selectivity for maintaining the integrity of the B 4 C optical coatings.

  17. Ecological effectiveness of oil spill countermeasures: how clean is clean?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper with 94 references examines background levels of hydrocarbons and the difficulty of defining clean. Processes and timescales for natural cleaning, and factors affecting natural cleaning timescales are considered. Ecological advantages and disadvantages of clean-up methods are highlighted, and five case histories of oil spills are summarised. The relationships between ecological and socio-economic considerations, and the need for a net environmental benefit analysis which takes into account the advantages and disadvantages of clean-up responses and natural clean-up are discussed. A decision tree for evaluating the requirement for shore clean-up is illustrated. (UK)

  18. Clean data

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, Megan

    2015-01-01

    If you are a data scientist of any level, beginners included, and interested in cleaning up your data, this is the book for you! Experience with Python or PHP is assumed, but no previous knowledge of data cleaning is needed.

  19. Clean-up system for pool water in pressure suppression chamber and operation method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Kentaro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-09-17

    Pool water in a pressure suppression chamber of a BWR type reactor is sucked by a pump of an after-heat removing system. The pool water pressurized here is sent to the pressure suppression chamber by way of a heat exchanger and a test line backwarding pipeline to stir the pool water in the pressure suppression chamber. Further, the pool water pressurized by the pump is sent to the pressure suppression chamber by way of a filtration desalting device and an exit pipe to purify the pool water. Upon cleaning of pipelines before the start of a periodical test, the pool water sucked by the pump is sent to the filtration desalting device and recovered to the pressure suppression chamber. This can reduce the amount of impurities carried to the suppression chamber. After the cleaning of the pipelines, pool water is passed through the test line backwarding pipeline, so that the pool water can be stirred at the same time. (I.N.)

  20. Investigation of Evaluation method of chemical runaway reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshihiko; Sasaya, Shinji; Kurakata, Koichiro; Nojiri, Ichiro

    2002-02-01

    Safety study 'Study of evaluation of abnormal occurrence for chemical substances in the nuclear fuel facilities' will be carried out from 2001 to 2005. In this study, the prediction of thermal hazards of chemical substances will be investigated and prepared. The hazard prediction method of chemical substances will be constructed from these results. Therefore, the hazard prediction methods applied in the chemical engineering in which the chemical substances with the hazard of fire and explosion were often treated were investigated. CHETAH (The ASTM Computer Program for Chemical Thermodynamic and Energy Release Evaluation) developed by ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) and TSS (Thermal Safety Software) developed by CISP (ChemInform St. Petersburg) were introduced and the fire and explosion hazards of chemical substances and reactions in the reprocessing process were evaluated. From these evaluated results, CHETAH could almost estimate the heat of reaction at 10% accuracy. It was supposed that CHETAH was useful as a screening for the hazards of fire and explosion of the new chemical substances and so on. TSS could calculate the reaction rate and the reaction behavior from the data measured by the various calorimeters rapidly. It was supposed that TSS was useful as an evaluation method for the hazards of fire and explosion of the new chemical reactions and so on. (author)

  1. Chemical Compounds and Extraction Methods of ?Maollahm?

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghpoor, Omid; Dayeni, Manijeh; Razi, Samane

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maollahm or meat juice, a by-product of meat, is a traditional remedy in Persian medicine. This product was used as a nourishment or treatment substance for sick people. According to the ancient Persian medicine, animal meat has more affinity with the human body and the body easily absorbs its nutrition. Therefore, one could resort to maollahm for patients requiring urgent nourishment to boost and strengthen their body. Methods: In this work, different ways of preparing maollahm f...

  2. Investigation of Chemical Equilibrium Kinetics by the Electromigration Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhikov, G A; Bontchev, G D; Maslov, O D; Milanov, M V; Dmitriev, S N

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the complex formation of Hf(IV) and DTPA is determined.

  3. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Steven B.; Miller, David J.; Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie; Hammond, Peter James; Clifford, Anthony Alan

    2002-01-01

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents, and degrading various compounds.

  4. Ultra-clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergenroether, K.

    1987-01-01

    No other method guarantees such a thorough cleaning of contaminated materials' surfaces. Only ultrasound can reach those cavities crevices and corners where any manual cleaning fails. Furthermore there is no cumbersome and time-consuming manual decontamination which often has to be carried out in glove boxes and hot cells. Depending on the design the cleaning effect can reach from removing adhering dirt particles to removing complete surface layers. (orig./PW) [de

  5. Critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place during the long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai

    2011-01-01

    The critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place (CIP) in a long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment were investigated. Steady filtration under high flux (30 L/(m2 h)) was successfully achieved due to effective membrane fouling control by sub-critical flux operation and chemical CIP with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) in both trans-membrane pressure (TMP) controlling mode (cleaning with high concentration NaClO of 2000-3000 mg/L in terms of effective chorine was performed when TMP rose to 15 kPa) and time controlling mode (cleanings were performed weekly and monthly respectively with low concentration NaClO (500-1000 mg/L) and high concentration NaClO (3000 mg/L)). Microscopic analysis on membrane fibers before and after high concentration NaClO was also conducted. Images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that NaClO CIP could effectively remove gel layer, the dominant fouling under sub-critical flux operation. Porosity measurements indicated that NaClO CIP could partially remove pore blockage fouling. The analyses from fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) with attenuated total reflectance accessory (ATR) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) demonstrated that protein-like macromolecular organics and inorganics were the important components of the fouling layer. The analysis of effluent quality before and after NaClO CIP showed no obvious effect on effluent quality. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. An efficient, environmentally acceptable, clean up system for well completions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Oe.; Saasen, A.

    1996-01-01

    Evaluation of different casing cleaning fluid systems has been a difficult task due to the lack of a standardised laboratory measurement technique for technical performance. In order to meet the need for a reliable evaluation of different chemicals and fluid systems used in casing cleaning, a laboratory procedure for the evaluation of casing cleaning chemicals has been developed. This procedure has been successfully applied in the development of a new environmentally acceptable casing cleaning fluid system. Two different procedures are presented. An old method where the drilling fluid was displaced down the annulus and up the drill string was found to be ineffective compared to a method where the drilling fluid was displaced up in the annulus. The application of this procedure together with the use of the new chemical additive has reduced the cost of casing cleanup operations in the range of 30-40%. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. Method of and system for cleaning and/or drying the inner walls of pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhaus, H.

    1989-04-04

    For cleaning and/or drying the inner walls of long distance pipelines the pressure in the interior of the pipeline is decreased and the vapour formed by evaporation of the substance adhering to the pipe inner wall (and, if applicable, foreign gases present) are exhausted from the pipeline. Upon exit from the pipeline and prior to entry into the exhausting apparatus, the exhausted medium passes through a condensating apparatus whose cooling surfaces are maintained at a temperature that is lower than the pipe wall temperature. With a temperature difference sufficient to condense the substance vapour on said cooling surfaces, it is possible to enhance the drying rate considerably, compared to pure vacuum-type drying. 1 fig.

  8. Variational methods for chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1977-01-01

    All the variational functionals are derived which satisfy certain criteria of suitability for molecular and nuclear scattering, below the threshold energy for three-body breakup. The existence and uniqueness of solutions are proven. The most general suitable functional is specialized, by particular values of its parameters, to Kohn's taneta, Kato's cot(eta-theta), the inverse Kohn coeta, Kohn's S matrix, our S matrix, Lane and Robson's functional, and several new functionals, an infinite number of which are contained in the general expression. Four general ways of deriving algebraic methods from a given functional are discussed, and illustrated with specific algebraic results. These include equations of Lane and Robson and of Kohn, the fundamental R matrix relation, and new equations. The relative configuration space is divided as in the Wigner R matrix theory, and trial wavefunctions are needed for only the region where all the particles are interacting. In addition, a version of the general functional is presented which does not require any division of space

  9. The international validation of bio- and chemical-anlaytical screening methods for dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs: the DIFFERENCE project rounds 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loco, van J.; Leeuwen, van S.P.J.; Roos, P.; Carbonnelle, S.; Boer, de J.; Goeyens, L.; Beernaert, H.

    2004-01-01

    The European research project DIFFERENCE is focussed on the development, optimisation and validation of screening methods for dioxin analysis, including bio-analytical and chemical techniques (CALUX, GC-LRMS/MS, GC x GC-ECD) and on the optimisation and validation of new extraction and clean-up

  10. Odour detection methods: olfactometry and chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattoli, Magda; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Pinto, Valentina; Loiotile, Annamaria Demarinis; Lovascio, Sara; Penza, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the odours issue arises from the sensory nature of smell. From the evolutionary point of view olfaction is one of the oldest senses, allowing for seeking food, recognizing danger or communication: human olfaction is a protective sense as it allows the detection of potential illnesses or infections by taking into account the odour pleasantness/unpleasantness. Odours are mixtures of light and small molecules that, coming in contact with various human sensory systems, also at very low concentrations in the inhaled air, are able to stimulate an anatomical response: the experienced perception is the odour. Odour assessment is a key point in some industrial production processes (i.e., food, beverages, etc.) and it is acquiring steady importance in unusual technological fields (i.e., indoor air quality); this issue mainly concerns the environmental impact of various industrial activities (i.e., tanneries, refineries, slaughterhouses, distilleries, civil and industrial wastewater treatment plants, landfills and composting plants) as sources of olfactory nuisances, the top air pollution complaint. Although the human olfactory system is still regarded as the most important and effective "analytical instrument" for odour evaluation, the demand for more objective analytical methods, along with the discovery of materials with chemo-electronic properties, has boosted the development of sensor-based machine olfaction potentially imitating the biological system. This review examines the state of the art of both human and instrumental sensing currently used for the detection of odours. The olfactometric techniques employing a panel of trained experts are discussed and the strong and weak points of odour assessment through human detection are highlighted. The main features and the working principles of modern electronic noses (E-Noses) are then described, focusing on their better performances for environmental analysis. Odour emission monitoring carried out through

  11. Odour Detection Methods: Olfactometry and Chemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lovascio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the odours issue arises from the sensory nature of smell. From the evolutionary point of view olfaction is one of the oldest senses, allowing for seeking food, recognizing danger or communication: human olfaction is a protective sense as it allows the detection of potential illnesses or infections by taking into account the odour pleasantness/unpleasantness. Odours are mixtures of light and small molecules that, coming in contact with various human sensory systems, also at very low concentrations in the inhaled air, are able to stimulate an anatomical response: the experienced perception is the odour. Odour assessment is a key point in some industrial production processes (i.e., food, beverages, etc. and it is acquiring steady importance in unusual technological fields (i.e., indoor air quality; this issue mainly concerns the environmental impact of various industrial activities (i.e., tanneries, refineries, slaughterhouses, distilleries, civil and industrial wastewater treatment plants, landfills and composting plants as sources of olfactory nuisances, the top air pollution complaint. Although the human olfactory system is still regarded as the most important and effective “analytical instrument” for odour evaluation, the demand for more objective analytical methods, along with the discovery of materials with chemo-electronic properties, has boosted the development of sensor-based machine olfaction potentially imitating the biological system. This review examines the state of the art of both human and instrumental sensing currently used for the detection of odours. The olfactometric techniques employing a panel of trained experts are discussed and the strong and weak points of odour assessment through human detection are highlighted. The main features and the working principles of modern electronic noses (E-Noses are then described, focusing on their better performances for environmental analysis. Odour emission monitoring

  12. Heat exchanger cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatewood, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey covers the various types of heat-exchange equipment that is cleaned routinely in fossil-fired generating plants, the hydrocarbon-processing industry, pulp and paper mills, and other industries; the various types, sources, and adverse effects of deposits in heat-exchange equipment; some details of the actual procedures for high-pressure water jetting and chemical cleaning of some specific pieces of equipment, including nuclear steam generators. (DN)

  13. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory--Chemical Management: A Method for Waste Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Stanley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods for reducing or eliminating waste disposal problems in the chemistry laboratory, considering both economic and environmental aspects of the problems. Proposes inventory control, shared use, solvent recycling, zero effluent, and various means of disposing of chemicals. (JM)

  14. Calculation of Multiphase Chemical Equilibrium by the Modified RAND Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsanas, Christos; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Yan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    method. The modified RAND extends the classical RAND method from single-phase chemical reaction equilibrium of ideal systems to multiphase chemical equilibrium of nonideal systems. All components in all phases are treated in the same manner and the system Gibbs energy can be used to monitor convergence....... This is the first time that modified RAND was applied to multiphase chemical equilibrium systems. The combined algorithm was tested using nine examples covering vapor–liquid (VLE) and vapor–liquid–liquid equilibria (VLLE) of ideal and nonideal reaction systems. Successive substitution provided good initial......A robust and efficient algorithm for simultaneous chemical and phase equilibrium calculations is proposed. It combines two individual nonstoichiometric solving procedures: a nested-loop method with successive substitution for the first steps and final convergence with the second-order modified RAND...

  15. Chemical analysis of cyanide in cyanidation process: review of methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nova-Alonso, F.; Elorza-Rodriguez, E.; Uribe-Salas, A.; Perez-Garibay, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cyanidation, the world wide method for precious metals recovery, the chemical analysis of cyanide, is a very important, but complex operation. Cyanide can be present forming different species, each of them with different stability, toxicity, analysis method and elimination technique. For cyanide analysis, there exists a wide selection of analytical methods but most of them present difficulties because of the interference of species present in the solution. This paper presents the different available methods for chemical analysis of cyanide: titration, specific electrode and distillation, giving special emphasis on the interferences problem, with the aim of helping in the interpretation of the results. (Author)

  16. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  17. Solar photocatalytic cleaning of polluted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockelmann, D.

    1994-01-01

    Alternatively to biological, physical and chemical methods of waste water cleaning, photocatalysis can be employed. In this residue-free method, titanium dioxide particles are brought into contact with polluted water as photocatalysts. Under UV irradiation at wave-lengths below 400 nm, change carriers are generated in the semiconductor particles that act so intensely oxidizing as to completely degrade almost all organic pollutants in waste water. In this process, the ultra-violet part of the solar spectrum can be harnessed to generate oxidation equivalents. Thus, solar photocatalytic waste water cleaning is excellently suited for developing countries. (BWI) [de

  18. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1996-05-07

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene or terpineol cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  19. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfurly alcohol cleaning agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  20. Overview of shoreline cleaning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, J.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical cleaning agents may be used to promote release of stranded oil from shorelines for reasons including biological sensitivity of indigenous fauna and flora to the oil, amenity considerations of the shoreline, or concern about refloating of the oil and subsequent stranding on adjacent shorelines. While use of chemical cleaning agents may be appropriate under proper toxic responses in circumstances, certain limitations should be recognized. The potential for toxic responses in indigenous fauna and flora to the cleaning agents must be considered. Enhanced penetration of oil into permeable shorelines following treatment with chemical cleaning agents also is not desirable. However, if conditions related to toxicity and substrate permeability are determined to be acceptable, the use of chemical cleaning agents for treatment of stranded oil can be considered. Chemical agents for cleaning oiled shorelines can be grouped into three categories: (1) non-surfactant-based solvents, (2) chemical dispersants, and (3) formulations especially designed to release stranded oil from shoreline substrates (i.e., shoreline-cleaning-agents). Depending on the specific circumstances present on an oiled shoreline, it is generally desirable that chemical agents used for cleaning will release oil from shoreline substrate(s) to surface waters. Recovery of the oil can then be accomplished by mechanical procedures such as booming and skimming operations

  1. A novel polymer inclusion membrane based method for continuous clean-up of thiocyanate from gold mine tailings water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsoo; Cattrall, Robert W; Kolev, Spas D

    2018-01-05

    Thiocyanate is present in gold mine tailings waters in concentrations up to 1000mgL -1 and this has a serious environmental impact by not allowing water reuse in the flotation of gold ore. This significantly increases the consumption of fresh water and the amount of wastewater discharged in tailings dams. At the same time thiocyanate in tailings waters often leads to groundwater contamination. A novel continuous membrane-based method for the complete clean-up of thiocyanate in concentrations as high as 1000mgL -1 from its aqueous solutions has been developed. It employs a flat sheet polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) of composition 70wt% PVC, 20wt% Aliquat 336 and 10wt% 1-tetradecanol which separates counter-current streams of a feed thiocyanate solution and a 1M NaNO 3 receiving solution. The PIM-based system has been operated continuously for 45days with 99% separation efficiency. The volume of the receiving solution has been drastically reduced by recirculating it and continuously removing thiocyanate by precipitating it with in-situ generated Cu(I). The newly developed PIM-based thiocyanate clean-up method is environmentally friendly in terms of reagent use and inexpensive with respect to both equipment and running costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Flue gas cleaning chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutberlet, H [VEBA Kraftwerke Ruhr AG, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The introduction of modern flue gas cleaning technology into fossil-fueled power stations has repeatedly confronted the power station chemists with new and interesting problems over the last 15 - 20 years. Both flue gas desulphurization by lime washing and catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides are based on simple basic chemical reactions. Owing to the use of readily available starting materials, the production of safe, useful end products and, last but not least, the possibility of implementing all this on an industrial scale by means of efficient process engineering, limestone desulphurization and catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides dominate the world market and, little by little, are becoming still more widespread. The origin and thus the quality of fuels and starting materials, the firing method, the mode of operation and engineering peculiarities in each plant interact in a complex manner. Simple cause/effect relationships are frequently incapable of explaining phenomena; thinking in complex interrelationships is needed. (EG)

  3. Chemical Methods to Knock Down the Amyloid Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Gao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins are closely related with amyloid diseases and do tremendous harm to human health. However, there is still a lack of effective strategies to treat these amyloid diseases, so it is important to develop novel methods. Accelerating the clearance of amyloid proteins is a favorable method for amyloid disease treatment. Recently, chemical methods for protein reduction have been developed and have attracted much attention. In this review, we focus on the latest progress of chemical methods that knock down amyloid proteins, including the proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC strategy, the “recognition-cleavage” strategy, the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA strategy, the selectively light-activatable organic and inorganic molecules strategy and other chemical strategies.

  4. Effect of drying methods on the chemical composition of three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three methods of drying (oven, sun and smoke) were used to dry Bonga spp., Sardinella spp. and Heterotis niloticus. The physico-chemical and minerals contents of the sample were determined using standard methods. Oven dried H. niloticus recorded the highest (16.42%) moisture content while the least moisture content ...

  5. A identification system for chemical warfare agents with PGNAA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Yin Guanghua; Yang Zhongping

    2006-01-01

    The principle and the experimental commanding of Chemical warfare Agents Identification with PGNAA method are discussed in this paper. The choosing of Detector, neutron source and the data processing method are detailed. Finally, a set of experimental instruments composed of Cf-232 and BGO detector is developed based on the theory discussed above. (authors)

  6. Identification system for chemical warfare agents with PGNAA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Yin Guanghua; Yang Zhongpin

    2007-01-01

    The principle and the experimental commanding of Chemical warfare Agents Identification with PGNAA method are discussed in this paper. The choosing of detector, neutron source and the data processing method are detailed. Finally, a set of experimental instruments composed of Cf-232 and BGO detector is developed based on this theory discussed above. (authors)

  7. Methods of uranium isotpic separation by chemical exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena V, L.A.; Valle M, L.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical exchange chromatography as applied to isotope separation has undergone a constant development during the last few years. The results so far indicate that this method could eventually become commercially useful. This work presents a critical review of the experimental methods presently under study by principal research groups, and which have not get been compared. (Author)

  8. Insights: A New Method to Balance Chemical Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Arcesio

    1987-01-01

    Describes a method designed to balance oxidation-reduction chemical equations. Outlines a method which is based on changes in the oxidation number that can be applied to both molecular reactions and ionic reactions. Provides examples and delineates the steps to follow for each type of equation balancing. (TW)

  9. New methods of sup(111)In chemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.F.; Osso Junior, J.A.; Bastos, M.A.V.; Britto, J.L.Q.; Silva, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The cation exchange and thermochromatography methods for chemical separation of sup(111) In from silver targets are described. The cation exchange method is based on the difference between In and Ag distribution coefficients on cation exchange resin treated with HNO sub(3). The thermochromatography consists of indium diffusion on silver melted after sublimation and posterior condensation. (M.C.K.)

  10. Method for Cleanly and Precisely Breaking Off a Rock Core Using a Radial Compressive Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Megan; Lin, Justin

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return mission has the goal to drill, break off, and retain rock core samples. After some results gained from rock core mechanics testing, the realization that scoring teeth would cleanly break off the core after only a few millimeters of penetration, and noting that rocks are weak in tension, the idea was developed to use symmetric wedging teeth in compression to weaken and then break the core at the contact plane. This concept was developed as a response to the break-off and retention requirements. The wedges wrap around the estimated average diameter of the core to get as many contact locations as possible, and are then pushed inward, radially, through the core towards one another. This starts a crack and begins to apply opposing forces inside the core to propagate the crack across the plane of contact. The advantage is in the simplicity. Only two teeth are needed to break five varieties of Mars-like rock cores with limited penetration and reasonable forces. Its major advantage is that it does not require any length of rock to be attached to the parent in order to break the core at the desired location. Test data shows that some rocks break off on their own into segments or break off into discs. This idea would grab and retain a disc, push some discs upward and others out, or grab a segment, break it at the contact plane, and retain the portion inside of the device. It also does this with few moving parts in a simple, space-efficient design. This discovery could be implemented into a coring drill bit to precisely break off and retain any size rock core.

  11. Development for ultra-trace analysis method of U and Pu in safeguards environmental samples at the clean facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masato; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Based on the strengthen safeguard program of the IAEA to detect undeclared nuclear activities and nuclear materials, the method of precise and accurate isotope ratio determination for uranium and plutonium in the environmental samples (cotton swipes) has been developed at JAERI. The samples should be treated in clean environment in order to secure the analytical reliability by eliminating external contamination from the samples containing trace amount of uranium and plutonium. Since the measurement by ICP-MS is favorable to bulk analysis from view points of analytical capacity and operation simplicity, we have studied sample preparation procedures for the trace amount of uranium and plutonium to be applied to ICP-MS. Up to the present, interfering factors involved during analytical processes and the ICP-MS measurement of uranium and plutonium were examined. As a result, uranium isotope measurement more than 100 pg became possible at JAERI clean facility by diminishing uranium blank introduced in the entire sample treatment procedure. And also, the estimation of plutonium recovery yield and uranium decontamination factor suggested the possibility in plutonium isotope measurement more than 100 fg. (author)

  12. 16th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1981-02-01

    Major topics discussed during the Sixteenth DOE Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference were: waste treatment, including volume reduction and storage; system and component response to stress and accident conditions; Three Mile Island accident; iodine adsorption; treatment and storage of noble gas: treatment of offgases from chemical processing; aerosol; behavior; containment venting; laboratory and in-place filter-testing methods; and particulate filtration. Volume I of the Proceedings has 49 papers from the following sessions; HEPA filter test methods; noble gas separation; air cleaning system design; containment venting; iodine adsorption; reprocessing offgas cleaning; critical review; filtration; filter testing; and aerosols. Volume II contains 44 papers from the sessions on: nuclear waste treatment; critical review; noble gas treatment; carbon-14 and tritium; air cleaning system response to stress; nuclear standards and safety; round table; open end; and air cleaning technology at Three Mile Island. Abstracts are provided for all of these papers

  13. 16th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1981-02-01

    Major topics discussed during the Sixteenth DOE Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference were: waste treatment, including volume reduction and storage; system and component response to stress and accident conditions; Three Mile Island accident; iodine adsorption; treatment and storage of noble gas; treatment of offgases from chemical processing; aerosol behavior; containment venting; laboratory and in-place filter-testing methods; and particulate filtration. Volume I of the Proceedings has 49 papers from the following sessions: HEPA filter test methods; noble gas separation; air cleaning system design; containment venting; iodine adsorption; reprocessing offgas cleaning; critical review; filtration, filter testing, and aerosols. Volume II contains 44 papers from the sessions on: nuclear waste treatment; critical review; noble gas treatment; carbon-14 and tritium; air cleaning system response to stress; nuclear standards and safety; round table; open end; and air cleaning technology at Three Mile Island. Abstracts are provided for all of these papers

  14. Testing of toxicity based methods to develop site specific clean up objectives - phase 1: Toxicity protocol screening and applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, H.; Kerr, D.; Thorne, W.; Taylor, B.; Zadnik, M.; Goudey, S.; Birkholz, D.

    1994-03-01

    A study was conducted to develop a cost-effective and practical protocol for using bio-assay based toxicity assessment methods for remediation of decommissioned oil and gas production, and processing facilities. The objective was to generate site-specific remediation criteria for contaminated sites. Most companies have used the chemical-specific approach which, however, did not meet the ultimate land use goal of agricultural production. The toxicity assessment method described in this study dealt with potential impairment to agricultural crop production and natural ecosystems. Human health concerns were not specifically addressed. It was suggested that chemical-specific methods should be used when human health concerns exist. . Results showed that toxicity tests will more directly identify ecological stress caused by site contamination than chemical-specific remediation criteria, which can be unnecessarily protective. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 6 figs

  15. Comparison studies of surface cleaning methods for PAN-based carbon fibers with acetone, supercritical acetone and subcritical alkali aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Linghui; Fan Dapeng; Huang Yudong; Jiang Zaixing; Zhang Chunhua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cleaning with supercritical acetone is appropriate to wipe off the oxygenated contaminants. ► Cleaning with supercritical acetone causes smaller damage to bulk strength of carbon fibers. ► Cleaning with subcritical alkali aqueous solution can thoroughly remove silicious contaminants. - Abstract: Four kinds of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were cleaned by three methods and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, monofilament tensile strength test and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental results of these tests reveal that the method using supercritical acetone or subcritical potassium hydroxide aqueous solution act as the processing medium shows a better cleaning effect compared to the traditional method, Soxhlet extraction with acetone. The method using supercritical acetone is more appropriate to wipe off the oxygenated contaminants on carbon fibers’ surfaces and causes a relatively smaller damage to the bulk strength of each carbon fiber. As far as treating method using the subcritical alkali aqueous solution, it can thoroughly remove silicious contaminants on the surfaces of treated fibers.

  16. Application of method of organizational congruences to substitution of organic solvents with vegetable agents for cleaning offset printing machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salerno, S [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute; Tartaglia, R [Unita Sanitaria Locale 10/D, Firenze (Italy); Garzi, S; Biagioni, A [Istituto tecnico Leonardo da Vinci, Firenze (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this research is the application of the method of organizational congruences before and after the substitution of organic solvents with vegetable agents for the cleaning offset printing machine in order to assess the organizational changes. A solvent free process is the goal of the SUBSPRINT project (Technology Transfer Program of the European Community). In this study it is shown how human and environmental health is improved by using vegetable agents through this change may lead to some other organizational constraints such as the time needed, the monotony and repetitiveness of the technical actions involved. The authors underline that the knowledge of the new technology impact of health help for a better understanding of the resistance to the change and help for a further amelioration of it.

  17. Cleaning power and abrasivity of European toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülknitz, P

    1997-11-01

    For 41 toothpastes available to European consumers in 1995, the cleaning efficacy was evaluated in comparison with abrasivity on dentin (RDA value). For cleaning power assessment, a modified pellicle cleaning ratio (PCR) measurement method was developed. The method is characterized by a five-day tea-staining procedure on bovine front teeth slabs on a rotating wheel, standardized brushing of the slabs in a V8 cross-brushing machine, and brightness measurement by a chromametric technique. All tested products were in accordance with the new DIN/ISO standard 11,609 for toothpastes in terms of dentin abrasivity. Not a single product exceeded an RDA value of 200. The majority of toothpastes (80%) had an RDA value below 100. Only three products surpassed the reference in cleaning power. Most products (73%) had a cleaning power (PCR value) between 20 and 80. The correlation between cleaning power and dentin abrasion was low (r = 0.66), which can be explained with the different influence on dentin and stains by factors like abrasive type, particle surface and size, as well as the chemical influence of other toothpaste ingredients. Some major trends could be shown on the basis of abrasive types. The ratio PCR to RDA was rather good in most silica-based toothpastes. A lower ratio was found in some products containing calcium carbonate or aluminum trihydrate as the only abrasive. The addition of other abrasives, such as polishing alumina, showed improved cleaning power. Some active ingredients, especially sequenstrants such as sodium tripolyphosphate or AHBP, also improve the PCR/RDA ratio by stain-dissolving action without being abrasive. The data for some special anti-stain products did not differ significantly from standard products. Compared with data measured in 1988, a general trend toward reduced abrasivity without loss of cleaning efficacy could be noticed on the European toothpaste market. This may be mostly due to the increased use of high-performance abrasives such

  18. Comparison of Fenton process and adsorption method for treatment of industrial container and drum cleaning industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güneş, Elçin; Çifçi, Deniz İzlen; Çelik, Suna Özden

    2018-04-01

    The present study aims to explore the characterization of industrial container and drum cleaning (ICDC) industry wastewater and treatment alternatives of this wastewater using Fenton and adsorption processes. Wastewater derived from ICDC industry is usually treated by chemical coagulation and biological treatment in Turkey and then discharged in a centralized wastewater treatment facility. It is required that the wastewater COD is below 1500 mg/L to treat in a centralized wastewater treatment facility. The wastewater samples were characterized for parameters of pH, conductivity, COD, BOD 5 , TSS, NH 3 -N, TN, TOC, TP, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Hg. Initial COD values were in the range of 11,300-14,200 mg/L. The optimum conditions for Fenton treatment were 35-40 g/L for H 2 O 2 , 2-5 g/L for Fe 2+ , and 13-36 for H 2 O 2 /Fe 2+ molar ratio. The optimum conditions of PAC doses and contact times in adsorption studies were 20-30 g/L and 5-12 h, respectively. Removal efficiencies of characterized parameters for the three samples were compared for both Fenton and adsorption processes under optimum conditions. The results suggest that these wastewaters are suitable for discharge to a centralized wastewater treatment plant.

  19. Clean coal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    According to the World Energy Council (WEC), at the beginning of the next century three main energy sources - coal, nuclear power and oil will have equal share in the world's total energy supply. This forecast is also valid for the USSR which possesses more than 40% of the world's coal resources and continuously increases its coal production (more than 700 million tons of coal are processed annually in the USSR). The stringent environmental regulations, coupled with the tendency to increase the use of coal are the reasons for developing different concepts for clean coal utilization. In this paper, the potential efficiency and environmental performance of different clean coal production cycles are considered, including technologies for coal clean-up at the pre-combustion stage, advanced clean combustion methods and flue gas cleaning systems. Integrated systems, such as combined gas-steam cycle and the pressurized fluidized bed boiler combined cycle, are also discussed. The Soviet National R and D program is studying new methods for coal utilization with high environmental performance. In this context, some basic research activities in the field of clean coal technology in the USSR are considered. Development of an efficient vortex combustor, a pressurized fluidized bed gasifier, advanced gas cleaning methods based on E-beam irradiation and plasma discharge, as well as new catalytic system, are are presented. In addition, implementation of technological innovations for retrofitting and re powering of existing power plants is discussed. (author)

  20. Chemical characteristics of N2O5 observed at a rural site in Beijing winter 2016: from clean to polluted air mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Lu, K.; Tan, Z.; Chen, X.; Wu, Z.; Zhu, Q.; Li, X.; Liu, Y.; Shang, D.; Wu, Y.; Min, H.; Zeng, L.; Schmitt, S. H.; Rohrer, F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) plays a vital role in the atmospheric oxidation, the NOX removal and the nitrate formation. A comprehensive campaign was conducted in the wintertime of 2016 in Beijing to focus on the atmospheric oxidation, new particle formation and aerosol light extinctions during the wintertime in Beijing. The site is located at a rural area in the northeast of Beijing and about 60 km away from the city center. A newly developed instrument based on the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) was deployed to measure ambient N2O5. Simultaneous measurements of the properties of particles and the relevant trace gases are available. The daily peaks of N2O5 in the clean episodes was lower than that of polluted episodes, the campaign maximum of 1.4 ppbv were captured in the most serious pollution episode. The averaged N2O5 maximum was about 120 pptv near 20:00, which is higher than that observed in summer. The uptake coefficient of N2O5 was derived from an iterative box model approach based on the Regional Atmospheric Chemical Mechanism version 2 (RACM2), constrained to observed trace gas compounds as well as the aerosol surface concentrations. The mechanisms of the chemical compounds of aerosols (measured by AMS) affects the N2O5 uptake coefficient are explored in several chemical coordinate systems. The chemical behaviors of the ambient N2O5 concentrations for this campaign is further discussed in the context of other campaigns performed in the urban and suburban areas in Beijing.

  1. APPLICATION OF CHEMICAL METHODS TO THE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Bulimaga

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article is a synthesis analysis of application of chemical methods for the development of technologies of hazardous waste management. Here are offered some technologies of neutralization of the waste containing hexacyanofferates, galvanic wastes and those with contain of vanadium, which are collected at Power Thermoelectric Plants.

  2. Comparison of traditional physico-chemical methods and molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aim to review the efficiency of molecular markers and traditional physico-chemical methods for the identification of basmati rice. The study involved 44 promising varieties of Indica rices collected from geographically distant places and adapted to irrigated and aerobic agro-ecosystems. Quality data for ...

  3. Effect of integration of cultural, botanical, and chemical methods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was conducted from November 2011 to June 2013 to evaluate the effects of botanical, cultural, and chemical methods on termite colony survival, crop and wooden damage, and other biological activities in Ghimbi district of western Ethiopia. The termite mounds were dug and the following treatments were ...

  4. Electrochemical and chemical methods of metallizing plastic films

    OpenAIRE

    Chapples, J.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis describes two novel techniques for the metallization of non-electroactive polymer films and thicker sectioned polyethylene and nylon substrates. In the first approach, non-electroactive polymer substrates were impregnated with surface layers of polypyrrole and polyaniline, using electrochemical and chemical methods of polymerization. The relative merits of both these approaches are discussed and compared with other methods in the literature. The resultant composi...

  5. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Jr., John W.

    1991-01-01

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

  6. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Lehmann, Sebastian; Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Bär, Marcus; Sadewasser, Sascha

    2014-12-01

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for "realistic" surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH3-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is - apart from a slight change in surface composition - identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  7. Biomonitoring in a clean and a multi-contaminated estuary based on biomarkers and chemical analyses in the endobenthic worm Nereis diversicolor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durou, Cyril [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France) and Institut de Biologie et Ecologie Appliquees, CEREA, Universite Catholique de l' Ouest, 44 rue Rabelais, 49008 Angers Cedex 01 (France)]. E-mail: cyril.durou@uco.fr; Poirier, Laurence [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Amiard, Jean-Claude [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Budzinski, Helene [CNRS UMR 5472, LPTC, Universite de Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Gnassia-Barelli, Mauricette [UMR INRA UNSA 1112 ROSE, Faculte des Sciences, BP 71, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Lemenach, Karyn [CNRS UMR 5472, LPTC, Universite de Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Peluhet, Laurent [CNRS UMR 5472, LPTC, Universite de Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Mouneyrac, Catherine [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut de Biologie et Ecologie Appliquees, CEREA, Universite Catholique de l' Ouest, 44 rue Rabelais, 49008 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Romeo, Michele [UMR INRA UNSA 1112 ROSE, Faculte des Sciences, BP 71, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Amiard-Triquet, Claude [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-07-15

    Relationships between biochemical and physiological biomarkers (acetylcholinesterase [AChE], catalase, and glutathione S-transferase [GST] activities, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glycogen, lipids and proteins) and accumulated concentrations of contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals) were examined in the keystone species Nereis diversicolor. The chemical analyses of worms and sediments allowed the designation of the Seine estuary and the Authie estuary as a polluted and relatively clean site respectively. Worms from the Seine estuary exhibited higher GST and lower AChE activities. Generally, larger worms had higher concentrations of energy reserves. Principal component analyses clearly highlighted intersite differences: in the first plan, GST activities and chemical concentrations were inversely related to concentrations of energy reserves; in the second one, PCB concentrations and AChE activity were inversely related. Depleted levels of energy reserves could be a consequence of combating toxicants and might predict effects at higher levels of biological organization. The use of GST and AChE activities and energy reserve concentrations as biomarkers is validated in the field in this keystone species. - The use of N. diversicolor as a biomonitor of environmental quality via the measurement of biomarkers and accumulated concentrations of contaminants is validated in the field.

  8. Methods for air cleaning and protection of building occupants from airborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2009-01-01

    germicidal irradiation (UVGI), photocatalytic oxidation (PCO), plasmacluster ions and other technologies for air disinfection and purification from pathogens are analyzed with respect to currently used air distribution principles. The importance of indoor air characteristics, such as temperature, relative...... of transmission, i.e. the generation of pathogen laden droplets originating in the respiratory tract of an infected individual, the survivability of the pathogens, their dispersal indoors and their transfer to a healthy person are reviewed. The advantages and the drawbacks of air dilution, filtration, ultraviolet...... humidity and velocity for the efficiency of each method is analyzed, taking into consideration the nature of the pathogens themselves. The applicability of the methods to the different types of total volume air distribution used at present indoors, i.e. mixing, displacement and underfloor ventilation...

  9. A Simple and Clean Method for O-Isopropylidenation of Carbohydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yuan Wei; Zhang, Qi Hua; Wang, Wei; Li, Bao Lin [Shaanxi Normal Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2014-07-15

    An efficient catalysis system for the synthesis of O-isopropylidene derivatives of sugars and polyhydroxy alcohols has been developed with sulfonated polystyrene cation exchange resin CAT600 as a catalyst. The key advantages of this protocol are simple workup, good yields and the recoverability, the innocuity and low cost of the catalyst. As a green, general and efficient reaction system, this method is expected to attract much attention for the preparation of various O-isopropylidene sugar derivatives in a large scale. Protection of hydroxyl functions by O-isopropylidenation is an important method in the field of carbohydrate chemistry. Due to its convenient application in synthetic, configurational and conformational studies, the O-isopropylidene derivatives of sugars play an important role in the research of building blocks, such as glycosyl acceptors and glycosyl donors. Additionally, these derivatives of sugars are important in the synthesis of various natural products.

  10. Identifying optimal cleaning cycles for heat exchangers subject to fouling and ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogiatzis, Thomas; Ishiyama, Edward M.; Paterson, William R.; Vassiliadis, Vassilios S.; Wilson, D. Ian

    2012-01-01

    Fouling of heat exchangers causes reduced heat transfer and other penalties. Regular cleaning represents one widely used fouling mitigation strategy, where the schedule of cleaning actions can be optimised to minimise the cost of fouling. This paper investigates, for the first time, the situation where there are two cleaning methods available so that the mode of cleaning has to be selected as well as the cleaning interval. Ageing is assumed to convert the initial deposit, labelled 'gel', into a harder and more conductive form, labelled 'coke', which cannot be removed by one of the cleaning methods. The second method can remove both the gel layer and the coke layer, but costs more and requires the unit to be off-line longer for cleaning. Experimental data demonstrating the effects of ageing are presented. The industrial application is the comparison of cleaning-in-place methods with off-line mechanical cleaning. A process model is constructed for an isolated counter-current heat exchanger subject to fouling, where ageing is described by a simple two-layer model. Solutions generated by an NLP-based approach prove to be superior to a simpler heuristic. A series of case studies demonstrate that combinations of chemical and mechanical cleaning can be superior to mechanical cleaning alone for certain combinations of parameters.

  11. Manual of selected physico-chemical analytical methods. IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, M.; Klosova, E.; Krtil, J.; Sus, F.; Kuvik, V.; Vrbova, L.; Hamplova, M.; Lengyel, J.; Kelnar, L.; Zakouril, K.

    1990-11-01

    The Central Testing Laboratory of the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez has for a decade been participating in the development of analytical procedures and has been providing analyses of samples of different types and origin. The analytical procedures developed have been published in special journals and a number of them in the Manuals of analytical methods, in three parts. The 4th part of the Manual contains selected physico-chemical methods developed or modified by the Laboratory in the years 1986-1990 within the project ''Development of physico-chemical analytical methods''. In most cases, techniques are involved for non-nuclear applications. Some can find wider applications, especially in analyses of environmental samples. Others have been developed for specific cases of sample analyses or require special instrumentation (mass spectrometer), which partly restricts their applicability by other institutions. (author)

  12. Method for fractional solid-waste sampling and chemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Christian; Rodushkin, I.; Spliid, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    four subsampling methods and five digestion methods, paying attention to the heterogeneity and the material characteristics of the waste fractions, it was possible to determine 61 substances with low detection limits, reasonable variance, and high accuracy. For most of the substances of environmental...... of variance (20-85% of the overall variation). Only by increasing the sample size significantly can this variance be reduced. The accuracy and short-term reproducibility of the chemical characterization were good, as determined by the analysis of several relevant certified reference materials. Typically, six...... to eight different certified reference materials representing a range of concentrations levels and matrix characteristics were included. Based on the documentation provided, the methods introduced were considered satisfactory for characterization of the chemical composition of waste-material fractions...

  13. Method for innovative synthesis-design of chemical process flowsheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    Chemical process synthesis-design involve the identification of the processing route to reach a desired product from a specified set of raw materials, design of the operations involved in the processing route, the calculations of utility requirements, the calculations of waste and emission...... to the surrounding and many more. Different methods (knowledge-based [1], mathematical programming [2], hybrid, etc.) have been proposed and are also currently employed to solve these synthesis-design problems. D’ Anterroches [3] proposed a group contribution based approach to solve the synthesis-design problem...... of chemical processes, where, chemical process flowsheets could be synthesized in the same way as atoms or groups of atoms are synthesized to form molecules in computer aided molecular design (CAMD) techniques [4]. That, from a library of building blocks (functional process-groups) and a set of rules to join...

  14. Temperature control of thermal-gas-dynamical installation in cleaning oil-well tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, V. A.; Martemyanov, D. B.; Pshenichnikova, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The article provides the study results of cleaning oil-well tubes, the oil-well tube failure reasons for service by their types have been considered. The chemical method of cleaning oil-well tubes as the least expensive has been reviewed when acid solution moves to the interptube space mixing up with oil and liquidates paraffin and pitches deposits on the internal pipe surface. Except the chemical method of pipes cleaning the mechanical one was considered as well. Also the disadvantages -such as the low productivity of cleaning and design complexity- of this deposits removal method on the internal oil-well tube surface have been considered. An effective method for cleaning oil-well tubing from paraffin and pitches by the thermodynamic plant based on the aircraft engine has been introduced for the first time. The temperature distribution graph in the gas stream at the engine output has been given.

  15. Discussion on cleaning and maintenance of YA system reverse osmosis membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yidong

    2012-01-01

    According to the overproof of pollution data of YA system reverse osmosis membrane in extension project, the daily maintenance company is using chemical cleaning on reverse osmosis unit to eliminate the pollution blindly, the fixed prescription, fixed dosage and high frequency of the chemical cleaning. The writer analyzed the cause of the membrane pollution and commended several chemical cleaning methods by the long-period study of the system, and also some suggestion, according to the status of operational site, for the daily maintenance. (author)

  16. An Evaluation of Common Cleaning Methods for the Removal of a Clinical Isolate of Escherichia coli in Personal Hydration System Water Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, Stephanie; Blythe, Jauchia; Guevara, Peter; Washington, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Waterborne infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Personal hydration packs have been used by military personnel since the Gulf War and are now a common issue item. Since military personnel tend to operate under austere conditions and may use a variety of water sources, preventing the acquisition of waterborne infections is extremely important. Further, since hydration pack water reservoir replacements may not be available during combat operations, the development of a reliable cleaning protocol for use in the field is essential. Several methods for cleaning have been described. In the current study, three common cleaning methodologies-bleach treatment, baking soda treatment, and proprietary CAMELBAK Cleaning Tabs™-were evaluated for the ability to remove Escherichia coli contamination from hydration pack water reservoirs. The study results suggest that the use of bleach and proprietary CAMELBAK tablets should be encouraged since they both operate by releasing bactericidal chlorine compounds into solution, which is more effective at reducing post-treatment bacterial burden. It should be noted that no method was 100% effective at completely eliminating bacteria from the reservoirs and that mechanical cleaning was not attempted. 2016.

  17. Method of making self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2017-06-06

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  18. Analysis of Cleaning Process for Several Kinds of Soil by Probability Density Functional Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Tanaka, Terumasa; Oya, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    A method of analyzing the detergency of various soils by assuming normal distributions for the soil adhesion and soil removal forces was developed by considering the relationship between the soil type and the distribution profile of the soil removal force. The effect of the agitation speed on the soil removal was also analyzed by this method. Washing test samples were prepared by soiling fabrics with individual soils such as particulate soils, oily dyes, and water-soluble dyes. Washing tests were conducted using a Terg-O-Tometer and four repetitive washing cycles of 5 min each. The transition of the removal efficiencies was recorded in order to calculate the mean value (μ rl ) and the standard deviation (σ rl ) of the removal strength distribution. The level of detergency and the temporal alteration in the detergency can be represented by μ rl and σ rl , respectively. A smaller σ rl indicates a smaller increase in the detergency with time, which also indicates the existence of a certain amount of soil with a strong adhesion force. As a general trend, the values of σ rl were the greatest for the oily soils, followed by those of the water-soluble soils and particulate soils in succession. The relationship between the soil removal processes and the soil adhesion force was expressed on the basis of the transition of the distribution of residual soil. Evaluation of the effects of the agitation speed on µ rl and ơ rl showed that σ rl was not affected by the agitation speed; the value of µ rl for solid soil and oily soil increased with increasing agitation, and the µ rl of water-soluble soil was not specifically affected by the agitation speed. It can be assumed that the parameter ơ rl is related to the characteristics of the soil and the adhesion condition, and can be applied to estimating the soil removal mechanism.

  19. Feasibility of arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering methods in cleaning plasma-facing and diagnostics components of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakola, Antti, E-mail: antti.hakola@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Likonen, Jari [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Karhunen, Juuso; Korhonen, Juuso T. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (Finland); Aints, Märt; Laan, Matti; Paris, Peeter [Department of Physics, University of Tartu (Estonia); Kolehmainen, Jukka; Koskinen, Mika; Tervakangas, Sanna [DIARC-Technology Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Feasibility of the arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering techniques in removing deposited layers from ITER-relevant samples demonstrated. • Samples with the size of an A4 paper can be cleaned from 1-μm thick deposited layers in 10–20 minutes by the arc-discharge method. • The plasma-sputtering method is 5–10 times slower but the resulting surfaces are very smooth. • Arc-discharge method could be used for rapid cleaning of plasma-facing components during maintenance shutdowns of ITER, plasma sputtering is preferred for diagnostics mirrors. - Abstract: We have studied the feasibility of arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering methods in removing deposited layers from ITER-relevant test samples. Prototype devices have been designed and constructed for the experiments and the cleaning process is monitored by a spectral detection system. The present version of the arc-discharge device is capable of removing 1-μm thick layers from 350-mm{sup 2} areas in 4–8 s, but due to the increased roughness of the cleaned surfaces and signs of local melting, mirror-like surfaces cannot be treated by this technique. The plasma-sputtering approach, for its part, is some 5–10 times slower in removing the deposited layers but no changes in surface roughness or morphology of the samples could be observed after the cleaning phase. The arc-discharge technique could therefore be used for rapid cleaning of plasma-facing components during maintenance shutdowns of ITER while in the case of diagnostics mirrors plasma sputtering is preferred.

  20. NICE3 SO3 Cleaning Process in Semiconductor Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, Steve

    1999-01-01

    This fact sheet explains how Anon, Inc., has developed a novel method of removing photoresist--a light-sensitive material used to produce semiconductor wafers for computers--from the computer manufacturing process at reduced cost and greater efficiency. The new technology is technically superior to existing semiconductor cleaning methods and results in reduced use of hazardous chemicals

  1. ZnS nanoflakes deposition by modified chemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Mangesh A.; Sartale, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    We report deposition of zinc sulfide nanoflakes on glass substrates by modified chemical method. The modified chemical method involves adsorption of zinc–thiourea complex on the substrate and its dissociation in presence of hydroxide ions to release sulfur ions from thiourea which react with zinc ions present in the complex to form zinc sulfide nanoflakes at room temperature. Influence of zinc salt and thiourea concentrations ratios on the morphology of the films was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ratio of zinc and thiourea in the zinc–thiourea complex significantly affect the size of the zinc sulfide nanoflakes, especially width and density of the nanoflakes. The X-ray diffraction analysis exhibits polycrystalline nature of the zinc sulfide nanoflakes with hexagonal phase

  2. Method and apparatus for controlling gas evolution from chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorpik, James R.; Dodson, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward monitoring a thermally driven gas evolving chemical reaction with an acoustic apparatus. Signals from the acoustic apparatus are used to control a heater to prevent a run-away condition. A digestion module in combination with a robotic arm further automate physical handling of sample material reaction vessels. The invention is especially useful for carrying out sample procedures defined in EPA Methods SW-846.

  3. Development of methods for remediation of artificial polluted soils and improvement of soils for ecologically clean agricultural production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogachev, V.; Adrianova, G.; Zaitzev, V.; Kalinin, V.; Kovalenko, E.; Makeev, A.; Malikova, L.; Popov, Yu.; Savenkov, A.; Shnyakina, V.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the research: Development of methods for the remediation of artificial polluted soils and the improvement of polluted lands to ecologically clean agricultural production.The following tasks will be implemented in this project to achieve viable practical solutions: - To determine the priority pollutants, their ecological pathways, and sources of origin. - To form a supervised environmental monitoring data bank throughout the various geo system conditions. - To evaluate the degree of the bio geo system pollution and the influence on the health of the local human populations. - To establish agricultural plant tolerance levels to the priority pollutants. - To calculate the standard concentrations of the priority pollutants for main agricultural plant groups. - To develop a soil remediation methodology incorporating the structural, functional geo system features. - To establish a territory zone division methodology in consideration of the degree of component pollution, plant tolerance to pollutants, plant production conditions, and human health. - Scientific grounding of the soil remediation proposals and agricultural plant material introductions with soil pollution levels and relative plant tolerances to pollutants. Technological Means, Methods, and Approaches Final proposed solutions will be based upon geo system and ecosystem approaches and methodologies. The complex ecological valuation methods of the polluted territories will be used in this investigation. Also, laboratory culture in vitro, application work, and multi-factor field experiments will be conducted. The results will be statistically analyzed using appropriate methods. Expected Results Complex biogeochemical artificial province assessment according to primary pollutant concentrations. Development of agricultural plant tolerance levels relative to the priority pollutants. Assessment of newly introduced plant materials that may possess variable levels of pollution tolerance. Remediation

  4. Accurate Quantitation of Water-amide Proton Exchange Rates Using the Phase-Modulated CLEAN Chemical EXchange (CLEANEX-PM) Approach with a Fast-HSQC (FHSQC) Detection Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tsang-Lin; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Mori, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of exchange rates between water and NH protons by magnetization transfer methods is often complicated by artifacts, such as intramolecular NOEs, and/or TOCSY transfer from Cα protons coincident with the water frequency, or exchange-relayed NOEs from fast exchanging hydroxyl or amine protons. By applying the Phase-Modulated CLEAN chemical EXchange (CLEANEX-PM) spin-locking sequence, 135 o (x) 120 o (-x) 110 o (x) 110 o (-x) 120 o (x) 135 o (-x) during the mixing period, these artifacts can be eliminated, revealing an unambiguous water-NH exchange spectrum. In this paper, the CLEANEX-PM mixing scheme is combined with Fast-HSQC (FHSQC) detection and used to obtain accurate chemical exchange rates from the initial slope analysis for a sample of 15N labeled staphylococcal nuclease. The results are compared to rates obtained using Water EXchange filter (WEX) II-FHSQC, and spin-echo-filtered WEX II-FHSQC measurements, and clearly identify the spurious NOE contributions in the exchange system

  5. Cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of surface prion contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, G; Dehen, C; Perrin, A; Thomas, V; Igel-Egalon, A; Burke, P A; Deslys, J P; Comoy, E

    2013-12-01

    Prion contamination is a risk during device reprocessing, being difficult to remove and inactivate. Little is known of the combined effects of cleaning, disinfection and sterilization during a typical reprocessing cycle in clinical practice. To investigate the combination of cleaning, disinfection and/or sterilization on reducing the risk of surface prion contamination. In vivo test methods were used to study the impact of cleaning alone and cleaning combined with thermal disinfection and high- or low-temperature sterilization processes. A standardized test method, based on contamination of stainless steel wires with high titres of scrapie-infected brain homogenates, was used to determine infectivity reduction. Traditional chemical methods of surface decontamination against prions were confirmed to be effective, but extended steam sterilization was more variable. Steam sterilization alone reduced the risk of prion contamination under normal or extended exposure conditions, but did show significant variation. Thermal disinfection had no impact in these studies. Cleaning with certain defined formulations in combination with steam sterilization can be an effective prion decontamination process, in particular with alkaline formulations. Low-temperature, gaseous hydrogen peroxide sterilization was also confirmed to reduce infectivity in the presence and absence of cleaning. Prion decontamination is affected by the full reprocessing cycle used on contaminated surfaces. The correct use of defined cleaning, disinfection and sterilization methods as tested in this report in the scrapie infectivity assay can provide a standard precaution against prion contamination. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of terminal cleaning and disinfection on isolation of Acinetobacter baumannii complex from inanimate surfaces of hospital rooms by quantitative and qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manian, Farrin A; Griesnauer, Sandra; Senkel, Diane

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative broth cultures were obtained from hospital rooms newly vacated by patients positive for multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ABC) before and after terminal cleaning and disinfection. Of 10 ABC-positive precleaned room surfaces, 6 (60%) remained culture-positive after terminal cleaning and disinfection. Of a total of 16 room surfaces with detectable ABC by the quantitative method, 5 (31.2%; 95% confidence interval, 13.9%-55.8%) were also culture-positive by the qualitative technique. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by chemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Wenli; Kumada, H.; Natusme, T.; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with controlled size were synthesized by chemical method. Higher deposition temperature and a rapid-raising temperature procedure are favorable to particle size distribution and fabrication of monodisperse nanoparticles. The larger nanoparticles can be synthesized by the two-step method. The large nanoparticle (up to 25 nm) without agglomeration was successfully produced. The saturation magnetization of 11 nm magnetite particles was 45 emu/g at room temperature, which is smaller than that of bulk magnetite due to surface effect. Hysteresis of the magnetite nanoparticle was very small, indicating superparamagnetic behavior. The magnetic domains of the 11 nm magnetite nanoparticles were successfully observed by MFM

  8. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B.; Yin, George

    2016-01-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766–1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794–1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence.

  9. Clean utilization of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueruem, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains 23 lectures presented at the Advanced Study Institute on 'Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Catalytic Solid Fuel Conversion for the Production of Clean Synthetic Fuels', which was held at Akcay, Edremit, Turkey, between 21 July and August 3, 1991. Three main subjects: structure and reactivity of coal; cleaning of coal and its products, and factors affecting the environmental balance of energy usage and solutions for the future, were discussed in the Institute and these are presented under six groups in the book: Part 1. Structure and reactivity of coal; Part 2. Factors affecting environmental balance; Part 3. Pre-usage cleaning operations and processes; Part 4. Upgrading of coal liquids and gases; Part 5. Oxygen enriched processes; and Part 6. Probable future solution for energy and pollution problems. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all the lectures

  10. Method and aparatus for flue gas cleaning by separation and liquefaction of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelmalek, F.T.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for recovering sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and cleaning flue gases emitted from power plants. It comprises: electronically treating the flue gases to neutralize its electrostatic charges and to enhance the coagulation of its molecules and particles; exchanging sensible and latent heat of the neutralized flue gases to lower its temperature down to a temperature approaching the ambient temperature while recovering its separating the flue gas in a first stage; cooling the separated enriched carbon dioxide gas fraction, after each separation stage, while removing its vapor condensate, then compressing the enriched carbon dioxide gas fraction and simultaneously cooling the compressed gas to liquefy the sulfur dioxide gas then; allowing the sulfur dioxide gas to condense, and continuously removing the liquefied sulfur dioxide; compressing he desulfurized enriched carbon dioxide fraction to further increase its pressure, and simultaneously cooling he compressed gas to liquefy the carbon dioxide gas, then; allowing the carbon dioxide gas to condense and continuously removing the liquefied carbon dioxide; allowing the light components of the flue gas to be released in a cooling tower discharge plume

  11. Orientation-dependent surface core-level shifts and chemical shifts on clean and H 2S-covered GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, W.; Finster, J.; Kuhr, H. J.

    1987-08-01

    Photoelectron spectra of the As 3d and Ga 3d core levels were studied in situ on a cylindrically shaped GaAs single crystal for the six inequivalent orientations (001), (113), (111), (110), (11¯1) and (11¯3). On the clean surface, prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), surface core levels are shifted by 0.25 to 0.55 eV towards smaller binding energy (BE) for As 3d and -0.25 to -0.35 eV towards higher BE for Ga, depending on orientation. Additional As causes As 3d contributions shifted between -0.45 and -0.7 eV towards higher BE. The position and intensity of them is influenced by H 2S adsorption. At 150 K, H 2S adsorbs preferentially on As sites. As chemical shifts appear at -0.6 to -0.9 eV towards higher BE. Simultaneously, As accumulation occurs on all orientations with the exception of (110). High temperature adsorption (550 K, 720 K) influences mainly the Ga 3d peaks. Two peaks shifted by about -0.45 and -0.8 eV towards higher Be were found which are attributed to Ga atoms with one or two sulfur ligands, respectively. At 720 K, also As depletion is observed. The compatibility of surface core-level positions and intensities with recent structural models for the (111) and (11¯1) surfaces is discussed.

  12. Reliable wet-chemical cleaning of natively oxidized high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cell absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Jascha [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Lehmann, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.lehmann@ftf.lth.se [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Lauermann, Iver; Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch. [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Bär, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.baer@helmholtz-berlin.de [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Physik und Chemie, Brandenburgische Technische Universität Cottbus-Senftenberg, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Sadewasser, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.sadewasser@inl.int [Renewable Energies, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-12-21

    Currently, Cu-containing chalcopyrite-based solar cells provide the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies. They have reached efficiency values above 20%, the same performance level as multi-crystalline silicon-wafer technology that dominates the commercial PV market. Chalcopyrite thin-film heterostructures consist of a layer stack with a variety of interfaces between different materials. It is the chalcopyrite/buffer region (forming the p-n junction), which is of crucial importance and therefore frequently investigated using surface and interface science tools, such as photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy. To ensure comparability and validity of the results, a general preparation guide for “realistic” surfaces of polycrystalline chalcopyrite thin films is highly desirable. We present results on wet-chemical cleaning procedures of polycrystalline Cu(In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin films with an average x = [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.29, which were exposed to ambient conditions for different times. The hence natively oxidized sample surfaces were etched in KCN- or NH{sub 3}-based aqueous solutions. By x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the KCN treatment results in a chemical surface structure which is – apart from a slight change in surface composition – identical to a pristine as-received sample surface. Additionally, we discover a different oxidation behavior of In and Ga, in agreement with thermodynamic reference data, and we find indications for the segregation and removal of copper selenide surface phases from the polycrystalline material.

  13. Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-09-30

    This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

  14. Investigation of chemical equilibrium kinetics by the electromigration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozhikov, G.A.; Ivanov, P.I.; Maslov, O.D.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Bontchev, G.D.; Milanov, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the formation a complex by Hf(IV) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is determined. The electrophoretic mobility, diffusion coefficient and stability constant of the [HfDTPA] - complex are calculated, taking into account experimental electrophoretic data obtained at 298.15±0.05 K and constant ionic strength. No-carrier-added 175 Hf radionuclide was used in electromigration experiments at concentrations of 10 -10 -10 -11 M. (orig.)

  15. Cleaning Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, James L.

    This curriculum guide provides cleaning services instructional materials for a ninth- and tenth-grade Coordinated Vocational Education and Training: Home and Community Services program. It includes 2 sections and 11 instructional units. Each unit of instruction consists of eight basic components: performance objectives, teacher activities,…

  16. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levrini L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Luca Levrini, Francesca Novara, Silvia Margherini, Camilla Tenconi, Mario Raspanti Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, Dental Hygiene School, Research Centre Cranio Facial Disease and Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy Background: Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Methods: Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1 running water (control condition; 2 effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3 brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste. At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Results: The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. Conclusion: On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental

  17. Electrospun Superhydrophobic Self-Cleaning Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Nü

    In this chapter, we introduce the wettability of electrospinning products. Especially, we concentrate on the fabrication, characteristics, and applications of the electrospun self-cleaning materials. Self-cleaning materials are typical nature-inspired artificial materials learning from such as lotus leaf and many other plants or animals. Self-cleaning materials usually rely on a superhydrophobic surface, which should be of low surface free energy as well as large surface roughness. Electrospinning method is such a method that could facilely shape various hydrophobic polymers into ultrathin fibers with tunable surface microstructures. It means the electrospun products are of very large specific area, which satisfy the two basic conditions in preparing superhydrophobic surfaces. Therefore, in the last decade, scientists put forward a good few of elegant approaches to fabricate superhydrophobic materials by electrospinning. These methods can be generally classified into two routes. One is a direct route that creates superhydrophobic electrospun films from hydrophobic materials. Another is an indirect route that decorates electrospun nanofibers (no matter hydrophobic or hydrophilic) with hydrophobic chemicals. We first introduce some representative works on the fabrication of superhydrophobic self-cleaning materials by electrospinning method. Then we show some applications of these superhydrophobic materials. Finally, we give a brief personal perspective on this area.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Exploratory Development for Air Force Systems. Delivery Order 0001: Quick Reaction NDE and Characterization--Effects of Chemical Effects of Chemical Etching after Pre-Inspection Mechanical Cleaning on Fluorescent Penetrant Indications of Fatigue Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Specimen 625 -58 Cleaned with 50-ksi Water Jet ....................... 18 Figure 12. SEM Images of Inconel Specimen 626-63 Cleaned with 50-ksi Water...SEM Images of Inconel Specimen 626-22 Cleaned with Wet Glass Bead.......................... 21 Figure 15. SEM Images of Titanium Specimen 625 -02...Figure 18. SEM Images of Titanium Specimen 625 -40 Cleaned with Dry Al2O3 (240 grit) ............... 24 Figure 19. SEM Images of Inconel Specimen

  19. An experimental design method leading to chemical Turing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Judit; Szalai, István; De Kepper, Patrick

    2009-05-08

    Chemical reaction-diffusion patterns often serve as prototypes for pattern formation in living systems, but only two isothermal single-phase reaction systems have produced sustained stationary reaction-diffusion patterns so far. We designed an experimental method to search for additional systems on the basis of three steps: (i) generate spatial bistability by operating autoactivated reactions in open spatial reactors; (ii) use an independent negative-feedback species to produce spatiotemporal oscillations; and (iii) induce a space-scale separation of the activatory and inhibitory processes with a low-mobility complexing agent. We successfully applied this method to a hydrogen-ion autoactivated reaction, the thiourea-iodate-sulfite (TuIS) reaction, and noticeably produced stationary hexagonal arrays of spots and parallel stripes of pH patterns attributed to a Turing bifurcation. This method could be extended to biochemical reactions.

  20. A method of refining aromatic hydrocarbons from coal chemical production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieborak, K.; Koprowski, A.; Ratajczak, W.

    1979-10-01

    A method is disclosed for refining aromatic hydrocarbons of coal chemical production by contact of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons and their mixtures with a strongly acid macroporous sulfocationite in the H-form at atmospheric pressure and high temperature. The method is distinguished in that the aromatic hydrocarbons and their mixtures, from which alkali compounds have already been removed, are supplied for refinement with the sulfocationite with simultaneous addition of olefin derivatives of aromatic hydrocarbons, followed by separation of pure hydrocarbons by rectification. Styrene or alpha-methylstyrene is used as the olefin derivatives of the aromatic hydrocarbons. The method is performed in several stages with addition of olefin derivatives of aromatic hydrocarbons at each stage.

  1. Methods of chemical and phase composition analysis of gallstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, E. I.; Pantushev, V. V.; Voloshin, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    This review presents the instrumental methods used for chemical and phase composition investigation of gallstones. A great body of data has been collected in the literature on the presence of elements and their concentrations, obtained by fluorescence microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, proton (particle) induced X-ray emission, atomic absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance. Structural methods—powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy—provide information about organic and inorganic phases in gallstones. Stone morphology was studied at the macrolevel with optical microscopy. Results obtained by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry are discussed. The chemical composition and structure of gallstones determine the strategy of removing stone from the body and treatment of patients: surgery or dissolution in the body. Therefore one chapter of the review describes the potential of dissolution methods. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the disease depend on the development of clinical methods for in vivo investigation, which gave grounds to present the main characteristics and potential of ultrasonography (ultrasound scanning), magnetic resonance imaging, and X-ray computed tomography.

  2. AN ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF SELENIUM IN SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Luca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential microelement, sometimes redoubtable, through its beneficial role - risk depending on its concentration in the food chain, at low dose is an important nutrient in the life of humans and animals, contrary at high doses, it becomes toxic. Selenium may be find itself in the environment (soil, sediment, water in many forms (oxidized, reduced, organometallic which determine their mobility and toxicity. Determination of chemical speciation (identification of different chemical forms provides much more complete information for a better understanding of the behavior and the potential impact on the environment. In this work we present the results of methodological research on the extraction of sequential forms of selenium in the soil and the coupling of analytical methods capable of identifying very small amounts of selenium in soils An efficient scheme of sequential extractions forms of selenium (SES consisting in atomic absorption spectrometry coupled with hydride generation (HGAAS has been developed into five experimental steps, detailed in the paper. This operational scheme has been applied to the analysis of chemical speciation in the following areas: the Bărăgan Plain and Central Dobrogea of Romania.

  3. Use of ab initio quantum chemical methods in battery technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deiss, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry can nowadays predict physical and chemical properties of molecules and solids. An attempt should be made to use this tool more widely for predicting technologically favourable materials. To demonstrate the use of ab initio quantum chemistry in battery technology, the theoretical energy density (energy per volume of active electrode material) and specific energy (energy per mass of active electrode material) of a rechargeable lithium-ion battery consisting of a graphite electrode and a nickel oxide electrode has been calculated with this method. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  4. Synthesis of Lead Sulfide Nanoparticles by Chemical Precipitation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongad, L S; Sharma, A; Banerjee, M; Jain, A

    2016-01-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were prepared by chemical precipitation method (CPM) with the assistance of H 2 S gas. The microstructure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the PbS nanoparticles reveal formation of cubic phase. To investigate the quality of prepared nanoparticles, the particles size, lattice constant, strain, dislocation density etc. have been determined using XRD. TEM images reveal formation of cubic nanoparticles and the particle size determined from TEM images agree well with those from XRD. (paper)

  5. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Novara, Francesca; Margherini, Silvia; Tenconi, Camilla; Raspanti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1) running water (control condition); 2) effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3) brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste). At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental hygienists should strongly advise patients wearing orthodontic aligners to clean them using a combination of brushing and commercially available tablets for cleaning oral appliances.

  6. Alternative Chemical Amplification Methods for Peroxy Radical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Peroxy radicals (HO2, CH3O2, etc.) are commonly detected by the chemical amplification technique, in which ambient air is mixed with high concentrations of CO and NO, initiating a chain reaction that produces 30 - 200 NO2 molecules per sampled peroxy radical. The NO2 is then measured by one of several techniques. With the exception of CIMS-based techniques, the chemical amplification method has undergone only incremental improvements since it was first introduced in 1982. The disadvantages of the technique include the need to use high concentrations of CO and the greatly reduced sensitivity of the amplification chain length in the presence of water vapor. We present a new chemical amplification scheme in which either ethane or acetaldehyde is used in place of CO, with the NO2 product detected using Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift spectroscopy (CAPS). Under dry conditions, the amplification factor of the alternative amplifiers are approximately six times lower than the CO-based amplifier. The relative humidity "penalty" is not as severe, however, such that at typical ambient relative humidity (RH) values the amplification factor is within a factor of three of the CO-based amplifier. Combined with the NO2 sensitivity of CAPS and a dual-channel design, the detection limit of the ethane amplifier is less than 2 ppt (1 minute average, signal-to-noise ratio 2). The advantages of these alternative chemical amplification schemes are improved safety, a reduced RH correction, and increased sensitivity to organic peroxy radicals relative to HO2.

  7. Evaporator Cleaning Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1999-01-01

    Operation of the 242-16H High Level Waste Evaporator proves crucial to liquid waste management in the H-Area Tank Farm. Recent operational history of the Evaporator showed significant solid formation in secondary lines and in the evaporator pot. Additional samples remain necessary to ensure material identity in the evaporator pot. Analysis of these future samples will provide actinide partitioning information and dissolution characteristics of the solid material from the pot to ensure safe chemical cleaning

  8. Cleaning must be well planned; Rengjoeringsopplegget maa planlegges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Both detergents and water may damage painted and varnished surfaces in the long run. It is therefore important to choose the right cleaning method once the rooms are put to use. It is essential that a cleaning method be found that does not require great quantities of chemicals. Professional cleaning implies that a program is used that describes in detail the cleaning operation in each room. Materials used in walls often do not tolerate much moisture. If such components are cleaned by means of too much water to which is added detergents, they may swell. These walls are exposed above all the first time they are cleaned because those doing the cleaning are not aware of the situation. Some of the detergents in current use contain hazardous components. It is very important to know the individual detergent's contents of volatile components as these may cause damage. Some detergents may lead to deterioration of the surface if incorrectly used. Some contain perfume or dyes that may develop allergies. Thus, detergents must be selected with due consideration of both the subject and the personnel. Declaration and user instruction is necessary.

  9. Comparison of different methods for extraction from Tetraclinis articulata: yield, chemical composition and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzi, Nejia; Bouajila, Jalloul; Camy, Séverine; Romdhane, Mehrez; Condoret, Jean-Stéphane

    2013-12-15

    In the present study, three techniques of extraction: hydrodistillation (HD), solvent extraction (conventional 'Soxhlet' technique) and an innovative technique, i.e., the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), were applied to ground Tetraclinis articulata leaves and compared for extraction duration, extraction yield, and chemical composition of the extracts as well as their antioxidant activities. The extracts were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The antioxidant activity was measured using two methods: ABTS(•+) and DPPH(•). The yield obtained using HD, SFE, hexane and ethanol Soxhlet extractions were found to be 0.6, 1.6, 40.4 and 21.2-27.4 g/kg respectively. An original result of this study is that the best antioxidant activity was obtained with an SFE extract (41 mg/L). The SFE method offers some noteworthy advantages over traditional alternatives, such as shorter extraction times, low environmental impact, and a clean, non-thermally-degraded final product. Also, a good correlation between the phenolic contents and the antioxidant activity was observed with extracts obtained by SFE at 9 MPa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clean cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piffaretti, M.

    2008-07-01

    This well-illustrated presentation made at the Swiss 2008 research conference on traffic by the Protoscar company takes a look at research, design, engineering and communication topics in the area of 'clean cars'. The present situation with electrically driven and hybrid-drive cars is reviewed and the chances and problems of the present-day vehicles are examined. New developments and a number of vehicles that should be on the market in the period from 2012 to 2015 are presented. Also, 'clean' specialist vehicles such as trucks and buses are reviewed. Battery systems and associated problems and new developments are looked at. The promotion scheme in Mendrisio, Switzerland is reviewed. Bottom-up and top-down approaches are discussed and future market developments are looked at, as are promotional activities in various countries.

  11. ANALYSIS ON TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES CLEANING OIL PIPELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana PǍTRAŞCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the researches are presented concerning the technological processes of oil pipelines.We know several technologies and materials used for cleaning the sludge deposits, iron and manganese oxides, dross, stone, etc.de on the inner walls of drinking water pipes or industries.For the oil industry, methods of removal of waste materials and waste pipes and liquid and gas transport networks are operations known long, tedious and expensive. The main methods and associated problems can be summarized as follows: 1 Blowing with compressed air.2 manual or mechanical brushing, sanding with water or dry.3 Wash with water jet of high pressure, solvent or chemical solution to remove the stone and hard deposits.4 The combined methods of cleaning machines that use water jets, cutters, chains, rotary heads cutters, etc.

  12. Chemical methods for the determination of composition of cryolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivarudrappa, V.; Patil, B.N.; Marathe, S.G.; Jain, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of uranium and plutonium alloys containing aluminium involves the use of cryolite and many times, cryolite which may be contaminated with alpha activity has to be analysed for its purity. In view of this, chemical methods for the determination of composition of commercial cryolite samples have been developed. Methods are standardised for the determination of individual constituents of cryolite viz., aluminium, sodium, fluoride and major impurities, calcium and magnesium. Studies on the dissolution of the sample, effect of one or more components on the determination of the other and their elimination are carried out. Aluminium and sodium are determined gravimetrically as oxinate and triple acetate respectively. Fluoride is determined by a volumetric procedure after cation exchange separtion of soluble fluoride. Calcium and magnesium are determined by a sequential pH-metri titration. This report describes the details of the procedures and the results of these studies for two commercial cryolite samples. (author). 7 tabs

  13. Innovative technologies on fuel assemblies cleaning for sodium fast reactors: First considerations on cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Lorcet, H.; Beauchamp, F.; Guigues, E.; Lovera, P.; Fleche, J. L.; Lacroix, M.; Carra, O.; Dechelette, F.; Prele, G.; Rodriguez, G.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of Sodium Fast Reactor development, innovative fuel assembly cleaning operations are investigated to meet the GEN IV goals of safety and of process development. One of the challenges is to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction currently used in these processes. The potential applications of aqueous solutions of mineral salts (including the possibility of using redox chemical reactions) to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction are considered in a first part and a new experimental bench, dedicated to this study, is described. Anhydrous alternative options based on Na/CO 2 interaction are also presented. Then, in a second part, a functional study conducted on the cleaning pit is proposed. Based on experimental feedback, some calculations are carried out to estimate the sodium inventory on the fuel elements, and physical methods like hot inert gas sweeping to reduce this inventory are also presented. Finally, the implementation of these innovative solutions in cleaning pits is studied in regard to the expected performances. (authors)

  14. PETROLEUM-COLLECTING AND DISPERSING CHEMICALS FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Films of petroleum origin reflecting sunlight rays hinder absorption of energy by water necessary for life ... Dispersing chemicals like mechanical clean-up methods have their own place in fighting oil spills. They are ... yellow color, and filtered.

  15. Atomic hydrogen cleaning of GaAs photocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelker, M.; Price, J.; Sinclair, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that surface contaminants on semiconductors can be removed when samples are exposed to atomic hydrogen. Atomic H reacts with oxides and carbides on the surface, forming compounds that are liberated and subsequently pumped away. Experiments at Jefferson lab with bulk GaAs in a low-voltage ultra-high vacuum H cleaning chamber have resulted in the production of photocathodes with high photoelectron yield (i.e., quantum efficiency) and long lifetime. A small, portable H cleaning apparatus also has been constructed to successfully clean GaAs samples that are later removed from the vacuum apparatus, transported through air and installed in a high-voltage laser-driven spin-polarized electron source. These results indicate that this method is a versatile and robust alternative to conventional wet chemical etching procedures usually employed to clean bulk GaAs

  16. Method of waste stabilization with dewatered chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D.

    2010-06-29

    A method of stabilizing a waste in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC). The method consists of preparing a slurry including the waste, water, an oxide binder, and a phosphate binder. The slurry is then allowed to cure to a solid, hydrated CBPC matrix. Next, bound water within the solid, hydrated CBPC matrix is removed. Typically, the bound water is removed by applying heat to the cured CBPC matrix. Preferably, the quantity of heat applied to the cured CBPC matrix is sufficient to drive off water bound within the hydrated CBPC matrix, but not to volatalize other non-water components of the matrix, such as metals and radioactive components. Typically, a temperature range of between 100.degree. C.-200.degree. C. will be sufficient. In another embodiment of the invention wherein the waste and water have been mixed prior to the preparation of the slurry, a select amount of water may be evaporated from the waste and water mixture prior to preparation of the slurry. Another aspect of the invention is a direct anyhydrous CBPC fabrication method wherein water is removed from the slurry by heating and mixing the slurry while allowing the slurry to cure. Additional aspects of the invention are ceramic matrix waste forms prepared by the methods disclosed above.

  17. Quantum confinement of lead titanate nanocrystals by wet chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital, Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Maaza, M., E-mail: likmaaz@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Lead Titanate (PbTiO{sub 3)} is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystalline materials have attracted a wide attention due to their unique properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were composed a tetragonal structure. The diameter of a single sphere was around 20 nm and the diameter reached up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of the samples and the valence states of elements were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. - Highlights: • Single crystalline NSs of PbTiO{sub 3} fabricated by wet chemical method. • PbTiO{sub 3} NSs were uniform and continuous along the long axis. • Tetragonal perovskite structure with the diameter 20 nm and length 3 μm. • XPS spectrum was fitted with Lorentzian function respectively. • The size of the images is also 10 μm × 10 μm.

  18. Development of a benchtop baking method for chemically leavened crackers. II. Validation of the method

    Science.gov (United States)

    A benchtop baking method has been developed to predict the contribution of gluten functionality to overall flour performance for chemically leavened crackers. Using a diagnostic formula and procedure, dough rheology was analyzed to evaluate the extent of gluten development during mixing and machinin...

  19. ZnSe thin films by chemical bath deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lokhande, C.D.; Patil, P.S.; Tributsch, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Bereich Physikalische Chemie, Abt. CS, Glienicker Strasse-100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Ennaoui, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Bereich Physikalische Chemie, Abt. CG, Glienicker Strasse-100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    1998-09-04

    The ZnSe thin films have been deposited onto glass substrates by the simple chemical bath deposition method using selenourea as a selenide ion source from an aqueous alkaline medium. The effect of Zn ion concentration, bath temperature and deposition time period on the quality and thickness of ZnSe films has been studied. The ZnSe films have been characterized by XRD, TEM, EDAX, TRMC (time-resolved microwave conductivity), optical absorbance and RBS techniques for their structural, compositional, electronic and optical properties. The as-deposited ZnSe films are found to be amorphous, Zn rich with optical band gap, Eg, equal to 2.9 eV

  20. Trace impurities in coal by wet chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.N.

    1975-01-01

    In determining trace elements in coal by wet chemical methods, conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to determine Li, Be, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, and Pb after dry ashing and acid dissolutions. A graphite furnace accessory was used for the flameless AAS determination of Bi, Se, Sn, Te, Be, Pb, As, Cd, Cr, Sb, and Ge. Mercury can be determined by flameless AAS after oxygen bomb combustion. Arsenic and antimony can be determined as their hydrides by AAS after low temperature ashing. Germanium, tin, bismuth, and tellurium can be determined as their hydrides by AAS after high temperature ashing. Selenium can be determined as its hydride by AAS after a special combustion procedure or after oxygen bomb combustion. Fluorine can be determined by specific ion analysis after oxygen bomb combustion. Boron can be determined colorimetrically. (U.S.)

  1. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report concerns our research on base-catalyzed coal solubilization and a new approach for hydrogen addition. The work on base-catalyzed, chemical solubilization is continuing. this report is focused on the hydrogenation research. Specifically it deals with the use of arene chromium carbonyl complexes as reagents for the addition of dideuterium to coal molecules. In one phase of the work, he has established that the aromatic hydrocarbons in a representative coal liquid can be converted in very good yield to arene chromium carbonyl compounds. In a second phase of the work directly related to our objective of improved methods for catalytic hydrogenation, he has established that the aromatic constituents of the same coal liquid add dideuterium in the presence of added napththalene chromium carbonyl.

  2. Standard Test Method to Determine Color Change and Staining Caused by Aircraft Maintenance Chemicals upon Aircraft Cabin Interior Hard Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of color change and staining from liquid solutions, such as cleaning or disinfecting chemicals or both, on painted metallic surfaces and nonmetallic surfaces of materials being used inside the aircraft cabin. The effects upon the exposed specimens are measured with the AATCC Gray Scale for Color Change and AATCC Gray Color Scale for Staining. Note 1—This test method is applicable to any colored nonmetallic hard surface in contact with liquids. The selected test specimens are chosen because these materials are present in the majority of aircraft cabin interiors. 1.2This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Packaging Glass with a Hierarchically Nanostructured Surface: A Universal Method to Achieve Self-Cleaning Omnidirectional Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Chin An

    2015-12-01

    Fused-silica packaging glass fabricated with a hierarchical structure by integrating small (ultrathin nanorods) and large (honeycomb nanowalls) structures was demonstrated with exceptional light-harvesting solar performance, which is attributed to the subwavelength feature of the nanorods and an efficient scattering ability of the honeycomb nanowalls. Si solar cells covered with the hierarchically structured packaging glass exhibit enhanced conversion efficiency by 5.2% at normal incidence, and the enhancement went up to 46% at the incident angle of 60°. The hierarchical structured packaging glass shows excellent self-cleaning characteristics: 98.8% of the efficiency is maintained after 6 weeks of outdoor exposure, indicating that the nanostructured surface effectively repels polluting dust/particles. The presented self-cleaning omnidirectional light-harvesting design using the hierarchical structured packaging glass is a potential universal scheme for practical solar applications.

  4. Impact of physical and chemical parameters on the hydroxyapatite nanopowder synthesized by chemical precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Trang Pham, Thi; Phuong Nguyen, Thu; Pham, Thi Nam; Phuong Vu, Thi; Tran, Dai Lam; Thai, Hoang; Thanh Dinh, Thi Mai

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanopowder was studied by chemical precipitation method at different values of reaction temperature, settling time, Ca/P ratio, calcination temperature, (NH4)2HPO4 addition rate, initial concentration of Ca(NO3)2 and (NH4)2HPO4. Analysis results of properties, morphology, structure of HAp powder from infrared (IR) spectra, x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the synthesized HAp powder had cylinder crystal shape with size less than 100 nm, single-phase structure. The variation of the synthesis conditions did not affect the morphology but affected the size of HAp crystals.

  5. Investigations of the Effects of Biocide Dosing and Chemical Cleaning on the Organic Carbon Removal in an Integrated Ultrafiltration - Nanofiltration Desalination Pilot Plant

    KAUST Repository

    Khojah, Bayan A.

    2017-12-01

    Membrane desalination has become one of the most important desalination technologies used in the world. It provides high water quality for numerous applications and it demonstrates excellent desalination efficiency. One of the most troubling drawbacks of membrane desalination is membrane fouling. It decreases the performance of the membranes and increases the energy requirement. Two of the most important causes of fouling are microbes and organic matter. Hence, to maintain an optimized desalination performance, routine inspection of microbial and organic contents of water is crucial for desalination plants. In this study, water samples were obtained from different treatment points in an ultrafiltration (UF)/nanofiltration (NF) seawater desalination pilot plant. This was performed to better understand how the water quality changes along the desalination scheme. The effect of fouling control techniques, including Chemically Enhanced Backwash (CEB), Cleaning in Place (CIP), and the addition of a biocide (DBNPA) was studied. Different analytical tools were applied, including Bactiquant, Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC), and Liquid Chromatography for Organic Carbon Detection (LC-OCD). Out results showed that UF did not decrease TOC but it was sufficient in removing up to 99.7% of bacteria. Nanofiltration, removed up to 95% of TOC. However, NF permeate had a high increase in AOC as compared to the raw seawater sample. The LC-OCD results suggested that this might be due to the increased low molecular weight neutrals which were the most common organic species in the NF permeate. The fouling control techniques showed various effects on the desalination efficiency. Daily CEB did not cause a reduction in TOC or bacteria but decreased AOC in the UF filtrate. The biocide addition resulted in an adequate membranes protection from fouling and it did not affect the investigated water parameters. When the dosing of biocide was stopped, the water quality

  6. Cleaning Schedule Operations in Heat Exchanger Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Hairul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat exchanger networks have been known to be the essential parts in the chemical industries. Unfortunately, since the performance of heat exchanger can be decreasing in transferring the heat from hot stream into cold stream due to fouling, then cleaning the heat exchanger is needed to restore its initial performance periodically. A process of heating crude oil in a refinery plant was used as a case study. As many as eleven heat exchangers were used to heat crude oil before it was heated by a furnace to the temperature required to the crude unit distillation column. The purpose of this study is to determine the cleaning schedule of heat exchanger on the heat exchanger networks due to the decrease of the overall heat transfer coefficient by various percentage of the design value. A close study on the process of heat exchanger cleaning schedule in heat exchanger networks using the method of decreasing overall heat transfer coefficient as target. The result showed that the higher the fouling value the more often the heat exchanger is cleaned because the overall heat transfer coefficient decreases quickly.

  7. Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods. First Update. (3rd edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman; Sellers.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed Update is for Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods, SW-846, Third Edition. Attached to the report is a list of methods included in the proposed update indicating whether the method is a new method, a partially revised method, or a totally revised method. Do not discard or replace any of the current pages in the SW-846 manual until the proposed update I package is promulgated. Until promulgation of the update package, the methods in the update package are not officially part of the SW-846 manual and thus do not carry the status of EPA-approved methods. In addition to the proposed Update, six finalized methods are included for immediate inclusion into the Third Edition of SW-846. Four methods, originally proposed October 1, 1984, will be finalized in a soon to be released rulemaking. They are, however, being submitted to subscribers for the first time in the update. These methods are 7211, 7381, 7461, and 7951. Two other methods were finalized in the 2nd Edition of SW-846. They were inadvertantly omitted from the 3rd Edition and are not being proposed as new. These methods are 7081 and 7761

  8. Extending CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning for advanced optical and EUV mask cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Ivin; Bowers, Charles W.; Balooch, Mehdi

    2011-11-01

    Cryogenic CO2 aerosol cleaning being a dry, chemically-inert and residue-free process is used in the production of optical lithography masks. It is an attractive cleaning option for the mask industry to achieve the requirement for removal of all printable soft defects and repair debris down to the 50nm printability specification. In the technique, CO2 clusters are formed by sudden expansion of liquid from high to almost atmospheric pressure through an optimally designed nozzle orifice. They are then directed on to the soft defects or debris for momentum transfer and subsequent damage free removal from the mask substrate. Unlike aggressive acid based wet cleaning, there is no degradation of the mask after processing with CO2, i.e., no critical dimension (CD) change, no transmission/phase losses, or chemical residue that leads to haze formation. Therefore no restriction on number of cleaning cycles is required to be imposed, unlike other cleaning methods. CO2 aerosol cleaning has been implemented for several years as full mask final clean in production environments at several state of the art mask shops. Over the last two years our group reported successful removal of all soft defects without damage to the fragile SRAF features, zero adders (from the cleaning and handling mechanisms) down to a 50nm printability specification. In addition, CO2 aerosol cleaning is being utilized to remove debris from Post-RAVE repair of hard defects in order to achieve the goal of no printable defects. It is expected that CO2 aerosol cleaning can be extended to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks. In this paper, we report advances being made in nozzle design qualification for optimum snow properties (size, velocity and flux) using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) technique. In addition the two new areas of focus for CO2 aerosol cleaning i.e. pellicle glue residue removal on optical masks, and ruthenium (Ru) film on EUV masks are presented. Usually, the residue left over after the pellicle

  9. Clean technologies: methods for minimizing the releases and choice of the effluents valorization processes. Application to metal workshops; Technologies propres: methodes de minimisation des rejets et de choix des procedes de valorisation des effluents. Application aux ateliers de traitement de surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laforest, V.

    1999-12-10

    Currently, the essential part of the money invested by the industrialist is for the water treatment. In France, most of the 20 billions francs per year devoted to the water treatment is used for the industrial activity. The global management of effluents favour the integration of clean technologies (optimization, change and modification of the production process) in order to reduce the pollution problem at its source. Our study aims at the introduction of clean technologies in the metal workshops (consumer and generator of water and chemicals) by the development of two data management methods, which lead to two decision support systems. The aim of the first one is to minimize both the water consumption and the wastewater disposal by optimizing the production process (optimum yield and efficiency of the rinsing baths). The second one concerns the choice of valorization techniques considering the valorization objectives, the effluents characteristics and the parameters limiting the use of the techniques. Our approach fits into a global management method for the metal finishing industry wastewater. Its aim is to limit the quantity of wastewater generated, to valorize effluents and by this way to develop the clean technologies.

  10. Evaluation of removal forces of implant-supported zirconia copings depending on abutment geometry, luting agent and cleaning method during re-cementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Rödiger, Matthias; Rinke, Sven; Ehret-Kleinau, Fenja; Pohlmeyer, Franziska; Lange, Katharina; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of different abutment geometries in combination with varying luting agents and the effectiveness of different cleaning methods (prior to re-cementation) regarding the retentiveness of zirconia copings on implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Implants were embedded in resin blocks. Three groups of titanium abutments (pre-fabricated, height: 7.5 mm, taper: 5.7°; customized-long, height: 6.79 mm, taper: 4.8°; customized-short, height: 4.31 mm, taper: 4.8°) were u...

  11. The Preparation of TiO₂ Film by the Sol-Gel Method and Evaluation of Its Self-Cleaning Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Sun, Sijia; Deng, Tongrong; Ding, Hao; Chen, Wanting; Chen, Ying

    2018-03-19

    TiO₂ sol was produced by the sol-gel method through the hydrolysis and the aging of tetrabutyl titanate and the TiO₂ film was obtained by dipping and uniform lifting of the acid-treated and ultrasound-treated clean glass slides into the TiO₂ sol followed by aging, drying, and calcination. The effect of the hydrolysis control agents to the formed sol was researched and the crystalline state, the morphology, and the photocatalytic properties of the products after calcination were characterized. The structural morphology, the contact angles before and after illumination, and the self-cleaning properties of the TiO₂ film were characterized as well. The results showed that by using acetylacetone as the hydrolysis control agent, the formed TiO₂ sol had relatively high stability. The product after the calcination of the TiO₂ sol was of single anatase type with crystalline size of 18-20 nm and it could degrade nearly 100% of methylene blue after 90 min illumination. The formed TiO₂ film is compact, continuous, smooth, and had the properties of super-hydrophilicity (after 30 min illumination due to its contact angle decreasing from 21° to nearly 0°) and anti-fogging capability, which indicated its excellent self-cleaning property.

  12. Surface micro-dissolve method of imparting self-cleaning property to cotton fabrics in NaOH/urea aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Tao; Hu, Ruimin; Zhao, Zhenyun [College of Textile & Garment, Southwest University, 400716, Chongqing (China); Liu, Yiping [College of Textile & Garment, Southwest University, 400716, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Engineering Research Center of Biomaterial Fiber and Modern Textile, 400716, Chongqing (China); Lu, Ming, E-mail: lumingswu@163.com [College of Textile & Garment, Southwest University, 400716, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Engineering Research Center of Biomaterial Fiber and Modern Textile, 400716, Chongqing (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A novel micro-dissolved process was carried out to embedding commercial titanium dioxide nanoparticles into cotton fabric with NaOH/urea aqueous solution. • X-ray diffraction pattern of modified fabrics shown that the cellulose structure of modified fabrics had not changed. • Modified cotton fabrics demonstrated favourable photocatalytic self-cleaning performance while tensile strength and whiteness of treated fabrics also expressed an increasement slightly. - Abstract: A simple and economical micro-dissolved process of embedding titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles into surface zone of cotton fabrics was developed. TiO{sub 2} was coated on cotton fabrics in 7% wt NaOH/12% wt urea aqueous solution at low temperature. Photocatalytic efficiency of cotton fabrics treated with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was studied upon measuring the photocatalytic decoloration of Rhodamine B (RhB) under ultraviolet irradiation. Self-cleaning property of cotton fabric coated with TiO{sub 2} was evaluated with color depth of samples (K/S value). The treated fabrics were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FITR), tensile strength, stiffness and whiteness. The results indicated, TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles could be embedded on the surface layer of cotton fabrics throuth surface micro-dissolve method. Treated cotton fabrics possessed distinct photocatalytic efficiency and self-cleaning properties. Tensile strength and whiteness of modified cotton fabrics appeared moderately increasement.

  13. Critical flux and chemical cleaning-in-place during the long-term operation of a pilot-scale submerged membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Chunhai; Huang, Xia; Ben Aï m, Roger M.; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Amy, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    of effective chorine was performed when TMP rose to 15 kPa) and time controlling mode (cleanings were performed weekly and monthly respectively with low concentration NaClO (500-1000 mg/L) and high concentration NaClO (3000 mg/L)). Microscopic analysis

  14. Physical-chemical property based sequence motifs and methods regarding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Werner [Friendswood, TX; Mathura, Venkatarajan S [Sarasota, FL; Schein, Catherine H [Friendswood, TX

    2008-09-09

    A data analysis system, program, and/or method, e.g., a data mining/data exploration method, using physical-chemical property motifs. For example, a sequence database may be searched for identifying segments thereof having physical-chemical properties similar to the physical-chemical property motifs.

  15. Evaluation of a chemical risk assessment method of South Korea for chemicals classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic or reprotoxic (CMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Uk; Byeon, Sang-Hoon

    2017-12-12

    Chemicals were used in various fields by the development of industry and science and technology. The Chemical Hazard Risk Management (CHARM) was developed to assess the risk of chemicals in South Korea. In this study, we were to evaluate the CHARM model developed for the effective management of workplace chemicals. We used 59 carcinogenic, mutagenic or reprotoxic (CMR) materials, which are both the work environment measurement result and the usage information among the manufacturer data. The CHARM model determines the risk to human health using the exposure level (based on working environment measurements or a combination of the quantity used and chemical physical properties (e.g., fugacity and volatility)), hazard (using occupational exposure limit (OEL) or Risk phrases (R-phrases)/Hazard statements (H-statements) from the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)). The risk level was lower when using the results of the work environment measurement than when applying the chemical quantity and physical properties in the exposure level evaluation method. It was evaluated as grade 4 for the CMR material in the hazard class determination. The risk assessment method by R-phrases was evaluated more conservatively than the risk assessment method by OEL. And the risk assessment method by H-statements was evaluated more conservatively than the risk assessment method by R-phrases. The CHARM model was gradually conservatively assessed as it proceeded in the next step without quantitative information for individual workplaces. The CHARM is expected to help identify the risk if the hazards and exposure levels of chemicals were identified in individual workplaces. For CMR substances, although CHARM is highly evaluated for hazards, the risk is assessed to be low if exposure levels are assessed low. When evaluating the risk of highly hazardous chemicals such as CMR substances, we believe the model should be adapted to be more conservative and classify these as higher risk. This work is

  16. Ultrasonic and immersion cleaning: a comparison using aqueous and fluorocarbon solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, R.D.; Kearsey, A.

    1984-11-01

    Decontamination is a necessary process in reducing radiation levels in the working environment in the nuclear industry. Components from active areas which require decontamination for re-use or maintenance operations. In this report, a typical chemical cleaning process using liquid pumping, airagitation and physical movement for agitation is compared with ultrasonic cleaning, now an established cleaning process in many industries. The chosen traditional method is immersion in an agitated solution of warm SDG.3 solution; an established decontaminating reagent. The decontamination effect of this process is compared with the effect of cleaning in an ultrasonic bath containing the same reagent at the same concentration and temperature. Fluorocarbon reagents are of particular interest to the nuclear industry for they offer the ability to clean electrical components without damage, and can clean product contaminated material without the risk of criticality. Such reagents are based on 1,1,2-trichloro, 1,2,2-trifluoroethane and azeotropic mixtures. This reagent and one mixture with 6% methanol were tested under agitation and ultrasonic immersion at the same temperature. Parallel control experiments were conducted using demineralised water as the cleaning media in an agitated bath. SGG3 is a good reagent for general purpose cleaning (it can remove 99% of particulate contamination) using scrubbing, immersion or spraying techniques. There is little evidence to show that ultrasonic cleaning increases its effectiveness. For special purpose fluorocarbon solvents will give satisfactory results when used in an ultrasonic system. (author)

  17. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  18. Wireless Chemical Sensor and Sensing Method for Use Therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A wireless chemical sensor includes an electrical conductor and a material separated therefrom by an electric insulator. The electrical conductor is an unconnected open-circuit shaped for storage of an electric field and a magnetic field. In the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, the first electrical conductor resonates to generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. The material is positioned at a location lying within at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses so-generated. The material changes in electrical conductivity in the presence of a chemical-of-interest.

  19. Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Seright

    2007-09-30

    This final technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004, through May 16, 2007, for the project, 'Aperture-Tolerant, Chemical-Based Methods to Reduce Channeling'. We explored the potential of pore-filling gels for reducing excess water production from both fractured and unfractured production wells. Several gel formulations were identified that met the requirements--i.e., providing water residual resistance factors greater than 2,000 and ultimate oil residual resistance factors (F{sub rro}) of 2 or less. Significant oil throughput was required to achieve low F{sub rro} values, suggesting that gelant penetration into porous rock must be small (a few feet or less) for existing pore-filling gels to provide effective disproportionate permeability reduction. Compared with adsorbed polymers and weak gels, strong pore-filling gels can provide greater reliability and behavior that is insensitive to the initial rock permeability. Guidance is provided on where relative-permeability-modification/disproportionate-permeability-reduction treatments can be successfully applied for use in either oil or gas production wells. When properly designed and executed, these treatments can be successfully applied to a limited range of oilfield excessive-water-production problems. We examined whether gel rheology can explain behavior during extrusion through fractures. The rheology behavior of the gels tested showed a strong parallel to the results obtained from previous gel extrusion experiments. However, for a given aperture (fracture width or plate-plate separation), the pressure gradients measured during the gel extrusion experiments were much higher than anticipated from rheology measurements. Extensive experiments established that wall slip and first normal stress difference were not responsible for the pressure gradient discrepancy. To explain the discrepancy, we noted that the aperture for gel flow (for mobile gel wormholing through concentrated

  20. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  1. Methods and tools for sustainable chemical process design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loureiro da Costa Lira Gargalo, Carina; Chairakwongsa, Siwanat; Quaglia, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    As the pressure on chemical and biochemical processes to achieve a more sustainable performance increases, the need to define a systematic and holistic way to accomplish this is becoming more urgent. In this chapter, a multilevel computer-aided framework for systematic design of more sustainable...

  2. Current methods in risk assessment of genotoxic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartus, Alexander; Schrenk, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Chemical contaminants and residues are undesired chemicals occurring in consumer products such as food and drugs, at the workplace and in the environment, i.e. in air, soil and water. These compounds can be detected even at very low concentrations and lead frequently to considerable concerns among consumers and in the media. Thus it is a major challenge for modern toxicology to provide transparent and versatile tools for the risk assessment of such compounds in particular with respect to human health. Well-known examples of toxic contaminants are dioxins or mercury (in the environment), mycotoxins (from infections by molds) or acrylamide (from thermal treatment of food). The process of toxicological risk assessment of such chemicals is based on i) the knowledge of their contents in food, air, water etc., ii) the routes and extent of exposure of humans, iii) the toxicological properties of the compound, and, iv) its mode(s) of action. In this process quantitative dose-response relationships, usually in experimental animals, are of outstanding importance. For a successful risk assessment, in particular of genotoxic chemicals, several conditions and models such as the Margin of Exposure (MoE) approach or the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) concept exist, which will be discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of different chemical materials and cultural methods on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 6

    2011-10-27

    Oct 27, 2011 ... which accounts for 53% of wheat production in China and about 15% of the total ... environment as it is mainly made from chemical mate- rials. ... yield and yield components in harvest in both years were deter- mined. The data were subjected to analyses of variance (ANOVA) ..... Long-term stability of.

  4. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo; Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute; Turchanin, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy

  5. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Technical University Ilmenau, Weimarer Strasse 25, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute, E-mail: ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Turchanin, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Universitätsstr. 25, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2014-04-14

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  6. Device and method for enhanced collection and assay of chemicals with high surface area ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addleman, Raymond S.; Li, Xiaohong Shari; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Cinson, Anthony D.; Bays, John T.; Wallace, Krys

    2016-02-16

    A method and device for enhanced capture of target analytes is disclosed. This invention relates to collection of chemicals for separations and analysis. More specifically, this invention relates to a solid phase microextraction (SPME) device having better capability for chemical collection and analysis. This includes better physical stability, capacity for chemical collection, flexible surface chemistry and high affinity for target analyte.

  7. Alternatives to Organic Solvents in Industrial Cleaning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    To control chemical hazards in work places, substitution of harmful substances with less harmful or non-toxic products is now a method used in many countries and in many companies. It has previously been demonstrated that it is desirable and possible to use non-volatile, low-toxic vegetable...... cleaning agents in offset printing companies instead of volatile, toxic organic solvents. The present study is based on a project with the aim of defining other industrial processes, where organic solvents used for cleaning or degreasing can be replaced by non-volatile, low-toxic products, which are based...... on esters from fatty acids of vegetable origin (vegetable esters - VE).The study indicates that industrial cleaning/degreasing with organic solvents may be substituted with VEs on metal surfaces and on some coated surfaces, in manufacture of paints and inks, use of paints, use of inks (printing), metal...

  8. Hierarchical surfaces for enhanced self-cleaning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariadna; Francone, Achille; Thamdrup, Lasse H.; Johansson, Alicia; Bilenberg, Brian; Nielsen, Theodor; Guttmann, Markus; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.; Kehagias, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    In this study we present a flexible and adaptable fabrication method to create complex hierarchical structures over inherently hydrophobic resist materials. We have tested these surfaces for their superhydrophobic behaviour and successfully verified their self-cleaning properties. The followed approach allow us to design and produce superhydrophobic surfaces in a reproducible manner. We have analysed different combination of hierarchical micro-nanostructures for their application to self-cleaning surfaces. A static contact angle value of 170° with a hysteresis of 4° was achieved without the need of any additional chemical treatment on the fabricated hierarchical structures. Dynamic effects were analysed on these surfaces, obtaining a remarkable self-cleaning effect as well as a good robustness over impacting droplets.

  9. Hierarchical surfaces for enhanced self-cleaning applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Ariadna; Francone, Achille; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M; Kehagias, Nikolaos; Thamdrup, Lasse H; Johansson, Alicia; Bilenberg, Brian; Nielsen, Theodor; Guttmann, Markus

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present a flexible and adaptable fabrication method to create complex hierarchical structures over inherently hydrophobic resist materials. We have tested these surfaces for their superhydrophobic behaviour and successfully verified their self-cleaning properties. The followed approach allow us to design and produce superhydrophobic surfaces in a reproducible manner. We have analysed different combination of hierarchical micro-nanostructures for their application to self-cleaning surfaces. A static contact angle value of 170° with a hysteresis of 4° was achieved without the need of any additional chemical treatment on the fabricated hierarchical structures. Dynamic effects were analysed on these surfaces, obtaining a remarkable self-cleaning effect as well as a good robustness over impacting droplets. (paper)

  10. Consolidation of the formation sand by chemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Mihočová

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The sand control by consolidation involves the process of injecting chemicals into the naturally unconsolidated formation to provide an in situ grain-to-grain cementation. The sand consolidation chemicals are available for some 30 years. Several types of consolidating material were tried. Presently available systems utilize solidified plastics to provide the cementation. These systems include phenol resin, phenol-formaldehyde, epoxy, furan and phenolic-furfuryl.The sand consolidation with the steam injection is a novel technique. This process provides a highly alkaline liquid phase and temperatures to 300 °C to geochemically create cements by interacting with the dirty sand.While the formation consolidation has widely applied, our experience has proved a high level of success.

  11. Using deuterated PAH amendments to validate chemical extraction methods to predict PAH bioavailability in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Eyles, Jose L.; Collins, Chris D.; Hodson, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Validating chemical methods to predict bioavailable fractions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by comparison with accumulation bioassays is problematic. Concentrations accumulated in soil organisms not only depend on the bioavailable fraction but also on contaminant properties. A historically contaminated soil was freshly spiked with deuterated PAHs (dPAHs). dPAHs have a similar fate to their respective undeuterated analogues, so chemical methods that give good indications of bioavailability should extract the fresh more readily available dPAHs and historic more recalcitrant PAHs in similar proportions to those in which they are accumulated in the tissues of test organisms. Cyclodextrin and butanol extractions predicted the bioavailable fraction for earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and plants (Lolium multiflorum) better than the exhaustive extraction. The PAHs accumulated by earthworms had a larger dPAH:PAH ratio than that predicted by chemical methods. The isotope ratio method described here provides an effective way of evaluating other chemical methods to predict bioavailability. - Research highlights: → Isotope ratios can be used to evaluate chemical methods to predict bioavailability. → Chemical methods predicted bioavailability better than exhaustive extractions. → Bioavailability to earthworms was still far from that predicted by chemical methods. - A novel method using isotope ratios to assess the ability of chemical methods to predict PAH bioavailability to soil biota.

  12. Using deuterated PAH amendments to validate chemical extraction methods to predict PAH bioavailability in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Eyles, Jose L., E-mail: j.l.gomezeyles@reading.ac.uk [University of Reading, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Soil Research Centre, Reading, RG6 6DW Berkshire (United Kingdom); Collins, Chris D.; Hodson, Mark E. [University of Reading, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Soil Research Centre, Reading, RG6 6DW Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Validating chemical methods to predict bioavailable fractions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by comparison with accumulation bioassays is problematic. Concentrations accumulated in soil organisms not only depend on the bioavailable fraction but also on contaminant properties. A historically contaminated soil was freshly spiked with deuterated PAHs (dPAHs). dPAHs have a similar fate to their respective undeuterated analogues, so chemical methods that give good indications of bioavailability should extract the fresh more readily available dPAHs and historic more recalcitrant PAHs in similar proportions to those in which they are accumulated in the tissues of test organisms. Cyclodextrin and butanol extractions predicted the bioavailable fraction for earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and plants (Lolium multiflorum) better than the exhaustive extraction. The PAHs accumulated by earthworms had a larger dPAH:PAH ratio than that predicted by chemical methods. The isotope ratio method described here provides an effective way of evaluating other chemical methods to predict bioavailability. - Research highlights: > Isotope ratios can be used to evaluate chemical methods to predict bioavailability. > Chemical methods predicted bioavailability better than exhaustive extractions. > Bioavailability to earthworms was still far from that predicted by chemical methods. - A novel method using isotope ratios to assess the ability of chemical methods to predict PAH bioavailability to soil biota.

  13. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Heterogeneous catalysis and the challenges of powering the planet, securing chemicals for civilised life, and clean efficient utilization of renewable feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2014-07-01

    This article reviews, first, the prospects, practices and principles of generating solar fuels. It does so with an analysis of recent progress in the light-driven emission of H2 (and other fuels) as well as O2 from water. To place this challenge in perspective, some current practices entailing the use of well-proven solid catalysts developed for fossil-based feedstocks, are described. The massive differences between proven methods of generating fuel and chemicals from non-renewable and from solar radiation are emphasized with the aid of numerous quantitative examples. Whilst it is acknowledged that a key action in reducing the liberation of greenhouse gases (GHG) is to tackle the challenge of decreasing their evolution in power generation and in the production of steel, aluminium and other bulk commodities (metals, alloys, concrete and ceramics), nevertheless much can be done to diminish the emission of CO2 (and to use it as feedstock) through the agency of new, designed solid catalysts and microalgae. Solar-thermal converters are also attractive alternatives, even though they are more likely to be used centrally rather than in small modular units like 'artificial leaves,' some of which are promising for the purposes of generating energy (and perhaps fuel) in a delocalized, modular manner. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Facile Dry Surface Cleaning of Graphene by UV Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hong; Haidari, Mohd Musaib; Choi, Jin Sik; Kim, Hakseong; Yu, Young-Jun; Park, Jonghyurk

    2018-05-01

    Graphene has been considered an ideal material for application in transparent lightweight wearable electronics due to its extraordinary mechanical, optical, and electrical properties originating from its ordered hexagonal carbon atomic lattice in a layer. Precise surface control is critical in maximizing its performance in electronic applications. Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is widely used but it produces polymeric residue following wet/chemical transfer process, which strongly affects its intrinsic electrical properties and limits the doping efficiency by adsorption. Here, we introduce a facile dry-cleaning method based on UV irradiation to eliminate the organic residues even after device fabrication. Through surface topography, Raman analysis, and electrical transport measurement characteristics, we confirm that the optimized UV treatment can recover the clean graphene surface and improve graphene-FET performance more effectively than thermal treatment. We propose our UV irradiation method as a systematically controllable and damage-free post process for application in large-area devices.

  16. L-Reactor 186-basin cleaning alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Operation of L Reactor will necessitate annual cleaning of the L Area 186 basins. Alternatives are presented for sediment discharge due to 186-basin cleaning activities as a basis for choosing the optimal cleaning method. Current cleaning activities (i.e. removal of accumulated sediments) for the P, C and K-Area 186 basins result in suspended solids concentrations in the effluent waters above the NPDES limits, requiring an exemption from the NPDES permit for these short-term releases. The objective of mitigating the 186-basin cleaning activities is to decrease the suspended solids concentrations to within permit limits while continuing satisfactory operation of the basins

  17. Development of a Benchtop Baking Method for Chemically Leavened Crackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, the baking performance of soft wheat flours has been evaluated by well-established benchtop cookie-baking methods. In contrast, a benchtop cracker-baking method has not been widely explored or implemented as an official method, due to hurdles including the difficulty in finding ideal...

  18. McClean Lake. Site Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    Located over 700 kilometers northeast of Saskatoon, Areva's McClean Lake site is comprised of several uranium mines and one of the most technologically advanced uranium mills in the world - the only mill designed to process high-grade uranium ore without dilution. Areva has operated several open-pit uranium mines at the McClean Lake site, and is evaluating future mines at and near the site. The McClean Lake mill has recently undergone a multimillion-dollar upgrade and expansion, which has doubled its annual production capacity of uranium concentrate to 24 million pounds. It is the only facility in the world capable of processing high-grade uranium ore without diluting it. The mill processes the ore from the Cigar Lake mine, the world's second largest and highest-grade uranium mine. The McClean Lake site operates 365 days a year on a week-in/week-out rotation schedule for workers, over 50% of whom reside in northern Saskatchewan communities. Tailings are waste products resulting from milling uranium ore. This waste is made up of leach residue solids, waste solutions and chemical precipitates that are carefully engineered for long-term disposal. The TMF serves as the repository for all resulting tailings. This facility allows proper waste management, which minimizes potential adverse environmental effects. Mining projections indicate that the McClean Lake mill will produce tailings in excess of the existing capacity of the TMF. After evaluating a number of options, Areva has decided to pursue an expansion of this facility. Areva is developing the Surface Access Borehole Resource Extraction (SABRE) mining method, which uses a high-pressure water jet placed at the bottom of the drill hole to extract ore. Areva has conducted a series of tests with this method and is evaluating its potential for future mining operations. McClean Lake maintains its certification in ISO 14001 standards for environmental management and OHSAS 18001 standards for occupational health

  19. Chemical and ecological control methods for Epitrix spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. S. Cuthbertson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little information exists in regards to the control options available for potato flea beetles, Epitrix spp. This short review covers both chemical and ecological options currently available for control of Epitrix spp. Synthetic pyrethroids are the weapon of choice for the beetles. However, the impetus in integrated pest management is to do timely (early-season applications with something harsh which will give long-term protection at a time when there are not a lot of beneficials in the field. Finding the balance for control of Epitrix spp. is proving difficult.

  20. Metal-assisted chemical etch porous silicon formation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuling; Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2004-09-14

    A thin discontinuous layer of metal such as Au, Pt, or Au/Pd is deposited on a silicon surface. The surface is then etched in a solution including HF and an oxidant for a brief period, as little as a couple seconds to one hour. A preferred oxidant is H.sub.2 O.sub.2. Morphology and light emitting properties of porous silicon can be selectively controlled as a function of the type of metal deposited, Si doping type, silicon doping level, and/or etch time. Electrical assistance is unnecessary during the chemical etching of the invention, which may be conducted in the presence or absence of illumination.

  1. Method for separating the isotopes of a chemical element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devienne, F.M.

    1977-01-01

    A beam of positive or negative primary ions of at least one compound of a chemical element is accelerated in order to pass through collision boxes placed in series. As a result of inelastic collisions of the ions with the molecules of a neutral target gas within each collision box, a given percentage of primary ions is dissociated into at least two fragments, one of which is a secondary ion in the form of at least two isotopic species. The collision boxes are brought to a potential V 2 so as to trap preferentially one isotopic species which is condensed within each box. 15 claims, 4 figures

  2. Late washing filter cleaning cycle demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.L.; McCabe, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The DWPF Late Washing Facility will filter cesium and potassium tetraphenyl borate (TPB) solids using a Mott sintered metal filter, identical to the filter now used in the In-tank Precipitation Facility. The purpose of the late wash step is primarily to remove the nitrite salts from the slurry prior to delivery to DWPF. Periodic chemical cleaning of the filter will be required, presumably after each batch although the actual required frequency could not be determined on the lab-scale. Minimization of chemical cleaning solution volumes is key to maximizing the attainment of the Late Wash facility. This report summarizes work completed in experiments designed to identify minimum cleaning solution requirements

  3. Chemical Mixtures Health Risk Assessment of Environmental Contaminants: Concepts, Methods, Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This problems-based, introductory workshop focuses on methods to assess health risks posed by exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment. Chemical mixtures health risk assessment methods continue to be developed and evolve to address concerns over health risks from multic...

  4. Methods for the Determination of Chemical Contaminants in Drinking Water. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual, intended for chemists and technicians with little or no experience in chemical procedures required to monitor drinking water, covers analytical methods for inorganic and organic chemical contaminants listed in the interim primary drinking water regulations. Topics include methods for heavy metals, nitrate, and organic…

  5. Chemical Mixtures Health Risk Assessment of Environmental Contaminants: Concepts, Methods, And Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This problems-based, introductory workshop focuses on methods to assess health risks posed by exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment. Chemical mixtures health risk assessment methods continue to be developed and evolve to address concerns over health risks from multic...

  6. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Escher, C.

    1988-06-07

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

  7. FY 2000 report on the investigational study of the general PR method for spreading clean energy vehicles and letting people know them; 2000 nendo chosa hokokusho. Clean energy jidosha fukyu keihatsu no tameno ippan koho shuho ni kansuru kento chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The details were outlined of the PR event 'Clean Energy Festa' which was carried out for PR activities for spread of new energy and clean energy vehicles. The festa was implemented in Yokote (Akita prefecture), Nagoya, Osaka, Yokohama and Hiroshima. The details of each place were reported in terms of the following: outline of the implementation, map of the place and booths, opening ceremony, management at entrance, dome theater, place for enjoying/relaxing, festival plaza, parking lot, PR related works, etc. In Festa in Yokote, more people gathered than expected. The reasons seem to be: the festa was held in the existing amusement facilities; the show using costumes of popular characters and gifts of the lottery were effective. As to new energy and clean energy vehicles, appeal was made mainly by stamp rally and questionnaire survey. By moving people inside the place, it helped people to have an understanding of clean energy vehicles. Almost the same effects were recognized also in the other places. (NEDO)

  8. FY 2000 report on the investigational study of the general PR method for spreading clean energy vehicles and letting people know them; 2000 nendo chosa hokokusho. Clean energy jidosha fukyu keihatsu no tameno ippan koho shuho ni kansuru kento chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The details were outlined of the PR event 'Clean Energy Festa' which was carried out for PR activities for spread of new energy and clean energy vehicles. The festa was implemented in Yokote (Akita prefecture), Nagoya, Osaka, Yokohama and Hiroshima. The details of each place were reported in terms of the following: outline of the implementation, map of the place and booths, opening ceremony, management at entrance, dome theater, place for enjoying/relaxing, festival plaza, parking lot, PR related works, etc. In Festa in Yokote, more people gathered than expected. The reasons seem to be: the festa was held in the existing amusement facilities; the show using costumes of popular characters and gifts of the lottery were effective. As to new energy and clean energy vehicles, appeal was made mainly by stamp rally and questionnaire survey. By moving people inside the place, it helped people to have an understanding of clean energy vehicles. Almost the same effects were recognized also in the other places. (NEDO)

  9. Cleaning Validation of Fermentation Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Satu; Friis, Alan; Wirtanen, Gun

    2008-01-01

    Reliable test methods for checking cleanliness are needed to evaluate and validate the cleaning process of fermentation tanks. Pilot scale tanks were used to test the applicability of various methods for this purpose. The methods found to be suitable for validation of the clenlinees were visula...

  10. Cleaning graphene with a titanium sacrificial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joiner, C. A.; Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Vogel, E. M.; Chakrabarti, B.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is a promising material for future electronic applications and chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper is a promising method for synthesizing graphene on the wafer scale. The processing of such graphene films into electronic devices introduces a variety of contaminants which can be difficult to remove. An approach to cleaning residues from the graphene channel is presented in which a thin layer of titanium is deposited via thermal e-beam evaporation and immediately removed. This procedure does not damage the graphene as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, greatly enhances the electrical performance of the fabricated graphene field effect transistors, and completely removes the chemical residues from the surface of the graphene channel as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  11. Discharge cleaning for a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Shigeyuki

    1983-01-01

    Various methods of discharge cleaning for tokamaks are described. The material of the first walls of tokamaks is usually stainless steel, inconel, titanium and so on. Hydrogen is exclusively used as the discharge gas. Glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Taylor discharge cleaning (TDC), and electron cyclotron resonance discharge cleaning (ECR-DC) are discussed in this paper. The cleaning by GDC is made by moving a movable anode to the center of a tokamak vassel. Taylor found the good cleaning effect of induced discharge by high pressure and low power discharge. This is called TDC. When the frequency of high frequency discharge in a magnetic field is equal to that of the electron cyclotron resonance, the break down potential is lowered if the pressure is sufficiently low. The ECR-CD is made by using this effect. In TDC and ECR-DC, the electron temperature, which has a close relation to the production rate of H 0 , can be controlled by the pressure. In GDC, the operating pressure was improved by the radio frequency glow (RG) method. However, there is still the danger of arcing. In case of GDC and ECR-DC, the position of plasma can be controlled, but not in case of TDC. The TDC is accepted by most of takamak devices in the world. (Kato, T.)

  12. Systematic methods for synthesis and design of sustainable chemical and biochemical processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    Chemical and biochemical process design consists of designing the process that can sustainably manufacture an identified chemical product through a chemical or biochemical route. The chemical product tree is potentially very large; starting from a set of basic raw materials (such as petroleum...... for process intensification, sustainable process design, identification of optimal biorefinery models as well as integrated process-control design, and chemical product design. The lecture will present the main concepts, the decomposition based solution approach, the developed methods and tools together...

  13. Effect of Fermentation Methods on Chemical and Microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mung flours were fermented using spontaneous and backslopping methods for 72 h and microbial analysis over a period of 72 h fermentation was carried out. The samples were subjected to biochemical test, anti-nutrient and selected mineral and vitamin contents evaluation using standard methods. There was a gradual ...

  14. Decontamination by water jet, chemical and electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauchon, J.P.; Mordenti, P.; Bezia, C.; Fuentes, P.; Kervegant, Y.; Munoz, C.; Pierlas, C.

    1986-01-01

    The decontamination tests have been carried out on samples coming from representative specimens from primary circuit of the PWR and on samples coming from the emergency feed water piping of the German BWR (Isar). The oxide found in PWR primary loops can only be removed by a two steps process. The initial embrittling step is particularly effective in hot alkaline permanganate medium. Oxidation by ozone treatment is less effective. The second step involves chemical erosion of the metal in nitrofluoric acid in conjonction with ultrasonic agitation. Among the reagents used, only oxalic acid is suitable for electrolytic decontamination. Among the reagents possible for decontamination of the Isar specimens (ferritic steel lined with hematite) halogenous acid in mixture without or with oxygenated water, sulfuric acid, the formic acid/formaldehyde mixture are chosen. Metal erosion with high pressure jet as well as the decontamination efficiency on parts lined with hematite have made possible to determine the best conditions. 33 figs, 29 refs

  15. Evaluation of chemical surface treatment methods for mitigation of PWSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dame, C.; Marks, C.; Olender, A.; Farias, J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of its mission to propose innovative and safe technologies to mitigate Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), EPRI recently initiated a program to evaluate potential new chemical surface treatments that might delay the occurrence of PWSCC such that no failure of components would be observed during their lifetime. Among the initial screening of more than thirty technologies, seven were selected for a more detailed review. The selected technologies were: nickel and nickel alloy plating, organic inhibitors, chromium-based inhibitors, silicon carbide, titanium-based inhibitors, rare earth metal (REM)-based inhibitors and encapsulation. The conclusions of the review of these technologies were that two of them were worth pursuing, titanium-based and REM-based inhibitors, and that evaluating the radiological consequences of injecting these products in the primary system, as well as assessing their efficacy to mitigate PWSCC, should be prioritized as the next required steps in qualification for implementation. (authors)

  16. Cleaning the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegmann, R.

    1993-01-01

    Volume 6 of the Hamburg Reports contains contributions from scientists from the Special Research Field 188 'Cleaning up Contaminated Soils' of the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg and the University of Hamburg and of experts from science and from the practical field. The soil science and analytical aspects of the biological and chemical/physical treatment processes are shown and open questions specific to processes are dealt with. Scientific results are compared with practical experience here. The evaluation of treated soils for reuse in the environment is a very important question, which is explained in the first articles here. Examples of case studies are shown in the last part of the volume. (orig.) [de

  17. Tests of an environmental and personnel safe cleaning process for BNL accelerator and storage ring components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Lee, R.; Mitchell, G.; Quade, W.

    1996-10-01

    A large measure of the successful operation of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for over a decade can be attributed to the cleaning of its UHV components during and after construction. A new UHV cleaning process, which had to be environmentally and personnel safe, was needed to replace the harsh, unfriendly process which was still in use. Dow Advanced Cleaning Systems was contracted to develop a replacement process without the use of harsh chemicals and which must clean vacuum surfaces as well as the existing process. Acceptance of the replacement process was primarily based on Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) measurements of beam tube samples run on NSLS beam line U10B. One meter long beam tube samples were fabricated from aluminum, 304 stainless steel and oxygen free copper. Initially, coupon samples were cleaned and passed preliminary testing for the proposed process. Next, beam tube samples of each material were cleaned, and the PSD measured on beam line U10B using white light with a critical energy of 487 ev. Prior to cleaning, the samples were contaminated with a mixture of cutting oils, lubricants, vacuum oils and vacuum grease. The contaminated samples were then baked. Samples of each material were also cleaned with the existing process after the same preparation. Beam tube samples were exposed to between 10 22 and 10 23 photons per meter for a PSD measurement. Desorption yields for H 2 , CO, CO 2 , CH 4 and H 2 O are reported for both the existing cleaning and for the replacement cleaning process. Preliminary data, residual gas scans, and PSD results are given and discussed. The new process is also compared with new cleaning methods developed in other laboratories

  18. Determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using an alternative wet chemical method free of mercury and dichromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Marit; Bahadir, Müfit; Teichgräber, Burkhard

    2017-10-01

    Worldwide, the standard methods for the determination of the important wastewater parameter chemical oxygen demand (COD) are still based on the use of the hazardous chemicals, mercury sulfate and chromium(VI). However, due to their properties they are meanwhile classified as "priority pollutants" and shall be phased out or banned in the frame of REACH (current European Chemical Law: Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals) by the European Union. Hence, a new wet-chemical method free of mercury and chromium(VI) was developed. Manganese(III) was used as oxidant and silver nitrate for the removal of chloride ions. The quantification was performed by back titration of manganese(III) with iron(II) as done in the standard method. In order to minimize losses of organic substances during the precipitation of silver chloride, suspended and colloid organic matter had to be separated by precipitation of aluminum hydroxide in a first step. In these cases, two fractions, one of the suspended and colloid matters and a second of the dissolved organic substances, are prepared and oxidized separately. The method was tested with potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) as conventional COD reference substance and different types of wastewater samples. The oxidation of KHP was reproducible in a COD range of 20-500 mg/L with a mean recovery rate of 88.7% in comparison to the standard COD method (DIN 38409-41). Also in presence of 1000 mg/L chloride a recovery rate of 84.1% was reached. For a series of industrial and municipal wastewater samples a high correlation (R 2  = 0.9935) to the standard method with a mean recovery rate of 78.1% (±5.2%) was determined. Even though the results of the new method are not 100% of the standard method, its high correlation to the standard method and reproducibility offers an environmentally benign alternative method with no need to purchase new laboratory equipment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of the Analytical Method Using HPLC with Fluorescence Detection to Determine Selected Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Clean Water Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Alonso, S.; Perez Pastor, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the comparison and evaluation of 3 miniaturized extraction methods for the determination of selected PACs in clear waters is presented. Three types of liquid-liquid extraction were used for chromatographic analysis by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The main objective was the optimization and development of simple, rapid and low cost methods, minimizing the use of extracting solvent volume. The work also includes a study on the scope of the methods developed at low and high levels of concentration and intermediate precision. (Author)

  20. Toxicity assessment of chemical contaminants;transition from in vitromethods to novel in vitro methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Farshad

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to occupational and environmental contaminants is a major contributor to human health problems. Despite significant achievements in the risk assessment of chemicals, the toxicological database, particularly for industrial chemicals, remains limited. Considering there areapproximately 80, 000 chemicals in commerce, and an extremely large number of chemical mixtures, in vivo testing of this large number is unachievable from ethical, economical and scientific perspectives. Therefore, increasing the number of available industrial chemicals andnew products has created a demand for alternatives to animal methods for better safety evaluation. Recent toxicity studies have demonstrated that in vitro methods are capable of rapidly providing toxicity information. In this review, current toxicity test methods for risk evaluation of industrial chemical contaminants are presented. To evaluate the potential applications of  more recent test methods developed for toxicity testing of chemical contaminants are discussed. Although  to be considered more broadly for risk assessment of human chemical exposures. In vitro methods,in vitro toxicology methods cannot exactly mimic the biodynamics of the whole body, in vitro  relationships (QSARs and physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK models have a potentialtest systems in combination with the knowledge of quantitative structure activity.

  1. Monitoring a chemical plume remediation via the radio imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCorkle, R.W.; Spence, T.; Linder, K.E.; Betsill, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present the results of a site characterization, monitoring, and remediation effort at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The primary objective of the study is to determine the feasibility of using the Radio Imaging Method (RIM) to solve a near-surface waste site characterization problem. The goals are to demonstrate the method during the site characterization phase, then continue with an in-situ monitoring and analysis of the remediation process

  2. Perovskite type nanopowders and thin films obtained by chemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Fruth

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the contribution of the authors, to the preparation of two types of perovskites, namely BiFeO3 and LaCoO3, by innovative methods. The studied perovskites were obtained as powders, films and sintered bodies. Their complex structural and morphological characterization is also presented. The obtained results have underlined the important influence of the method of preparation on the properties of the synthesized perovskites.

  3. A New Pseudoinverse Matrix Method For Balancing Chemical Equations And Their Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risteski, Ice B.

    2008-01-01

    In this work is given a new pseudoniverse matrix method for balancing chemical equations. Here offered method is founded on virtue of the solution of a Diophantine matrix equation by using of a Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse matrix. The method has been tested on several typical chemical equations and found to be very successful for the all equations in our extensive balancing research. This method, which works successfully without any limitations, also has the capability to determine the feasibility of a new chemical reaction, and if it is feasible, then it will balance the equation. Chemical equations treated here possess atoms with fractional oxidation numbers. Also, in the present work are introduced necessary and sufficient criteria for stability of chemical equations over stability of their extended matrices

  4. Deciding which chemical mixtures risk assessment methods work best for what mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuschler, Linda K.

    2007-01-01

    The most commonly used chemical mixtures risk assessment methods involve simple notions of additivity and toxicological similarity. Newer methods are emerging in response to the complexities of chemical mixture exposures and effects. Factors based on both science and policy drive decisions regarding whether to conduct a chemical mixtures risk assessment and, if so, which methods to employ. Scientific considerations are based on positive evidence of joint toxic action, elevated human exposure conditions or the potential for significant impacts on human health. Policy issues include legislative drivers that may mandate action even though adequate toxicity data on a specific mixture may not be available and risk assessment goals that impact the choice of risk assessment method to obtain the amount of health protection desired. This paper discusses three important concepts used to choose among available approaches for conducting a chemical mixtures risk assessment: (1) additive joint toxic action of mixture components; (2) toxicological interactions of mixture components; and (3) chemical composition of complex mixtures. It is proposed that scientific support for basic assumptions used in chemical mixtures risk assessment should be developed by expert panels, risk assessment methods experts, and laboratory toxicologists. This is imperative to further develop and refine quantitative methods and provide guidance on their appropriate applications. Risk assessors need scientific support for chemical mixtures risk assessment methods in the form of toxicological data on joint toxic action for high priority mixtures, statistical methods for analyzing dose-response for mixtures, and toxicological and statistical criteria for determining sufficient similarity of complex mixtures

  5. [Bioinorganic chemical composition of the lens and methods of its investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, S E; Novikov, I A; Pakhomova, N A; Motalov, V G

    2018-01-01

    Bioinorganic chemical composition of the lens of human and experimental animals (cows, dogs, rats, rabbits) have been analyzed in various studies. In most cases, the studies employed different methods to determine the gross (total) composition of chemical elements and their concentrations in the examined samples. Less frequently, they included an assessment of the distribution of chemical elements in the lens and correlation of their concentration with its morphological changes. Chemical elements from all groups (series) of the periodic classification system were discovered in the lens substance. Despite similar investigation methods, different authors obtained contradicting results on the chemical composition of the lens. This article presents data suggesting possible correlation between inorganic chemical elements in the lens substance with the development and formation of lenticular opacities. All currently employed methods are known to only analyze limited number of select chemical elements in the tissues and do not consider the whole range of elements that can be analyzed with existing technology; furthermore, the majority of studies are conducted on the animal model lens. Therefore, it is feasible to continue the development of the chemical microanalysis method by increasing the sensitivity of Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) with the purpose of assessing the gross chemical composition and distribution of the elements in the lens substance, as well as revealing possible correlation between element concentration and morphological changes in the lens.

  6. Detailed balance method for chemical potential determination in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, P.J.; Ray, J.R.; Wolf, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new, nondestructive, method for determining chemical potentials in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The method estimates a value for the chemical potential such that one has a balance between fictitious successful creation and destruction trials in which the Monte Carlo method is used to determine success or failure of the creation/destruction attempts; we thus call the method a detailed balance method. The method allows one to obtain estimates of the chemical potential for a given species in any closed ensemble simulation; the closed ensemble is paired with a ''natural'' open ensemble for the purpose of obtaining creation and destruction probabilities. We present results for the Lennard-Jones system and also for an embedded atom model of liquid palladium, and compare to previous results in the literature for these two systems. We are able to obtain an accurate estimate of the chemical potential for the Lennard-Jones system at higher densities than reported in the literature

  7. Advances in telescope mirror cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanken, Maarten F.; Chopping, Alan K.; Dee, Kevin M.

    2004-09-01

    Metrology and cleaning techniques for telescope mirrors are generally well established. CO2 cleaning and water washing are mainly used. Water washing has proven to be the best method of removing oil and water stains and restoring the aluminium to nearly fresh values. The risk of water getting to unwanted places such as electronics or other optics prevents this method from being employed more often. Recently the Isaac Newton Group introduced a new cleaning technique for their telescope mirrors, which reduces the risks discussed above. This technique uses water vapour instead of water to wash the mirror. The advantage of this method is that the amount of water needed is drastically reduced. In addition the pressure of the vapour will blow away any large dust particles on the mirror and the temperature shock between the vapour and the mirror will help to de-bond the dust particles. Adding a soapy solution will help to clean oil and watermarks of the mirror. This paper describes the vapour cleaning method, tests that have been done and the overall findings.

  8. Emerging forward osmosis (FO) technologies and challenges ahead for clean water and clean energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Tai-Shung

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this short review is to share our understanding and perspectives with the chemical, environmental, water and osmotic power communities on FO processes in order to conduct meaningful R & D and develop effective and sustainable FO technologies for clean water and clean energy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emerging forward osmosis (FO) technologies and challenges ahead for clean water and clean energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Tai-Shung; Li, Xue; Ong, Rui Chin; Ge, Qingchun; Wang, Honglei; Han, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this short review is to share our understanding and perspectives with the chemical, environmental, water and osmotic power communities on FO processes in order to conduct meaningful R & D and develop effective and sustainable FO technologies for clean water and clean energy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Virtual screening methods as tools for drug lead discovery from large chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X H; Zhu, F; Liu, X; Shi, Z; Zhang, J X; Yang, S Y; Wei, Y Q; Chen, Y Z

    2012-01-01

    Virtual screening methods have been developed and explored as useful tools for searching drug lead compounds from chemical libraries, including large libraries that have become publically available. In this review, we discussed the new developments in exploring virtual screening methods for enhanced performance in searching large chemical libraries, their applications in screening libraries of ~ 1 million or more compounds in the last five years, the difficulties in their applications, and the strategies for further improving these methods.

  11. An Energy Efficiency Evaluation Method Based on Energy Baseline for Chemical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Dong-mei; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Ke-feng; Zou, Tao; Wang, Dong; Qian, Xin-hua

    2016-01-01

    According to the requirements and structure of ISO 50001 energy management system, this study proposes an energy efficiency evaluation method based on energy baseline for chemical industry. Using this method, the energy plan implementation effect in the processes of chemical production can be evaluated quantitatively, and evidences for system fault diagnosis can be provided. This method establishes the energy baseline models which can meet the demand of the different kinds of production proce...

  12. Evaluation of the effect of coal cleaning of fugitive elements. Part II. Analytical methods. Final report, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosshart, R.E.; Price, A.A.; Ford, C.T.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains the analytical and test methods which were used routinely at Bituminous Coal Research, Inc. during the project. The procedures contained herein should aid coal industry laboratories and others, including commercial laboratories, who might be required to determine trace elements in coal. Some of the procedures have been presented in previous BCR reports; however, this report includes additional procedures which are described in greater detail. Also presented are many as the more basic coal methods which have been in use at BCR for many years, or which have been adapted or refined from other standard reference sources for coal and water. The basis for choosing specific analytical procedures for trace elements in coal is somewhat complex. At BCR, atomic absorption was selected as the basic method in the development of these procedures. The choice was based on sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, practicability, and economy. Whenever possible, the methods developed had to be both adequate and amenable for use by coal industry laboratories by virtue of relative simplicity and cost. This is not to imply that the methods described are simple or inexpensive; however, atomic abosrption techniques do meet these criteria in relation to more complex and costly methods such as neutron activation, mass spectrometry, and x-ray fluorescence, some of which require highly specialized personnel as well as access to sophisticated nuclear and computational facilities. Many of the analytical procedures for trace elements in coal have been developed or adapted specifically for the BCR studies. Their presentation is the principal purpose of this report.

  13. An effective and low cost carbon based clean-up method for PCDD/Fs and PCBs analysis in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedikoglou, Kleopatra; Costopoulou, Danae; Vassiliadou, Irene; Bakeas, Evangelos; Leondiadis, Leondios

    2018-09-01

    Sample preparation is of critical importance in dioxin analysis of food and feed samples. It is a complex procedure that includes lipid extraction followed by the application of chromatographic separation techniques, aiming in removing undesirable interferences from the matrix. The separation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is achieved by carbon-based materials which should have high fat capacity in order to be suitable for lipid-containing matrices. Automated methods are available but due to high cost and use of high amounts of solvents, manual methods are also applied. An active carbon material (Carbosphere) with high fat capacity that has been used in the past for manual methods is no longer commercially available. The present study assesses an alternative active carbon material, FU 4652, that can be used for the separation of PCDD/Fs and non-ortho PCBs. Mono-ortho and 6 non-dioxin-like PCBs are also analyzed. The method was validated according to the analytical criteria set in EU regulations 589/2014 and 709/2014. Control samples analyzed for the evaluation of the above material were olive oil reference samples spiked with PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs at two concentration levels. The new method was tested successfully on food samples of interlaboratory trials organized in previous years. Farmed fish samples collected within national surveillance programs for the years 2016-2017 were analyzed with the method developed. The results obtained indicate that the FU 4652 carbon sorbent has high fat capacity and is capable of separating congeners with good recoveries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrochemical cleaning of Sv-08G2S wire surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, E.I.; Degtyarev, V.G.; Novikov, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    Results of industrial tests of the Sv-08G2S wire with different state of surface fwith technological lubrication, after mechanical cleaning, with electrochemically cleaned surface) are presented. Advantages of welding-technological properties of the wire with electroe chemically cleaned surface are shown. An operation principle of the electrochemical cleaning facility is described. A brief specf ification f of the facility is given [ru

  15. Reduction in Acidity by Chemical and Microbiological Methods and Their Effect on Moslavac Wine Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Herjavec, Stanka; Majdak, Ana; Tupajić, Pavica; Redžepović, Sulejman; Orlić, Sandi

    2003-01-01

    Changes in chemical composition and sensory properties caused by chemical and microbiological methods of deacidification in Moslavac (syn. Furmint) wines were investigated. Alcoholic fermentation of Moslavac musts was carried out with two different strains of the yeasts Saccharomyces paradoxus. There were no marked differences in chemical composition among the wines. Compared to the control microbiological deacidification of wines by Oenococcus oeni resulted in a complete decomposition of mal...

  16. Destruction and waste treatment methods used in a chemical agent disposal project. Memorandum report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAndless, J.; Fedor, V.; Kinderwater, T.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the equipment and methods used to thermally decontaminate scrap metal and destroy stockpiles of nerve agents, mustard and lewisite chemical warfare agents. Mustard was destroyed by direct incineration whereas the nerve agents and lewisite were chemically neutralized. The arsenic waste from the lewisite neutralization process was chemically-fixated in concrete for final disposal by landfilling. The scrap metal was incinerated and rendered suitable for recycling into metal feedstock.

  17. Laboratory studies of 235U enrichment by chemical separation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daloisi, P.J.; Orlett, M.J.; Tracy, J.W.; Saraceno, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on 235 U enrichment processes based on column redox ion exchange, electrodialysis, and gas exchange chromatography performed from August 1972 to September 1974 are summarized. Effluent from a 50 to 50 weight mixture of U +4 and U +6 (as UO 2 2+ ), at a total uranium concentration of 5 mg U per ml in 0.25N H 2 SO 4 -0.03N NaF solution, passing through a 100 cm length cation exchange column at 0.5 ml/min flow rates, was enriched in 235 U by 1.00090 +- .00012. The enriched fraction was mostly in the +6 valence form while the depleted fraction was U +4 retained on the resin. At flow rates of 2 ml/min, the enrichment factor decreases to 1.00033 +- .00003. In the electrodialysis experiments, the fraction of uranium diffusing through the membranes (mostly as +6 valence state) in 4.2 hours is enriched in 235 U by 1.00096 +- .00012. Gas exchange chromatography tests involved dynamic and static exposure of UF 6 over NaF. In dynamic tests, no significant change in isotopic abundance occurred in the initial one-half weight cut of UF 6 . The measured relative 235 U/ 238 U mole ratios were 1.00004 +- .00004 for these runs. In static runs, enrichment became evident. For the NaF(UF 6 )/sub x/-UF 6 system, there is 235 U depletion in the gas phase, with a single-stage factor of 1.00033 at 100 0 C and 1.00025 at 25 0 C after 10 days of equilibration. The single-stage or unit holdup time is impractically long for all three chemical processes

  18. Physico-chemical properties of manufactured nanomaterials - Characterisation and relevant methods. An outlook based on the OECD Testing Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten; Rauscher, Hubert; Mech, Agnieszka; Riego Sintes, Juan; Gilliland, Douglas; González, Mar; Kearns, Peter; Moss, Kenneth; Visser, Maaike; Groenewold, Monique; Bleeker, Eric A J

    Identifying and characterising nanomaterials require additional information on physico-chemical properties and test methods, compared to chemicals in general. Furthermore, regulatory decisions for chemicals are usually based upon certain toxicological properties, and these effects may not be

  19. Apparatus and method for solid fuel chemical looping combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Weber, Justin M

    2015-04-14

    The disclosure provides an apparatus and method utilizing fuel reactor comprised of a fuel section, an oxygen carrier section, and a porous divider separating the fuel section and the oxygen carrier section. The porous divider allows fluid communication between the fuel section and the oxygen carrier section while preventing the migration of solids of a particular size. Maintaining particle segregation between the oxygen carrier section and the fuel section during solid fuel gasification and combustion processes allows gases generated in either section to participate in necessary reactions while greatly mitigating issues associated with mixture of the oxygen carrier with char or ash products. The apparatus and method may be utilized with an oxygen uncoupling oxygen carrier such as CuO, Mn.sub.3O.sub.4, or Co.sub.3O.sub.4, or utilized with a CO/H.sub.2 reducing oxygen carrier such as Fe.sub.2O.sub.3.

  20. EFFECTS OF EXTRACTION METHODS ON PHYSICO-CHEMICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative density value ranged from 0.9 to 0.92 at 29°C (room temperature). Both oil samples were in liquid state at room temperature and boiling points varied from 94°C-to 98°C for solvent extracted oil and hydraulic press oil respectively. The results showed thatJhe method ofextraction imposed significant changes on ...

  1. Methods for chemical analysis of water and wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This manual provides test procedures approved for the monitoring of water supplies, waste discharges, and ambient waters, under the Safe Drinking Water Act, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, and Ambient Monitoring Requirements of Section 106 and 208 of Public Law 92-500. The test methods have been selected to meet the needs of federal legislation and to provide guidance to laboratories engaged in the protection of human health and the aquatic environment.

  2. Clean Hands Count

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on May ... 34 How The Clean Hands - Safe Hands System Works - Duration: 3:38. Clean Hands-Safe Hands 5, ...

  3. Recycling of poly(ethylene terephthalate – A review focusing on chemical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Geyer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET is of crucial importance, since worldwide amounts of PETwaste increase rapidly due to its widespread applications. Hence, several methods have been developed, like energetic, material, thermo-mechanical and chemical recycling of PET. Most frequently, PET-waste is incinerated for energy recovery, used as additive in concrete composites or glycolysed to yield mixtures of monomers and undefined oligomers. While energetic and thermo-mechanical recycling entail downcycling of the material, chemical recycling requires considerable amounts of chemicals and demanding processing steps entailing toxic and ecological issues. This review provides a thorough survey of PET-recycling including energetic, material, thermo-mechanical and chemical methods. It focuses on chemical methods describing important reaction parameters and yields of obtained reaction products. While most methods yield monomers, only a few yield undefined low molecular weight oligomers for impaired applications (dispersants or plasticizers. Further, the present work presents an alternative chemical recycling method of PET in comparison to existing chemical methods.

  4. A LITERATURE REVIEW OF WIPE SAMPLING METHODS FOR CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipe sampling is an important technique for the estimation of contaminant deposition in buildings, homes, or outdoor surfaces as a source of possible human exposure. Numerousmethods of wipe sampling exist, and each method has its own specification for the type of wipe, we...

  5. A clean method for solvent-free nitration of toluene over sulfated titania promoted by ceria catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Ma, Hongzhu; Wang, Bo

    2009-08-15

    A mild simple method for nitration of aromatic compounds, various solid acids as catalysts, the air treated with the corona discharge generator as nitrating agent, the liquid-phase nitration of toluene, at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure without solvent has been investigated. The results show that SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) (ST) and SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) doped with CeO(2) (STC) catalysts displayed good nitration activity in the experiments. It is an attractive method for the environmentally friendly synthesis of nitroaromatic compounds. Moreover, only mononitrotoluenes were detected in the products, and the ratio of para-nitrotoluene and ortho-nitrotoluene was approximately 1:1 with various catalysts. A maximum yield of about 11.4% was achieved for mononitrotoluenes in STC reaction system in 3h.

  6. Determination of Anthracycline Drug Residual in Cleaning Validation Swabs of Stainless-Steel Equipment after Production of Cytostatic Injections Using HPLC Analytical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Slivová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard cleaning procedures of production line equipment were verified after manufacture of cytostatic injections containing Anthracycline derivate substance. Residual content of Anthracycline drug substance on stainless-steel equipment surface was determined using swab sampling with a specific HPLC-DAD analysis. The acceptance limit was decided as 200.0 μg/100 cm2. Recovery from the stainless-steel surface was 90.1%. Linearity of the method was observed in the concentration range of 0.155–194 μg/mL when estimated using Zorbax TMS (5 μm, 0.25 m × 4.6 mm ID column at 1.3 mL/min flow rate and 254 nm (DAD 190–600 nm. The mobile phase consisted of lauryl hydrogen sulphate solution (3.7 g/L : methanol : acetonitrile (54 : 16 : 30, v/v/v with pH adjusted to 2.5 using phosphoric acid (85%. The LOD and LOQ for Anthracycline derivate were found to be 0.047 and 0.155 μg/mL, respectively. The method validation confirmed the method provides acceptable degree of selectivity, linearity, accuracy, and precision for the intended purposes.

  7. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of

  8. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  9. Quality control of chemical heat treatment by the fractography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamarina, A.M.; Parygin, V.A.; Karpov, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    A fractographic investigation is carried out of fracture of a nitrided layer of 38KhMYuA steel and of cemented and cyanided layers of 12KhM3A steel. It is established that a fracture of the nitrided layer consists of three zones of crystalline facets: 1) a surface zone of fine crystalline facets located in a single plane and having the appearance of a white band (Σ-phase zone); 2) zone of acicular facets whose presence is due to the break-down of the carbonitride phase; 3) zone of large facets of boundary breakdown. The fractures of cemented and cyanided samples consist of multiple fine facets of multi-face shapes. It has been found that the depth and the microstructure of a diffusion layer in steel after chemothermal processing can be most rapidly and objectively evaluated by the fractographic method

  10. Cleaning results of new and fouled nanofiltration membrane characterized by contact angle, updated DSPM, flux and salts rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Amoudi, Ahmed; Williams, Paul; Al-Hobaib, A.S.; Lovitt, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    In membrane process industries, membrane cleaning is one of the most important concerns from both economical and scientific points of view. Though cleaning is important to recover membrane performance, an inappropriate selection of cleaning agents may result into unsatisfactory cleaning or irreparable membrane. In this study the cleaning performance has been studied with measurements of membrane contact angle, Updated Donnan steric partitioning pore model (UDSPM) and salt rejection as well as flux measurement. Thin film nanofiltration (NF) membranes such as DK, HL and DL provided by GE Osmonics are used in this study. Tests were carried out with virgin DK, HL and DL as well as fouled DK membranes. Several cleaning agents were investigated; some of them were analytical grade such as HCl, NaOH and others such as SDS, mix agents were commercial grade agents that are already in use in commercial plants. Contact angle, DSPM and salt rejection as well as flux of virgin and fouled membranes before and after chemical cleaning were measured and compared. The contact angle measurements with and without chemical cleaning of different virgin and fouled membranes revealed very interesting results which may be used to characterise the membrane surface cleanliness. The contact angle results revealed that the cleaning agents are found to modify membrane surface properties (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of the treated and untreated virgin and fouled membranes. The details of these results were also investigated and are reported in the paper. However, UDSPM method did not give any valuable information about pore size of the untreated and treated NF membranes. The salt rejection level of monovalent and divalent ions before and after cleaning by high and low pH cleaning agents is also investigated and is reported in the paper

  11. Cleaning results of new and fouled nanofiltration membrane characterized by contact angle, updated DSPM, flux and salts rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Amoudi, Ahmed [Centre for complex fluids processing, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, School of Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom) and Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC), Saline Water Desalination Research Institute Staff (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: 310981@swan.ac.uk; Williams, Paul [Centre for complex fluids processing, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, School of Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Al-Hobaib, A.S. [Institute of Atomic Energy Research, King Abdulaziz City for Science And Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Lovitt, Robert W. [Centre for complex fluids processing, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, School of Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-30

    In membrane process industries, membrane cleaning is one of the most important concerns from both economical and scientific points of view. Though cleaning is important to recover membrane performance, an inappropriate selection of cleaning agents may result into unsatisfactory cleaning or irreparable membrane. In this study the cleaning performance has been studied with measurements of membrane contact angle, Updated Donnan steric partitioning pore model (UDSPM) and salt rejection as well as flux measurement. Thin film nanofiltration (NF) membranes such as DK, HL and DL provided by GE Osmonics are used in this study. Tests were carried out with virgin DK, HL and DL as well as fouled DK membranes. Several cleaning agents were investigated; some of them were analytical grade such as HCl, NaOH and others such as SDS, mix agents were commercial grade agents that are already in use in commercial plants. Contact angle, DSPM and salt rejection as well as flux of virgin and fouled membranes before and after chemical cleaning were measured and compared. The contact angle measurements with and without chemical cleaning of different virgin and fouled membranes revealed very interesting results which may be used to characterise the membrane surface cleanliness. The contact angle results revealed that the cleaning agents are found to modify membrane surface properties (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of the treated and untreated virgin and fouled membranes. The details of these results were also investigated and are reported in the paper. However, UDSPM method did not give any valuable information about pore size of the untreated and treated NF membranes. The salt rejection level of monovalent and divalent ions before and after cleaning by high and low pH cleaning agents is also investigated and is reported in the paper.

  12. [Research on determination of chemical purity of andrographolide by coulometric titration method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Yang, Dezhi; Xu, Lishen; Lv, Yang

    2010-04-01

    The determination of chemical purity of andrographolide by coulometric titration method is studied in this paper. The coulometric titration was carried out in a mixture composed of 4 mol x L(-1) hydrochloric acid and 1 mol x L(-1) potassium bromide solution and 1 mol x L(-1) potassium nitrate solution (1:1). Bromine is electrogenerated at the anode and reacts with the andrographolide. The number of electrons involved in the eleatrode reaction is 2. Purity of andrographolide is 99.76% compared with 99.77% utilizing area normalization method by HPLC. The RSD are 0.33% and 0.02% respectively. The results from two methods are consistent, so the determination of chemical purity of andrographolide by coulometric titration method is scientific and feasible. The method is rapid, simple, convenient, sensitive and accurate. The reference material is not essential in the method. The method is suitable for determination of chemical purity of andrographolide.

  13. Fluorine- and iron-modified hierarchical anatase microsphere photocatalyst for water cleaning: facile wet chemical synthesis and wavelength-sensitive photocatalytic reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaohong; Sun, Xudong; Li, Ji-Guang; Li, Xiaodong; Xiu, Zhimeng; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2010-03-16

    High photocatalytic efficiency, easy recovery, and no biological toxicity are three key properties related to the practical application of anatase photocatalyst in water cleaning, but seem to be incompatible. Nanoparticles-constructed hierarchical anatase microspheres with high crystallinity and good dispersion prepared in this study via one-step solution processing at 90 degrees C under atmospheric pressure by using ammonium fluotitanate as the titanium source and urea as the precipitant can reconcile these three requirements. The hierarchical microspheres were found to grow via an aggregative mechanism, and contact recrystallization occurred at high additions of the FeCl(3) electrolyte into the reaction system. Simultaneous incorporation of fluorine and iron into the TiO(2) matrix was confirmed by combined analysis of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Surface structure and morphology changes of the microspheres induced by high-temperature annealing were clearly observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, especially for the phase-transformed particles. The original nanoparticles-constructed rough surfaces partially became smooth, resulting in a sharp drop in photocatalytic efficiency. Interestingly, iron loading has detrimental effects on the visible-light photocatalytic activity of both the as-prepared and the postannealed anatase microspheres but greatly enhances the photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared anatase microspheres under UV irradiation. No matter under UV or visible-light irradiation, the fluorine-loaded anatase microspheres and especially the postannealed ones show excellent photocatalytic performance. The underlying mechanism of fluorine and iron loading on the photocatalytic efficacy of the anatase microspheres was discussed in detail. Beyond photocatalytic applications, this kind of material is of great importance to the assembling of

  14. Canyon solvent cleaning with activated alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents recent work at SRL concerning the cleaning of solvent extraction solvent used at SRP. The paper explains why we undertook the work, and some laboratory studies on two approaches to solvent cleaning, namely extended carbonate washing and use of solid adsorbents. The paper then discusses scale-up of the preferred method and the results of the full-scale cleaning. 19 figs

  15. Progress in the development and application of methods for cleaning and decontamination of components exposed to sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msika, D.; Lafon, A.

    1978-01-01

    In the technology of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, the necessary processes for washing and decontamination have been demonstrated. For sodium removal, different solutions have been considered and tested in France. The studies have been progressively oriented toward defining a process using a fine dispersion of water in a gas (atomization). The results obtained by that method on non-radioactive components were satisfactory insofar as the efficiency and safety of the operation was concerned. The purpose of decontaminating components from the reactor primary circuits is to reduce the level of surface activity to a level compatible with personnel access without biological shielding. The treatment Is comprised of two stages: (i) washing, to remove any residual sodium, and (ii) decontamination which alternately applies alkaline and acid solutions, to dissolve the deposited radionuclides without significant attack on the surface. The treatment, recently applied to components from in-service reactors, generally met the design objective. (author)

  16. Gas turbine cleaning upgrade (compressor wash)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, P. [Gas Turbine Efficiency, Jarfalla (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The influence of gas turbine degradation on operating costs is high. Gas turbine cleaning is one of many actions taken for power recovery and is to consider as preventive maintenance. It is generally performed within the industrial field and occasionally within the aero sector. In order to meet the gas turbine development win high blade loads and ever-increasing temperatures, together with emission Aces and environmental regulations, more efficient and careful cleaning methods are needed. Following a survey about potentials for cost reduction in gas turbine operation a new man-hour and water saving cleaning method has been evaluated for a standard process. Compared with traditional cleaning methods, the new method is water,- cost,- weight and space saving due to a new washing technique. Traditional methods are based on using different nozzles for ON and OFF-line cleaning, which rise the demand for complicated systems. In the new method the same nozzle installation, same liquid flow and pressure is used for both ON and OFF-line cleaning. This gives a cost reduction of appr. 20.000 - 30.000 USD per gas turbine depending on installation and size. Evaluation of the new method shows significantly improved ON -line cleaning performance and thus OFF -line cleaning is required only during scheduled stops. (orig.) 10 refs.

  17. Gas turbine cleaning upgrade (compressor wash)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, P [Gas Turbine Efficiency, Jarfalla (Sweden)

    1999-12-31

    The influence of gas turbine degradation on operating costs is high. Gas turbine cleaning is one of many actions taken for power recovery and is to consider as preventive maintenance. It is generally performed within the industrial field and occasionally within the aero sector. In order to meet the gas turbine development win high blade loads and ever-increasing temperatures, together with emission Aces and environmental regulations, more efficient and careful cleaning methods are needed. Following a survey about potentials for cost reduction in gas turbine operation a new man-hour and water saving cleaning method has been evaluated for a standard process. Compared with traditional cleaning methods, the new method is water,- cost,- weight and space saving due to a new washing technique. Traditional methods are based on using different nozzles for ON and OFF-line cleaning, which rise the demand for complicated systems. In the new method the same nozzle installation, same liquid flow and pressure is used for both ON and OFF-line cleaning. This gives a cost reduction of appr. 20.000 - 30.000 USD per gas turbine depending on installation and size. Evaluation of the new method shows significantly improved ON -line cleaning performance and thus OFF -line cleaning is required only during scheduled stops. (orig.) 10 refs.

  18. DRES Database of Methods for the Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Agostino, Paul

    1997-01-01

    .... Update of the database continues as an ongoing effort and the DRES Database of Methods for the Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents is available panel in hardcopy form or as a softcopy Procite or Wordperfect file...

  19. A comparison of the microstructures and electrochemical capacitive properties of 2 graphenes prepared by arc discharge method and chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.; Yang, Y. [Research Inst. of Chemical Defense, Beijing (China); Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Cao, G.; Xu, B. [Research Inst. of Chemical Defense, Beijing (China)

    2010-07-01

    In this study, 2 kinds of graphene materials were prepared using both arc discharge and chemical methods. The pore structures and electrochemical capacitive properties of the materials were investigated. A mesopore structure was obtained for the graphene prepared using the arc discharge method, with a capacitance of 12.9 F/g and a high rate capability when used in electrochemical applications. The graphene prepared with the chemical method demonstrated a more highly developed micropore structure and capacitances greater than 70 F/g. However, rate performance for the graphene was normal. 2 figs.

  20. Acid leaching of coal: to produce clean fuels from Turkish lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seferinoglu, Meryem [Mineral Research and Exploration Directorate (Turkey)], email: meryem_seferinoglu66@yahoo.com; Duzenli, Derya [Ankara Central Laboratory (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing concerns about the environment, energy producers and governments are looking at developing clean energy sources. However, Turkey has limited clean energy resources and is using low grade coal which has high sulphur content as an alternative energy source. The aim of this paper is to study the possibility of generating clean fuel from Edirne Lignite and to get a better understanding of chemical mechanisms involved in coal leaching with hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions. Leaching was conducted on Edirne Lignite with HF solution at ambient temperature and the effects of parameters such as reaction time and concentration of acid solutions on the process were evaluated. The optimum conditions were found and it was shown that ash levels can be reduced from 28.9% to 10.5% and the calorific value increased by 500kcal/kg with the HF leaching method. This study demonstrated that the production of clean fuel from high sulphur lignite is possible.