WorldWideScience

Sample records for chemical analyses electronic

  1. Chemical analysis of minerals in granitic rocks by electron probe micro analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yoshihiro

    1994-01-01

    The chemical compositions of minerals in a few granitic rocks were determined by electron probe micro analyser (EPMA). The accurate analytical data for standard feldspar groups were obtained by correcting the low analytical values of sodium and potassium that were arised from the damage in EPMA analysis. Using this method, feldspar groups and biotites in three granitic rocks gathered from Hiei, Hira and Kurama areas respectively, were analyzed. As the results, the local characteristics were observed in the kinds of feldspar groups and the chemical compositions of biotites that were contained in granitic rocks. (author)

  2. Analyser of sweeping electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strasser, A.

    1993-01-01

    The electron beam analyser has an array of conductors that can be positioned in the field of the sweeping beam, an electronic signal treatment system for the analysis of the signals generated in the conductors by the incident electrons and a display for the different characteristics of the electron beam

  3. Electron probe micro analyser chemical zircon ages of the Khetri granitoids, Rajasthan, India: records of widespread late palaeoproterozoic extension-related magmatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Parampreet; Chaudhri, Naveen; Biju-Sekhar, S.; Yokoyama, K.

    2006-01-01

    A number of granitoid plutons were emplaced in the northernmost entity of the Aravalli craton, the Khetri Copper Belt (KCB). We report here Th-U-Pb electron probe micro analyser chemical ages for zircon and monazite from two granitoid plutons of the north KCB, the Biharipur and Dabla. Zircons occurring in the granitoids depict well-developed magmatic zoning and are chronologically unzoned. Both the plutons and their diverse granitoid facies are coeval and provide ages around 1765-1710 Ma. Geochemical attributes of the studied plutons are typical of A-type within-plate granites and consistent with an extensional tectonic environment. Our new age data are comparable to the petrologically similar A-type granitoids of the Alwar region, which have provided zircon chemical ages around 1780-1710 Ma. These analogous ages imply a widespread late palaeoproterozoic extension-related plutonism in the northern part of the Aravalli craton. The monazites, which were recovered only from the mafic magmatic rocks of the Biharipur pluton, yielded an isochron age of 910 ±10 Ma, signifying an over- print of a younger neoproterozoic thermal event in the region. (author)

  4. Chemical evaluation of electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tianrong

    2014-05-01

    To review the available evidence evaluating the chemicals in refill solutions, cartridges, aerosols and environmental emissions of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Systematic literature searches were conducted to identify research related to e-cigarettes and chemistry using 5 reference databases and 11 search terms. The search date range was January 2007 to September 2013. The search yielded 36 articles, of which 29 were deemed relevant for analysis. The levels of nicotine, tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), aldehydes, metals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), flavours, solvent carriers and tobacco alkaloids in e-cigarette refill solutions, cartridges, aerosols and environmental emissions vary considerably. The delivery of nicotine and the release of TSNAs, aldehydes and metals are not consistent across products. Furthermore, the nicotine level listed on the labels of e-cigarette cartridges and refill solutions is often significantly different from measured values. Phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and drugs have also been reported in e-cigarette refill solutions, cartridges and aerosols. Varying results in particle size distributions of particular matter emissions from e-cigarettes across studies have been observed. Methods applied for the generation and chemical analyses of aerosols differ across studies. Performance characteristics of e-cigarette devices also vary across and within brands. Additional studies based on knowledge of e-cigarette user behaviours and scientifically validated aerosol generation and chemical analysis methods would be helpful in generating reliable measures of chemical quantities. This would allow comparisons of e-cigarette aerosol and traditional smoke constituent levels and would inform an evaluation of the toxicity potential of e-cigarettes.

  5. Chemical evaluation of electronic cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tianrong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the chemicals in refill solutions, cartridges, aerosols and environmental emissions of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted to identify research related to e-cigarettes and chemistry using 5 reference databases and 11 search terms. The search date range was January 2007 to September 2013. The search yielded 36 articles, of which 29 were deemed relevant for analysis. Results The levels of nicotine, tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), aldehydes, metals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), flavours, solvent carriers and tobacco alkaloids in e-cigarette refill solutions, cartridges, aerosols and environmental emissions vary considerably. The delivery of nicotine and the release of TSNAs, aldehydes and metals are not consistent across products. Furthermore, the nicotine level listed on the labels of e-cigarette cartridges and refill solutions is often significantly different from measured values. Phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and drugs have also been reported in e-cigarette refill solutions, cartridges and aerosols. Varying results in particle size distributions of particular matter emissions from e-cigarettes across studies have been observed. Methods applied for the generation and chemical analyses of aerosols differ across studies. Performance characteristics of e-cigarette devices also vary across and within brands. Conclusions Additional studies based on knowledge of e-cigarette user behaviours and scientifically validated aerosol generation and chemical analysis methods would be helpful in generating reliable measures of chemical quantities. This would allow comparisons of e-cigarette aerosol and traditional smoke constituent levels and would inform an evaluation of the toxicity potential of e-cigarettes. PMID:24732157

  6. Precise Chemical Analyses of Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, David; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Meyer, Charles; Trombka, Jacob; Freund, Friedemann; Economou, Thanasis; Yen, Albert; Kim, Soon Sam; Treiman, Allan H.; Blake, David; hide

    1996-01-01

    We identify the chemical elements and element ratios that should be analyzed to address many of the issues identified by the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). We determined that most of these issues require two sensitive instruments to analyze the necessary complement of elements. In addition, it is useful in many cases to use one instrument to analyze the outermost planetary surface (e.g. to determine weathering effects), while a second is used to analyze a subsurface volume of material (e.g., to determine the composition of unaltered planetary surface material). This dual approach to chemical analyses will also facilitate the calibration of orbital and/or Earth-based spectral observations of the planetary body. We determined that in many cases the scientific issues defined by COMPLEX can only be fully addressed with combined packages of instruments that would supplement the chemical data with mineralogic or visual information.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, F.; Repoux, L.; Ruste, J.; Grillon, F.; Robaut, F.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the related micro-analyses are involved in extremely various domains, from the academic environments to the industrial ones. The overall theoretical bases, the main technical characteristics, and some complements of information about practical usage and maintenance are developed in this book. high-vacuum and controlled-vacuum electron microscopes are thoroughly presented, as well as the last generation of EDS (energy dispersive spectrometer) and WDS (wavelength dispersive spectrometer) micro-analysers. Beside these main topics, other analysis or observation techniques are approached, such as EBSD (electron backscattering diffraction), 3-D imaging, FIB (focussed ion beams), Monte-Carlo simulations, in-situ tests etc.. This book, in French language, is the only one which treats of this subject in such an exhaustive way. It represents the actualized and totally updated version of a previous edition of 1979. It gathers the lectures given in 2006 at the summer school of Saint Martin d'Heres (France). Content: 1 - electron-matter interactions; 2 - characteristic X-radiation, Bremsstrahlung; 3 - electron guns in SEM; 4 - elements of electronic optics; 5 - vacuum techniques; 6 - detectors used in SEM; 7 - image formation and optimization in SEM; 7a - SEM practical instructions for use; 8 - controlled pressure microscopy; 8a - applications; 9 - energy selection X-spectrometers (energy dispersive spectrometers - EDS); 9a - EDS analysis; 9b - X-EDS mapping; 10 - technological aspects of WDS; 11 - processing of EDS and WDS spectra; 12 - X-microanalysis quantifying methods; 12a - quantitative WDS microanalysis of very light elements; 13 - statistics: precision and detection limits in microanalysis; 14 - analysis of stratified samples; 15 - crystallography applied to EBSD; 16 - EBSD: history, principle and applications; 16a - EBSD analysis; 17 - Monte Carlo simulation; 18 - insulating samples in SEM and X-ray microanalysis; 18a - insulating

  8. Chemical evaluation of electronic cigarettes

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Tianrong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the chemicals in refill solutions, cartridges, aerosols and environmental emissions of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted to identify research related to e-cigarettes and chemistry using 5 reference databases and 11 search terms. The search date range was January 2007 to September 2013. The search yielded 36 articles, of which 29 were deemed relevant for analysis. Results The levels ...

  9. Chemical information from Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of chemical information in Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data is reviewed with special emphasis on data from solid surface systems. Two strategies are most frequently used to extract this information: (i) measuring and analyzing energy (chemical) shifts in Auger peaks; and (ii) making use of the shapes of Auger signals to determine the chemical environment at the site of the initial core hole. Chemical shift data are primarily illustrated by highlighting the interaction of oxygen with solids; and analyses of these data based on core-level binding-energy shifts, relaxation, and hole--hole interactions are outlined and discussed. Auger transitions that involve valence electrons are usually those for which lineshapes are taken as indications of the local chemistry at the initial core-hole site. Attempts at extracting valence band density-of-states information from lineshapes are proving successful and this approach to the surface chemical information in AES is illustrated with the aid of examples dealing with the interaction of silicon with hydrogen and with oxygen. The use of the AES lineshapes simply as ''fingerprints'' of the core-hole-site chemistry is examined and illustrated by examples which include studies of silicon nitride properties, of solid surface properties related to catalytic reactions, and of passive films on iron. Auger decay activated desorption processes are briefly examined and found to promise new and unique chemical information when combined with conventional AES. Some gas phase AES studies are also briefly reviewed

  10. Magnetic energy analyser for slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limberg, W.

    1974-08-01

    A differential spectrometer with high time and energy resolution has been developed using the principle of energy analysis with a longitudinal homogeneous magnetic field. This way it is possible to measure the energy distribution of low energy electrons (eV-range) in the presence of high energy electrons without distortions by secondary electrons. The functioning and application of the analyzer is demonstrated by measuring the energy distributions of slow electrons emitted by a filament. (orig.) [de

  11. Certification of a uranium dioxide reference material for chemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, Y.

    1984-01-01

    This report, issued by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM), describes the characterization of a uranium dioxide reference material with accurately determined uranium mass fraction for chemical analyses. The preparation, conditioning, homogeneity tests and the analyses performed on this material are described in Annex 1. The evaluation of the individual impurity results, total of impurities and uranium mass fraction are given in Annex 2. Information on a direct determination of uranium by titration is given in Annex 3. The uranium mass fraction (881.34+-0.13) g.kg -1 calculated in Annex 2 is given on the certificate

  12. Correlated Raman micro-spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses of flame retardants in environmental samples: a micro-analytical tool for probing chemical composition, origin and spatial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Wagner, Jeff

    2013-07-07

    We present correlated application of two micro-analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) for the non-invasive characterization and molecular identification of flame retardants (FRs) in environmental dusts and consumer products. The SEM/EDS-RMS technique offers correlated, morphological, molecular, spatial distribution and semi-quantitative elemental concentration information at the individual particle level with micrometer spatial resolution and minimal sample preparation. The presented methodology uses SEM/EDS analyses for rapid detection of particles containing FR specific elements as potential indicators of FR presence in a sample followed by correlated RMS analyses of the same particles for characterization of the FR sub-regions and surrounding matrices. The spatially resolved characterization enabled by this approach provides insights into the distributional heterogeneity as well as potential transfer and exposure mechanisms for FRs in the environment that is typically not available through traditional FR analysis. We have used this methodology to reveal a heterogeneous distribution of highly concentrated deca-BDE particles in environmental dust, sometimes in association with identifiable consumer materials. The observed coexistence of deca-BDE with consumer material in dust is strongly indicative of its release into the environment via weathering/abrasion of consumer products. Ingestion of such enriched FR particles in dust represents a potential for instantaneous exposure to high FR concentrations. Therefore, correlated SEM/RMS analysis offers a novel investigative tool for addressing an area of important environmental concern.

  13. Finite element analyses of a linear-accelerator electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M.; Wasy, A.; Islam, G. U.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-02-01

    Thermo-structural analyses of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII) linear-accelerator, electron gun, were performed for the gun operating with the cathode at 1000 °C. The gun was modeled in computer aided three-dimensional interactive application for finite element analyses through ANSYS workbench. This was followed by simulations using the SLAC electron beam trajectory program EGUN for beam optics analyses. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the assembly to verify its beam parameters under the same boundary conditions. Simulation and test results were found to be in good agreement and hence confirmed the design parameters under the defined operating temperature. The gun is operating continuously since commissioning without any thermal induced failures for the BEPCII linear accelerator.

  14. Finite element analyses of a linear-accelerator electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, M., E-mail: muniqbal.chep@pu.edu.pk, E-mail: muniqbal@ihep.ac.cn [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wasy, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Changwon National University, Changwon 641773 (Korea, Republic of); Islam, G. U. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 45590 (Pakistan); Zhou, Z. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Thermo-structural analyses of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII) linear-accelerator, electron gun, were performed for the gun operating with the cathode at 1000 °C. The gun was modeled in computer aided three-dimensional interactive application for finite element analyses through ANSYS workbench. This was followed by simulations using the SLAC electron beam trajectory program EGUN for beam optics analyses. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the assembly to verify its beam parameters under the same boundary conditions. Simulation and test results were found to be in good agreement and hence confirmed the design parameters under the defined operating temperature. The gun is operating continuously since commissioning without any thermal induced failures for the BEPCII linear accelerator.

  15. Finite element analyses of a linear-accelerator electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Wasy, A.; Islam, G. U.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Thermo-structural analyses of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII) linear-accelerator, electron gun, were performed for the gun operating with the cathode at 1000 °C. The gun was modeled in computer aided three-dimensional interactive application for finite element analyses through ANSYS workbench. This was followed by simulations using the SLAC electron beam trajectory program EGUN for beam optics analyses. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the assembly to verify its beam parameters under the same boundary conditions. Simulation and test results were found to be in good agreement and hence confirmed the design parameters under the defined operating temperature. The gun is operating continuously since commissioning without any thermal induced failures for the BEPCII linear accelerator

  16. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of f-element complexes by quantum chemical methods; Analyse de la structure electronique des complexes contenant des elements F par des methodes de la chimie quantique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetere, V

    2002-09-15

    This thesis is related to comparative studies of the chemical properties of molecular complexes containing lanthanide or actinide trivalent cations, in the context of the nuclear waste disposal. More precisely, our aim was a quantum chemical analysis of the metal-ligand bonding in such species. Various theoretical approaches were compared, for the inclusion of correlation (density functional theory, multiconfigurational methods) and of relativistic effects (relativistic scalar and 2-component Hamiltonians, relativistic pseudopotentials). The performance of these methods were checked by comparing computed structural properties to published experimental data, on small model systems: lanthanide and actinide tri-halides and on X{sub 3}M-L species (X=F, Cl; M=La, Nd, U; L = NH{sub 3}, acetonitrile, CO). We have thus shown the good performance of density functionals combined with a quasi-relativistic method, as well as of gradient-corrected functionals associated with relativistic pseudopotentials. In contrast, functionals including some part of exact exchange are less reliable to reproduce experimental trends, and we have given a possible explanation for this result . Then, a detailed analysis of the bonding has allowed us to interpret the discrepancies observed in the structural properties of uranium and lanthanides complexes, based on a covalent contribution to the bonding, in the case of uranium(III), which does not exist in the lanthanide(III) homologues. Finally, we have examined more sizeable systems, closer to experimental species, to analyse the influence of the coordination number, of the counter-ions and of the oxidation state of uranium, on the metal-ligand bonding. (author)

  17. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Raina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS in selected reaction monitoring (SRM mode with both electron ionization (EI and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs, organophosphorus pesticides (OPs and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin. The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations <100 pg µL -1 (< 100 pg m -3 in air. No one method could be used to analyze the range of pre-emergent herbicides, OPs, and OCs investigated. In general GC-NCI/SIM provided the lowest method detection limits (MDLs commonly 2.5-10 pg µL -1 along with best confirmation (<25% RSD of ion ratio, while GC-NCI/SRM is recommended for use where added selectivity or confirmation is required (such as parathion-ethyl, tokuthion, carbofenothion. GC-EI/SRM at concentration < 100 pg µL -1 was not suitable for most pesticides. GC-EI/SIM was more prone to interference issues than NCI methods, but gave good sensitivity (MDLs 1-10 pg µL -1 for pesticides with poor NCI response (OPs: sulfotep, phorate, aspon, ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT.

  18. Electron Beam Treatment of Toxic Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, In Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Lee, Oh Mi; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were commercially produced from 1920s as complex mixtures containing multiple isomers for a variety of applications. They are very toxic, chemically stable and resist microbial, photochemical, chemical, and thermal degradation. The public, legal, and scientific concerns about PCBs arose from research indicating they were environmental contaminants that had a potential to adversely impact the environment, and, therefore, were undesirable as commercial products. Eventually, most producers reduced or stopped production of PCBs in the 1970s. Stockholm convention on POPs (Persistent Organic Pollutants), which was effective on May 2004 and 151 nations including Korea were joined on June 2005, asked to dispose of PCBs by 2028 with environmental friendly methods. Korean government also has declared to perform by 2015. According to the Environmental law of Korea, over 2 ppm of PCBs has to be decomposed by legal methods of incineration and thermal destruction. But those are inapplicable owing to the environmental groups. KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has recently developed a remarkable technology for radiation treatment of toxic chemicals including chlorides using an electron beam accelerator

  19. Chemical analyses in the World Coal Quality Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewalt, Susan J.; Belkin, Harvey E.; SanFilipo, John R.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Palmer, Curtis A.; Warwick, Peter D.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Finkelman, Robert B.; Park, Andy J.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the World Coal Quality Inventory (WoCQI) was to collect and analyze a global set of samples of mined coal during a time period from about 1995 to 2006 (Finkelman and Lovern, 2001). Coal samples were collected by foreign collaborators and submitted to country specialists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Program. However, samples from certain countries, such as Afghanistan, India, and Kyrgyzstan, were collected collaboratively in the field with USGS personnel. Samples were subsequently analyzed at two laboratories: the USGS Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory located in Denver, CO and a commercial laboratory (Geochemical Testing, Inc.) located in Somerset, PA. Thus the dataset, which is in Excel (2003) format and includes 1,580 samples from 57 countries, does not have the inter-laboratory variability that is present in many compilations. Major-, minor-, and trace-element analyses from the USGS laboratory, calculated to a consistent analytical basis (dry, whole-coal) and presented with available sample identification information, are sorted alphabetically by country name. About 70 percent of the samples also have data from the commercial laboratory, which are presented on an as-received analytical basis. The USGS initiated a laboratory review of quality assurance in 2008, covering quality control and methodology used in inorganic chemical analyses of coal, coal power plant ash, water, and sediment samples. This quality control review found that data generated by the USGS Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory from 1996 through 2006 were characterized by quality practices that did not meet USGS requirements commonly in use at the time. The most serious shortcomings were (1) the adjustment of raw sample data to standards when the instrument values for those standards exceeded acceptable limits or (2) the insufficient use of multiple standards to provide adequate quality assurance. In general, adjustment of raw data to account for instrument

  20. Physico-chemical analyses and corrosion effect of produced water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physico-chemical characteristics of the composite produced water sample used for the study has a higher concentration compared with DPR standard for discharge of produced formation water into surface environment. It was assumed that the corrosion of the coupons was due to presence of high chemical matters in the ...

  1. Chemometrics as a tool to analyse complex chemical mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J. H.

    Chemical characterisation of contaminant mixtures is important for environmental forensics and risk assessment. The great challenge in future research lies in develop- ing suitable, rapid, reliable and objective methods for analysis of the composition of complex chemical mixtures. This thesis...... describes the development of such methods for assessing the identity (chemical fingerprinting) and fate (e.g. biodegradation) of petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures. The methods comply with the general concept that suitable methods must be rapid and inexpensive, objective with limited human in- tervention...... and at the same time must consider a substantial fraction of compounds in the complex mixture. A combination of a) limited sample preparation, b) rapid chemical screening analysis, c) fast and semi-automatic pre-processing, d) compre- hensive multivariate statistical data analysis and e) objective data evaluation...

  2. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ e ) and chemical hardness (η e ) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ e . Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness

  3. Revisiting the definition of the electronic chemical potential, chemical hardness, and softness at finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco, E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: qimfranco@hotmail.com, E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340 (Mexico); Ayers, Paul W. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2015-10-21

    We extend the definition of the electronic chemical potential (μ{sub e}) and chemical hardness (η{sub e}) to finite temperatures by considering a reactive chemical species as a true open system to the exchange of electrons, working exclusively within the framework of the grand canonical ensemble. As in the zero temperature derivation of these descriptors, the response of a chemical reagent to electron-transfer is determined by the response of the (average) electronic energy of the system, and not by intrinsic thermodynamic properties like the chemical potential of the electron-reservoir which is, in general, different from the electronic chemical potential, μ{sub e}. Although the dependence of the electronic energy on electron number qualitatively resembles the piecewise-continuous straight-line profile for low electronic temperatures (up to ca. 5000 K), the introduction of the temperature as a free variable smoothens this profile, so that derivatives (of all orders) of the average electronic energy with respect to the average electron number exist and can be evaluated analytically. Assuming a three-state ensemble, well-known results for the electronic chemical potential at negative (−I), positive (−A), and zero values of the fractional charge (−(I + A)/2) are recovered. Similarly, in the zero temperature limit, the chemical hardness is formally expressed as a Dirac delta function in the particle number and satisfies the well-known reciprocity relation with the global softness.

  4. Analysing chemical equilibrium conditions when studying butyl acetate synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño; Fernando Leiva Lenis; Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso; Gerardo Rodríguez Niño; Luis María Carballo Suárez

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the liquid phase of acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm = 560 mmHg),using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431) as catalyst. A set of assays were carried out for determining the effect of catalyst load, temperature and molar ratio (acid/alcohol) on chemical equilibrium constant. Components’ selective sorption on the resin matrix was noticed; its effect on equilibrium conditions was verified, by using different acid/alcohol starting ratios. A non-ide...

  5. Physico-Chemical and Bacteriological Analyses of Water Used for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samuel Olaleye

    Physicochemical and bacteriological analyses were carried out on well water, stream water and river water used for drinking and swimming purposes in. Abeokuta, Nigeria. The results obtained were compared with WHO and EPA standards for drinking and recreational water. With the exception of Sokori stream and a well ...

  6. Toxicity and chemical analyses of airport runoff waters in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulej, Anna Maria; Polkowska, Zaneta; Wolska, Lidia; Cieszynska, Monika; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicological effects of various compounds in complex airport effluents using a chemical and ecotoxicological integrated strategy. The present work deals with the determination of sum of PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, cations, anions, phenols, anionic, cationic, non-ionic detergents, formaldehyde and metals--as well as TOC and conductivity--in runoff water samples collected from 2009 to 2011 at several locations on two Polish international airports. Two microbiotests (Vibrio fischeri bacteria and the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus) have been used to determine the ecotoxicity of airport runoff waters. The levels of many compounds exceeded several or even several tens of times the maximum permissible levels. Analysis of the obtained data shows that samples that displayed maximum toxicity towards the bioindicators Vibrio fischeri were not toxic towards Thamnocephalus platyurus. Levels of toxicity towards T. platyurus are strongly correlated with pollutants that originate from the technological operations related to the maintenance of airport infrastructure. The integrated (chemical-ecotoxicological) approach to environmental contamination assessment in and around airports yields extensive information on the quality of the environment. These methodologies can be then used as tools for tracking the environmental fate of these compounds and for assessing the environmental effect of airports. Subsequently, these data will provide a basis for airport infrastructure management.

  7. Lipids: From Chemical Structures, Biosynthesis, and Analyses to Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Nakamura, Yuki; Harwood, John

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are one of the major subcellular components, and play numerous essential functions. As well as their physiological roles, oils stored in biomass are useful commodities for a variety of biotechnological applications including food, chemical feedstocks, and fuel. Due to their agronomic as well as economic and societal importance, lipids have historically been subjected to intensive studies. Major current efforts are to increase the energy density of cell biomass, and/or create designer oils suitable for specific applications. This chapter covers some basic aspects of what one needs to know about lipids: definition, structure, function, metabolism and focus is also given on the development of modern lipid analytical tools and major current engineering approaches for biotechnological applications. This introductory chapter is intended to serve as a primer for all subsequent chapters in this book outlining current development in specific areas of lipids and their metabolism.

  8. Application of principal component and factor analyses in electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siuda, R.; Balcerowska, G.

    1998-01-01

    Fundamentals of two methods, taken from multivariate analysis and known as principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), are presented. Both methods are well known in chemometrics. Since 1979, when application of the methods to electron spectroscopy was reported for the first time, they became to be more and more popular in different branches of electron spectroscopy. The paper presents examples of standard applications of the method of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Advantages one can take from application of the methods, their potentialities as well as their limitations are pointed out. (author)

  9. Computational Analyses of Complex Flows with Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kang-Sik

    The heat and mass transfer phenomena in micro-scale for the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the simulation of oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, and a reduced chemical kinetic modeling of gas turbine combustion for Jet propellant-10 have been studied numerically. For the numerical analysis of the mass transfer phenomena on drug in cylindrical matrix system, the governing equations are derived from the cylindrical matrix systems, Krogh cylinder model, which modeling system is comprised of a capillary to a surrounding cylinder tissue along with the arterial distance to veins. ADI (Alternative Direction Implicit) scheme and Thomas algorithm are applied to solve the nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). This study shows that the important factors which have an effect on the drug penetration depth to the tissue are the mass diffusivity and the consumption of relevant species during the time allowed for diffusion to the brain tissue. Also, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to simulate the blood flow and oxygen/drug diffusion in a three dimensional capillary network, which are satisfied in the physiological range of a typical capillary. A three dimensional geometry has been constructed to replicate the one studied by Secomb et al. (2000), and the computational framework features a non-Newtonian viscosity model for blood, the oxygen transport model including in oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation and wall flux due to tissue absorption, as well as an ability to study the diffusion of drugs and other materials in the capillary streams. Finally, a chemical kinetic mechanism of JP-10 has been compiled and validated for a wide range of combustion regimes, covering pressures of 1atm to 40atm with temperature ranges of 1,200 K--1,700 K, which is being studied as a possible Jet propellant for the Pulse Detonation Engine (PDE) and other high-speed flight applications such as hypersonic

  10. A high dutycycle low cost multichannel analyser for electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norell, K.E.; Baltzer, P.

    1983-03-01

    A high dutycycle multichannel analyzer has been designed and used in time-of-flight electron spectroscopy. The memory capacity is 64k counts. The number of channels is 8192 with a time resolution of 100 ns. An oscilloscope is used to display the spectra synchronous with the counting. The unit has been built with standard electronic components. (author)

  11. Procedures for field chemical analyses of water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.; Ealey, D.

    1983-12-01

    A successful water-quality monitoring program requires a clear understanding of appropriate measurement procedures in order to obtain reliable field data. It is imperative that the responsible personnel have a thorough knowledge of the limitations of the techniques being used. Unfortunately, there is a belief that field analyses are simple and straightforward. Yet, significant controversy as well as misuse of common measurement techniques abounds. This document describes procedures for field measurements of pH, carbonate and bicarbonate, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, Eh, and uranium. Each procedure section includes an extensive discussion regarding the limitations of the method as well as brief discussions of calibration procedures and available equipment. A key feature of these procedures is the consideration given to the ultimate use of the data. For example, if the data are to be used for geochemical modeling, more precautions are needed. In contrast, routine monitoring conducted merely to recognize gross changes can be accomplished with less effort. Finally, quality assurance documentation for each measurement is addressed in detail. Particular attention is given to recording sufficient information such that decisions concerning the quality of the data can be easily made. Application of the procedures and recommendations presented in this document should result in a uniform and credible water-quality monitoring program. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  12. Expansions for model-independent analyses of inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.F.; Hilton, J.M.; Roberts, A.C.M.

    1977-01-01

    It is noted that the commonly-used Fourier-Bessel expansion for the transition density for inelastic electron scattering depends sensitively on an arbitrary parameter and is not realistic at large distances. Alternative expansions are suggested. (author)

  13. Chemical and physical analyses of selected plants and soils from Puerto Rico (1981-2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.J. Sanchez; E. Lopez; A.E. Lugo

    2015-01-01

    This report contains the results of analyses conducted at the chemistry laboratory of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico from 1981 to 2000. The data set includes 109,177 plant analyses and 70,729 soil analyses. We report vegetation chemical data by plant part, species, life zone, soil order, geology, or parent material. Soil data are...

  14. Inventory Control: A Small Electronic Device for Studying Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, A. L.; Calvo-Aguilar, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Shows how the rate of reaction can be studied using a simple electronic device that overcomes the difficulty students encounter in solving the differential equations describing chemical equilibrium. The device, used in conjunction with an oscilloscope, supplies the voltages that represent the chemical variables that take part in the equilibrium.…

  15. The Electronic Flux in Chemical Reactions. Insights on the Mechanism of the Maillard Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Patricio; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Herrera, Bárbara; Silva, Eduardo; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2007-11-01

    The electronic transfer that occurs during a chemical process is analysed in term of a new concept, the electronic flux, that allows characterizing the regions along the reaction coordinate where electron transfer is actually taking place. The electron flux is quantified through the variation of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate and is used, together with the reaction force, to shed light on reaction mechanism of the Schiff base formation in the Maillard reaction. By partitioning the reaction coordinate in regions in which different process might be taking place, electronic reordering associated to polarization and transfer has been identified and found to be localized at specific transition state regions where most bond forming and breaking occur.

  16. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romins Brasca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0 oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+ chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+.

  17. Chemical and physical analyses of selected plants and soils from Puerto Rico (1981-1990)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. J. Sanchez; E. Lopez; A. E. Lugo

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the result of many analyses conducted at the laboratory of the IITF of Puerto Rico between 1981 and 1990. our objective was to make available the chemical and physical data developed for tropical forest ecosystems.

  18. PETROS - Worldwide Databank of Major Element Chemical Analyses of Igneous Rocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PETROS is a worldwide data bank of major element chemical analyses of igneous rocks compiled for research and teaching purposes by Dr. Felix Mutschler and Staff at...

  19. Thin-film chemical sensors based on electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.; Leduc, H. G.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying a novel chemical sensor based on electron tunneling in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions were studied. Chemical sensors based on electron tunneling were shown to be sensitive to a variety of substances that include iodine, mercury, bismuth, ethylenedibromide, and ethylenedichloride. A sensitivity of 13 parts per billion of iodine dissolved in hexane was demonstrated. The physical mechanisms involved in the chemical sensitivity of these devices were determined to be the chemical alteration of the surface electronic structure of the top metal electrode in the MIM structure. In addition, electroreflectance spectroscopy (ERS) was studied as a complementary surface-sensitive technique. ERS was shown to be sensitive to both iodine and mercury. Electrolyte electroreflectance and solid-state MIM electroreflectance revealed qualitatively the same chemical response. A modified thin-film structure was also studied in which a chemically active layer was introduced at the top Metal-Insulator interface of the MIM devices. Cobalt phthalocyanine was used for the chemically active layer in this study. Devices modified in this way were shown to be sensitive to iodine and nitrogen dioxide. The chemical sensitivity of the modified structure was due to conductance changes in the active layer.

  20. Environmental high resolution electron microscopy and applications to chemical science

    OpenAIRE

    Boyes, Edward; Gai, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    An environmental cell high resolution electron microscope (EHREM) has been developed for in situ studies of dynamic chemical reactions on the atomic scale. It allows access to metastable intermediate phases of catalysts and to sequences of reversible microstructural and chemical development associated with the activation, deactivation and poisoning of a catalyst. Materials transported through air can be restored or recreated and samples damaged, e.g. by dehydration, by the usual vacuum enviro...

  1. Destructive electronics from electrochemical-mechanically triggered chemical dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Wang, Xu; Yu, Cunjiang; Li, Yuhang; Linghu, Changhong; Song, Jizhou; Gao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    The considerable need to enhance data and hardware security suggest one possible future for electronics where it is possible to destroy them and even make them disappear physically. This paper reports a type of destructive electronics which features fast transience from chemical dissolution on-demand triggered in an electrochemical-mechanical manner. The detailed materials, mechanics, and device construction of the destructive electronics are presented. Experiment and analysis of the triggered releasing and transience study of electronic materials, resistors and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors illustrate the key aspects of the destructive electronics. The reported destructive electronics is useful in a wide range of areas from security and defense, to medical applications (paper)

  2. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Chemical analyses of rocks, minerals, and detritus, Yucca Mountain--Preliminary report, special report No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Livingston, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    This chemical analysis study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. This report is preliminary in the sense that more chemical analyses may be needed in the future and also in the sense that these chemical analyses should be considered as a small part of a much larger geological data base. The interpretations discussed herein may be modified as that larger data base is examined and established. All of the chemical analyses performed to date are shown in Table 1. There are three parts to this table: (1) trace element analyses on rocks (limestone and tuff) and minerals (calcite/opal), (2) rare earth analyses on rocks (tuff) and minerals (calcite/opal), and (3) major element analyses + CO 2 on rocks (tuff) and detritus sand. In this report, for each of the three parts of the table, the data and its possible significance will be discussed first, then some overall conclusions will be made, and finally some recommendations for future work will be offered

  4. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  5. The Equipment of Czech Firefighters for the Detection and Field Analyses of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Krykorkova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the requirements for the devices of detection, chemical reconnaissance and field analyses of chemical warfare agents (CWA and divides them into simple devices of detection, universal detectors, selective analyzers, multi-component analyzers and mobile laboratories. It also describes the devices of detection available within the Fire and Rescue Service of the Czech Republic (FRS CR and compares them with some prospective trends of further development.

  6. Electronic Transmutation (ET): Chemically Turning One Element into Another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Lundell, Katie A; Olson, Jared K; Bowen, Kit H; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2018-03-08

    The concept of electronic transmutation (ET) depicts the processes that by acquiring an extra electron, an element with the atomic number Z begins to have properties that were known to only belong to its neighboring element with the atomic number Z+1. Based on ET, signature compounds and chemical bonds that are composed of certain elements can now be designed and formed by other electronically transmutated elements. This Minireview summarizes the recent developments and applications of ET on both the theoretical and experimental fronts. Examples on the ET of Group 13 elements into Group 14 elements, Group 14 elements into Group 15 elements, and Group 15 elements into Group 16 elements are discussed. Compounds and chemical bonding composed of carbon, silicon, germanium, phosphorous, oxygen and sulfur now have analogues using transmutated boron, aluminum, gallium, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Yuji; Mandal, Swapan K; Hu, Chunping; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Goedecker, Stefan; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Gimzewski, James K; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-06-01

    Key to single-molecule electronics is connecting functional molecules to each other using conductive nanowires. This involves two issues: how to create conductive nanowires at designated positions, and how to ensure chemical bonding between the nanowires and functional molecules. Here, we present a novel method that solves both issues. Relevant functional molecules are placed on a self-assembled monolayer of diacetylene compound. A probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is then positioned on the molecular row of the diacetylene compound to which the functional molecule is adsorbed, and a conductive polydiacetylene nanowire is fabricated by initiating chain polymerization by stimulation with the tip. Since the front edge of chain polymerization necessarily has a reactive chemical species, the created polymer nanowire forms chemical bonding with an encountered molecular element. We name this spontaneous reaction "chemical soldering". First-principles theoretical calculations are used to investigate the structures and electronic properties of the connection. We demonstrate that two conductive polymer nanowires are connected to a single phthalocyanine molecule. A resonant tunneling diode formed by this method is discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  9. Single-Molecule Electronics: Chemical and Analytical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    It is now possible to measure the electrical properties of single molecules using a variety of techniques including scanning probe microcopies and mechanically controlled break junctions. Such measurements can be made across a wide range of environments including ambient conditions, organic liquids, ionic liquids, aqueous solutions, electrolytes, and ultra high vacuum. This has given new insights into charge transport across molecule electrical junctions, and these experimental methods have been complemented with increasingly sophisticated theory. This article reviews progress in single-molecule electronics from a chemical perspective and discusses topics such as the molecule-surface coupling in electrical junctions, chemical control, and supramolecular interactions in junctions and gating charge transport. The article concludes with an outlook regarding chemical analysis based on single-molecule conductance.

  10. New Zealand guidelines for the collection of groundwater samples for chemical and isotopic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.R.; Cameron, S.G.; Reeves, R.R.; Taylor, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater are important tools for differentiating between the natural composition and human-induced contaminants of groundwater. A comprehensive suite of inorganic water chemical analyses is necessary to characterise waters. The geology of New Zealand is diverse, so it is impractical to characterise a ''typical'' groundwater chemical composition. Each aquifer system should be evaluated individually because the major dissolved species contain useful information about the pathways of water through the soil zone into the aquifer. Analyses of major ions such as chloride, nitrate, potassium and sulphate often give indication of septic systems and agricultural contamination. The minor ions, while most are not considered contaminants, are often indicators of human activity. Iron and manganese are good indicators of Eh potential, which is an important control on the mobility of many heavy metals. The inexpensive inorganic chemical analytical suite should be used as a guide to advisability of more expensive contaminant testing. The purpose of this manual is to provide consistent groundwater sampling guidelines for use throughout New Zealand. Sinton's (1998) guide to groundwater sampling techniques provided a sound basis for the accurate collection of groundwater samples. However Sinton did not address sampling materials and techniques for the collection of samples for ultra trace component analysis or the collection of environmental isotope samples. These important aspects of groundwater sampling have been included in this updated manual. (author). 30 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs., 1 appendix

  11. The electron as a chemical entity 201 Farday lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainton, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    After an introductory section, the subject is covered in sections, as follows: on 'dropping' an electron into a liquid or an amorphous solid; the preparation of solvated and trapped electrons in condensed media; the physical properties of solvated or trapped electrons (the E.S.R. spectrum and cavity structure; the equivalent conductance, mobility, diffusion constant, and Stokes radius of esub(s)sup(-); the ionic atmosphere relaxation time; the thermodynamic properties of esub(s)sup(-)); spectroscopic and other evidence concerning the cavities (the effects of pressure and temperature on the spectrum; direct evidence for a range of trap sizes for esub(t)sup(-)); the trapping and solvation mechanism; the chemical reactions of esub(s)sup(-); some applications of our knowledge of esub(s)sup(-). (U.K.)

  12. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Michael; Oh, Dong-Chan; Clardy, Jon

    2011-01-01

    and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15...... and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding...... phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest....

  13. Chemical Vapor-Deposited (CVD) Diamond Films for Electronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Diamond films have a variety of useful applications as electron emitters in devices such as magnetrons, electron multipliers, displays, and sensors. Secondary electron emission is the effect in which electrons are emitted from the near surface of a material because of energetic incident electrons. The total secondary yield coefficient, which is the ratio of the number of secondary electrons to the number of incident electrons, generally ranges from 2 to 4 for most materials used in such applications. It was discovered recently at the NASA Lewis Research Center that chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films have very high secondary electron yields, particularly when they are coated with thin layers of CsI. For CsI-coated diamond films, the total secondary yield coefficient can exceed 60. In addition, diamond films exhibit field emission at fields orders of magnitude lower than for existing state-of-the-art emitters. Present state-of-the-art microfabricated field emitters generally require applied fields above 5x10^7 V/cm. Research on field emission from CVD diamond and high-pressure, high-temperature diamond has shown that field emission can be obtained at fields as low as 2x10^4 V/cm. It has also been shown that thin layers of metals, such as gold, and of alkali halides, such as CsI, can significantly increase field emission and stability. Emitters with nanometer-scale lithography will be able to obtain high-current densities with voltages on the order of only 10 to 15 V.

  14. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  15. The Chemical Modeling of Electronic Materials and Interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivilahti, J. K.

    2002-12-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling, together with careful experimental work, is of great help for developing new electronic materials such as lead-free solders, their compatible metallizations and diffusion-barrier layers, as well as joining and bonding processes for advanced electronics manufacturing. When combined, these modeling techniques lead to a rationalization of the trial-and-error methods employed in the electronics industry, limiting experimentation and, thus, reducing significantly time-to-market of new products. This modeling provides useful information on the stabilities of phases (microstructures), driving forces for chemical reactions, and growth rates of reaction products occurring in interconnections or thin-film structures during processing, testing, and in longterm use of electronic devices. This is especially important when manufacturing advanced lead-free electronics where solder joint volumes are decreasing while the number of dissimilar reactive materials is increasing markedly. Therefore, a new concept of local nominal composition was introduced and applied together with the relevant ternary and multicomponent phase diagrams to some solder/conductor systems.

  16. Electronic and chemical properties of barium and indium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onwuagba, B.N.

    1992-11-01

    The ground state electronic and chemical properties of divalent barium and trivalent indium are investigated in a self-consistent manner using the spin-polarized local density approximation in the framework of Density Functional Theory. A jellium model is adopted in the spirit of Gunnarsson and Lundqvist exchange and correlation energies and the calculated properties primarily associated with the s-p orbitals in barium and p orbitals in indium provide deepened insight towards the understanding of the mechanisms to the magic numbers in both clusters. (author). 21 refs, 5 figs

  17. Chemical kinetics of flue gas cleaning by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maetzing, H.

    1989-02-01

    By electron beam treatment of flue gases, NO x and SO 2 are converted to nitric and sulfuric acids simultaneously. Upon ammonia addition, the corresponding salts are collected in solid state and can be sold as fertilizer. Both homogeneous gas phase reactions and physico-chemical aerosol dynamics are involved in product formation. These processes have been analyzed by model calculations. In part 1, the present report summarizes the model results and gives an account of the theoretical understanding of the EBDS process and its performance characteristics. Part 2 of this report gives a complete listing of the reactions used in the AGATE code. (orig.) [de

  18. Theory of the chemical effects of high-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.L.; Chatterjee, A.

    1978-01-01

    The general nature of radiation chemical yields arising from electron irradiations is examined. A relationship between the G value of an arbitrary radiation product and the initial electron energy (greater than 20 keV) in the form of an integro-differential equation is derived. G values for the water decomposition products in acid solution are obtained by numerical solution of the equation and the use of a model. A differential equation equivalent to the integro-differential equation for the case of Rutherford scattering is introduced and an approximate analytical solution is found (eq 10). The latter turns out to be in agreement with the numerical solution of the integro-differential equation obtained with the more accurate Moeller cross section. Experimental data for ferrous sulfate oxidation (Fricke dosimeter) are examined and found to be in agreement with the relationships obtained here. Primary yields of the water decomposition products are also given. 4 figures, 2 tables, 35 references

  19. Dosimetry for electron beam from Microtron accelerator using chemical dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Praveen; Nairy, Rajesha; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Narayana, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Microtron is a simple, compact, low cost electron accelerator with excellent beam quality and it can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies. The variable energy Microtron at Mangalore University is used for R and D programmes in basic and applied areas of physics, chemistry, materials science, biological sciences, medical science and industry. While studying the effects of radiation, it is essential to have complete knowledge of absorbed dose. In the present study the absorbed dose and the uniformity of dose distribution at various points due to 8 MeV electron beam from Microtron accelerator has been calculated using different chemical dosimeters. From the dosimetry studies for Microtron accelerator, it is observed that the absorbed doses measured at various dose ranges from 2 Gy to 25 kGy using FBX dosimeters at very low doses, Fricke at intermediate doses and alanine and glutamine at higher doses, varied linearly with increasing electron counts. From the dosimetry studies it is observed that there is a linear relation between dose and electron numbers over a wide range of absorbed doses. It is evaluated that the electron counts of about 1.15 x 10 14 corresponds to an absorbed dose of 100 Gy. Fricke dosimetry was carried out to measure the uniformity in dose distribution at a distance of 30 cm from the beam exit window of the accelerator to ensure the availability of uniform irradiation field size. It is observed that a field size of about 4 x 4 cm is available at 30 cm distance from the beam exit window over which the dose distribution is uniform. The sample size during radiological studies using Microtron was restricted to less than 4 x 4 cm dimension at 30 cm distance from the beam exit window to ensure uniform dose distribution to the sample

  20. The case study on elemental analyses of Asian dust particles by using an analytical scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Jo; Masaki, Kazushige; Emoto, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    The individual particle analyses of suspended particulate matter (SPM: particles less than 10 μm in size) collected on tape filters during April 17-18, 2006, in Kawasaki, Japan, were carried out. The chemical elements present in aerosol particles were investigated by using a scanning electron microscope with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The fraction of chemical elements detected in the particles collected on April 18, 2006, except for S, was in good agreement with that in Asian dust particles from the Loess Plateau, China. S was not detected in Asian dust particles but was detected in the particles collected on April 18, 2006. Therefore, it was concluded that the particles collected in April 18, 2006, in Kawasaki were Asian dust particles transported from the Asian continent, and the absorption of SO 2 or the coagulation of sulfate occurred during the transportation of Asian dust particles. (author)

  1. CALCMIN - an EXCEL™ Visual Basic application for calculating mineral structural formulae from electron microprobe analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandelik, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    CALCMIN, an open source Visual Basic program, was implemented in EXCEL™. The program was primarily developed to support geoscientists in their routine task of calculating structural formulae of minerals on the basis of chemical analysis mainly obtained by electron microprobe (EMP) techniques. Calculation programs for various minerals are already included in the form of sub-routines. These routines are arranged in separate modules containing a minimum of code. The architecture of CALCMIN allows the user to easily develop new calculation routines or modify existing routines with little knowledge of programming techniques. By means of a simple mouse-click, the program automatically generates a rudimentary framework of code using the object model of the Visual Basic Editor (VBE). Within this framework simple commands and functions, which are provided by the program, can be used, for example, to perform various normalization procedures or to output the results of the computations. For the clarity of the code, element symbols are used as variables initialized by the program automatically. CALCMIN does not set any boundaries in complexity of the code used, resulting in a wide range of possible applications. Thus, matrix and optimization methods can be included, for instance, to determine end member contents for subsequent thermodynamic calculations. Diverse input procedures are provided, such as the automated read-in of output files created by the EMP. Furthermore, a subsequent filter routine enables the user to extract specific analyses in order to use them for a corresponding calculation routine. An event-driven, interactive operating mode was selected for easy application of the program. CALCMIN leads the user from the beginning to the end of the calculation process.

  2. Electron microscopy analyses and electrical properties of the layered Bi2WO6 phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taoufyq, A.; Ait Ahsaine, H.; Patout, L.; Benlhachemi, A.; Ezahri, M.

    2013-01-01

    The bismuth tungstate Bi 2 WO 6 was synthesized using a classical coprecipitation method followed by a calcination process at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analyses. The Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction clearly confirmed the Pca2 1 non centrosymmetric space group previously proposed for this phase. The layers Bi 2 O 2 2+ and WO 4 2− have been directly evidenced from the HRTEM images. The electrical properties of Bi 2 WO 6 compacted pellets systems were determined from electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and direct current (DC) analyses, under air and argon, between 350 and 700 °C. The direct current analyses showed that the conduction observed from EIS analyses was mainly ionic in this temperature range, with a small electronic contribution. Electrical change above the transition temperature of 660 °C is observed under air and argon atmospheres. The strong conductivity increase observed under argon is interpreted in terms of formation of additional oxygen vacancies coupled with electron conduction. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron microscopy: inverse fast Fourier transform giving the layered structure of the Bi 2 WO 6 phase, with a representation of the cell dimensions (b and c vectors). The Bi 2 O 2 2+ and WO 4 2− sandwiches are visible in the IFFT image. - Highlights: • Using transmission electron microscopy, we visualize the layered structure of Bi 2 WO 6 . • Electrical analyses under argon gas show some increase in conductivity. • The phase transition at 660 °C is evidenced from electrical modification

  3. Deflection type energy analyser for energetic electron beams in a beam-plasma system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, J.A.; Hogge, J.P.

    1988-11-01

    An energy analyser for the study of electron beam distribution functions in unmagnetized plasmas is described. This analyser is designed to avoid large electric fields which are created in multi-grid analysers and to measure directly the beam distribution function without differentiation. As an example of an application we present results on the propagation of an energetic beam (E b : 2.0 keV) in a plasma (n o : 1.10 10 cm -3 , T e : 1.4 eV) (author) 7 figs., 10 refs

  4. Carbon speciation in ash, residual waste and contaminated soil by thermal and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Robinson, Ryan; Brännvall, Evelina; Nordmark, Désirée; Bjurström, Henrik; Andreas, Lale; Lagerkvist, Anders; Ecke, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Carbon in waste can occur as inorganic (IC), organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) each having distinct chemical properties and possible environmental effects. In this study, carbon speciation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), chemical degradation tests and the standard total organic carbon (TOC) measurement procedures in three types of waste materials (bottom ash, residual waste and contaminated soil). Over 50% of the total carbon (TC) in all studied materials (72% in ash and residual waste, and 59% in soil) was biologically non-reactive or EC as determined by thermogravimetric analyses. The speciation of TOC by chemical degradation also showed a presence of a non-degradable C fraction in all materials (60% of TOC in ash, 30% in residual waste and 13% in soil), though in smaller amounts than those determined by TGA. In principle, chemical degradation method can give an indication of the presence of potentially inert C in various waste materials, while TGA is a more precise technique for C speciation, given that waste-specific method adjustments are made. The standard TOC measurement yields exaggerated estimates of organic carbon and may therefore overestimate the potential environmental impacts (e.g. landfill gas generation) of waste materials in a landfill environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Graphene-Based Chemical Vapor Sensors for Electronic Nose Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallon, Eric C.

    An electronic nose (e-nose) is a biologically inspired device designed to mimic the operation of the olfactory system. The e-nose utilizes a chemical sensor array consisting of broadly responsive vapor sensors, whose combined response produces a unique pattern for a given compound or mixture. The sensor array is inspired by the biological function of the receptor neurons found in the human olfactory system, which are inherently cross-reactive and respond to many different compounds. The use of an e-nose is an attractive approach to predict unknown odors and is used in many fields for quantitative and qualitative analysis. If properly designed, an e-nose has the potential to adapt to new odors it was not originally designed for through laboratory training and algorithm updates. This would eliminate the lengthy and costly R&D costs associated with materiel and product development. Although e-nose technology has been around for over two decades, much research is still being undertaken in order to find new and more diverse types of sensors. Graphene is a single-layer, 2D material comprised of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, with extraordinary electrical, mechanical, thermal and optical properties due to its 2D, sp2-bonded structure. Graphene has much potential as a chemical sensing material due to its 2D structure, which provides a surface entirely exposed to its surrounding environment. In this configuration, every carbon atom in graphene is a surface atom, providing the greatest possible surface area per unit volume, so that electron transport is highly sensitive to adsorbed molecular species. Graphene has gained much attention since its discovery in 2004, but has not been realized in many commercial electronics. It has the potential to be a revolutionary material for use in chemical sensors due to its excellent conductivity, large surface area, low noise, and versatile surface for functionalization. In this work, graphene is incorporated into a

  6. Structural, vibrational, electronic investigations and quantum chemical studies of 2-amino-4-methoxybenzothiazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Raj, Arushma; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2013-02-01

    Extensive vibrational investigations of 2-amino-4-methoxybenzothiazole have been carried out with FTIR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The electronic structure of the molecule has been analysed by UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies. The DFT studies were carried out with B3LYP and HF methods utilising 6-31G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets to determine the structural, thermodynamical, vibrational, electronic characteristics of the compound and also to understand the electronic and steric influence of the methoxy amino groups on the skeletal frequencies. The mixing of the fundamental modes was determined with the help of total energy distribution (TED). The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have also been determined. The kinetic and thermodynamic stability and chemical hardness of the molecule have been determined. Complete NBO analysis was also carried out to find out the intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energy. 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and the electronic transitions of the molecule are also discussed.

  7. Structural, vibrational, electronic investigations and quantum chemical studies of 2-amino-4-methoxybenzothiazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Raj, Arushma; Santhanam, R; Marchewka, M K; Mohan, S

    2013-02-01

    Extensive vibrational investigations of 2-amino-4-methoxybenzothiazole have been carried out with FTIR and FT-Raman spectral techniques. The electronic structure of the molecule has been analysed by UV-Visible and NMR spectroscopies. The DFT studies were carried out with B3LYP and HF methods utilising 6-31G(d,p), 6-311++G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets to determine the structural, thermodynamical, vibrational, electronic characteristics of the compound and also to understand the electronic and steric influence of the methoxy amino groups on the skeletal frequencies. The mixing of the fundamental modes was determined with the help of total energy distribution (TED). The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have also been determined. The kinetic and thermodynamic stability and chemical hardness of the molecule have been determined. Complete NBO analysis was also carried out to find out the intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energy. (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts and the electronic transitions of the molecule are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-09-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure-property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost.

  9. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O

    2013-01-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure–property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost. (paper)

  10. General-purpose chemical analyzer for on-line analyses of radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Kronberg, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    An automated analyzer is being developed to perform analytical measurements on radioactive solutions on-line in a hostile environment. This General Purpose Chemical Analyzer (GPCA) samples a process stream, adds reagents, measures solution absorbances or electrode potentials, and automatically calculates the results. The use of modular components, under microprocessor control, permits a single analyzer design to carry out many types of analyses. This paper discusses the more important design criteria for the GPCA, and describes the equipment being tested in a prototype unit

  11. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettler, C.; Boegl, W.

    1984-09-01

    In the present second part of a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 14 radiation treated spices and 2 radiation treated spice-mixtures were evaluated. The tests in this part contain mainly toxicological but also chemical and sensorial analyses. Most of the spices were treated with gamma radiation from cobalt-60 sources with doses between 80 Gy and 60 kGy. This part contains a cumulated subject index for part 1 and part 2. (orig./AJ) [de

  12. Preliminary analyses on hydrogen diffusion through small break of thermo-chemical IS process hydrogen plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somolova, Marketa; Terada, Atsuhiko; Takegami, Hiroaki; Iwatsuki, Jin

    2008-12-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a conceptual design study of nuclear hydrogen demonstration plant, that is, a thermal-chemical IS process hydrogen plant coupled with the High temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR-IS), which will be planed to produce a large amount of hydrogen up to 1000m 3 /h. As part of the conceptual design work of the HTTR-IS system, preliminary analyses on small break of a hydrogen pipeline in the IS process hydrogen plant was carried out as a first step of the safety analyses. This report presents analytical results of hydrogen diffusion behaviors predicted with a CFD code, in which a diffusion model focused on the turbulent Schmidt number was incorporated. By modifying diffusion model, especially a constant accompanying the turbulent Schmidt number in the diffusion term, analytical results was made agreed well with the experimental results. (author)

  13. Evaluation Of Plutonium Oxide Destructive Chemical Analyses For Validity Of Original 3013 Container Binning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcclard, J.; Kessinger, G.

    2010-01-01

    The surveillance program for 3013 containers is based, in part, on the separation of containers into various bins related to potential container failure mechanisms. The containers are assigned to bins based on moisture content and pre-storage estimates of content chemistry. While moisture content is measured during the packaging of each container, chemistry estimates are made by using a combination of process knowledge, packaging data and prompt gamma analyses to establish the moisture and chloride/fluoride content of the materials. Packages with high moisture and chloride/fluoride contents receive more detailed surveillances than packages with less chloride/fluoride and/or moisture. Moisture verification measurements and chemical analyses performed during the surveillance program provided an opportunity to validate the binning process. Validation results demonstrated that the binning effort was generally successful in placing the containers in the appropriate bin for surveillance and analysis.

  14. Validation of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition in forested European sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin ULRICH

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the activities of the Integrated Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests and of the EU Regulation 2152/2003, a Working Group on Quality Assurance/Quality Control of analyses has been created to assist the participating laboratories in the analysis of atmospheric deposition, soil and soil solution, and leaves/needles. As part of the activity of the WG, this study is a statistical analysis in the field of water analysis of chemical concentrations and relationships between ions, and between conductivity and ions for different types of samples (bulk or wet-only samples, throughfall, stemflow considered in forest studies. About 5000 analyses from seven laboratories were used to establish relationships representative of different European geographic and climatic situations, from northern Finland to southern Italy. Statistically significant differences between the relationships obtained from different types of solutions, interacting with different types of vegetation (throughfall and stemflow samples, broad-leaved trees and conifers and with varying influence of marine salt were tested. The ultimate aim is to establish general relationships between ions, and between conductivity and ions, with relative confidence limits, which can be used as a comparison with those established in single laboratories. The use of such techniques is strongly encouraged in the ICPF laboratories to validate single chemical analyses, to be performed when it is still possible to replicate the analysis, and as a general overview of the whole set of analyses, to obtain an indication of the laboratory performance on a long-term basis.

  15. Botanical discrimination of Greek unifloral honeys with physico-chemical and chemometric analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabagias, Ioannis K; Badeka, Anastasia V; Kontakos, Stavros; Karabournioti, Sofia; Kontominas, Michael G

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of characterisation and classification of Greek unifloral honeys (pine, thyme, fir and orange blossom) according to botanical origin using volatile compounds, conventional physico-chemical parameters and chemometric analyses (MANOVA and Linear Discriminant Analysis). For this purpose, 119 honey samples were collected during the harvesting period 2011 from 14 different regions in Greece known to produce unifloral honey of good quality. Physico-chemical analysis included the identification and semi quantification of fifty five volatile compounds performed by Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and the determination of conventional quality parameters such as pH, free, lactonic, total acidity, electrical conductivity, moisture, ash, lactonic/free acidity ratio and colour parameters L, a, b. Results showed that using 40 diverse variables (30 volatile compounds of different classes and 10 physico-chemical parameters) the honey samples were satisfactorily classified according to botanical origin using volatile compounds (84.0% correct prediction), physicochemical parameters (97.5% correct prediction), and the combination of both (95.8% correct prediction) indicating that multi element analysis comprises a powerful tool for honey discrimination purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphological and chemical analyses of Eriocauli Flos sold in Taiwan markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Jung Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Eriocauli Flos (Gujingcao; EF, the dried capitulum with the peduncle of Eriocaulon buergerianum Koern. (Eriocaulaceae, is a Chinese herbal medicine for treating eye diseases and inflammation. However, several species of the Eriocaulon genus are used as substitutes in different areas. To examine the species of EF used in Taiwan and to establish the quality control platform, morphological and chemical analyses have been performed. Ten major compounds, including apigenin (7 and its 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1 and 7-O-(6-O-E-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (6, hispidulin (8 and its 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2 and 7-O-(6-O-E-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (5, jaceosidin (9 and its 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, and toralactone (10 and its 9-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→6-β-D-glucopyranoside (4, were isolated and identified from commercially available EF. Morphological investigation showed that two kinds of EFs and most of the EFs sold in Taiwan herbal markets are capitulum without the peduncle. A simultaneous high performance liquid chromatography and ultra performance liquid chromatography analyses of multiple components (1–10 in commercially available EFs, collected from different areas of Taiwan, was conducted. Results showed wide variations in morphology and chemical profiles between capitulum with and without the peduncle. In comparison with an authentic E. buergerianum, we found not only the morphology but also the chemical profile was different from both collected samples. In terms of the morphological examination, the samples without peduncle are closer to the authentic one. To ensure the correct EF materia medica is used in Taiwan so as to guarantee their therapeutic efficacy in clinical practice, further monitoring is necessary.

  17. Chemical dosimetry of linac electron pulse with nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanba, Hideki; Shinsaka, Kyoji; Hatano, Yoshihiko; Yagi, Masuo; Shiokawa, Takanobu.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption dose, dose rate and the reproducibility of intensity in each pulse of the electron beam pulses from a Linac (42 MeV, 3μsec) have been determined by applying nitrous oxide chemical dosimetry, in order to obtain the fundamental data required for radiation chemistry researches with the Linac. Nitrous oxide is used as a chemical dosimeter because it is known that it decomposed through radiation ensures easy detection and the determination of quantity of the decomposed product, nitrogen, which is stable, and presents linear relationship between absorption dose and produced quantity over the wide dose-rate range. Irradiation cells used for the experiment were cylindrical ones made of hard molybdenum glass. Irradiated samples were fractionated with liquid nitrogen, and separated and determined with a gas chromatograph. Details on the experimental results and their examination are described at the end. They include absorption dose of 1x10 16 eV/g per pulse, dose rate of 3x10 21 eV/g, sec and intensity reproducibility of +- 20%. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  19. Electronic structure and chemical bond in technetium dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyagina, A.P.; Fursova, V.D.; Levin, A.A.; Gutsev, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    DV-X α method is used to study electron structure and peculiarities of chemical bond in Tc 2 and Tc 2 2+ dimers. Electron state characteristics are calculated in the basis of numerical Hartree-Fock functions for d 6 s 1 - and d 5 s 2 -configurations of Tc atom and for Tc 2 2+ ion d 5 s 1 -configuration. Disposition order for valence MO in Tc and Tc 2 2+ calculated for the given configurations is presented. It is shown that quinary bond with π u 4 dσ g 2 σ g 4 sσ g 2 δ u 2 configuration corresponds to the ground state of Tc 2 molecule. In Tc 2 some weakening of binding for π- and δ-orbitals and strengthening of total σ-binding in comparison with Mo 2 takes place. In Tc + and Tc 2+ MO composition is slightly changed, but a shift of 2σ-MO relatively MO consisting of d-AO is occured

  20. Chemical Modification of Semiconductor Surfaces for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilan, Ayelet; Cahen, David

    2017-03-08

    Inserting molecular monolayers within metal/semiconductor interfaces provides one of the most powerful expressions of how minute chemical modifications can affect electronic devices. This topic also has direct importance for technology as it can help improve the efficiency of a variety of electronic devices such as solar cells, LEDs, sensors, and possible future bioelectronic ones. The review covers the main aspects of using chemistry to control the various aspects of interface electrostatics, such as passivation of interface states and alignment of energy levels by intrinsic molecular polarization, as well as charge rearrangement with the adjacent metal and semiconducting contacts. One of the greatest merits of molecular monolayers is their capability to form excellent thin dielectrics, yielding rich and unique current-voltage characteristics for transport across metal/molecular monolayer/semiconductor interfaces. We explain the interplay between the monolayer as tunneling barrier on the one hand, and the electrostatic barrier within the semiconductor, due to its space-charge region, on the other hand, as well as how different monolayer chemistries control each of these barriers. Practical tools to experimentally identify these two barriers and distinguish between them are given, followed by a short look to the future. This review is accompanied by another one, concerning the formation of large-area molecular junctions and charge transport that is dominated solely by molecules.

  1. Electronic spectra from TDDFT and machine learning in chemical space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Hartmann, Mia; Tapavicza, Enrico; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2015-01-01

    Due to its favorable computational efficiency, time-dependent (TD) density functional theory (DFT) enables the prediction of electronic spectra in a high-throughput manner across chemical space. Its predictions, however, can be quite inaccurate. We resolve this issue with machine learning models trained on deviations of reference second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) singles and doubles spectra from TDDFT counterparts, or even from DFT gap. We applied this approach to low-lying singlet-singlet vertical electronic spectra of over 20 000 synthetically feasible small organic molecules with up to eight CONF atoms. The prediction errors decay monotonously as a function of training set size. For a training set of 10 000 molecules, CC2 excitation energies can be reproduced to within ±0.1 eV for the remaining molecules. Analysis of our spectral database via chromophore counting suggests that even higher accuracies can be achieved. Based on the evidence collected, we discuss open challenges associated with data-driven modeling of high-lying spectra and transition intensities

  2. Electronic spectra from TDDFT and machine learning in chemical space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Hartmann, Mia; Tapavicza, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Tapavicza@csulb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, California 90840 (United States); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von, E-mail: anatole.vonlilienfeld@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Due to its favorable computational efficiency, time-dependent (TD) density functional theory (DFT) enables the prediction of electronic spectra in a high-throughput manner across chemical space. Its predictions, however, can be quite inaccurate. We resolve this issue with machine learning models trained on deviations of reference second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) singles and doubles spectra from TDDFT counterparts, or even from DFT gap. We applied this approach to low-lying singlet-singlet vertical electronic spectra of over 20 000 synthetically feasible small organic molecules with up to eight CONF atoms. The prediction errors decay monotonously as a function of training set size. For a training set of 10 000 molecules, CC2 excitation energies can be reproduced to within ±0.1 eV for the remaining molecules. Analysis of our spectral database via chromophore counting suggests that even higher accuracies can be achieved. Based on the evidence collected, we discuss open challenges associated with data-driven modeling of high-lying spectra and transition intensities.

  3. New measurements in plutonium L X ray emission spectrum using an electron probe micro-analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.L.; Despres, J.

    1966-01-01

    Further studies by means of an electron-probe micro-analyser, allowed report CEA-R--1798 authors to set up a larger plutonium X ray spectrum table. Measurements of plutonium L II and L III levels excitation potentials have also been achieved. Some remarks about apparatus performance data (such as spectrograph sensibility, resolving power and accuracy) will be found in the appendix. (authors) [fr

  4. Independent component analysis: A new possibility for analysing series of electron energy loss spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, Nogl; Nuzillard, Danielle

    2005-01-01

    A complementary approach is proposed for analysing series of electron energy-loss spectra that can be recorded with the spectrum-line technique, across an interface for instance. This approach, called blind source separation (BSS) or independent component analysis (ICA), complements two existing methods: the spatial difference approach and multivariate statistical analysis. The principle of the technique is presented and illustrations are given through one simulated example and one real example

  5. Chemical and microstructural analyses for heavy metals removal from water media by ceramic membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Asmaa; Ahmed, Abdelkader; Gad, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the ability of low cost ceramic membrane filtration in removing three common heavy metals namely; Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ from water media. The work includes manufacturing ceramic membranes with dimensions of 15 by 15 cm and 2 cm thickness. The membranes were made from low cost materials of local clay mixed with different sawdust percentages of 0.5%, 2.0%, and 5.0%. The used clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Aqueous solutions of heavy metals were prepared in the laboratory and filtered through the ceramic membranes. The influence of the main parameters such as pH, initial driving pressure head, and concentration of heavy metals on their removal efficiency by ceramic membranes was investigated. Water samples were collected before and after the filtration process and their heavy metal concentrations were determined by chemical analysis. Moreover, a microstructural analysis using scanning electronic microscope (SEM) was performed on ceramic membranes before and after the filtration process. The chemical analysis results showed high removal efficiency up to 99% for the concerned heavy metals. SEM images approved these results by showing adsorbed metal ions on sides of the internal pores of the ceramic membranes.

  6. Poisoned Wine: Regulation, Chemical Analyses, and Spanish-French Trade in the 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suay-Matallana, Ignacio; Guillem-Llobat, Ximo

    2018-04-16

    This paper describes the resources, scientific spaces, and experts involved in the study of a mass poisoning caused by the drinking of arsenic-contaminated wine exported from Spain to France in 1932. Local and international periodicals record the poisoning of 300 French sailors, and stressed the commercial implications of the case. We discuss the reports prepared by different experts (mainly physicians, agricultural engineers, and customs chemists). Their work was not limited to preparing technical publications or chemical analyses; they also actively defended the quality of their local wine, and played a major role in the discussions regarding the regulation of the international wine market in the 1930s, when new standards regarding the analysis of wine were being considered. Curiously, this well-publicised case of mass poisoning did not have any noticeable consequences in the international regulation of wine. This absence of subsequent regulatory action and the role of experts are central topics of the paper.

  7. Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of recycled fibre-based paper for food contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Vinggaard, Anne

    2002-01-01

    of different qualities as food-contact materials and to Perform a preliminary evaluation of their suitability from a safety point of view, and, second, to evaluate the use of different in vitro toxicity tests for screening of paper and board. Paper produced from three different categories of recycled fibres (B...... of the paper products were extracted with either 99% ethanol or water. Potential migrants in the extracts were identified and semiquantified by GC-1R-MS or GC-HRMS. In parallel to the chemical analyses, a battery of four different in vitro toxicity tests with different endpoints were applied to the same...... was less cytotoxic than the extracts prepared from paper made from recycled fibres, and extracts prepared from C was the most cytotoxic. None of the extracts showed mutagenic activity No conclusion about the oestrogenic activity could be made, because all extracts were cytotoxic to the test organism (yeast...

  8. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    The manifestation of novel phenomena upon scaling to finite size has inspired a paradigm shift in materials science that takes advantage of the distinctive electrical and physical properties of nanomaterials. Remarkably, the simple honeycomb arrangement of carbon atoms in a single atomic layer has become renowned for exhibiting never-before-seen electronic and physical phenomena. This archetypal 2-dimensional nanomaterial is known as graphene, a single layer of graphite. Early reports in the 1950's eluded to graphene-like nanostructures that were evidenced from exfoliation of oxidized graphite followed by chemical reduction, absorbed carbon on transition metals, and thermal decomposition of SiC. Furthermore, the earliest tight binding approximation calculations in the 1950's held clues that a single-layer of graphite would behave drastically different than bulk graphite. Not until 2004, when Giem and Novoselov first synthesized graphene by mechanical exfoliation from highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite did the field of graphene-based research bloom within the scientific community. Since 2004, the availability and relatively straight forward synthesis of single-layer graphene (SLG) enabled the observation of remarkable phenomena including: massless Dirac fermions, extremely high mobilities of its charge carriers, room temperature half-integer quantum Hall effect, the Rashba effect, and the potential for ballistic conduction over macroscopic distances. These enticing electronic properties produce the drive to study graphene for use in truly nanoscale electrical interconnects, integrated circuits, transparent conducting electrodes, ultra-high frequency transistors, and spintronic devices, just to name a few. Yet, for almost all real world applications graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials, metals, dielectrics, organics, or any combination thereof that in turn are constituted from various inorganic and organic components. Interfacing graphene, a

  9. Graphene Electronic Device Based Biosensors and Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan

    Two-dimensional layered materials, such as graphene and MoS2, are emerging as an exciting material system for a new generation of atomically thin electronic devices. With their ultrahigh surface to volume ratio and excellent electrical properties, 2D-layered materials hold the promise for the construction of a generation of chemical and biological sensors with unprecedented sensitivity. In my PhD thesis, I mainly focus on graphene based electronic biosensors and chemical sensors. In the first part of my thesis, I demonstrated the fabrication of graphene nanomesh (GNM), which is a graphene thin film with a periodic array of holes punctuated in it. The periodic holes introduce long periphery active edges that provide a high density of functional groups (e.g. carboxylic groups) to allow for covalent grafting of specific receptor molecules for chemical and biosensor applications. After covalently functionalizing the GNM with glucose oxidase, I managed to make a novel electronic sensor which can detect glucose as well as pH change. In the following part of my thesis I demonstrate the fabrication of graphene-hemin conjugate for nitric oxide detection. The non-covalent functionalization through pi-pi stacking interaction allows reliable immobilization of hemin molecules on graphene without damaging the graphene lattice to ensure the highly sensitive and specific detection of nitric oxide. The graphene-hemin nitric oxide sensor is capable of real-time monitoring of nitric oxide concentrations, which is of central importance for probing the diverse roles of nitric oxide in neurotransmission, cardiovascular systems, and immune responses. Our studies demonstrate that the graphene-hemin sensors can respond rapidly to nitric oxide in physiological environments with sub-nanomolar sensitivity. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that the graphene-hemin sensors can be used for the detection of nitric oxide released from macrophage cells and endothelial cells, demonstrating their

  10. Historical Weathering Based on Chemical Analyses of Two Spodosols in Southern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkerud, Per-Arne; Bain, Derek C.; Olsson, Mats T.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical weathering losses were calculated for two conifer stands in relation to ongoing studies on liming effects and ash amendments on chemical status, soil solution chemistry and soil genesis. Weathering losses were based on elemental depletion trends in soil profiles since deglaciation and exposure to the weathering environment. Gradients in total geochemical composition were assumed to reflect alteration over time. Study sites were Horroed and Hassloev in southern Sweden. Both Horroed and Hassloev sites are located on sandy loamy Weichselian till at an altitude of 85 and 190 m a.s.l., respectively. Aliquots from volume determined samples from a number of soil levels were fused with lithium metaborate, dissolved in HNO 3 , and analysed by ICP - AES. Results indicated highest cumulative weathering losses at Hassloev. The weathering losses for the elements are in the following order:Si > Al > K > Na > Ca > MgTotal annual losses for Ca+Mg+K+Na, expressed in mmol c m -2 yr -1 , amounted to c. 28 and 58 at Horroed and Hassloev, respectively. Variations between study sites could not be explained by differences in bulk density, geochemistry or mineralogy. The accumulated weathering losses since deglaciation were larger in the uppermost 15 cm than in deeper B horizons for most elements studied

  11. Chemical analyses of wasp-associated streptomyces bacteria reveal a prolific potential for natural products discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifying new sources for small molecule discovery is necessary to help mitigate the continuous emergence of antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic microbes. Recent studies indicate that one potentially rich source of novel natural products is Actinobacterial symbionts associated with social and solitary Hymenoptera. Here we test this possibility by examining two species of solitary mud dauber wasps, Sceliphron caementarium and Chalybion californicum. We performed enrichment isolations from 33 wasps and obtained more than 200 isolates of Streptomyces Actinobacteria. Chemical analyses of 15 of these isolates identified 11 distinct and structurally diverse secondary metabolites, including a novel polyunsaturated and polyoxygenated macrocyclic lactam, which we name sceliphrolactam. By pairing the 15 Streptomyces strains against a collection of fungi and bacteria, we document their antifungal and antibacterial activity. The prevalence and anti-microbial properties of Actinobacteria associated with these two solitary wasp species suggest the potential role of these Streptomyces as antibiotic-producing symbionts, potentially helping defend their wasp hosts from pathogenic microbes. Finding phylogenetically diverse and chemically prolific Actinobacteria from solitary wasps suggests that insect-associated Actinobacteria can provide a valuable source of novel natural products of pharmaceutical interest.

  12. Electronic structure and chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). CNRS; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Nakhl, Michel [Univ. Libanaise, Fanar (Lebanon). Ecole Doctorale Sciences et Technologies

    2017-05-01

    The cubic LaIrSi type has 23 representatives in aluminides, gallides, silicides, germanides, phosphides, and arsenides, all with a valence electron count of 16 or 17. The striking structural motif is a three-dimensional network of the transition metal (T) and p element (X) atoms with TX{sub 3/3} respectively XT{sub 3/3} coordination. Alkaline earth or rare earth atoms fill cavities within the polyanionic [TX]{sup δ-} networks. The present work presents a detailed theoretical study of chemical bonding in LaIrSi-type representatives, exemplarily for CaPtSi, BaIrP, BaAuGa, LaIrSi, CeRhSi, and CeIrSi. DFT-GGA-based electronic structure calculations show weakly metallic compounds with itinerant small magnitude DOSs at E{sub F} except for CeRhSi whose large Ce DOS at E{sub F} leads to a finite magnetization on Ce (0.73 μ{sub B}) and induced small moments of opposite sign on Rh and Si in a ferromagnetic ground state. The chemical bonding analyses show dominant bonding within the [TX]{sup δ-} polyanionic networks. Charge transfer magnitudes were found in accordance with the course of the electronegativites of the chemical constituents.

  13. Chemical and geotechnical analyses of soil samples from Olkiluoto for studies on sorption in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusa, M.; Aemmaelae, K.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J.; Lahdenperae, A.-M.

    2009-05-01

    The safety assessment of disposal of spent nuclear fuel will include an estimate on the behavior of nuclear waste nuclides in the biosphere. As a part of this estimate also the transfer of nuclear waste nuclides in the soil and sediments is to be considered. In this study soil samples were collected from three excavator pits in Olkiluoto and the geotechnical and chemical characteristics of the samples were determined. In later stage these results will be used in sorption tests. Aim of these tests is to determine the Kd-values for Cs, Tc and I and later for Mo, Nb and Cl. Results of these sorption tests will be reported later. The geotechnical characteristics studied included dry weight and organic matter content as well as grain size distribution and mineralogy analyses. Selective extractions were carried out to study the sorption of cations into different mineral types. The extractions included five steps in which the cations bound to exchangeable, carbonate, oxides of Fe and Mn, organic matter and residual fractions were determined. For all fractions ICPMS analyses were carried out. In these analyses Li, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Cs and Pb were determined. In addition six profiles were taken from the surroundings of two excavator pits for the 137 Cs determination. Besides the samples taken for the characterization of soil, supplement samples were taken from the same layers for the separation of soil water. From the soil water pH, DOC, anions (F, Cl, NO 3 , SO 4 ) and cations (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, S, Cd, Cs, Pb, U) were determined. (orig.)

  14. Characterization of Si:O:C:H films fabricated using electron emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrant, Steven F. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Avenida Tres de Marco, 511, Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Soracaba, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: steve@sorocaba.unesp.br; Rouxinol, Francisco P.M.; Gelamo, Rogerio V. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Trasferetti, B. Claudio [Present address: Superintendencia Regional da Policia Federal em Sao Paulo, Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Rua Hugo d' Antola 95/10o Andar, Lapa de Baixo, 05038-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Davanzo, C.U. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Bica de Moraes, Mario A. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    Silicon-based polymers and oxides may be formed when vapours of oxygen-containing organosilicone compounds are exposed to energetic electrons drawn from a hot filament by a bias potential applied to a second electrode in a controlled atmosphere in a vacuum chamber. As little deposition occurs in the absence of the bias potential, electron impact fragmentation is the key mechanism in film fabrication using electron-emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition (EEECVD). The feasibility of depositing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films also containing silicon from plasmas of tetramethylsilane or hexamethyldisiloxane has already been shown. In this work, we report the deposition of diverse films from plasmas of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)-argon mixtures and the characterization of the materials obtained. The effects of changes in the substrate holder bias (V{sub S}) and of the proportion of TEOS in the mixture (X{sub T}) on the chemical structure of the films are examined by infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) at near-normal and oblique incidence using unpolarised and p-polarised, light, respectively. The latter is particularly useful in detecting vibrational modes not observed when using conventional near-normal incidence. Elemental analyses of the film were carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which was also useful in complementary structural investigations. In addition, the dependencies of the deposition rate on V{sub S} and X{sub T} are presented.

  15. Characterization of Si:O:C:H films fabricated using electron emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrant, Steven F.; Rouxinol, Francisco P.M.; Gelamo, Rogerio V.; Trasferetti, B. Claudio; Davanzo, C.U.; Bica de Moraes, Mario A.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon-based polymers and oxides may be formed when vapours of oxygen-containing organosilicone compounds are exposed to energetic electrons drawn from a hot filament by a bias potential applied to a second electrode in a controlled atmosphere in a vacuum chamber. As little deposition occurs in the absence of the bias potential, electron impact fragmentation is the key mechanism in film fabrication using electron-emission enhanced chemical vapour deposition (EEECVD). The feasibility of depositing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films also containing silicon from plasmas of tetramethylsilane or hexamethyldisiloxane has already been shown. In this work, we report the deposition of diverse films from plasmas of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)-argon mixtures and the characterization of the materials obtained. The effects of changes in the substrate holder bias (V S ) and of the proportion of TEOS in the mixture (X T ) on the chemical structure of the films are examined by infrared-reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) at near-normal and oblique incidence using unpolarised and p-polarised, light, respectively. The latter is particularly useful in detecting vibrational modes not observed when using conventional near-normal incidence. Elemental analyses of the film were carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which was also useful in complementary structural investigations. In addition, the dependencies of the deposition rate on V S and X T are presented

  16. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Du

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC basis set. The Pu– O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified.

  17. Scanning electron microscopic analyses of Ferrocyanide tank wastes for the Ferrocyanide safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, W.S.

    1995-09-01

    This is Fiscal Year 1995 Annual Report on the progress of activities relating to the application of scanning electron microscopy in addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. The status of the FY 1995 activities directed towards establishing facilities capable of providing SEM based micro-characterization of ferrocyanide tank wastes is described. A summary of key events in the SEM task over FY 1995 and target activities in FY 1996 are presented. A brief overview of the potential applications of computer controlled SEM analytical data in light of analyses of ferrocyanide simulants performed by an independent contractor is also presented

  18. Automated thin-film analyses of hydrated interplanetary dust particles in the analytical electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germani, M. S.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    A 200 keV electron microscope was used to obtain elemental analyses from over 4000 points on thin sections of eight 'layer silicate' class interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Major and minor element abundances from a volume approaching that of a cylinder 50 nm in diameter were observed. Mineral phases and their relative abundances in the thin sections were identified and petrographic characteristics were determined. Three of the particles contained smectite (1.0-1.2 nm basal spacing) and two contained serpentine (0.7 nm basal spacing). The point count analyses and Mg-Si-Fe ternary diagrams show that one of the serpentine-containing IDPs is similar to CI and CM chondritic meteorites. The IDPs exhibit evidence of aqueous processing, but they have typically experienced only short range, submicrometer scale alteration. The IDPs may provide a broad sampling of the asteroid belt.

  19. Physico-chemical analyses of Hispano-Moresque lustred ceramic: a precursor for Italian majolica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabanne, D.; Bouquillon, A.; Aucouturier, M.; Dectot, X.; Padeletti, G.

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents a comprehensive physico-chemical investigation on a series of Hispano-Moresque objects produced in the eastern Spain workshops between the XIV and XVIII centuries and fragments from XII century, in order to compare them with the Italian Renaissance majolica production. The techniques used are mainly non-destructive (ion beam analyses and X-ray diffraction), sometimes complemented by SEM observation and microanalysis, and electrothermal atomic emission spectrometry. Such methods allow a full description of the terra cotta, of the glaze and of the different surface layers which constitute the lustre decoration indicating individual elemental composition and thickness of each layer containing or not metallic nanoparticles. Principal results show the following: i) a constant source of supply for the eastern Spain terra cotta; ii) a significant change in the composition of the Spanish glazes around the XVII century, with the disappearance of the opacifying tin oxide addition; iii) significant evolutions in the structure and composition of the lustre layers, in particular related to the presence or not of a metal-free surface glaze film and its thickness; iv) interesting analogies and differences with the Italian majolica; v) confirmation of the change in the quality of blue pigment during XVI century, already evidenced by the authors in previous publications. A discussion about the transmission of the lustre technique between eastern Spain and Italy at the Renaissance period is proposed.

  20. Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamp, Susan; Dayvault, Jalena

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and analyses conducted for the Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) Ancillary Work Plan (AWP) project titled Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Sample Laboratory Analyses from Selected LM Groundwater Monitoring Wells. This effort entailed compiling an inventory of nearly 500 previous well redevelopment events at 16 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) sites, searching the literature for impacts of well redevelopment on groundwater sample quality, and-the focus of this report-evaluating the impacts of well redevelopment on field measurements and sample analytical results. Study Catalyst Monitoring well redevelopment, the surging or high-volume pumping of a well to loosen and remove accumulated sediment and biological build-up from a well, is considered an element of monitoring well maintenance that is implemented periodically during the lifetime of the well to mitigate its gradual deterioration. Well redevelopment has been conducted fairly routinely at a few LM sites in the western United States (e.g., the Grand Junction office site and the Gunnison processing site in Colorado), but at most other sites in this region it is not a routine practice. Also, until recently (2014-2015), there had been no specific criteria for implementing well redevelopment, and documentation of redevelopment events has been inconsistent. A catalyst for this evaluation was the self-identification of these inconsistencies by the Legacy Management Support contractor. As a result, in early 2015 Environmental Monitoring Operations (EMO) staff began collecting and documenting additional field measurements during well redevelopment events. In late 2015, AS&T staff undertook an independent internal evaluation of EMO's well redevelopment records and corresponding pre- and post-well-redevelopment groundwater analytical results. Study Findings Although literature discussions parallel the prevailing industry

  1. Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, Susan [Navarro Reserch and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dayvault, Jalena [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2016-05-01

    This report documents the efforts and analyses conducted for the Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) Ancillary Work Plan (AWP) project titled Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Sample Laboratory Analyses from Selected LM Groundwater Monitoring Wells. This effort entailed compiling an inventory of nearly 500 previous well redevelopment events at 16 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) sites, searching the literature for impacts of well redevelopment on groundwater sample quality, and—the focus of this report—evaluating the impacts of well redevelopment on field measurements and sample analytical results. Study Catalyst Monitoring well redevelopment, the surging or high-volume pumping of a well to loosen and remove accumulated sediment and biological build-up from a well, is considered an element of monitoring well maintenance that is implemented periodically during the lifetime of the well to mitigate its gradual deterioration. Well redevelopment has been conducted fairly routinely at a few LM sites in the western United States (e.g., the Grand Junction office site and the Gunnison processing site in Colorado), but at most other sites in this region it is not a routine practice. Also, until recently (2014–2015), there had been no specific criteria for implementing well redevelopment, and documentation of redevelopment events has been inconsistent. A catalyst for this evaluation was the self-identification of these inconsistencies by the Legacy Management Support contractor. As a result, in early 2015 Environmental Monitoring Operations (EMO) staff began collecting and documenting additional field measurements during well redevelopment events. In late 2015, AS&T staff undertook an independent internal evaluation of EMO's well redevelopment records and corresponding pre- and post-well-redevelopment groundwater analytical results. Study Findings Although literature discussions parallel the prevailing industry

  2. Oxidation state analyses of uranium with emphasis on chemical speciation in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervanne, H.

    2004-01-01

    , linearity, repeatability and comparability of methods were examined. Both Nd-coprecipitation and ion exchange were found to be valid and reliable methods. Both are suitable tools for studying oxidation/reduction mechanisms in geochemical processes. The oxidation state analyses of uranium in different geological materials gave new information on the chemical speciation and behaviour of uranium. (orig.)

  3. Analyses on the U-Mo/Al Chemical Interaction and the Effects of Diffusion Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Kim, Woo Jeong; Cho, Woo Hyung; Jeong, Yong Jin; Lee, Yoon Sang; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    While many HEU-fueled research reactors have been converted by adopting LEU U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel in harmony with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, some high performance research reactors still need the development of advanced fuels with higher uranium densities. Currently, gamma-phase U-Mo alloys are considered promising candidates to be used as high uranium density fuel for the high performance reactors. For the production of UMo alloy powder, the centrifugal atomization technology developed by KAERI has been considered the most promising way because of high yield production and excellent powder quality when compared with other possible methods such as grinding, machining or hydriding-dehydriding. However, severe pore formation associated with an extensive interaction between the U-Mo and Al matrix, although the irradiation performance of U-Mo itself showed most stable, delay the fuel qualification of UMo fuel for high performance research reactors. Because the reaction products, i.e. uranium aluminides (UAlx), is less dense than the mixed reactants, the volume of the fuel meat increases after formation of interaction layer(IL). In addition to the impact on the swelling performance, the reaction layers between the U-Mo and Al matrix induces a degradation of the thermal conductivities of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels. The chemical interaction between the U-Mo and Al matrix are analyzed in this study to find remedies to reduce the growth of the interaction layers during irradiation. In addition, various coating technologies for the formation of diffusion barriers on U-Mo particles are proposed as a result of the analyses

  4. Electronic structure and chemical properties of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershina, V [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Gmbh (Germany)

    2009-12-31

    Relativistic electronic structure calculations of superheavy elements (Z>=104) are analyzed. Preference is given to those related to experimental research. The role of relativistic effects is discussed.

  5. Harmonisation of food consumption data format for dietary exposure assessments of chemicals analysed in raw agricultural commodities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boon, Polly E.; Ruprich, Jiri; Petersen, Annette

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to format national food consumption data at raw agricultural commodity (RAC) level. In this way, the data is both formatted in a harmonised way given the comparability of RACs between countries, and suitable to assess the dietary exposure to chemicals analysed......, and the use of the FAO/WHO Codex Classification system of Foods and Animal Feeds to harmonise the classification. We demonstrate that this approach works well for pesticides and glycoalkaloids, and is an essential step forward in the harmonisation of risk assessment procedures within Europe when addressing...... chemicals analysed in RACs by all national food control systems....

  6. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols III: morphologic and chemical oxide analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, Kenneth M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W; Jenson, Evan D; Guilmette, Raymond A

    2009-03-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using x-ray diffraction (XRD), and particle morphologies were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Others appear to have fractures that perhaps resulted from abrasion and comminution, or shear bands that developed from plastic deformation of the DU material. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small bits of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of Health Physics to interpret the

  7. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols III: Morphologic and Chemical Oxide Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W.; Jenson, Evan D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphologies using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles appear to have been fractured (perhaps as a result of abrasion and comminution); others were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small chunks of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of The Journal of Health Physics to interpret the results of lung solubility studies and in selecting input parameters for

  8. Electron transport characteristics of silicon nanowires by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yangyang; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdwang@semi.ac.cn; Ji, An; Yang, Fuhua [Engineering Research Center for Semiconductor Integrated Technology, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The electron transport characteristics of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching with different doping concentrations were studied. By increasing the doping concentration of the starting Si wafer, the resulting SiNWs were prone to have a rough surface, which had important effects on the contact and the electron transport. A metal-semiconductor-metal model and a thermionic field emission theory were used to analyse the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Asymmetric, rectifying and symmetric I-V curves were obtained. The diversity of the I-V curves originated from the different barrier heights at the two sides of the SiNWs. For heavily doped SiNWs, the critical voltage was one order of magnitude larger than that of the lightly doped, and the resistance obtained by differentiating the I-V curves at large bias was also higher. These were attributed to the lower electron tunnelling possibility and higher contact barrier, due to the rough surface and the reduced doping concentration during the etching process.

  9. Electron transport characteristics of silicon nanowires by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Qi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The electron transport characteristics of silicon nanowires (SiNWs fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching with different doping concentrations were studied. By increasing the doping concentration of the starting Si wafer, the resulting SiNWs were prone to have a rough surface, which had important effects on the contact and the electron transport. A metal-semiconductor-metal model and a thermionic field emission theory were used to analyse the current-voltage (I-V characteristics. Asymmetric, rectifying and symmetric I-V curves were obtained. The diversity of the I-V curves originated from the different barrier heights at the two sides of the SiNWs. For heavily doped SiNWs, the critical voltage was one order of magnitude larger than that of the lightly doped, and the resistance obtained by differentiating the I-V curves at large bias was also higher. These were attributed to the lower electron tunnelling possibility and higher contact barrier, due to the rough surface and the reduced doping concentration during the etching process.

  10. Electron transport characteristics of silicon nanowires by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yangyang; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Xiaodong; Ji, An; Yang, Fuhua

    2014-03-01

    The electron transport characteristics of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching with different doping concentrations were studied. By increasing the doping concentration of the starting Si wafer, the resulting SiNWs were prone to have a rough surface, which had important effects on the contact and the electron transport. A metal-semiconductor-metal model and a thermionic field emission theory were used to analyse the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Asymmetric, rectifying and symmetric I-V curves were obtained. The diversity of the I-V curves originated from the different barrier heights at the two sides of the SiNWs. For heavily doped SiNWs, the critical voltage was one order of magnitude larger than that of the lightly doped, and the resistance obtained by differentiating the I-V curves at large bias was also higher. These were attributed to the lower electron tunnelling possibility and higher contact barrier, due to the rough surface and the reduced doping concentration during the etching process.

  11. Development of an ellipse fitting method with which to analyse selected area electron diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G., E-mail: dmitchel@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Van den Berg, J.A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Catalyst Fundamentals, Fischer-Tropsch and Syngas Conversion Research, Sasol Technology R & D, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

    2016-01-15

    A software method has been developed which uses ellipse fitting to analyse electron diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials. The method, which requires minimal user input, can determine the pattern centre and the diameter of diffraction rings with sub-pixel precision. This enables accurate crystallographic information to be obtained in a rapid and consistent manner. Since the method fits ellipses, it can detect, quantify and correct any elliptical distortion introduced by the imaging system. Distortion information derived from polycrystalline patterns as a function of camera length can be subsequently recalled and applied to single crystal patterns, resulting in improved precision and accuracy. The method has been implemented as a plugin for the DigitalMicrograph software by Gatan, and is a freely available via the internet. - Highlights: • A robust ellipse fitting method is developed. • Freely available software for automated diffraction pattern analysis is demonstrated. • Measurement and correction of elliptical distortion is routinely achieved.

  12. Electron Microscopic, Genetic and Protein Expression Analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis Strains from a Bengal Tiger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Rivas Traverso, Francisco; Rohde, Manfred; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Lehn, Norbert; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Ferrero, Richard L.; Fox, James G.; Berg, Douglas E.; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5–6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections. PMID:23940723

  13. Electron microscopic, genetic and protein expression analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis strains from a Bengal tiger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Tegtmeyer

    Full Text Available Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5-6 µm and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections.

  14. Electron microscopic, genetic and protein expression analyses of Helicobacter acinonychis strains from a Bengal tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Rivas Traverso, Francisco; Rohde, Manfred; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Lehn, Norbert; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Ferrero, Richard L; Fox, James G; Berg, Douglas E; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Helicobacter species is commonly noted in many mammals. These infections often remain unrecognized, but can cause severe health complications or more subtle host immune perturbations. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize putative novel Helicobacter spp. from Bengal tigers in Thailand. Morphological investigation (Gram-staining and electron microscopy) and genetic studies (16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, flagellin, urease and prophage gene analyses, RAPD DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment polymorphisms) as well as Western blotting were used to characterize the isolated Helicobacters. Electron microscopy revealed spiral-shaped bacteria, which varied in length (2.5-6 µm) and contained up to four monopolar sheathed flagella. The 16SrRNA, 23SrRNA, sequencing and protein expression analyses identified novel H. acinonychis isolates closely related to H. pylori. These Asian isolates are genetically very similar to H. acinonychis strains of other big cats (cheetahs, lions, lion-tiger hybrid and other tigers) from North America and Europe, which is remarkable in the context of the great genetic diversity among worldwide H. pylori strains. We also found by immunoblotting that the Bengal tiger isolates express UreaseA/B, flagellin, BabA adhesin, neutrophil-activating protein NapA, HtrA protease, γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase GGT, Slt lytic transglycosylase and two DNA transfer relaxase orthologs that were known from H. pylori, but not the cag pathogenicity island, nor CagA, VacA, SabA, DupA or OipA proteins. These results give fresh insights into H. acinonychis genetics and the expression of potential pathogenicity-associated factors and their possible pathophysiological relevance in related gastric infections.

  15. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, Annex 3: Chemical and radiometric control analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1964-01-01

    Simple, fast and reliable control analyses are obligatory during reprocessing. The analyses performed covered measuring the contents of uranium in water and organic solutions, contents of plutonium in water and organic solutions as well as the free acid in both solutions. In addition temporary analyses were done to determine the density of water and organic solutions as well as content of TBP in kerosine

  16. Spectroscopic analyses of chemical adaptation processes within microalgal biomass in response to changing environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Frank, E-mail: fvogt@utk.edu; White, Lauren

    2015-03-31

    Highlights: • Microalgae transform large quantities of inorganics into biomass. • Microalgae interact with their growing environment and adapt their chemical composition. • Sequestration capabilities are dependent on cells’ chemical environments. • We develop a chemometric hard-modeling to describe these chemical adaptation dynamics. • This methodology will enable studies of microalgal compound sequestration. - Abstract: Via photosynthesis, marine phytoplankton transforms large quantities of inorganic compounds into biomass. This has considerable environmental impacts as microalgae contribute for instance to counter-balancing anthropogenic releases of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. On the other hand, high concentrations of nitrogen compounds in an ecosystem can lead to harmful algae blooms. In previous investigations it was found that the chemical composition of microalgal biomass is strongly dependent on the nutrient availability. Therefore, it is expected that algae’s sequestration capabilities and productivity are also determined by the cells’ chemical environments. For investigating this hypothesis, novel analytical methodologies are required which are capable of monitoring live cells exposed to chemically shifting environments followed by chemometric modeling of their chemical adaptation dynamics. FTIR-ATR experiments have been developed for acquiring spectroscopic time series of live Dunaliella parva cultures adapting to different nutrient situations. Comparing experimental data from acclimated cultures to those exposed to a chemically shifted nutrient situation reveals insights in which analyte groups participate in modifications of microalgal biomass and on what time scales. For a chemometric description of these processes, a data model has been deduced which explains the chemical adaptation dynamics explicitly rather than empirically. First results show that this approach is feasible and derives information about the chemical biomass

  17. Spectroscopic analyses of chemical adaptation processes within microalgal biomass in response to changing environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Frank; White, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microalgae transform large quantities of inorganics into biomass. • Microalgae interact with their growing environment and adapt their chemical composition. • Sequestration capabilities are dependent on cells’ chemical environments. • We develop a chemometric hard-modeling to describe these chemical adaptation dynamics. • This methodology will enable studies of microalgal compound sequestration. - Abstract: Via photosynthesis, marine phytoplankton transforms large quantities of inorganic compounds into biomass. This has considerable environmental impacts as microalgae contribute for instance to counter-balancing anthropogenic releases of the greenhouse gas CO 2 . On the other hand, high concentrations of nitrogen compounds in an ecosystem can lead to harmful algae blooms. In previous investigations it was found that the chemical composition of microalgal biomass is strongly dependent on the nutrient availability. Therefore, it is expected that algae’s sequestration capabilities and productivity are also determined by the cells’ chemical environments. For investigating this hypothesis, novel analytical methodologies are required which are capable of monitoring live cells exposed to chemically shifting environments followed by chemometric modeling of their chemical adaptation dynamics. FTIR-ATR experiments have been developed for acquiring spectroscopic time series of live Dunaliella parva cultures adapting to different nutrient situations. Comparing experimental data from acclimated cultures to those exposed to a chemically shifted nutrient situation reveals insights in which analyte groups participate in modifications of microalgal biomass and on what time scales. For a chemometric description of these processes, a data model has been deduced which explains the chemical adaptation dynamics explicitly rather than empirically. First results show that this approach is feasible and derives information about the chemical biomass adaptations

  18. Evaluation of Two Surface Sampling Methods for Microbiological and Chemical Analyses To Assess the Presence of Biofilms in Food Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Sharon; Huu, Son Nguyen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Weyenberg, Stephanie van; Steenackers, Hans; Verplaetse, Alex; Vackier, Thijs; Sampers, Imca; Raes, Katleen; Reu, Koen De

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms are an important source of contamination in food companies, yet the composition of biofilms in practice is still mostly unknown. The chemical and microbiological characterization of surface samples taken after cleaning and disinfection is very important to distinguish free-living bacteria from the attached bacteria in biofilms. In this study, sampling methods that are potentially useful for both chemical and microbiological analyses of surface samples were evaluated. In the manufacturing facilities of eight Belgian food companies, surfaces were sampled after cleaning and disinfection using two sampling methods: the scraper-flocked swab method and the sponge stick method. Microbiological and chemical analyses were performed on these samples to evaluate the suitability of the sampling methods for the quantification of extracellular polymeric substance components and microorganisms originating from biofilms in these facilities. The scraper-flocked swab method was most suitable for chemical analyses of the samples because the material in these swabs did not interfere with determination of the chemical components. For microbiological enumerations, the sponge stick method was slightly but not significantly more effective than the scraper-flocked swab method. In all but one of the facilities, at least 20% of the sampled surfaces had more than 10 2 CFU/100 cm 2 . Proteins were found in 20% of the chemically analyzed surface samples, and carbohydrates and uronic acids were found in 15 and 8% of the samples, respectively. When chemical and microbiological results were combined, 17% of the sampled surfaces were contaminated with both microorganisms and at least one of the analyzed chemical components; thus, these surfaces were characterized as carrying biofilm. Overall, microbiological contamination in the food industry is highly variable by food sector and even within a facility at various sampling points and sampling times.

  19. Elaboration process, chemical and sensory analyses of fried-salted soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayol, María F.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to develop an elaboration process of fried-salted soybean and to determine the chemical composition, consumer acceptance and sensory description of the product. Different fried-salted soybean products were obtained under different temperature and time conditions by maceration in water, roasting and frying. Four of the best products were selected and evaluated by consumers (overall, color and texture acceptances: FSS1, FSS2, FSS3 and FSS4. The product with the highest consumer acceptance (7 = “like moderately” in a hedonic scale of 9 points was the one obtained by maceration at 100°C during 10 min and fried at 170°C for 5 min (FSS3. Proximate and fatty acid composition along with sensory attribute intensity ratings from descriptive analyses were determined on the fried-salted soybean with the highest consumer acceptance (FSS3. Proximate and fatty acid composition were also determined in raw soybeans. FSS3 had lower percentages of moisture and proteins, and higher lipids and carbohydrates than raw soybean. The use of sunflower oil in the frying process improved the fatty acid composition of the soybean product. Sensory attributes from descriptive analyses that were detected in high intensity ratings for the product were roasted, salty, crunchiness, hardness, brown color and gloss. This product is neither commonly consumed nor easily available in markets. It could be promoted to be consumed as a snack because of its high nutritional and sensory quality.

    El propósito de este trabajo fue desarrollar un proceso de elaboración de soja frita salada, determinar la composición química, la aceptabilidad por consumidores y la descripción sensorial del producto. Diferentes productos de soja frita salada fueron obtenidos bajo diferentes condiciones de temperatura y tiempo de: maceración, tostado y fritura. Los consumidores evaluaron y seleccionaron los cuatro mejores productos, los que presentaron mayor aceptaci

  20. Electron-beam generated porous dextran gels: experimental and quantum chemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Sergej; Knolle, Wolfgang; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Reichelt, Senta

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the reaction mechanism of electron-beam generated macroporous dextran cryogels by quantum chemical calculation and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. Electron-beam radiation was used to initiate the cross-linking reaction of methacrylated dextran in semifrozen aqueous solutions. The pore morphology of the resulting cryogels was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Quantum chemical calculations and electron paramagnetic resonance studies provided information on the most probable reaction pathway and the chain growth radicals. The most probable reaction pathway was a ring opening reaction and the addition of a C-atom to the double-bond of the methacrylated dextran molecule. First detailed quantum chemical calculation on the reaction mechanism of electron-beam initiated cross-linking reaction of methacrylated dextran are presented.

  1. Correlation and regression analyses of genetic effects for different types of cells in mammals under radiation and chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutskaya, N.G.; Mosseh, I.B.

    2006-01-01

    Data about genetic mutations under radiation and chemical treatment for different types of cells have been analyzed with correlation and regression analyses. Linear correlation between different genetic effects in sex cells and somatic cells have found. The results may be extrapolated on sex cells of human and mammals. (authors)

  2. Surface analyses of TiC coated molybdenum limiter material exposed to high heat flux electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Uchikawa, T.; Yamao, H.; Kawai, H.; Kousaku, A.; Nakamura, H.; Niikura, S.

    1987-01-01

    Observation and surface analyses of TiC coated molybdenum exposed to high heat flux have been performed to study thermal damage resistance of TiC coated molybdenum limiter material. High heat loads were provided by a 120 kW electron beam facility. SEM, AES and EPMA have been applied to the surface analyses

  3. Towards electron transport measurements in chemically modified graphene: effect of a solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Arnhild; Ensslin, Klaus [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J, E-mail: arnhildj@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: fabian.koehler@chem.ethz.ch [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    The chemical functionalization of graphene modifies the local electron density of carbon atoms and hence electron transport. Measuring these changes allows for a closer understanding of the chemical interaction and the influence of functionalization on the graphene lattice. However, not only chemistry, in this case diazonium chemistry, has an effect on electron transport. The latter is also influenced by defects and dopants resulting from different processing steps. Here, we show that the solvents used in the chemical reaction process change the transport properties. In more detail, the investigated combination of isopropanol and heating treatment reduces the doping concentration and significantly increases the mobility of graphene. Furthermore, isopropanol treatment alone increases the concentration of dopants and introduces an asymmetry between electron and hole transport, which might be difficult to distinguish from the effect of functionalization. The results shown in this work demand a closer look at the influence of solvents used for chemical modification in order to understand their influence.

  4. Towards electron transport measurements in chemically modified graphene: effect of a solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Arnhild; Ensslin, Klaus; Koehler, Fabian M; Stark, Wendelin J

    2010-01-01

    The chemical functionalization of graphene modifies the local electron density of carbon atoms and hence electron transport. Measuring these changes allows for a closer understanding of the chemical interaction and the influence of functionalization on the graphene lattice. However, not only chemistry, in this case diazonium chemistry, has an effect on electron transport. The latter is also influenced by defects and dopants resulting from different processing steps. Here, we show that the solvents used in the chemical reaction process change the transport properties. In more detail, the investigated combination of isopropanol and heating treatment reduces the doping concentration and significantly increases the mobility of graphene. Furthermore, isopropanol treatment alone increases the concentration of dopants and introduces an asymmetry between electron and hole transport, which might be difficult to distinguish from the effect of functionalization. The results shown in this work demand a closer look at the influence of solvents used for chemical modification in order to understand their influence.

  5. Conformational, structural, vibrational, electronic and quantum chemical investigations of cis-2-methoxycinnamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Anitha, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and FT-Raman spectra of cis-2-methoxycinnamic acid have been measured in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound were carried out using the observed FTIR and FT-Raman data. The geometry was optimised without any symmetry constrains using the DFT/B3LYP method utilising 6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The thermodynamic stability and chemical reactivity descriptors of the molecule have been determined. The exact environment of C and H of the molecule has been analysed by NMR spectroscopies through 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule. The energies of the frontier molecular orbitals have also been determined. Complete NBO analysis was also carried out to find out the intramolecular electronic interactions and their stabilisation energy. The vibrational frequencies which were determined experimentally are compared with those obtained theoretically from density functional theory (DFT) gradient calculations employing the B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ and cc-pVTZ methods.

  6. Electronic and chemical properties of graphene-based structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco

    In the present thesis several aspects of graphene-based structures have been investigated using density functional theory calculations to solve the electronic structure problem. A review of the implementation of a localized basis-set within the projector augmented wave method - the way of describ...... are attractive candidates although issues regarding the poisoning of the active site remain to be addressed....

  7. Shut-down dose rate analyses for the ITER electron cyclotron-heating upper launcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinhorst, Bastian; Serikov, Arkady; Fischer, Ulrich; Lu, Lei [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany); Spaeh, Peter; Strauss, Dirk [Institute for Applied Materials IAM (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The electron cyclotron resonance heating upper launcher (ECHUL) is going to be installed in the upper port of the ITER tokamak thermonuclear fusion reactor for plasma mode stabilization (neoclassical tearing modes and the sawtooth instability). The paper reports the latest neutronic modeling and analyses which have been performed for the ITER reference front steering launcher design. It focuses on the port accessibility after reactor shut-down for which dose rate (SDDR) distributions on a fine regular mesh grid were calculated. The results are compared to those obtained for the ITER Dummy Upper Port. The calculations showed that the heterogeneous ECHUL design gives rise to enhanced radiation streaming as compared to the homogenous dummy upper port. Therefore the used launcher geometry was upgraded to a more recent development stage. The inter-comparison shows a significant improvement of the launchers shielding properties but also the necessity to further upgrade the shielding performance. Furthermore, the analysis for the homogenous dummy upper port, which represents optimal shielding inside the launcher, demonstrates that the shielding upgrade also needs to include the launcher's environment.

  8. Forensic applications of scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analyser in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y S

    1982-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy - Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM/EDX) has been applied in casework for more than a year in the Forensic Division, Government Laboratory of Hong Kong. The types of samples being analysed are summarised and three cases of scientific interest are described. The first case applies SEM/EDX to characterize microscopic gold particles recovered from clothing of suspects involved in goldsmith robberies. Both elemental and morphological results obtained were used as supporting evidence. The second case describes the three types of beaded ends on fibres found in a single cloth sample. These beaded ends are different in shape and surface features and can be used as an additional parameter in fibre identification. The final case shows the application of vacuum evaporation of graphite on a document sample to reveal the area of paper which has been skillfully mechanically erased. Both the image intensity and the composition of the ink are used to differentiate between original and altered characters on the document.

  9. Dental caries and chemical analyses in reconstruction of diet, health and hygienic behaviour in the Middle Euphrates valley (Syria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Jacek; Szostek, Krzysztof; Komarnitki, Iulian; Mańkowska-Pliszka, Hanna; Zalewska, Marta

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to use two methods, biological and chemical, to examine changes in diet and health in individuals from the Middle Euphrates valley (Syria). We determined the frequency distribution of dental caries. Chemical analyses were concerned with the presence of elements such as strontium, barium, calcium and stable carbon isotopes ((13)C/(14)C). We chose three consecutive periods: Late Roman (2nd-4th century AD), Islamic (600-1200 AD) and Modern Islamic (1850-1950 AD). We analysed the dental remains of 145 individuals, with a total of 2530 teeth. We used visual research (magnifying glass/sharp dental probe) and radiography. The frequencies of caries were calculated on the basis of the proportional correction factor of Erdal and Duyar. We chose 39 permanent second molars for chemical analyses. The frequency of carious lesions was similar in all three periods (6-8%). In the Modern Islamic and Islamic periods, occlusal surfaces were infected with caries most often, while the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and approximal surfaces were affected to a lesser degree. However, in the Late Roman period, the CEJ and approximal surfaces showed caries most frequently, in contrast to occlusal surfaces, which seldom showed signs of caries. Chemical analyses showed lower Sr/Ca ratios and Observed Ratio index values for the Modern Islamic and higher values for the Islamic and Late Roman periods. Mean stable isotope (δ(13)C) analyses demonstrated that the Modern Islamic period was strongly divergent from the other periods. These data suggest a similar socio-economic status during the Late Roman and Islamic periods. The diet of the population living in the Late Roman and Islamic periods contained a larger number of products containing strontium than calcium. In the modern population these proportions have been reversed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical tables on physical and chemical analyses of Rhine water 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The numerical tables contain the measuring results of the physical-chemical studies on the Rhine water for the year 1983. The tables are arranged by general parameters, organic matter, eutrophicating substances, anorganic matter, metals, organic micropollution as well as by radioactivity (total alpha- or beta- and T-activity). (MM) [de

  11. Electronic structure and chemical bond of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the band structure calculations for the compound Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 are discussed and compared to those obtained for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . An analysis of the contribution of the densities of states at the different atomic sites shows that the states at the Fermi energy. E F , have a strong bidimensional character due to the CuO 2 planes. Moreover, for the bismuth compound, the contribution of the Bi-O planes at E F is substantial. The elements Y and Ba in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , Ca and Sr in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 act essentially as electron donors, the corresponding densities of states at E F are very small. An analysis of the electronic charge at the different atomic sites is presented. The respective roles of the CuO 2 planes. Cu-O chains and Bi-O planes on the electronic properties at the Fermi level are discussed [fr

  12. Electronic dissipation processes during chemical reactions on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stella, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Hauptbeschreibung Every day in our life is larded with a huge number of chemical reactions on surfaces. Some reactions occur immediately, for others an activation energy has to be supplied. Thus it happens that though a reaction should thermodynamically run off, it is kinetically hindered. Meaning the partners react only to the thermodynamically more stable product state within a mentionable time if the activation energy of the reaction is supplied. With the help of catalysts the activation energy of a reaction can be lowered. Such catalytic processes on surfaces are widely used in industry. A

  13. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  14. Analysis of abused drugs by selected ion monitoring: quantitative comparison of electron impact and chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz, R.L.; Knowlton, D.A.; Lin, D.C.K.; Fentiman, A.F. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of electron impact and chemical ionization when used for selected ion monitoring analysis of commonly abused drugs. For most of the drugs examined chemical ionization using ammonia as the reactant gas gave the largest single m/e ion current response per unit weight of sample. However, if maximum sensitivity is desired it is important to evaluate electron impact and chemical ionization with respect to both maximum response and degree of interference from background and endogenous materials

  15. Extra virgin olive oil bitterness evaluation by sensory and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favati, Fabio; Condelli, Nicola; Galgano, Fernanda; Caruso, Marisa Carmela

    2013-08-15

    An experimental investigation was performed on blend extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs) from different cultivars and EVOO from different olive monovarieties (Coratina, Leccino, Maiatica, Ogliarola) with the aim to evaluate the possibility of estimating the perceived bitterness intensity by using chemical indices, such as the total phenol content and the compounds responsible for oil bitterness measured spectrophotometrically at 225 nm (K225 value), as bitterness predictors in different EVOO. Therefore, a bitterness predictive model, based on the relationship between the perceived bitterness intensity of the selected stimuli and the chosen chemicals parameters has been built and validated. The results indicated that the oil bitterness intensity could be satisfactorily predicted by using the K225 values of oil samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coordinating Chemical and Mineralogical Analyses of Antarctic Dry Valley Sediments as Potential Analogs for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S. N.; Bishop, J. L.; Englert, P.; Gibson, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) provide a unique terrestrial analog for Martian surface processes as they are extremely cold and dry sedimentary environments. The surface geology and the chemical composition of the Dry Valleys that are similar to Mars suggest the possible presence of these soil-formation processes on Mars. The soils and sediments from Wright Valley, Antarctica were investigated in this study to examine mineralogical and chemical changes along the surface layer in this region and as a function of depth. Surface samples collected near Prospect Mesa and Don Juan Pond of the ADV were analyzed using visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy and major and trace element abundances.

  17. Analysing and Navigating Natural Products Space for Generating Small, Diverse, But Representative Chemical Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Steve; Kell, Douglas B

    2018-01-01

    Armed with the digital availability of two natural products libraries, amounting to some 195 885 molecular entities, we ask the question of how we can best sample from them to maximize their "representativeness" in smaller and more usable libraries of 96, 384, 1152, and 1920 molecules. The term "representativeness" is intended to include diversity, but for numerical reasons (and the likelihood of being able to perform a QSAR) it is necessary to focus on areas of chemical space that are more highly populated. Encoding chemical structures as fingerprints using the RDKit "patterned" algorithm, we first assess the granularity of the natural products space using a simple clustering algorithm, showing that there are major regions of "denseness" but also a great many very sparsely populated areas. We then apply a "hybrid" hierarchical K-means clustering algorithm to the data to produce more statistically robust clusters from which representative and appropriate numbers of samples may be chosen. There is necessarily again a trade-off between cluster size and cluster number, but within these constraints, libraries containing 384 or 1152 molecules can be found that come from clusters that represent some 18 and 30% of the whole chemical space, with cluster sizes of, respectively, 50 and 27 or above, just about sufficient to perform a QSAR. By using the online availability of molecules via the Molport system (www.molport.com), we are also able to construct (and, for the first time, provide the contents of) a small virtual library of available molecules that provided effective coverage of the chemical space described. Consistent with this, the average molecular similarities of the contents of the libraries developed is considerably smaller than is that of the original libraries. The suggested libraries may have use in molecular or phenotypic screening, including for determining possible transporter substrates. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by Wiley

  18. Statistical Data Analyses of Trace Chemical, Biochemical, and Physical Analytical Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udey, Ruth Norma [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry measurement results are most meaningful when interpreted using rigorous statistical treatments of the data. The same data set may provide many dimensions of information depending on the questions asked through the applied statistical methods. Three principal projects illustrated the wealth of information gained through the application of statistical data analyses to diverse problems.

  19. Modern Information Technologies in Chemical Education: Research, Analyses and Prospects for Chemistry Teachers Training [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review paper describes the present state-of-art of two areas of the contemporary science education – the use of interactive media in teaching and learning chemistry in secondary schools and the competences of chemistry teachers for application of electronic education in these schools. A review of the current literature in those topics is presented in some details. The own contributions of the author in these areas are emphasized.

  20. Chemical models of chains electron transfer in hydroxylating ferment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhrem, A.A.; Kiselev, P.A.; Metelitsa, D.I.

    1977-01-01

    The rate constants are measured of consumption of nicotineamidedinucleotide (NAD-N) during its oxidation by molecular oxygen with the participation of Ti 4+ , Sn 4+ , Cu 2+ , Fe 3+ , VO 2+ , and Ce 4+ ions in mixtures of acetonitrile with water and of dioxane with water taken in a volume ratio of 1:1 (46 deg C). The kinetics of oxidation of NAD-N with the participation of Ti 4+ at 37 deg C in a water-acetonitrile medium is studied in detail. The hydroxylating capacity of the system NAD-N - Ti 4+ - O 2 with respect to naphthalene is proved. The reaction mechanism and its relationship with the microsomal chains of electron transport are discussed

  1. Chemical analyses for selected wells in San Joaquin County and part of Contra Costa County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeter, Gail L.

    1980-01-01

    The study area of this report includes the eastern valley area of Contra Costa County and all of San Joaquin County, an area of approximately 1,600 square miles in the northern part of the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. Between December 1977 and December 1978, 1,489 wells were selectively canvassed. During May and June in 1978 and 1979, water samples were collected for chemical analysis from 321 of these wells. Field determinations of alkalinity, conductance, pH, and temperature were made, and individual constituents were analyzed. This report is the fourth in a series of baseline data reports on wells in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. (USGS)

  2. The evolution of a LIMS (laboratory information management system). [Chemical analyses at BNFL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-04-01

    Changes in the world and United Kingdom markets for nuclear fuels during the 1990s have prompted British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) to maximise cost effectiveness in its Chemical and Metallurgical Services department. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) was introduced in order to keep records of analytical techniques and equipment up to date by coordinating various computer systems. Wherever possible automated systems have replaced traditional, labour intensive techniques. So successful has the LIMS system been, that the team now hopes to expand into expert systems. (UK).

  3. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, δ13C, and δ15N.

  4. Time-resolved imaging of purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockett, Paul; Bisgaard, Christer Z.; Clarkin, Owen J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions are manifestations of the dynamics of molecular valence electrons and their couplings to atomic motions. Emerging methods in attosecond science can probe purely electronic dynamics in atomic and molecular systems(1-6). By contrast, time-resolved structural-dynamics methods...... such as electron(7-10) or X-ray diffraction(11) and X-ray absorption(12) yield complementary information about the atomic motions. Time-resolved methods that are directly sensitive to both valence-electron dynamics and atomic motions include photoelectron spectroscopy(13-15) and high-harmonic generation(16......,17): in both cases, this sensitivity derives from the ionization-matrix element(18,19). Here we demonstrate a time-resolved molecular-frame photoelectron-angular-distribution (TRMFPAD) method for imaging the purely valence-electron dynamics during a chemical reaction. Specifically, the TRMFPADs measured during...

  5. Assessment of toxicological profiles of the municipal wastewater effluents using chemical analyses and bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smital, Tvrtko; Terzic, Senka; Zaja, Roko; Senta, Ivan; Pivcevic, Branka; Popovic, Marta; Mikac, Iva; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Thomas, Kevin V; Ahel, Marijan

    2011-05-01

    The hazardous chemical contamination of untreated wastewater and secondary effluent from the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) of the city of Zagreb, Croatia was comprehensively characterized using large-volume solid-phase extraction (SPE) and silica gel fractionation, followed by a detailed analysis of the resulting extracts by a combination of chemical and bioassay methods. Over 100 individual contaminants or closely related-contaminant groups were identified by high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF). Ecotoxicity profiling of the investigated samples, including cytotoxicity, chronic toxicity and EROD activity; inhibition of the multixenobiotic resistance (MXR), genotoxicity and estrogenic potential, revealed the most significant contribution of toxic compounds to be present in polar fractions. Wastewater treatment using conventional activated sludge process reduced the initial toxicity of raw wastewater to various extents, ranging from 28% for algal toxicity to 73.2% for an estrogenic activity. The most efficient toxicity removal was observed for the polar compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Refractometry and interferometry in chemical analysis; Refractometrie et interferometrie en analyse chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veret, C [Faculte des Sciences de Paris, 75 (France)

    2000-03-01

    In vacuum, an electromagnetic radiation is propagated at a constant velocity. But, when it has to pass through a physical medium, it is submitted to different interactions (for instance: absorption, diffusion, refraction, polarization, dispersion, fluorescence) which lead to a modification of its propagation. In the frequency ranges of the radiation for which the absorption is not very important, the modifications of the propagation velocity of a radiation can bring data on the nature and/or the physical conditions (pressure, temperature) of a medium, whatever its state be: gas, liquid or solid. Thus, the absolute refractive index of a medium in relation to vacuum is defined as the ratio c/v of the propagation velocity c of a monochromatic electromagnetic radiation in vacuum at its velocity v in this medium. The photonic refractometry (field of ultraviolet, visible and infrared radiations) is the set of the measure techniques of the refractive indexes having a role in chemical analysis. The refractometry measures can only be applied to media which are optically transparent. After having described these techniques, the author presents their uses in chemical analysis. (O.M.)

  7. Kelvin probe microscopy and electronic transport measurements in reduced graphene oxide chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, Christopher E; MacNaughton, Samuel; Sonkusale, Sameer; Staii, Cristian

    2013-06-21

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is an electronically hybrid material that displays remarkable chemical sensing properties. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the chemical gating effects in RGO-based chemical sensors. The gas sensing devices are patterned in a field-effect transistor geometry, by dielectrophoretic assembly of RGO platelets between gold electrodes deposited on SiO2/Si substrates. We show that these sensors display highly selective and reversible responses to the measured analytes, as well as fast response and recovery times (tens of seconds). We use combined electronic transport/Kelvin probe microscopy measurements to quantify the amount of charge transferred to RGO due to chemical doping when the device is exposed to electron-acceptor (acetone) and electron-donor (ammonia) analytes. We demonstrate that this method allows us to obtain high-resolution maps of the surface potential and local charge distribution both before and after chemical doping, to identify local gate-susceptible areas on the RGO surface, and to directly extract the contact resistance between the RGO and the metallic electrodes. The method presented is general, suggesting that these results have important implications for building graphene and other nanomaterial-based chemical sensors.

  8. Kelvin probe microscopy and electronic transport measurements in reduced graphene oxide chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, Christopher E.; MacNaughton, Samuel; Sonkusale, Sameer; Staii, Cristian

    2013-06-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is an electronically hybrid material that displays remarkable chemical sensing properties. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the chemical gating effects in RGO-based chemical sensors. The gas sensing devices are patterned in a field-effect transistor geometry, by dielectrophoretic assembly of RGO platelets between gold electrodes deposited on SiO2/Si substrates. We show that these sensors display highly selective and reversible responses to the measured analytes, as well as fast response and recovery times (tens of seconds). We use combined electronic transport/Kelvin probe microscopy measurements to quantify the amount of charge transferred to RGO due to chemical doping when the device is exposed to electron-acceptor (acetone) and electron-donor (ammonia) analytes. We demonstrate that this method allows us to obtain high-resolution maps of the surface potential and local charge distribution both before and after chemical doping, to identify local gate-susceptible areas on the RGO surface, and to directly extract the contact resistance between the RGO and the metallic electrodes. The method presented is general, suggesting that these results have important implications for building graphene and other nanomaterial-based chemical sensors.

  9. Electron microscopy analyses and electrical properties of the layered Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoufyq, A. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Département d‘Études des Réacteurs, Laboratoire Dosimétrie Capteurs Instrumentation, CEA Cadarache (France); Société CESIGMA—Signals and Systems, 1576 Chemin de La Planquette, F 83 130 LA GARDE (France); Ait Ahsaine, H. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); Patout, L. [Institut Matériaux Microélectronique et Nanosciences de Provence, IM2NP, UMR CNRS 7334, Université du Sud Toulon-Var, BP 20132, 83957, La Garde Cedex (France); Benlhachemi, A.; Ezahri, M. [Laboratoire Matériaux et Environnement LME, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Zohr, BP 8106, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Maroc (Morocco); and others

    2013-07-15

    The bismuth tungstate Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} was synthesized using a classical coprecipitation method followed by a calcination process at different temperatures. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) analyses. The Rietveld analysis and electron diffraction clearly confirmed the Pca2{sub 1} non centrosymmetric space group previously proposed for this phase. The layers Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2−} have been directly evidenced from the HRTEM images. The electrical properties of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} compacted pellets systems were determined from electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) and direct current (DC) analyses, under air and argon, between 350 and 700 °C. The direct current analyses showed that the conduction observed from EIS analyses was mainly ionic in this temperature range, with a small electronic contribution. Electrical change above the transition temperature of 660 °C is observed under air and argon atmospheres. The strong conductivity increase observed under argon is interpreted in terms of formation of additional oxygen vacancies coupled with electron conduction. - Graphical abstract: High resolution transmission electron microscopy: inverse fast Fourier transform giving the layered structure of the Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} phase, with a representation of the cell dimensions (b and c vectors). The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} and WO{sub 4}{sup 2−} sandwiches are visible in the IFFT image. - Highlights: • Using transmission electron microscopy, we visualize the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • Electrical analyses under argon gas show some increase in conductivity. • The phase transition at 660 °C is evidenced from electrical modification.

  10. Hanford Environmental Restoration data validation process for chemical and radiochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.R.; Bechtold, R.A.; Clark, D.E.; Angelos, K.M.; Winter, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Detailed procedures for validation of chemical and radiochemical data are used to assure consistent application of validation principles and support a uniform database of quality environmental data. During application of these procedures, it was determined that laboratory data packages were frequently missing certain types of documentation causing subsequent delays in meeting critical milestones in the completion of validation activities. A quality improvement team was assembled to address the problems caused by missing documentation and streamline the entire process. The result was the development of a separate data package verification procedure and revisions to the data validation procedures. This has resulted in a system whereby deficient data packages are immediately identified and corrected prior to validation and revised validation procedures which more closely match the common analytical reporting practices of laboratory service vendors

  11. Using vegetable oils and animal fats in Diesel Engines: chemical analyses and engine texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmino, I.; Verhelst, S.; Sierens, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, some vegetable oils (rapeseed oil, palm oil) and animal fat were tested in a Diesel engine at a range of engine spreads and torque settings, after preheating at 70 0 C. Engine performance, fuel consumption and NOx, unburnt hydrocarbons and soot emissions have been recorded. The results have been compared to those obtained with diesel fuel in the same test conditions. The oils and fats were also analyzed for their physical and chemical properties (viscosity, composition, unsaturation, heating value). NOx emissions were found to be lower for the oils than for the diesel fuel. This, combined with higher HC emissions, can probably be explained through less effective atomization due to the higher viscosity of the oils and fat. On the other hand, soot emissions were found to decrease. [it

  12. The Chemical Diversity of Lantana camara: Analyses of Essential Oil Samples from Cuba, Nepal, and Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Prabodh; Crouch, Rebecca A; Monzote, Lianet; Cos, Paul; Awadh Ali, Nasser A; Alhaj, Mehdi A; Setzer, William N

    2016-03-01

    The aerial parts of Lantana camara L. were collected from three different geographical locations: Artemisa (Cuba), Biratnagar (Nepal), and Sana'a (Yemen). The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A cluster analysis of 39 L. camara essential oil compositions revealed eight major chemotypes: β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, ar-curcumene/zingiberene, γ-curcumen-15-al/epi-β-bisabolol, (E)-nerolidol, davanone, eugenol/alloaromadendrene, and carvone. The sample from Cuba falls into the group dominated by (E)-nerolidol, the sample from Nepal is a davanone chemotype, and the sample from Yemen belongs to the β-caryophyllene chemotype. The chemical composition of L. camara oil plays a role in the biological activity; the β-caryophyllene and (E)-nerolidol chemotypes showed antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  13. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  14. Assessing the Extent of Sediment Contamination Around Creosote-treated Pilings Through Chemical and Biological Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Creosote is a common wood preservative used to treat marine structures, such as docks and bulkheads. Treated dock pilings continually leach polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other creosote compounds into the surrounding water and sediment. Over time, these compounds can accumulate in marine sediments, reaching much greater concentrations than those in seawater. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of creosote contamination in sediments, at a series of distances from treated pilings. Three pilings were randomly selected from a railroad trestle in Fidalgo Bay, WA and sediment samples were collected at four distances from each: 0 meters, 0.5 meters, 1 meter, and 2 meters. Samples were used to conduct two bioassays: an amphipod bioassay (Rhepoxynius abronius) and a sand dollar embryo bioassay. Grain size and PAH content (using a fluorometric method) were also measured. Five samples in the amphipod bioassay showed significantly lower effective survival than the reference sediment. These consisted of samples closest to the piling at 0 and 0.5 meters. One 0 m sample in the sand dollar embryo bioassay also showed a significantly lower percentage of normal embryos than the reference sediment. Overall, results strongly suggest that creosote-contaminated sediments, particularly those closest to treated pilings, can negatively affect both amphipods and echinoderm embryos. Although chemical data were somewhat ambiguous, 0 m samples had the highest levels of PAHs, which corresponded to the lowest average survival in both bioassays. Relatively high levels of PAHs were found as far as 2 meters away from pilings. Therefore, we cannot say how far chemical contamination can spread from creosote-treated pilings, and at what distance this contamination can still affect marine organisms. These results, as well as future research, are essential to the success of proposed piling removal projects. In addition to creosote-treated pilings, contaminated sediments must

  15. Combining hydraulic model, hydrogeomorphological observations and chemical analyses of surface waters to improve knowledge on karst flash floods genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Raynaud

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During a flood event over a karst watershed, the connections between surface and ground waters appear to be complex ones. The karst may attenuate surface floods by absorbing water or contribute to the surface flood by direct contribution of karst waters in the rivers (perennial and overflowing springs and by diffuse resurgence along the hillslopes. If it is possible to monitor each known outlet of a karst system, the diffuse contribution is yet difficult to assess. Furthermore, all these connections vary over time according to several factors such as the water content of the soil and underground, the rainfall characteristics, the runoff pathways. Therefore, the contribution of each compartment is generally difficult to assess, and flood dynamics are not fully understood. To face these misunderstandings and difficulties, we analysed surface waters during six recent flood events in the Lirou watershed (a karst tributary of the Lez, in South of France. Because of the specific chemical signature of karst waters, chemical analyses can supply information about water pathways and flood dynamics. Then, we used the dilution law to combine chemical results, flow data and field observations to assess the dynamics of the karst component of the flood. To end, we discussed the surface or karst origin of the waters responsible for the apparent runoff coefficient rise during flash karst flood.

  16. Surface analyses of TiC coated molybdenum limiter material exposed to high heat flux electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Uchikawa, T.; Yamao, H.; Kawai, H.; Kousaku, A.; Nakamura, H.; Niikura, S.

    1986-01-01

    Observation and surface analyses of TiC coated molybdenum exposed to high heat flux have been performed to study thermal damage resistance of TiC coated molybdenum limiter material. High heat loads were provided by a 120 kW electron beam facility. (author)

  17. An electronic probe micro-analyser. A linear scan device; Microanalyseur a sonde electronique. Dispositif de balayage lineaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirianenko, A; Maurice, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The Castaing electronic probe micro-analyser makes possible static analysis at successive points. For two years this apparatus has been equipped by its constructor with an automatic device for surface scanning. In order to increase the micro-analyser's efficiency a 'linear' scan device has been incorporated making it possible to obtain semi-quantitative analyses very rapidly. (authors) [French] Le microanalyseur a sonde electronique de Castaing permet l'analyse statique en des points successifs. Depuis deux ans, cet appareil a ete equipe par son constructeur d'un dispositif de balayage automatique 'surface'. Afin d'augmenter l'efficacite du microanalyaeur, on a adapte un dispositif de balayage 'lineaire' qui permet d'obtenir tres rapidement des analyses semi-quantitative. (auteurs)

  18. X-ray electron density investigation of chemical bonding in van der Waals materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Tolborg, Kasper; Sist, Mattia; Zhang, Jiawei; Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Filsø, Mette Ø.; Cenedese, Simone; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Nishibori, Eiji; Iversen, Bo B.

    2018-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) solids have attracted great attention ever since the discovery of graphene, with the essential feature being the weak chemical bonding across the vdW gap. The nature of these weak interactions is decisive for many extraordinary properties, but it is a strong challenge for current theory to accurately model long-range electron correlations. Here we use synchrotron X-ray diffraction data to precisely determine the electron density in the archetypal vdW solid, TiS2, and compare the results with density functional theory calculations. Quantitative agreement is observed for the chemical bonding description in the covalent TiS2 slabs, but significant differences are identified for the interactions across the gap, with experiment revealing more electron deformation than theory. The present data provide an experimental benchmark for testing theoretical models of weak chemical bonding.

  19. Chemometrical characterization of four italian rice varieties based on genetic and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandolini, Vincenzo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Tedeschi, Paola; Barile, Daniela; Cereti, Elisabetta; Maietti, Annalisa; Vecchiati, Giorgio; Martelli, Aldo; Arlorio, Marco

    2006-12-27

    This paper describes a method for achieving qualitative identification of four rice varieties from two different Italian regions. To estimate the presence of genetic diversity among the four rice varieties, we used polymerase chain reaction-randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (PCR-RAPD) markers, and to elucidate whether a relationship exists between the ground and the specific characteristics of the product, we studied proximate composition, fatty acid composition, mineral content, and total antioxidant capacity. Using principal component analysis on genomic and compositional data, we were able to classify rice samples according to their variety and their district of production. This work also examined the discrimination ability of different parameters. It was found that genomic data give the best discrimination based on varieties, indicating that RAPD assays could be useful in discriminating among closely related species, while compositional analyses do not depend on the genetic characters only but are related to the production area.

  20. A framework for analysing relationships between chemical composition and crystal structure in metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, N.W.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program has been written to characterize the coordination polyhedra of metal cations in terms of their volumes and polyhedral elements, i.e. corners, edges and faces. The sharing of these corners, edges and faces between polyhedra is also quantitatively monitored. In order to develop the methodology, attention is focused on ternary oxides containing the Al 3+ ion, whose structures were retrieved from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD). This also permits an objective assessment of the applicability of Pauling's rules. The influence of ionic valence on the structures of these compounds is examined, by calculating electrostatic bond strengths. Although Pauling's second rule is not supported in detail, the calculation of oxygen-ion valence reveals a basic structural requirement, that the average calculated oxygen-ion valence in any ionic oxide structure is equal to 2. The analysis is further developed to define a general method for the prediction of novel chemical compositions likely to adopt a given desired structure. The polyhedral volumes of this structure are calculated, and use is made of standard ionic radii for cations in sixfold coordination. The electroneutrality principle is invoked to take valence considerations into account. This method can be used to guide the development of new compositions of ceramic materials with certain desirable physical properties. (orig.)

  1. Qualitative/Chemical Analyses of Ankaferd Hemostat and Its Antioxidant Content in Synthetic Gastric Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Koluman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ankaferd hemostat (ABS is the first topical haemostatic agent involving the red blood cell-fibrinogen interactions. The antihemorrhagic efficacy of ABS has been tested in controlled clinical trials. The drug induces the formation of an encapsulated complex protein web with vital erythroid aggregation. The aim of this study is to detect the essential toxicity profile and the antioxidant molecules inside ABS. Methods. The pesticides were analyzed by GC-MS and LC-MS. The determination by ICP-MS after pressure digestion was performed for the heavy metals. HPLC was used for the detection of mycotoxins. Dioxin Response Chemically Activated Luciferase Gene Expression method was used for the dioxin evaluation. TOF-MS and spectra data were evaluated to detect the antioxidants and other molecules. Results. TOF-MS spectra revealed the presence of several antioxidant molecules (including tocotrienols, vitamin E, tryptophan, estriol, galangin, apigenin, oenin, 3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran, TBHQ, thymol, BHA, BHT, lycopene, glycyrrhetinic acid, and tomatine, which may have clinical implications in the pharmacobiological actions of ABS. Conclusion. The safety of ABS regarding the presence of heavy metals, pesticides, mycotoxins, GMO and dioxins, and PCBs was demonstrated. Thus the present toxicological results indicated the safety of ABS. The antioxidant content of ABS should be investigated in future studies.

  2. Wet-chemical etching of atom probe tips for artefact free analyses of nanoscaled semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonyan, D; Fleischmann, C; Veloso, A; Franquet, A; Bogdanowicz, J; Morris, R J H; Vandervorst, W

    2018-03-01

    We introduce an innovative specimen preparation method employing the selectivity of a wet-chemical etching step to improve data quality and success rates in the atom probe analysis of contemporary semiconductor devices. Firstly, on the example of an SiGe fin embedded in SiO 2 we demonstrate how the selective removal of SiO 2 from the final APT specimen significantly improves accuracy and reliability of the reconstructed data. With the oxide removal, we eliminate the origin of shape artefacts, i.e. the formation of a non-hemispherical tip shape, that are typically observed in the reconstructed volume of complex systems. Secondly, using the same approach, we increase success rates to ∼90% for the damage-free, 3D site-specific localization of short (250 nm), vertical Si nanowires at the specimen apex. The impact of the abrupt emitter radius change that is introduced by this specimen preparation method is evaluated as being minor using field evaporation simulation and comparison of different reconstruction schemes. The Ge content within the SiGe fin as well as the 3D boron distribution in the Si NW as resolved by atom probe analysis are in good agreement with TEM/EDS and ToF-SIMS analysis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. HELP: a model for evaluating the feasibility of using various chemical reaction systems as electronic lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbelin, J M; Cohen, N

    1975-09-01

    An analytical model for estimating the minimum requirements of a chemically pumped electronic laser is developed. From a knowledge of the basic spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of a particular reaction, the model can quickly classify the system in accordance with the feasibility of generating stimulated emission at different possible wavelengths. Sample calculations of the reactions of barium atoms with nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide indicate that the model is sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between very similar systems and, therefore, should be useful in providing classification criteria in the search for a chemically pumped electronic laser.

  4. Chemical changes induced on a TiO2 surface by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, L.I.; Passeggi, M.C.G.; Ferron, J.

    2007-01-01

    We study the TiO 2 (Ti 4+ ) chemical reduction induced by electron bombardment using Auger electron spectroscopy and factor analysis. We show that the electron irradiation of a TiO 2 sample is characterized by the appearance of a lower Ti oxidation state, Ti 2 O 3 (Ti 3+ ), followed by a further deposition of carbon, which is present inevitably in the environment even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The appearance of C over the surface is found to be a complex mechanism which affects the reduction process through passivation of the electron-induced oxygen desorption and formation of titanium carbide. For very high irradiation doses, we also found that the chemical changes on the surface are stopped due to the deposition of carbon in a graphitic form

  5. Honey roasted peanuts and roasted peanuts from Argentina. Sensorial and chemical analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosso, Nelson R.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to characterize the chemical and sensory aspects of Honey Roasted (HRP and Roasted Peanuts (RP. These products were evaluated for sensory analysis: overall acceptance using a consumer test and a descriptive analysis using a trained panel. Percentages of protein, oil, carbohydrate and ash was analyzed in HRP and RP. The contents of carbohydrate, oil and protein in HRP were 28.22%, 45.56% and 21.06%, respectively. RP showed higher percentages of lipids and protein and lower percentages of carbohydrate content than HRP. The total energetic value was lower in HRP. Values of 8 (like very much were chosen by a higher number of consumer panelist for HRP while values of 6 (like slightly were found in a higher proportion for RP. The trained panel described 11 attributes: brown color, roughness, roasted peanutty, oxidized, cardboard, sweet, salty, bitter, sour, hardness and crunchiness. The roasted peanutty intensity in RP was higher than in HRP. The intensities of roughness, sweet and salty in HRP were higher than in RP.El objetivo del trabajo fue caracterizar química y sensorialmente al Maní Tostado con Miel (MTM y Maní Tostado (MT. Estos dos productos fueron evaluados sensorialmente analizando su aceptabilidad por parte de consumidores (test de aceptabilidad y sus atributos sensoriales por el uso de un panel de jueces entrenados (prueba descriptiva. Por otra parte se describió la composición química porcentual: porcentajes de proteínas, aceites, hidratos de carbonos y cenizas. Los contenidos de hidratos de carbonos, aceites y proteínas en MTM fueron de 28,22%, 45.56% y 21,06%. MT presentó mayores porcentajes de lípidos y proteínas y menor contenido de hidratos de carbono que MTM. El valor energético total de MTM es levemente menor que en MT. La aceptabilidad de los productos mostró mayor número de consumidores que le asignaron un valor de 8 ( me gusta mucho dentro de una escala hedónica de 9 puntos a MTM y

  6. The reliability of radiochemical and chemical trace analyses in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, Jorma.

    1977-12-01

    After theoretically exploring the factors which influence the quality of analytical data as well as the means by which a sufficient quality can be assured and controlled, schemes of different kinds have been developed and applied in order to demonstrate the analytical quality assurance and control in practice. Methods have been developed for the determination of cesium, bromine and arsenic by neutron activation analysis at the natural ''background'' concentration level in environmental materials. The calibration of methods is described. The methods were also applied on practical routine analysis, the results of which are briefly reviewed. In the case of Ce the precision of a comprehensive calibration was found to vary between 5.2-9.2% as a relative standard deviation, which agrees well with the calculated statistical random error 5.7-8.7%. In the case of Br the method showed a reasonable precision, about 11% on the average, and accuracy. In employing the method to analyze died samples containing Br from 3 to 12 ppm a continuous control of precison was performed. The analysis of As demonstrates the many problems and difficulties associated with environmental analysis. In developing the final method four former intercomparison materials of IAEA were utilized in the calibration. The tests performed revealed a systematic error. In this case a scheme was developed for the continuous control of both precision and accuracy. The results of radiochemical analyses in environmental materials show a reliability somewhat better than that occuring in the determination of stable trace elements. According to a rough classification, 15% of the results of radiochemical analysis show excellent reliability, whereas 60% show a reliability adequate for certain purposes. The remaining 15% are excellent, 60% adequate for some purposes and 30% good-for-nothing. The reasons for often insufficient reliability of results are both organizational and technical. With reasonable effort and

  7. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-07

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  8. Atomistic observations and analyses of lattice defects in transmission electron microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, H

    2003-01-01

    The transmission electron microscope (TEM) -accelerators was developed. TEM-Accelerator made possible to observe in situ experiments of ion irradiation and implantation. The main results are the experimental proof of new lattice defects by irradiation, the formation process and synthesized conditions of carbon onion by ion implantation, the microstructure and phase transformation conditions of graphite by ion irradiated phase transformation, the irradiation damage formation process by simultaneous irradiation of electron and ion and behavior of fullerene whisker under irradiation. The microstructural evolution of defect clusters in copper irradiated with 240-keV Cu sup + ions and a high resolution electron micrograph of carbon onions synthesized by ion implantation are explained as the examples of recent researches. (S.Y.)

  9. Effects of electron-transfer chemical modification on the electrical characteristics of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiaoyan; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Nouchi, Ryo; Yin Lichang

    2010-01-01

    Because of the large reactivity of single layer graphene to electron-transfer chemistries, 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is employed to modify the electrical properties of graphene field-effect transistors. After modification, the transfer characteristics of chemically modified graphene show a reduction in the minimum conductivity, electron-hole mobility asymmetry, a decrease in the electron/hole mobility, and a positive shift of the charge neutrality point with broadening of the minimum conductivity region. These phenomena are attributed to a dediazoniation reaction and the adsorbates on the graphene surface.

  10. Effects of electron-transfer chemical modification on the electrical characteristics of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Xiaoyan; Tanigaki, Katsumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nouchi, Ryo [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Yin Lichang, E-mail: nouchi@sspns.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-11-26

    Because of the large reactivity of single layer graphene to electron-transfer chemistries, 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is employed to modify the electrical properties of graphene field-effect transistors. After modification, the transfer characteristics of chemically modified graphene show a reduction in the minimum conductivity, electron-hole mobility asymmetry, a decrease in the electron/hole mobility, and a positive shift of the charge neutrality point with broadening of the minimum conductivity region. These phenomena are attributed to a dediazoniation reaction and the adsorbates on the graphene surface.

  11. Study of chemical shifts of the chloroform complexes with cyclic donors of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaszkiewicz, B.; Pajak, Z.

    1973-01-01

    Chemical shifts of chloroform complexes with the heterocyclic electron donors: pyridine, piperidine, alpha-picoline and gamma-picoline have been studied using the high resolution (5.10 -9 ) spectrometer operating at 80 MHz. An attempt has also been made to study the three - component solutions of : chloroform, a heterocyclic donor of electrons and carbon tetrachloride. The results, which have been obtained, indicate that the complex-forming power of pyridine and other electron donors is greater in carbon tetrachloride than in other solvents. (S.B.)

  12. Quantifying Chemical and Electrochemical Reactions in Liquids by in situ Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia

    and developing a robust imaging analysis method for quantitatively understand chemical and electrochemical process during in situ liquid electron microscopy. By using two custom-made liquid cells (an electrochemical scanning electron microscopy (EC-SEM) platform and Liquid Flow S/TEM holder) beam...... of electrochemical deposition of copper (Cu) by electrochemical liquid scanning electron microscopy (EC-SEM) was done in order to direct observe the formation of dendritic structures. Finally the shape evolution from solid to hollow structures through galvanic replacement reactions were observed for different silver...

  13. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis caused by sterile non-latex protective gloves: clinical investigation and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontén, Ann; Hamnerius, Nils; Bruze, Magnus; Hansson, Christer; Persson, Christina; Svedman, Cecilia; Thörneby Andersson, Kirsten; Bergendorff, Ola

    2013-02-01

    An increased frequency of occupational contact hand dermatitis among surgical operating theatre personnel has been noticed. To evaluate patients with occupational contact dermatitis caused by their rubber gloves, and to describe a method for analysing the content of the allergens in the gloves. Patch tests were performed with the baseline series, a rubber chemical series, and the patients' own gloves. A method for analysing 1,3-diphenylguanidine (DPG) and cetylpyridinium chloride in the gloves was developed. Contact allergy to thiuram mix was found in 8 of 16 patients, whereas 12 of 16 patients reacted to DPG. In 7 of 8 patients, contact allergy to cetylpyridinium chloride was found. In the patients' gloves, cetylpyridinium chloride and DPG were detected at higher concentrations on the inside of the gloves than on the outside. Most patients had worked for decades in their present occupations, but their hand dermatitis had only been present for months. Contact allergy to DPG in gloves has been disputed, but, in this study, we were able to confirm the presence of DPG and cetylpyridinium chloride in the causative gloves by using a modified method for the analysis. The presence of these chemicals in gloves caused an increase in occupational contact dermatitis in surgical operating theatre personnel. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Long-term fertilization alters chemically-separated soil organic carbon pools: Based on stable C isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaolin; He, Ping; Cheng, Xiaoli; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools under the influence of long-term fertilization is essential for predicting carbon (C) sequestration. We combined soil chemical fractionation with stable C isotope analyses to investigate the C dynamics of the various SOC pools after 25 years of fertilization. Five types of soil samples (0-20, 20-40 cm) including the initial level (CK) and four fertilization treatments (inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, IN; balanced inorganic fertilizer, NPK; inorganic fertilizer plus farmyard manure, MNPK; inorganic fertilizer plus corn straw residue, SNPK) were separated into recalcitrant and labile fractions, and the fractions were analysed for C content, C:N ratios, δ13C values, soil C and N recalcitrance indexes (RIC and RIN). Chemical fractionation showed long-term MNPK fertilization strongly increased the SOC storage in both soil layers (0-20 cm = 1492.4 gC m2 and 20-40 cm = 1770.6 gC m2) because of enhanced recalcitrant C (RC) and labile C (LC). The 25 years of inorganic fertilizer treatment did not increase the SOC storage mainly because of the offsetting effects of enhanced RC and decreased LC, whereas no clear SOC increases under the SNPK fertilization resulted from the fast decay rates of soil C.

  15. Landfill mining: Resource potential of Austrian landfills--Evaluation and quality assessment of recovered municipal solid waste by chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsberger, Tanja; Aldrian, Alexia; Sarc, Renato; Hermann, Robert; Höllen, Daniel; Budischowsky, Andreas; Zöscher, Andreas; Ragoßnig, Arne; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Since the need for raw materials in countries undergoing industrialisation (like China) is rising, the availability of metal and fossil fuel energy resources (like ores or coal) has changed in recent years. Landfill sites can contain considerable amounts of recyclables and energy-recoverable materials, therefore, landfill mining is an option for exploiting dumped secondary raw materials, saving primary sources. For the purposes of this article, two sanitary landfill sites have been chosen for obtaining actual data to determine the resource potential of Austrian landfills. To evaluate how pretreating waste before disposal affects the resource potential of landfills, the first landfill site has been selected because it has received untreated waste, whereas mechanically-biologically treated waste was dumped in the second. The scope of this investigation comprised: (1) waste characterisation by sorting analyses of recovered waste; and (2) chemical analyses of specific waste fractions for quality assessment regarding potential energy recovery by using it as solid recovered fuels. The content of eight heavy metals and the net calorific values were determined for the chemical characterisation tests. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Analyses of electron runaway in front of the negative streamer channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2017-01-01

    X-and γ-ray emissions, observed in correlation with negative leaders of lightning and long sparks of high-voltage laboratory experiments, are conventionally connected with the bremsstrahlung of high-energy runaway electrons (REs). Here we extend a focusing mechanism, analyzed in our previous paper...

  17. Automated thin-film analyses of anhydrous interplanetary dust particles in the analytical electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. P.; Germani, M. S.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    An AEM apparatus equipped with digital beam control has obtained quantitative point-count analyses of thin sections taken from eight anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs); between 200 and 500 X-ray analyses were collected from each thin section and analyzed for Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni. Two types of anhydrous chondritic aggregates were observed in the eight IDPs: one highly porous, the other less so. The eight anhydrous IDPs are characterizable as mixtures of fine- and coarse-grained aggregates, large mineral grains, glass, and carbonaceous materials. Their elemental concentrations follow those of solar abundances, suggesting that they are unperturbed by aqueous alteration.

  18. Soft x-ray spectroscopy for probing electronic and chemical states of battery materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wanli; Qiao Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    The formidable challenge of developing high-performance battery system stems from the complication of battery operations, both mechanically and electronically. In the electrodes and at the electrode–electrolyte interfaces, chemical reactions take place with evolving electron states. In addition to the extensive studies of material synthesis, electrochemical, structural, and mechanical properties, soft x-ray spectroscopy provides unique opportunities for revealing the critical electron states in batteries. This review discusses some of the recent soft x-ray spectroscopic results on battery binder, transition-metal based positive electrodes, and the solid-electrolyte-interphase. By virtue of soft x-ray’s sensitivity to electron states, the electronic property, the redox during electrochemical operations, and the chemical species of the interphases could be fingerprinted by soft x-ray spectroscopy. Understanding and innovating battery technologies need a multimodal approach, and soft x-ray spectroscopy is one of the incisive tools to probe the chemical and physical evolutions in batteries. (topical review)

  19. Electron optical study of the Venus Express ASPERA-4 Electron Spectrometer (ELS) top-hat electrostatic analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collinson, Glyn A; Kataria, D O; Coates, Andrew J; Tsang, Sharon M E; Arridge, Christopher S; Lewis, Gethyn R; Frahm, Rudy A; Winningham, J David; Barabash, Stas

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the Venus Express (VEX) ASPERA-4 Electron Spectrometer (ELS) is different from the nominal response shown by the ASPERA-3 ELS aboard Mars Express due to machining tolerance. Up to now, the precise mechanism for this was unknown and, therefore, the results of the experimental calibration could not be supported with a theoretical understanding of the fundamental instrument science behind the device. In this study, we show that the difference is due to a misalignment of the inner hemisphere and a widening of the entrance aperture of the instrument. The response of the VEX ELS can be approximated by a combination of a vertical offset of the inner hemisphere of ≈0.6 mm and a lateral offset of less than 0.125 mm, combined with an aperture that is ≈0.54 mm wider than nominal. The resulting K-factor, geometric factor, energy resolution and peak elevation are in good agreement with those observed experimentally. Therefore, we now have a good agreement between both laboratory calibration data and computer simulation, giving a firm foundation for future scientific data analysis

  20. Surface potential measurement of negative-ion-implanted insulators by analysing secondary electron energy distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Syoji; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki.

    1994-01-01

    The negative ion implantation method we have proposed is a noble technique which can reduce surface charging of isolated electrodes by a large margin. In this paper, the way to specify the surface potential of negative-ion-implanted insulators by the secondary electron energy analysis is described. The secondary electron energy distribution is obtained by a retarding field type energy analyzer. The result shows that the surface potential of fused quartz by negative-ion implantation (C - with the energy of 10 keV to 40 keV) is negatively charged by only several volts. This surface potential is extremely low compared with that by positive-ion implantation. Therefore, the negative-ion implantation is a very effective method for charge-up free implantation without charge compensation. (author)

  1. Nanoscale “Quantum” Islands on Metal Substrates: Microscopy Studies and Electronic Structure Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Jiang Liu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Confinement of electrons can occur in metal islands or in continuous films grown heteroepitaxially upon a substrate of a different metal or on a metallic alloy. Associated quantum size effects (QSE can produce a significant height-dependence of the surface free energy for nanoscale thicknesses of up to 10–20 layers. This may suffice to induce height selection during film growth. Scanning STM analysis has revealed remarkable flat-topped or mesa-like island and film morphologies in various systems. We discuss in detail observations of QSE and associated film growth behavior for Pb/Cu(111, Ag/Fe(100, and Cu/fcc-Fe/Cu(100 [A/B or A/B/A], and for Ag/NiAl(110 with brief comments offered for Fe/Cu3Au(001 [A/BC binary alloys]. We also describe these issues for Ag/5-fold i-Al-Pd-Mn and Bi/5-fold i-Al-Cu-Fe [A/BCD ternary icosohedral quasicrystals]. Electronic structure theory analysis, either at the level of simple free electron gas models or more sophisticated Density Functional Theory calculations, can provide insight into the QSE-mediated thermodynamic driving force underlying height selection.

  2. Electron microprobe analyses of glasses from Kīlauea tephra units, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Mastin, Larry G.; Rose, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents approximately 2,100 glass analyses from three tephra units of Kīlauea Volcano: the Keanakākoʻi Tephra, the Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, and the Pāhala Ash. It also includes some new analyses obtained as part of a re-evaluation of the MgO contents of glasses in two of the three original datasets; this re-evaluation was conducted to improve the consistency of glass MgO contents among the three datasets. The glass data are a principal focus of Helz and others (in press), which will appear in the AGU Monograph Hawaiian Volcanoes—From Source to Surface. The report is intended to support this publication, in addition to making the data available to the scientific community.

  3. Random telegraph signals by alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles in chemically assembled single-electron transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Shinya; Azuma, Yasuo; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Smith, Luke W.; Smith, Charles G.; Majima, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We have studied random telegraph signals (RTSs) in a chemically assembled single-electron transistor (SET) at temperatures as low as 300 mK. The RTSs in the chemically assembled SET were investigated by measuring the source–drain current, using a histogram of the RTS dwell time, and calculating the power spectrum density of the drain current–time characteristics. It was found that the dwell time of the RTS was dependent on the drain voltage of the SET, but was independent of the gate voltage. Considering the spatial structure of the chemically assembled SET, the origin of the RTS is attributed to the trapped charges on an alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticle positioned near the SET. These results are important as they will help to realize stable chemically assembled SETs in practical applications

  4. Analyses of electron runaway in front of the negative streamer channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.; Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.

    2017-08-01

    X-ray and γ-ray emissions, observed in correlation with negative leaders of lightning and long sparks of high-voltage laboratory experiments, are conventionally connected with the bremsstrahlung of high-energy runaway electrons (REs). Here we extend a focusing mechanism, analyzed in our previous paper, which allows the electric field to reach magnitudes, required for a generation of significant RE fluxes and associated bremsstrahlung, when the ionization wave propagates in a narrow, ionized channel created by a previous streamer. Under such conditions we compute the production rate of REs per unit streamer length as a function of the streamer velocity and predict that, once a streamer is formed with the electric field capable of producing REs ahead of the streamer front, the ionization induced by the REs is capable of creating an ionized channel that allows for self-sustained propagation of the RE-emitting ionization wave independent of the initial electron concentration. Thus, the streamer coronas of the leaders are probable sources of REs producing the observed high-energy radiation. To prove these predictions, new simulations are planned, which would show explicitly that the preionization in front of the channel via REs will lead to the ionization wave propagation self-consistent with RE generation.

  5. Stretchable Electronic Sensors of Nanocomposite Network Films for Ultrasensitive Chemical Vapor Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong; Zhong, Mengjuan; Lv, Ze; Wan, Pengbo

    2017-11-01

    A stretchable, transparent, and body-attachable chemical sensor is assembled from the stretchable nanocomposite network film for ultrasensitive chemical vapor sensing. The stretchable nanocomposite network film is fabricated by in situ preparation of polyaniline/MoS 2 (PANI/MoS 2 ) nanocomposite in MoS 2 suspension and simultaneously nanocomposite deposition onto prestrain elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane substrate. The assembled stretchable electronic sensor demonstrates ultrasensitive sensing performance as low as 50 ppb, robust sensing stability, and reliable stretchability for high-performance chemical vapor sensing. The ultrasensitive sensing performance of the stretchable electronic sensors could be ascribed to the synergistic sensing advantages of MoS 2 and PANI, higher specific surface area, the reliable sensing channels of interconnected network, and the effectively exposed sensing materials. It is expected to hold great promise for assembling various flexible stretchable chemical vapor sensors with ultrasensitive sensing performance, superior sensing stability, reliable stretchability, and robust portability to be potentially integrated into wearable electronics for real-time monitoring of environment safety and human healthcare. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Mechanical and chemical analyses across dental porcelain fused to CP titanium or Ti6Al4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Júlio C.M.; Henriques, Bruno; Ariza, Edith; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Rocha, Luís A.; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the evolution of mechanical properties and chemical variation across veneering dental porcelain fused to different titanium-based substrates. Test samples were synthesized by fusing dental feldspar-based porcelain onto commercially pure titanium grade II or Ti6Al4V alloy. Samples were cross-sectioned at angles of 10 and 90° to the interface plane. Afterwards, nanoindentation tests and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging coupled to an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) system were carried out across interfaces extending from the metal towards the porcelain area. Elemental diffusion profiles across the porcelain-to-metal interfaces were also obtained by EDS analysis. The mismatch in mechanical properties found in porcelain-to-Ti6Al4V interfaces was lower than that of porcelain-to-CP titanium. Cracking was noticed at low-thickness veneering dental porcelain regions after the nanoindentation tests of samples cross-sectioned at low angles to the interface plane. A wide reaction zone between titanium and porcelain as well as higher incidence of defects was noticed at the porcelain-to-CP titanium interfaces. This study confirmed Ti6Al4V as an improved alternative to CP-titanium as it showed to establish a better interface with the veneering dental porcelain considering the slight chemical interaction and the lower mechanical properties mismatch. The elastic modulus of porcelain-to-Ti6Al4V samples showed to be less sensitive to porcelain thickness variations. - Highlights: • This study reveals mechanical and chemical behaviors across porcelain/titanium interfaces. • Cracks were noticed after nanoindentation on thin porcelain layers. • Ti6Al4V/porcelain showed a better mechanical behavior than that at CP-Ti/porcelain

  7. Chemical state analysis of oxidation products on steel surface by conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujihira, Yusuke; Nomura, Kiyoshi

    1978-01-01

    The polished NT-70H steel (Fe: 95.97%, C: 0.56%, diameter: 5 cm, thickness: 0.5 cm) was immersed in deionized water or in solutions containing (0.25 -- 0.5) M of chloride, sulfate and nitrate ions. The chemical states of oxidation products of iron on the surface were identified through the analysis of conversion electron Moessbauer spectra (CEMS). CEMS of the steel surface, which had been dipped in deionized water, revealed that γ-FeOOH was formed on the surface. The thickness of γ-FeOOH layer increased with the increase of the duration of dipping. Dissolved oxygen in the solution played an essential role in the oxidation of iron to γ-FeOOH. Oxidation product of iron dipped in the 0.5 M sodium chloride solution was identified as γ-FeOOH. Amorphous paramagnetic iron (III) compound tended to form in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or ammonium ions in the solutions. The increase of alkalinity of the solution up to pH 12 suppressed the oxidation rate and assisted the formation of green rust, which was confirmed by the appearance of the quadrupole splitting peaks of the green rust. In the 0.25 M sodium sulfate solution, oxidation of the steel surface proceeded slowly and the quadrupole splitting peaks of Fe(OH) 2 were seen in the CEMS. The peak intensity of Fe(OH) 2 gradually decreased and that of γ-FeOOH increased by the extension of immersion of steel in the solution. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) layer was developed beneath the γ-FeOOH layer, when steel was dipped in 0.5 M sodium nitrate solution. However, the peaks of Fe 3 O 4 were not seen on CEMS of steel surface immersed in 0.5 M ammonium nitrate solution. Thus, applying the feasibility of CEMS for the characterization of oxidated compounds of iron on the steel surface formed by the immersion in solutions, the oxidation mechanism of the steel surface was discussed based upon the results of chemical state analyses. (author)

  8. A combined approach to investigate the toxicity of an industrial landfill's leachate: Chemical analyses, risk assessment and in vitro assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baderna, D.; Maggioni, S.; Boriani, E.; Gemma, S.; Molteni, M.; Lombardo, A.; Colombo, A.; Bordonali, S.; Rotella, G.; Lodi, M.; Benfenati, E.

    2011-01-01

    Solid wastes constitute an important and emerging problem. Landfills are still one of the most common ways to manage waste disposal. The risk assessment of pollutants from landfills is becoming a major environmental issue in Europe, due to the large number of sites and to the importance of groundwater protection. Furthermore, there is lack of knowledge for the environmental, ecotoxicological and toxicological characteristics of most contaminants contained into landfill leacheates. Understanding leachate composition and creating an integrated strategy for risk assessment are currently needed to correctly face the landfill issues and to make projections on the long-term impacts of a landfill, with particular attention to the estimation of possible adverse effects on human health and ecosystem. In the present study, we propose an integrated strategy to evaluate the toxicity of the leachate using chemical analyses, risk assessment guidelines and in vitro assays using the hepatoma HepG2 cells as a model. The approach was applied on a real case study: an industrial waste landfill in northern Italy for which data on the presence of leachate contaminants are available from the last 11 years. Results from our ecological risk models suggest important toxic effects on freshwater fish and small rodents, mainly due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. Our results from in vitro data show an inhibition of cell proliferation by leachate at low doses and cytotoxic effect at high doses after 48 h of exposure. - Research highlights: → We study the toxicity of leachate from a non-hazardous industrial waste landfill. → We perform chemical analyses, risk assessments and in vitro assays on HepG2 cells. → Risk models suggest toxic effects due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. → In vitro assays show that leachate inhibits cell proliferation at low doses. → Leachate can induce cytotoxic effects on HepG2 cells at high doses.

  9. An evaluation system for electronic retrospective analyses in radiation oncology: implemented exemplarily for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Jäger, Andreas; Bohn, Christian; Habermehl, Daniel; Zhang, Lanlan; Engelmann, Uwe; Bougatf, Nina; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2013-03-01

    To date, conducting retrospective clinical analyses is rather difficult and time consuming. Especially in radiation oncology, handling voluminous datasets from various information systems and different documentation styles efficiently is crucial for patient care and research. With the example of patients with pancreatic cancer treated with radio-chemotherapy, we performed a therapy evaluation by using analysis tools connected with a documentation system. A total number of 783 patients have been documented into a professional, web-based documentation system. Information about radiation therapy, diagnostic images and dose distributions have been imported. For patients with disease progression after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, we designed and established an analysis workflow. After automatic registration of the radiation plans with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose-volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence. All results are stored in the database and included in statistical calculations. The main goal of using an automatic evaluation system is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses, especially with large patient groups. We showed a first approach and use of some existing tools, however manual interaction is still necessary. Further steps need to be taken to enhance automation. Already, it has become apparent that the benefits of digital data management and analysis lie in the central storage of data and reusability of the results. Therefore, we intend to adapt the evaluation system to other types of tumors in radiation oncology.

  10. Complete chemical transformation of a molecular film by subexcitation electrons (<3 eV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Richard; Illenberger, Eugen

    2003-11-21

    The potential of slow electrons to act as a soft tool to control a chemical reaction in the condensed phase is demonstrated. By setting the energy of a well defined electron beam to values below 3 eV, the surface of a thin film of 1,2-C(2)F(4)C(l2) molecules can completely be transformed into molecular chlorine (and by-products, possibly perfluorinated polymers). At higher energies (>6 eV) some equilibrium state between product and educt composition can be achieved, however, accompanied by a gradual overall degradation of the film. The effect of complete transformation is based on both the selectivity and particular energy dependence of the initial step of the reaction which is dissociative electron attachment to C(2)F(4)C(l2), but also the fact that the initial molecule is efficiently decomposed by subexcitation electrons while the product C(l2) is virtually unaffected.

  11. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  12. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom

    2009-11-11

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  13. Chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer at metal/C60-doped polymer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, C. M.; Campbell, I. H.; Smith, D. L.; Barashkov, N. N.; Ferraris, J. P.

    1997-04-01

    We report electroabsorption measurements of the built-in electrostatic potential in metal/C60-doped polymer/metal structures to investigate chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer from a metal contact to the electron acceptor energy level of C60 molecules in the polymer film. The built-in potentials of a series of structures employing thin films of both undoped and C60-doped poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) were measured. For undoped MEH-PPV, which has an energy gap of about 2.4 eV, the maximum built-in potential is about 2.1 eV, whereas for C60-doped MEH-PPV the maximum built-in potential decreases to 1.5 eV. Electron transfer to the C60 molecules close to the metal interface pins the chemical potential of the metal contact near the electron acceptor energy level of C60 and decreases the built-in potential of the structure. From the systematic dependence of the built-in potential on the metal work function we find that the electron acceptor energy level of C60 in MEH-PPV is about 1.7 eV above the hole polaron energy level of MEH-PPV.

  14. Nanostructured PLD-grown gadolinia doped ceria: Chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Katarzyna Agnieszka; Wang, Hsiang-Jen; Heiroth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The morphology as well as the spatially resolved elemental and chemical characterization of 10 mol% gadolinia doped ceria (CGO10) structures prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique are investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy accompanied with electron energy loss spec......, indicate apparent variation of the ceria valence state across and along the film. No element segregation to the grain boundaries is detected. These results are discussed in the context of solid oxide fuel cell applications.......The morphology as well as the spatially resolved elemental and chemical characterization of 10 mol% gadolinia doped ceria (CGO10) structures prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique are investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy accompanied with electron energy loss...... spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A dense, columnar and structurally inhomogeneous CGO10 film, i.e. exhibiting grain size refinement across the film thickness, is obtained in the deposition process. The cerium M4,5 edges, used to monitor the local electronic structure of the grains...

  15. Study and structural and chemical characterization of human dental smalt by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belio R, I.A.; Reyes G, J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of human dental smalt has been subject to investigation for this methods with electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and image simulation programs have been used with the purpose to determine its chemical and structural characteristics of the organic and inorganic materials. This work has been held mainly for the characterization of hydroxyapatite (Ca) 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH 4 ) 2 , inorganic material which conforms the dental smalt in 97%, so observing its structural unity which is composed by the prisms and these by crystals and atoms. It was subsequently initiated the study of the organic material, with is precursor of itself. (Author)

  16. Precession technique and electron diffractometry as new tools for crystal structure analysis and chemical bonding determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, A.; Kuligin, K.; Nicolopoulos, S.; Nickolskiy, M.; Boulahya, K.; Portillo, J.; Lepeshov, G.; Sobolev, B.; Collette, J.P.; Martin, N.; Robins, A.C.; Fischione, P.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new fast electron diffractometer working with high dynamic range and linearity for crystal structure determinations. Electron diffraction (ED) patterns can be scanned serially in front of a Faraday cage detector; the total measurement time for several hundred ED reflections can be tens of seconds having high statistical accuracy for all measured intensities (1-2%). This new tool can be installed to any type of TEM without any column modification and is linked to a specially developed electron beam precession 'Spinning Star' system. Precession of the electron beam (Vincent-Midgley technique) reduces dynamical effects allowing also use of accurate intensities for crystal structure analysis. We describe the technical characteristics of this new tool together with the first experimental results. Accurate measurement of electron diffraction intensities by electron diffractometer opens new possibilities not only for revealing unknown structures, but also for electrostatic potential determination and chemical bonding investigation. As an example, we present detailed atomic bonding information of CaF 2 as revealed for the first time by precise electron diffractometry

  17. The effects of a stress field and chemical diffusion on electronic behaviour in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xu; Wang Chongyu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a stress field and chemical diffusion on electronic behaviour in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD) are investigated by using first-principle calculations. We find that a potential well appears in a QD without a lattice misfit and chemical diffusion, and both stress field and Ga chemical diffusion can induce the formation of a potential barrier, which strongly affects the electronic behaviour within the QD. The stress field can localize electrons to the base of the QD. And associated with Ga diffusion, the stress field will induce an inverted electronic alignment. The electronic behaviour in the QD without a stress field does not present the confined or localized characteristics caused by a lattice misfit, atomic size and Ga diffusion. This study provides useful information for modulating electronic behaviour by introducing a stress field and chemical diffusion

  18. Application of electron-chemical curing in the production of thin composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopetchenov, V.; Shik, V.; Konev, V.; Kurapov, A.; Misin, I.; Gavrilov, V.; Malik, V. (Polyrad Research and Production Co., Moscow (Russian Federation))

    Thousands of tons of various thin composite materials in rolls for electrotechnical and domestic application including a whole range of electrical insulating materials, such as varnished and polymer fabrics, glass-micatapes, prepregs, thin laminated plastics and clad laminates, materials for decorative and domestic purposes - pressure sensitive adhesive tape and laminates, covering and finishing compositions based on fabrics, films and papers are produced. An important advantage of the electron-chemical processing in the production of composite materials is an essential energy saving (reduction of energy consumption 3-5 times). Absence of the organic diluents in binders decreases fire and explosion hazards of the production and sufficiently decreases danger for the environment of the technology used. Research and Production Company ''Polyrad'' is engaged in the development of technologies and equipment for the production of thin composite materials by the Electron-Chemical Method. (author).

  19. Application of electron-chemical curing in the production of thin composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopetchenov, V.; Shik, V.; Konev, V.; Kurapov, A.; Misin, I.; Gavrilov, V.; Malik, V.

    1993-01-01

    Thousands of tons of various thin composite materials in rolls for electrotechnical and domestic application including a whole range of electrical insulating materials, such as varnished and polymer fabrics, glass-micatapes, prepregs, thin laminated plastics and clad laminates, materials for decorative and domestic purposes - pressure sensitive adhesive tape and laminates, covering and finishing compositions based on fabrics, films and papers are produced. An important advantage of the electron-chemical processing in the production of composite materials is an essential energy saving (reduction of energy consumption 3-5 times). Absence of the organic diluents in binders decreases fire and explosion hazards of the production and sufficiently decreases danger for the environment of the technology used. Research and Production Company ''Polyrad'' is engaged in the development of technologies and equipment for the production of thin composite materials by the Electron-Chemical Method. (author)

  20. Out-of-equilibrium catalysis of chemical reactions by electronic tunnel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhioev, Alan A; Kosov, Daniel S; von Oppen, Felix

    2013-04-07

    We present an escape rate theory for current-induced chemical reactions. We use Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions to derive a Langevin equation for the reaction coordinate. Due to the out of equilibrium electronic degrees of freedom, the friction, noise, and effective temperature in the Langevin equation depend locally on the reaction coordinate. As an example, we consider the dissociation of diatomic molecules induced by the electronic current from a scanning tunnelling microscope tip. In the resonant tunnelling regime, the molecular dissociation involves two processes which are intricately interconnected: a modification of the potential energy barrier and heating of the molecule. The decrease of the molecular barrier (i.e., the current induced catalytic reduction of the barrier) accompanied by the appearance of the effective, reaction-coordinate-dependent temperature is an alternative mechanism for current-induced chemical reactions, which is distinctly different from the usual paradigm of pumping vibrational degrees of freedom.

  1. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of GrapheneGermanium Interfaces Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-27

    that graphene acts as a diffusion barrier to ambient contaminants, as similarly prepared bare Ge exposed to ambient conditions possesses a much...in-plane order underneath the graphene (Figure 1b,f). The stabilization of Ge terraces with half-step heights indicates that the graphene modifies the...Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Graphene −Germanium Interfaces Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition Brian Kiraly,†,‡ Robert M. Jacobberger

  2. Electronic parameters of Sr2Nb2O7 and chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Korotkov, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    /2)) and Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s)-BE(Sr 3d(5/2)), were used to characterize the valence electron transfer on the formation of the Nb-O and Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and earlier published structural and XPS data for other Sr- or Nb...

  3. Light and electron microscopic analyses of Vasa expression in adult germ cells of the fish medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongming; Li, Mingyou; Hong, Yunhan

    2014-07-15

    Germ cells of diverse animal species have a unique membrane-less organelle called germ plasm (GP). GP is usually associated with mitochondria and contains RNA binding proteins and mRNAs of germ genes such as vasa. GP has been described as the mitochondrial cloud (MC), intermitochondrial cement (IC) and chromatoid body (CB). The mechanism underlying varying GP structures has remained incompletely understood. Here we report the analysis of GP through light and electron microscopy by using Vasa as a marker in adult male germ cells of the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Immunofluorescence light microscopy revealed germ cell-specific Vasa expression. Vasa is the most abundant in mitotic germ cells (oogonia and spermatogonia) and reduced in meiotic germ cells. Vasa in round spermatids exist as a spherical structure reminiscent of CB. Nanogold immunoelectron microscopy revealed subcellular Vasa redistribution in male germ cells. Vasa in spermatogonia concentrates in small areas of the cytoplasm and is surrounded by mitochondria, which is reminiscent of MC. Vasa is intermixed with mitochondria to form IC in primary spermatocytes, appears as the free cement (FC) via separation from mitochondria in secondary spermatocyte and becomes condensed in CB at the caudal pole of round spermatids. During spermatid morphogenesis, Vasa redistributes and forms a second CB that is a ring-like structure surrounding the dense fiber of the flagellum in the midpiece. These structures resemble those described for GP in various species. Thus, Vasa identifies GP and adopts varying structures via dynamic reorganization at different stages of germ cell development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electron microprobe analyses of selected samples from deep rock disposal experiment No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlava, P.F.; Chambers, W.F.

    1976-04-01

    Deep Rock Disposal Experiment No. 1 was designed to provide information about the interaction between a molten, glass-based, nuclear waste simulant and rock material. Selected samples from this experiment were examined by optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Analysis of the homogenized material in the convection cell that was created in the central portion of the melt region shows that an amount of rock equal to about one-half of the original amount of waste simulant was incorporated in the melt during the experiment. Stagnant melt at the sides of the cell formed a glass with large compositional gradients. A white band separated the convected and stagnant materials. The color of the band is attributed to light scattering by small crystallites formed during cooling. Four types of crystallites grew from the melt: two oxides, a Mg--Fe borate, and a silicate. Spinel (MgO, Cr 2 O 3 , FeO (Fe 2 O 3 ), and NiO) was the most common crystallite in the glass. The spinel crystallites found within the convection cell displayed skeletal morphology and oscillatory zoning which indicates growth at varying temperatures as they were carried along by convection. A single cluster of nonskeletal (Fe,Cr) 2 O 3 crystallites was found at the bottom of the melt zone where convection did not occur. Mg--Fe borate crystallites grew in clusters in the central portion of the convection cell after convection ceased. A silicate similar to Fe-rich diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) with unusual amounts of Ce 2 O 3 and other heavy metal oxides formed as larger crystallites in the stagnant melt at the side of the convection cell and as many very small crystallites in the white band

  5. Comparison between electron-beam and chemical crosslinking of silicone rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frounchi, Masoud [Polymer Engineering Group, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: frounchi@sharif.edu; Dadbin, Susan [Yazd Processing Center, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahinia, Farhad [Polymer Engineering Group, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Silicone rubber (SR) was irradiated by electron beam over a dose range of 50-300 kGy in the absence of chemical reagents. Molecular weight between crosslinks (M {sub c}) in the network of SB was determined by two methods of solvent swelling and modulus of elasticity. The network structure of the elastomer crosslinked by electron beam irradiation and chemical vulcanization was compared. Mechanical tests were performed to determine shore hardness, tensile elongation, strength and modulus of the samples. It was found that SR is effectively crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength, hardness, modulus and elongation of irradiated SR were higher than peroxide-crosslinked SR. The optimum dose for the neat rubber was 150 kGy which reduced to 50 kGy with addition of 10 wt.% fumed silica. The synergistic effect of fumed silica was verified by M {sub c} measurements which showed a dramatic decrease in presence of fumed silica in the rubber. The synergism in properties was also verified by comparing the modulus values calculated from the Guth-Smallwood equation and experimental data. Absence of chemical reagents in irradiated SR samples makes them a proper choice for medical applications.

  6. Analyses of electron and proton scattering to low excitation isoscalar states in 20Ne, 24Mg and 28Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, K.; Bauhoff, W.

    1983-01-01

    Intermediate energy inelastic proton scattering differential cross section and polarization data from the 2 1 + states in 24 Mg and 28 Si and from the 4 1 + states in 28 Si have been analysed using the Distorted Wave Approximation with large basis models of nuclear structure. These structure models were tested by use in analyses of the longitudinal form factors obtained from inelastic electron scattering, so that analyses of the intermediate energy (p,p') data from the same transitions are then sensitive tests of the two-nucleon t-matrix. Data from these and other 2 1 + transitions in 12 C and 20 Ne at 49 MeV (24 MeV in the case of 20 Ne), were also analysed to compare models of t-matrices at lower energies. An ancilliary study of the momentum transfer dependence of effective charges has been made as both s-d shell and large basis structure models have been used to compare with form factor data up to momentum transfers of 2.5 fm -1 . The deduced momentum dependence of the effective charges is significant

  7. DFT modeling of the electronic and magnetic structures and chemical bonding properties of intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Alam, A.F.

    2009-06-01

    This thesis presents an ab initio study of several classes of intermetallics and their hydrides. These compounds are interesting from both a fundamental and an applied points of view. To achieve this aim two complementary methods, constructed within the DFT, were chosen: (i) pseudo potential based VASP for geometry optimization, structural investigations and electron localization mapping (ELF), and (ii) all-electrons ASW method for a detailed description of the electronic structure, chemical bonding properties following different schemes as well as quantities depending on core electrons such as the hyperfine field. A special interest is given with respect to the interplay between magneto-volume and chemical interactions (metal-H) effects within the following hydrided systems: binary Laves (e.g. ScFe 2 ) and Haucke (e.g. LaNi 5 ) phases on one hand, and ternary cerium based (e.g. CeRhSn) and uranium based (e.g. U 2 Ni 2 Sn) alloys on the other hand. (author)

  8. Surface chemical reactions during electron beam irradiation of nanocrystalline CaS:Ce3+ phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Pitale, Shreyas S.; Nagpure, I. M.; Coetsee, E.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.; Mishra, Varun

    2010-01-01

    The effects of accelerating voltage (0.5-5 keV) on the green cathodoluminescence (CL) of CaS:Ce 3+ nanocrystalline powder phosphors is reported. An increase in the CL intensity was observed from the powders when the accelerating voltage was varied from 0.5 to 5 keV, which is a relevant property for a phosphor to be used in field emission displays (FEDs). The CL degradation induced by prolonged electron beam irradiation was analyzed using CL spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The AES data showed the decrease in the S peak intensity and an increase in the O peak intensity during electron bombardment. The CL intensity was found to decrease to 30% of its original intensity after about 50 C/cm 2 . XPS was used to study the chemical composition of the CaS:Ce 3+ nanophosphor before and after degradation. The XPS data confirms that a nonluminescent CaSO 4 layer has formed on the surface during the degradation process, which may partially be responsible for the CL degradation. The electron stimulated surface chemical reaction mechanism was used to explain the effects of S desorption and the formation of the nonluminescent CaSO 4 layer on the surface.

  9. The molecular structure of 4-methylpyridine-N-oxide: Gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belova, Natalya V.; Girichev, Georgiy V.; Kotova, Vitaliya E.; Korolkova, Kseniya A.; Trang, Nguyen Hoang

    2018-03-01

    The molecular structure of 4-methylpiridine-N-oxide, 4-MePyO, has been studied by gas-phase electron diffraction monitored by mass spectrometry (GED/MS) and quantum chemical (DFT) calculations. Both, quantum chemistry and GED analyses resulted in CS molecular symmetry with the planar pyridine ring. Obtained molecular parameters confirm the hyperconjugation in the pyridine ring and the sp2 hybridization concept of the nitrogen and carbon atoms in the ring. The experimental geometric parameters are in a good agreement with the parameters for non-substituted N-oxide and reproduced very closely by DFT calculations. The presence of the electron-donating CH3 substituent in 4-MePyO leads to a decrease of the ipso-angle and to an increase of r(N→O) in comparison with the non-substituted PyO. Electron density distribution analysis has been performed in terms of natural bond orbitals (NBO) scheme. The nature of the semipolar N→O bond is discussed.

  10. Theoretical study of relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding of UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, Jun; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Sekine, Rika; Nakamatsu, Hirohide; Mukoyama, Takeshi; Adachi, Hirohiko.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed the relativistic molecular orbital calculation for the ground state of UF 6 , using the discrete-variational Dirac-Slater method (DV-DS), in order to elucidate the relativistic effects in the electronic structure and chemical bonding. Compared with the electronic structure calculated by the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (DV-X α )MO method, not only the direct relativistic effects (spin-orbit splitting etc), but also the indirect effect due to the change in screening core potential charge are shown to be important in the MO level structure. From the U-F bond overlap population analysis, we found that the U-F bond formation can be explained only by the DV-DS, not by the DV-X α . The calculated electronic structure in valence energy region (-20-OeV) and excitation energies in UV region are in agreement with experiments. (author)

  11. Chemically induced dynamic electron polarization. Pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Thurnauer, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    The radical pair model of chemically induced dynamic electron polarization (CIDEP) is experimentally verified. Aqueous solutions of alcohols were irradiated with 3 MeV electrons and observed with time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Relative line intensities of the polarized EPR spectra of radicals from methanol and especially ethylene glycol, alone and in the presence of radicals from compounds containing halogens, illustrates the polarization dependence on the g-factor differences between the radical pair components. The observation of the relative polarization enhancement in the various lines of the multiline EPR spectra illustrates the polarization dependence on the hyperfine terms. Intrinsic enhancements are calculated and are shown to be proportional to the observed enhancement, showing that the radical pair model of CIDEP is qualitatively correct

  12. Changes in mechanical and chemical wood properties by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnabel, Thomas; Huber, Hermann; Grünewald, Tilman A.; Petutschnigg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Changes in wood due to electron beam irradiations (EBI) were evaluated. • Wood components undergo different altering mechanisms due to the irradiation. • Chemical reactions in wood lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood. - Abstract: This study deals with the influence of various electron beam irradiation (EBI) dosages on the Brinell hardness of Norway spruce. The results of the hardness measurements and the FT-IR spectroscopic analysis show different effects of the EBI at dosages of 25, 50, 100 and 200 kGy. It was assumed that the lignin and carbohydrates undergo different altering mechanisms due to the EBI treatment. New cleavage products and condensation reactions of lignin and carbohydrates lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood samples. These results provide a useful basis for further investigations on the changes in wood chemistry and material properties due to electron beam irradiations

  13. Changes in mechanical and chemical wood properties by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.schnabel@fh-salzburg.ac.at [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); Huber, Hermann [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); Grünewald, Tilman A. [BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Physics and Materials Science, Peter Jordan Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Petutschnigg, Alexander [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Konrad Lorenzstraße 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Changes in wood due to electron beam irradiations (EBI) were evaluated. • Wood components undergo different altering mechanisms due to the irradiation. • Chemical reactions in wood lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood. - Abstract: This study deals with the influence of various electron beam irradiation (EBI) dosages on the Brinell hardness of Norway spruce. The results of the hardness measurements and the FT-IR spectroscopic analysis show different effects of the EBI at dosages of 25, 50, 100 and 200 kGy. It was assumed that the lignin and carbohydrates undergo different altering mechanisms due to the EBI treatment. New cleavage products and condensation reactions of lignin and carbohydrates lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood samples. These results provide a useful basis for further investigations on the changes in wood chemistry and material properties due to electron beam irradiations.

  14. Nobel Prize 1992: Rudolph A. Marcus: theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulate Segura, Diego Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A review of the theory developed by Rudolph A. Marcus is presented, who for his rating to the theory of electron transfer in chemical systems was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992. Marcus theory has constituted not only a good extension of the use of a spectroscopic principle, but also has provided an energy balance and the application of energy conservation for electron transfer reactions. A better understanding of the reaction coordinate is exposed in terms energetic and establishing the principles that govern the transfer of electrons, protons and some labile small molecular groups as studied at present. Also, the postulates and equations described have established predictive models of reaction time, very useful for industrial environments, biological, metabolic, and others that involve redox processes. Marcus theory itself has also constituted a large contribution to the theory of complex transition [es

  15. Using US EPA’s Chemical Safety for Sustainability’s Comptox Chemistry Dashboard and Tools for Bioactivity, Chemical and Toxicokinetic Modeling Analyses (Course at 2017 ISES Annual Meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title: Using US EPA’s Chemical Safety for Sustainability’s Comptox Chemistry Dashboard and Tools for Bioactivity, Chemical and Toxicokinetic Modeling Analyses • Class format: half-day (4 hours) • Course leader(s): Barbara A. Wetmore and Antony J. Williams,...

  16. The impact of chemical structure and molecular packing on the electronic polarisation of fullerene arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, Sheridan; Chia, Cleaven; Teo, Daniel; Kirkpatrick, James; Nelson, Jenny

    2017-07-19

    Electronic polarisation contributes to the electronic landscape as seen by separating charges in organic materials. The nature of electronic polarisation depends on the polarisability, density, and arrangement of polarisable molecules. In this paper, we introduce a microscopic, coarse-grained model in which we treat each molecule as a polarisable site, and use an array of such polarisable dipoles to calculate the electric field and associated energy of any arrangement of charges in the medium. The model incorporates chemical structure via the molecular polarisability and molecular packing patterns via the structure of the array. We use this model to calculate energies of charge pairs undergoing separation in finite fullerene lattices of different chemical and crystal structures. The effective dielectric constants that we estimate from this approach are in good quantitative agreement with those measured experimentally in C 60 and phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) films, but we find significant differences in dielectric constant depending on packing and on direction of separation, which we rationalise in terms of density of polarisable fullerene cages in regions of high field. In general, we find lattices containing molecules of more isotropic polarisability tensors exhibit higher dielectric constants. By exploring several model systems we conclude that differences in molecular polarisability (and therefore, chemical structure) appear to be less important than differences in molecular packing and separation direction in determining the energetic landscape for charge separation. We note that the results are relevant for finite lattices, but not necessarily for infinite systems. We propose that the model could be used to design molecular systems for effective electronic screening.

  17. Simultaneous assessment of phase chemistry, phase abundance and bulk chemistry with statistical electron probe micro-analyses: Application to cement clinkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, William; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Ulm, Franz-Josef, E-mail: ulm@mit.edu

    2014-01-15

    According to recent developments in cement clinker engineering, the optimization of chemical substitutions in the main clinker phases offers a promising approach to improve both reactivity and grindability of clinkers. Thus, monitoring the chemistry of the phases may become part of the quality control at the cement plants, along with the usual measurements of the abundance of the mineralogical phases (quantitative X-ray diffraction) and the bulk chemistry (X-ray fluorescence). This paper presents a new method to assess these three complementary quantities with a single experiment. The method is based on electron microprobe spot analyses, performed over a grid located on a representative surface of the sample and interpreted with advanced statistical tools. This paper describes the method and the experimental program performed on industrial clinkers to establish the accuracy in comparison to conventional methods. -- Highlights: •A new method of clinker characterization •Combination of electron probe technique with cluster analysis •Simultaneous assessment of phase abundance, composition and bulk chemistry •Experimental validation performed on industrial clinkers.

  18. Simultaneous assessment of phase chemistry, phase abundance and bulk chemistry with statistical electron probe micro-analyses: Application to cement clinkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, William; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-01-01

    According to recent developments in cement clinker engineering, the optimization of chemical substitutions in the main clinker phases offers a promising approach to improve both reactivity and grindability of clinkers. Thus, monitoring the chemistry of the phases may become part of the quality control at the cement plants, along with the usual measurements of the abundance of the mineralogical phases (quantitative X-ray diffraction) and the bulk chemistry (X-ray fluorescence). This paper presents a new method to assess these three complementary quantities with a single experiment. The method is based on electron microprobe spot analyses, performed over a grid located on a representative surface of the sample and interpreted with advanced statistical tools. This paper describes the method and the experimental program performed on industrial clinkers to establish the accuracy in comparison to conventional methods. -- Highlights: •A new method of clinker characterization •Combination of electron probe technique with cluster analysis •Simultaneous assessment of phase abundance, composition and bulk chemistry •Experimental validation performed on industrial clinkers

  19. ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION SPIKING CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS RELATED TO CHEMICAL WEAPON CONVENTION IN UNKNOWN WATER SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY ELECTRON IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification and analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products is one of important component for the implementation of the convention. Nowadays, the analytical method for determination chemical warfare agent and their degradation products has been developing and improving. In order to get the sufficient analytical data as recommended by OPCW especially in Proficiency Testing, the spiking chemical compounds related to Chemical Weapon Convention in unknown water sample were determined using two different techniques such as gas chromatography and gas chromatography electron-impact ionization mass spectrometry. Neutral organic extraction, pH 11 organic extraction, cation exchanged-methylation, triethylamine/methanol-silylation were performed to extract the chemical warfare agents from the sample, before analyzing with gas chromatography. The identification of chemical warfare agents was carried out by comparing the mass spectrum of chemicals with mass spectrum reference from the OPCW Central Analytical Database (OCAD library while the retention indices calculation obtained from gas chromatography analysis was used to get the confirmation and supported data of  the chemical warfare agents. Diisopropyl methylphosphonate, 2,2-diphenyl-2-hydroacetic acid and 3-quinuclidinol were found in unknown water sample. Those chemicals were classified in schedule 2 as precursor or reactant of chemical weapons compound in schedule list of Chemical Weapon Convention.   Keywords: gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, retention indices, OCAD library, chemical warfare agents

  20. A miniaturised, nested-cylindrical electrostatic analyser geometry for dual electron and ion, multi-energy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedington, Robert, E-mail: r.bedington@nus.edu.sg; Kataria, Dhiren; Smith, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The CATS (Cylindrical And Tiny Spectrometer) electrostatic optics geometry features multiple nested cylindrical analysers to simultaneously measure multiple energies of electron and multiple energies of ion in a configuration that is targeted at miniaturisation and MEMS fabrication. In the prototyped model, two configurations of cylindrical analyser were used, featuring terminating side-plates that caused particle trajectories to either converge (C type) or diverge (D type) in the axial direction. Simulations show how these different electrode configurations affect the particle focussing and instrument parameters; C-type providing greater throughputs but D-type providing higher resolving powers. The simulations were additionally used to investigate unexpected plate spacing variations in the as-built model, revealing that the k-factors are most sensitive to the width of the inter-electrode spacing at its narrowest point. - Highlights: • A new nested cylindrical miniaturised electrostatic analyser geometry is described. • “Converging” (C) and “diverging” (D) type channel properties are investigated. • C channels are shown to have greater throughputs and D greater resolving powers. • Plate factors are shown to be sensitive to the minimum in inter-electrode spacing.

  1. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Cui, Dong-Yu; Liu, Yong; Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol e− (g C) −1 and 57.1– 346.07 μmol e− (g C) −1 , respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting

  2. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiao-Song [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Xi, Bei-Dou, E-mail: hexs82@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Cui, Dong-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Yong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agro-Environmental Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Innovation base of Ground Water and Environmental System Engineering, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1} and 57.1– 346.07 μmol{sub e−} (g C){sup −1}, respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting.

  3. Low-Energy Electron Scattering Data for Chemical Plasma Treatment of Biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Marco A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Replacing fossil fuels with biofuels from renewable sources is an important goal for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Many countries are already using few percent of ethanol in the gasoline and few of them, with more aggressive programs, have developed flex fuel engines that can run with any mixture of gasoline and ethanol. An important point is how to produce ethanol in a sustainable way and with which technology? Biomass is a good candidate since it has cellulose and hemicellulose as source of sugars. In order to liberate these sugars for fermentation, it is important to learn how to separate the main components. Chemical routes (acid treatment) and biological routes (enzymatic hydrolysis) are combined and used for these purposes. Atmospheric plasmas can be useful for attacking the biomass in a controlled manner and low-energy electrons may have an important role in the process. Recently we have been studying the interaction of electrons with lignin subunits (phenol, guaiacol, p-coumaryl alcohol), cellulose components, β-D-glucose and cellobiose (β(1 - 4) linked glucose dimer) and hemicellulose components (β-D-xylose). We also obtained results for the amylose subunits α-D-glucose and maltose (α(1 - 4) linked glucose dimer). Altogether, the resonance spectra of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose components establish a physical–chemical basis for electron-induced biomass pretreatment that could be applied to biofuel production. In my talk I will give a progress report on this matter. We will also discuss microsolvation effects on the electron-phenol scattering process and present our strategy to study molecular dissociation through electronic excitation of low energy triplet states. (author)

  4. Chemical Selectivity and Sensitivity of a 16-Channel Electronic Nose for Trace Vapour Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Good chemical selectivity of sensors for detecting vapour traces of targeted molecules is vital to reliable detection systems for explosives and other harmful materials. We present the design, construction and measurements of the electronic response of a 16 channel electronic nose based on 16 differential microcapacitors, which were surface-functionalized by different silanes. The e-nose detects less than 1 molecule of TNT out of 10+12 N2 molecules in a carrier gas in 1 s. Differently silanized sensors give different responses to different molecules. Electronic responses are presented for TNT, RDX, DNT, H2S, HCN, FeS, NH3, propane, methanol, acetone, ethanol, methane, toluene and water. We consider the number density of these molecules and find that silane surfaces show extreme affinity for attracting molecules of TNT, DNT and RDX. The probability to bind these molecules and form a surface-adsorbate is typically 10+7 times larger than the probability to bind water molecules, for example. We present a matrix of responses of differently functionalized microcapacitors and we propose that chemical selectivity of multichannel e-nose could be enhanced by using artificial intelligence deep learning methods.

  5. Synthesis and electronic properties of chemically functionalized graphene on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grüneis, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A review on the electronic properties, growth and functionalization of graphene on metals is presented. Starting from the derivation of the electronic properties of an isolated graphene layer using the nearest neighbor tight-binding (TB) approximation for π and σ electrons, the TB model is then extended to third-nearest neighbors and interlayer coupling. The latter is relevant to few-layer graphene and graphite. Next, the conditions under which epitaxial graphene can be obtained by chemical vapor deposition are reviewed with a particular emphasis on the Ni(111) surface. Regarding functionalization, I first discuss the intercalation of monolayer Au into the graphene/Ni(111) interface, which renders graphene quasi-free-standing. The Au intercalated quasi-free-standing graphene is then the basis for chemical functionalization. Functionalization of graphene is classified into covalent, ionic and substitutional functionalization. As archetypical examples for these three possibilities I discuss covalent functionalization by hydrogen, ionic functionalization by alkali metals and substitutional functionalization by nitrogen heteroatoms.

  6. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiba, K; Nakamura, Y; Nagamura, N; Toyoda, S; Kumigashira, H; Oshima, M; Amemiya, K; Senba, Y; Ohashi, H

    2011-11-01

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 μm and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60° as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. A new route to nanoscale tomographic chemical analysis: Focused ion beam-induced auger electron spectrosocpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvaneh, Hamed

    This research project is aimed to study the application of ion-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (IAES) in combination with the characteristics of focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy for performing chemical spectroscopy and further evaluate its potential for 3-dimensional chemical tomography applications. The mechanism for generation of Auger electrons by bombarding ions is very different from its electron induced counterpart. In the conventional electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopy (EAES), an electron beam with energy typically in the range 1-10kV is used to excite inner-shell (core) electrons of the solid. An electron from a higher electron energy state then de-excites to fill the hole and the extra energy is then transferred to either another electron, i.e. the Auger electron, or generation of an X-ray (photon). In both cases the emitting particles have charac-teristic energies and could be used to identify the excited target atoms. In IAES, however, large excitation cross sections can occur by promotion of in-ner shell electrons through crossing of molecular orbitals. Originally such phenomenological excitation processes were first proposed [3] for bi-particle gas phase collision systems to explain the generation of inner shell vacancies in violent collisions. In addition to excitation of incident or target atoms, due to a much heavier mass of ions compared to electrons, there would also be a substantial momentum transfer from the incident to the target atoms. This may cause the excited target atom to recoil from the lattice site or alternatively sputter off the surface with the possibility of de-excitation while the atom is either in motion in the matrix or traveling in vacuum. As a result, one could expect differences between the spectra induced by incident electrons and ions and interpretation of the IAE spectra requires separate consideration of both excitation and decay processes. In the first stage of the project, a state-of-the-art mass

  8. Chemical formation of soft metal electrodes for flexible and wearable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongrui; Zhang, Yaokang; Lu, Xi; Ma, Zhijun; Xie, Chuan; Zheng, Zijian

    2018-06-18

    Flexible and wearable electronics is one major technology after smartphones. It shows remarkable application potential in displays and informatics, robotics, sports, energy harvesting and storage, and medicine. As an indispensable part and the cornerstone of these devices, soft metal electrodes (SMEs) are of great significance. Compared with conventional physical processes such as vacuum thermal deposition and sputtering, chemical approaches for preparing SMEs show significant advantages in terms of scalability, low-cost, and compatibility with the soft materials and substrates used for the devices. This review article provides a detailed overview on how to chemically fabricate SMEs, including the material preparation, fabrication technologies, methods to characterize their key properties, and representative studies on different wearable applications.

  9. A Novel Wearable Electronic Nose for Healthcare Based on Flexible Printed Chemical Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panida Lorwongtragool

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel wearable electronic nose for armpit odor analysis is proposed by using a low-cost chemical sensor array integrated in a ZigBee wireless communication system. We report the development of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs/polymer sensor array based on inkjet printing technology. With this technique both composite-like layer and actual composite film of CNTs/polymer were prepared as sensing layers for the chemical sensor array. The sensor array can response to a variety of complex odors and is installed in a prototype of wearable e-nose for monitoring the axillary odor released from human body. The wearable e-nose allows the classification of different armpit odors and the amount of the volatiles released as a function of level of skin hygiene upon different activities.

  10. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  11. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollobrigida, V.; Basso, V.; Borgatti, F.; Torelli, P.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F.; Tortora, L.; Stefani, G.; Panaccione, G.; Offi, F.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  12. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lollobrigida, V.; Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F.; Borgatti, F.; Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G.; Tortora, L.; Stefani, G.; Offi, F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  13. Field electron emission characteristics of chemical vapour deposition diamond films with controlled sp2 phase concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, X.; Yang, Q.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond films were synthesized in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition reactor. The microstructure and surface morphology of deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscope and scanning electron microscope. The sp 2 phase concentration in diamond films was varied and its effect on the field electron emission (FEE) properties was investigated. Diamond films deposited under higher methane concentration exhibit better FEE property including lower turn-on electric field and larger emission current. The predominating factor modifying the FEE property is presumed to be the increase of sp 2 phase concentration. The influence of bias voltage on the FEE property of diamond films is not monotonic. Postgrowth acid treatment reduces the sp 2 phase content in diamond films without changing diamond grain sizes. The corresponding FEE property was degraded

  14. Analysis of electronic circuits using digital computers; L'analyse des circuits electroniques par les calculateurs numeriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapu, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Various programmes have been proposed for studying electronic circuits with the help of computers. It is shown here how it possible to use the programme ECAP, developed by I.B.M., for studying the behaviour of an operational amplifier from different point of view: direct current, alternating current and transient state analysis, optimisation of the gain in open loop, study of the reliability. (author) [French] Differents programmes ont ete proposes pour l'etude des circuits electroniques a l'aide des calculateurs. On montre comment on peut utiliser le programme ECAP, mis au point par I. B. M., pour etudier le comportement d'un amplificateur operationnel, a differents points de vue: analyse en courant continu, courant alternatif et regime transitoire, optimalisation du gain en boucle ouverte, etude de la fiabilite. (auteur)

  15. IT-CARES: an interactive tool for case-crossover analyses of electronic medical records for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Alexandre; Chazard, Emmanuel; Muller, Joris; Perichon, Renaud; Ferret, Laurie; Koutkias, Vassilis; Beuscart, Régis; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Ficheur, Grégoire

    2017-03-01

    The significant risk of adverse events following medical procedures supports a clinical epidemiological approach based on the analyses of collections of electronic medical records. Data analytical tools might help clinical epidemiologists develop more appropriate case-crossover designs for monitoring patient safety. To develop and assess the methodological quality of an interactive tool for use by clinical epidemiologists to systematically design case-crossover analyses of large electronic medical records databases. We developed IT-CARES, an analytical tool implementing case-crossover design, to explore the association between exposures and outcomes. The exposures and outcomes are defined by clinical epidemiologists via lists of codes entered via a user interface screen. We tested IT-CARES on data from the French national inpatient stay database, which documents diagnoses and medical procedures for 170 million inpatient stays between 2007 and 2013. We compared the results of our analysis with reference data from the literature on thromboembolic risk after delivery and bleeding risk after total hip replacement. IT-CARES provides a user interface with 3 columns: (i) the outcome criteria in the left-hand column, (ii) the exposure criteria in the right-hand column, and (iii) the estimated risk (odds ratios, presented in both graphical and tabular formats) in the middle column. The estimated odds ratios were consistent with the reference literature data. IT-CARES may enhance patient safety by facilitating clinical epidemiological studies of adverse events following medical procedures. The tool's usability must be evaluated and improved in further research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  16. Electronic, structural and chemical effects of charge-transfer at organic/inorganic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, R.; Vázquez de Parga, A. L.; Gallego, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    During the last decade, interest on the growth and self-assembly of organic molecular species on solid surfaces spread over the scientific community, largely motivated by the promise of cheap, flexible and tunable organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. These efforts lead to important advances in our understanding of the nature and strength of the non-bonding intermolecular interactions that control the assembly of the organic building blocks on solid surfaces, which have been recently reviewed in a number of excellent papers. To a large extent, such studies were possible because of a smart choice of model substrate-adsorbate systems where the molecule-substrate interactions were purposefully kept low, so that most of the observed supramolecular structures could be understood simply by considering intermolecular interactions, keeping the role of the surface always relatively small (although not completely negligible). On the other hand, the systems which are more relevant for the development of organic electronic devices include molecular species which are electron donors, acceptors or blends of donors and acceptors. Adsorption of such organic species on solid surfaces is bound to be accompanied by charge-transfer processes between the substrate and the adsorbates, and the physical and chemical properties of the molecules cannot be expected any longer to be the same as in solution phase. In recent years, a number of groups around the world have started tackling the problem of the adsorption, self- assembly and electronic and chemical properties of organic species which interact rather strongly with the surface, and for which charge-transfer must be considered. The picture that is emerging shows that charge transfer can lead to a plethora of new phenomena, from the development of delocalized band-like electron states at molecular overlayers, to the existence of new substrate-mediated intermolecular interactions or the strong modification of the chemical

  17. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Singamaneni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW, pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs, which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH3 adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns and fast (39 ns components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and 13C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and 13C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  18. Magnetic defects in chemically converted graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [INPAC – Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3001 Leuven (Belgium); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Stesmans, Andre [INPAC – Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Semiconductor Physics Laboratory, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B–3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tol, Johan van [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Kosynkin, D. V. [Department of Chemistry, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Tour, James M. [Department of Chemistry, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, MS-222, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 77005, USA. (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Electronic spin transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are influenced by the presence of adatoms, adsorbates and edge functionalization. To improve the understanding of the factors that influence the spin properties of GNRs, local (element) spin-sensitive techniques such as electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy are important for spintronics applications. Here, we present results of multi-frequency continuous wave (CW), pulse and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) ESR spectroscopy measurements performed on oxidatively unzipped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which were subsequently chemically converted (CCGNRs) with hydrazine. ESR spectra at 336 GHz reveal an isotropic ESR signal from the CCGNRs, of which the temperature dependence of its line width indicates the presence of localized unpaired electronic states. Upon functionalization of CCGNRs with 4-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate, the ESR signal is found to be 2 times narrower than that of pristine ribbons. NH{sub 3} adsorption/desorption on CCGNRs is shown to narrow the signal, while retaining the signal intensity and g value. The electron spin-spin relaxation process at 10 K is found to be characterized by slow (163 ns) and fast (39 ns) components. HYSCORE ESR data demonstrate the explicit presence of protons and {sup 13}C atoms. With the provided identification of intrinsic point magnetic defects such as proton and {sup 13}C has been reported, which are roadblocks to spin travel in graphene-based materials, this work could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge-spin (or magnetic)-based transport properties of CCGNRs.

  19. The impact of semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries on downstream perfluorinated chemical contamination in Taiwanese rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lo, Chao-Chun

    2009-01-01

    This study provides the first evidence on the influence of the semiconductor and electronics industries on perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) contamination in receiving rivers. We have quantified ten PFCs, including perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFASs: PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs: PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA) in semiconductor, electronic, and optoelectronic industrial wastewaters and their receiving water bodies (Taiwan's Keya, Touchien, and Xiaoli rivers). PFOS was found to be the major constituent in semiconductor wastewaters (up to 0.13 mg/L). However, different PFC distributions were found in electronics plant wastewaters; PFOA was the most significant PFC, contributing on average 72% to the effluent water samples, followed by PFOS (16%) and PFDA (9%). The distribution of PFCs in the receiving rivers was greatly impacted by industrial sources. PFOS, PFOA and PFDA were predominant and prevalent in all the river samples, with PFOS detected at the highest concentrations (up to 5.4 μg/L). - The semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries are the primary source of PFC contamination in downstream aqueous environments

  20. Homogeneity of Ge-rich nanostructures as characterized by chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollani, Monica; Chrastina, Daniel; Montuori, Valeria; Terziotti, Daniela; Bonera, Emiliano; Vanacore, Giovanni M; Tagliaferri, Alberto; Sordan, Roman; Spinella, Corrado; Nicotra, Giuseppe

    2012-02-03

    The extension of SiGe technology towards new electronic and optoelectronic applications on the Si platform requires that Ge-rich nanostructures be obtained in a well-controlled manner. Ge deposition on Si substrates usually creates SiGe nanostructures with relatively low and inhomogeneous Ge content. We have realized SiGe nanostructures with a very high (up to 90%) Ge content. Using substrate patterning, a regular array of nanostructures is obtained. We report that electron microscopy reveals an abrupt change in Ge content of about 20% between the filled pit and the island, which has not been observed in other Ge island systems. Dislocations are mainly found within the filled pit and only rarely in the island. Selective chemical etching and electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveal that the island itself is homogeneous. These Ge-rich islands are possible candidates for electronic applications requiring locally induced stress, and optoelectronic applications which exploit the Ge-like band structure of Ge-rich SiGe.

  1. Homogeneity of Ge-rich nanostructures as characterized by chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollani, Monica; Chrastina, Daniel; Montuori, Valeria; Vanacore, Giovanni M; Tagliaferri, Alberto; Sordan, Roman; Terziotti, Daniela; Bonera, Emiliano; Spinella, Corrado; Nicotra, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The extension of SiGe technology towards new electronic and optoelectronic applications on the Si platform requires that Ge-rich nanostructures be obtained in a well-controlled manner. Ge deposition on Si substrates usually creates SiGe nanostructures with relatively low and inhomogeneous Ge content. We have realized SiGe nanostructures with a very high (up to 90%) Ge content. Using substrate patterning, a regular array of nanostructures is obtained. We report that electron microscopy reveals an abrupt change in Ge content of about 20% between the filled pit and the island, which has not been observed in other Ge island systems. Dislocations are mainly found within the filled pit and only rarely in the island. Selective chemical etching and electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveal that the island itself is homogeneous. These Ge-rich islands are possible candidates for electronic applications requiring locally induced stress, and optoelectronic applications which exploit the Ge-like band structure of Ge-rich SiGe. (paper)

  2. Process and device of elementary and chemical analysis of a sample through a spectral analysis of the secondary electron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gressus, Claude; Massignon, Daniel; Sopizet, Rene.

    1975-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of chemical and elementary analysis of samples through a spectral analysis of secondary electrons (Auger electrons) emitted from said sample under a primary monokinetic electron beam concentrated on its surface. Said method is characterized in that the intensity of the primary monokinetic electron beam emitted from an electron gun is modulated at a frequency ω; and in that the secondary electrons of energy E emitted from the sample are then collected. A reference voltage corresponding to the modulation in intensity of the primary electron beam is applied at the input of a phase sensitive detector together with a voltage proportional to the intensity of the flux of said collected secondary electrons to obtain at the output of said detector a voltage proportional to the number of the secondary electrons of energy E. The secondary emission energy spectrum of the sample is then plotted [fr

  3. Chemical and engineering approaches to enable organic field-effect transistors for electronic skin applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Bettinger, Christopher J; Tok, Jeffrey B-H; Bao, Zhenan

    2012-03-20

    Skin is the body's largest organ and is responsible for the transduction of a vast amount of information. This conformable material simultaneously collects signals from external stimuli that translate into information such as pressure, pain, and temperature. The development of an electronic material, inspired by the complexity of this organ is a tremendous, unrealized engineering challenge. However, the advent of carbon-based electronics may offer a potential solution to this long-standing problem. In this Account, we describe the use of an organic field-effect transistor (OFET) architecture to transduce mechanical and chemical stimuli into electrical signals. In developing this mimic of human skin, we thought of the sensory elements of the OFET as analogous to the various layers and constituents of skin. In this fashion, each layer of the OFET can be optimized to carry out a specific recognition function. The separation of multimodal sensing among the components of the OFET may be considered a "divide and conquer" approach, where the electronic skin (e-skin) can take advantage of the optimized chemistry and materials properties of each layer. This design of a novel microstructured gate dielectric has led to unprecedented sensitivity for tactile pressure events. Typically, pressure-sensitive components within electronic configurations have suffered from a lack of sensitivity or long mechanical relaxation times often associated with elastomeric materials. Within our method, these components are directly compatible with OFETs and have achieved the highest reported sensitivity to date. Moreover, the tactile sensors operate on a time scale comparable with human skin, making them ideal candidates for integration as synthetic skin devices. The methodology is compatible with large-scale fabrication and employs simple, commercially available elastomers. The design of materials within the semiconductor layer has led to the incorporation of selectivity and sensitivity within

  4. The effects of high electronic energy loss on the chemical modification of polyimide

    CERN Document Server

    SunYouMei; Jin Yun Fan; Liu Chang Long; LiuJie; Wang Zhi Guang; Zhang Qi; Zhu Zhi Yong

    2002-01-01

    In order to observe the role of electronic energy loss (dE/dX) sub e on chemical modification of polyimide (PI), the multi-layer stacks (corresponding to different dE/dX) were irradiated by different swift heavy ions (1.37 GeV Ar sup 4 sup 0 , 1.98 GeV Kr sup 8 sup 4 , 1.755 GeV Xe sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 and 2.636 GeV U sup 2 sup 3 sup 8) under vacuum and room temperature. The chemical changes of modified PI films were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectroscopy. The degradation of PI was investigated in the fluence range from 1x10 sup 1 sup 0 to 5.5x10 sup 1 sup 2 ions/cm sup 2 and different electronic energy loss from 0.77 to 11.5 keV/nm. The FTIR results show the absorbance of the typical function group decrease exponentially as a function of fluence. The alkyne end group was found after irradiation and its formation radii were 5.6 and 5.9 nm corresponding to 8.8 and 11.5 keV/nm Xe irradiation respectively. UV/Vis analysis indicates the radiation induced...

  5. The electronic structure of VO in its ground and electronically excited states: A combined matrix isolation and quantum chemical (MRCI) study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hübner, Olaf; Hornung, Julius; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The electronic ground and excited states of the vanadium monoxide (VO) molecule were studied in detail. Electronic absorption spectra for the molecule isolated in Ne matrices complement the previous gas-phase spectra. A thorough quantum chemical (multi-reference configuration interaction) study essentially confirms the assignment and characterization of the electronic excitations observed for VO in the gas-phase and in Ne matrices and allows the clarification of open issues. It provides a complete overview over the electronically excited states up to about 3 eV of this archetypical compound

  6. Remediation of electronic waste polluted soil using a combination of persulfate oxidation and chemical washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Luo, Zhanbin; Liu, Gangjun; Yang, Yongjun; Zhang, Shaoliang; Ma, Jing

    2017-12-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of a simultaneous chemical extraction and oxidation for removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and toxic metals from an actual soil polluted by the recycling activity of electronic waste. Various chemicals, including hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD), citric acid (CA) and sodium persulfate (SP) were applied synchronously with Fe 2+ activated oxidation to enhance the co-removal of both types of pollutants. It is found that the addition of HPCD can enhance POPs removal through solubilization of POPs and iron chelation; while the CA-chelated Fe 2+ activation process is effective for extracting metals and degrading residual POPs. Under the optimized reagent conditions, 69.4% Cu, 78.1% Pb, 74.6% Ni, 97.1% polychlorinated biphenyls, 93.8% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 96.4% polybrominated diphenylethers were removed after the sequential application of SP-HPCD-Fe 2+ and SP-CA-Fe 2+ processes with a duration of 180 and 240 min, respectively. A high dehalogenation efficiency (84.8% bromine and 86.2% chlorine) is observed, suggesting the low accumulation of halogen-containing organic intermediates. The remediated soil can satisfy the national soil quality standard of China. Collectively, co-contaminated soil can be remediated with reasonable time and capital costs through simultaneous application of persulfate oxidation and chemical extraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Method of chemical analysis of silicate rocks (1962); Methode d'analyse chimique des roches silicatees (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouget, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A rapid method of analysis for the physical and chemical determination of the major constituents of silicate rocks is described. Water losses at 100 deg. C and losses of volatile elements at 1000 deg. C are estimated after staying in oven for these temperatures, or by mean of a thermo-balance. The determination of silica is made by a double insolubilization with hydrochloric acid on attack solution with sodium carbonate; total iron and aluminium, both with calcium and magnesium, after ammoniacal precipitation of Fe and Al, are determined on the filtration product of silica by titrimetry-photometry of their complexes with EDTA. The alkalis Na and K by flame spectrophotometry, Mn by colorimetry of the permanganate, and Ti by mean of his complex with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, are determined on fluosulfuric attack solution. Phosphorus is determined by his complex with 'molybdenum blue' on a fluoro-nitro-boric attack solution; iron is estimated by potentiometry, with the help of bichromate on hydrofluoric solution. (author) [French] Une methode d'analyse rapide est decrite pour la determination physico-chimique des constituants principaux des roches silicatees. Les pertes en eau a 100 deg. C et en matieres volatiles a 1000 deg. C sont evaluees apres passage au four a ces temperatures, ou a l'aide d'une thermobalance. La determination de la silice se fait par double insolubilisation a l'acide chlorhydrique, sur une attaque au carbonate de sodium; le fer total et l'aluminium ainsi que le calcium et le magnesium, apres precipitation a l'ammoniaque des deux premiers metaux, sont determines sur le filtrat de la silice par titrimetrie-photometrie de leurs complexes avec l'E.D.T.A. Les alcalins sodium et potassium par spectrophotometrie de flamme, le manganese par colorimetrie du permanganate, le titane a l'aide de son complexe avec l'eau oxygenee, sont determines sur une attaque fluosulfurique. Le phosphore est determine par son complexe du 'bleu de molybdene' sur une attaque fluo

  8. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  9. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Pt. 1. Behandlung von Gewuerzen mit ionisierenden Strahlen - chemische, organoleptische, mikrobiologische und toxikologische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C; Boegl, W

    1984-01-01

    In a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 30 radiation treated spices were evaluated. The tests contain chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Most of the spices were treated with gamma radiation from cobalt-60 sources with doses up to 60 kGy.

  10. Effect of local atomic and electronic structures on thermoelectric properties of chemically substituted CoSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. C.; Pao, C. W.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, C. L.; Dong, C. L.; Liu, Y. S.; Lee, J. F.; Chan, T. S.; Chang, C. L.; Kuo, Y. K.; Lue, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    We report the effects of Ge partial substitution for Si on local atomic and electronic structures of thermoelectric materials in binary compound cobalt monosilicides (\\text{CoSi}_{1-x}\\text{Ge}_{x}\\text{:}\\ 0 \\le x \\le 0.15 ). Correlations between local atomic/electronic structure and thermoelectric properties are investigated by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The spectroscopic results indicate that as Ge is partially substituted onto Si sites at x \\le 0.05 , Co in CoSi1-xGex gains a certain amount of charge in its 3d orbitals. Contrarily, upon further replacing Si with Ge at x \\ge 0.05 , the Co 3d orbitals start to lose some of their charge. Notably, thermopower is strongly correlated with charge redistribution in the Co 3d orbital, and the observed charge transfer between Ge and Co is responsible for the variation of Co 3d occupancy number. In addition to Seebeck coefficient, which can be modified by tailoring the Co 3d states, local lattice disorder may also be beneficial in enhancing the thermoelectric properties. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectrum results further demonstrate that the lattice phonons can be enhanced by Ge doping, which results in the formation of the disordered Co-Co pair. Improvements in the thermoelectric properties are interpreted based on the variation of local atomic and electronic structure induced by lattice distortion through chemical substitution.

  11. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C 2 H 2 S 2 −2 /C 2 H 2 S 2 •− ) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C 2 H 2 S 2 •− , whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol −1 lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V

  12. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  13. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: the importance of chemical intuition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Eric A C; Burns, Thomas D; Boyd, Russell J

    2014-05-14

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C2H2S2(-2)/C2H2S2(•-)) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C2H2S2(•-), whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71-2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

  14. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J., E-mail: russell.boyd@dal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup −2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}, whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol{sup −1} lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

  15. The impact of semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries on downstream perfluorinated chemical contamination in Taiwanese rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lo, Chao-Chun

    2009-04-01

    This study provides the first evidence on the influence of the semiconductor and electronics industries on perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) contamination in receiving rivers. We have quantified ten PFCs, including perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFASs: PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs: PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA) in semiconductor, electronic, and optoelectronic industrial wastewaters and their receiving water bodies (Taiwan's Keya, Touchien, and Xiaoli rivers). PFOS was found to be the major constituent in semiconductor wastewaters (up to 0.13 mg/L). However, different PFC distributions were found in electronics plant wastewaters; PFOA was the most significant PFC, contributing on average 72% to the effluent water samples, followed by PFOS (16%) and PFDA (9%). The distribution of PFCs in the receiving rivers was greatly impacted by industrial sources. PFOS, PFOA and PFDA were predominant and prevalent in all the river samples, with PFOS detected at the highest concentrations (up to 5.4 microg/L).

  16. Microelectrode voltammetry of multi-electron transfers complicated by coupled chemical equilibria: a general theory for the extended square scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborda, Eduardo; Gómez-Gil, José María; Molina, Angela

    2017-06-28

    A very general and simple theoretical solution is presented for the current-potential-time response of reversible multi-electron transfer processes complicated by homogeneous chemical equilibria (the so-called extended square scheme). The expressions presented here are applicable regardless of the number of electrons transferred and coupled chemical processes, and they are particularized for a wide variety of microelectrode geometries. The voltammetric response of very different systems presenting multi-electron transfers is considered for the most widely-used techniques (namely, cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and steady state voltammetry), studying the influence of the microelectrode geometry and the number and thermodynamics of the (electro)chemical steps. Most appropriate techniques and procedures for the determination of the 'interaction' between successive transfers are discussed. Special attention is paid to those situations where homogeneous chemical processes, such as protonation, complexation or ion association, affect the electrochemical behaviour of the system by different stabilization of the oxidation states.

  17. The use of microbial and chemical analyses to characterize the variations in fouling profile of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Manes, Carmem Lara De O; Khan, Muhammad; Molina, Veró nica Garcí a; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    and microbiological composition. The overall assessment of chemical parameters revealed that fouling layers were mainly composed by bio and organic material (proteins and lipids). Ca and Fe were found to be the most abundant elements having an increasing concentration

  18. Externally predictive single-descriptor based QSPRs for physico-chemical properties of polychlorinated-naphthalenes: Exploring relationships of log SW, log KOA, and log KOW with electron-correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chayawan; Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aqueous solubility and partition coefficient are modelled using single-parameter. • Electron-correlation observed as a vital predictorof physico-chemical properties. • For octanol-air partition coefficient, energy and polarizability yield best models. • Dipole-moment is found to be worst single-descriptor for the properties analysed. - Abstract: Quantitative structure–property relationships (QSPRs), based only on a single-parameter, are proposed for the prediction of physico-chemical properties, namely, aqueous solubility (log S W ), octanol–water partition coefficient (log K OW ) and octanol–air partition coefficient (log K OA ) of polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs) including all the 75 chloronaphthalene congeners. The QSPR models are developed using molecular descriptors computed through quantum mechanical methods including ab-initio as well as advanced semi-empirical methods. The predictivity of the developed models is tested through state-of-the-art external validation procedures employing an external prediction set of compounds. To analyse the role of instantaneous interactions between electrons (the electron-correlation), the models are also compared with those developed using only the electron-correlation contribution of the quantum chemical descriptor. The electron-correlation contribution towards the chemical hardness and the LUMO energy are observed to be the best predictors for octanol–water partition coefficient, whereas for the octanol–air partition coefficient, the total electronic energy and electron-correlation energy are found to be reliable descriptors, in fact, even better than the polarisability. For aqueous solubility of PCNs, the absolute electronegativity is observed to be the best predictor. This work suggests that the electron-correlation contribution of a quantum-chemical descriptor can be used as a reliable indicator for physico-chemical properties, particularly the partition coefficients

  19. Externally predictive single-descriptor based QSPRs for physico-chemical properties of polychlorinated-naphthalenes: Exploring relationships of log S{sub W}, log K{sub OA}, and log K{sub OW} with electron-correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chayawan; Vikas, E-mail: qlabspu@pu.ac.in

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Aqueous solubility and partition coefficient are modelled using single-parameter. • Electron-correlation observed as a vital predictorof physico-chemical properties. • For octanol-air partition coefficient, energy and polarizability yield best models. • Dipole-moment is found to be worst single-descriptor for the properties analysed. - Abstract: Quantitative structure–property relationships (QSPRs), based only on a single-parameter, are proposed for the prediction of physico-chemical properties, namely, aqueous solubility (log S{sub W}), octanol–water partition coefficient (log K{sub OW}) and octanol–air partition coefficient (log K{sub OA}) of polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs) including all the 75 chloronaphthalene congeners. The QSPR models are developed using molecular descriptors computed through quantum mechanical methods including ab-initio as well as advanced semi-empirical methods. The predictivity of the developed models is tested through state-of-the-art external validation procedures employing an external prediction set of compounds. To analyse the role of instantaneous interactions between electrons (the electron-correlation), the models are also compared with those developed using only the electron-correlation contribution of the quantum chemical descriptor. The electron-correlation contribution towards the chemical hardness and the LUMO energy are observed to be the best predictors for octanol–water partition coefficient, whereas for the octanol–air partition coefficient, the total electronic energy and electron-correlation energy are found to be reliable descriptors, in fact, even better than the polarisability. For aqueous solubility of PCNs, the absolute electronegativity is observed to be the best predictor. This work suggests that the electron-correlation contribution of a quantum-chemical descriptor can be used as a reliable indicator for physico-chemical properties, particularly the partition coefficients.

  20. Chemical analyses of waters from geysers, hot springs, and pools in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming from 1974 to 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.M.; Yadav, S.

    1979-01-01

    Waters from geysers, hot springs, and pools of Yellowstone National Park have been analyzed. We report 422 complete major ion analyses from 330 different locations of geysers, hot springs, and pools, collected from 1974 to 1978. Many of the analyses from Upper, Midway, Lower, and Norris Geyser Basin are recollections of features previously reported.

  1. Fine chemicals for the electronics industry: the proceedings of a symposium organised by the Fine Chemicals and Medicinals Group of the Industrial Division of the Royal Society of Chemistry, Bath, UK, 2-4 April 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamfield, P.

    1986-01-01

    Most business surveys on electronic chemicals emphasise the importance of semi-conductor materials, printed circuit board chemicals, hybrid circuit materials and others, e.g. liquid crystal materials. This was expanded in this symposium to include chemicals consumed by the telecommunications, optoelectronics, reprographics, displays, and energy conversion sectors. The burgeoning area of molecular electronics was also considered to be important. (author)

  2. Changes in the chemical structure of polytetrafluoroethylene induced by electron beam irradiation in the molten state

    CERN Document Server

    Lappan, U; Lunkwitz, K

    2000-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was exposed to electron beam radiation at elevated temperature above the melting point under nitrogen atmosphere and in vacuum for comparison. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the changes in the chemical structure. The irradiation under nitrogen atmosphere leads to the same structures as described recently for PTFE irradiated in vacuum. Trifluoromethyl branches and double bond structures were detected. The concentrations of terminal and internal double bonds are higher after irradiation under nitrogen than in vacuum. Annealing experiments have shown that the thermal oxidative stability of the radiation-modified PTFE is reduced compared to unirradiated PTFE. The reason are the formation of unstable structures such as double bonds.

  3. Comparative study of tantalum deposition by chemical vapor deposition and electron beam vacuum evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, J.; Chevallier, J.

    1975-01-01

    The coating by tantalum of steel parts has been carried out by the two following methods: chemical vapor deposition by hydrogen reduction of TaCl 5 (temperature=1100 deg C, pressure=200 mmHg, H 2 /TaCl 5 =10); electron beam vacuum evaporation. In this case Ta was firstly condensed by ion plating (P(Ar)=5x10 -3 up to 2x10 -2 mmHg; U(c)=3 to -4kV and J(c)=0.2 to 1mAcm -2 ) in order to ensure a good adhesion between deposit and substrate; then by vacuum condensation (substrate temperature: 300 to 650 deg C) to ensure that the coating is impervious to HCl an H 2 SO 4 acids. The advantages and inconveniences of each method are discussed [fr

  4. Electronic waste: chemical characterization glasses of tubes cathode rays with viability for recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Norma Maria O.; Morais, Crislene R. Silva; Lima, Lenilde Mergia Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    Electronic waste, or e-waste, often makes incorrect destinations, which causes serious environmental problems. The aim of this study was to analyze the X-ray fluorescence to study the recycling technology for the glass of Cathode Ray Tubes or, popularly, 'picture tubes', identified by the acronym CRT (Cathode Ray Tubes), which integrate computer monitors. It was observed that the glass screen and funnel analyzed have different chemical compositions. As the silicon oxide (SiO2), the largest component of these glasses percentage 59.89% and 48.63% respectively for the screen and funnel this oxide is responsible for forming the vitreous network. The study of recycling of computer monitors it is important, since about 45% of existing materials on a monitor are made of glass, since it is 100% recyclable and can be reused, thus reducing the amount of waste deposited in the environment. (author)

  5. Solvated electron: criticism of a suggested correlation of chemical potential with optical absorption energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhataziz, M.

    1984-01-01

    A recent theoretical treatment of the absorption spectrum of the solvated electron, e - sub(s), maintains that rigorously μ 0 >= -0.75 Esub(av), which gives empirical relationship, μ 0 >= -(0.93 +- 0.02)Esub(max). For e - sub(s) in a particular solvent at a temperature and pressure, μ 0 , Esub(av) and Esub(max) are standard chemical potential, average energy of the absorption spectrum and the energy at the absorption maximum respectively. The temperature and pressure effects on the absorption spectrum of e - sub(s) in water and liquid ammonia do not support the equality sign in the above cited relationships. The implications of inequality expressed above are discussed for e - sub(s) in water and liquid ammonia. (author)

  6. Metal and physico-chemical variations at a hydroelectric reservoir analyzed by Multivariate Analyses and Artificial Neural Networks: environmental management and policy/decision-making tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Y L; Hauser-Davis, R A; Saraiva, A C F; Brandão, I L S; Oliveira, T F; Silveira, A M

    2013-01-01

    This paper compared and evaluated seasonal variations in physico-chemical parameters and metals at a hydroelectric power station reservoir by applying Multivariate Analyses and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) statistical techniques. A Factor Analysis was used to reduce the number of variables: the first factor was composed of elements Ca, K, Mg and Na, and the second by Chemical Oxygen Demand. The ANN showed 100% correct classifications in training and validation samples. Physico-chemical analyses showed that water pH values were not statistically different between the dry and rainy seasons, while temperature, conductivity, alkalinity, ammonia and DO were higher in the dry period. TSS, hardness and COD, on the other hand, were higher during the rainy season. The statistical analyses showed that Ca, K, Mg and Na are directly connected to the Chemical Oxygen Demand, which indicates a possibility of their input into the reservoir system by domestic sewage and agricultural run-offs. These statistical applications, thus, are also relevant in cases of environmental management and policy decision-making processes, to identify which factors should be further studied and/or modified to recover degraded or contaminated water bodies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and the physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory analyses of red pepper seasoned with parmesan cheese - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.12794

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Teixeira de Souza Sora

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pickles comprising red pepper seasoned with Parmesan cheese has been developed as a new type of product developed by family cottage industries. Two formulations were prepared, or rather, with and without the preservative potassium sorbate, which underwent several physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory analyses. Physical and chemical analyses were undertaken for acidity, pH and °Brix; microbiological analyses for total heat-tolerant coliforms, Salmonella sp, molds, yeasts; sensory aspects such as physical features, aroma, flavor and texture, coupled to purchase intention among tasters were investigated. Both formulations comprised physical, chemical and microbiological parameters within standards. Sensory evaluation showed satisfactory results and research on purchase intention showed approximately 80% acceptability. Results from physical, chemical and microbiological tests showed that pickled pepper seasoned with Parmesan cheese may be prepared with citric acid as a preservative. Sensory evaluation and purchase intention indicate a real production and sale possibility of pickled peppers seasoned with Parmesan cheese by family cottage industries.  

  8. Development of a fully automated open-column chemical-separation system—COLUMNSPIDER—and its application to Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses of igneous rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Vaglarov, Bogdan Stefanov; Takei, Masakazu; Suzuki, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Ohsawa, Kouzou; Chang, Qing; Takahashi, Toshiro; Hirahara, Yuka; Hanyu, Takeshi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    A fully automated open-column resin-bed chemical-separation system, named COLUMNSPIDER, has been developed. The system consists of a programmable micropipetting robot that dispenses chemical reagents and sample solutions into an open-column resin bed for elemental separation. After the initial set up of resin columns, chemical reagents, and beakers for the separated chemical components, all separation procedures are automated. As many as ten samples can be eluted in parallel in a single automated run. Many separation procedures, such as radiogenic isotope ratio analyses for Sr and Nd, involve the use of multiple column separations with different resin columns, chemical reagents, and beakers of various volumes. COLUMNSPIDER completes these separations using multiple runs. Programmable functions, including the positioning of the micropipetter, reagent volume, and elution time, enable flexible operation. Optimized movements for solution take-up and high-efficiency column flushing allow the system to perform as precisely as when carried out manually by a skilled operator. Procedural blanks, examined for COLUMNSPIDER separations of Sr, Nd, and Pb, are low and negligible. The measured Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for JB-2 and Nd isotope ratios for JB-3 and BCR-2 rock standards all fall within the ranges reported previously in high-accuracy analyses. COLUMNSPIDER is a versatile tool for the efficient elemental separation of igneous rock samples, a process that is both labor intensive and time consuming.

  9. Development of fabric-based chemical gas sensors for use as wearable electronic noses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seesaard, Thara; Lorwongtragool, Panida; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2015-01-16

    Novel gas sensors embroidered into fabric substrates based on polymers/ SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were proposed in this paper, aiming for their use as a wearable electronic nose (e-nose). The fabric-based chemical gas sensors were fabricated by two main processes: drop coating and embroidery. Four potential polymers (PVC, cumene-PSMA, PSE and PVP)/functionalized-SWCNT sensing materials were deposited onto interdigitated electrodes previously prepared by embroidering conductive thread on a fabric substrate to make an optimal set of sensors. After preliminary trials of the obtained sensors, it was found that the sensors yielded a electrical resistance in the region of a few kilo-Ohms. The sensors were tested with various volatile compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ethanol, pyridine, triethylamine, methanol and acetone, which are commonly found in the wastes released from the human body. These sensors were used to detect and discriminate between the body odors of different regions and exist in various forms such as the urine, armpit and exhaled breath odor. Based on a simple pattern recognition technique, we have shown that the proposed fabric-based chemical gas sensors can discriminate the human body odor from two persons.

  10. Characterization of plutonium-bearing wastes by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R.G.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Van Deventer, E.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of characterization studies of plutonium-bearing wastes produced at the US Department of Energy weapons production facilities. Several different solid wastes were characterized, including incinerator ash and ash heels from Rocky Flats Plant and Los Alamos National Laboratory; sand, stag, and crucible waste from Hanford; and LECO crucibles from the Savannah River Site. These materials were characterized by chemical analysis and analytical electron microscopy. The results showed the presence of discrete PuO 2 PuO 2-x , and Pu 4 O 7 phases, of about 1μm or less in size, in all of the samples examined. In addition, a number of amorphous phases were present that contained plutonium. In all the ash and ash heel samples examined, plutonium phases were found that were completely surrounded by silicate matrices. Consequently, to achieve optimum plutonium recovery in any chemical extraction process, extraction would have to be coupled with ultrafine grinding to average particle sizes of less than 1 μm to liberate the plutonium from the surrounding inert matrix

  11. Development of Fabric-Based Chemical Gas Sensors for Use as Wearable Electronic Noses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thara Seesaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel gas sensors embroidered into fabric substrates based on polymers/ SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were proposed in this paper, aiming for their use as a wearable electronic nose (e-nose. The fabric-based chemical gas sensors were fabricated by two main processes: drop coating and embroidery. Four potential polymers (PVC, cumene-PSMA, PSE and PVP/functionalized-SWCNT sensing materials were deposited onto interdigitated electrodes previously prepared by embroidering conductive thread on a fabric substrate to make an optimal set of sensors. After preliminary trials of the obtained sensors, it was found that the sensors yielded a electrical resistance in the region of a few kilo-Ohms. The sensors were tested with various volatile compounds such as ammonium hydroxide, ethanol, pyridine, triethylamine, methanol and acetone, which are commonly found in the wastes released from the human body. These sensors were used to detect and discriminate between the body odors of different regions and exist in various forms such as the urine, armpit and exhaled breath odor. Based on a simple pattern recognition technique, we have shown that the proposed fabric-based chemical gas sensors can discriminate the human body odor from two persons.

  12. Chemical effects of low-energy electron impact on hydrocarbons in the gas phase. II. Propene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derai, R.; Danon, J.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical effects of low-energy (3.5 to 15.0 eV) electron impact on propene were investigated. The setup used for the irradiations has previously been described. Appearance curves for stable products were determined, from which correlations between products and precursors were deduced. In the excitation range, the main precursors are the triplet state at 4.4 eV and various singlet states around 7.0 and 9.0 eV. Above the ionization potential, contribution from superexcited molecules and ions was noted. Superexcited molecules are formed with a much higher cross section than excited molecules. A reaction scheme was proposed to account for the chemical effects associated with excited states and the yields of excited molecules in dissociating states were derived from experimental data. Results concerning the fragmentation of propene excited in singlet states conform to photolysis data. The following new results were obtained: the decomposition of propene excited in the triplet state at 4.4 eV involves mainly C--C bond rupture; the decomposition processes of superexcited and excited molecules are similar. A higher degree of fragmentation is observed in the case of superexcited molecules

  13. Chemical analyses and calculation of isotopic compositions of high-burnup UO{sub 2} fuels and MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Tetsuo; Sasahara, Akihiro [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    Chemical analysis activities of isotopic compositions of high-burnup UO{sub 2} fuels and MOX fuels in CRIEPI and calculation evaluation are reviewed briefly. C/E values of ORIGEN2, in which original libraries and JENDL-3.2 libraries are used, and other codes with chemical analysis data are reviewed and evaluated. Isotopic compositions of main U and Pu in fuels can be evaluated within 10% relative errors by suitable libraries and codes. Void ratio is effective parameter for C/E values in BWR fuels. JENDL-3.2 library shows remarkable improvement compared with original libraries in isotopic composition evaluations of FP nuclides. (author)

  14. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  15. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  16. DFT simulation, quantum chemical electronic structure, spectroscopic and structure-activity investigations of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Thillai Govindaraja, S; Jose, Sujin P; Mohan, S

    2014-07-15

    The Fourier transform infrared and FT-Raman spectra of 2-benzothiazole acetonitrile (BTAN) have been recorded in the range 4000-450 and 4000-100 cm(-1) respectively. The conformational analysis of the compound has been carried out to obtain the stable geometry of the compound. The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound are carried out using the experimental FTIR and FT-Raman data and quantum chemical studies. The experimental vibrational frequencies are compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically by B3LYP gradient calculations employing the standard 6-31G(**), high level 6-311++G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, thermodynamic properties and vibrational frequencies of the normal modes obtained from the B3LYP methods are in good agreement with the experimental data. The (1)H (400 MHz; CDCl3) and (13)C (100 MHz;CDCl3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are also recorded. The electronic properties, the energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are measured by DFT approach. The kinetic stability of the molecule has been determined from the frontier molecular orbital energy gap. The charges of the atoms and the structure-chemical reactivity relations of the compound are determined by its chemical potential, global hardness, global softness, electronegativity, electrophilicity and local reactivity descriptors by conceptual DFT methods. The non-linear optical properties of the compound have been discussed by measuring the polarisability and hyperpolarisability tensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. De-MA: a web Database for electron Microprobe Analyses to assist EMP lab manager and users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaz, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Lab managers and users of electron microprobe (EMP) facilities require comprehensive, yet flexible documentation structures, as well as an efficient scheduling mechanism. A single on-line database system for managing reservations, and providing information on standards, quantitative and qualitative setups (element mapping, etc.), and X-ray data has been developed for this purpose. This system is particularly useful in multi-user facilities where experience ranges from beginners to the highly experienced. New users and occasional facility users will find these tools extremely useful in developing and maintaining high quality, reproducible, and efficient analyses. This user-friendly database is available through the web, and uses MySQL as a database and PHP/HTML as script language (dynamic website). The database includes several tables for standards information, X-ray lines, X-ray element mapping, PHA, element setups, and agenda. It is configurable for up to five different EMPs in a single lab, each of them having up to five spectrometers and as many diffraction crystals as required. The installation should be done on a web server supporting PHP/MySQL, although installation on a personal computer is possible using third-party freeware to create a local Apache server, and to enable PHP/MySQL. Since it is web-based, any user outside the EMP lab can access this database anytime through any web browser and on any operating system. The access can be secured using a general password protection (e.g. htaccess). The web interface consists of 6 main menus. (1) "Standards" lists standards defined in the database, and displays detailed information on each (e.g. material type, name, reference, comments, and analyses). Images such as EDS spectra or BSE can be associated with a standard. (2) "Analyses" lists typical setups to use for quantitative analyses, allows calculation of mineral composition based on a mineral formula, or calculation of mineral formula based on a fixed

  18. Electronic tongue - an array of non-specific chemical sensors - for analysis of radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, A.; Rudnitskaya, A.; Babain, V.

    2006-01-01

    Multisensor systems, combining chemical sensor arrays with multivariate data processing engines (electronic tongue) rapidly and successfully developing in the last years are capable of simultaneous quantitative analysis of several species, e.g. metals, in complex real solutions. The expansion of the metals (metal ions) and species to be detected in radioactive waste requires permanent enhancement of sensing materials and sensors, with seriously different properties from those known earlier. A prospective direction of R and D of novel sensing materials is exploitation of radiochemical extraction systems and application of extraction substances as active components of new sensors. The sensors based on bidentate phosphorous organic compounds and their combinations with chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide displayed high sensitivity and selectivity to rare-earth metal ions La 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ . The results indicated good promise for the development of novel analytical tools for detection of multivalent metal cations in different media, particularly in corrosive solutions such as radioactive wastes and solutions derived from spent nuclear fuel. The sensors and sensor arrays made on their basis can play an important role in the development of 'electronic tongue' systems for rapid analytical determinations of different components in complex radioactive solutions

  19. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  20. The use of microbial and chemical analyses to characterize the variations in fouling profile of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Manes, Carmem Lara De O

    2013-01-01

    Biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is one of the most common problems in desalinations plants reducing the efficiency of the water production process. The characterization of bacterial community composition from fouling layers as well as detailed analysis of surrounding chemical environment might reveal process specific bacterial groups/species that are involved in RO biofouling. In this study, advanced organics analytic methods (elemental analysis, FTIR, and ICP-OES) were combined with high-throughput 16S rRNA (pyro) sequencing to assess in parallel, the chemical properties and the active microbial community composition of SWRO membranes from a pilot desalination plant (MFT, Tarragona) in February 2011 and July 2011. Prefiltered ultrafiltration. waters fed SWRO membranes during third and fifth month of operation, respectively. SWRO samples were taken from three modules at different positions (first, fourth, and sixth) in order to investigate the spatial changes in fouling layers\\' chemical and microbiological composition. The overall assessment of chemical parameters revealed that fouling layers were mainly composed by bio and organic material (proteins and lipids). Ca and Fe were found to be the most abundant elements having an increasing concentration gradient according to the module position. Bacterial community composition of SWRO membranes is mostly represented by the Gammaproteobacteria class with interesting differences in genera/species spatial and temporal distribution. This preliminary result suggests that pretreatments and/or operational conditions might have selected different bacterial groups more adapted to colonize SWRO membranes. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  1. How Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) over the past 25 years has changed our way of performing chemical analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Miró, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Briefly looking back on the impact of flow injection analysis (FIA), as reflected in the rapid growth of publications in the scientific literature, and touching upon many of the novel and unique analytical chemical possibilities that FIA and its sequels, sequential injection analysis (SIA) and La...

  2. Mechanical analyses of the waveguide flange coupling for the first confinement system of the ITER electron cyclotron upper launcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas Sánchez, Avelino, E-mail: avelino.massanchez@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bertizzolo, Robert; Chavan, René [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gagliardi, Mario [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Goodman, Timothy; Landis, Jean-Daniel [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saibene, Gabriella [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Santos Silva, Phillip [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Vaccaro, Alessandro [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A double-metallic-seal waveguide flange coupling, capable of withstanding the expected load specification, has been designed. • The numerical simulations have shown that bending is the dominant load configuration for the current coupling concept. • The numerical studies indicate that an excessive seal decompression will not occur due to the expected load configurations. • Experimental tests show a good agreement with the results obtained in the numerical analyses. - Abstract: The four electron cyclotron (EC) upper port antennas (or “upper launchers” —UL) will be used to drive current locally inside magnetic islands located at the q = 2 (or smaller) rational surfaces in order to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), as well as heat inside of ρ of about 0.4. Each antenna consists of eight beam lines that are designed for the transmission of 1.5 MW of mm-wave power at 170 GHz. The First Confinement System (FCS) is formed by the ex-vessel mm-wave waveguide components, for which SIC-1 classification requirements apply. The beam lines in the FCS comprise a Z shaped set of straight corrugated waveguides with a nominal diameter of 50 mm connected by miter bends. This system is subjected to imposed displacements coming mainly from the thermal expansion of the vacuum vessel, seismic events and/or plasma disruption events. In absence of suitable SIC-1 waveguide bellows, the FCS waveguides must provide the necessary mechanical functional compliance. This has required the development of a dedicated, flange type coupling system with double metallic seals, capable of resisting the generated external loads while maintaining vacuum tightness and alignment. This paper presents the results of the design, analysis and pre-qualification experimental work done on the waveguides and the integrated SIC-1 compliant coupling system.

  3. Mechanical analyses of the waveguide flange coupling for the first confinement system of the ITER electron cyclotron upper launcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas Sánchez, Avelino; Bertizzolo, Robert; Chavan, René; Gagliardi, Mario; Goodman, Timothy; Landis, Jean-Daniel; Saibene, Gabriella; Santos Silva, Phillip; Vaccaro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A double-metallic-seal waveguide flange coupling, capable of withstanding the expected load specification, has been designed. • The numerical simulations have shown that bending is the dominant load configuration for the current coupling concept. • The numerical studies indicate that an excessive seal decompression will not occur due to the expected load configurations. • Experimental tests show a good agreement with the results obtained in the numerical analyses. - Abstract: The four electron cyclotron (EC) upper port antennas (or “upper launchers” —UL) will be used to drive current locally inside magnetic islands located at the q = 2 (or smaller) rational surfaces in order to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), as well as heat inside of ρ of about 0.4. Each antenna consists of eight beam lines that are designed for the transmission of 1.5 MW of mm-wave power at 170 GHz. The First Confinement System (FCS) is formed by the ex-vessel mm-wave waveguide components, for which SIC-1 classification requirements apply. The beam lines in the FCS comprise a Z shaped set of straight corrugated waveguides with a nominal diameter of 50 mm connected by miter bends. This system is subjected to imposed displacements coming mainly from the thermal expansion of the vacuum vessel, seismic events and/or plasma disruption events. In absence of suitable SIC-1 waveguide bellows, the FCS waveguides must provide the necessary mechanical functional compliance. This has required the development of a dedicated, flange type coupling system with double metallic seals, capable of resisting the generated external loads while maintaining vacuum tightness and alignment. This paper presents the results of the design, analysis and pre-qualification experimental work done on the waveguides and the integrated SIC-1 compliant coupling system.

  4. GRANNY, a data bank of chemical analyses of Laramide and younger high-silica rhyolites and granites from Colorado and north-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, Celia H.; Mutschler, Felix E.; Ludington, Steve

    1983-01-01

    GRANNY is a data bank containing information on 507 chemically analyzed Laramide or younger high-silica rhyolites and granites from Colorado and north-central New Mexico. The data were compiled from both published and unpublished sources. The data bank is designed to aid in the recognition of igneous rocks with a high exploration potential for the discovery of molybdenum (and other lithophile element) deposits. Information on source reference, geographic location, age, mineralogic and petrologic characteristics, major constituent analyses, and trace element analyses for each sample are given. The data bank is available in two formats: 1) paper- or microfiche-hardcopy, and 2) fixed format computer readable magnetic tape.

  5. Electrochemical/chemical oxidation of bisphenol A in a four-electron/two-proton process in aprotic organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Ya Yun; Yue, Yanni; Li, Yongxin; Webster, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Bisphenol A undergoes a chemically irreversible voltammetric oxidation process. • Chemical oxidation was performed to overcome adsorption effects that cause electrode fouling. • A new product was isolated from chemical oxidation with 4 mol equiv. of the one-electron oxidant, NO + . • The oxidative mechanism was proposed to be a four-electron/two-proton process. - Abstract: The electrochemical behavior of bisphenol A (BPA) was examined using cyclic voltammetry, bulk electrolysis and chemical oxidation in aprotic organic solvents. It was found that BPA undergoes a chemically irreversible voltammetric oxidation process to form compounds that cannot be electrochemically converted back to the starting materials on the voltammetric timescale. To overcome the effects of electrode fouling during controlled potential electrolysis experiments, NO + was used as a one-electron chemical oxidant. A new product, hydroxylated bisdienone was isolated from the chemical oxidation of BPA with 4 mol equiv of NO + SbF 6 − in low water content CH 3 CN. The structure of the cation intermediate species was deduced and it was proposed that BPA is oxidized in a four-electron/two-proton process to form a relatively unstable dication which reacts quickly in the presence of water in acetonitrile (in a mechanism that is similar to phenols in general). However, as the water content of the solvent increased it was found that the chemical oxidation mechanism produced a nitration product in high yield. The findings from this study provide useful insights into the reactions that can occur during oxidative metabolism of BPA and highlight the possibility of the role of a bisdienone cation as a reactive metabolite in biological systems

  6. Treatment of spices with ionizing radiation - chemical, organoleptical, microbiological and toxicological analyses. Pt. 2. Behandlung von Gewuerzen mit ionisierenden Strahlen - chemische, sensorische, mikrobiologische und toxikologische Aspekte. T. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C; Boegl, W

    1984-09-01

    In the present second part of a study of the relevant literature the results of tests on 14 radiation treated spices and 2 radiation treated spice-mixtures were evaluated. The tests in this part contain mainly toxicological but also chemical and sensorial analyses. Most of the spices were treated with gamma radiation from cobalt-60 sources with doses between 80 Gy and 60 kGy. This part contains a cumulated subject index for part 1 and part 2.

  7. Operational and biological analyses of branched water-adjustment and combined treatment of wastewater from a chemical industrial park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Cao, Jiashun; Li, Chao; Tu, Yong; Wu, Haisuo; Liu, Weijing

    2018-01-01

    The combined biological processes of branched water-adjustment, chemical precipitation, hydrolysis acidification, secondary sedimentation, Anoxic/Oxic and activated carbon treatment were used for chemical industrial wastewater treatment in the Taihu Lake Basin. Full-scale treatment resulted in effluent chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, NH 3 -N and total phosphorus of 35.1, 5.20, 3.10 and 0.15 mg/L, respectively, with a total removal efficiency of 91.1%, 67.1%, 70.5% and 89.3%, respectively. In this process, short-circuited organic carbon from brewery wastewater was beneficial for denitrification and second-sulfate reduction. The concentration of effluent fluoride was 6.22 mg/L, which also met the primary standard. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed that many types of refractory compounds were present in the inflow. Microbial community analysis performed in the summer by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and MiSeq demonstrated that certain special functional bacteria, such as denitrificans, phosphorus-accumulating bacteria, sulfate- and perhafnate-reducing bacteria, aromatic compound-degrading bacteria and organic fluoride-degrading bacteria, present in the bio-tanks were responsible for the acceptable specific biological pollutant reduction achieved.

  8. Chemical and magnetic analyses on tree bark as an effective tool for biomonitoring: A case study in Lisbon (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignole, Daniele; Drava, Giuliana; Minganti, Vincenzo; Giordani, Paolo; Samson, Roeland; Vieira, Joana; Pinho, Pedro; Branquinho, Cristina

    2018-03-01

    Tree bark has proven to be a reliable tool for biomonitoring deposition of metals from the atmosphere. The aim of the present study was to test if bark magnetic properties can be used as a proxy of the overall metal loads of a tree bark, meaning that this approach can be used to discriminate different effects of pollution on different types of urban site. In this study, the concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, V and Zn were measured by ICP-OES in bark samples of Jacaranda mimosifolia, collected along roads and in urban green spaces in the city of Lisbon (Portugal). Magnetic analyses were also performed on the same bark samples, measuring Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM), Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (SIRM) and Magnetic Susceptibility (χ). The results confirmed that magnetic analyses can be used as a proxy of the overall load of trace elements in tree bark, and could be used to distinguish different types of urban sites regarding atmospheric pollution. Together with trace element analyses, magnetic analyses could thus be used as a tool to provide high-resolution data on urban air quality and to follow up the success of mitigation actions aiming at decreasing the pollutant load in urban environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Waste water treatment by ionizing radiations. Removal of biological and chemical risks by water and sludge treatment with electron beams. Orientation 10 July 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report aims at analysing the reliability of the application of electron ionizing radiation in the treatment of waste waters and effluents, and at identifying possible fields of application and associated technological and economic implications. After some recalls on physics, electrochemistry, radiolysis, and water pollution, the report proposes an overview of the technique of irradiation of waters, with its scientific background (water radiolysis, chemical and biological effects), its process (recovery cycle and possible interventions, processed pollutants), the case of irradiation by electrons (power, rate, flexibility), an overview of benefits and drawbacks, and a brief history of this practice and an overview of current researches. After a recall of regulatory and political requirements, the report discusses possible fields of application: waste water treatment plants, domestic, agricultural and urban sewage wasters, hospital and medical wastes, liquid food industry products, industrial waters. The choice of accelerator parameters and components is then discussed

  10. Evaluation of chemical and/or mechanical treatments of the smear layer as revealed by scanning electron microscopy - a blind comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUZ Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A blind comparative study of chemical and/or mechanical treatments of the smear layer, according to scanning electron microscopy images, was carried out. The effect of the treatments was analyzed on the smear layer of mesio-occlusodistal cavity walls prepared in vitro in human third molars. The agents used were air/water spray, 37% phosphoric acid, 5% tannic acid, biologic detergent, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite, and enamel hatchet alone or in association with the previous agents. Electron micrographs were evaluated by three professionals according to the degree of visualization of underlying dentin or enamel. Phosphoric acid received the highest scores due to the complete removal of the smear layer. However, statistical analyses revealed diverse performances of non or slightly demineralizing agents, according to the cavity walls in dentin, while there was equivalent effect on the enamel of gingival walls.

  11. A software platform to analyse the ethical issues of electronic patient privacy policy: the S3P example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizani, M A; Baykal, N

    2007-12-01

    Paper-based privacy policies fail to resolve the new changes posed by electronic healthcare. Protecting patient privacy through electronic systems has become a serious concern and is the subject of several recent studies. The shift towards an electronic privacy policy introduces new ethical challenges that cannot be solved merely by technical measures. Structured Patient Privacy Policy (S3P) is a software tool assuming an automated electronic privacy policy in an electronic healthcare setting. It is designed to simulate different access levels and rights of various professionals involved in healthcare in order to assess the emerging ethical problems. The authors discuss ethical issues concerning electronic patient privacy policies that have become apparent during the development and application of S3P.

  12. Spurious effects of electron emission from the grids of a retarding field analyser on secondary electron emission measurements. Results on a (111) copper single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillon, J.; Roptin, D.; Cailler, M.

    1976-01-01

    Spurious effects of a four grid retarding field analyzer were studied for low energy secondary electron measurements. Their behavior was investigated and two peaks in the energy spectrum were interpreted as resulting from tertiary electrons from the grids. It was shown that the true secondary electron peak has to be separated from these spurious peaks. The spectrum and the yields sigma and eta obtained for a Cu(111) crystal after a surface cleanness control by Auger spectroscopy are given

  13. Physico-chemical effects of electron beam radiation on polypropylene film and its polyphenolic antioxydant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymes-Chodur, C.; Legendre, B.; Yagoubi, N.; Betz, N.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Even though plastics are widely used in various industrial applications, problems have occurred concerning the quality of the packaged products, due to the presence of potentially toxic additives that can migrate out of the polymer and thus contaminate the surrounding medium. This phenomenon is due to the fact that the additives are only mixed with the polymer powder before the plastic is molded, and as no chemical bond keeps them into the polymer matrix, additives are able to migrate as the plastic ages. In order to avoid this phenomenon, which can lead to the rejection of biomaterials, or food or drugs contamination problems, we intend to graft the additives into the polymer matrix by means of ionizing radiation. Indeed, previous studies have shown that radiation induces the formation of free radicals and hydroperoxides that can react with monomers to create covalent bonds. Our work deals with electron beam irradiation of polypropylene (PP) containing a known concentration of Irganox 1010, a polyphenolic antioxidant. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements have been performed in order to evaluate the behavior of the additives under ionizing radiation, but the polymer matrix must also be characterized as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. This present study gives FTIR, high temperature size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results performed on both PP and Irganox 1010. They evidence the formation of oxidative groups such as free alcohols and hydroperoxides, and the formation of double bonds in the PP. SEC results highlight the scission of the polymer chains correlated to the degradation of the crystalline domains observed by DSC. Those physico-chemical modifications must be characterized for the understanding of the grafting and before the antioxidant activity is evaluated

  14. Effect of flavoring chemicals on free radical formation in electronic cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Zachary T; Goel, Reema; Reilly, Samantha M; Elias, Ryan J; Silakov, Alexey; Foulds, Jonathan; Muscat, Joshua; Richie, John P

    2018-05-20

    Flavoring chemicals, or flavorants, have been used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) since their inception; however, little is known about their toxicological effects. Free radicals present in e-cigarette aerosols have been shown to induce oxidative stress resulting in damage to proliferation, survival, and inflammation pathways in the cell. Aerosols generated from e-liquid solvents alone contain high levels of free radicals but few studies have looked at how these toxins are modulated by flavorants. We investigated the effects of different flavorants on free radical production in e-cigarette aerosols. Free radicals generated from 49 commercially available e-liquid flavors were captured and analyzed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The flavorant composition of each e-liquid was analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS). Radical production was correlated with flavorant abundance. Ten compounds were identified and analyzed for their impact on free radical generation. Nearly half of the flavors modulated free radical generation. Flavorants with strong correlations included β-damascone, δ-tetradecalactone, γ-decalactone, citral, dipentene, ethyl maltol, ethyl vanillin, ethyl vanillin PG acetal, linalool, and piperonal. Dipentene, ethyl maltol, citral, linalool, and piperonal promoted radical formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Ethyl vanillin inhibited the radical formation in a concentration dependent manner. Free radical production was closely linked with the capacity to oxidize biologically-relevant lipids. Our results suggest that flavoring agents play an important role in either enhancing or inhibiting the production of free radicals in flavored e-cigarette aerosols. This information is important for developing regulatory strategies aimed at reducing potential harm from e-cigarettes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Linear chemically sensitive electron tomography using DualEELS and dictionary-based compressed sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlAfeef, Ala, E-mail: a.al-afeef.1@research.gla.ac.uk [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bobynko, Joanna [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Cockshott, W. Paul. [School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Craven, Alan J. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zuazo, Ian; Barges, Patrick [ArcelorMittal Maizières Research, Maizières-lès-Metz 57283 (France); MacLaren, Ian, E-mail: ian.maclaren@glasgow.ac.uk [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    We have investigated the use of DualEELS in elementally sensitive tilt series tomography in the scanning transmission electron microscope. A procedure is implemented using deconvolution to remove the effects of multiple scattering, followed by normalisation by the zero loss peak intensity. This is performed to produce a signal that is linearly dependent on the projected density of the element in each pixel. This method is compared with one that does not include deconvolution (although normalisation by the zero loss peak intensity is still performed). Additionally, we compare the 3D reconstruction using a new compressed sensing algorithm, DLET, with the well-established SIRT algorithm. VC precipitates, which are extracted from a steel on a carbon replica, are used in this study. It is found that the use of this linear signal results in a very even density throughout the precipitates. However, when deconvolution is omitted, a slight density reduction is observed in the cores of the precipitates (a so-called cupping artefact). Additionally, it is clearly demonstrated that the 3D morphology is much better reproduced using the DLET algorithm, with very little elongation in the missing wedge direction. It is therefore concluded that reliable elementally sensitive tilt tomography using EELS requires the appropriate use of DualEELS together with a suitable reconstruction algorithm, such as the compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm used here, to make the best use of the limited data volume and signal to noise inherent in core-loss EELS. - Highlights: • DualEELS is essential for chemically sensitive electron tomography using EELS. • A new compressed sensing based algorithm (DLET) gives high fidelity reconstruction. • This combination of DualEELS and DLET will give reliable results from few projections.

  16. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of f-element complexes by quantum chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetere, V.

    2002-09-01

    This thesis is related to comparative studies of the chemical properties of molecular complexes containing lanthanide or actinide trivalent cations, in the context of the nuclear waste disposal. More precisely, our aim was a quantum chemical analysis of the metal-ligand bonding in such species. Various theoretical approaches were compared, for the inclusion of correlation (density functional theory, multiconfigurational methods) and of relativistic effects (relativistic scalar and 2-component Hamiltonians, relativistic pseudopotentials). The performance of these methods were checked by comparing computed structural properties to published experimental data, on small model systems: lanthanide and actinide tri-halides and on X 3 M-L species (X=F, Cl; M=La, Nd, U; L = NH 3 , acetonitrile, CO). We have thus shown the good performance of density functionals combined with a quasi-relativistic method, as well as of gradient-corrected functionals associated with relativistic pseudopotentials. In contrast, functionals including some part of exact exchange are less reliable to reproduce experimental trends, and we have given a possible explanation for this result . Then, a detailed analysis of the bonding has allowed us to interpret the discrepancies observed in the structural properties of uranium and lanthanides complexes, based on a covalent contribution to the bonding, in the case of uranium(III), which does not exist in the lanthanide(III) homologues. Finally, we have examined more sizeable systems, closer to experimental species, to analyse the influence of the coordination number, of the counter-ions and of the oxidation state of uranium, on the metal-ligand bonding. (author)

  17. Changes in extra-virgin olive oil added with Lycium barbarum L. carotenoids during frying: Chemical analyses and metabolomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, F; Rocchetti, G; Montesano, D; Lucini, L; Chiodelli, G; Ghisoni, S; Baccolo, G; Simonetti, M S; Cossignani, L

    2018-03-01

    In this work, an Italian extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) sample and the same sample added with a carotenoid-rich nutraceutical extract from Lycium barbarum L. (EVOOCar) were subjected to a frying process to comparatively assess chemical and physical changes and heat stability. Oxidation progress was monitored by measuring oil quality changes such as peroxide value, free acidity, K232, K268, and fatty acid composition as well as minor compound content, phenols, α-tocopherol, and carotenoids. An UHPLC/QTOF-MS metabolomics approach discriminated the two oil samples based on their chemical changes during frying, identifying also the phenolic classes most exposed to statistically significant variations. Partial least square discriminant analysis and volcano analysis were applied together to identify the most significant markers allowing group separation. The decrease in total phenolic content was lower in EVOOCar than in EVOO during frying. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids showed a significant percentage loss, 3.7% and 17.2%, respectively, in EVOO after 180min frying at 180°C, while they remained constant or slightly changed in EVOOCar. Zeaxanthin added to the oil rapidly decreased during the frying process. These findings showed that the addition of a carotenoid extract from L. barbarum can help to improve the oxidative stability of extra-virgin olive oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantum chemical studies on electronic structure and photodynamics of ruthenium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium complexes have found their way into many applications in the last decades. Among those, ruthenium polypyridyl compounds have been employed as light harvesting devices and photosensitisers in artificial photosynthesis and molecular photocatalysis. Ruthenium nitrosyl complexes are rapidly emerging as NO delivery agents to biological tissues with promising applications in anticancer photodynamic therapy, thanks to their ability to photorelease nitric oxide (NO). This thesis encompasses computational studies on reactivity, electronic structure, excited states and photodynamics of several ruthenium nitrosyl and polypyridyl complexes. The first part of the thesis deals with ruthenium nitrosyls. The cis-trans isomerisation mechanism of RuHIndNO, a ruthenium nitrosyl derivate of the prominent anti-cancer drug candidate KP1019, is investigated with density functional theory calculations. Next, the electronic structure of the ground and the first excited triplet state of RuHIndNO is studied with multiconfigurational methods including the density-matrix renormalisation group (DMRG). The obtained multiconfigurational wavefunctions and DMRG-based orbital entanglement analysis provides theoretical insight into the non-innocence of the NO ligand in nitrosyl complexes by describing the electron correlation in the Ru--NO bond and assigning oxidation states to the metal and the NO ligand. Another study is performed on excited states of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes with quantum chemical calculations and surface-hopping dynamics to obtain insights into the photodissociation mechanism of NO. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the excited states and photophysics of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes. Accurate excitation energies of tris(2,2-bipyridine)ruthenium (II), the prototype ruthenium polypyridyl are obtained with multiconfigurational calculations assisted by an orbital entanglement analysis. Subsequently, the effect of the ligand substitution on the photophysics

  19. MATLAB Algorithms for Rapid Detection and Embedding of Palindrome and Emordnilap Electronic Watermarks in Simulated Chemical and Biological Image Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Ronny C

    2004-01-01

    .... This is similar to words such as STOP which when flipped left right gives the new word POTS. Emordnilap is palindrome spelled backwards. This paper explores the use of MATLAB algorithms in the rapid detection and embedding of palindrome and emordnilap electronic watermarks in simulated chemical and biological Image Data.

  20. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  1. Quantum-Chemical Electron Densities of Proteins and of Selected Protein Sites from Subsystem Density Functional Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewisch, K.; Jacob, C.R.; Visscher, L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to calculate accurate electron densities of full proteins or of selected sites in proteins is a prerequisite for a fully quantum-mechanical calculation of protein-protein and protein-ligand interaction energies. Quantum-chemical subsystem methods capable of treating proteins and other

  2. Donor–Acceptor Copolymers of Relevance for Organic Photovoltaics: A Theoretical Investigation of the Impact of Chemical Structure Modifications on the Electronic and Optical Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Laxman; Risko, Chad; Norton, Joseph E.; Bré das, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    We systematically investigate at the density functional theory level how changes to the chemical structure of donor-acceptor copolymers used in a number of organic electronics applications influences the intrinsic geometric, electronic, and optical

  3. A comparison of chemical and ionization dosimetry for high-energy x-ray and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durocher, J.J.; Boese, H.; Cormack, D.V.; Holloway, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison was made of ferrous sulfate (Fricke) and ionometric methods for determining the absorbed dose in a phantom irradiated with 4-MV x-rays, 25-MV x-rays, or electron beams having various incident energies between 10 and 32 MeV. Both chemical and ionization instruments were calibrated in a 60 Co beam at a point in water where the absorbed dose had been previously determined. The chemical yield measurements were corrected for spatial variations in dose within the volume of the solution and used to obtain a value of the absorbed dose for each of the x-ray and electron beams. The ratios of G-values required for these determinations were taken from ICRU reports 14 and 21. Ionization instrument readings from three types of commercial ionization chambers were used to obtain alternate values of the absorbed dose for each radiation. C lambda and CE values used in determining these ionization values of dose were also taken from the above ICRU reports. For 4-MV x-rays the values of absorbed dose obtained from chemical measurements agreed to within 0.5% with values obtained from ionization measurements; for 25-MV x-rays the chemical values were about 1% higher than the ionization values; for the electron beams the chemical values were 1%-4% below the ionization values. These discrepancies suggest an inconsistency among the recommended G, C lambda, and CE values similar to that which has been noted by other workers

  4. Thiobenzamide: Structure of a free molecule as studied by gas electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, Inna N.; Putkov, Andrei E.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2018-06-01

    The equilibrium (re) molecular structure of thiobenzamide along with rh1 structure has been determined in gas phase using gas electron-diffraction (GED) at about 127 °C and quantum-chemical calculations (QC). Rovibrational distance corrections to the thermal averaged GED structure have been computed with anharmonic force constants obtained at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. According to the results of GED and QC thiobenzamide exists as mixture of two non-planar enantiomers of C1 symmetry. The selected equilibrium geometrical parameters of thiobenzamide (re, Å and ∠e, deg) are the following: (Cdbnd S) = 1.641(4), (Csbnd N) = 1.352(2), (Csbnd C) = 1.478(9), (Cdbnd C)av = 1.395(2), CCN = 114.7(5), CCS = 123.4(5), C2C1C7S = 31(4), C6C1C7N = 29(4). The structure of thiobenzamide in the gas phase is markedly different to that in the literature for the single crystal. The differences between the gas and the solid structures are ascribed to the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid phase.

  5. Dissociation mechanism of HNIW ions investigated by chemical ionization and electron impact mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rongjie; Xiao, Hemiao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2006-04-15

    Chemical Ionization (CI) with Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) spectroscopy and Electron Impacting (EI) with metastable Mass analyzed Ion Kinetic Energy (MIKE) spectroscopy have been applied to study ionic dissociations of Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW). Similarities and differences between EI/MIKE and CI/CID mass spectra of HNIW were analyzed. In EI mass spectra, the ions [HNIW-n NO{sub 2}]{sup +} (n=2-5), such as the ion at m/z 347, were less frequent (1-2% relative abundance), but in CI mass spectra, these ions were very abundant. For some ions of large molar mass from HNIW, their dissociations pathways from parent ions to daughter ions were built according to CID and MIKE spectra. Molecular ions of HNIW with a protonated nitro group at five-member ring seem more stable than at six-member ring. The HNIW ions losing five of six nitro groups are very stable based on CID spectra, which agrees with some research results for thermal decomposition of HNIW in literature. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Electronic Structure and Chemical Bond of Ti3SiC2 and Adding Al Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xinmin; LU Ning; MEI Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    The relation among electronic structure, chemical bond and property of Ti3SiC2 and Al-doped was studied by density function and discrete variation (DFT-DVM) method. When Al element is added into Ti3SiC2, there is a less difference of ionic bond, which does not play a leading role to influent the properties. After adding Al, the covalent bond of Al and the near Ti becomes somewhat weaker, but the covalent bond of Al and the Si in the same layer is obviously stronger than that of Si and Si before adding. Therefore, in preparation of Ti3SiC2, adding a proper quantity of Al can promote the formation of Ti3SiC2. The density of state shows that there is a mixed conductor character in both of Ti3SiC2 and adding Al element. Ti3SiC2 is with more tendencies to form a semiconductor. The total density of state near Fermi lever after adding Al is larger than that before adding, so the electric conductivity may increase after adding Al.

  7. Electronic and physico-chemical properties of nanometric boron delta-doped diamond structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicot, G.; Fiori, A.; Tran Thi, T. N.; Bousquet, J.; Delahaye, J.; Grenet, T.; Eon, D.; Omnès, F.; Bustarret, E.; Volpe, P. N.; Tranchant, N.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Arnault, J. C.; Gerbedoen, J. C.; Soltani, A.; De Jaeger, J. C.; Alegre, M. P.; Piñero, J. C.; Araújo, D.; Jomard, F.

    2014-01-01

    Heavily boron doped diamond epilayers with thicknesses ranging from 40 to less than 2 nm and buried between nominally undoped thicker layers have been grown in two different reactors. Two types of [100]-oriented single crystal diamond substrates were used after being characterized by X-ray white beam topography. The chemical composition and thickness of these so-called delta-doped structures have been studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Temperature-dependent Hall effect and four probe resistivity measurements have been performed on mesa-patterned Hall bars. The temperature dependence of the hole sheet carrier density and mobility has been investigated over a broad temperature range (6 K  2 /Vs, independently of the layer thickness and the substrate type. Comparison with previously published data and theoretical calculations showed that scattering by ionized impurities explained only partially this low common value. None of the delta-layers showed any sign of confinement-induced mobility enhancement, even for thicknesses lower than 2 nm

  8. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  9. Ultrafast chemical interface scattering as an additional decay channel for nascent nonthermal electrons in small metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christophe; Abid, Jean-Pierre; Fermin, David; Girault, Hubert H

    2004-05-15

    The use of 4.2 nm gold nanoparticles wrapped in an adsorbates shell and embedded in a TiO2 metal oxide matrix gives the opportunity to investigate ultrafast electron-electron scattering dynamics in combination with electronic surface phenomena via the surface plasmon lifetimes. These gold nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit a large nonclassical broadening of the surface plasmon band, which is attributed to a chemical interface damping. The acceleration of the loss of surface plasmon phase coherence indicates that the energy and the momentum of the collective electrons can be dissipated into electronic affinity levels of adsorbates. As a result of the preparation process, gold NPs are wrapped in a shell of sulfate compounds that gives rise to a large density of interfacial molecules confined between Au and TiO2, as revealed by Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy. A detailed analysis of the transient absorption spectra obtained by broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy allows separating electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction. Internal thermalization times (electron-electron scattering) are determined by probing the decay of nascent nonthermal electrons (NNEs) and the build-up of the Fermi-Dirac electron distribution, giving time constants of 540 to 760 fs at 0.42 and 0.34 eV from the Fermi level, respectively. Comparison with literature data reveals that lifetimes of NNEs measured for these small gold NPs are more than four times longer than for silver NPs with similar sizes. The surprisingly long internal thermalization time is attributed to an additional decay mechanism (besides the classical e-e scattering) for the energy loss of NNEs, identified as the ultrafast chemical interface scattering process. NNEs experience an inelastic resonant scattering process into unoccupied electronic states of adsorbates, that directly act as an efficient heat bath, via the excitation of molecular vibrational modes. The two-temperature model is no longer

  10. Candelariella placodizans (Candelariaceae reported new to mainland China and Taiwan based on morphological, chemical and molecular phylogenetic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Yakovchenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Candelariella placodizans is newly reported from China. It was collected on exposed rocks with mosses on the alpine areas of Taiwan and Yunnan Province, China at elevation between 3200-4400 m. Molecular phylogenetic analyses based on ITS rDNA sequences were also performed to confirm the monophyly of the Chinese populations with respect to already existing sequences of the species, and then further to examine their relationships to other members of the genus. An identification key to all 14 known taxa of Candelariella in China is provided.

  11. The Importance of using Discounted Cash Flow Methodology in Techno-economic Analyses of Energy and Chemical Production Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorka Novak Pintarič

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the correct application of discounted cash flow methodology forevaluating and designing energy and chemical production plants. Such processes usuallycorrespond to capital intensive long-term projects. Simple economic criteria, like theprofit or production cost are insufficient for this type of decision making because they donot take into account the time value of money and underestimate the profitabilities of theevaluated plants. This paper shows that some of those criteria based on the discountedcash flows establish suitable compromises between long-term cash flow generation andprofitability. As several alternative options are usually evaluated in parallel, it is shownhow to rank mutually exclusive alternatives properly and how to select the best optionfrom among them. Two large-scale case studies demonstrate that using discounted cashflow methodology can result in substantially different decisions than non-discountedcriteria, however, these decisions are affected by several input parameters.

  12. Computational Study on Atomic Structures, Electronic Properties, and Chemical Reactions at Surfaces and Interfaces and in Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2018-06-01

    Through computer simulations using atomistic models, it is becoming possible to calculate the atomic structures of localized defects or dopants in semiconductors, chemically active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, nanoscale structures, and active sites in biological systems precisely. Furthermore, it is also possible to clarify physical and chemical properties possessed by these nanoscale structures such as electronic states, electronic and atomic transport properties, optical properties, and chemical reactivity. It is sometimes quite difficult to clarify these nanoscale structure-function relations experimentally and, therefore, accurate computational studies are indispensable in materials science. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relation between local structures and functions for inorganic, organic, and biological systems by using atomistic computer simulations.

  13. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Fungal contributions to Stable Soil Organic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton-Warburton, L. M.; Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.

    2016-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal organic carbon (OC) can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2-month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Members of the Zygomycota and Ascomycota were among the dominant fungal groups involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycota. At the end of the 2-month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibited varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16, C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue while others maintained steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (C18) or increased in concentration throughout the degradation sequence (C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to rapidly and significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker

  14. Coupled Metagenomic and Chemical Analyses of Degrading Fungal Necromass and Implications for Microbial Contributions to Stable Soil OC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Morgan, B. S. T.; Schultz, J.; Blair, N. E.; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fungi comprise a significant portion of total soil biomass, the turnover of which must represent a dominant flux within the soil carbon cycle. Fungal OC can turn over on time scales of days to months, but this process is poorly understood. Here, we examined temporal changes in the chemical and microbial community composition of fungal necromass during a 2 month decomposition experiment in which Fusarium avenaceum (a common saprophyte) was exposed to a natural soil microbial community. Over the course of the experiment, residual fungal necromass was harvested and analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS to examine chemical changes in the tissue. Additionally, genomic DNA was extracted from tissues, amplified with barcoded ITS primers, and sequenced using the high-throughput Illumina platform to examine changes in microbial community composition. Up to 80% of the fungal necromass turned over in the first week. This rapid degradation phase corresponded to colonization of the necromass by known chitinolytic soil fungi including Mortierella species. Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes were among the dominant fungal species involved in degradation with very small contributions from Basidiomycetes. At the end of the 2 month degradation, only 15% of the original necromass remained. The residual material was rich in amide and C-O moieties which is consistent with previous work predicting that peptidoglycans are the main residual product from microbial tissue degradation. Straight-chain fatty acids exhibit varying degradation profiles, with some fatty acids (e.g. C16 and C18:1) degrading more rapidly than bulk tissue, others maintaining steady concentrations relative to bulk OC (e.g. C18), and some increasing in concentration throughout the degradation (e.g. C24). These results indicate that the turnover of fungal necromass has the potential to significantly influence a variety of soil OC properties, including C/N ratios, lipid biomarker distributions, and OC turnover times.

  15. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2010 Regional Mussel Watch (AMB02)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suslick, Carolynn R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Robert K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-10-20

    The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) and Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton (Shipyard) located in Bremerton, WA are committed to a culture of continuous process improvement for all aspects of Shipyard operations, including reducing the releases of hazardous materials and waste in discharges from the Shipyard. Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, a cooperative project among PSNS&IMF, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders (US Navy, EPA and Ecology 2002) has been helping to improve the environmental quality of the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet Watershed (ENVVEST 2006). An ambient monitoring program for sediment, water, and indigenous mussels began in 2009 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. This document presents the 2010 chemical residue data and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) for the regional mussel watch stations located in Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. Indigenous bivalves were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc. The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These chemical residue data provide the first year of the biota ambient monitoring.

  16. Significance of fundamental processes of radiation chemistry in hot atom chemical processes: electron thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the current understanding of the course of electron thermalization. An outline is given of the physical picture without going into mathematical details. The analogy of electron thermalization with hot atom processes is taken as guiding principle in this paper. Content: secondary electrons (generation, track structure, yields); thermalization (mechanism, time, spatial distribution); behaviour of hot electrons. (Auth.)

  17. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tribological and physico-chemical properties of Polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM-C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Md. Shahinur; Shaislamov, Ulugbek; Yang, Jong-Keun [Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Applications Laboratory, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju-si, Jeju 63243 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Kuk [Plasma Processing Laboratory, Division of Surface Technology, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwondaero, Sungsan-Gu, Changwon, Kyungnam 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Young Hun [Department of Physics, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju-si, Jeju 63243 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sooseok [Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Applications Laboratory, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju-si, Jeju 63243 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heon-Ju, E-mail: hjlee@jejunu.ac.kr [Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Applications Laboratory, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehak-ro, Jeju-si, Jeju 63243 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Electron beam dose irradiation effect on tribology of POM-C was investigated. • Raman and FTIR-ATR spectra confirm the chemical structural modification. • 1 MeV, 100 kGy dose irradiation induced well suited carbonization and hydrophobicity. • Well suited carbonization and hydrophobicity reduced friction coefficient. - Abstract: Polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM-C) is an attractive and widely used engineering thermoplastic across many industrial sectors owing to outstanding physical, mechanical, self-lubricating and chemical properties. In this research work, the POM-C blocks were irradiated with 1 MeV electron beam energy in five doses (100, 200, 300, 500 and 700 kGy) in vacuum condition at room temperature. The tribological and physico-chemical properties of electron beam irradiated POM-C blocks have been analyzed using pin on disk tribometer, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR-ATR, gel content analysis, SEM-EDS (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy), surface profiler and contact angle analyzer. Electron beam irradiation at a dose of 100 kGy resulted in decrease of the friction coefficient of POM-C block due to well suited carbonization, cross-linking, free radicals formation and partial physical modification. It also showed the lowest surface roughness and highest water contact angle among all unirradiated and irradiated POM-C blocks. The irradiation dose at 200 kGy resulted in increase of friction coefficient due to less effective cross-linking, but the irradiation doses at 300, 500 and 700 kGy resulted in increase of the friction coefficient as compared to unirradiated POM-C block due to severe chain scission, chemical and physical structural degradation. The degree of improvement for tribological attribute relies on the electron beam surface dose delivered (energy and dose rate).

  18. Assessing the ecological long-term impact of wastewater irrigation on soil and water based on bioassays and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Elisabeth; Hecht, Fabian; Schnellbacher, Nadine; Ternes, Thomas A; Wick, Arne; Wode, Florian; Coors, Anja

    2015-11-01

    The reuse of treated wastewater for irrigation and groundwater recharge can counteract water scarcity and reduce pollution of surface waters, but assessing its environmental risk should likewise consider effects associated to the soil. The present study therefore aimed at determining the impact of wastewater irrigation on the habitat quality of water after soil passage and of soil after percolation by applying bioassays and chemical analysis. Lab-scale columns of four different soils encompassing standard European soil and three field soils of varying characteristics and pre-contamination were continuously percolated with treated wastewater to simulate long-term irrigation. Wastewater and its percolates were tested for immobilization of Daphnia magna and growth inhibition of green algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and water lentils (Lemna minor). The observed phytotoxicity of the treated wastewater was mostly reduced by soil passage, but in some percolates also increased for green algae. Chemical analysis covering an extensive set of wastewater-born organic pollutants demonstrated that many of them were considerably reduced by soil passage, particularly through peaty soils. Taken together, these results indicated that wastewater-born phytotoxic substances may be removed by soil passage, while existing soil pollutants (e.g. metals) may leach and impair percolate quality. Soils with and without wastewater irrigation were tested for growth of plants (Avena sativa, Brassica napus) and soil bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis) and reproduction of collembolans (Folsomia candida) and oligochaetes (Enchytraeus crypticus, Eisenia fetida). The habitat quality of the standard and two field soils appeared to be deteriorated by wastewater percolation for at least one organism (enchytraeids, plants or bacteria), while for two pre-contaminated field soils it also was improved (for plants and/or enchytraeids). Wastewater percolation did not seem to raise soil concentrations

  19. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2012 Regional Mussel Watch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2012-09-01

    Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders have worked collaboratively to improve the environmental quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets. A regional mussel monitoring program began in 2010 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. The program collected indigenous mussels to represent a time-integrated measure of bioavailable metals and organic chemicals present in the water column. This document supplements the 2010 indigenous mussel data with 2012 data to provide two years of data on the chemical residue of mussels present in the inter-tidal regions of Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. The 2012 data set added one station at PSNS&IMF and one market samples from Penn Cove. Indigenous mussels were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for percent lipids, percent moisture, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver (Ag), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average lengths between the 2010 and 2012 data were generally less than 30% relative percent difference (RPD). Generally, the metals concentrations were lower in 2012 than 2010 with some notable exceptions in Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage where increases in Ag, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn exceeded

  20. Evaluation of chemical changes during Myrciaria cauliflora (jabuticaba fruit) fermentation by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and chemometric analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Gilmara A.C.; Naves, Sara S.; Ferri, Pedro H.; Santos, Suzana C., E-mail: suzana.quimica.ufg@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Bioatividade Molecular

    2012-10-15

    Organic acids, sugars, alcohols, phenolic compounds, color properties, pH and titratable acidity were monitored during the commercial fermentation of jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, spectrophotometric assays and standard methods of analysis. Data collected was analyzed by principal component (PCA), hierarchical cluster (HCA) and canonical correlation (CCA) analyses. Two sample groups were distinguished and the variables responsible for separation were sugars, anthocyanins, alcohols, hue and acetic and succinic acids. The canonical correlation analysis confirmed the influence of alcohols (ethanol, methanol and glycerol), organic acids (citric, succinic and acetic acids), pH and titratable acidity on the extraction and stability of anthocyanins and co pigments. As a result, color properties were also affected by phenolic variation throughout the fermentative process. (author)

  1. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste

  2. Chemical Differentiation of Dendrobium officinale and Dendrobium devonianum by Using HPLC Fingerprints, HPLC-ESI-MS, and HPTLC Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi; Dai, Jia-Rong; Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Lu, Ye; Wu, Lei-Lei; Gong, Amy G. W.; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2017-01-01

    The stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo (Dendrobii Officinalis Caulis) have a high medicinal value as a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Because of the limited supply, D. officinale is a high priced TCM, and therefore adulterants are commonly found in the herbal market. The dried stems of a closely related Dendrobium species, Dendrobium devonianum Paxt., are commonly used as the substitute; however, there is no effective method to distinguish the two Dendrobium species. Here, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was successfully developed and applied to differentiate D. officinale and D. devonianum by comparing the chromatograms according to the characteristic peaks. A HPLC coupled with electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) method was further applied for structural elucidation of 15 flavonoids, 5 phenolic acids, and 1 lignan in D. officinale. Among these flavonoids, 4 flavonoid C-glycosides were firstly reported in D. officinale, and violanthin and isoviolanthin were identified to be specific for D. officinale compared with D. devonianum. Then, two representative components were used as chemical markers. A rapid and reliable high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method was applied in distinguishing D. officinale from D. devonianum. The results of this work have demonstrated that these developed analytical methods can be used to discriminate D. officinale and D. devonianum effectively and conveniently. PMID:28769988

  3. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  4. Estimation of time-variable fast flow path chemical concentrations for application in tracer-based hydrograph separation analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholm, Scott C.; Capel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Mixing models are a commonly used method for hydrograph separation, but can be hindered by the subjective choice of the end-member tracer concentrations. This work tests a new variant of mixing model that uses high-frequency measures of two tracers and streamflow to separate total streamflow into water from slowflow and fastflow sources. The ratio between the concentrations of the two tracers is used to create a time-variable estimate of the concentration of each tracer in the fastflow end-member. Multiple synthetic data sets, and data from two hydrologically diverse streams, are used to test the performance and limitations of the new model (two-tracer ratio-based mixing model: TRaMM). When applied to the synthetic streams under many different scenarios, the TRaMM produces results that were reasonable approximations of the actual values of fastflow discharge (±0.1% of maximum fastflow) and fastflow tracer concentrations (±9.5% and ±16% of maximum fastflow nitrate concentration and specific conductance, respectively). With real stream data, the TRaMM produces high-frequency estimates of slowflow and fastflow discharge that align with expectations for each stream based on their respective hydrologic settings. The use of two tracers with the TRaMM provides an innovative and objective approach for estimating high-frequency fastflow concentrations and contributions of fastflow water to the stream. This provides useful information for tracking chemical movement to streams and allows for better selection and implementation of water quality management strategies.

  5. Report on hydro-mechanical and chemical-mineralogical analyses of the bentonite buffer in Canister Retrieval Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Kristensson, Ola; Olsson, Siv [Clay Technology AB (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of five years of exposure to repository-like conditions on compacted Wyoming bentonite was determined by comparing the hydraulic, mechanical, and mineralogical properties of samples from the bentonite buffer of the Canister Retrieval Test (CRT) with those of reference material. The CRT, located at the Swedish Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), was a full-scale field experiment simulating conditions relevant for the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. The compacted bentonite, surrounding a copper canister equipped with heaters, had been subjected to heating at temperatures up to 95 deg C and hydration by natural Na-Ca-Cl type groundwater for almost five years at the time of retrieval. Under the thermal and hydration gradients that prevailed during the test, sulfate in the bentonite was redistributed and accumulated as anhydrite close to the canister. The major change in the exchangeable cation pool was a loss in Mg in the outer parts of the blocks, suggesting replacement of Mg mainly by Ca along with the hydration with groundwater. Close to the copper canister, small amounts of Cu were incorporated in the bentonite. A reduction of strain at failure was observed in the innermost part of the bentonite buffer, but no influence was seen on the shear strength. No change of the swelling pressure was observed, while a modest decrease in hydraulic conductivity was found for the samples with the highest densities. No coupling was found between these changes in the hydro-mechanical properties and the montmorillonite . the X-ray diffraction characteristics, the cation exchange properties, and the average crystal chemistry of the Na-converted < 1 {mu}m fractions provided no evidence of any chemical/structural changes in the montmorillonite after the 5-year hydrothermal test.

  6. Chemical analyses and in vitro and in vivo toxicity of fruit methanol extract of Sechium edule var. nigrum spinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiñiga-Sánchez, Itzen; Cadena-Íñiguez, Jorge; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Gómez-García, Guadalupe; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rosado-Pérez, Juana; Ruíz-Ramos, Mirna; Cisneros-Solano, Víctor Manuel; Ledesma-Martínez, Edgar; Delgado-Bordonave, Angel de Jesus; Soto-Hernández, Ramón Marcos

    2017-12-01

    Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw. (Cucurbitaceae) is used in ethnomedicine, but the diversity of the varietal groups of this species has not often been considered. This is important because we previously reported that different variety of species exhibit different activities across different tumor cell lines. This study investigates the chemical composition and biological activities of extracts obtained from S. edule var. nigrum spinosum. The leukemia P388 cell line and mononuclear bone marrow cells (MNCBMs) were treated with the extract at a concentration ranging from 40 to 2370 μg/mL for cytotoxicity and viability assays. CD-1 mice were treated with 8-5000 mg/kg extract and monitored every hour for the first 24 h and subsequently for seven days for signs of toxicity (LD 50 ). In addition, the chromatographic profile of the extract was determined by HPLC. The extract inhibits the proliferation of both P388 cells and MNCBMs, with IC 50 values of 927 and 1911 μg/mL, respectively, but reduced the viability and induced the apoptosis of only leukemia cells. The LD 50 was higher than 5000 mg/kg, and this concentration did not alter the blood chemistry or cell count but doubled the mitotic index in the bone marrow. The HPLC showed the presence of cucurbitacins, phloridzin, naringenin, phloretin, apigenin, and gallic, chlorogenic, vanillic, p-hydroxybenzoic, caffeic, and p-coumaric acids. Sechium edule var. nigrum spinosum contains bioactive compounds that explain the antiproliferative and nutraceutical activities, and its lack of physiological side effects constitutes an added value to a widely consumed vegetable.

  7. Chemical and Electronic Structure Studies of Refractory and Dielectric Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneille, Jason Stephen

    This study presents the synthesis and characterization of oxide and refractory thin films under varying conditions. The deposition of the thin films is performed under vacuum conditions. The characterization of the growth, as well as the chemical and electronic properties of the thin films was accomplished using a broad array of surface analytical techniques. These model studies describe the relationship between the preparative processes and the stoichiometry, structure and electronic properties of the film products. From these efforts, the optimal deposition conditions for the production of high quality films have been established. The thin film oxides synthesized and studied here include magnesium oxide, silicon oxide and iron oxide. These oxides were synthesized on a refractory substrate using both post oxidation of thin films as well as reactive vapor deposition of the metals in the presence of an oxygen background. Comparisons and contrasts are presented for the various systems. Metallic magnesium films were grown and characterized as a preliminary study to the synthesis of magnesium oxide. Magnesium oxide (MgO(100)) was synthesized on Mo(100) by evaporating magnesium at a rate of one monolayer per minute in an oxygen background pressure of 1 times 10 ^{-6} Torr at room temperature. The resulting film was found to exhibit spectroscopic characteristics quite similar to those observed for bulk MgO. The acid/base characteristics of the films were studied using carbon monoxide, water and methanol as probe molecules. The film was found to exhibit essentially the same chemical properties as found in analogous powdered catalysts. Silicon dioxide was synthesized by evaporating silicon onto Mo(100) in an oxygen ambient. It is shown that the silicon oxide prepared at room temperature with a silicon deposition rate of {~ }{1.2}A/min and an oxygen pressure of 2 times 10^{ -8} Torr, consisted of predominantly silicon dioxide with a small fraction of suboxides. Annealing to

  8. Binding energies and chemical shifts of least bound core electron excitations in cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechstedt, F.; Enderlein, R.; Wischnewski, R.

    1981-01-01

    Core electron binding energies Esup(B) with respect to the vacuum level and their chemical shifts are calculated for the least bound core levels of cations and anions of cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors. Starting from the HF-binding energy of the free atom absolute values of Esup(B) are obtained by adding core level shifts and relaxation energies. Core level shifts are calculated by means of an electrostatic model with ionic and bond charges according to Phillips' bond charge model. For the calculation of relaxation energies the linear dielectric theory of electronic polarization is applied. Valence and core electrons, and diagonal and non-diagonal screening are taken into account. The theoretical results for chemical shifts of binding energies are compared with experimental values from XPS-measurements corrected by work function data. Good agreement is obtained in all cases within the error limit of about one eV. Chemical and atomic trends of core level shifts, relaxation energies, and binding energies are discussed in terms of changes of atomic and solid state parameters. Chemical shifts and relaxation energies are predicted for various ternary Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) compounds. (author)

  9. Chemical analyses of hot springs, pools, geysers, and surface waters from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and vicinity, 1974-1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, James W.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Jenne, Everett A.; Vivit, Davison V.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents all analytical determinations for samples collected from Yellowstone National Park and vicinity during 1974 and 1975. Water temperature, pH, Eh, and dissolved O2 were determined on-site. Total alkalinity and F were determined on the day of sample collection. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was used to determine concentrations of Li, Na, K, Ca, and Mg. Ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry was used to determine concentrations of Fe(II), Fe(III), As(III), and As(V). Direct-current plasma-optical-emission spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of B, Ba, Cd, Cs, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, and Zn. Two samples collected from Yellowstone Park in June 1974 were used as reference samples for testing the plasma analytical method. Results of these tests demonstrate acceptable precision for all detectable elements. Charge imbalance calculations revealed a small number of samples that may have been subject to measurement errors in pH or alkalinity. These data represent some of the most complete analyses of Yellowstone waters available.

  10. Chemical and physical properties of the normal and aging lens: spectroscopic (UV, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and NMR) analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, S.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro [UV absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)] spectroscopic studies on the normal human lens demonstrate age-related changes which can be correlated with biochemical and photobiologic mechanisms occurring during our lifetime. Chronic cumulative UV exposure results in an age-related increase of photochemically induced chromophores and in color of the lens nucleus. This enables the lens to filter the incident UV radiation, thereby protecting the underlying aging retina from UV photodamage. We have measured the age-related increase in lens fluorescence in vivo on more than 300 normal subjects (1st to 9th decade) by UV slitlamp densitography. These data show a good correlation with the in vitro lens fluorescence studies reported previously and demonstrate that molecular photodamage can be monitored in the lens. In vitro NMR (human and animal lenses) and in vivo experiments currently in progress are rapidly elucidating the physicochemical basis for transparency and the development of light scattering areas. Surface scanning NMR can monitor organophosphate metabolism in the ocular lens in vivo as well as in vitro. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using biophysical methods (optical spectroscopy and NMR analyses) to delineate age-related parameters in the lens, in vivo as well as in vitro. 46 references

  11. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D it (E), and density D it,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on

  12. Chemical and structural analyses of subsurface crevices formed during spontaneous deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Daimon K, E-mail: dkheller@mmm.com; Fahrenholtz, William G., E-mail: billf@mst.edu; O' Keefe, Matthew J., E-mail: mjokeefe@mst.edu

    2011-11-15

    Subsurface crevices formed during the deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings were analyzed in cross-section to assess the effect of deposition and post-treatment on the structure and chemistry of phases present. An Al-O containing phase, believed to be amorphous Al(OH){sub 3}, was formed in crevices during coating deposition. Analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of up to 1.6 at.% chlorine within the Al-O phase, which was likely a product of soluble chlorides that were present in the coating solution. Cerium was not detected within crevices. After post-treatment in an 85 deg. C aqueous phosphate solution, the chloride concentration was reduced to {<=} 0.30 at.% and electron diffraction of the Al-O phase produced ring patterns, indicating it had crystallized. Some diffraction patterns could be indexed to gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), but others are believed to be a combination of hydrated aluminum hydroxides and/or oxides. Aluminum phosphate was not identified. Separately from its effect on cerium-based conversion coatings, phosphate post-treatment improved the corrosion resistance of Al 2024-T3 substrates by acting to crystallize Al(OH){sub 3} present on interior surfaces of crevices and by reducing the chloride concentration in this phase. - Highlights: {yields} Analysis of subsurface crevices formed during deposition of Ce-based conversion coatings. {yields} Phosphate post-treatment improved corrosion protection in salt spray testing. {yields} Post-treatment affected the composition and structure of regions within crevices. {yields} Crystallized Al(OH){sub 3} within crevices acted as a more effective barrier to chloride ions.

  13. Comparative physical-chemical characterization of encapsulated lipid-based isotretinoin products assessed by particle size distribution and thermal behavior analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carla Aiolfi, E-mail: carlaaiolfi@usp.br [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Menaa, Farid [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg 97080 (Germany); Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Menaa, Bouzid, E-mail: bouzid.menaa@gmail.com [Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Quenca-Guillen, Joyce S. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Matos, Jivaldo do Rosario [Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Mercuri, Lucildes Pita [Department of Exact and Earth Sciences, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Diadema, SP 09972-270 (Brazil); Braz, Andre Borges [Department of Engineering of Mines and Oil, Polytechnical School, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Rossetti, Fabia Cristina [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14015-120 (Brazil); Kedor-Hackmann, Erika Rosa Maria; Santoro, Maria Ines Rocha Miritello [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2010-06-10

    Isotretinoin is the drug of choice for the management of severe recalcitrant nodular acne. Nevertheless, some of its physical-chemical properties are still poorly known. Hence, the aim of our study consisted to comparatively evaluate the particle size distribution (PSD) and characterize the thermal behavior of the three encapsulated isotretinoin products in oil suspension (one reference and two generics) commercialized in Brazil. Here, we show that the PSD, estimated by laser diffraction and by polarized light microscopy, differed between the generics and the reference product. However, the thermal behavior of the three products, determined by thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal (DTA) analyses and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), displayed no significant changes and were more thermostable than the isotretinoin standard used as internal control. Thus, our study suggests that PSD analyses in isotretinoin lipid-based formulations should be routinely performed in order to improve their quality and bioavailability.

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy analyses of thermally annealed self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosini, S.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Booth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown on Si-treated GaAs substrates were studied with a transmission electron microscope before and after annealing at 600◦C. At room temperature the nanowires have a zincblende structure and are locally characterized by a high density of rotational twins and stacking...... faults. Selected area diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that nanowires undergo structural modifications upon annealing, suggesting a decrease of defect density following the thermal treatment....

  15. Anti-oxidant activity and major chemical component analyses of twenty-six commercially available essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Fen Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed 26 commercially available essential oils and their major chemical components to determine their antioxidant activity levels by measuring their total phenolic content (TPC, reducing power (RP, β-carotene bleaching (BCB activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging (DFRS ability. The clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had the highest RP, BCB activity levels, and TPC values among the 26 commercial essential oils. Furthermore, of the 26 essential oils, the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had the highest TEAC values, and the clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils had the highest DFRS ability. At a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had RP and BCB activity levels of 94.56% ± 0.06% and 24.64% ± 0.03% and 94.58% ± 0.01% and 89.33% ± 0.09%, respectively. At a concentration of 1 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils showed TPC values of 220.00 ± 0.01 and 69.05 ± 0.01 mg/g relative to gallic acid equivalents, respectively, and the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had TEAC values of 809.00 ± 0.01 and 432.33 ± 0.01 μM, respectively. The clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils showed DFRS abilities of 94.13% ± 0.01% and 78.62% ± 0.01%, respectively. Phenolic compounds of the clove bud, thyme borneol and jasmine absolute essential oils were eugenol (76.08%, thymol (14.36% and carvacrol (12.33%, and eugenol (0.87%, respectively. The phenolic compounds in essential oils were positively correlated with the RP, BCB activity, TPC, TEAC, and DFRS ability.

  16. Anti-oxidant activity and major chemical component analyses of twenty-six commercially available essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Fen; Yih, Kuang-Hway; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Huang, Keh-Feng

    2017-10-01

    This study analyzed 26 commercially available essential oils and their major chemical components to determine their antioxidant activity levels by measuring their total phenolic content (TPC), reducing power (RP), β-carotene bleaching (BCB) activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging (DFRS) ability. The clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had the highest RP, BCB activity levels, and TPC values among the 26 commercial essential oils. Furthermore, of the 26 essential oils, the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had the highest TEAC values, and the clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils had the highest DFRS ability. At a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had RP and BCB activity levels of 94.56% ± 0.06% and 24.64% ± 0.03% and 94.58% ± 0.01% and 89.33% ± 0.09%, respectively. At a concentration of 1 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils showed TPC values of 220.00 ± 0.01 and 69.05 ± 0.01 mg/g relative to gallic acid equivalents, respectively, and the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had TEAC values of 809.00 ± 0.01 and 432.33 ± 0.01 μM, respectively. The clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils showed DFRS abilities of 94.13% ± 0.01% and 78.62% ± 0.01%, respectively. Phenolic compounds of the clove bud, thyme borneol and jasmine absolute essential oils were eugenol (76.08%), thymol (14.36%) and carvacrol (12.33%), and eugenol (0.87%), respectively. The phenolic compounds in essential oils were positively correlated with the RP, BCB activity, TPC, TEAC, and DFRS ability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Electron nature of chemically active state of spiropyran with nitro group. Dependence of efficiency of radiation colouring of spiropyrans on their structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmanskij, A.S.; Zubkov, A.V.; Dyumaev, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Using the theory of solvatochromy it is shown that chemically active state of spiropyran with nitro group is its highly polar electron-excitated state. On the basis of the image on the electron nature of chemically active state of spiropyran the dependence of the values of radiation yield of the coloured forms of spiropyrans upon their structure is explained

  18. Phase-Space Density Analyses of the AE-8 Trapped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayton, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, μ, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of μ and K, and for 3.5 R E E , the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R E for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits μ-dependent local minima around L = 5 R E . Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K c . Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons

  19. Chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer at metal/C{sub 60}-doped polymer interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, C.M.; Campbell, I.H.; Smith, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barashkov, N.N.; Ferraris, J.P. [The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    1997-04-01

    We report electroabsorption measurements of the built-in electrostatic potential in metal/C{sub 60}-doped polymer/metal structures to investigate chemical potential pinning due to equilibrium electron transfer from a metal contact to the electron acceptor energy level of C{sub 60} molecules in the polymer film. The built-in potentials of a series of structures employing thin films of both undoped and C{sub 60}-doped poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2{sup {prime}}-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) were measured. For undoped MEH-PPV, which has an energy gap of about 2.4 eV, the maximum built-in potential is about 2.1 eV, whereas for C{sub 60}-doped MEH-PPV the maximum built-in potential decreases to 1.5 eV. Electron transfer to the C{sub 60} molecules close to the metal interface pins the chemical potential of the metal contact near the electron acceptor energy level of C{sub 60} and decreases the built-in potential of the structure. From the systematic dependence of the built-in potential on the metal work function we find that the electron acceptor energy level of C{sub 60} in MEH-PPV is about 1.7 eV above the hole polaron energy level of MEH-PPV. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Quantum chemical analysis of the electronic structure and Moessbauer spectra parameters for low spin cyanide- and pyridine-hemichromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khleskov, V.I.; Kolpakov, E.V.; Smirnov, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The work contains results of quantum-chemical calculations of electronic structure and Moessbauer spectra parameters for low spin S=1/2 hexa-coordinated ferri-porphyrin complexes with cyanide (CN) and pyridine (Py) as axial ligands. Theoretical results made it possible to explain experimentally observed regularity of anomalous quadrupole splitting decrease after substitution of Py-ligands by CN. Comparison of theoretical and experimental data indicated that 2 E g must be the ground state of investigated hemichromes. In this state unpaired electron symmetrically occupies d π -orbitals of Fe-ion. (orig.)

  1. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed

  2. Annihilation of positrons with the electrons of chemical bonds of the superconducting CuO-polyhedrons in the HTSC materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunov, N.Yu.; Trashchakov, V.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    Angular distribution parameters of annihilation photon pairs emitted from R-Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (x≤0.2; R=Y, Nd, Lu) specimens after injection and subsequent annihilation of positrons in them. It is shown that annihilation of thermalized positrons proceeds advantageously with electrons of chemical bonds of O(4)-Cu(I)-O(I) polyhedrons in R-Ba-Cu-O oxides. In an orthorhombic phase positrons are mostly delocalized in rows of ordered stoichiometric vacancies. The result obtained provides to recommend the methods of positron diagnostics for studying parameters of electron state density in superconducting structural groups of high-temperature superconductors. 2 refs.; 1 fig

  3. Surface chemical reactions induced by molecules electronically-excited in the gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrunin, Victor V.

    2011-01-01

    and alignment are taking place, guiding all the molecules towards the intersections with the ground state PES, where transitions to the ground state PES will occur with minimum energy dissipation. The accumulated kinetic energy may be used to overcome the chemical reaction barrier. While recombination chemical...... be readily produced. Products of chemical adsorption and/or chemical reactions induced within adsorbates are aggregated on the surface and observed by light scattering. We will demonstrate how pressure and spectral dependencies of the chemical outcomes, polarization of the light and interference of two laser...... beams inducing the reaction can be used to distinguish the new process we try to investigate from chemical reactions induced by photoexcitation within adsorbed molecules and/or gas phase photolysis....

  4. Biomonitoring in a clean and a multi-contaminated estuary based on biomarkers and chemical analyses in the endobenthic worm Nereis diversicolor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durou, Cyril [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France) and Institut de Biologie et Ecologie Appliquees, CEREA, Universite Catholique de l' Ouest, 44 rue Rabelais, 49008 Angers Cedex 01 (France)]. E-mail: cyril.durou@uco.fr; Poirier, Laurence [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Amiard, Jean-Claude [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Budzinski, Helene [CNRS UMR 5472, LPTC, Universite de Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Gnassia-Barelli, Mauricette [UMR INRA UNSA 1112 ROSE, Faculte des Sciences, BP 71, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Lemenach, Karyn [CNRS UMR 5472, LPTC, Universite de Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Peluhet, Laurent [CNRS UMR 5472, LPTC, Universite de Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence (France); Mouneyrac, Catherine [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut de Biologie et Ecologie Appliquees, CEREA, Universite Catholique de l' Ouest, 44 rue Rabelais, 49008 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Romeo, Michele [UMR INRA UNSA 1112 ROSE, Faculte des Sciences, BP 71, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Amiard-Triquet, Claude [CNRS, Universite de Nantes, Pole Mer et Littoral, SMAB, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-07-15

    Relationships between biochemical and physiological biomarkers (acetylcholinesterase [AChE], catalase, and glutathione S-transferase [GST] activities, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glycogen, lipids and proteins) and accumulated concentrations of contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals) were examined in the keystone species Nereis diversicolor. The chemical analyses of worms and sediments allowed the designation of the Seine estuary and the Authie estuary as a polluted and relatively clean site respectively. Worms from the Seine estuary exhibited higher GST and lower AChE activities. Generally, larger worms had higher concentrations of energy reserves. Principal component analyses clearly highlighted intersite differences: in the first plan, GST activities and chemical concentrations were inversely related to concentrations of energy reserves; in the second one, PCB concentrations and AChE activity were inversely related. Depleted levels of energy reserves could be a consequence of combating toxicants and might predict effects at higher levels of biological organization. The use of GST and AChE activities and energy reserve concentrations as biomarkers is validated in the field in this keystone species. - The use of N. diversicolor as a biomonitor of environmental quality via the measurement of biomarkers and accumulated concentrations of contaminants is validated in the field.

  5. The calculation of electron chemical potential and ion charge state and their influence on plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Li, Yao; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2014-01-01

    The electron chemical potential and ion charge state (average ion charge and ion distribution) are important parameters in calculating plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire. In this paper, the calculating method of electron chemical potential and ion charge state is discussed at first. For the calculation of electron chemical potential, the ideal free electron gas model and Thomas-Fermi model are compared and analyzed in terms of the coupling constant of plasma. The Thomas-Fermi ionization model, which is used to calculate ion charge state, is compared with the method based on Saha equation. Furthermore, the influence of electron degenerated energy levels and ion excited states in Saha equation on the ion charge state is also analyzed. Then the influence of different calculating methods of electron chemical potential and ion charge state on plasma conductivity is discussed by applying them in the Lee-More conductivity model

  6. Vascugraft polyurethane arterial prosthesis as femoro-popliteal and femoro-peroneal bypasses in humans: pathological, structural and chemical analyses of four excised grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Marois, Y; Guidoin, R G; Bull, P; Marois, M; How, T; Laroche, G; King, M W

    1997-01-01

    Following positive results obtained in in vitro studies and in vivo implantations in animals, a clinical trial using the Vascugraft polyurethane arterial prosthesis as a below-knee substitute was undertaken in 15 patients. Eight grafts became occluded during the first year, and segments from four of them were explanted and made available for pathological, structural and chemical investigations. The implantation periods ranged from 21 to 358 days. Failures were associated with kinking (one case), possible anastomotic mismatch between the graft and the artery (one case), and poor run-off (two cases). No organized collagenous internal encapsulation was noted; however, endothelial-like cells were observed at the anastomotic site of one graft. No significant structural degradation of the prostheses was observed in those grafts implanted for 21, 38 and 46 days. Some deteriorations in the fibrous structure were observed on the external surface of the prosthesis implanted for 358 days. High-resolution carbon C1s analysis by ESCA demonstrated a 60 to 80% decrease in carbonate content on the surface of all explanted prostheses. Chemical analyses of each polyurethane graft by IR, SEC and DSC revealed no significant chemical changes. The clinical performance of the Vascugraft prosthesis for below-knee implantation proved to be no more impressive than that of expanded polytetrafluorethylene, the currently accepted reference. The decision by B. Braun Melsungen AG to end this program is therefore to be regarded as highly professional.

  7. Phase-Space Density Analyses of the AE-8 Trapped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.E. Cayton

    2005-08-12

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, {mu}, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of {mu} and K, and for 3.5 R{sub E} < L < 6.5 R{sub E}, the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R{sub E} for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits {mu}-dependent local minima around L = 5 R{sub E}. Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K{sub c}. Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons.

  8. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N_2 and 20% O_2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 10"1"3" cm"−"3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the

  9. Assessment of wastewater and recycled water quality: a comparison of lines of evidence from in vitro, in vivo and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leusch, Frederic D L; Khan, Stuart J; Gagnon, M Monique; Quayle, Pam; Trinh, Trang; Coleman, Heather; Rawson, Christopher; Chapman, Heather F; Blair, Palenque; Nice, Helen; Reitsema, Tarren

    2014-03-01

    We investigated water quality at an advanced water reclamation plant and three conventional wastewater treatment plants using an "ecotoxicity toolbox" consisting of three complementary analyses (chemical analysis, in vitro bioanalysis and in situ biological monitoring), with a focus on endocrine disruption. The in vitro bioassays were chosen to provide an appropriately wide coverage of biological effects relevant to managed aquifer recharge and environmental discharge of treated wastewater, and included bioassays for bacterial toxicity (Microtox), genotoxicity (umuC), photosynthesis inhibition (Max-I-PAM) and endocrine effects (E-SCREEN and AR-CALUX). Chemical analysis of hormones and pesticides using LCMSMS was performed in parallel to correlate standard analytical methods with the in vitro assessment. For two plants with surface water discharge into open drains, further field work was carried out to examine in situ effects using mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) as a bioindicator species for possible endocrine effects. The results show considerable cytotoxicity, phytotoxicity, estrogenicity and androgenicity in raw sewage, all of which were significantly reduced by conventional wastewater treatment. No biological response was detected to RO water, suggesting that reverse osmosis is a significant barrier to biologically active compounds. Chemical analysis and in situ monitoring revealed trends consistent with the in vitro results: chemical analysis confirmed the removal trends observed by the bioanalytical tools, and in situ sampling did not reveal any evidence of endocrine disruption specifically due to discharge of treated wastewater (although other sources may be present). Biomarkers of exposure (in vitro) and effect (in vivo or in situ) are complementary and together provide information with a high level of ecological relevance. This study illustrates the utility of combining multiple lines of evidence in the assessment of water quality. Copyright

  10. Three-input gate logic circuits on chemically assembled single-electron transistors with organic and inorganic hybrid passivation layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Yutaka; Hackenberger, Guillaume; Azuma, Yasuo; Kano, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2017-01-01

    Single-electron transistors (SETs) are sub-10-nm scale electronic devices based on conductive Coulomb islands sandwiched between double-barrier tunneling barriers. Chemically assembled SETs with alkanethiol-protected Au nanoparticles show highly stable Coulomb diamonds and two-input logic operations. The combination of bottom-up and top-down processes used to form the passivation layer is vital for realizing multi-gate chemically assembled SET circuits, as this combination enables us to connect conventional complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technologies via planar processes. Here, three-input gate exclusive-OR (XOR) logic operations are demonstrated in passivated chemically assembled SETs. The passivation layer is a hybrid bilayer of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and pulsed laser deposited (PLD) aluminum oxide (AlO[Formula: see text]), and top-gate electrodes were prepared on the hybrid passivation layers. Top and two-side-gated SETs showed clear Coulomb oscillation and diamonds for each of the three available gates, and three-input gate XOR logic operation was clearly demonstrated. These results show the potential of chemically assembled SETs to work as logic devices with multi-gate inputs using organic and inorganic hybrid passivation layers.

  11. Experimental (FT-IR and FT-Raman) and theoretical (HF and DFT) investigation, NMR, NBO, electronic properties and frequency estimation analyses on 2,4,5-trichlorobenzene sulfonyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, R.; Arivazhagan, M.

    2012-11-01

    The present work deals with the structural, electronic, and vibrational analyses of the biomolecule 2,4,5-trichlorobenzene sulfonyl chloride (TCBSC). TCBSC is a novel pharmaceutical compound used in dyes, pesticides, pigments, fluorescence brighteners and intermediate for agricultural chemicals in the manufacture of insecticides. Quantum chemical calculation of geometrical structure and energies of TCBSC was carried out by density functional theory (B3LYP) and ab initio (HF) methods at 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) standard basis set. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NMR analysis shows that the isotropic chemical shifts of carbon and hydrogen atom of TCBSC are giving the reasonable shielding to the molecule. Another interesting property shows nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior. Moreover, we have not only simulated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) but also determined the transition state and energy band gap.

  12. Investigation of electronic structure and chemical bonding of intermetallic Pd2HfIn: An ab-initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Amreen; Gaur, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    Ab-initio calculations are carried out to study the electronic and chemical bonding properties of Intermetallic full Heusler compound Pd2HfIn which crystallizes in F-43m structure. All calculations are performed by using density functional theory (DFT) based code Quantum Espresso. Generalized gradient approximations (GGA) of Perdew- Burke- Ernzerhof (PBE) have been adopted for exchange-correlation potential. Calculated electronic band structure reveals the metallic character of the compound. From partial density of states (PDoS), we found the presence of relatively high intensity electronic states of 4d-Pd atom at Fermi level. We have found a pseudo-gap just abouve the Fermi level and N(E) at Fermi level is observed to be 0.8 states/eV, these finding indicates the existence of superconducting character in Pd2HfIn.

  13. Formation of hydrogen-related traps in electron-irradiated n-type silicon by wet chemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Yutaka; Shimada, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    Interaction of hydrogen atoms and vacancy-related defects in 10 MeV electron-irradiated n-type silicon has been studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy. Hydrogen has been incorporated into electron-irradiated n-type silicon by wet chemical etching. The reduction of the concentration of the vacancy-oxygen pair and divacancy occurs by the incorporation of hydrogen, while the formation of the NH1 electron trap (E c - 0.31 eV) is observed. Further decrease of the concentration of the vacancy-oxygen pair and further increase of the concentration of the NH1 trap are observed upon subsequent below-band-gap light illumination. It is suggested that the trap NH1 is tentatively ascribed to the vacancy-oxygen pair which is partly saturated with hydrogen

  14. Effect of chemical compounds on electronic tongue response to citrus juices

    Science.gov (United States)

    The electronic tongue system mimics the process of taste detection by human taste buds and recognition by the brain, hence helping in prediction of taste. With this unique capability, the electronic tongue has been used for taste detection of a wide range of food products. As a preliminary step in p...

  15. Electron–electron interactions in the chemical bond: “1/3” Effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The prominent “1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of two- dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron–electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall ...

  16. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Wang, Hailiang; Dai, Hongjie; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen, Zhi-xun

    2009-01-01

    inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can

  17. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses of low-temperature laser welding of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, Paolo; Sbrana, Francesca; Tiribilli, Bruno; Pini, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    Low-temperature laser welding of the cornea is a technique used to facilitate the closure of corneal cuts. The procedure consists of staining the wound with a chromophore (indocyanine green), followed by continuous wave irradiation with an 810 nm diode laser operated at low power densities (12-16 W/cm(2)), which induces local heating in the 55-65 degrees C range. In this study, we aimed to investigate the ultrastructural modifications in the extracellular matrix following laser welding of corneal wounds by means of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results evidenced marked disorganization of the normal fibrillar assembly, although collagen appeared not to be denatured under the operating conditions we employed. The mechanism of low-temperature laser welding may be related to some structural modifications of the nonfibrillar extracellular components of the corneal stroma.

  18. Applying Data Mining Techniques to Chemical Analyses of Pre-drill Groundwater Samples within the Marcellus Formation Shale Play in Bradford County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, T.; Niu, X.; Gonzales, M. S.; Li, Z.; Brantley, S.

    2017-12-01

    Groundwater samples are collected for chemical analyses by shale gas industry consultants in the vicinity of proposed gas wells in Pennsylvania. These data sets are archived so that the chemistry of water from homeowner wells can be compared to chemistry after gas-well drilling. Improved public awareness of groundwater quality issues will contribute to designing strategies for both water resource management and hydrocarbon exploration. We have received water analyses for 11,000 groundwater samples from PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) in the Marcellus Shale footprint in Bradford County, PA for the years ranging from 2010 to 2016. The PA DEP has investigated these analyses to determine whether gas well drilling or other activities affected water quality. We are currently investigating these analyses to look for patterns in chemistry throughout the study area (related or unrelated to gas drilling activities) and to look for evidence of analytes that may be present at concentrations higher than the advised standards for drinking water. Our preliminary results reveal that dissolved methane concentrations tend to be higher along fault lines in Bradford County [1]. Lead (Pb), arsenic (As), and barium (Ba) are sometimes present at levels above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL). Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) more frequently violate the EPA standard. We find that concentrations of some chemical analytes (e.g., Ba and Mn) are dependent on bedrock formations (i.e., Catskill vs. Lock Haven) while concentrations of other analytes (e.g., Pb) are not statistically significantly distinct between different bedrock formations. Our investigations are also focused on looking for correlations that might explain water quality patterns with respect to human activities such as gas drilling. However, percentages of water samples failing EPA MCL with respect to Pb, As, and Ba have decreased from previous USGS and PSU studies in the 1990s and 2000s. Public access to

  19. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of Roman amphorae from Augustan period recovered at the production center of Sant Antoni de Calonge (Gerona, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila Socias, L.; Prats Pico, N.; Buxeda Garrigos, J.

    2016-01-01

    Amphorae were the most popular transport vessels used to ship wine and other commodities in Antiquity. This paper reports the results of the analyses of 38 samples of several Roman amphorae types recovered at Calonge (Gerona, Spain). Chemical composition of individuals have been obtained by means of XRF. Equivalent firing temperatures have been estimated by XRD and further refiring experiments have been performed. The results suggest the existence of two different clay pastes among individuals analyzed, most of which were fired at the range 900-1000 degree centigrade. Moreover, it is argued that craftsmen did not follow highly standardized paste preparation process during the first activity period of the workshop. The results are discussed in terms of production technology and standardization. (Author)

  20. Database supported electronic retrospective analyses in radiation oncology. Establishing a workflow using the example of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, K.A.; Habermehl, D.; Bougatf, N.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E.; Jaeger, A.; Floca, R.O.; Zhang, L.; Bendl, R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Especially in the field of radiation oncology, handling a large variety of voluminous datasets from various information systems in different documentation styles efficiently is crucial for patient care and research. To date, conducting retrospective clinical analyses is rather difficult and time consuming. With the example of patients with pancreatic cancer treated with radio-chemotherapy, we performed a therapy evaluation by using an analysis system connected with a documentation system. Materials and methods: A total number of 783 patients have been documented into a professional, database-based documentation system. Information about radiation therapy, diagnostic images and dose distributions have been imported into the web-based system. Results: For 36 patients with disease progression after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, we designed and established an analysis workflow. After an automatic registration of the radiation plans with the follow-up images, the recurrence volumes are segmented manually. Based on these volumes the DVH (dose volume histogram) statistic is calculated, followed by the determination of the dose applied to the region of recurrence. All results are saved in the database and included in statistical calculations. Conclusion: The main goal of using an automatic analysis tool is to reduce time and effort conducting clinical analyses, especially with large patient groups. We showed a first approach and use of some existing tools, however manual interaction is still necessary. Further steps need to be taken to enhance automation. Already, it has become apparent that the benefits of digital data management and analysis lie in the central storage of data and reusability of the results. Therefore, we intend to adapt the analysis system to other types of tumors in radiation oncology. (orig.)

  1. Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in...

  2. Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the BUNNY BORDELON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the BUNNY BORDELON in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-23...

  3. Chemical and laboratory analyses oceanographic data collected aboard the Wes Bordelon in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-22 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074863)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical and laboratory analyses oceanographic data were collected aboard the Wes Bordelon in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-18 to 2010-08-22 in response to the...

  4. Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-12 to 2010-06-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, laboratory analyses, physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the JACK FITZ in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-12 to 2010-06-20 in...

  5. Instruments and techniques for analysing the time-resolved transverse phase space distribution of high-brightness electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, Jeniffa

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the instruments and techniques used to characterise the transverse phase space distribution of high-brightness electron beams. In particular, methods are considered allowing to measure the emittance as a function of the longitudinal coordinate within the bunch (slice emittance) with a resolution in the ps to sub-ps range. The main objective of this work is the analysis of techniques applicable for the time-resolved phase space characterisation for future high-brightness electron beam sources and single-pass accelerators based on these. The competence built up by understanding and comparing different techniques is to be used for the design and operation of slice diagnostic systems for the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (BERLinPro). In the framework of the thesis, two methods applicable for slice emittance measurements are considered, namely the zero-phasing technique and the use of a transverse deflector. These methods combine the conventional quadrupole scan technique with a transfer of the longitudinal distribution into a transverse distribution. Measurements were performed within different collaborative projects. The experimental setup, the measurement itself and the data analysis are discussed as well as measurement results and simulations. In addition, the phase space tomography technique is introduced. In contrast to quadrupole scan-based techniques, tomography is model-independent and can reconstruct the phase space distribution from simple projected measurements. The developed image reconstruction routine based on the Maximum Entropy algorithm is introduced. The quality of the reconstruction is tested using different model distributions, simulated data and measurement data. The results of the tests are presented. The adequacy of the investigated techniques, the experimental procedures as well as the developed data analysis tools could be verified. The experimental and practical experience gathered during this work, the

  6. Electronic structure, excitation properties, and chemical transformations of extreme ultra-violet resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert A.; Narasimhan, Amrit; Brainard, Robert L.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of extreme ultra violet resist materials and of their individual components, two polymers and two photoacid generators (PAGs), is studied using a combination of x-ray and UV photoemission spectroscopies, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab-initio techniques. It is shown that simple molecular models can be used to understand the electronic structure of each sample and describe the experimental data. Additionally, effects directly relevant to the photochemical processes are observed: low energy loss processes are observed for the phenolic polymer containing samples that should favor thermalization of electrons; PAG segregation is measured at the surface of the resist films that could lead to surface inhomogeneities; both PAGs are found to be stable upon irradiation in the absence of the polymer, contrasting with a high reactivity that can be followed upon x-ray irradiation of the full resist.

  7. Both gas chromatography and an electronic nose reflect chemical polymorphism of juniper shrubs browsed or avoided by sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markó, Gábor; Novák, Ildikó; Bernáth, Jeno; Altbäcker, Vilmos

    2011-07-01

    Chemical polymorphism may contribute to variation in browsing damage by mammalian herbivores. Earlier, we demonstrated that essential oil concentration in juniper, Juniperus communis, was negatively associated with herbivore browsing. The aim of the present study was to characterize the volatile chemical composition of browsed and non-browsed J. communis. By using either gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) or an electronic nose device, we could separate sheep-browsed or non-browsed juniper shrubs by their essential oil pattern and complex odor matrix. The main components of the essential oil from J. communis were monoterpenes. We distinguished three chemotypes, dominated either by α-pinene, sabinene, or δ-3-carene. Shrubs belonging to the α-pinene- or sabinene-dominated groups were browsed, whereas all individuals with the δ-3-carene chemotype were unused by the local herbivores. The electronic nose also separated the browsed and non-browsed shrubs indicating that their odor matrix could guide sheep browsing. Responses of sheep could integrate the post-ingestive effects of plant secondary metabolites with sensory experience that stems from odor-phytotoxin interactions. Chemotype diversity could increase the survival rate in the present population of J. communis as certain shrubs could benefit from relatively better chemical protection against the herbivores.

  8. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in Great Lakes areas of concern, 2010 to 2011-Collection methods, analyses methods, quality assurance, and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Smith, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) cooperated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on a study to identify the occurrence of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in water and bottom-sediment samples collected during 2010–11 at sites in seven areas of concern (AOCs) throughout the Great Lakes. Study sites include tributaries to the Great Lakes in AOCs located near Duluth, Minn.; Green Bay, Wis.; Roches­ter, N.Y.; Detroit, Mich.; Toledo, Ohio; Milwaukee, Wis.; and Ashtabula, Ohio. This report documents the collection meth­ods, analyses methods, quality-assurance data and analyses, and provides the data for this study. Water and bottom-sediment samples were analyzed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., for a broad suite of CECs. During this study, 135 environmental and 23 field dupli­cate samples of surface water and wastewater effluent, 10 field blank water samples, and 11 field spike water samples were collected and analyzed. Sixty-one of the 69 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 4433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 11.2 micrograms per liter. Twenty-eight of the 48 pharmaceuticals (research method 8244) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.0029 to 22.0 micro­grams per liter. Ten of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols analyzed (research method 4434) were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.16 to 10,000 nanograms per liter. During this study, 75 environmental, 13 field duplicate samples, and 9 field spike samples of bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for a wide variety of CECs. Forty-seven of the 57 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 5433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.921 to 25,800 nanograms per gram. Seventeen of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols (research method 6434) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.006 to 8,921 nanograms per gram. Twelve of

  9. Strain and water effects on the electronic structure and chemical activity of in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistanov, Andrey A.; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zhou, Kun

    2017-03-01

    By using first-principles calculations, the electronic structure of planar and strained in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure is studied. The heterostructure is found to be metallic in a strain range from  -7% (compression) to  +7% (tension). The effect of compressive/tensile strain on the chemical activity of the in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure is examined by studying its interaction with the H2O molecule. It shows that compressive/tensile strain is able to increase the binding energy of H2O compared with the adsorption on a planar surface, and the charge transfer between the water molecule and the graphene/silicene sheet can be modulated by strain. Moreover, the presence of the boron-nitride (BN)-substrate significantly influences the chemical activity of the graphene/silicene heterostructure upon its interaction with the H2O molecule and may cause an increase/decrease of the charge transfer between the H2O molecule and the heterostructure. These findings provide insights into the modulation of electronic properties of the in-plane free-standing/substrate-supported graphene/silicene heterostructure, and render possible ways to control its electronic structure, carrier density and redox characteristics, which may be useful for its potential applications in nanoelectronics and gas sensors.

  10. Strain and water effects on the electronic structure and chemical activity of in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistanov, Andrey A; Zhou, Kun; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Dmitriev, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    By using first-principles calculations, the electronic structure of planar and strained in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure is studied. The heterostructure is found to be metallic in a strain range from  −7% (compression) to  +7% (tension). The effect of compressive/tensile strain on the chemical activity of the in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure is examined by studying its interaction with the H 2 O molecule. It shows that compressive/tensile strain is able to increase the binding energy of H 2 O compared with the adsorption on a planar surface, and the charge transfer between the water molecule and the graphene/silicene sheet can be modulated by strain. Moreover, the presence of the boron-nitride (BN)-substrate significantly influences the chemical activity of the graphene/silicene heterostructure upon its interaction with the H 2 O molecule and may cause an increase/decrease of the charge transfer between the H 2 O molecule and the heterostructure. These findings provide insights into the modulation of electronic properties of the in-plane free-standing/substrate-supported graphene/silicene heterostructure, and render possible ways to control its electronic structure, carrier density and redox characteristics, which may be useful for its potential applications in nanoelectronics and gas sensors. (paper)

  11. NMR Chemical Shift of a Helium Atom as a Probe for Electronic Structure of FH, F-, (FHF)-, and FH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupikina, E Yu; Efimova, A A; Denisov, G S; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-12-21

    In this work, we present the first results of outer electronic shell visualization by using a 3 He atom as a probe particle. As model objects we have chosen F - , FH, and FH 2 + species, as well as the hydrogen-bonded complex FH···F - at various H···F - distances (3.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.5 Å and equilibrium at ca. 1.14 Å). The interaction energy of investigated objects with helium atom (CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ) and helium atom chemical shift (B3LYP/pcS-2) surfaces were calculated, and their topological analysis was performed. For comparison, the results of standard quantum mechanical approaches to electronic shell visualization were presented (ESP, ELF, ED, ∇ 2 ED). We show that the Laplacian of helium chemical shift, ∇ 2 δ He , is sensitive to fluorine atom lone pair localization regions, and it can be used for the visualization of the outer electronic shell, which could be used to evaluate the proton accepting ability. The sensitivity of ∇ 2 δ He to lone pairs is preserved at distances as large as 2.0-2.5 Å from the fluorine nucleus (in comparison with the distance to ESP minima, located at 1.0-1.5 Å or maxima of ELF, which are as close as 0.6 Å to the fluorine nucleus).

  12. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angermann, Heike, E-mail: angermann@helmholtz-berlin.de

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D{sub it}(E), and density D{sub it,min} of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly

  13. Comparative analyses of population-scale phenomic data in electronic medical records reveal race-specific disease networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksberg, Benjamin S.; Li, Li; Badgeley, Marcus A.; Shameer, Khader; Kosoy, Roman; Beckmann, Noam D.; Pho, Nam; Hakenberg, Jörg; Ma, Meng; Ayers, Kristin L.; Hoffman, Gabriel E.; Dan Li, Shuyu; Schadt, Eric E.; Patel, Chirag J.; Chen, Rong; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Underrepresentation of racial groups represents an important challenge and major gap in phenomics research. Most of the current human phenomics research is based primarily on European populations; hence it is an important challenge to expand it to consider other population groups. One approach is to utilize data from EMR databases that contain patient data from diverse demographics and ancestries. The implications of this racial underrepresentation of data can be profound regarding effects on the healthcare delivery and actionability. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first attempt to perform comparative, population-scale analyses of disease networks across three different populations, namely Caucasian (EA), African American (AA) and Hispanic/Latino (HL). Results: We compared susceptibility profiles and temporal connectivity patterns for 1988 diseases and 37 282 disease pairs represented in a clinical population of 1 025 573 patients. Accordingly, we revealed appreciable differences in disease susceptibility, temporal patterns, network structure and underlying disease connections between EA, AA and HL populations. We found 2158 significantly comorbid diseases for the EA cohort, 3265 for AA and 672 for HL. We further outlined key disease pair associations unique to each population as well as categorical enrichments of these pairs. Finally, we identified 51 key ‘hub’ diseases that are the focal points in the race-centric networks and of particular clinical importance. Incorporating race-specific disease comorbidity patterns will produce a more accurate and complete picture of the disease landscape overall and could support more precise understanding of disease relationships and patient management towards improved clinical outcomes. Contacts: rong.chen@mssm.edu or joel.dudley@mssm.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307606

  14. Comparative analyses of population-scale phenomic data in electronic medical records reveal race-specific disease networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Li, Li; Badgeley, Marcus A; Shameer, Khader; Kosoy, Roman; Beckmann, Noam D; Pho, Nam; Hakenberg, Jörg; Ma, Meng; Ayers, Kristin L; Hoffman, Gabriel E; Dan Li, Shuyu; Schadt, Eric E; Patel, Chirag J; Chen, Rong; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-06-15

    Underrepresentation of racial groups represents an important challenge and major gap in phenomics research. Most of the current human phenomics research is based primarily on European populations; hence it is an important challenge to expand it to consider other population groups. One approach is to utilize data from EMR databases that contain patient data from diverse demographics and ancestries. The implications of this racial underrepresentation of data can be profound regarding effects on the healthcare delivery and actionability. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first attempt to perform comparative, population-scale analyses of disease networks across three different populations, namely Caucasian (EA), African American (AA) and Hispanic/Latino (HL). We compared susceptibility profiles and temporal connectivity patterns for 1988 diseases and 37 282 disease pairs represented in a clinical population of 1 025 573 patients. Accordingly, we revealed appreciable differences in disease susceptibility, temporal patterns, network structure and underlying disease connections between EA, AA and HL populations. We found 2158 significantly comorbid diseases for the EA cohort, 3265 for AA and 672 for HL. We further outlined key disease pair associations unique to each population as well as categorical enrichments of these pairs. Finally, we identified 51 key 'hub' diseases that are the focal points in the race-centric networks and of particular clinical importance. Incorporating race-specific disease comorbidity patterns will produce a more accurate and complete picture of the disease landscape overall and could support more precise understanding of disease relationships and patient management towards improved clinical outcomes. rong.chen@mssm.edu or joel.dudley@mssm.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Impact of chemical polishing on surface roughness and dimensional quality of electron beam melting process (EBM) parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolimont, Adrien; Rivière-Lorphèvre, Edouard; Ducobu, François; Backaert, Stéphane

    2018-05-01

    Additive manufacturing is growing faster and faster. This leads us to study the functionalization of the parts that are produced by these processes. Electron Beam melting (EBM) is one of these technologies. It is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method. With this process, it is possible to manufacture high-density metal parts with complex topology. One of the big problems with these technologies is the surface finish. To improve the quality of the surface, some finishing operations are needed. In this study, the focus is set on chemical polishing. The goal is to determine how the chemical etching impacts the dimensional accuracy and the surface roughness of EBM parts. To this end, an experimental campaign was carried out on the most widely used material in EBM, Ti6Al4V. Different exposure times were tested. The impact of these times on surface quality was evaluated. To help predicting the excess thickness to be provided, the dimensional impact of chemical polishing on EBM parts was estimated. 15 parts were measured before and after chemical machining. The improvement of surface quality was also evaluated after each treatment.

  16. Chemical formation of palladium-free surface-nickelized polyimide film for flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Y.-S.; Whang, W.-T.; Wu, S.-C.; Chuang, Kuen-Ru

    2008-01-01

    Flexible polyimide (PI) films for flexible electronics were surface-nickelized using a fully solution-based process and excellent adhesion between the nickel and polyimide phases was observed. Polyimide substrates were modified by alkaline hydrolysis, ion exchange, reduction and nickel electroless deposition without palladium. Atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to follow the growth of nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) and nickel layers on the polyimide surface. The surface resistances of the Ni-NPs/PI films and Ni/PI films, measured using a four-point probe, were 1.6 x 10 7 and 0.83 Ω/cm 2 , respectively. The thicknesses of Ni-NPs and the Ni layer on the polyimide surface were 82 nm and 382 nm, respectively, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, and the Ni layer adhered well to PI, as determined by the adhesive tape testing method

  17. A study on chemical composition of spices irradiated by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Lianzhong; Ding Shiyue; Zhu Yan; Li Yixu; Zhu Songmei

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative changes in common organic acids and inorganic acids from spices irradiated by electron beam were studied by Dionex-4000i ion chromatograph. The results showed that the acids content of either chilli or the five-spice powder irradiated with a dose of 9.94 kGy did not undergo significant changes in comparison with the control samples. The flavour composition in the five-spice powder irradiated by electron beam was also determined by Finnigan MAT-8230B gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and compared to the results by heating treatment (120 deg. C, 30min). The comparison indicated that the effect of electron beam treatment on flavour composition was less than that of heating

  18. A study on chemical composition of spices irradiated by electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lianzhong, Ding [Inst. of Applied Technical Physics of Zhejiang Province (China); Shiyue, Ding; Yan, Zhu; Yixu, Li [Testing Technology Inst. of Zhejiang Province (China)

    1992-02-01

    Quantitative changes in common organic acids and inorganic acids from spices irradiated by electron beam were studied by Dionex-4000 ion Chromatograph. The results showed that the acids content of either achilli or the five-spice powder irradiated with a dose of 9.94 kGy did not undergo significant changes in comparison with the control samples. The flavour composition in the five-spice powder irradiated by electron beam was also determined by Finnigan MAT-8230B gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and compared to the results by heating treatment (120 C, 30 min). The comparison indicated that the effect of electron beam treatment on flavour composition was less than that of heating.

  19. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  20. Inverted bulk-heterojunction organic solar cell using chemical bath deposited titanium oxide as electron collection layer

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwabara, Takayuki; Sugiyama, Hirokazu; Kuzuba, Mitsuhiro  ; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takahashi, Kohshin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical bath deposited titanium oxide (TiOx ) as an electron collection layer is introduced between the organic layer and the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for improving the performance of inverted bulk-heterojunction organic thin film solar cells with 1 cm2 active area, where regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were mainly used as the photo-active layer. The uniform and thin TiOx film was easily prepared onto the ITO electrode ...

  1. Role of defects in tuning the electronic properties of monolayer WS{sub 2} grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jie; Zheliuk, Oleksandr; Lu, Jianming; Ye, Jianting [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Gordiichuk, Pavlo [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States); Herrmann, Andreas [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biology, Humboldt-Universitaet Berlin (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides have already attracted enormous research interest. To understand the dependence of electronic properties on the quality and defect morphology is vital for synthesizing high quality materials and the realization of functional devices. Here, we demonstrate the mapping of the conductive variations by conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in the monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) grown by chemical vapor deposition. The electronic properties are strongly affected by the formation of vacancies in monolayer WS{sub 2} during growth, which is also verified by the photoluminescence. This spatial study of defects provides opportunities for optimization of the growth process for enhancing devices performance of TMDs monolayers. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Semiclassical theory of electronically nonadiabatic chemical dynamics: Incorporation of the Zhu-Nakamura theory into the frozen Gaussian propagation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondorskiy, A.; Nakamura, H.

    2004-01-01

    The title theory is developed by combining the Herman-Kluk semiclassical theory for adiabatic propagation on single potential-energy surface and the semiclassical Zhu-Nakamura theory for nonadiabatic transition. The formulation with use of natural mathematical principles leads to a quite simple expression for the propagator based on classical trajectories and simple formulas are derived for overall adiabatic and nonadiabatic processes. The theory is applied to electronically nonadiabatic photodissociation processes: a one-dimensional problem of H 2 + in a cw (continuous wave) laser field and a two-dimensional model problem of H 2 O in a cw laser field. The theory is found to work well for the propagation duration of several molecular vibrational periods and wide energy range. Although the formulation is made for the case of laser induced nonadiabatic processes, it is straightforwardly applicable to ordinary electronically nonadiabatic chemical dynamics

  3. Time-series product and substance flow analyses of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habuer,; Nakatani, Jun; Moriguchi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We estimate the possession and obsolescence of household appliances (HAs) in China. • Over 4.8–5.1 billion units of major HAs will be discarded in the next 20 years. • We calculate the amounts of substances contained in end-of-life (EoL) TV sets. • Less common metals will tend to decrease in content in generation of EoL TV sets. • Precious metals will tend to increase in content in EoL TV sets in 2015–2030. - Abstract: Given the amounts of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EoL-EEE) being generated and their contents of both harmful and valuable materials, the EoL-EEE issue should be regarded not only as an emerging environmental problem but also as a resource management strategy in China. At present, in order to provide the basis for managing EoL-EEE at both product and substance levels in China, it is necessary to carry out a quantitative analysis on EoL-EEE and to determine how much of it will be generated and how much materials and substances it contains. In this study, the possession and obsolescence amounts of five types of household appliance (HA) including television (TV) sets and the amounts of substances contained in EoL TV sets were estimated using time-series product flow analysis (PFA) and substance flow analysis (SFA). The results of PFA indicated that the total possession amounts of those five types of HAs will exceed 3.1 billion units in 2030, which will be two times higher than those in 2010. In addition, it was estimated that cumulatively over 4.8–5.1 billion units of these five types of EoL HA would be obsoleted between 2010–2030. The results of SFA on TV sets indicated that the generated amounts of most of the less common metals and a part of common metals such as copper (Cu) would tend to decrease, whereas those of other common metals such as iron (Fe) as well as precious metals would tend to increase in EoL TV sets in 2015–2030. The results of this study provide a quantitative basis for helping

  4. Time-series product and substance flow analyses of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habuer,, E-mail: habuer@env.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakatani, Jun; Moriguchi, Yuichi

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We estimate the possession and obsolescence of household appliances (HAs) in China. • Over 4.8–5.1 billion units of major HAs will be discarded in the next 20 years. • We calculate the amounts of substances contained in end-of-life (EoL) TV sets. • Less common metals will tend to decrease in content in generation of EoL TV sets. • Precious metals will tend to increase in content in EoL TV sets in 2015–2030. - Abstract: Given the amounts of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EoL-EEE) being generated and their contents of both harmful and valuable materials, the EoL-EEE issue should be regarded not only as an emerging environmental problem but also as a resource management strategy in China. At present, in order to provide the basis for managing EoL-EEE at both product and substance levels in China, it is necessary to carry out a quantitative analysis on EoL-EEE and to determine how much of it will be generated and how much materials and substances it contains. In this study, the possession and obsolescence amounts of five types of household appliance (HA) including television (TV) sets and the amounts of substances contained in EoL TV sets were estimated using time-series product flow analysis (PFA) and substance flow analysis (SFA). The results of PFA indicated that the total possession amounts of those five types of HAs will exceed 3.1 billion units in 2030, which will be two times higher than those in 2010. In addition, it was estimated that cumulatively over 4.8–5.1 billion units of these five types of EoL HA would be obsoleted between 2010–2030. The results of SFA on TV sets indicated that the generated amounts of most of the less common metals and a part of common metals such as copper (Cu) would tend to decrease, whereas those of other common metals such as iron (Fe) as well as precious metals would tend to increase in EoL TV sets in 2015–2030. The results of this study provide a quantitative basis for helping

  5. Study of the influence of micro-oxygenation and oak chip maceration on wine composition using an electronic tongue and chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnitskaya, A., E-mail: alisa.rudnitskaya@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193 (Portugal); Chemistry Department, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Schmidtke, L.M., E-mail: lschmidtke@csu.edu.au [National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, School of Agricultural and Wine Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Delgadillo, I. [Chemistry Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro 3810-193 (Portugal); Legin, A. [Chemistry Department, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Scollary, G. [School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2009-05-29

    The influence of micro-oxygenation (MOX) and maceration with oak chips treatments on wine was studied on wine samples from three vintages produced in the Yarra Valley, Australia. A full factorial design was employed where two factors (MOX and oak chips treatments) had two levels and one factor (vintage) had three levels. Three replicated treatments were run for each factor's setting. Wine samples were analysed using conventional laboratory methods with respect to the phenolic wine compounds and colour attributes since the phenolic fraction of wine is most affected by both MOX and oak maceration treatments. The same wine samples were measured with an electronic tongue based on potentiometric chemical sensors. The significance of treatments and vintage effects on wine phenolic compounds was assessed using ANOVA and ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis (ASCA). Cross-validation was used for the ASCA sub-model optimisations and permutation test for evaluations of the significance of the factors. Main effects of vintage and maceration with oak chips were found to be significant for both physicochemical and the ET data. Main effect of MOX treatment was also found significant for the physicochemical parameters. The largest effect on the phenolic composition of wine was due to its vintage, which accounted for 70% and 33% of total variance in the physicochemical and ET data respectively. The ET was calibrated with respect to the total phenolic content, colour density and hue and chemical ages 1 and 2 and could predict these parameters of wine with good precision.

  6. Study of the influence of micro-oxygenation and oak chip maceration on wine composition using an electronic tongue and chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnitskaya, A.; Schmidtke, L.M.; Delgadillo, I.; Legin, A.; Scollary, G.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of micro-oxygenation (MOX) and maceration with oak chips treatments on wine was studied on wine samples from three vintages produced in the Yarra Valley, Australia. A full factorial design was employed where two factors (MOX and oak chips treatments) had two levels and one factor (vintage) had three levels. Three replicated treatments were run for each factor's setting. Wine samples were analysed using conventional laboratory methods with respect to the phenolic wine compounds and colour attributes since the phenolic fraction of wine is most affected by both MOX and oak maceration treatments. The same wine samples were measured with an electronic tongue based on potentiometric chemical sensors. The significance of treatments and vintage effects on wine phenolic compounds was assessed using ANOVA and ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis (ASCA). Cross-validation was used for the ASCA sub-model optimisations and permutation test for evaluations of the significance of the factors. Main effects of vintage and maceration with oak chips were found to be significant for both physicochemical and the ET data. Main effect of MOX treatment was also found significant for the physicochemical parameters. The largest effect on the phenolic composition of wine was due to its vintage, which accounted for 70% and 33% of total variance in the physicochemical and ET data respectively. The ET was calibrated with respect to the total phenolic content, colour density and hue and chemical ages 1 and 2 and could predict these parameters of wine with good precision.

  7. Chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer of water oxidation on TiO2 anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Li, Ye-Fei; Sit, Patrick; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-12-18

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a prototype, water-splitting (photo)catalyst, but its performance is limited by the large overpotential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We report here a first-principles density functional theory study of the chemical dynamics of the first proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which is considered responsible for the large OER overpotential on TiO2. We use a periodic model of the TiO2/water interface that includes a slab of anatase TiO2 and explicit water molecules, sample the solvent configurations by first principles molecular dynamics, and determine the energy profiles of the two electronic states involved in the electron transfer (ET) by hybrid functional calculations. Our results suggest that the first PCET is sequential, with the ET following the proton transfer. The ET occurs via an inner sphere process, which is facilitated by a state in which one electronic hole is shared by the two oxygen ions involved in the transfer.

  8. Review of electronic-nose technologies and algorithms to detect hazardous chemicals in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphus D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Novel mobile electronic-nose (e-nose) devices and algorithms capable of real-time detection of industrial and municipal pollutants, released from point-sources, recently have been developed by scientists worldwide that are useful for monitoring specific environmental-pollutant levels for enforcement and implementation of effective pollution-abatement programs. E-nose...

  9. Predicting Pt-195 NMR chemical shift using new relativistic all-electron basis set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschoal, D.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; de Oliveira, M.A.L.; Ramalho, T.C.; Dos Santos, H.F.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting NMR properties is a valuable tool to assist the experimentalists in the characterization of molecular structure. For heavy metals, such as Pt-195, only a few computational protocols are available. In the present contribution, all-electron Gaussian basis sets, suitable to calculate the

  10. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnosov, Arkady A.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Maksymov, Andrii O.; Burin, Alexander L., E-mail: aburin@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  11. Electronic torsional sound in linear atomic chains: Chemical energy transport at 1000 km/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, Arkady A.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Maksymov, Andrii O.; Burin, Alexander L.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate entirely electronic torsional vibrational modes in linear cumulene chains. The carbon nuclei of a cumulene are positioned along the primary axis so that they can participate only in the transverse and longitudinal motions. However, the interatomic electronic clouds behave as a torsion spring with remarkable torsional stiffness. The collective dynamics of these clouds can be described in terms of electronic vibrational quanta, which we name torsitons. It is shown that the group velocity of the wavepacket of torsitons is much higher than the typical speed of sound, because of the small mass of participating electrons compared to the atomic mass. For the same reason, the maximum energy of the torsitons in cumulenes is as high as a few electronvolts, while the minimum possible energy is evaluated as a few hundred wavenumbers and this minimum is associated with asymmetry of zero point atomic vibrations. Theory predictions are consistent with the time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Molecular systems for experimental evaluation of the predictions are proposed.

  12. Electronic structure of transition metal-isocorrole complexes: A first quantum chemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, B; Tangen, E; Ghosh, A.

    2004-01-01

    DFT calculations indicate that the broad electronic-structural features of metalloisocorroles are rather similar to those of analogous metallocorroles. Thus, like their corrole analogues, many metalloisocorroles feature substantially non-innocent ligands. Another key point is that both corroles and

  13. Topological Aspects of Chemical Reactivity. Destiny of Electron Pairs in Allowed and Forbidden Pericyclic Reactions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 12 (2017), č. článku e3706. ISSN 0894-3230 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : curved arrow formalism * electron reorganization * pericyclic reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 1.336, year: 2016

  14. Adsorption of Organic Electron Acceptors on Graphene-like Molecules: Quantum Chemical and Molecular Mechanical Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haldar, Susanta; Kolář, Michal; Sedlák, Robert; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 48 (2012), s. 25328-25336 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : graphene * organic electron acceptors * interaction energies * base-pairs * hydrophobic association Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  15. Vibrational, electronic and quantum chemical studies of 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic-1,2-anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V; Raj, Arushma; Subramanian, S; Mohan, S

    2013-06-01

    The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic-1,2-anhydride (BTCA) have been recorded in the range 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm(-1), respectively. The complete vibrational assignments and analysis of BTCA have been performed. More support on the experimental findings was added from the quantum chemical studies performed with DFT (B3LYP, MP2, B3PW91) method using 6-311++G(**), 6-31G(**) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. The structural parameters, energies, thermodynamic parameters, vibrational frequencies and the NBO charges of BTCA were determined by the DFT method. The (1)H and (13)C isotropic chemical shifts (δ ppm) of BTCA with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. The delocalization energies of different types of interactions were determined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of very thin organic fibres by means of small spots electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daiser, S.M.; Cormia, R.D.; Scharpen, L.

    1985-01-01

    ESCA analysis of very thin organic fibres as small as a few micrometer diameter is now possible using the small spot X-ray capability of the SSX100 ESCA system. The sampling method involves suspending the material in the SSX100 chamber, and illuminating it with a monochromatized X-ray beam of 150-300 μm diameter. From the small spot ESCA spectra one can determine the chemical character of the organic layer and the thickness. (Author)

  17. Chemical and structural properties of Pd nanoparticle-decorated graphene-Electron spectroscopic methods and QUASES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesiak, B.; Jiříček, Petr; Bieloshapka, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 404, May (2017), s. 300-309 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015088 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : graphite (Gr) * graphene oxide (GO) * reduced graphene oxide (RGO) * Pd nanoparticles * XPS * QUASES * REELS * chemical and structural properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  18. Analysis of self-organized In(Ga)As quantum structures with the scanning transmission electron microscope; Analyse selbstorganisierter In(Ga)As-Quantenstrukturen mit dem Raster-Transmissionselektronenmikroskop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwald, Andres

    2008-05-27

    Aim of this thesis was to apply the analytical methods of the scanning transmission electron microscopy to the study of self-organized In(Ga)As quantum structures. With the imaging methods Z contrast and bright field (position resolutions in the subnanometer range) and especially with the possibilities of the quantitative chemical EELS analysis of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) fundamental questions concerning morphology and chemical properties of self-organized quantum structures should be answered. By the high position resolution of the STEM among others essentail morphological and structural parameters in the growth behaviour of 'dot in a well' (DWell) structures and of vertically correlated quantum dots (QDs) could be analyzed. For the optimization of DWell structures samples were studied, the nominal InAs-QD growth position was directedly varied within the embedding InGaAs quantum wells. The STEM offers in connection with the EELS method a large potential for the chemical analysis of quantum structures. Studied was a sample series of self-organized InGaAs/GaAs structures on GaAs substrate, the stress of which was changed by varying the Ga content of the INGaAs material between 2.4 % and 4.3 %. [German] Ziel dieser Arbeit war es, die analytischen Methoden der Raster-Transmissionselektronenmikroskopie zur Untersuchung selbstorganisierter In(Ga)As-Quantenstrukturen anzuwenden. Mit den abbildenden Methoden Z-Kontrast und Hellfeld (Ortsaufloesungen im Subnanometerbereich) und insbesondere mit den Moeglichkeiten der quantitativen chemischen EELS-Analyse des Raster-Transmissionselektronenmikroskops (RTEMs) sollten grundsaetzliche Fragestellungen hinsichtlich der Morphologie und der chemischen Eigenschaften selbstorganisierter Quantenstrukturen beantwortet werden. Durch die hohe Ortsaufloesung des RTEMs konnten u.a. essentielle morphologische und strukturelle Parameter im Wachstumsverhalten von 'Dot in a Well

  19. B{sub 36} borophene as an electronic sensor for formaldehyde: Quantum chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbazi Kootenaei, Amirhossein, E-mail: a.kootenaei@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Mahshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mahshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ansari, Goodarz [Department of Chemistry, Mahshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mahshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-06

    Pristine carbon nanotubes and graphene show great sensitivity toward several lethal gases but cannot identify some extremely toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde (HCOH). Recent successful synthesis of all-boron graphene-like sheets attracted strong interest in exploring their possible applications. Herein, we inspected the potential application of B{sub 36} borophene sheet as a sensor for HCOH detection, using density functional theory computations. Different theoretical levels including B97D and Minnesota 06 functionals with different basis sets were employed. It was predicted that the electrical conductivity of B{sub 36} borophene significantly increases at the presence of HCOH molecules, thereby generating an electrical signal. The electrical signal is increased by increasing the number of adsorbed HCOH molecules, indicating that this sensor is sensitive to the concentration (or pressure) of HCOH gas. These results suggest that the pristine borophene may be used in the HCOH chemical sensors. - Highlights: • B{sub 36} borophene sheet can be used as a chemical sensor for HCOH detection. • The B{sub 36} is sensitive to the concentration of HCOH. • When the B{sub 36} adsorbs HCOH molecules, it is converted to a p-type semiconductor.

  20. Control of chemical reactions with electron beams; Kontrolle chemischer Reaktionen mit Elektronenstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehler, Esther

    2014-03-18

    Interaction between low-energy electrons and molecules can lead to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) or dissociative ionization (DI). In condensed matter, the resulting reactive fragments can attack adjacent molecules to yield larger products. In this thesis, reactions initiated by DEA to acetonitrile in condensed phase have been compared to the known gas phase fragmentation channels. Also, gas phase DEA experiments have been performed on chlorosilanes to study the effect of a variation of the organic ligands on the energy of their molecular orbitals and reactivity in DEA processes. Furthermore, hydroamination reactions induced by DI for different alkenes and amines have been investigated. A similar reaction of ammonia and carbon monoxide was shown to produce formamide (HCONH2), which is the smallest molecule to contain a peptide bond and thus represents an important building block of biologically relevant substances.

  1. Electronic parameters and top surface chemical stability of RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V., E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.ru [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Isaenko, L.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Laboratory of Physical Principles for Integrated Microelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Pokrovsky, L.D. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Tarasova, A.Yu. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bridgman growth of RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure measurements with XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical crystalline surface fabrication. - Abstract: The RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} crystal has been grown by Bridgman method. The electronic structure of RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} has been measured with XPS for a powder sample. High chemical stability of RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} surface is verified by weak intensity of O 1s core level recorded by XPS and structural RHEED measurements. Chemical bonding effects have been observed by the comparative analysis of element core levels and crystal structure of RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} and several rubidium- and lead-containing bromides using binding energy difference parameters {Delta}{sub Rb} = (BE Rb 3d - BE Br 3d) and {Delta}{sub Pb} = (BE Pb 4f{sub 7/2} - BE Br 3d).

  2. Ab initio investigations of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of Li2ZrN2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.F.; Pöttgen, R.; Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N.

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure of the ternary nitride Li 2 ZrN 2 is examined from ab initio with DFT computations for an assessment of the properties of chemical bonding. The compound is found insulating with 1.8 eV band gap; it becomes metallic and less ionic upon removal of one equivalent of Li. The chemical interaction is found mainly between Zr and N on one hand and Li and N on the other hand. While all pair interactions are bonding, antibonding N–N interactions are found dominant at the top of the valence band of Li 2 ZrN 2 and they become less intense upon removal of Li. From energy differences the partial delithiation leading to Li 2−x ZrN 2 (x=∼1) is favored. - Graphical abstract: Trigonal structure of Li 2 ZrN 2 showing the Zr–N–Li layers along the c-axis. Highlights: ► Li 2 ZrN 2 calculated insulating with a 1.8 eV gap in agreement with its light green color. ► Lithium de-intercalation is energetically favored for one out of two Li equivalents. ► Li plays little role in the change of the structure, ensured by Zr and N binding. ► Similar changes in the electronic structure as for various intercalated phases of ZrN.

  3. Mechanical, electronic, chemical bonding and optical properties of cubic BaHfO3: First-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qijun; Liu Zhengtang; Feng Liping; Tian Hao

    2010-01-01

    We have performed ab-initio total energy calculations using the plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential technique based on the first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) to study structural parameters, mechanical, electronic, chemical bonding and optical properties of cubic BaHfO 3 . The calculated lattice parameter and independent elastic constants are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental work. The bulk, shear and Young's modulus, Poisson coefficient, compressibility and Lame constants are obtained using Voigt-Reuss-Hill method and the Debye temperature is estimated using Debye-Grueneisen model, which are consistent with previous results. Electronic and chemical bonding properties have been studied from the calculations of band structure, density of states and charge densities. Furthermore, in order to clarify the mechanism of optical transitions of cubic BaHfO 3 , the complex dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, reflectivity, absorption efficient, loss function and complex conductivity function are calculated. Then, we have explained the origins of spectral peaks on the basis of the theory of crystal-field and molecular-orbital bonding.

  4. Fabrication of submicron conducting and chemically functionalized structures from poly(3-octylthiophene) by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.X.; Kanskar, M.; Nabity, J.C.; Keana, J.F.W.; Wybourne, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a novel method of using an electron beam to both functionalize and cross-link poly (3-octylthiophene) (P3OT) in a single step to produce submicron scale polymer structures carrying functionalized groups. P3OT is shown to be a negative electron-beam resist with a sensitivity of 15-30 μC cm -2 .The electrical conductivity of doped P3OT wire structures was measured at room temperature and was found to be in the range 4.0-5.9 Ω -1 cm -1 . Electron-beam exposure of P3OT films containing 7 wt % of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) functionalized perfluorophenyl azide 2 resulted in the incorporation of the NHS functional groups in the polymer, as well as cross-linking. The functionalized submicron structures were found to be weakly fluorescent under fluorescein excitation (450-490 nm), but after treatment with a solution of 5-(aminoacetamido)fluorescein in ethanol the structures became strongly fluorescent. 27 refs., 3 figs

  5. Evaluation of umami taste in mushroom extracts by chemical analysis, sensory evaluation, and an electronic tongue system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phat, Chanvorleak; Moon, BoKyung; Lee, Chan

    2016-02-01

    Seventeen edible mushrooms commercially available in Korea were analysed for their umami taste compounds (5'-nucleotides: AMP, GMP, IMP, UMP, XMP; free amino acids: aspartic, glutamic acid) and subjected to human sensory evaluation and electronic tongue measurements. Amanita virgineoides featured the highest total 5'-nucleotide content (36.9 ± 1.50 mg/g), while monosodium glutamate-like components (42.4 ± 6.90 mg/g) were highest in Agaricus bisporus. The equivalent umami concentration (EUC) ranged from 1.51 ± 0.42 to 3890 ± 833 mg MSG/g dry weight; most mushrooms exhibited a high umami taste. Pleurotus ostreatus scored the highest in the human sensory evaluation, while Flammulina velutipes obtained the maximum score in the electronic tongue measurement. The EUC and the sensory score from the electronic tongue test were highly correlated, and also showed significant correlation with the human sensory evaluation score. These results suggest that the electronic tongue is suitable to determine the characteristic umami taste of mushrooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tuning electronic properties in graphene quantum dots by chemical functionalization: Density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Elhaes, Hanan; Ibrahim, Medhat A.

    2018-03-01

    The energy gap and dipole moment of chemically functionalized graphene quantum dots are investigated by density functional theory. The energy gap can be tuned through edge passivation by different elements or groups. Edge passivation by oxygen considerably decreases the energy gap in hexagonal nanodots. Edge states in triangular quantum dots can also be manipulated by passivation with fluorine. The dipole moment depends on: (a) shape and edge termination of the quantum dot, (b) attached group, and (c) position to which the groups are attached. Depending on the position of attached groups, the total dipole can be increased, decreased, or eliminated.

  7. The Anomalous Metalloporphyrin and Chlorophyll a Activated Chemiluminescence of Dimethyldioxetanone. Chemically Initiated Electron-Exchange Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-26

    cadmium, and magnesium porphyrins the first oxidation is ligand centered. 7 On the other hand, for silver and cobalt porphyrin the first oxidation...kQ . Cyclic voltammetry was done in argon saturated dichlor- omethane solution at (23±2)°C with 0.1 M tetra-n-butyl-ammonium perchlorate as supporting...TECHNICAL REPORT DISTRIBUTION LIST. 051A No. No. Copies Cpe Dr. M. A. El-Sayed Dr. ItI. Rauhut Department of Chemistry Chemical Research Division University

  8. Chemical data and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical survey of the Rio Ojo Caliente drainage basin, New Mexico. Part I. Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenrich-Verbeek, K.J.; Suits, V.J.

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the chemical analyses and statistical evaluation of 62 water samples collected in the north-central part of New Mexico near Rio Ojo Caliente. Both spring and surface-water samples were taken throughout the Rio Ojo Caliente drainage basin above and a few miles below the town of La Madera. A high U concentration (15 μg/l) found in the water of the Rio Ojo Caliente near La Madera, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, during a regional sampling-technique study in August 1975 by the senior author, was investigated further in May 1976 to determine whether stream waters could be effectively used to trace the source of a U anomaly. A detailed study of the tributaries to the Rio Ojo Caliente, involving 29 samples, was conducted during a moderate discharge period, May 1976, so that small tributaries would contain water. This study isolated Canada de la Cueva as the tributary contributing the anomalous U, so that in May 1977, an extremely low discharge period due to the 1977 drought, an additional 33 samples were taken to further define the anomalous area. 6 references, 3 figures, 6 tables

  9. Chemical and ecotoxicological analyses of sediments and elutriates of contaminated rivers due to e-waste recycling activities using a diverse battery of bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, F.; Leung, A.O.W.; Wu, S.C.; Yang, M.S. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.h [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-07-15

    A multi-trophic, multi-exposure phase assessment approach was applied to characterize the toxicity of sediments collected from two rivers in Guiyu, China, an e-waste recycling centre. Elutriate toxicity tests (bacterium Vibrio fischeri and microalga Selenastrum capricornutum) and whole sediment toxicity test (crustacean Heterocypris incongruens) showed that most sediments exhibited acute toxicity, due to elevated heavy metals and PAHs levels, and low pH caused by uncontrolled acid discharge. The survival rates of crustaceans were negatively (p < 0.05) correlated with total PAHs in sediments (411-1755 mg kg{sup -1}); EC50s of V. fischeri on the elutriates were significantly correlated with elutriate pH (p < 0.01). Significant (p < 0.05) correlations between the induction of hepatic metallothionein in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and metal concentrations (Cu, Zn, Pb) in sediments were also observed, when fish were fed with diets containing sediment. The results showed that uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities may bring adverse effects to local aquatic ecosystem. - Toxicity tests using different trophic organisms provided important information, supplementing chemical analyses.

  10. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron radiation for high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, M.L.; Chien, T.Y.; Preissner, C.; Madhavan, V.; Diesing, D.; Bode, M.; Freeland, J.W.; Rose, V.

    2012-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy opens the path to high-resolution imaging with chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrast. Here, the design and experimental results of an in-situ synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system are presented. The system is designed to allow monochromatic synchrotron radiation to enter the chamber, illuminating the sample with x-ray radiation, while an insulator-coated tip (metallic tip apex open for tunneling, electron collection) is scanned over the surface. A unique feature of the SXSTM is the STM mount assembly, designed with a two free-flex pivot, providing an angular degree of freedom for the alignment of the tip and sample with respect to the incoming x-ray beam. The system designed successfully demonstrates the ability to resolve atomic-scale corrugations. In addition, experiments with synchrotron x-ray radiation validate the SXSTM system as an accurate analysis technique for the study of local magnetic and chemical properties on sample surfaces. The SXSTM system's capabilities have the potential to broaden and deepen the general understanding of surface phenomena by adding elemental contrast to the high-resolution of STM. -- Highlights: ► Synchrotron enhanced x-ray scanning tunneling microscope (SXSTM) system designed. ► Unique STM mount design allows angular DOF for tip alignment with x-ray beam. ► System demonstrates ability to resolve atomic corrugations on HOPG. ► Studies show chemical sensitivity with STM tip from photocurrent and tunneling. ► Results show system's ability to study local magnetic (XMCD) properties on Fe films.

  11. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.serranti@uniroma1.it

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery.

  12. Recycling-oriented characterization of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from mobile phones by electronic and chemical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A recycling oriented characterization of end-of-life mobile phones was carried out. • Characterization was developed in a zero-waste-perspective, aiming to recover all the mobile phone materials. • Plastic frames and printed circuit boards were analyzed by electronic and chemical imaging. • Suitable milling/classification strategies were set up to define specialized-pre-concentrated-streams. • The proposed approach can improve the recovery of polymers, base/precious metals, rare earths and critical raw materials. - Abstract: This study characterizes the composition of plastic frames and printed circuit boards from end-of-life mobile phones. This knowledge may help define an optimal processing strategy for using these items as potential raw materials. Correct handling of such a waste is essential for its further “sustainable” recovery, especially to maximize the extraction of base, rare and precious metals, minimizing the environmental impact of the entire process chain. A combination of electronic and chemical imaging techniques was thus examined, applied and critically evaluated in order to optimize the processing, through the identification and the topological assessment of the materials of interest and their quantitative distribution. To reach this goal, end-of-life mobile phone derived wastes have been systematically characterized adopting both “traditional” (e.g. scanning electronic microscopy combined with microanalysis and Raman spectroscopy) and innovative (e.g. hyperspectral imaging in short wave infrared field) techniques, with reference to frames and printed circuit boards. Results showed as the combination of both the approaches (i.e. traditional and classical) could dramatically improve recycling strategies set up, as well as final products recovery

  13. Radiation chemical studies on the electron-beam treatment of exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washino, Masamitsu; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Nishimura, Koichi; Suzuki, Nobutake

    1980-03-01

    This report summarizes the radiation chemical studies on the synthetic models of exhaust gases which has been done in JAERI-Takasaki. Radiation-induced reactions of low concentrations of SO 2 and NO was studied in dry and moist mixtures of N 2 and O 2 . SO 2 was oxidized to H 2 SO 4 only in the moist mixtures. Oxidation of NO and reduction of NO 2 took place simultaneously and approached to a radiation-chemical stationary state in the dry N 2 -O 2 systems. NO was easily oxidized to NO 2 and finally to HNO 3 in the moist systems. Addition of NH 3 in the mixture enhanced the NO-removing reactions and suppressed the NO 2 - and HNO 3 -formations. A set of reaction mechanisms deduced is proposed. The reaction proceeds by the mechanism of such indirect effect of radiation as the energies absorbed by the main components are transferred and utilized effectively to the SO 2 - and NO sub(x)-removing reactions. (author)

  14. Chemical states and electronic structure of a HfO(-2)/Ge(001) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kang-ill; McIntyre, Paul C.; Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Shiyu; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; SLAC, SSRL; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.

    2005-01-01

    We report the chemical bonding structure and valence band alignment at the HfO 2 /Ge (001) interface by systematically probing various core level spectra as well as valence band spectra using soft x-rays at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. We investigated the chemical bonding changes as a function of depth through the dielectric stack by taking a series of synchrotron photoemission spectra as we etched through the HfO 2 film using a dilute HF-solution. We found that a very non-stoichiometric GeO x layer exists at the HfO 2 /Ge interface. The valence band spectra near the Fermi level in each different film structure were carefully analyzed, and as a result, the valence band offset between Ge and GeO x was determined to be ΔE v (Ge-GeO x ) = 2.2 ± 0.15 eV, and that between Ge and HfO 2 , ΔE v (Ge-HfO 2 ) = 2.7 ± 0.15 eV

  15. Cob(I)alamin: insight into the nature of electronically excited states elucidated via quantum chemical computations and analysis of absorption, CD and MCD data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornobis, Karina; Ruud, Kenneth; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2013-02-07

    The nature of electronically excited states of the super-reduced form of vitamin B(12) (i.e., cob(I)alamin or B(12s)), a ubiquitous B(12) intermediate, was investigated by performing quantum-chemical calculations within the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework and by establishing their correspondence to experimental data. Using response theory, the electronic absorption (Abs), circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic CD (MCD) spectra of cob(I)alamin were simulated and directly compared with experiment. Several issues have been taken into considerations while performing the TD-DFT calculations, such as strong dependence on the applied exchange-correlation (XC) functional or structural simplification imposed on the cob(I)alamin. In addition, the low-lying transitions were also validated by performing CASSCF/MC-XQDPT2 calculations. By comparing computational results with existing experimental data a new level of understanding of electronic excitations has been established at the molecular level. The present study extends and confirms conclusions reached for other cobalamins. In particular, the better performance of the BP86 functional, rather than hybrid-type, was observed in terms of the excitations associated with both Co d and corrin π localized transitions. In addition, the lowest energy band was associated with multiple metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations as opposed to the commonly assumed view of a single π → π* transition followed by vibrational progression. Finally, the use of the full cob(I)alamin structure, instead of simplified molecular models, shed new light on the spectral analyses of cobalamin systems and revealed new challenges of this approach related to long-range charge transfer excitations involving side chains.

  16. Chemical engineering in the electronics industry: progress towards the rational design of organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Clancy, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    We review the current status of heterojunction design for combinations of organic semiconductor materials, given its central role in affecting the device performance for electronic devices and solar cell applications. We provide an emphasis on recent progress towards the rational design of heterojunctions that may lead to higher performance of charge separation and mobility. We also play particular attention to the role played by computational approaches and its potential to help define the best choice of materials for solar cell development in the future. We report the current status of the field with respect to such goals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Chemical engineering in the electronics industry: progress towards the rational design of organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Clancy, Paulette

    2012-05-01

    We review the current status of heterojunction design for combinations of organic semiconductor materials, given its central role in affecting the device performance for electronic devices and solar cell applications. We provide an emphasis on recent progress towards the rational design of heterojunctions that may lead to higher performance of charge separation and mobility. We also play particular attention to the role played by computational approaches and its potential to help define the best choice of materials for solar cell development in the future. We report the current status of the field with respect to such goals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Electronic structure and chemical bonding of nanocrystalline-TiC/amorphous-C nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Magnuson, Martin; Lewin, Erik; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Theelectronic structure of nanocrystalline (nc-) TiC/amorphous C nanocomposites has beeninvestigated by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. The measuredspectra at the Ti 2p and C 1s thresholds of the nanocompositesare compared to those of Ti metal and amorphous C.The corresponding intensities of the electronic states for the valenceand conduction bands in the nanocomposites are shown to stronglydepend on the TiC carbide grain size. An increased chargetransfer between the Ti 3d-eg...

  19. Synthesis of ultrathin polymer insulating layers by initiated chemical vapour deposition for low-power soft electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hanul; Seong, Hyejeong; Shin, Woo Cheol; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Mincheol; Lee, Seungwon; Bong, Jae Hoon; Noh, Yong-Young; Cho, Byung Jin; Yoo, Seunghyup; Im, Sung Gap

    2015-06-01

    Insulating layers based on oxides and nitrides provide high capacitance, low leakage, high breakdown field and resistance to electrical stresses when used in electronic devices based on rigid substrates. However, their typically high process temperatures and brittleness make it difficult to achieve similar performance in flexible or organic electronics. Here, we show that poly(1,3,5-trimethyl-1,3,5-trivinyl cyclotrisiloxane) (pV3D3) prepared via a one-step, solvent-free technique called initiated chemical vapour deposition (iCVD) is a versatile polymeric insulating layer that meets a wide range of requirements for next-generation electronic devices. Highly uniform and pure ultrathin films of pV3D3 with excellent insulating properties, a large energy gap (>8 eV), tunnelling-limited leakage characteristics and resistance to a tensile strain of up to 4% are demonstrated. The low process temperature, surface-growth character, and solvent-free nature of the iCVD process enable pV3D3 to be grown conformally on plastic substrates to yield flexible field-effect transistors as well as on a variety of channel layers, including organics, oxides, and graphene.

  20. Evolution of Taste Compounds of Dezhou-Braised Chicken During Cooking Evaluated by Chemical Analysis and an Electronic Tongue System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dengyong; Li, Shengjie; Wang, Nan; Deng, Yajun; Sha, Lei; Gai, Shengmei; Liu, Huan; Xu, Xinglian

    2017-05-01

    This paper aimed to study the time course changes in taste compounds of Dezhou-braised chicken during the entire cooking process mainly consisting of deep-frying, high-temperature boiling, and low-temperature braising steps. For this purpose, meat samples at different processing stages were analyzed for 5'-nucleotides and free amino acids, and were also subjected to electronic tongue measurements. Results showed that IMP, Glu, Lys, and sodium chloride were the main compounds contributing to the taste attributes of the final product. IMP and Glu increased in the boiling step and remained unchanged in the following braising steps. Meanwhile, decrease in Lys content and increase in sodium chloride content were observed over time in both boiling and braising steps. Intensities for bitterness, saltiness, and Aftertaste-B obtained from the electronic tongue analysis were correlated with the concentrations of these above chemical compounds. Therefore, the electronic tongue system could be applied to evaluate the taste development of Dezhou-braised chicken during processing. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Rhombic Coulomb diamonds in a single-electron transistor based on an Au nanoparticle chemically anchored at both ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Yasuo; Onuma, Yuto; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2016-02-28

    Rhombic Coulomb diamonds are clearly observed in a chemically anchored Au nanoparticle single-electron transistor. The stability diagrams show stable Coulomb blockade phenomena and agree with the theoretical curve calculated using the orthodox model. The resistances and capacitances of the double-barrier tunneling junctions between the source electrode and the Au core (R1 and C1, respectively), and those between the Au core and the drain electrode (R2 and C2, respectively), are evaluated as 4.5 MΩ, 1.4 aF, 4.8 MΩ, and 1.3 aF, respectively. This is determined by fitting the theoretical curve against the experimental Coulomb staircases. Two-methylene-group short octanedithiols (C8S2) in a C8S2/hexanethiol (C6S) mixed self-assembled monolayer is concluded to chemically anchor the core of the Au nanoparticle at both ends between the electroless-Au-plated nanogap electrodes even when the Au nanoparticle is protected by decanethiol (C10S). This is because the R1 value is identical to that of R2 and corresponds to the tunneling resistances of the octanedithiol chemically bonded with the Au core and the Au electrodes. The dependence of the Coulomb diamond shapes on the tunneling resistance ratio (R1/R2) is also discussed, especially in the case of the rhombic Coulomb diamonds. Rhombic Coulomb diamonds result from chemical anchoring of the core of the Au nanoparticle at both ends between the electroless-Au-plated nanogap electrodes.

  2. An Experimental and Quantum Chemical Study of the Electronic Spectrum of the HBCl Free Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Mohammed A.; Nagarajan, Ramya; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Tarroni, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    The chloroborane (HBCl) free radical has a complex electronic spectrum in the visible that involves a transition from a bent ground state to a linear excited state, both of which are the Renner-Teller components of what would be a ^2π state at linearity. We have used the synchronous-scan LIF and single vibronic level emission techniques to untangle the many overlapping vibronic bands and assign upper state K quantum numbers for jet-cooled HBCl and DBCl. The radicals were produced in a pulsed electric discharge jet using a precursor mixture of boron trichloride (BCl_3) and hydrogen or deuterium in high-pressure argon. As an important aid to understanding the data, the ground and excited state high level ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES) have been calculated and the vibrational levels obtained variationally. The calculated ground state levels are in excellent agreement with the emission data validating the quality of the PES. Aside from an approximately 100 cm-1 shift in the upper state electronic term value, the calculated excited state vibrational energy levels and isotope shifts match the LIF data very well, allowing the observed bands to be assigned with confidence.

  3. Chemical bonding and electronic localization in a Ga(I) amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Maja K; Dange, Deepak; Jones, Cameron; Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-10-05

    The electron density in a one-coordinate [Ga(I) N(SiMe3 )R] complex has been determined from ab initio calculations and multipole modeling of 90 K X-ray data. The topologies of the Laplacian distribution and the ELI-D match a situation having an sp(3) -hybridized nitrogen with a tetrahedral arrangement of two single σ-bonds (to carbon and silicon) and two lone pairs pointing towards gallium in a scissor-grasping fashion. The analysis of the Laplacian distribution furthermore reveals a ligand-induced charge concentration (LICC) in the outer core of gallium oriented directly towards the nitrogen atom, and thus in between the two lone pairs. These observations might suggest that the trigonal planar nitrogen geometry result from a dative GaN bond, in which the roles of the metal and the ligand have been reversed with respect to a "standard" metal-ligand interaction, that is, the metal is here electron-donating. The ELI-D reveals a diffuse and directional lone pair on gallium, suggesting that this complex could serve as a σ-donor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.F.; Nakhl, M.; Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N.; Chevalier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH X structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH 4 is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH 3 and YNiH 4 hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  5. YNi and its hydrides: Phase stabilities, electronic structures and chemical bonding properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Nakhl, M. [Universite Libanaise, Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique des Materiaux LCPM, Fanar (Lebanon); Al Alam, A.F.; Ouaini, N. [Universite Saint-Esprit de Kaslik, Faculte des Sciences et de Genie Informatique, Jounieh (Lebanon); Chevalier, B. [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France)

    2010-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Base centered orthorhombic YNiH{sub X} structure. For x = 3, only H1 and H2 are present. Highest hydrogen content YNiH{sub 4} is obtained when H3 are added. - Abstract: Within density functional theory, establishing the equations of states of YNi in two different controversial structures in the literature, leads to determine the orthorhombic FeB-type as the ground state one with small energy difference. For YNiH{sub 3} and YNiH{sub 4} hydrides crystallizing in the orthorhombic CrB-type structure the geometry optimization and the ab initio determination of the H atomic positions show that the stability of hydrogen decreases from the tri- to the tetra- hydride. New states brought by hydrogen within the valence band lead to its broadening and to enhanced localization of metal density of states. The chemical bonding analysis shows a preferential Ni-H bonding versus Y-H.

  6. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The chemical conditions of the late Archean Hamersley basin inferred from whole rock and pyrite geochemistry with Δ33S and δ34S isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Daniel D.; Large, Ross R.; Halpin, Jacqueline A.; Steadman, Jeffery A.; Hickman, Arthur H.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The well-preserved late Archean sedimentary rocks of the Fortescue and Hamersley Basins in Western Australia offer fascinating insights into early earth ocean chemistry prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). In this study, we use a combination of whole rock geochemistry, LA-ICPMS trace element analysis of sedimentary pyrite and pyrrhotite and SHRIMP-SI sulfur isotope analyses to elucidate the chemical changes in these sedimentary rocks. These proxies are used to examine chemical conditions of the ocean during the late Archean. Two to three periods of oxygen enrichment prior to the deposition of banded iron formations (BIF) can be identified. One minor stage of general increase in whole rock enrichment factors and trace element content of pyrite is observed up stratigraphy in the Jeerinah Formation, Fortescue Basin and a more substantial stage is present in the Paraburdoo and Bee Gorge Members of the Wittenoom Formation, Hamersley Basin. Some of the trace element enrichments indicate organic matter burial flux (Ni, Cr, Zn, Co and Cu) which suggests an increase in biological productivity. If the increased biological activity reflects an increase in cyanobacteria activity then an associated increase in oxygen is likely to have occurred during the deposition of the Bee Gorge Member. An increase in atmospheric oxygen would result in continental weathering of sulfide and other minerals, increasing the trace element content of the water column via erosion and avoiding excessive depletion of trace elements due to drawdown in seawater. Since some of these trace elements may also be limiting nutrients (such as Mo and Se) for the cyanobacteria, the degree of biological productivity may have further increased due to the increasing amount of trace elements introduced by oxygenation in a positive feedback loop. These periods of increased productivity and oxygen rise stopped prior to the onset of BIF deposition in the Hamersley Basin. This may be due to the ocean reaching an

  8. Chemical and structural properties of Pd nanoparticle-decorated graphene—Electron spectroscopic methods and QUASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesiak, B., E-mail: blesiak-orlowska@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Jiricek, P.; Bieloshapka, I. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 6, 162-53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Pd-decorated graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (RGO), graphite (Gr). • Electron spectroscopy (XPS) aided with QUASES and REELS structural analysis. • Pd nanoparticle size decreases with surface hydrophilicity (oxygen group content). • PdO{sub x} overlayer thickness increases with surface hydrophilicity. • GO reduction, Pd decoration by reduction lead to exfoliated graphene structures. - Abstract: Graphite (Gr) and carbon nanomaterials such as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and those decorated with Pd nanoparticles were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) aided with Quantitative Analysis of Surfaces by Electron Spectroscopy (QUASES) and reflected electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS). Oxidation of Gr decreased the C/O ratio from 10 (Gr) to 2.2 (GO), whereas reduction of GO by N{sub 2}H{sub 4} increased this ratio to 6.6 (RGO) due to decreasing number of oxygen groups (hydroxyl, epoxy, carbonyl and hydroxyl). Graphene materials and those after Pd decoration had 6–11 average number of layers in stacked nanostructures. Pd decoration using NaBH{sub 4}-reducing agents formed nanoparticles of size 6.9 nm (Pd/Gr) > 5.3 nm (Pd/RGO) > 4.25 nm (Pd/GO), with PdO{sub x} overlayer thickness of 2.20 nm (Pd/GO) > 1.42 nm (Pd/Gr) > 1.20 nm (Pd/RGO), decreased number of oxygen groups and average number of layers. Smaller Pd nanoparticles of larger PdO{sub x} overlayer thickness were observed on highly hydrophilic substrates (functional oxygen groups content). Decoration accompanied by reduction using NaBH{sub 4} led to the removal of water attached by hydrogen bonding to graphene interplanes and the formation of PdO{sub x} overlayer from oxygen functional groups. Nanoparticle size obtained from QUASES was confirmed by Pd 3d{sub 5/2} spectra binding energy and full-width at half maximum. Various chemistry and mechanisms of graphene reduction using N{sub 2}H{sub 4} and NaBH{sub 4} were observed, where Na

  9. Electron Transfer Reactivity Patterns at Chemically Modified Electrodes: Fundamentals and Application to the Optimization of Redox Recycling Amplification Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergren, Adam Johan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Electroanalytical chemistry is often utilized in chemical analysis and Fundamental studies. Important advances have been made in these areas since the advent of chemically modified electrodes: the coating of an electrode with a chemical film in order to impart desirable, and ideally, predictable properties. These procedures enable the exploitation of unique reactivity patterns. This dissertation presents studies that investigate novel reaction mechanisms at self-assembled monolayers on gold. In particular, a unique electrochemical current amplification scheme is detailed that relies on a selective electrode to enable a reactivity pattern that results in regeneration of the analyte (redox recycling). This regenerating reaction can occur up to 250 times for each analyte molecule, leading to a notable enhancement in the observed current. The requirements of electrode selectivity and the resulting amplification and detection limit improvements are described with respect to the heterogeneous and homogeneous electron transfer rates that characterize the system. These studies revealed that the heterogeneous electrolysis of the analyte should ideally be electrochemically reversible, while that for the regenerating agent should be held to a low level. Moreover, the homogeneous reaction that recycles the analyte should occur at a rapid rate. The physical selectivity mechanism is also detailed with respect to the properties of the electrode and redox probes utilized. It is shown that partitioning of the analyte into/onto the adlayer leads to the extraordinary selectivity of the alkanethiolate monolayer modified electrode. Collectively, these studies enable a thorough understanding of the complex electrode mechanism required for successful redox recycling amplification systems, Finally, in a separate (but related) study, the effect of the akyl chain length on the heterogeneous electron transfer behavior of solution-based redox probes is reported, where an odd-even oscillation

  10. Time-resolved Chemical Imaging of Molecules by High-order Harmonics and Ultrashort Rescattering Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chii Dong [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Directly monitoring atomic motion during a molecular transformation with atomic-scale spatio-temporal resolution is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. Here we provide the foundation for a new imaging method, fixed-angle broadband laser-induced electron scattering, based on structural retrieval by direct one-dimensional Fourier transform of a photoelectron energy distribution observed along the polarization direction of an intense ultrafast light pulse. The approach exploits the scattering of a broadband wave packet created by strong-field tunnel ionization to self-interrogate the molecular structure with picometre spatial resolution and bond specificity. With its inherent femtosecond resolution, combining our technique with molecular alignment can, in principle, provide the basis for time-resolved tomography for multi-dimensional transient structural determination.

  11. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumov, E.; Starbov, N.; Starbova, K.; Perea, A.; Solis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO 2 ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO 2 films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO 2 based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  12. Laser assisted modification and chemical metallization of electron-beam deposited ceria thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumov, E., E-mail: emodk@clf.bas.bg [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses ' Acad. Jordan Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgy Bonchev Str., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Starbov, N.; Starbova, K. [Central Laboratory of Photoprocesses ' Acad. Jordan Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Georgy Bonchev Str., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Perea, A.; Solis, J. [Instituto de Optica ' Daza de Valdes' , CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Excimer laser processing is applied for tailoring the surface morphology and phase composition of CeO{sub 2} ceramic thin films. E-beam evaporation technique is used to deposit samples on stainless steel and silicate glass substrates. The films are then irradiated with ArF* excimer laser pulses under different exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy, optical spectrophotometry, X-ray diffractometry and EDS microanalysis are used to characterize the non-irradiated and laser-processed films. Upon UV laser exposure there is large increase of the surface roughness that is accompanied by photo-darkening and ceria reduction. It is shown that the laser induced changes in the CeO{sub 2} films facilitate the deposition of metal nano-aggregates in a commercial copper electroless plating bath. The significance of laser modification as a novel approach for the production of CeO{sub 2} based thin film catalysts is discussed.

  13. On the spatio-temporal and energy-dependent response of riometer absorption to electron precipitation: drift-time and conjunction analyses in realistic electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Adam; Shprits, Yuri; Makarevich, Roman; Donovan, Eric; Zhu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Riometers are low-cost passive radiowave instruments located in both northern and southern hemispheres that capable of operating during quiet and disturbed conditions. Many instruments have been operating continuously for multiple solar cycles, making them a useful tool for long-term statistical studies and for real-time analysis and forecasting of space weather. Here we present recent and new analyses of the relationship between the riometer-measured cosmic noise absorption and electron precipitation into the D-region and lower E-region ionosphere. We utilize two techniques: a drift-time analysis in realistic electric and magnetic field models, where a particle is traced from one location to another, and the energy determined by the time delay between similar observations; and a conjunction analysis, where we directly compare precipitated fluxes from THEMIS and Van Allen Probes with the riometer absorption. In both cases we present a statistical analysis of the response of riometer absorption to electron precipitation as a function of MLAT, MLT, and geomagnetic conditions.

  14. Donor–Acceptor Copolymers of Relevance for Organic Photovoltaics: A Theoretical Investigation of the Impact of Chemical Structure Modifications on the Electronic and Optical Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Laxman

    2012-08-28

    We systematically investigate at the density functional theory level how changes to the chemical structure of donor-acceptor copolymers used in a number of organic electronics applications influences the intrinsic geometric, electronic, and optical properties. We consider the combination of two distinct donors, where a central five-membered ring is fused on both sides by either a thiophene or a benzene ring, with 12 different acceptors linked to the donor either directly or through thienyl linkages. The interplay between the electron richness/deficiency of the subunits as well as the evolution of the frontier electronic levels of the isolated donors/acceptors plays a significant role in determining the electronic and optical properties of the copolymers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. A rapid novel derivatization of amphetamine and methamphetamine using 2,2,2-trichloroethyl chloroformate for gas chromatography electron ionization and chemical ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, A; Spies, J

    1998-05-01

    Amphetamine and methamphetamine are commonly abused central nervous system stimulants. We describe a rapid new derivatization of amphetamine and methamphetamine using 2,2,2-trichloroethyl chloroformate for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. Amphetamine and methamphetamine, along with N-propyl amphetamine (internal standard), were extracted from urine using 1-chlorobutane. The derivatization with 2,2,2-trichloroethyl chloroformate can be achieved at room temperature in 10 minutes. The electron ionization mass spectrum of amphetamine 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate showed two weak molecular ions at m/z 309 and 311, but showed diagnostic strong peaks at m/z 218, 220, and 222. In contrast, chemical ionization of the mass spectrum of amphetamine 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate showed strong (M + 1) ions at m/z 310 and 312 and other strong diagnostic peaks at m/z 274 and 276. The major advantages of this derivative are the presence of a diagnostic cluster of peaks due to the isotopic effect of three chlorine atoms (isotopes 35 and 37) in the derivatized molecule and the relative ease of its preparation. We also observed strong molecular ions for derivatized methamphetamine in the chemical ionization mass spectrum, but the molecular ions were very weak in the electron ionization mass spectrum. We used the scan mode of mass spectrometry in all analyses. When using a urine standard containing 1,000 ng/mL of amphetamine (a 7.4-micromol/L concentration) and methamphetamine (a 6.7-micromol/L concentration), the within-run precisions were 4.8% for amphetamine and 3.6% for methamphetamine. The corresponding between-run precisions were 5.3% for amphetamine and 6.7% for methamphetamine. The assay was linear for amphetamine and methamphetamine concentrations of 250 to 5,000 ng/mL (amphetamine, 1.9-37.0 micromol/L; methamphetamine, 1.7-33.6 micromol/L). The detection limit was 100 ng/mL (amphetamine, 0.74 micromol/L; methamphetamine, 0.67 micromol/L) using the scan mode

  16. [Studies on photo-electron-chemical catalytic degradation of the malachite green].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-yu; Diao, Zeng-hui; Song, Lin; Wang, Xin-le; Zhang, Yuan-ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel two-compartment photo-electro-chemical catalytic reactor was designed. The TiO2/Ti thin film electrode thermally formed was used as photo-anode, and graphite as cathode and a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as the reference electrode in the reactor. The anode compartment and cathode compartment were connected with the ionic exchange membrane in this reactor. Effects of initial pH, initial concentration of malachite green and connective modes between the anode compartment and cathode compartment on the decolorization efficiency of malachite green were investigated. The degradation dynamics of malachite green was studied. Based on the change of UV-visible light spectrum, the degradation process of malachite green was discussed. The experimental results showed that, during the time of 120 min, the decolouring ratio of the malachite green was 97.7% when initial concentration of malachite green is 30 mg x L(-1) and initial pH is 3.0. The catalytic degradation of malachite green was a pseudo-first order reaction. In the degradation process of malachite green the azo bond cleavage and the conjugated system of malachite green were attacked by hydroxyl radical. Simultaneity, the aromatic ring was oxidized. Finally, malachite green was degraded into other small molecular compounds.

  17. An approach to develop chemical intuition for atomistic electron transport calculations using basis set rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, A.; Solomon, G. C. [Department of Chemistry and Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2016-05-21

    Single molecule conductance measurements are often interpreted through computational modeling, but the complexity of these calculations makes it difficult to directly link them to simpler concepts and models. Previous work has attempted to make this connection using maximally localized Wannier functions and symmetry adapted basis sets, but their use can be ambiguous and non-trivial. Starting from a Hamiltonian and overlap matrix written in a hydrogen-like basis set, we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain a new basis set that is chemically more intuitive and allows interpretation in terms of simple concepts and models. By diagonalizing the Hamiltonians corresponding to each atom in the molecule, we obtain a basis set that can be partitioned into pseudo-σ and −π and allows partitioning of the Landuaer-Büttiker transmission as well as create simple Hückel models that reproduce the key features of the full calculation. This method provides a link between complex calculations and simple concepts and models to provide intuition or extract parameters for more complex model systems.

  18. Structural and electronic characterization of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joucken, Frédéric; Colomer, Jean-François; Sporken, Robert; Reckinger, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CVD graphene is transferred onto sapphire. • Transport measurements reveal relatively low charge carriers mobility. • Scanning probe microscopy experiments reveal the presence of robust contaminant layers between the graphene and the sapphire, responsible for the low carriers mobility. - Abstract: We present a combination of magnetotransport and local probe measurements on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition on copper foil and subsequently transferred onto a sapphire substrate. A rather strong p-doping is observed (∼9 × 10 12 cm −2 ) together with quite low carrier mobility (∼1350 cm 2 /V s). Atomic force and tunneling imaging performed on the transport devices reveals the presence of contaminants between sapphire and graphene, explaining the limited performance of our devices. The transferred graphene displays ridges similar to those observed whilst graphene is still on the copper foil. We show that, on sapphire, these ridges are made of different thicknesses of the contamination layer and that, contrary to what was reported for hBN or certain transition metal dichalcogenides, no self-cleansing process of the sapphire substrate is observed.

  19. Review on the application of electron microprobe chemical dating method in the age research of uranium/pitchblende

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Xiangkun; Qin Mingkuan; Fan Guang

    2011-01-01

    Different micro dating methods have been developed in recent years, the advantages and disadvantages are simply introduced at first. The recent development of electron microprobe chemical dating method in the age research of uraninite/pitchblende and the used analytical conditions by the precurser are presented in detail by stages. Finally, the application foreground of this method in the age research of uraninite/pitchblende and the possible problems are systematically investigated and discussed. It is believed that this method will play a big role in the age research of uranium minerals, especially in the micro dating research of tiny uranium minerals (φ < 10 μm) and uranium micro-ores of multi-stage. (authors)

  20. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marconnet, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: cyril.marconnet@yahoo.fr; Wouters, Y. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Miserque, F. [Laboratoire de Reactivite des Surfaces et des Interfaces, CEA Saclay, Bat. 391, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France); Dagbert, C. [Laboratoire de Genie des Procedes et des Materiaux, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92290 CHATENAY-MALABRY (France)], E-mail: catherine.dagbert@ecp.fr; Petit, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie des Materiaux et des Interfaces, INPG, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Galerie, A. [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Feron, D. [Service de Corrosion et du Comportement des Materiaux dans leur Environnement, CEA Saclay, Bat. 458, 91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE (France)

    2008-12-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region.

  1. Chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer formed on stainless steels in a glucose-oxidase solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marconnet, C.; Wouters, Y.; Miserque, F.; Dagbert, C.; Petit, J.-P.; Galerie, A.; Feron, D.

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the interaction between the passive layer formed on UNS S30403 and S31254 stainless steels and an enzymatic solution containing glucose oxidase (GOx) and its substrate D-glucose. This enzymatic solution is often used to reproduce in laboratory the ennoblement occuring in non-sterile aerated aqueous environments because of the biofilm settlement on the surface of the metallic material. GOx catalyses the oxidation of D-glucose to gluconic acid by reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and produces an organic acid. Thanks to photocurrent measurements, XPS analysis and Mott-Schottky diagrams, it is here shown that such an environment generates modifications in the chemical composition and electronic structure of the passive layer: it induces a relative enrichment of the n-type semi-conducting phase containing chromium (chromine Cr 2 O 3 ) and an increase of the donors density in the space charge region

  2. Electronic parameters of Sr2M2O7 (M = V, Nb, Ta) and Sr-O chemical bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Zhaoming

    2010-01-01

    XPS measurements were carried out on Sr2Nb2O7 and Sr2Ta2O7 powder samples, which were synthesized using standard solid state method. The binding energy differences between the O 1s and cation core level, Δ(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Sr 3d5/2), was used to characterize the valence electron transfer...... on the formation of the Sr-O bonds. The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Nb2O7 and Sr2Ta2O7 and the previously published structural and XPS data for other Sr-oxide compounds. A new empirical relationship between Δ(O-Sr) and L(Sr-O) was obtained. Possible applications...

  3. Ab initio investigations of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of Li{sub 2}ZrN{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matar, S.F., E-mail: matar@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, 33600 Pessac (France); Poettgen, R., E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.de [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Al Alam, A.F., E-mail: adelalalam@usek.edu.lb [Universite Saint Esprit de Kaslik (USEK), Faculte des Sciences, URA GREVE (CNRS/USEK/UL), Jounieh (Lebanon); Ouaini, N., E-mail: naimouaini@usek.edu.lb [Universite Saint Esprit de Kaslik (USEK), Faculte des Sciences, URA GREVE (CNRS/USEK/UL), Jounieh (Lebanon)

    2012-06-15

    The electronic structure of the ternary nitride Li{sub 2}ZrN{sub 2} is examined from ab initio with DFT computations for an assessment of the properties of chemical bonding. The compound is found insulating with 1.8 eV band gap; it becomes metallic and less ionic upon removal of one equivalent of Li. The chemical interaction is found mainly between Zr and N on one hand and Li and N on the other hand. While all pair interactions are bonding, antibonding N-N interactions are found dominant at the top of the valence band of Li{sub 2}ZrN{sub 2} and they become less intense upon removal of Li. From energy differences the partial delithiation leading to Li{sub 2-x}ZrN{sub 2} (x={approx}1) is favored. - Graphical abstract: Trigonal structure of Li{sub 2}ZrN{sub 2} showing the Zr-N-Li layers along the c-axis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li{sub 2}ZrN{sub 2} calculated insulating with a 1.8 eV gap in agreement with its light green color. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lithium de-intercalation is energetically favored for one out of two Li equivalents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li plays little role in the change of the structure, ensured by Zr and N binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar changes in the electronic structure as for various intercalated phases of ZrN.

  4. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichienberger, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  5. Studies on manufacturing technology of materials for fine chemical and electronic industry use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S K; Kim, B G; Chung, H S; Lee, J C [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Fine natural crystalline graphite which is used as a source material of a high electrically conductive film and an addition of advanced high functional solid lubricant. For use high electrically conductive film and advanced high functional solid lubricant, add new and advanced high functional properties to fine graphite powder through surface modification with gas and organic materials. Surface modification methods: 1) Searching for suitable surfactant to improve dispersing characteristics in aqueous system. 2) Adsorption with oxygen on graphite surface to improve dispersing characteristics in oil. 3) Mechanochemical process using hybridization system is to shape control and spontaneous re-arrangement of the surface layer and interaction between the particle surface and extraneous molecules. In aqueous system, the optimum conditions for graphite to disperse is with 0.3-0.5% concentrations of surfactant Lomar D PWA-40 at pH range 10-11. In order to improve dispersing characteristics in oil, the optimum conditions to adsorb over 3.5% with oxygen on graphite surface are as follows: - Tip speed {yields} 3.9 m/sec, - Reaction time {yields} at least 30 min. at 120 deg.C - inert gas and pressure {yields} dried air, 1 kgf/cm{sup 2}. The oxygen contents acts critical point for dispersing graphite in oil system so needs to control oxygen contents by use of air pressure in reacting mill. Chemical methods for coating with Stearic acid and Paraffin need above 15 weight % to graphite powders. Mechanochemical process using hybridization system is to shape control and spontaneous re-arrangement of the surface layer and interaction between the particle surface and extraneous molecules. (author). 45 refs., 9 tabs., 23 figs.

  6. Effect of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the physico-chemical and nutritional properties of mushrooms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ângela; Antonio, Amilcar L; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Martins, Anabela; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-11-15

    The short shelf-life of mushrooms is an obstacle to the distribution and marketing of the fresh product. Thus, prolonging postharvest storage, while preserving their quality, would benefit the mushroom industry as well as consumers. There has been extensive research on finding the most appropriate technology for mushrooms preservation. Gamma, electron-beam and UV irradiation have been shown to be potential tools in extending the postharvest shelf-life of fresh mushrooms. Studies evaluating the effects of ionizing radiation are available mainly in cultivated species such as Agaricus bisporus, Lentinus edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus. This review comprises a comprehensive study of the effects of irradiation on physico-chemical parameters (weight, colour, texture and pH), chemical compounds including nutrients (proteins, sugars and vitamins) and non-nutrients (phenolics, flavonoids and flavour compounds), and on biochemical parameters such as enzymatic activity of mushrooms for different species and from different regions of the world. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical states and electronic properties of the interface between aluminium and a photoluminescent conjugated copolymer containing europium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Q.J.; Ling, Q.D.; Li, S.; Zhu, F.R.; Huang, Wei; Kang, E.T.; Neoh, K.G.

    2004-01-01

    The chemical states and electronic properties of the interface between thermally evaporated aluminium and a photoluminescent conjugated copolymer containing 9,9'-dihexylfluorene and europium complex-chelated benzoate units in the main chain (PF6-Eu(dbm) 2 phen) were studied in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The changes in C 1s, Eu 3d, N 1s, and Al 2p core-level lineshapes with progressive deposition of aluminium atoms were carefully monitored. Aluminium was found to interact with the conjugated backbone of the copolymer to form the Al carbide, Al-O-C complex, and Al(III)-N chelate at the interface. In addition, the europium ions were reduced to the metallic state by the deposited aluminium atoms, which were oxidized and chelated by the 1,10-phenanthroline ligands (phen). The changes in chemical states at the interface suggest that the intramolecular energy transfer process in this copolymer had been affected. Moreover, aluminium also interacted with the bulk-adsorbed oxygen, which migrates to the surface in response to the deposition of aluminium atoms, to form a layer of metal oxides. On the other hand, the evolution of the UPS spectra suggests that the π-states of the conjugated system were affected and an unfavorable dipole layer was induced by the deposited aluminium atoms

  8. Molecular Structure and Electronic Properties of Porphyrin-Thiophene-Perylene Using Quantum Chemical Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiya Chokbunpiam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to design a new series of compounds consisting of a porphyrin macrocycle linked to a perylene unit via a thiophenic bridge. The structural and electronic properties of the molecules, and the effects of mono- and di-substituents R on C3 and R′ on C4 of the thiophene ring were investigated using a quantum calculation approach. The results from the method validation revealed that using the density functional theory approach at B3LYP/6–31G(d data set was the optimal one, considering the accuracy attained and maintaining the computer time required within tractable limits. The results from the B3LYP/6–31G(d approach indicated that significant changes of the torsion angle between the molecular planes of the porphyrin and perylene rings, compared to that of the unsubstituted derivatives, were found in the di-substituted systems bearing R = R′ = −OCH3 and −NH2, and in a mono-substituted system having R = −H and R′=−NH2. The symmetric di-substitution does not provide a significantly lower HOMO-LUMO energy gap (ΔEg. Noticeable decreases in ΔEg were found only with the substitution patterns of: R, R′ = −OCH3, −H; −OH, −H; −N(CH32, −H; −H, −NH2. UV-visible spectra of all derivatives exhibited characteristic absorption maxima of the free bases of porphyrin and perylene.

  9. Nonequilibrium chemical potential in a two-dimensional electron gas in the quantum-Hall-effect regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhabov, D. A., E-mail: pokhabov@isp.nsc.ru; Pogosov, A. G.; Budantsev, M. V.; Zhdanov, E. Yu.; Bakarov, A. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The nonequilibrium state of a two-dimensional electron gas in the quantum-Hall-effect regime is studied in Hall bars equipped with additional inner contacts situated within the bar. The magnetic-field dependence of the voltage drop between different contact pairs are studied at various temperatures. It was found that the voltage between the inner and outer contacts exhibits peaks of significant amplitude in narrow magnetic-field intervals near integer filling factors. Furthermore, the magnetic-field dependence of the voltage in these intervals exhibits a hysteresis, whereas the voltage between the outer contacts remains zero in the entire magnetic-field range. The appearance of the observed voltage peaks and their hysteretic behavior can be explained by an imbalance between the chemical potentials of edge and bulk states, resulting from nonequilibrium charge redistribution between the edge and bulk states when the magnetic field sweeps under conditions of the quantum Hall effect. The results of the study significantly complement the conventional picture of the quantum Hall effect, explicitly indicating the existence of a significant imbalance at the edge of the two-dimensional electron gas: the experimentally observed difference between the electrochemical potentials of the edge and bulk exceeds the distance between Landau levels by tens of times.

  10. Fluorescent carbon quantum dots synthesized by chemical vapor deposition: An alternative candidate for electron acceptor in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bo; Yan, Lingpeng; Gu, Huimin; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang; Ma, Chang-Qi; Chen, Yongkang; Jia, Husheng

    2018-01-01

    Excitation-wavelength-dependent blue-greenish fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with graphite structure were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In comparison with those synthesized by hydrothermal method (named H-CQDs), C-CQDs have less hydrophilic terminal groups, showing good solubility in common organic solvents. Furthermore, these synthesized C-CQDs show a low LUMO energy level (LUMO = -3.84 eV), which is close to that of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM, LUMO = -4.01 eV), the most widely used electron acceptor in polymer solar cells. Photoluminescence quenching of the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):C-CQDs blended film (P3HT:C-CQDs) indicated that a photo-induced charge transfer between P3HT and C-CQDs occurs in such a composite film. Bulk heterojunction solar cells using C-CQDs as electron acceptors or doping materials were fabricated and tested. High fill factors were achieved for these C-CQDs based polymer solar cells, demonstrating that CQDs synthesized by CVD could be alternative to the fullerene derivatives for applying in polymer solar cells.

  11. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  12. Correlation between the Inhibition of Positronium Formation by Scavenger Molecules, and Chemical Reaction Rate of Electrons with these Molecules in Nonpolar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levay, B.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    a correlation between the inhibition coefficient and the chemical rate constant of electrons with scavenger molecules. We found that the dependence of the inhibition coefficient on the work function (VOo)f electrons in different liquids shows a very unusual behavior, similar to that recently found...... for the chemical rate constants of quasifree electrons with the same scavenger molecules. The inhibition coefficient as a function of Vo had a maximum for C2HsBr, while it increased monotonously with decreasing V, for CC14. The inhibition coefficient for C2H5Br in a 1:l molar tetramethylsilane......-n-tetradecane mixture was found to be greater than in both of the pure components. The clear correlation found between electron scavenging rate constants and positronium inhibition constitutes the severest test to date of the spur reaction model of positronium formation. The importance of the positron annihilation...

  13. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  14. Physical Matrix Characterisation: Studies of Crystalline Rocks and Consolidated Clays by PMMA Method and Electron Microscopy as Support of Diffusion Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Kelokaski, A.; Togneri, L.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.

    2007-07-01

    Crystalline rock and consolidated clay are both considered adequate host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste deep geological repository (HLWR). Over the extended periods of HLWR operation, long-lived radionuclides (RN) may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. To predict the fate of contaminants and to assess the safety of the host rock, it is very important to determine transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients, and to relate them to the physical properties of the barriers, as connected porosity. In heterogeneous materials, it is also a major task to describe the transport at the mineral scale evaluating diffusion coefficients and mineral-specific porosities on single minerals. The main objective of this study was to determine within granite and consolidated clay, the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities by poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) autoradiography method. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDS) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. By the novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at mineral scale. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficients and retention parameters of single minerals in different granite samples and consolidated clays. (Author) 42 refs.

  15. Physical Matrix Characterisation: Studies of Crystalline Rocks and Consolidated Clays by PMMA Method and Electron Microscopy as a Support of Diffusion Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Kelokaski, A.; Togneri, L.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline rock and consolidated clay are both considered adequate host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste deep geological repository (HLWR). Over the extended periods of HLWR operation, long-lived radionuclides (RN) may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. To predict the fate of contaminants and to assess the safety of the host rock, it is very important to determine transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients, and to relate them to the physical properties of the barriers, as connected porosity. In heterogeneous materials, it is also a major task to describe the transport at the mineral scale evaluating diffusion coefficients and mineral-specific porosities on single minerals. The main objective of this study was to determine within granite and consolidated clay, the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities by poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) autoradiography method. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDS) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. By the novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at mineral scale. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficients and retention parameters of single minerals in different granite samples and consolidated clays. (Author) 42 refs

  16. Effect of heating on the behaviors of hydrogen in C-TiC films with auger electron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Y.; Wang, L.W.; Huang, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    C-TiC films with a content of 75% TiC were prepared with magnetron sputtering deposition followed by Ar + ion bombardment. Effect of heating on the behaviors of hydrogen in C-TiC films before and after heating was studied with Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analyses. SIMS depth profiles of hydrogen after H + ion implantation and thermal treatment show different hydrogen concentrations in C-TiC coatings and stainless steel. SIMS measurements show the existence of TiH, TiH 2 , CH 3 , CH 4 , C 2 H 2 bonds in the films after H + ion irradiation and the changes in the Ti LMM, Ti LMV and C KLL Auger line shape reveal that they have a good hydrogen retention ability after heating up to the temperature 393 K. All the results show that C-TiC coatings can be used as a hydrogen retainer or hydrogen permeable barrier on stainless steel to protect it from hydrogen brittleness

  17. Transient thermal stress wave and vibrational analyses of a thin diamond crystal for X-ray free-electron lasers under high-repetition-rate operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Songwei; Wu, Juhao

    2018-01-01

    High-brightness X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are perceived as fourth-generation light sources providing unprecedented capabilities for frontier scientific researches in many fields. Thin crystals are important to generate coherent seeds in the self-seeding configuration, provide precise spectral measurements, and split X-ray FEL pulses, etc. In all of these applications a high-intensity X-ray FEL pulse impinges on the thin crystal and deposits a certain amount of heat load, potentially impairing the performance. In the present paper, transient thermal stress wave and vibrational analyses as well as transient thermal analysis are carried out to address the thermomechanical issues for thin diamond crystals, especially under high-repetition-rate operation of an X-ray FEL. The material properties at elevated temperatures are considered. It is shown that, for a typical FEL pulse depositing tens of microjoules energy over a spot of tens of micrometers in radius, the stress wave emission is completed on the tens of nanoseconds scale. The amount of kinetic energy converted from a FEL pulse can reach up to ∼10 nJ depending on the layer thickness. Natural frequencies of a diamond plate are also computed. The potential vibrational amplitude is estimated as a function of frequency. Due to the decreasing heat conductivity with increasing temperature, a runaway temperature rise is predicted for high repetition rates where the temperature rises abruptly after ratcheting up to a point of trivial heat damping rate relative to heat deposition rate.

  18. Vanadium NMR Chemical Shifts of (Imido)vanadium(V) Dichloride Complexes with Imidazolin-2-iminato and Imidazolidin-2-iminato Ligands: Cooperation with Quantum-Chemical Calculations and Multiple Linear Regression Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun; Yang, Wenhong; Sun, Wen-Hua; Nomura, Kotohiro; Hada, Masahiko

    2017-11-30

    The NMR chemical shifts of vanadium ( 51 V) in (imido)vanadium(V) dichloride complexes with imidazolin-2-iminato and imidazolidin-2-iminato ligands were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method with GIAO. The calculated 51 V NMR chemical shifts were analyzed by the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis (MLRA) method with a series of calculated molecular properties. Some of calculated NMR chemical shifts were incorrect using the optimized molecular geometries of the X-ray structures. After the global minimum geometries of all of the molecules were determined, the trend of the observed chemical shifts was well reproduced by the present DFT method. The MLRA method was performed to investigate the correlation between the 51 V NMR chemical shift and the natural charge, band energy gap, and Wiberg bond index of the V═N bond. The 51 V NMR chemical shifts obtained with the present MLR model were well reproduced with a correlation coefficient of 0.97.

  19. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bsat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM, can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M and immersion times (6, 24 h of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200–300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  1. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bsat, Suzan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Munsch, Maximilian; Valstar, Edward R; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-04-08

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be bio-functionalized to promote bone growth. In the current work, EBM porous Ti6Al4V alloy was exposed to an alkali acid heat (AlAcH) treatment to bio-functionalize the surface of the porous structure. Various molar concentrations (3, 5, 10M) and immersion times (6, 24 h) of the alkali treatment were used to determine optimal parameters. The apatite forming ability of the samples was evaluated using simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion testing. The micro-topography and surface chemistry of AlAcH treated samples were evaluated before and after SBF testing using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The AlAcH treatment successfully modified the topographical and chemical characteristics of EBM porous titanium surface creating nano-topographical features ranging from 200-300 nm in size with a titania layer ideal for apatite formation. After 1 and 3 week immersion in SBF, there was no Ca or P present on the surface of as manufactured porous titanium while both elements were present on all AlAcH treated samples except those exposed to 3M, 6 h alkali treatment. An increase in molar concentration and/or immersion time of alkali treatment resulted in an increase in the number of nano-topographical features per unit area as well as the amount of titania on the surface.

  2. Radioactive particles revealed by electron microscopy. Chemical and physical properties of radioactive particles in aerosol samples emitted during the early stage of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    Water-insoluble radioactive materials emitted during an early stage of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 were identified, and their chemical and physical properties were characterized as particulate matters. In this report, studies on radioactive particles collected from filter samples in Tsukuba on March 14–15, 2011 are summarized. Their compositions, chemical states, sizes, shapes, crystallinity, and hygroscopicity were analyzed using microscopic analyses such as electron microscopy and synchrotron with a micro-beam. The results indicate that they include Cs, Fe, and Zn as well as elements from fission products and are water insoluble, spherical-glassy particles with ca. 2 micrometer in size. Understanding of their detailed properties is significant to improve the numerical models during the accident and to understand their occurrences in soil as well as the accident itself. In addition to the water-insoluble radioactive materials, water-soluble radioactive materials, which were likely emitted in different events during the accident, should be investigated to have comprehensive understanding of the accident and its environmental effects. More samples from various environments such as soil will be needed, and more detailed chemical and physical analyses will help to understand their formation process, influences on human health, and long term decrements in ambient conditions. (author)

  3. Electronic tongue response to chemicals in orange juice that change concentration in relation to harvest maturity and citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an earlier study, the electronic tongue system (etongue) was used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an etongue system to the main chemicals in orange ...

  4. An infrared free electron laser system for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL based on a 500 MHz superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.J.; Byrns, R.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Donahue, R.; Edighoffer, J.; Gough, R.; Hoyer, E.; Leemans, W.; Staples, J.; Taylor, B.; Xie, M.

    1992-09-01

    We describe a new design of the Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) at LBL. The design and choice of parameters are dictated by the unique requirements of the CDRL scientific program. The accelerator system is based on the 500 MHz superconducting cavity technology to achieve a wavelength stability of 10 -4

  5. Evaluation of freestanding boron-doped diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition as substrates for vertical power electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issaoui, R.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.; Silva, F.; Gicquel, A. [LSPM-CNRS (formerly LIMHP), Universite Paris 13, 99, Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisaro, R.; Servet, B.; Garry, G. [Thales Research and Technology France, Campus de Polytechnique, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Barjon, J. [GEMaC-CNRS, Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin Batiment Fermat, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2012-03-19

    In this study, 4 x 4 mm{sup 2} freestanding boron-doped diamond single crystals with thickness up to 260 {mu}m have been fabricated by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition. The boron concentrations measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy were 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} which is in a good agreement with the values calculated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, thus indicating that almost all incorporated boron is electrically active. The dependence of lattice parameters and crystal mosaicity on boron concentrations have also been extracted from high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments on (004) planes. The widths of x-ray rocking curves have globally shown the high quality of the material despite a substantial broadening of the peak, indicating a decrease of structural quality with increasing boron doping levels. Finally, the suitability of these crystals for the development of vertical power electronic devices has been confirmed by four-point probe measurements from which electrical resistivities as low as 0.26 {Omega} cm have been obtained.

  6. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B x C:H y ) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E U ), and Tauc parameter (B 1/2 )], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B x C:H y thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm 3 , Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10 10 to 10 15 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm 3 (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E U and B 1/2 , with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a

  7. Weld region corrosion during chemical cleaning of PWR [pressurized-water reactor] steam generators: Volume 2, Tests and analyses: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barna, J.L.; Bozeka, S.A.; Jevec, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The potential for preferential corrosion of steam generator weld regions during chemical cleaning using the generic SGOG solvents was investigated. The investigations included development and use of a corrosion assessment test facility which measured corrosion currents in a realistic model of the steam generator geometry in the vicinity of a specific weld during a simulated chemical dissolution of sludge consisting of essentially pure magnetite. A corrosion monitoring technique was developed and qualified. In this technique free corrosion rates measured by linear polarization techniques are added to corrosion rates calculated from galvanic current measured using a zero resistance ammeter to give an estimate of total corrosion rate for a galvanically corroding material. An analytic modeling technique was developed and proved useful in determining the size requirements for the weld region mockup used in the corrosion assessment test facility. The technique predicted galvanic corrosion rates consistent with that observed in a corrosion assessement test when polarization data used as model input were obtained on-line during the test. The test results obtained during this investigation indicated that chemical cleaning using the SGOG magnetite dissolution solvent can be performed with a small amount of corrosion of secondary side internals and pressure boundary welds. The maximum weld region corrosion measured during a typical chemical cleaning cycle to remove essentially pure magnetite sludge was about 8 mils. However, additional site specific weld region corrosion assessment testing and qualification will be required prior to chemical cleaning steam generators at a specific plant. Recommendations for site specific qualification of chemical cleaning processes and for use of process monitors and on-line corrosion instrumentation are included in this report

  8. Tuning the electronic structure of bulk FeSe with chemical pressure using quantum oscillations and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldea, Amalia

    FeSe is a unique and intriguing superconductor which can be tuned into a high temperature superconducting state using applied pressure, chemical intercalation and surface doping. In the absence of magnetism, the structural transition in FeSe is believed to be electronically driven, with the orbital degrees of freedom playing an important part. This scenario supports the stabilization of a nematic state in FeSe, which manifests as a Fermi surface deformation in the presence of strong interactions, as detected by ARPES. Another manifestation of the nematicity is the enhanced nematic susceptibility determined from elastoresistance measurements under applied strain. Isovalent Sulphur substitution onto the Selenium site constitutes a chemical pressure, which subtly modifies the electronic structure of FeSe, suppressing the structural transition without inducing high temperature superconductivity. I will present the evolution of the electronic structure with chemical pressure in FeSe, as determined from quantum oscillations and ARPES studies and I will discuss the suppression of the nematic electronic state and the role of electronic correlations. Experiments were performed at high magnetic field facilities in Tallahassee, Nijmegen and Toulouse and Diamond Light Source, UK. This work is mainly supported by EPSRC, UK (EP/I004475/1, EP/I017836/1) and I acknowledge my collaborators from Refs. .

  9. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu; Niu, Dongmei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng; Gao, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical reaction and band bending at the interface are confirmed by the UPS and XPS. • Co atoms mostly accumulate at or near the interface and penetration into sublayer is weak. • The electron and hole barriers are too high and interfacial buffer layer is needed for device design. - Abstract: Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  10. Electronic structure, chemical bonding, phase stability, and ground-state properties of YNi2-x(Co/Cu)xB2C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindran, P.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    1998-01-01

    In order to understand the role of Ni site substitution on the electronic structure and chemical bonding in YNi 2 B 2 C, we have made systematic electronic-structure studies on YNi 2 B 2 C as a function of Co and Cu substitution using the supercell approach within the local density approximation. The equilibrium volume, bulk modulus (B 0 ) and its pressure derivative (B 0 ' ), Grueneisen constant (γ G ), Debye temperature (Θ D ), cohesive energy (E c ), and heat of formation (ΔH) are calculated for YNi 2-x (Co/Cu) x B 2 C (x=0,0.5,1.0,1.5,2). From the total energy, electron-energy band structure, site decomposed density of states, and charge-density contour we have analyzed the structural stability and chemical bonding behavior of YNi 2 B 2 C as a function of Co/Cu substitution. We find that the simple rigid band model successfully explains the electronic structure and structural stability of Co/Cu substitution for Ni. In addition to studying the chemical bonding and electronic structure we present a somewhat speculative analysis of the general trends in the behavior of critical temperature for superconductivity as a function of alloying. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  11. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Niu, Dongmei, E-mail: mayee@csu.edu.cn [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Gao, Yongli, E-mail: ygao@pas.rochester.edu [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester NY14627 (United States)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Chemical reaction and band bending at the interface are confirmed by the UPS and XPS. • Co atoms mostly accumulate at or near the interface and penetration into sublayer is weak. • The electron and hole barriers are too high and interfacial buffer layer is needed for device design. - Abstract: Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  12. Examination of chemical elements partitioning between the γ and γ′ phases in CMSX-4 superalloy using EDS microanalysis and electron tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruk Adam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the partition of chemical elements between γ and γ′ phases in CMSX-4 was investigated using EDS microanalysis and electron tomography (FIB-SEM and STEM-EDS methods. The investigation has been performed for the superalloy after standard heat treatment and the ex-service CMSX-4 turbine blade after operation for 12 700 hours and 200 starts in industrial gas turbine. The results have shown that Co, Cr and Re partition to the γ matrix, Ni and W are present in both γ and γ′ phases, while Al, Ti and Ta strongly partition to the γ′ phase. The results show the abilities of new analytical electron microscopy and electron tomography methods to characterize the microstructure and chemical composition of single crystal superalloys at the nanoscale.

  13. Influence of chemical disorder on the electronic level spacing distribution of the Ag{sub 5083} nanoparticle: A tight-binding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano, L.R., E-mail: leonardoms20@gmail.com [Faculty of Physical Sciences, National University of San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14 (Peru); Landauro, C.V., E-mail: clandauros@unmsm.edu.pe [Faculty of Physical Sciences, National University of San Marcos, P.O. Box 14-0149, Lima 14 (Peru)

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study, employing a tight-binding Hamiltonian, the influence of chemical disorder on the electronic level spacing distribution of a silver nanoparticle containing 5083 atoms (∼ 5.5 nm). This nanoparticle was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations with a tight-binding atomic potential. The results indicate that in the absence of disorder the level spacing distributions are similar to those expected for systems belonging to the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble. Whereas, after increasing the chemical disorder, the electronic level spacing distribution and the Σ{sub 2} statistics tend to the corresponding form for the Poisson Ensemble, i.e., the silver nanoparticle acquires an insulating character which is expected for strongly disordered systems. Hence, this kind of disorder produces the localization of the electronic states of the nanoparticle.

  14. A Tutorial for Analysing the Cost-effectiveness of Alternative Methods for Assessing Chemical Toxicology: The Case of Acute Oral Toxicity Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norlen, H.; Worth, A.P.; Gabbert, S.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Compared with traditional animal methods for toxicity testing, in vitro and in silico methods are widely considered to permit a more cost-effective assessment of chemicals. However, how to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods has remained unclear. This paper offers a user-oriented

  15. Analysis of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by chiral liquid chromatography/electron capture atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using [13C]-analog internal standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesaros, Clementina; Lee, Seon Hwa; Blair, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) is thought to be mediated primarily by the cytochromes P450 (P450s) from the 2 family (2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 2J2). In contrast, P450s of the 4 family are primarily involved in omega oxidation of AA (4A11 and 4A22). The ability to determine enantioselective formation of the regioisomeric EETs is important in order to establish their potential biological activities and to asses which P450 isoforms are involved in their formation. It has been extremely difficult to analyze individual EET enantiomers in biological fluids because they are present in only trace amounts and they are extremely difficult to separate from each other. In addition, the deuterium-labeled internal standards that are commonly used for stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analyses have different LC retention times when compared with the corresponding protium forms. Therefore, quantification by LC/MS-based methodology can be compromised by differential suppression of ionization of the closely eluting isomers. We report the preparation of [13C20]-EET analog internal standards and the use of a validated high-sensitivity chiral LC/electron capture atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (ECAPCI)-MS method for the trace analysis of endogenous EETs as their pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) ester derivatives. The assay was then used to show the exquisite enantioselectivity of P4502C19-, P4502D6-, P4501A1-, and P4501B1-mediated conversion of AA into EETs and to quantify the enantioselective formation of EETs produced by AA metabolism in a mouse epithelial hepatoma (Hepa) cell line. PMID:20972997

  16. Localization and chemical forms of cadmium in plant samples by combining analytical electron microscopy and X-ray spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre [Section d' Application des Traceurs, LITEN, CEA-Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France) and Environmental Geochemistry Group, LGIT, UMR 5559, Universite J. Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: mpisaure@ujf-grenoble.fr; Fayard, Barbara [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502 Universite Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, ID-21, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Sarret, Geraldine [Environmental Geochemistry Group, LGIT, UMR 5559, Universite J. Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Pairis, Sebastien [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, UPR 5031, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Bourguignon, Jacques [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale, UMR 5168 CEA/CNRS/INRA/UJF, DRDC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2006-12-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a metal of high toxicity for plants. Resolving its distribution and speciation in plants is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance, trafficking and accumulation. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was exposed to cadmium under controlled conditions. Elemental distributions in the roots and in the leaves were determined using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), which offers a better sensitivity. The chemical form(s) of cadmium was investigated using Cd L{sub III}-edge (3538 eV) micro X-ray absorption near edge structure ({mu}-XANES) spectroscopy. Plant {mu}-XANES spectra were fitted by linear combination of Cd reference spectra. Biological sample preparation and conditioning is a critical point because of possible artifacts. In this work we compared freeze-dried samples analyzed at ambient temperature and frozen hydrated samples analyzed at -170 deg. C. Our results suggest that in the roots Cd is localized in vascular bundles, and coordinated to S ligands. In the leaves, trichomes (epidermal hairs) represent the main compartment of Cd accumulation. In these specialized cells, {mu}-XANES results show that the majority of Cd is bound to O/N ligands likely provided by the cell wall, and a minor fraction could be bound to S-containing ligands. No significant difference in Cd speciation was observed between freeze-dried and frozen hydrated samples. This work illustrates the interest and the sensitivity of Cd L{sub III}-edge XANES spectroscopy, which is applied here for the first time to plant samples. Combining {mu}-XRF and Cd L{sub III}-edge {mu}-XANES spectroscopy offers promising tools to study Cd storage and trafficking mechanisms in plants and other biological samples.

  17. Molecular structure of tris(cyclopropylsilyl)amine as determined by gas electron diffraction and quantum-chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevskiy, Yuri V.; Abaev, Maxim A.; Ivanov, Arkadii A.; Vilkov, Lev V.; Dakkouri, Marwan

    2008-10-01

    The molecular structure and conformation of tris(cyclopropylsilyl)amine (TCPSA) has been studied by means of gas-phase electron diffraction at 338 K and quantum-chemical calculations. A total of 12 relatively stable conformations of TCPSA molecule were considered. According to the experimental results and the DFT calculations the most stable conformer corresponds to a configuration (according to the Prelog-Klyne notation) of the type (-ac)(-ac)(+ac)-(-ac)(-ac)(+ac), where the first three parentheses describe the three different Si-N-Si-C torsional angles and the latter ones depict the rotation of the three cyclopropyl groups about the C ring-Si axes, respectively. The quantum-mechanical calculations were performed using various density functional (B3LYP, X3LYP and O3LYP) and perturbation MP2 methods in combination with double- and triple- ζ basis sets plus polarization and diffuse functions. The most important experimental geometrical parameters of TCPSA ( ra Å, ∠ h1 degrees) are: (Si-N) av = 1.741(3), (Si-C) av = 1.866(4), (C-C) av = 1.510(3), (C-C(Si)) av = 1.535(3), (N-Si-C) av = 115.1(18)°. For the purpose of comparison and searching for reasons leading to the planarity of the Si 3N moiety in trisilylated amines we carried out NBO analysis and optimized the geometries of numerous silylamines. Among these compounds was tris(allylsilyl)amine (TASA), which is isovalent and isoelectronic to TCPSA. Utilizing the structural results we obtained we could show that Si +⋯Si + electrostatic repulsive interaction is predominantly responsible for the planarity of the Si 3N skeleton in TCPSA and in all other trisilylamines we considered. We also found that regardless the size and partial charges of the substituents the Si-N-Si bond angle in various disilylamines amounts to 130 ± 2°.

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of the chemical and electronic properties of chalcogenide materials for thin-film optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Kimberly Anne

    Chalcogen-based materials are at the forefront of technologies for sustainable energy production. This progress has come only from decades of research, and further investigation is needed to continue improvement of these materials. For this dissertation, a number of chalcogenide systems were studied, which have applications in optoelectronic devices, such as LEDs and Photovoltaics. The systems studied include Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) and CuInSe 2 (CISe) thin-film absorbers, CdTe-based photovoltaic structures, and CdTe-ZnO nanocomposite materials. For each project, a sample set was prepared through collaboration with outside institutions, and a suite of spectroscopy techniques was employed to answer specific questions about the system. These techniques enabled the investigation of the chemical and electronic structure of the materials, both at the surface and towards the bulk. CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-films produced from the roll-to-roll, ambient pressure, Nanosolar industrial line were studied. While record-breaking efficiency cells are usually prepared in high-vacuum (HV) or ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environments, these samples demonstrate competitive mass-production efficiency without the high-cost deposition environment. We found relatively low levels of C contaminants, limited Na and Se oxidation, and a S-Se intermixing at the CdS/CIGSe interface. The surface band gap compared closely to previously investigated CIGSe thin-films deposited under vacuum, illustrating that roll-to-roll processing is a promising and less-expensive alternative for solar cell production. An alternative deposition process for CuInSe2 was also studied, in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg. CuInSe2 absorbers were prepared with varying Cu content and surface treatments to investigate the potential to produce an absorber with a Cu-rich bulk and Cu-poor surface. This is desired to combine the bulk characteristics of reduced defects and larger grains in Cu-rich films, while maintaining

  19. Simultaneous Scanning Electron Microscope Imaging of Topographical and Chemical Contrast Using In-Lens, In-Column, and Everhart-Thornley Detector Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinming; Cen, Xi; Ravichandran, Rijuta; Hughes, Lauren A; van Benthem, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The scanning electron microscope provides a platform for subnanometer resolution characterization of material morphology with excellent topographic and chemical contrast dependent on the used detectors. For imaging applications, the predominantly utilized signals are secondary electrons (SEs) and backscattered electrons (BSEs) that are emitted from the sample surface. Recent advances in detector technology beyond the traditional Everhart-Thornley geometry have enabled the simultaneous acquisition and discrimination of SE and BSE signals. This study demonstrates the imaging capabilities of a recently introduced new detector system that consists of the combination of two in-lens (I-L) detectors and one in-column (I-C) detector. Coupled with biasing the sample stage to reduce electron-specimen interaction volumes, this trinity of detector geometry allows simultaneous acquisition of signals to distinguish chemical contrast from topographical changes of the sample, including the identification of surface contamination. The I-C detector provides 4× improved topography, whereas the I-L detector closest to the sample offers excellent simultaneous chemical contrast imaging while not limiting the minimization of working distance to obtain optimal lateral resolution. Imaging capabilities and contrast mechanisms for all three detectors are discussed quantitatively in direct comparison to each other and the conventional Everhart-Thornley detector.

  20. Fragmentation pathways and structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds related to the Chemical Weapons Convention by electron ionization and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Esmaeil; Saeidian, Hamid; Amozadeh, Ali; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Babri, Mehran

    2016-12-30

    For unambiguous identification of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)-related chemicals in environmental samples, the availability of mass spectra, interpretation skills and rapid microsynthesis of suspected chemicals are essential requirements. For the first time, the electron ionization single quadrupole and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra of a series of O-alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates (Scheme 1, cpd 4) were studied for CWC verification purposes. O-Alkyl N-[bis(dimethylamino)methylidene]-P-methylphosphonamidates were prepared through a microsynthetic method and were analyzed using electron ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with gas and liquid chromatography, respectively, as MS-inlet systems. General EI and ESI fragmentation pathways were proposed and discussed, and collision-induced dissociation studies of the protonated derivatives of these compounds were performed to confirm proposed fragment ion structures by analyzing mass spectra of deuterated analogs. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as McLafferty rearrangement, hydrogen rearrangement and a previously unknown intramolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The EI and ESI fragmentation routes of the synthesized compounds 4 were investigated with the aim of detecting and identifying CWC-related chemicals during on-site inspection and/or off-site analysis and toxic chemical destruction monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Results of chemical analyses of soil, shale, and soil/shale extract from the Mancos Shale formation in the Gunnison Gorge National Conservation Area, southwestern Colorado, and at Hanksville, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli; Grauch, Richard I.; Ball, Bridget A.; Chong, Geneva W.; Elliott, John G.; Kosovich, John J.; Livo, Keith E.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2007-01-01

    Results of chemical and some isotopic analyses of soil, shale, and water extracts collected from the surface, trenches, and pits in the Mancos Shale are presented in this report. Most data are for sites on the Gunnison Gorge National Conservation Area (GGNCA) in southwestern Colorado. For comparison, data from a few sites from the Mancos landscape near Hanksville, Utah, are included. Twelve trenches were dug on the GGNCA from which 258 samples for whole-rock (total) analyses and 187 samples for saturation paste extracts were collected. Sixteen of the extract samples were duplicated and subjected to a 1:5 water extraction for comparison. A regional soil survey across the Mancos landscape on the GGNCA generated 253 samples for whole-rock analyses and saturation paste extractions. Seventeen gypsum samples were collected on the GGNCA for sulfur and oxygen isotopic analysis. Sixteen samples were collected from shallow pits in the Mancos Shale near Hanksville, Utah.

  2. Microsynthesis and electron ionization mass spectral studies of O(S)-alkyl N,N-dimethyl alkylphosphono(thiolo)thionoamidates for Chemical Weapons Convention verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidian, Hamdollah; Babri, Mehran; Abdoli, Morteza; Sarabadani, Mansour; Ashrafi, Davood; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-12-15

    The availability of mass spectra and interpretation skills are essential for unambiguous identification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)-related chemicals. The O(S)-alkyl N,N-dimethyl alkylphosphono(thiolo)thionoamidates are included in the list of scheduled CWC-related compounds, but there are very few spectra from these compounds in the literature. This paper examines these spectra and their mass spectral fragmentation routes. The title chemicals were prepared through microsynthetic protocols and were analyzed using electron ionization mass spectrometry with gas chromatography as a MS-inlet system. Structures of fragments were confirmed using analysis of fragment ions of deuterated analogs, tandem mass spectrometry and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as alkene and amine elimination and McLafferty-type rearrangements. The most important fragmentation route of the chemicals is the thiono-thiolo rearrangement. DFT calculations are used to support MS results and to reveal relative preference formation of fragment ions. The retention indices (RIs) of all the studied compounds are also reported. Mass spectra of the synthesized compounds were investigated with the aim to enrich the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Central Analytical Database (OCAD) which may be used for detection and identification of CWC-related chemicals during on-site inspection and/or off-site analysis such as OPCW proficiency tests. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The structure and conformations of piracetam (2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide): Gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenafontov, Denis N.; Moiseeva, Natalia F.; Khristenko, Lyudmila V.; Karasev, Nikolai M.; Shishkov, Igor F.; Vilkov, Lev V.

    2010-12-01

    The geometric structure of piracetam was studied by quantum chemical calculations (DFT and ab initio), gas electron diffraction (GED), and FTIR spectroscopy. Two stable mirror symmetric isomers of piracetam were found. The conformation of pyrrolidine ring is an envelope in which the C4 atom deviates from the ring plane, the angle between the planes (C3 sbnd C4 sbnd C5) and (C2 sbnd C3 sbnd C5) is 154.1°. The direction of the deviation is the same as that of the side acetamide group. The piracetam molecule is stabilized in the gas phase by an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the N9H 2 group and the oxygen O6, bonded to C2. The principal structural parameters ( re, Å and ∠e, degrees; uncertainties are 3 σLS values) were found to be: r(С3 sbnd С4) = 1.533(1), r(C4 sbnd C5) = 1.540(1), r(N1 sbnd C5) = 1.456(1), r(C2 sbnd C3) = 1.520(1), r(N1 sbnd C7) = 1.452(1), r(C7 sbnd C8) = 1.537(1), r(N1 sbnd C2) = 1.365(2), r(C8 sbnd N9) = 1.360(2), r(C2 dbnd O6) = 1.229(1), r(C8 dbnd O10) = 1.221(1), ∠C2 sbnd N1 sbnd C5 = 113.4(6), ∠N1 sbnd C2 sbnd C3 = 106.9(6), ∠N1 sbnd C7 sbnd C8 = 111.9(6), ∠C7 sbnd C8 sbnd N9 = 112.5(6), ∠N1 sbnd C2 sbnd O6 = 123.0(4), ∠C3 sbnd N1 sbnd C7 = 120.4(4), ∠C7 sbnd C8 sbnd O10 = 120.2(4), ∠C5 sbnd N1 sbnd C2 sbnd O6 = 170(6), ∠C3 sbnd C2 sbnd N1 sbnd C7 = 178(6), ∠C2 sbnd N1 sbnd C7 sbnd C8 = 84.2, ∠N1 sbnd C7 sbnd C8 sbnd O10 = 111.9.

  4. Analyses of experimental observations of electron temperatures in the near wake of a model in a laboratory-simulated solar wind plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intriligator, D.S.; Steele, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed that show the effect on the electron temperature of inserting a spherical conducting model, larger than the Debye length, into a free-streaming high-energy (1 kv) unmagnetized hydrogen plasma. These experiments are the first electron temperature experiments conducted at energies and compositions directly relevant to solar wind and astrophysical plasma phenomena. The incident plasma parameters were held constant. A large number of axial profiles of the electron temperature ratios T/sub e//sub in// T/sub e//sub out/ behind the model downstream in the model wake are presented. A rigorous statistical approach is used in the analysis of the electron temperature ratio data in both our experimental laboratory data and in our reanalysis of the published data of others. The following new results ae obtained: (1) In energetic plasma flow there is no overall temperature enhancement in the near wake since the best fit to the T/sub e//sub i/n/ T/sub e//sub out/ data is a horizontal straight line having a mean value of 1.05; (2) No statistically significant electron temperature enhancement peaks or depressions exist in the near-wake region behind a model at zero potential in a high-energy plasma even at distances less than or equal to Ma, where M is the acoustic Mach number and a is the model radius. This implies a ''filling in'' of electrons in the wake region which may be due to the higher mobility of these energetic electrons. This mechanism may permit the solar wind electrons to significantly contribute to the maintenance of the nightside ionosphere at Venus

  5. Inhibition of precipitation of carbonate apatite by trisodium citrate analysed in base of the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prywer, Jolanta, E-mail: jolanta.prywer@p.lodz.pl [Institute of Physics, Lodz University of Technology, ul. Wólczańska 219, 93-005 Łódź (Poland); Olszynski, Marcin [Institute of Physics, Lodz University of Technology, ul. Wólczańska 219, 93-005 Łódź (Poland); Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa [Institute of Chemistry, Environment Protection and Biotechnology, Jan Długosz University of Częstochowa, ul. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Częstochowa (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the precipitation of carbonate apatite is studied. The experimental series are performed in the solution of artificial urine. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation as carbonate apatite is one of the main components of t