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Sample records for chemical agents ii

  1. Chemical crowd control agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Hussain, Syed Ather; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed; Anwar, Naureen; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Chemical crowd control agents are also referred to as riot control agents and are mainly used by civil authorities and government agencies to curtail civil disobedience gatherings or processions by large crowds. Common riot control agents used to disperse large numbers of individuals into smaller, less destructive, and more easily controllable numbers include chloroacetophenone, chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile, dibenzoxazepine, diphenylaminearsine, and oleoresin capsicum. In this paper, we discuss the emergency medical care needed by sufferers of acute chemical agent contamination and raise important issues concerning toxicology, safety and health. PMID:26658556

  2. Chemical Agents: Facts about Evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Emergency Response Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations Chemical Agents: Facts About Evacuation Format: Select one PDF [ ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Some kinds of chemical accidents or attacks, such as a train derailment ...

  3. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  4. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens

  5. Monitoring presence of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specification describes a case for use with a hand-portable chemical agent detector for continuously monitoring an atmosphere for the presence of predetermined chemical agents. The detector having means for ionizing air samples and providing at an output terminal electrical signals representative of the mobility spectrum of ionized chemical vapours produced by the ionizing means. The case comprises means for defining a chamber in the case for supporting and removably enclosing the detector, means for communicating ambient atmosphere to the chamber, electrical circuit means in the case, the circuit means being adapted to be detachably connected to the detector output terminal when the detector is positioned in the chamber and being responsive to the electrical signals for producing an alarm signal when the signals detect a chemical agent concentration in the atmosphere exceeding a predetermined concentration level, and alarm means responsive to the alarm signal. (author)

  6. New Safety rule for Chemical Agents

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    The following Safety rule has been issued on 08-01-2010: Safety Regulation SR-C Chemical Agents This document applies to all persons under the Director General’s authority. It sets out the minimal requirements for the protection of persons from risks to their safety and health arising, or likely to arise, from the effects of hazardous chemical agents used in any CERN activity. All Safety rules are available on the web pages.

  7. History of chemical and biological warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinicz, L

    2005-10-30

    Chemical and biological warfare agents constitute a low-probability, but high-impact risk both to the military and to the civilian population. The use of hazardous materials of chemical or biological origin as weapons and for homicide has been documented since ancient times. The first use of chemicals in terms of weapons of mass destruction goes back to World War I, when on April 22, 1915 large amounts of chlorine were released by German military forces at Ypres, Belgium. Until around the 1970s of the 20th century, the awareness of the threat by chemical and biological agents had been mainly confined to the military sector. In the following time, the development of increasing range delivery systems by chemical and biological agents possessors sensitised public attention to the threat emanating from these agents. Their proliferation to the terrorists field during the 1990s with the expanding scale and globalisation of terrorist attacks suggested that these agents are becoming an increasing threat to the whole world community. The following article gives a condensed overview on the history of use and development of the more prominent chemical and biological warfare agents. PMID:16111798

  8. Joint chemical agent detector (JCAD): the future of chemical agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laljer, Charles E.

    2003-08-01

    The Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) has continued development through 2002. The JCAD has completed Contractor Validation Testing (CVT) that included chemical warfare agent testing, environmental testing, electromagnetic interferent testing, and platform integration validation. The JCAD provides state of the art chemical warfare agent detection capability to military and homeland security operators. Intelligence sources estimate that over twenty countries have active chemical weapons programs. The spread of weapons of mass destruction (and the industrial capability for manufacture of these weapons) to third world nations and terrorist organizations has greatly increased the chemical agent threat to U.S. interests. Coupled with the potential for U.S. involvement in localized conflicts in an operational or support capacity, increases the probability that the military Joint Services may encounter chemical agents anywhere in the world. The JCAD is a small (45 in3), lightweight (2 lb.) chemical agent detector for vehicle interiors, aircraft, individual personnel, shipboard, and fixed site locations. The system provides a common detection component across multi-service platforms. This common detector system will allow the Joint Services to use the same operational and support concept for more efficient utilization of resources. The JCAD detects, identifies, quantifies, and warns of the presence of chemical agents prior to onset of miosis. Upon detection of chemical agents, the detector provides local and remote audible and visual alarms to the operators. Advance warning will provide the vehicle crew and other personnel in the local area with the time necessary to protect themselves from the lethal effects of chemical agents. The JCAD is capable of being upgraded to protect against future chemical agent threats. The JCAD provides the operator with the warning necessary to survive and fight in a chemical warfare agent threat environment.

  9. Laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) for chemical agent reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Richter, Dale A.; Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Lobb, C. T.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III

    2002-06-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a new technique which exploits Raman scattering to provide standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division is developing the LISA technology under a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command for incorporation on the Army's future reconnaissance vehicles. A field-engineered prototype LISA-Recon system is being designed to demonstrate on-the- move measurements of chemical contaminants. In this article, we will describe the LISA technique, data form proof-of- concept measurements, the LISA-Recon design, and some of the future realizations envisioned for military sensing applications.

  10. Detection of electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2014-08-12

    A "real time" method for detecting chemical agents generally and particularly electrophilic and nucleophilic species by employing tunable, precursor sensor materials that mimic the physiological interaction of these agents to form highly florescent berberine-type alkaloids that can be easily and rapidly detected. These novel precursor sensor materials can be tuned for reaction with both electrophilic (chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (proteins and other biological molecules) species. By bonding or otherwise attaching these precursor molecules to a surface or substrate they can be used in numerous applications.

  11. Detection of Electrophilic and Nucleophilic Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-11-11

    A "real time" method for detecting electrophilic and nucleophilic species generally by employing tunable, precursor sensor materials that mimic the physiological interaction of these agents to form highly florescent berberine-type alkaloids that can be easily and rapidly detected. These novel precursor sensor materials can be tuned for reaction with both electrophilic (chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (proteins and other biological molecules) species.

  12. JOHNSTON ATOLL CHEMICAL AGENT DISPOSAL SYSTEM (JACADS) CLOSURE PLAN DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JACADS project consists of four incinerators including a liquid chemical agent waste processor, an explosives treatment incinerator and a batch metal parts treatment unit. Its mission was to disassemble and destroy chemcial weapons and bulk chemical agent. This prototypical...

  13. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This segment of the report of the proceedings of the National Cancer Institute symposium is devoted to the presentations about studies with in vitro cell systems, in vitro-in vivo systems, and whole animals including humans. The NCI symposium was designed to cover many aspects of carcinogenesis so that the similarities and differences of the manner in which ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens initiate cancer and complete its expression could be examined. The hope was that the identification of both the common and the clearly distinct features would help elucidate mechanisms and indicate areas for new research

  14. Optical detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Michael E.; Pushkarsky, Michael B.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analytical model evaluating the suitability of optical absorption based spectroscopic techniques for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) in ambient air. The sensor performance is modeled by simulating absorption spectra of a sample containing both the target and multitude of interfering species as well as an appropriate stochastic noise and determining the target concentrations from the simulated spectra via a least square fit (LSF) algorithm. The distribution of the LSF target concentrations determines the sensor sensitivity, probability of false positives (PFP) and probability of false negatives (PFN). The model was applied to CO2 laser based photoacosutic (L-PAS) CWA sensor and predicted single digit ppb sensitivity with very low PFP rates in the presence of significant amount of interferences. This approach will be useful for assessing sensor performance by developers and users alike; it also provides methodology for inter-comparison of different sensing technologies.

  15. Chemical Agents: Personal Cleaning and Disposal of Contaminated Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Emergency Response Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations Chemical Agents: Facts About Personal Cleaning and Disposal of ... Filipino) 中文 (Chinese) Français (French) Some kinds of chemical accidents or attacks may cause you to come ...

  16. Fluorescent sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnworth, Mark; Rowan, Stuart J; Weder, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Along with biological and nuclear threats, chemical warfare agents are some of the most feared weapons of mass destruction. Compared to nuclear weapons they are relatively easy to access and deploy, which makes them in some aspects a greater threat to national and global security. A particularly hazardous class of chemical warfare agents are the nerve agents. Their rapid and severe effects on human health originate in their ability to block the function of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that is vital to the central nervous system. This article outlines recent activities regarding the development of molecular sensors that can visualize the presence of nerve agents (and related pesticides) through changes of their fluorescence properties. Three different sensing principles are discussed: enzyme-based sensors, chemically reactive sensors, and supramolecular sensors. Typical examples are presented for each class and different fluorescent sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents are summarized and compared. PMID:17705326

  17. Chemical agents and the immune response.

    OpenAIRE

    Luster, M I; Rosenthal, G J

    1993-01-01

    Our desire to understand the potential adverse human health effects of environmental chemical exposure has coincided with an increased understanding of the immune system and an appreciation of its complex regulatory network. This has spawned a broad interest in the area of immunotoxicology within the scientific community as well as certain concerns in the public sector regarding chemical-induced hypersensitivity and immunosuppression. The incidence of alleged human sensitization to chemicals ...

  18. Study on scattering properties of tissues with hyperosmotic chemical agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Optical properties of biological tissue are variable due to the changes of micro-structures and scattering constituents after hyperosmotic chemical agents permeates into tissue. The changes of optical properties of biological tissue are due to the refractive indices matching between the scatterers with high refractive index and the ground substances, which reduce scattering of tissue. The main reasons are that permeated semipermeable chemical agents with higher refractive index than the ground substances of tissuemakes the refractive index of ground substances of tissue higher by the enhancement of the permeated concentration. We studied on the collimated transmittance changes of light penetrating biological tissue after the hyperosmotic chemical agents administrates with different concentration.

  19. The induction of synaesthesia with chemical agents: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eLuke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the general consensus that synaesthesia emerges at an early developmental stage and is only rarely acquired during adulthood, the transient induction of synaesthesia with chemical agents has been frequently reported in research on different psychoactive substances. Nevertheless, these effects remain poorly understood and have not been systematically incorporated. Here we review the known published studies in which chemical agents were observed to elicit synaesthesia. Across studies there is consistent evidence that serotonin agonists elicit transient experiences of synaesthesia. Despite convergent results across studies, studies investigating the induction of synaesthesia with chemical agents have numerous methodological limitations and little experimental research has been conducted. Cumulatively, these studies implicate the serotonergic system in synaesthesia and have implications for the neurochemical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon but methodological limitations in this research area preclude making firm conclusions regarding whether chemical agents can induce genuine synaesthesia.

  20. Handbook of toxicology of chemical warfare agents

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This groundbreaking book covers every aspect of deadly toxic chemicals used as weapons of mass destruction and employed in conflicts, warfare and terrorism. Including findings from experimental as well as clinical studies, this one-of-a-kind handbook is prepared in a very user- friendly format that can easily be followed by students, teachers and researchers, as well as lay people. Stand-alone chapters on individual chemicals and major topics allow the reader to easily access required information without searching through the entire book. This is the first book that offers in-depth coverage of individual toxicants, target organ toxicity, major incidents, toxic effects in humans, animals and wildlife, biosensors, biomarkers, on-site and laboratory analytical methods, decontamination and detoxification procedures, prophylactic, therapeutic and countermeasures, and the role of homeland security. Presents a comprehensive look at all aspects of chemical warfare toxicology in one reference work. This saves research...

  1. A decontamination study of simulated chemical and biological agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive decontamination scheme of the chemical and biological agents, including airborne agents and surface contaminating agents, is presented. When a chemical and biological attack occurs, it is critical to decontaminate facilities or equipments to an acceptable level in a very short time. The plasma flame presented here may provide a rapid and effective elimination of toxic substances in the interior air in isolated spaces. As an example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies air with an airflow rate of 5000 l/min contaminated with toluene, the simulated chemical agent, and soot from a diesel engine, the simulated aerosol for biological agents. Although the airborne agents in an isolated space are eliminated to an acceptable level by the plasma flame, the decontamination of the chemical and biological agents cannot be completed without cleaning surfaces of the facilities. A simulated sterilization study of micro-organisms was carried out using the electrolyzed ozone water. The electrolyzed ozone water very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372) within 3 min. The electrolyzed ozone water also kills the vegetative micro-organisms, fungi, and virus. The electrolyzed ozone water, after the decontamination process, disintegrates into ordinary water and oxygen without any trace of harmful materials to the environment

  2. Carbon Nanotubes: Detection of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Kumar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of carbon nanotubes has great impact on the development of newer methodologies and devicesuseful for the analysis of various types of chemicals. The functionalisation of CNTs with biomolecules relatedto chemical and biological warfare agents makes these useful for the detection of these agents. The detectionsensitivity can be increased manyfold. Various types of chemical and biological sensors were developed usingvarious type of carbon nanotubes as well as nano particles of different metals.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.617-625, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1684

  3. Rapid chemical agent identification by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Hsiang; Farquharson, Stuart

    2001-08-01

    Although the Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical warfare agents (CWAs), the use of these agents persists due to their low cost, simplicity in manufacturing and ease of deployment. These attributes make these weapons especially attractive to low technology countries and terrorists. The military and the public at large require portable, fast, sensitive, and accurate analyzers to provide early warning of the use of chemical weapons. Traditional laboratory analyzers such as the combination of gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy, although sensitive and accurate, are large and require up to an hour per analysis. New, chemical specific analyzers, such as immunoassays and molecular recognition sensors, are portable, fast, and sensitive, but are plagued by false-positives (response to interferents). To overcome these limitations, we have been investigating the potential of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to identify and quantify chemical warfare agents in either the gas or liquid phase. The approach is based on the extreme sensitivity of SERS demonstrated by single molecule detection, a new SERS material that we have developed to allow reproducible and reversible measurements, and the molecular specific information provided by Raman spectroscopy. Here we present SER spectra of chemical agent simulants in both the liquid and gas phase, as well as CWA hydrolysis phase.

  4. A traceable quantitative infrared spectral database of chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Williams, Barry R.; Ben-David, Avishai; Hulet, Melissa; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Green, Norman; Zhu, Changjiang

    2004-12-01

    Recent experimental field trials have demonstrated the ability of both Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and active light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensors to detect particulate matter, including simulants for biological materials. Both systems require a reliable, validated, quantitative database of the mid infrared spectra of the targeted threat agents. While several databases are available, none are validated and traceable to primary standards for reference quality reliability. Most of the existing chemical agent databases have been developed using a bubbler or syringe-fed vapor generator, and all are fraught with errors and uncertainties as a result. In addition, no quantitative condensed phase data on the low volatility chemicals and biological agents have been reported. We are filling this data gap through the systematic measurement of gas phase chemical agent materials generated using a unique vapor-liquid equilibrium approach that allows the quantitation of the cross-sections using a mass measurement calibrated to primary, National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards. In addition, we have developed quantitative methods for the measurement of condensed phase materials in both transmission and diffuse reflectance modes. The latter data are valuable for the development of complex index of refraction data, which is required for both system modeling and algorithm development of both FTIR and LIDAR based sensor systems. We will describe our measurement approach and progress toward compiling the first known comprehensive and validated database of both vapor and condensed phase chemical warfare agents.

  5. Fate of chemical warfare agents and toxic indutrial chemicals in landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartelt-Hunt, D.L.; Barlaz, M.A.; Knappe, D.R.U.;

    2006-01-01

    One component of preparedness for a chemical attack is planning for the disposal of contaminated debris. To assess the feasibility of contaminated debris disposal in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, the fate of selected chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs...

  6. Environmental assessments of sea dumped chemical warfare agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Fauser, Patrik

    This is a report on the information gathered during work related to sea dumped chemical warfare agents. It mainly reviews the work conducted in relation to the installation of the two Nord Stream gas pipeline from 2008-2012. The focus was on the weight-of-evidence risk assessment of disturbed CWA...

  7. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janos, P.; Skoumal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 236, č. 2016 (2016), s. 239-259. ISSN 0179-5953 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1116 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : chemical warfare agent * metal nanoparticle * unique surface-chemistry * mesoporous manganese oxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.744, year: 2014

  8. Respiratory Protection Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.K. Prasad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and biological warfare (CBW agents pose unavoidable threat, both to soldiers and civilians.Exposure to such deadly agents amidst the CBW agents contaminated environment can be avoided bytaking proper protective measures. Respiratory protection is indispensable when the soldiers or civiliansare surrounded by such deadly environment as contamination-free air is needed for respiration purposes.In this context, an attempt has been made to review the literature for the past five decades on developmentof various protective devices for respiratory protection against aerosols, gases, and vapours of CBWagents. This review covers structural, textural, and adsorption properties of materials used in gas filtersand mechanical filters for the removal of CBW agents.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.686-697, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1692

  9. Appendix C. Collection of Samples for Chemical Agent Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, C; Thompson, C; Doerr, T; Scripsick, R

    2005-09-23

    This chapter describes procedures for the collection and analysis of samples of various matrices for the purpose of determining the presence of chemical agents in a civilian setting. This appendix is intended to provide the reader with sufficient information to make informed decisions about the sampling and analysis process and to suggest analytical strategies that might be implemented by the scientists performing sampling and analysis. This appendix is not intended to be used as a standard operating procedure to provide detailed instructions as to how trained scientists should handle samples. Chemical agents can be classified by their physical and chemical properties. Table 1 lists the chemical agents considered by this report. In selecting sampling and analysis methods, we have considered procedures proposed by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and peer-reviewed scientific literature. EPA analytical methods are good resources describing issues of quality assurance with respect to chain-of-custody, sample handling, and quality control requirements.

  10. Diagnosis of exposure to chemical warfare agents: An essential tool to counteract chemical terrorism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Schans, M.J. van der; Bikker, F.J.; Benschop, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    Methods to analyze chemical warfare agents (CW-agents) and their decomposition products in environmental samples were developed over the last decades. In contrast herewith, procedures for analysis in biological samples have only recently been developed. Retrospective detection of exposure to CW-agen

  11. Chemical cleaning agents and bonding to glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Rodrigues Gonçalves

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of chemical cleaning agents on the bond strength between resin cement and glass-fiber posts was investigated. The treatments included 10% hydrofluoric acid, 35% phosphoric acid, 50% hydrogen peroxide, acetone, dichloromethane, ethanol, isopropanol, and tetrahydrofuran. Flat glass-fiber epoxy substrates were exposed to the cleaners for 60 s. Resin cement cylinders were formed on the surfaces and tested in shear. All treatments provided increased bond strength compared to untreated control specimens. All failures were interfacial. Although all agents improved the bond strength, dichloromethane and isopropanol were particularly effective.

  12. Chemically modified tetracyclines: The novel host modulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Devulapalli Narasimha; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kapalavai, Vasavi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal pathogens and destructive host responses are involved in the initiation and progression of periodontitis. The emergence of host response modulation as a treatment concept has resulted from our improved understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A variety of drugs have been evaluated as host modulation agents (HMA), including Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS), bisphosphonates, tetracyclines, enamel matrix proteins and bone morphogenetic proteins. Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) are one such group of drugs which have been viewed as potential host modulating agents by their anticollagenolytic property. The CMTs are designed to be more potent inhibitors of pro inflammatory mediators and can increase the levels of anti inflammatory mediators. PMID:26392682

  13. Chemically modified tetracyclines: The novel host modulating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devulapalli Narasimha Swamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal pathogens and destructive host responses are involved in the initiation and progression of periodontitis. The emergence of host response modulation as a treatment concept has resulted from our improved understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A variety of drugs have been evaluated as host modulation agents (HMA, including Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS, bisphosphonates, tetracyclines, enamel matrix proteins and bone morphogenetic proteins. Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs are one such group of drugs which have been viewed as potential host modulating agents by their anticollagenolytic property. The CMTs are designed to be more potent inhibitors of pro inflammatory mediators and can increase the levels of anti inflammatory mediators.

  14. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  16. Passive standoff detection of chemical warfare agents on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Jean-Marc; Puckrin, Eldon; Hancock, Jim; Lecavalier, Pierre; Lepage, Carmela Jackson; Jensen, James O

    2004-11-01

    Results are presented on the passive standoff detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) liquid agents on surfaces by the Fourier-transform IR radiometry. This study was performed during surface contamination trials at Defence Research and Development Canada-Suffield in September 2002. The goal was to verify that passive long-wave IR spectrometric sensors can potentially remotely detect surfaces contaminated with CW agents. The passive sensor, the Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, was used in the trial to obtain laboratory and field measurements of CW liquid agents, HD and VX. The agents were applied to high-reflectivity surfaces of aluminum, low-reflectivity surfaces of Mylar, and several other materials including an armored personnel carrier. The field measurements were obtained at a standoff distance of 60 m from the target surfaces. Results indicate that liquid contaminant agents deposited on high-reflectivity surfaces can be detected, identified, and possibly quantified with passive sensors. For low-reflectivity surfaces the presence of the contaminants can usually be detected; however, their identification based on simple correlations with the absorption spectrum of the pure contaminant is not possible. PMID:15540446

  17. Passive Standoff Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Jean-Marc; Puckrin, Eldon; Hancock, Jim; Lecavalier, Pierre; Lepage, Carmela Jackson; Jensen, James O.

    2004-11-01

    Results are presented on the passive standoff detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) liquid agents on surfaces by the Fourier-transform IR radiometry. This study was performed during surface contamination trials at Defence Research and Development Canada-Suffield in September 2002. The goal was to verify that passive long-wave IR spectrometric sensors can potentially remotely detect surfaces contaminated with CW agents. The passive sensor, the Compact Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, was used in the trial to obtain laboratory and field measurements of CW liquid agents, HD and VX. The agents were applied to high-reflectivity surfaces of aluminum, low-reflectivity surfaces of Mylar, and several other materials including an armored personnel carrier. The field measurements were obtained at a standoff distance of 60 m from the target surfaces. Results indicate that liquid contaminant agents deposited on high-reflectivity surfaces can be detected, identified, and possibly quantified with passive sensors. For low-reflectivity surfaces the presence of the contaminants can usually be detected; however, their identification based on simple correlations with the absorption spectrum of the pure contaminant is not possible.

  18. Using cheminformatics to find simulants for chemical warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Summary of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in current use. → Application of method of molecular similarity to CWA and simulants. → Quantitative metric for CWA-simulant similarity. → Rank ordering of simulants in current use. → Potential of method to identify simulants for emerging agents. - Abstract: Direct experimentation with chemical warfare agents (CWA) to study important problems such as their permeation across protective barrier materials, decontamination of equipment and facilities, or the environmental transport and fate of CWAs is not feasible because of the obvious toxicity of the CWAs and associated restrictions on their laboratory use. The common practice is to use 'simulants,' namely, analogous chemicals that closely resemble the CWAs but are less toxic, with the expectation that the results attained for simulants can be correlated to how the CWAs would perform. Simulants have been traditionally chosen by experts, by means of intuition, using similarity in one or more physical properties (such as vapor pressure or aqueous solubility) or in the molecular structural features (such as functional groups) between the stimulant and the CWA. This work is designed to automate the simulant identification process backed by quantitative metrics, by means of chemical similarity search software routinely used in pharmaceutical drug discovery. The question addressed here is: By the metrics of such software, how similar are traditional simulants to CWAs? That is, what is the numerical 'distance' between each CWA and its customary simulants in the quantitative space of molecular descriptors? The answers show promise for finding close but less toxic simulants for the ever-increasing numbers of CWAs objectively and fast.

  19. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets[I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas[2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study[3] has been

  20. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; Wald, Lara; Paul, Kateri; Hancock, Lawrence F.

    2005-05-01

    A reactive chromophore developed at MIT exhibits sensitive and selective detection of surrogates for G-class nerve agents. This reporter acts by reacting with the agent to form an intermediate that goes through an internal cyclization reaction. The reaction locks the molecule into a form that provides a strong fluorescent signal. Using a fluorescent sensor platform, Nomadics has demonstrated rapid and sensitive detection of reactive simulants such as diethyl chloro-phosphate (simulant for sarin, soman, and related agents) and diethyl cyanophosphate (simulant for tabun). Since the unreacted chromophore does not fluoresce at the excitation wavelength used for the cyclized reporter, the onset of fluo-rescence can be easily detected. This fluorescence-based detection method provides very high sensitivity and could enable rapid detection at permissible exposure levels. Tests with potential interferents show that the reporter is very selective, with responses from only a few highly toxic, electrophilic chemicals such as phosgene, thionyl chloride, and strong acids such as HF, HCl, and nitric acid. Dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), a common and inactive simu-lant for other CW detectors, is not reactive enough to generate a signal. The unique selectivity to chemical reactivity means that a highly toxic and hazardous chemical is present when the reporter responds and illustrates that this sensor can provide very low false alarm rates. Current efforts focus on demonstrating the sensitivity and range of agents and toxic industrial chemicals detected with this reporter as well as developing additional fluorescent reporters for a range of chemical reactivity classes. The goal is to produce a hand-held sensor that can sensitively detect a broad range of chemical warfare agent and toxic industrial chemical threats.

  1. The efficacy of chemical agents in cleaning and disinfection programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Martins Alzira

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the growing number of outbreaks of infection in hospital nurseries, it becomes essential to set up a sanitation program that indicates that the appropriate chemical agent was chosen for application in the most effective way. Method For the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of a chemical agent, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was reached by the classic method of successive broth dilutions. The reference bacteria utilized were Bacillus subtilis var. globigii ATCC 9372, Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The strains of Enterobacter cloacae IAL 1976 (Adolfo Lutz Institute, Serratia marcescens IAL 1478 and Acinetobactev calcoaceticus IAL 124 (ATCC 19606, were isolated from material collected from babies involved in outbreaks of infection in hospital nurseries. Results The MIC intervals, which reduced bacteria populations over 08 log10, were: 59 to 156 mg/L of quaternarium ammonium compounds (QACs; 63 to 10000 mg/L of chlorhexidine digluconate; 1375 to 3250 mg/L of glutaraldehyde; 39 to 246 mg/L of formaldehyde; 43750 to 87500 mg/L of isopropanol or ethanol; 1250 to 6250 mg/L of iodine in polyvinyl-pyrolidone complexes, 150 to 4491 mg/L of chlorine-releasing-agents (CRAs; 469 to 2500 mg/L of hydrogen peroxide; and, 2310 to 18500 mg/L of peracetic acid. Conclusions Chlorhexidine showed non inhibitory activity over germinating spores. A. calcoaceticus, was observed to show resistance to the majority of the agents tested, followed by E. cloacae and S. marcescens.

  2. Hand-Held Devices Detect Explosives and Chemical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ion Applications Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, partnered with Ames Research Center through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements to develop a miniature version ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). While NASA was interested in the instrument for detecting chemicals during exploration of distant planets, moons, and comets, the company has incorporated the technology into a commercial hand-held IMS device for use by the military and other public safety organizations. Capable of detecting and identifying molecules with part-per-billion sensitivity, the technology now provides soldiers with portable explosives and chemical warfare agent detection. The device is also being adapted for detecting drugs and is employed in industrial processes such as semiconductor manufacturing.

  3. Tetrachloroethene degradation by reducing-agent enhanced Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed percarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Lu, S.; Gu, X.; Yan, N.; Qiu, Z.; Sui, Q.

    2015-12-01

    This project investigated the effect of reducing agents on the degradation of tetrachloroethene(PCE) by Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC). SPC possesses similar function as liquid H2O2, such that free H2O2 is released into solution when percarbonate is mixed with water. The addition of reducing agents, including hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium sulfite, ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate, accelerated the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redoxcycle, leading to a relatively steady Fe(II) concentration and higher production of free radicals. This, in turn, resulted in enhanced PCE oxidation by SPC, with almost complete PCE removal obtained for appropriate Fe and SPC concentrations.The results of chemical probe tests, using nitrobenzene and carbon tetrachloride, demonstrated that HO● was the predominant radical in the system and that O2●-played a minor role. This was further confirmed by the results of electron paramagnetic resonance measurements and salicylic acid hydroxylationanalysis by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). PCE degradation decreased significantly with the addition of isopropanol, a strong HO● scavenger, supporting the hypothesis that HO● was primarily responsible for PCE degradation. It should be noted that the release of Cl- was slightly delayed in the first 20 mins, indicating that intermediate products were produced. However, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis did not detect any chlorinated organic compound except PCE, indicating these intermediates were quickly degraded, which resulted in the complete conversion of PCE to CO2. In conclusion, the use of reducing agents to enhance Fe(II)/Fe(III) catalyzed SPC oxidation appears to be a promising approach for the rapid degradation of organic contaminants in groundwater.

  4. Chemical bath deposition of II-VI compound thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeji, Isaiah Olatunde

    II-VI compounds are direct bandgap semiconductors with great potentials in optoelectronic applications. Solar cells, where these materials are in greater demand, require a low cost production technology that will make the final product more affordable. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) a low cost growth technique capable of producing good quality thin film semiconductors over large area and at low temperature then becomes a suitable technology of choice. Heterogeneous reaction in a basic aqueous solution that is responsible for the II-VI compound film growth in CBD requires a metal complex. We have identified the stability constant (k) of the metal complex compatible with CBD growth mechanism to be about 106.9. This value is low enough to ensure that the substrate adsorbed complex relax for subsequent reaction with the chalcogen precursor to take place. It is also high enough to minimize the metal ion concentration in the bath participating in the precipitation of the bulk compounds. Homogeneous reaction that leads to precipitation in the reaction bath takes place because the solubility products of bulk II-VI compounds are very low. This reaction quickly depletes the bath of reactants, limit the film thickness, and degrade the film quality. While ZnS thin films are still hard to grow by CBD because of lack of suitable complexing agent, the homogeneous reaction still limits quality and thickness of both US and ZnS thin films. In this study, the zinc tetraammine complex ([Zn(NH3) 4]2+) with k = 108.9 has been forced to acquire its unsaturated form [Zn(NH3)3]2+ with a moderate k = 106.6 using hydrazine and nitrilotriacetate ion as complementary complexing agents and we have successfully grown ZnS thin films. We have also, minimized or eliminated the homogeneous reaction by using ammonium salt as a buffer and chemical bath with low reactant concentrations. These have allowed us to increase the saturation thickness of ZnS thin film by about 400% and raise that of US film

  5. Multidimensional chemical modelling, II. Irradiated outflow walls

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; Doty, Steven D; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bourke, Tyler L

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO+, a molecule known to be enhanced by far UV (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO+ is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first 2D axi-symmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star forming region to explain the CO+ observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axi-symmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to ...

  6. Studies on residue-free decontaminants for chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, George W

    2015-03-17

    Residue-free decontaminants based on hydrogen peroxide, which decomposes to water and oxygen in the environment, are examined as decontaminants for chemical warfare agents (CWA). For the apparent special case of CWA on concrete, H2O2 alone, without any additives, effectively decontaminates S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), pinacolyl methylphosphorofluoridate (GD), and bis(2-choroethyl) sulfide (HD) in a process thought to involve H2O2 activation by surface-bound carbonates/bicarbonates (known H2O2 activators for CWA decontamination). A plethora of products are formed during the H2O2 decontamination of HD on concrete, and these are characterized by comparison to synthesized authentic compounds. As a potential residue-free decontaminant for surfaces other than concrete (or those lacking adsorbed carbonate/bicarbonate) H2O2 activation for CWA decontamination is feasible using residue-free NH3 and CO2 as demonstrated by reaction studies for VX, GD, and HD in homogeneous solution. Although H2O2/NH3/CO2 ("HPAC") decontaminants are active for CWA decontamination in solution, they require testing on actual surfaces of interest to assess their true efficacy for surface decontamination. PMID:25710477

  7. Rapid Ultrasensitive Chemical-Fingerprint Detection of Chemical and Biochemical Warfare Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ASHBY, CAROL I.; SHEPODD, TIMOTHY J.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.; MURON, DAVID J.

    2002-12-01

    Vibrational spectra can serve as chemical fingerprints for positive identification of chemical and biological warfare molecules. The required speed and sensitivity might be achieved with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using nanotextured metal surfaces. Systematic and reproducible methods for preparing metallic surfaces that maximize sensitivity have not been previously developed. This work sought to develop methods for forming high-efficiency metallic nanostructures that can be integrated with either gas or liquid-phase chem-lab-on-a-chip separation columns to provide a highly sensitive, highly selective microanalytical system for detecting current and future chem/bio agents. In addition, improved protein microchromatographic systems have been made by the creation of acrylate-based porous polymer monoliths that can serve as protein preconcentrators to reduce the optical system sensitivity required to detect and identify a particular protein, such as a bacterial toxin.

  8. Optical detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals: Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Michael E.; Pushkarsky, Michael; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2005-06-01

    We present an analysis of optical techniques for the detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals in real-world conditions. We analyze the problem of detecting a target species in the presence of a multitude of interferences that are often stochastic and we provide a broadly applicable technique for evaluating the sensitivity, probability of false positives (PFP), and probability of false negatives (PFN) for a sensor through the illustrative example of a laser photoacoustic spectrometer (L-PAS). This methodology includes (1) a model of real-world air composition, (2) an analytical model of an actual field-deployed L-PAS, (3) stochasticity in instrument response and air composition, (4) repeated detection calculations to obtain statistics and receiver operating characteristic curves, and (5) analyzing these statistics to determine the sensor's sensitivity, PFP, and PFN. This methodology was used to analyze variations in sensor design and ambient conditions, and can be utilized as a framework for comparing different sensors.

  9. SCIENTIFIC AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF WATER BASIN CLEANING FROM CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS

    OpenAIRE

    T. M. Tiavlovskaya; V. F. Tamelo

    2011-01-01

    The paper contains an analysis of reasons that explain pollution of World Ocean waters by chemical warfare agents and ecological dangers which can arise due to their emission. Possible methods for liquidation of chemical warfare agents and water basin cleaning from them have been considered in the paper.

  10. Estimated Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Clearance Goals for Remediation Pre-Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bansleben, Dr. Donald [U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Health-based surface clearance goals, in units of mg/cm2, have been developed for the persistent chemical warfare agents sulfur mustard (HD) and nerve agent VX as well as their principal degradation products. Selection of model parameters and critical receptor (toddler child) allow calculation of surface residue estimates protective for the toddler child, the general population and adult employees of a facilty that has undergone chemical warfare agent attack.

  11. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  12. Adsorption study of copper (II) by chemically modified orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adsorbent, the chemically modified orange peel, was prepared from hydrolysis of the grafted copolymer, which was synthesized by interaction of methyl acrylate with cross-linking orange peel. The presence of poly (acrylic acid) on the biomass surface was verified by infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Total negative charge in the biomass surface and the zeta potentials were determined. The modified biomass was found to present high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate for Cu (II). From Langmuir isotherm, the adsorption capacity for Cu (II) was 289.0 mg g-1, which is about 6.5 times higher than that of the unmodified biomass. The kinetics for Cu (II) adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorbent was used to remove Cu (II) from electroplating wastewater and was suitable for repeated use for more than four cycles.

  13. A review on common chemical hemostatic agents in restorative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Pardis Tarighi; Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-01-01

    Control of hemorrhage is one of the challenging situations dentists confront during deep cavity preparation and before impressions or cementation of restorations. For the best bond and least contamination it is necessary to be familiar with the hemostatic agents available on the market and to be able to choose the appropriate one for specific situations. This review tries to introduce the commercially available hemostatic agents, discusses their components and their specific features. The mos...

  14. Applicability of federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs to waste chemical weapons and chemical warfare agents.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs that govern the management of chemical weapons or chemical warfare agents. It addresses state programs in the eight states with chemical weapon storage facilities managed by the U.S. Army: Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Oregon, and Utah. It also includes discussions on 32 additional states or jurisdictions with known or suspected chemical weapons or chemical warfare agent presence (e.g., disposal sites containing chemical agent identification sets): Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, Washington, D.C., and Wyoming. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste programs are reviewed to determine whether chemical weapons or chemical warfare agents are listed hazardous wastes or otherwise defined or identified as hazardous wastes. Because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) military munitions rule specifically addresses the management of chemical munitions, this report also indicates whether a state has adopted the rule and whether the resulting state regulations have been authorized by EPA. Many states have adopted parts or all of the EPA munitions rule but have not yet received authorization from EPA to implement the rule. In these cases, the states may enforce the adopted munitions rule provisions under state law, but these provisions are not federally enforceable

  15. Stand-off tissue-based biosensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents using photosynthetic fluorescence induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C A; Rodriguez, M; Greenbaum, E

    2001-09-01

    Tissue biosensors made from immobilized whole-cell photosynthetic microorganisms have been developed for the detection of airborne chemical warfare agents and simulants. The sensor read-out is based on well-known principles of fluorescence induction by living photosynthetic tissue. Like the cyanobacteria and algae from which they were constructed, the sensors are robust and mobile. The fluorescence signal from the sensors was stable after 40 days, storage and they can be launched or dropped into suspected danger zones. Commercially available hand-held fluorometric detector systems were used to measure Photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency of green algae and cyanobacteria entrapped on filter paper disks. Toxic agents flowing in the gas stream through the sensors can alter the characteristic fluorescence induction curves with resultant changes in photochemical yields. Tabun (GA), sarin (GB), mustard agent, tributylamine (TBA) (a sarin stabilizer), and dibutyl sulfide (DBS) (a mustard agent analog) were tested. Upper threshold limits of detectability for GA, TBA, and DBS are reported. With additional research and development, these biosensors may find application in stand-off detection of chemical and perhaps biological warfare agents under real-world conditions. PMID:11544038

  16. Extrudates of starch-xanthan gum mixtures as affected by chemical agents and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixtures of starch, xanthan gum and either polyvinyl alcohol, epichlorohydrin, valeric acid or adipoyl chloride were extruded. Properties of extrudates including apparent viscosity, water solubility, water absorption indices and extrudate expansion were measured for different proportions of xanthan gum, 70% amylose starch (with or without irradiation) and chemical agents. Extrusion with chemical agents and irradiation changed physical properties of both starch and xanthan gum. Expansions of extrudates were higher than that of starch. Viscosity of extrudates increased with xanthan gum concentration. The addition of 1% (w/w) polyvinyl alcohol had the greatest effect of the chemical agents. Irradiation increased the apparent viscosity of starch-xanthan gum mixtures

  17. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively

  18. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  19. Pyrazine-Derived Disulfide-Reducing Agent for Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Lukesh, John C.; Wallin, Kelly K.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    For fifty years, dithiothreitol (DTT) has been the preferred reagent for the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins and other biomolecules. Herein we report on the synthesis and characterization of 2,3-bis(mercaptomethyl)pyrazine (BMMP), a readily accessible disulfide-reducing agent with reactivity under biological conditions that is markedly superior to DTT and other known reagents.

  20. Cerium oxide for the destruction of chemical warfare agents: A comparison of synthetic routes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janos, P.; Henych, Jiří; Pelant, O.; Pilařová, V.; Vrtoch, L.; Kormunda, M.; Mazanec, K.; Štengl, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 304, MAR (2016), s. 259-268. ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Cerium oxide * Chemical warfare agents * Organophosphate compounds * Decontamination Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.529, year: 2014

  1. Chemical structure and pharmacokinetics of novel quinolone agents represented by avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin

    OpenAIRE

    Kocsis, Bela; Domokos, J.; Szabo, D.

    2016-01-01

    Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents with a basic chemical structure of bicyclic ring. Fluorine atom at position C-6 and various substitutions on the basic quinolone structure yielded fluoroquinolones, namely norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and numerous other agents. The target molecules of quinolones and fluoroquinolones are bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. Broad-spectrum and excellent tissue penetration make fluoroquinolones potent agents but their...

  2. Chemically modified tetracyclines: The novel host modulating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Devulapalli Narasimha Swamy; Sahitya Sanivarapu; Srinivas Moogla; Vasavi Kapalavai

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal pathogens and destructive host responses are involved in the initiation and progression of periodontitis. The emergence of host response modulation as a treatment concept has resulted from our improved understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A variety of drugs have been evaluated as host modulation agents (HMA), including Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS), bisphosphonates, tetracyclines, enamel matrix proteins and bone morphogenetic proteins. Chemica...

  3. Use of in vitro topoisomerase II assays for studying quinolone antibacterial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, J F; Gootz, T D; McGuirk, P R; C.A. Farrell; Sokolowski, S A

    1989-01-01

    Several quinolones and antitumor compounds were tested as inhibitors of purified calf thymus topoisomerase II in unknotting, catenation, radiolabeled DNA cleavage, and quantitative nonradiolabeled cleavage assays. The antitumor agents VP-16 (demethylepipodophyllotoxin ethylio-beta-D-glucoside) and ellipticine demonstrated drug-enhanced topoisomerase II DNA cleavage (the concentration of drug that induced 50% of the maximal DNA cleavage in the test system [CC50]) at levels of less than or equa...

  4. Novel fluorescence-based integrated sensor for chemical and biological agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; Wald, Lara; Paul, Kateri; Hancock, Lawrence F.; Fagan, Steve; Krouse, Justin; Hutchinson, Kira D.

    2004-12-01

    There is a renewed interest in the development of chemical and biological agent sensors due to the increased threat of weapons deployment by terrorist organizations and rogue states. Optically based sensors address the needs of military and homeland security forces in that they are reliable, rapidly deployed, and can provide continuous monitoring with little to no operator involvement. Nomadics has developed optically based chemical weapons sensors that utilize reactive fluorescent chromophores initially developed by Professor Tim Swager at MIT. The chromophores provide unprecedented sensitivity and selectivity toward toxic industrial chemicals and certain chemical weapon agents. The selectivity is based upon the reactivity of the G-class nerve agents (phosphorylation of acetylcholinesterase enzyme) that makes them toxic. Because the sensor recognizes the reactivity of strong electrophiles and not molecular weight, chemical affinity or ionizability, our system detects a specific class of reactive agents and will be able to detect newly developed or modified agents that are not currently known. We have recently extended this work to pursue a combined chemical/biological agent sensor system incorporating technologies based upon novel deep ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) developed out of the DARPA Semiconductor UV Optical Sources (SUVOS) program.

  5. Quantum chemical analysis of potential anti-Parkinson agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nima Razzaghi-Asl; Sara Shahabipour; Ahmad Ebadi; Azam Bagheri

    2015-07-01

    Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) are amine oxidoreductase falvoenzymes that belong to the integral proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane. MAO exists in two distinct isoforms; MAO-A and MAO-B. Inhibition of MAO-A and MAO-B is important for developing antidepressant and antiparkinson agents, respectively. In the light of the above explanations, detailed structure binding relationship studies on the intermolecular binding components of MAO-B complexes may unravel the way toward developing novel anti-Parkinson agents. In the present contribution, intermolecular binding pattern for a series of experimentally validated 3-arylcoumarin MAO-B inhibitors (1–9) have been elucidated via molecular docking and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Intermolecular binding energy components could not be analyzed by docking and due to this limitation, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations including functional B3LYP in association with split valence basis set (Def2-SVP) were applied to estimate the ligand-residue binding energies in the MAO-B active site. Moreover; results were interpreted in terms of calculated polarization effects that were induced by individual amino acids of the MAO-B active site. The results of the present study provide an approach to pharmacophore-based modification within the 3-arylcoumarin scaffold for potent MAO-B inhibitors.

  6. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.P.

    2003-07-24

    Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

  7. Chemical structure and pharmacokinetics of novel quinolone agents represented by avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Bela; Domokos, J; Szabo, D

    2016-01-01

    Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents with a basic chemical structure of bicyclic ring. Fluorine atom at position C-6 and various substitutions on the basic quinolone structure yielded fluoroquinolones, namely norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and numerous other agents. The target molecules of quinolones and fluoroquinolones are bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. Broad-spectrum and excellent tissue penetration make fluoroquinolones potent agents but their toxic side effects and increasing number of resistant pathogens set limits on their use. This review focuses on recent advances concerning quinolones and fluoroquinolones, we will be summarising chemical structure, mode of action, pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity. We will be describing fluoroquinolones introduced in clinical trials, namely avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and non-fluorinated nemonoxacin. These agents have been proved to have enhanced antibacterial effect even against ciprofloxacin resistant pathogens, and found to be well tolerated in both oral and parenteral administrations. These features are going to make them potential antimicrobial agents in the future. PMID:27215369

  8. A Portable System for Nuclear, Chemical Agent and Explosives Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FRIS/PINS hybrid integrates the LLNL-developed Field Radionuclide Identification System (FRIS) with the INEEL-developed Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) chemical assay system to yield a combined general radioisotope, special nuclear material, and chemical weapons/explosives detection and identification system. The PINS system uses a neutron source and a high-purity germanium γ-ray detector. The FRIS system uses an electrochemically cooled germanium detector and its own analysis software to detect and identify special nuclear material and other radioisotopes. The FRIS/PINS combined system also uses the electromechanically-cooled germanium detector. There is no other currently available integrated technology that can combine an active neutron interrogation and analysis capability for CWE with a passive radioisotope measurement and identification capability for special nuclear material

  9. Spectroscopic investigation of the noncovalent association of the nerve agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) with zinc(II) porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, William A; Vetromile, Carissa M; Kim, Chungsik; Xu, Xue; Zhang, X Peter; Larsen, Randy W

    2013-11-01

    Organophosphonates pose a significant threat as chemical warfare agents, as well as environmental toxins in the form of pesticides. Thus, methodologies to sense and decontaminate these agents are of significant interest. Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins offer an excellent platform to develop chemical threat sensors and photochemical degradation systems. These highly conjugated planar molecules exhibit relatively long-lived singlet and triplet states with high quantum yields and also form self-associated complexes with a wide variety of molecules. A significant aspect of porphyrins is the ability to functionalize the peripheral ring system either directly to the pyrrole rings or to the bridging methine carbons. In this report, steady-state absorption and fluorescence are utilized to probe binding affinities of a series of symmetric and asymmetric zinc(II) metalloporphyrins for the nerve agent simulant diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) in hexane. The red shifts in the absorption and emission spectra observed for all of the metalloporphyrins probed are discussed in the frame of Gouterman's four orbital model and a common binding motif involving coordination between the metalloporphyrin and DIMP via interaction between the zinc metal center of the porphyrin and phosphoryl oxygen of DIMP (Zn-O═P) is proposed. PMID:24093669

  10. Oxidative Conversion of a Europium(II)-Based T1 Agent into a Europium(III)-Based paraCEST Agent that can be Detected In Vivo by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Alexander M; Clavijo Jordan, Veronica; Sherry, A Dean; Ratnakar, S James; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2016-04-11

    The Eu(II) complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) tetra(glycinate) has a higher reduction potential than most Eu(II) chelates reported to date. The reduced Eu(II) form acts as an efficient water proton T1 relaxation reagent, while the Eu(III) form acts as a water-based chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agent. The complex has extremely fast water exchange rate. Oxidation to the corresponding Eu(III) complex yields a well-defined signal from the paraCEST agent. The time course of oxidation was studied in vitro and in vivo by T1 -weighted and CEST imaging. PMID:26954661

  11. Chitosan-bound pyridinedicarboxylate Ni(II) and Fe(III) complex biopolymer films as waste water decyanidation agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewuyi, Sheriff; Jacob, Julianah Modupe; Olaleye, Oluwatoyin Omolola; Abdulraheem, Taofiq Olanrewaju; Tayo, Jubril Ayopo; Oladoyinbo, Fatai Oladipupo

    2016-10-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with immense structural advantage for chemical and mechanical modifications to generate novel properties, functions and applications. This work depicts new pyridinedicarboxylicacid (PDC) crosslinked chitosan-metal ion films as veritable material for cyanide ion removal from aqueous solution. The PDC-crosslinked chitosan-metal films (PDC-Chit-Ni(II) and PDC-Chit-Fe(III)) were formed by complexing PDC-crosslinked chitosan film with anhydrous nickel(II) and iron(III) chloride salts respectively. The PDC-Chit and its metal films were characterized employing various analytical and spectroscopic techniques. The FT-IR, UV-vis and the XRD results confirm the presence of the metal ions in the metal coordinated PDC-crosslinked chitosan film. The surface morphological difference of PDC-Chit-Ni(II) film before and after decyanidation was explored with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the quantitative amount of nickel(II) and iron(III) present in the complex were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer as 32.3 and 37.2μg/g respectively which portends the biopolymer film as a good complexing agent. Removal of cyanide from aqueous solution with PDC-Chit, PDC-Chit-Ni(II) and PDC-Chit-Fe(III) films was studied with batch equilibrium experiments. At equilibrium, decyanidation capacity (DC) followed the order PDC-Chit-Ni (II)≈PDC-Chit-Fe(III)>PDC-Chit. PDC-Chit-Ni(II) film gave 100% CN(-) removal within 40min decyanidation owing to favorable coordination geometry. PMID:27474675

  12. Detection/classification/quantification of chemical agents using an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, G. Martin

    2005-05-01

    ChemSentry is a portable system used to detect, identify, and quantify chemical warfare (CW) agents. Electro chemical (EC) cell sensor technology is used for blood agents and an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is used for nerve and blister agents. The combination of the EC cell and the SAW array provides sufficient sensor information to detect, classify and quantify all CW agents of concern using smaller, lighter, lower cost units. Initial development of the SAW array and processing was a key challenge for ChemSentry requiring several years of fundamental testing of polymers and coating methods to finalize the sensor array design in 2001. Following the finalization of the SAW array, nearly three (3) years of intensive testing in both laboratory and field environments were required in order to gather sufficient data to fully understand the response characteristics. Virtually unbounded permutations of agent characteristics and environmental characteristics must be considered in order to operate against all agents and all environments of interest to the U.S. military and other potential users of ChemSentry. The resulting signal processing design matched to this extensive body of measured data (over 8,000 agent challenges and 10,000 hours of ambient data) is considered to be a significant advance in state-of-the-art for CW agent detection.

  13. Activation of aluminum as an effective reducing agent by pitting corrosion for wet-chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F⁻, Cl⁻, and Br⁻ in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu₂Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  14. NOVEL MULTI-LEVEL OPTIMIZATION METHOD FOR CHEMICAL COMPLEX USING INTELLIGENT AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun LI; Huanjun YU; Shangxu HU

    2003-01-01

    Multi-level optimization of complex chemical complex was comprehensively analyzed, including the optimization of management plan, production scheme, operating conditions, etc. The software framework of multi-level optimization of chemical complex was worked out. Basing upon the frame of multi-level optimization, the intelligent agent technique was adopted to search for global optimum. The organization, function, design and the implementation of a series of intelligent agents were discussed. According to the strategy that to spend most computing time in optimization solving and much less time in exchanging information regarding the tasks and results of optimization through network, the communication mechanism and cooperation rules for Multi-Agent System for hierarchically optimizing chemical complex was proposed.

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection for chemical and biological agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Griffin, Guy D.; Vass, Arpad A.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2004-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of chemical agent simulants such as dimethyl methylphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), diethyl phosphoramidate (DEPA), and 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (CEES), and biological agent simulants such as bacillus globigii (BG), erwinia herbicola (EH), and bacillus thuringiensis (BT) were obtained from silver oxide film-deposited substrates. Thin AgO films ranging in thickness from 50 nm to 250 nm were produced by chemical bath deposition onto glass slides. Further Raman intensity enhancements were noticed in UV irradiated surfaces due to photo-induced Ag nanocluster formation, which may provide a possible route to producing highly useful plasmonic sensors for the detection of chemical and biological agents upon visible light illumination.

  16. Metal Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni (II) complexes of ursodeoxycholic acid as putative anticancer agents

    OpenAIRE

    Dyakova, Lora; Culita, Daniela-Cristina; Marinescu, Gabriela; Alexandrov, Marin; Kalfin, Reni; Patron, Luminita; Alexandrova, Radostina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of metal [Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II)] complexes with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on the viability and proliferation of tumour and non-tumour cells. Cell lines established from retrovirus-transformed chicken hepatoma (LSCC-SF-Mc29) and rat sarcoma (LSR-SF-SR) as well as from human cancers of the breast (MCF-7), uterine cervix (HeLa), lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) were used as model systems. Non-tumour human embryo (Lep-3) cells were also included ...

  17. Chemical characterization of oil-based asphalt release agents and their emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing Tang; Ulf Isacsson [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Division of Highway Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

    2006-06-15

    Four commercial asphalt release agents were chemically characterized using different analytical methods. Functional groups and molecular weight distributions were determined by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and mass spectrometry (MS). General compositions of the agents were obtained as petroleum hydrocarbons, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), fatty acids and glycerides using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and MS probe inlet method. The contents of health related analytes, such as aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were determined. Asphalt release agents emission was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME). The emission proneness as well as emission level of aromatic hydrocarbons from these agents were compared. The results obtained were used for ranking the agents with regard to health hazards. 19 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Chemical soil investigation report for the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant/Raffinate Pits, Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data and interpretations from the Phase II Chemical Soil Investigation at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant/Raffinate Pits. This investigation was performed to provide data in support of the Remedial Investigation and Baseline Risk Assessment. The investigation consisted of both biased and unbiased sampling programs designed to detect contamination from previous operations. Very small amounts of nitroaromatic compound contamination were detected in former ordnance production areas. Metals and inorganic anion contamination was observed in numerous locations related to both explosives and uranium production. Small amounts of semi-volatile organic, pesticide, and PCB contamination were also detected. No volatile organic contamination was observed. The data collected in this investigation was of sufficient quality and quantity to characterize the on-site chemical soil contamination. Additional investigations may be required to support remedial design. 14 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Mitochondrial complex II, a novel target for anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 5 (2013), s. 552-564. ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1937; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrion * Complex II * Anti- cancer agent Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  20. Chemical evolution of two-component galaxies. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to confirm and refine the results obtained in a previous paper the chemical evolution of two-component (spheroid + disk) galaxies is derived rejecting the instantaneous recycling approximation, by means of numerical computations, accounting for (i) the collapse phase of the gas, assumed to be uniform in density and composition, and (ii) a birth-rate stellar function. Computations are performed relatively to the solar neighbourhood and to model galaxies which closely resemble the real morphological sequence: in both cases, numerical results are compared with analytical ones. The numerical models of this paper constitute a first-order approximation, while higher order approximations could be made by rejecting the hypothesis of uniform density and composition, and making use of detailed dynamical models. (Auth.)

  1. Zeolite fiber integrated microsensors for highly sensitive point detection of chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hui, Juan; Dong, Junhang; Xiao, Hai

    2006-05-01

    A zeolite-fiber integrated chemical sensor was developed for in situ point detection of chemical warfare agents. The sensor was made by fine-polishing the MFI polycrystalline zeolite thin film synthesized on the endface of the single mode optical fiber. The sensor device operates by measuring the optical thickness changes of the zeolite thin film caused by the adsorption of analytes into the zeolite channels. The sensor was demonstrated for sensitive detection of toluene and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP).

  2. Applications of LPG fiber optical sensors for relative humidity and chemical-warfare-agents monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shufang; Liu, Yongcheng; Sucheta, Artur; Evans, Mishell K.; Van Tassell, Roger

    2002-09-01

    A long-period grating (LPG) fiber optic sensor has been developed for monitoring the relative humidity levels and toxic chemicals, especially the chemical warfare agents. The principle of operation of this sensor is based on monitoring the refractive index changes exhibited by the reactive coating applied to the surface of the LPG region in response to analytes. Specific interaction of the analyte with the thin film polymer coating produces as the output a wavelength shift that can be correlated with the concentration of the analyte. Thin polymer coating for relative humidity sensor is made of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) covalently bound to the surface of the fiber. Coating for chemical warfare agent detection employs metal nanoclusters imbedded in polyethylenimine (PEI) for specific reaction. The relative humidity level can be determined from 0% to 95% and the level of toxic chemicals can be determined is at least on the scale of 1 ppm. This small-size and low-cost LPG fiber optic sensor exhibited high sensitivity, rapid response, repeatability and durability. The goal of developing relative humidity sensor is to produce a fiber optic sensor-based health monitoring system for building, while the chemical sensor has found its application in point detection network for chemical warfare agent monitoring.

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents by low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanqi; Liang, Miao; Li, Zhen; Shu, Jinian; Yang, Bo; Xu, Ce; Zou, Yao

    2016-08-15

    On-spot monitoring of threat agents needs high sensitive instrument. In this study, a low-pressure photoionization mass spectrometer (LPPI-MS) was employed to detect trace amounts of vapor-phase explosives and chemical warfare agent mimetics under ambient conditions. Under 10-s detection time, the limits of detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene, nitrotoluene, nitrobenzene, and dimethyl methyl phosphonate were 30, 0.5, 4, and 1 parts per trillion by volume, respectively. As compared to those obtained previously with PI mass spectrometric techniques, an improvement of 3-4 orders of magnitude was achieved. This study indicates that LPPI-MS will open new opportunities for the sensitive detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents. PMID:27260452

  4. Chemical Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Updates Subscribe Listen Page last reviewed April ... Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Subscribe to RSS Get email updates To ...

  5. Portable Raman device for detection of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Martin, Matthew E.; Yan, Fei; Stokes, David L.; Mobley, Joel; Cullum, Brian M.; Wintenberg, Alan; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes a compact, self-contained, cost effective, and portable Raman Integrated Tunable Sensor (RAMiTs) for screening a wide variety of chemical and biological agents for homeland defense applications. The instrument is a fully-integrated, tunable, "point-and-shoot" Raman monitor based on solid-state acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. It can provide direct identification and quantitative analysis of chemical and biological samples in a few seconds under field conditions. It also consists of a 830-nm diode laser for excitation, and an avalanche photodiode for detection. Evaluation of this instrument has been performed by analyzing several standard samples and comparing the results those obtained using a conventional Raman system. In addition to system evaluation, this paper will also discuss potential applications of the RAMiTs for detection of chemical and biological warfare agents.

  6. Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Fredrick G [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development

  7. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  8. Synergic effect of chelating agent and oxidant on chemical mechanical planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemically dominant alkaline slurry, which is free of BTA (benzotriazole) and other inhibitors, was investigated. The synergic effect of the chelating agent and oxidant on the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) was taken into consideration. Copper CMP slurry is mainly composed of an oxidizer, nonionic surfactant, chelating agent and abrasive particles. The effect of different synergic ratios of oxidant with chelating agent on the polishing removal rate, static etch rate and planarization were detected. The planarization results reveal that with the increase of oxidant concentration, the dishing value firstly diminished and then increased again. When the synergic ratios is 3, the dishing increases the least. A theoretical model combined with chemical-mechanical kinetics process was proposed in the investigation, which can explain this phenomenon. Based on the theoretical model, the effect of synergic ratios of oxidant with chelating agent on velocity D-value (convex removal rate minus recessed removal rate) was analyzed. The results illustrate that when the synergic ratio is between 2.5–3.5, the velocity D-value is relatively higher, thereby good planarization can be achieved in this interval. This investigation provides a new guide to analyze and study copper line corrosion in the recessed region during copper clearing polishing. (semiconductor technology)

  9. The Chemical Evolution of Globular Clusters - II. Metals and Fluorine

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia; Gibson, Brad K; Karakas, Amanda I; Pilkington, Kate; Calura, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In the first paper in this series, we proposed a new framework in which to model the chemical evolution of globular clusters. This model, is predicated upon the assumption that clusters form within an interstellar medium enriched locally by the ejecta of a single Type Ia supernova and varying numbers of asymptotic giant branch stars, superimposed on an ambient medium pre-enriched by low-metallicity Type II supernovae. Paper I was concerned with the application of this model to the observed abundances of several reactive elements and so-called non-metals for three classical intermediate-metallicity clusters, with the hallmark of the work being the successful recovery of many of their well-known elemental and isotopic abundance anomalies. Here, we expand upon our initial analysis by (a) applying the model to a much broader range of metallicities (from the factor of three explored in Paper I, to now, a factor of ~50; i.e., essentially, the full range of Galactic globular cluster abundances, and (b) incorporating...

  10. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    OpenAIRE

    F. Sharafeddin; H. Moradian

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO) and disto-occlusal (DO) Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity ...

  11. Platinum(II and Palladium(II Complexes of Pyridine-2-Carbaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone as Alternative Antiherpes Simplex Virus Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kovala-Demertzi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity and the antivirus activity of Pd(II and Pt(II complexes with pyridine-2-carbaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (HFoTsc against HSV replication were evaluated on four HSV strains—two wt strains Victoria (HSV-1 and BJA (HSV-2 and two ACVR mutants with different tk gene mutations R-100 (TKA, HSV-1 and PU (TKN, HSV-2. The experiments were performed on continuous MDBK cells and four HSV 1 and HSV 2 strains were used, two sensitive to acyclovir and two resistant mutants. The five complexes of HFoTsc, [Pt(FoTscCl], [Pt(FoTsc(H2FoTsc]Cl2, [Pt(FoTsc2], [Pd(FoTsc(H2FoTsc]Cl2, and [Pd(FoTsc2], were found to be effective inhibitors of HSV replication. The most promising, active, and selective anti-HSV agent was found to be complex [Pt(FoTsc(H2FoTsc]Cl2. This complex could be useful in the treatment of HSV infections, since it is resistant to ACV mutants. PCR study of immediate early 300 bp ReIV Us1 region reveals that the complex [Pt(FoTsc(H2FoTsc]Cl2 specifically suppressed wt HSV-1 genome 2 hours after the infection, not inducing apoptosis/necrosis on the 8 hours after virus infection. The target was found to be most probably the viral, instead of the host cell DNA.

  12. Impurity Profiling to Match a Nerve Agent to Its Precursor Source for Chemical Forensics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Perez Acosta, Gabriel A.; Crenshaw, Michael D.; Wallace, Krys; Mong, Gary M.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2011-10-31

    Chemical forensics is an emerging field in homeland security that aims to attribute a weaponized toxic chemical or related material to its source. Herein, for the first time, trace impurities originating from a chemical precursor were used to match a synthesized nerve agent to its precursor source. Specifically, multiple batches of sarin and its intermediate were synthesized from two commercial stocks of methylphosphonic dichloride (DC) and were then matched by impurity profiling to their DC stocks from out of five possible stocks. This was possible because each DC stock had a unique impurity profile that, for the tested stocks, persisted through synthesis, decontamination, and sample preparation. This work may form a basis for using impurity profiling to help find and prosecute perpetrators of chemical attacks.

  13. An agent-based service-oriented integration architecture for chemical process automation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Luo; Weimin Zhong; Feng Wan; Zhencheng Ye; Feng Qian

    2015-01-01

    In reality, traditional process control system built upon centralized and hierarchical structures presents a weak response to change and is easy to shut down by single failure. Aiming at these problems, a new agent-based service-oriented integration architecture was proposed for chemical process automation system. Web services were dynamical y orchestrated on the internet and agent behaviors were built in them. Data analysis, model, op-timization, control, fault diagnosis and so on were capsuled into different web services. Agents were used for ser-vice compositions by negotiation. A prototype system of poly(ethylene terephthalate) process automation was used as the case study to demonstrate the validation of the integration.

  14. Chemical modification of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with possible application as asphaltene flocculant agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asphaltenes can cause enormous losses in the oil industry, because they are soluble only in aromatic solvents. Therefore, they must be removed from the petroleum before it is refined, using flocculant agents. Aiming to find new materials that can work as flocculant agents to asphaltenes, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were chemically modified through acid-base reactions using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) to increase their lipophilicity. Nanoparticle synthesis was performed using the co-precipitation method followed by annealing of these nanoparticles, aiming to change the structural phase. Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were tested by FTIR-ATR, XRD and TGA/DTA. In addition, precipitation onset of the asphaltenes was performed using modified and unmodified nanoparticles. These tests showed that modified nanoparticles have a potential application as flocculant agents used to remove asphaltenes before oil refining, since the presence of nanoparticles promotes the asphaltene precipitation onset with the addition of a small amount of non-solvent (author)

  15. Chemical modification of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with possible application as asphaltene flocculant agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, G.E.; Clarindo, J.E.S.; Santo, K.S.E., E-mail: geiza.oliveira@ufes.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCE/DQUI/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Souza Junior, F.G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoleculas

    2013-11-01

    Asphaltenes can cause enormous losses in the oil industry, because they are soluble only in aromatic solvents. Therefore, they must be removed from the petroleum before it is refined, using flocculant agents. Aiming to find new materials that can work as flocculant agents to asphaltenes, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were chemically modified through acid-base reactions using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) to increase their lipophilicity. Nanoparticle synthesis was performed using the co-precipitation method followed by annealing of these nanoparticles, aiming to change the structural phase. Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were tested by FTIR-ATR, XRD and TGA/DTA. In addition, precipitation onset of the asphaltenes was performed using modified and unmodified nanoparticles. These tests showed that modified nanoparticles have a potential application as flocculant agents used to remove asphaltenes before oil refining, since the presence of nanoparticles promotes the asphaltene precipitation onset with the addition of a small amount of non-solvent (author)

  16. NONDESTRUCTIVE IDENTIFICATION OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND EXPLOSIVES BY NEUTRON GENERATOR-DRIVEN PGNAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is now a proven method for the identification of chemical warfare agents and explosives in military projectiles and storage containers. Idaho National Laboratory is developing a next-generation PGNAA instrument based on the new Ortec Detective mechanically-cooled HPGe detector and a neutron generator. In this paper we review PGNAA analysis of suspect chemical warfare munitions, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of replacing the californium-252 radioisotopic neutron source with a compact accelerator neutron generator

  17. NONDESTRUCTIVE IDENTIFICATION OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND EXPLOSIVES BY NEUTRON GENERATOR-DRIVEN PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Twomey; A. J. Caffrey; D. L. Chichester

    2007-02-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is now a proven method for the identification of chemical warfare agents and explosives in military projectiles and storage containers. Idaho National Laboratory is developing a next-generation PGNAA instrument based on the new Ortec Detective mechanically-cooled HPGe detector and a neutron generator. In this paper we review PGNAA analysis of suspect chemical warfare munitions, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of replacing the californium-252 radioisotopic neutron source with a compact accelerator neutron generator.

  18. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL AGENTS ON BREAST TUMOR CELLS UNDER 24-HOUR INCUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Navruzov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of cytostatics is frequently limited due to their high toxicity and inadequate selectivity. This makes one search for adjuvant treat- ments to limit tumor growth and extent, to eliminate traditional chemotherapy sequels, and to ensure stable and prolonged remission. This investigation has revealed the specific features of using natural and recombinant cytokines in combination with chemical agents in therapy for malignancies. The findings open up new vistas for the treatment of malignancies with natural cytokines.

  19. The Steel Helmet Project: Canine Olfactory Detection of Low Concentrations of a Surrogate Chemical Warfare Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    The Steel Helmet project was meant to assess the feasibility of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) detector dog concept. A relatively benign organophosphate pesticide called dichlorvos was used as a surrogate for CWAs. Using conventional training techniques, U.S. Department of Defense military working dogs were taught to discriminate scent boxes containing dichlorvos from “vehicle” scent boxes. Experiment 1 appeared to show that two out of three subjects were capable of criterion accuracy (0.95...

  20. Comparison of Selected Methods for Individual Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Capoun; Jana Krykorkova

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the individual decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) and other hazardous substances. The individual decontamination applies to contaminated body surfaces, protective clothing and objects immediately after contamination, performed individually or by mutual assistance using prescribed or improvised devices. The article evaluates the importance of individual decontamination, security level for Fire and Rescue Service Units of the Czech Republic (FRS CR) and demons...

  1. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  2. Reactive chromophores for sensitive and selective detection of chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye-Mason, Greg; Leuschen, Martin; la Grone, Marcus; Wald, Lara; Aker, Craig; Dock, Matt; Hancock, Lawrence F.; Fagan, Steve; Paul, Kateri

    2004-08-01

    A new sensor for highly toxic species including chemical warfare (CW) agents has been developed. This sensor is based on a unique CW indicating chromophore (CWIC) developed by Professor Tim Swager at MIT. The CWIC was designed to be sensitive to the reactivity that makes these chemicals so toxic. Since it requires the reactivity of the agent to be detected, the CWIC technology has shown remarkable selectivity for nerve agent surrogates and some other highly toxic species, thereby demonstrating the potential to provide low false alarm rate detection. Since the chromophore has mini-mal fluorescence prior to reaction with an electrophilic and toxic chemical, the sensor acts in a dark field fluorescence mode. This provides the sensor with exceptional sensitivity and a potential to detect priority analytes well below levels detected by current hand held sensors. Finally, it is based on a simple optical detection scheme that enables small and rugged sensors to be developed and produced at a low enough cost so they can be widely utilized.

  3. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  4. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  5. Accelerating the degradation of green plant waste with chemical decomposition agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejun, Sun; Juntao, Zhang; Ying, Chen; Zongwen, Liao; Lin, Ruan; Cong, Liu

    2011-10-01

    Degradation of green plant waste is often difficult, and excess maturity times are typically required. In this study, we used lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose assays; scanning electron microscopy; infrared spectrum analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the effects of chemical decomposition agents on the lignocellulose content of green plant waste, its structure and major functional groups and the mechanism of accelerated degradation. Our results showed that adding chemical decomposition agents to Ficus microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust reduced the contents of lignin by 0.53%-11.48% and the contents of cellulose by 2.86%-7.71%, and increased the contents of hemicellulose by 2.92%-33.63% after 24 h. With increasing quantities of alkaline residue and sodium lignosulphonate, the lignin content decreased. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, after F. microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust was treated with chemical decomposition agents, lignocellulose tube wall thickness increased significantlyIncreases of 29.41%, 3.53% and 34.71% were observed after treatment with NaOH, alkaline residue and sodium lignosulphonate, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy showed that CO and aromatic skeleton stretching absorption peaks were weakened and the C-H vibrational absorption peak from out-of-plane in positions 2 and 6 (S units) (890-900 cm(-1)) was strengthened after F. microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust was treated with chemical decomposition agents, indicating a reduction in lignin content. Several absorption peaks [i.e., C-H deformations (asymmetry in methyl groups, -CH(3)- and -CH(2)-) (1450-1460 cm(-1)); Aliphatic C-H stretching in methyl and phenol OH (1370-1380 cm(-1)); CO stretching (cellulose and hemicellulose) (1040-1060 cm(-1))] that indicate the presence of a chemical bond between lignin and cellulose was reduced, indicating that the chemical bond between lignin and cellulose had been partially broken. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that Na

  6. Biotechnology in China II. Chemicals, energy and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, G.T. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Lab. Renewable Resources Engineering; Ouyang, Pingkai [Nanjing Univ. of Technology (China). College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering; Chen, Jian (eds.) [Jiangnan Univ., Wuxi (China). School of Biotechnology

    2010-07-01

    The biochemical engineering and biotechnology is now becoming the most important industry all over the world. China, as a country that has more than 1.3 billion people, has become one of the fastest growing countries in the world during the last several decades. Both the Chinese government and companies pay more and more attention on the research and the application of biotechnology. In the 11th five-year plan (2006-2010), Chinese government unprecedented enhanced the support on the biotechnology in both policy and finance. Currently, the biotechnology gains the most R and D funding in China. With the great support and the increasingly frequent exchanges from abroad, the biotechnology in China becomes more and more important in the world. In recognition of the enormous advances in biotechnology in China, we are pleased to present the second volume of Advances in Biochemical Engineering/ Biotechnology: Biotechnology in China II, edited by P. K. Ouyang, J. Chen and G. T. Tsao, relatively soon after the introduction of the first volume of this multivolume comprehensive books. Since the previous volume was extremely well accepted by the scientific community, we have maintained the overall goal of creating a number of chapters, each devoted to a certain topic by several Chinese research groups working in the field, which provide scientists in academia and public institutions with a well-balanced and comprehensive overview of this growing field in China. We have fully revised the volume and expanded it from bioreaction, bioseparation and bioremediation to more extensive issues in order to cover all recent developments in China into account as much as possible. The new volume of Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology: Biotechnology in China II is a comprehensive description of the state-of-the-art in China, and a guide to the understanding the work of Chinese biochemical engineering and biotechnology researchers. It is specifically directed to microbiologists

  7. Quantitative analysis of cadmium(II) and copper(II) by chemical stripping chronopotentiometry using dissolved oxygen as an oxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical stripping chronopotentiometry was applied to determine cadmium(II) and copper(II) by using oxygen as an oxidant. The calibration curve for cadmium(II) was linear within a range of (10-6--10-4) mol dm-3, while the calibration curve for copper(II) was distorted, since copper(II) ion in the sample solution also worked as an oxidant. The calibration curve for cadmium(II) in the presence of constant concentration of copper(II) ion was linear within the range of (10-5--2 x 10-4) mol dm-3. In order to determine copper(II) in the presence of cadmium(II), it was necessary to electrodeposit only copper by reducing at -0.5 V vs. SCE. The instrumentation used in this work was composed of only a simple voltage supply circuit, a stirrer, a y-t recorder and a pH-meter used as a high-impedance potentiometer. (author)

  8. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Carlos G; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities from the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to the reagent and the specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All the reagent stocks had impurity profiles that differentiated them from one another. This was demonstrated by building classification models with partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) and obtaining average stock classification errors of 2.4, 2.8, 2.8, and 11% by cross-validation for chloroform (7 stocks), thionyl chloride (3 stocks), acetone (7 stocks), and TEA (3 stocks), respectively, and 0% for a validation set of chloroform samples. In addition, some reagent impurities indicative of reagent type were found in the HN3 batches that were originally present in the reagent stocks and presumably not altered during synthesis. More intriguing, impurities in HN3 batches that were apparently produced by side reactions of impurities unique to specific TEA and chloroform stocks, and thus indicative of their use, were observed. PMID:27116337

  9. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities produced during the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reaction-produced impurities indicative of specific TEA and chloroform stocks were exclusively discovered in HN3 batches made with those reagent stocks. In addition, some reagent impurities were found in the HN3 batches that were presumably not altered during synthesis and believed to be indicative of reagent type regardless of stock. Supervised classification using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) on the impurity profiles of chloroform samples from seven stocks resulted in an average classification error by cross-validation of 2.4%. A classification error of zero was obtained using the seven-stock PLSDA model on a validation set of samples from an arbitrarily selected chloroform stock. In a separate analysis, all samples from two of seven chloroform stocks that were purposely not modeled had their samples matched to a chloroform stock rather than assigned a “no class” classification.

  10. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes derived from organic-chemical decontaminating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To process radioactive liquid wastes of organic-chemical decontaminating agents after being used for the decontamination of tanks, pipeways, pumps or like other equipments contaminated with radioactive materials in nuclear power plants. Method: Radioactive liquid wasted derived from decontaminating agents mainly composed of organic acids such as citric acid, formic acid, oxalic acid, hydroxyl acetic acid, ascorbic acid and gluconic acid are at first processed in a filter comprising porous filtering membranes, to eliminate suspended materials containing claddings not dissolved in the liquid wastes. As the porous filtering membranes, hollow thread filtering membranes, ceramic filters, sintered metal membranes, metal mesh filters or the likes may be used, the back-wash type hollow thread porous polymeric membranes being preferred. Then, the organic mateirals are effectively decomposed into gaseous dioxide and water through photolysis while blowing ozone under the irradiation of UV-rays to thereby decrease the amount of radioactive wastes significantly. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Impurity profiling to match a nerve agent to its precursor source for chemical forensics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Carlos G; Acosta, Gabriel A Pérez; Crenshaw, Michael D; Wallace, Krys; Mong, Gary M; Colburn, Heather A

    2011-12-15

    Chemical forensics is a developing field that aims to attribute a chemical (or mixture) of interest to its source by the analysis of the chemical itself or associated material constituents. Herein, for the first time, trace impurities detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and originating from a chemical precursor were used to match a synthesized nerve agent to its precursor source. Specifically, six batches of sarin (GB, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) and its intermediate methylphosphonic difluoride (DF) were synthesized from two commercial stocks of 97% pure methylphosphonic dichloride (DC); the GB and DF were then matched by impurity profiling to their DC stocks from a collection of five possible stocks. Source matching was objectively demonstrated through the grouping by hierarchal cluster analysis of the GB and DF synthetic batches with their respective DC precursor stocks based solely upon the impurities previously detected in five DC stocks. This was possible because each tested DC stock had a unique impurity profile that had 57% to 88% of its impurities persisting through product synthesis, decontamination, and sample preparation. This work forms a basis for the use of impurity profiling to help find and prosecute perpetrators of chemical attacks. PMID:22040126

  12. LANL organic analysis detection capabilities for chemical and biological warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansell, G.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.; Hollis, K.W.; Monagle, M.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analysis is the analytical arm for several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) research programs and nuclear materials processes, including characterization and certification of nuclear and nonnuclear materials used in weapons, radioactive waste treatment and waste certification programs. Organic Analysis has an extensive repertoire of analytical technique within the group including headspace gas, PCBs/pesticides, volatile organics and semivolatile organic analysis. In addition organic analysis has mobile labs with analytic capabilities that include volatile organics, total petroleum hydrocarbon, PCBs, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and high explosive screening. A natural extension of these capabilities can be applied to the detection of chemical and biological agents,

  13. Surface-immobilization of molecules for detection of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Indrani; Neelam

    2014-09-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale molecular assemblies with advanced functionalities is an emerging field. These systems provide new perspectives for the detection and degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The main concern in this context is the design and fabrication of "smart surfaces" able to immobilize functional molecules which can perform a certain function or under the input of external stimuli. This review addresses the above points dealing with immobilization of various molecules on different substrates and describes their adequacy as sensors for the detection of CWAs. PMID:24998209

  14. Scanning surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of chemical agent simulants on templated Au-Ag nanowire substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Miragliotta, J. A.; Wang, J.; Tyagi, P.; Maddanimath, T.; Gracias, D. H.; Papadakis, S. J.

    2009-05-01

    We report the results of scanning micro-Raman spectroscopy obtained on Au-Ag nanowires for a variety of chemical warfare agent simulants. Rough silver segments embedded in gold nanowires showed enhancement of 105 - 107 and allowed unique identification of 3 of 4 chemical agent simulants tested. These results suggest a promising method for detection of compounds significant for security applications, leading to sensors that are compact and selective.

  15. Copper(II) interactions with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents. I. Salicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumas, V; Brumas, B; Berthon, G

    1995-02-15

    Recently a growing body of evidence has accumulated on the beneficial effects of copper compounds toward various models of inflammation, and copper complexes of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be more effective in this respect than the parent agents. However, the origin of this activity remains unclear: The ability of NSAIDs to influence copper metabolism is still questionable, and apart from the claimed SOD-like activity of copper salts in vivo, relatively little is known about how copper-NSAID interactions may help regulate the inflammatory process. Before the potential role of copper-NSAID complexes versus inflammation can be elucidated, speciation studies are necessary (i) to analyze the overall influence of these drugs on copper metabolism and (ii) to discriminate the individual complexes likely to represent the active form of the drug in vivo. In this paper, copper(II) complex equilibria with salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids--and benzoic acid used as a reference--as well as the mixed-ligand complex equilibria generated by these binary systems and L-histidine [main low-molar-mass ligand of copper(II) in blood plasma] have been investigated under physiological conditions (37 degrees C; 0.15-M NaCl). Confirming previous observations by others, resulting simulated plasma copper distributions virtually rule out any quantitative influence of salicylate on copper tissue diffusion at therapeutic levels. Even though, as is presently shown, both salicylate and acetylsalicylate may favor the gastrointestinal absorption of copper, it seems unlikely that salicylate can exert its antinflammatory activity predominantly through copper complexation. The assertion that copper-NSAID complexes represent the active forms of NSAIDs therefore seems to be of limited significance for salicylate. PMID:7876837

  16. A Survey of Commercially Available Chemical Agent Instrumentation for Use in the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, J S; Alcaraz, A; Andresen, B D; Pruneda, C O

    2002-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Forensic Science Center (FSC) has extensive experience and capabilities in the analysis of chemical agents (CA) and related compounds as well as experience in identifying these materials in the field (i.e. samples such as those found in soils, liquids, gases). An open source survey was performed to determine viable, commercially available technology that can detect, in situ, CA and also meet field-use performance criteria as specified by the Program Management Consultant (PMC). The performance requirements of the technology include accuracy, reliability, integration onto robotics, and chemical detection sensitivities that meet required specifications. Not included in this survey are technologies and methodologies to detect CA decomposition products and related waste streams.

  17. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  18. Oak Ridge Multiple Attribute System (ORMAS) for Pu, HEU, HE, Chemical Agents, and Drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept for the Oak Ridge Multiple Attribute System (ORMAS) is a Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) time-dependent coincidence processor that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry and utilizes a small, lightweight, portable DT neutron (14.1 MeV) generator (1 x 108 n/s), proton recoil scintillation detectors, and a gamma ray detector (HPGe). ORMAS is based on detecting fission neutrons and gamma rays from inherent source fission, fission induced by the external DT source, gamma ray detection of natural emissions of uranium and Pu, and induced gamma ray emission by the interaction of the 14.1 MeV neutrons from the DT source. This system is uniquely suited for detection of shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU), plutonium and other special nuclear materials, and detection of high explosives (HE), chemical agents, and in some cases, drugs. It could easily be adjusted to utilize a trusted processor that incorporates information barrier and authentication techniques using open software and then be useful in some international applications for materials whose characteristics may be classified. Since it is based entirely on commercially available components, the entire system, including the NMIS data acquisition boards, can be built with commercial off the shelf components (COTS). ORMAS incorporates the PINS technology of A. J. Caffrey of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for HE, chemical agents, and drugs detection

  19. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet

  20. Overview of the joint services lightweight standoff chemical agent detector (JSLSCAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Barney; Popa, Mirela

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents a system-level description of the Joint Services Lightweight Standoff Chemical Agent Detector (JSLSCAD). JSLSCAD is a passive Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) based remote sensing system for detecting chemical warfare agents. Unlike predecessor systems, JSLSCAD is capable of operating while on the move to accomplish reconnaissance, surveillance, and contamination avoidance missions. Additionally, the system is designed to meet the needs for application on air and sea as well as ground mobile and fixed site platforms. The core of the system is a rugged Michelson interferometer with a flexure spring bearing mechanism and bi-directional data acquisition capability. The sensor is interfaced to a small, high performance spatial scanner that provides high-speed, two-axis area coverage. Command, control, and processing electronics have been coupled with real time control software and robust detection/discrimination algorithms. Operator interfaces include local and remote options in addition to interfaces to external communications networks. The modular system design facilitates interfacing to the many platforms targeted for JSLSCAD.

  1. Impregnation of chelating agent 3,3-bis-N,N bis-(carboxymethylaminomethyl-o-cresolsulfonephthalein in biopolymer chitosan: adsorption equilibrium of Cu(II in aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Vitali

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to impregnate the chelating agent 3,3-bis-N,N,bis-(carboxymethylaminomethyl-o-cresolsulfonephthalein in chitosan and to investigate the adsorption of Cu(II ions. The chemical modification was confirmed by FTIR spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The adsorption studies were carried out with Cu(II ions in a batch process and were shown to be dependent on pH. The adsorption kinetics was tested using three models: pseudo first-order, pseudo second order and intraparticle diffusion. The experimental kinetics data were best fitted with the pseudo second-order model (R² = 0.999, which provided a rate constant, k2, of 1.21 x 10-3 g mg-1 min-1. The adsorption rate depended on the concentration of Cu(II ions on the adsorbent surface and on the quantity of Cu(II ions adsorbed at equilibrium. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit for the equilibrium data in the concentration range investigated, with the maximum adsorption capacity being 81.0 mg of Cu(II per gram of adsorbent, as obtained from the linear equation of the isotherm. Desorption tests revealed that around 90% of the adsorbed metal was removed, using EDTA solution as the eluent. This result suggests that the polymeric matrix can be reused.

  2. Common and distinct mechanisms of induced pulmonary fibrosis by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Yu, Xiaoqing; Porter, Dale W; Battelli, Lori A; Kashon, Michael L; Ma, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis results from the excessive deposition of collagen fibers and scarring in the lungs with or without an identifiable cause. The mechanism(s) underlying lung fibrosis development is poorly understood, and effective treatment is lacking. Here we compared mouse lung fibrosis induced by pulmonary exposure to prototypical particulate (crystalline silica) or soluble chemical (bleomycin or paraquat) fibrogenic agents to identify the underlying mechanisms. Young male C57BL/6J mice were given silica (2 mg), bleomycin (0.07 mg), or paraquat (0.02 mg) by pharyngeal aspiration. All treatments induced significant inflammatory infiltration and collagen deposition, manifesting fibrotic foci in silica-exposed lungs or diffuse fibrosis in bleomycin or paraquat-exposed lungs on day 7 post-exposure, at which time the lesions reached their peaks and represented a junction of transition from an acute response to chronic fibrosis. Lung genome-wide gene expression was analyzed, and differential gene expression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting for representative genes to demonstrate their induced expression and localization in fibrotic lungs. Canonical signaling pathways, gene ontology, and upstream transcription networks modified by each agent were identified. In particular, these inducers elicited marked proliferative responses; at the same time, silica preferentially activated innate immune functions and the defense against foreign bodies, whereas bleomycin and paraquat boosted responses related to cell adhesion, platelet activation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and wound healing. This study identified, for the first time, the shared and unique genes, signaling pathways, and biological functions regulated by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents during lung fibrosis, providing insights into the mechanisms underlying human lung fibrotic diseases. PMID:26345256

  3. Common and distinct mechanisms of induced pulmonary fibrosis by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jie; Yu, Xiaoqing; Porter, Dale W.; Battelli, Lori A.; Kashon, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis results from the excessive deposition of collagen fibers and scarring in the lungs with or without an identifiable cause. The mechanism(s) underlying lung fibrosis development is poorly understood, and effective treatment is lacking. Here we compared mouse lung fibrosis induced by pulmonary exposure to prototypical particulate (crystalline silica) or soluble chemical (bleomycin or paraquat) fibrogenic agents to identify the underlying mechanisms. Young male C57BL/6J mice were given silica (2 mg), bleomycin (0.07 mg), or paraquat (0.02 mg) by pharyngeal aspiration. All treatments induced significant inflammatory infiltration and collagen deposition, manifesting fibrotic foci in silica-exposed lungs or diffuse fibrosis in bleomycin or paraquat-exposed lungs on day 7 post-exposure, at which time the lesions reached their peaks and represented a junction of transition from an acute response to chronic fibrosis. Lung genomewide gene expression was analyzed, and differential gene expression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting for representative genes to demonstrate their induced expression and localization in fibrotic lungs. Canonical signaling pathways, gene ontology, and upstream transcription networks modified by each agent were identified. In particular, these inducers elicited marked proliferative responses; at the same time, silica preferentially activated innate immune functions and the defense against foreign bodies, whereas bleomycin and paraquat boosted responses related to cell adhesion, platelet activation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and wound healing. This study identified, for the first time, the shared and unique genes, signaling pathways, and biological functions regulated by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents during lung fibrosis, providing insights into the mechanisms underlying human lung fibrotic diseases. PMID:26345256

  4. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Miller, R.L.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Tolbert, V.R.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Rickert, L.W.; Rogers, G.O.; Staub, W.P.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this Phase I report is to examined the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) in light of more detailed and more recent data than those included in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EPEIS). Two principal issues are addressed: (1) whether or not the new data would result in identification of on-site disposal at ANAD as the environmentally preferred alternative (using the same selection method and data analysis tools as in the FPEIS), and (2) whether or not the new data indicate the presence of significant environmental resources that could be affected by on-site disposal at ANAD. In addition, a status report is presented on the maturity of the disposal technology (and now it could affect on-site disposal at ANAD). Inclusion of these more recent data into the FPEIS decision method resulted in confirmation of on-site disposal for ANAD. No unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD have been identified. A review of the technology status identified four principal technology developments that have occurred since publication of the FPEIS and should be of value in the implementation of on-site disposal at ANAD: the disposal of nonlethal agent at Pine Bluff Arsenal, located near Pine Bluff, Arkansas; construction and testing of facilities for disposal of stored lethal agent at Johnston Atoll, located about 1300 km (800 miles) southwest of Hawaii in the Pacific Ocean; lethal agent disposal tests at the chemical agent pilot plant operations at Tooele Army Depot, located near Salt Lake City, Utah; and equipment advances. 18 references, 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baderna, Diego, E-mail: diego.baderna@marionegri.it [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Lomazzi, Eleonora [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Passoni, Alice [Unit of Analytical Instrumentation, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Pogliaghi, Alberto; Petoumenou, Maria Ifigeneia [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Bagnati, Renzo [Unit of Analytical Instrumentation, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Lodi, Marco [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Viarengo, Aldo; Sforzini, Susanna [Department of Sciences and Technological Innovation (DiSIT), University of Piemonte Orientale “A. Avogadro”, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Benfenati, Emilio [Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Fanelli, Roberto [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • An integrated approach was applied to study three foaming agents. • Several compounds not reported on the safety data sheets were identified by HRMS. • Environmental impacts were investigated with a battery of biological assays. • An ecotoxicological ranking of the products was obtained. - Abstract: The construction of tunnels and rocks with mechanized drills produces several tons of rocky debris that are today recycled as construction material or as soil replacement for covering rocky areas. The lack of accurate information about the environmental impact of these excavated rocks and foaming agents added during the excavation process has aroused increasing concern for ecosystems and human health. The present study proposes an integrated approach to the assessment of the potential environmental impact of three foaming agents containing different anionic surfactants and other polymers currently on the market and used in tunnel boring machines. The strategy includes chemical characterization with high resolution mass spectrometry techniques to identify the components of each product, the use of in silico tools to perform a similarity comparison among these compounds and some pollutants already listed in regulatory frameworks to identify possible threshold concentrations of contamination, and the application of a battery of ecotoxicological assays to investigate the impact of each foaming mixture on model organisms of soil (higher plants and Eisenia andrei) and water communities (Daphnia magna). The study identified eleven compounds not listed on the material safety data sheets for which we have identified possible concentrations of contamination based on existing regulatory references. The bioassays allowed us to determine the no effect concentrations (NOAECs) of the three mixtures, which were subsequently used as threshold concentration for the product in its entirety. The technical mixtures used in this study have a different degree of toxicity

  6. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An integrated approach was applied to study three foaming agents. • Several compounds not reported on the safety data sheets were identified by HRMS. • Environmental impacts were investigated with a battery of biological assays. • An ecotoxicological ranking of the products was obtained. - Abstract: The construction of tunnels and rocks with mechanized drills produces several tons of rocky debris that are today recycled as construction material or as soil replacement for covering rocky areas. The lack of accurate information about the environmental impact of these excavated rocks and foaming agents added during the excavation process has aroused increasing concern for ecosystems and human health. The present study proposes an integrated approach to the assessment of the potential environmental impact of three foaming agents containing different anionic surfactants and other polymers currently on the market and used in tunnel boring machines. The strategy includes chemical characterization with high resolution mass spectrometry techniques to identify the components of each product, the use of in silico tools to perform a similarity comparison among these compounds and some pollutants already listed in regulatory frameworks to identify possible threshold concentrations of contamination, and the application of a battery of ecotoxicological assays to investigate the impact of each foaming mixture on model organisms of soil (higher plants and Eisenia andrei) and water communities (Daphnia magna). The study identified eleven compounds not listed on the material safety data sheets for which we have identified possible concentrations of contamination based on existing regulatory references. The bioassays allowed us to determine the no effect concentrations (NOAECs) of the three mixtures, which were subsequently used as threshold concentration for the product in its entirety. The technical mixtures used in this study have a different degree of toxicity

  7. Thermodynamics of natural selection II: Chemical Carnot cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric

    2008-05-21

    This is the second in a series of three papers devoted to energy flow and entropy changes in chemical and biological processes, and to their relations to the thermodynamics of computation. In the first paper of the series, it was shown that a general-form dimensional argument from the second law of thermodynamics captures a number of scaling relations governing growth and development across many domains of life. It was also argued that models of physiology based on reversible transformations provide sensible approximations within which the second-law scaling is realized. This paper provides a formal basis for decomposing general cyclic, fixed-temperature chemical reactions, in terms of the chemical equivalent of Carnot's cycle for heat engines. It is shown that the second law relates the minimal chemical work required to perform a cycle to the Kullback-Leibler divergence produced in its chemical output ensemble from that of a Gibbs equilibrium. Reversible models of physiology are used to create reversible models of natural selection, which relate metabolic energy requirements to information gain under optimal conditions. When dissipation is added to models of selection, the second-law constraint is generalized to a relation between metabolic work and the combined energies of growth and maintenance. PMID:18367209

  8. A New Class of Contrast Agents for MRI Based on Proton Chemical Exchange Dependent Saturation Transfer (CEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, K. M.; Aletras, A. H.; Balaban, R. S.

    2000-03-01

    It has been previously shown that intrinsic metabolites can be imaged based on their water proton exchange rates using saturation transfer techniques. The goal of this study was to identify an appropriate chemical exchange site that could be developed for use as an exogenous chemical exchange dependent saturation transfer (CEST) contrast agent under physiological conditions. These agents would function by reducing the water proton signal through a chemical exchange site on the agent via saturation transfer. The ideal chemical exchange site would have a large chemical shift from water. This permits a high exchange rate without approaching the fast exchange limit at physiological pH (6.5-7.6) and temperature (37°C), as well as minimizing problems associated with magnetic field susceptibility. Numerous candidate chemicals (amino acids, sugars, nucleotides, heterocyclic ring chemicals) were evaluated in this preliminary study. Of these, barbituric acid and 5,6-dihydrouracil were more fully characterized with regard to pH, temperature, and concentration CEST effects. The best chemical exchange site found was the 5.33-ppm indole ring -NH site of 5-hydroxytryptophan. These data demonstrate that a CEST-based exogenous contrast agent for MRI is feasible.

  9. Animal model: damage to DNA in the Amazon Molly by physical and chemical agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.; Woodhead, A.D.; Hart, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Effects of acute exposure to ionizing radiation in humans are generally reflected in damage to the brain when doses exceed 3000 rad, to the gastrointestinal tract at doses from 500 to 3000 rad, and to the hematopoietic tissues at doses less than 500 rad. Deposition of radiation energy in cells causes physicochemical changes in DNA; since the information for all cellular physiologic processes is carried on DNA, damage to DNA may play a crucial role in injury to the cells and ultimately to pathologic changes in organs. The Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa, has an unusual mode of reproduction, which makes it eminently suitable for study of the in vivo effects of biologic damage to DNA caused by ionizing radiation. There is no genetic contribution from the male; sperm provides only the stimulus for egg development. The offspring of a single original female, all females, are clones with identical genotypes, so that tissue and cell transplants between members of a clone survive as long as the recipient animal. Cells taken from speicific tissues in donor fish can be treated in vitro, which allows precise physical and chemical measuremnts of the agent used. The cells are injected into homologous recipients, and the resulting lesions are scored in vivo a number of months later. Damage to DNA caused by ionizing radiation, by ultraviolet radition, and by certain chemicals results in tumor development and hematopoietic lesions; when known specific damage to DNA was reversed in vitro, the recipient group of fish showed no lesions. It is suggested that the fish model may be used to obtain information about the molecular effects, both physical and chemical, of injurious agents on animals. Cells garnered from specific tissues can be treated quite precisely; the damage can be measured; and lesions can be examined in vivo. The genetic homogeneity of the clone ensures that variation between the responses of individuals will be minimal and the experiments will be highly reproducible.

  10. Functionalized gold nanoparticle supported sensory mechanisms applied in detection of chemical and biological threat agents: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Smart sensors are needed for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. ► Smart sensors detect analytes with rapid speed, high sensitivity and selectivity. ► Functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can potentially smart sense threat agents. ► Functionalized GNPs support multiple analytical methods for sensing threat agents. ► Threat agents of all types can be detected using functionalized GNPs. - Abstract: There is a great necessity for development of novel sensory concepts supportive of smart sensing capabilities in defense and homeland security applications for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. A smart sensor is a detection device that can exhibit important features such as speed, sensitivity, selectivity, portability, and more importantly, simplicity in identifying a target analyte. Emerging nanomaterial based sensors, particularly those developed by utilizing functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a sensing component potentially offer many desirable features needed for threat agent detection. The sensitiveness of physical properties expressed by GNPs, e.g. color, surface plasmon resonance, electrical conductivity and binding affinity are significantly enhanced when they are subjected to functionalization with an appropriate metal, organic or biomolecular functional groups. This sensitive nature of functionalized GNPs can be potentially exploited in the design of threat agent detection devices with smart sensing capabilities. In the presence of a target analyte (i.e., a chemical or biological threat agent) a change proportional to concentration of the analyte is observed, which can be measured either by colorimetric, fluorimetric, electrochemical or spectroscopic means. This article provides a review of how functionally modified gold colloids are applied in the detection of a broad range of threat agents, including radioactive substances, explosive compounds, chemical warfare agents, biotoxins, and

  11. Functionalized gold nanoparticle supported sensory mechanisms applied in detection of chemical and biological threat agents: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K.K., E-mail: Upadhyayula.Venkata@epa.gov [Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE), MC-100-44, PO Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smart sensors are needed for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smart sensors detect analytes with rapid speed, high sensitivity and selectivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can potentially smart sense threat agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functionalized GNPs support multiple analytical methods for sensing threat agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threat agents of all types can be detected using functionalized GNPs. - Abstract: There is a great necessity for development of novel sensory concepts supportive of smart sensing capabilities in defense and homeland security applications for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. A smart sensor is a detection device that can exhibit important features such as speed, sensitivity, selectivity, portability, and more importantly, simplicity in identifying a target analyte. Emerging nanomaterial based sensors, particularly those developed by utilizing functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a sensing component potentially offer many desirable features needed for threat agent detection. The sensitiveness of physical properties expressed by GNPs, e.g. color, surface plasmon resonance, electrical conductivity and binding affinity are significantly enhanced when they are subjected to functionalization with an appropriate metal, organic or biomolecular functional groups. This sensitive nature of functionalized GNPs can be potentially exploited in the design of threat agent detection devices with smart sensing capabilities. In the presence of a target analyte (i.e., a chemical or biological threat agent) a change proportional to concentration of the analyte is observed, which can be measured either by colorimetric, fluorimetric, electrochemical or spectroscopic means. This article provides a review of how functionally modified gold colloids are applied in the detection of a broad

  12. Computational Investigations of Potential Energy Function Development for Metal--Organic Framework Simulations, Metal Carbenes, and Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioce, Christian R.

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional porous nanomaterials with a variety of applications, including catalysis, gas storage and separation, and sustainable energy. Their potential as air filtration systems is of interest for designer carbon capture materials. The chemical constituents (i.e. organic ligands) can be functionalized to create rationally designed CO2 sequestration platforms, for example. Hardware and software alike at the bleeding edge of supercomputing are utilized for designing first principles-based molecular models for the simulation of gas sorption in these frameworks. The classical potentials developed herein are named PHAST --- Potentials with High Accuracy, Speed, and Transferability, and thus are designed via a "bottom-up" approach. Specifically, models for N2 and CH4 are constructed and presented. Extensive verification and validation leads to insights and range of applicability. Through this experience, the PHAST models are improved upon further to be more applicable in heterogeneous environments. Given this, the models are applied to reproducing high level ab initio energies for gas sorption trajectories of helium atoms in a variety of rare-gas clusters, the geometries of which being representative of sorption-like environments commonly encountered in a porous nanomaterial. This work seeks to push forward the state of classical and first principles materials modeling. Additionally, the characterization of a new type of tunable radical metal---carbene is presented. Here, a cobalt(II)---porphyrin complex, [Co(Por)], was investigated to understand its role as an effective catalyst in stereoselective cyclopropanation of a diazoacetate reagent. Density functional theory along with natural bond order analysis and charge decomposition analysis gave insight into the electronics of the catalytic intermediate. The bonding pattern unveiled a new class of radical metal---carbene complex, with a doublet cobalt into which a triplet carbene

  13. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  14. Hematotoxicity response in rats by the novel copper-based anticancer agent: casiopeina II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo toxicity of the novel copper-based anticancer agent, casiopeina II (Cu(4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline)(glycine)NO3) (CII), was investigated. Casiopeinas are a family of copper-coordinated complexes that have shown promising anticancer activity. The major toxic effect attributed to a single i.v. administration of CII (5 mg/kg dose) in the rat was an hemolytic anemia (reduced hemoglobin concentration (HB), red blood cell (RBC) count and packed cell volume (PCV) accompanied by a marked neutrophilic leukocytosis) 12 h and 5 days after administration, attributed to a direct erythrocyte damage. Increased reticulocyte levels and presence of normoblasts in peripheral blood 5 days post-administration indicated an effective erythropoietic response with recovery at 15 days. Increase in spleen weight and the morphological evidence of congestion of the red pulp (RP) with erythrocytes (E) resulting in a higher ratio of red to white pulp (WP) was consistent with increased uptake of damaged erythrocytes by the reticuloendothelial system observed by histopathology and electron microscopy. Extramedullary hemopoiesis was markedly increased at 5 days giving further evidence of a regenerative erythropoietic response that had an effective recovery by 15 days. Morphological changes in spleen cellularity were consistent with hematotoxicity, mainly a reduction of the red pulp/white pulp ratio, increase in erythrocyte content at 12 h, and an infiltration of nucleated cells in the red pulp at 5 days, with a tendency towards recovery 15 days after administration. The erythrocyte damage is attributed to generation of free radicals and oxidative damage on the membrane and within cells resulting from the reduction of Cu(II) and the probable dissociation of the CII complex

  15. Mutagenic Effects of Some Chemical Agents in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water soaked wheat cv. NW 1014 seeds were treated with aqueous solutions (1 per cent) of 6 chemicals, namely, acid slurry, sodium carbonate, tri-sodium phosphate, sodium tri-polyphosphate, carboxy methylcellulose and sodium sulphate for 22h. Out of these chemicals, tri-sodium phosphate and carboxy methylcellulose recorded the highest mutation frequency (1.15 per cent), followed by sodium sulphate (1.00 per cent), sodium carbonate (0.85 per cent), sodium tri-poly phosphate (0.65 per cent) and acid slurry (0.0 per cent) in the M2 generation. The highest number of mutants was observed for late heading (47), followed by dwarf stature (36), white spike (7) and high tillering (6) in the M2 generation. On the basis of the number of high yielding mutants (M5), the mutagenic efficiency of sodium carbonate may be placed at the top rank, followed by sodium sulphate, tri-sodium phosphate, sodium tri-poly phosphate and carboxy methyl cellulose. One type of macro mutant (white spiked) was induced by tri-sodium phosphate whereas sodium carbonate generated 3 types of macro-mutants (large flag leaf, club shape spike and small grain ). The studies reveal that all the chemicals, except acid slurry, may be used as mutagenic agents in wheat. (author)

  16. Decomposition of 2-chloroethylethylsulfide on copper oxides to detoxify polymer-based spherical activated carbons from chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, S; Hofmann, J; Möller, A; Schrage, C; Giebelhausen, J M; Böhringer, B; Gläser, R

    2013-11-15

    For the decomposition of chemical warfare agents, a hybrid material concept was applied. This consists of a copper oxide-containing phase as a component with reactive functionality supported on polymer-based spherical activated carbon (PBSAC) as a component with adsorptive functionality. A corresponding hybrid material was prepared by impregnation of PBSAC with copper(II)nitrate and subsequent calcination at 673K. The copper phase exists predominantly as copper(I)oxide which is homogeneously distributed over the PBSAC particles. The hybrid material containing 16 wt.% copper on PBSAC is capable of self-detoxifying the mustard gas surrogate 2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES) at room temperature. The decomposition is related to the breakthrough behavior of the reactant CEES, which displaces the reaction product ethylvinylsulfide (EVS). This leads to a combined breakthrough of CEES and EVS. The decomposition of CEES is shown to occur catalytically over the copper-containing PBSAC material. Thus, the hybrid material can even be considered to be self-cleaning. PMID:24140529

  17. The chemosensitizing agent lubeluzole binds calmodulin and inhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Claudio; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Lovece, Angelo; Carrieri, Antonio; Pracella, Riccardo; Giannuzzi, Giulia; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Viale, Maurizio; Illario, Maddalena; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-06-30

    An affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method to estimate apparent dissociation constants between bovine brain calmodulin (CaM) and non-peptidic ligands was developed. The method was validated reproducing the dissociation constants of a number of well-known CaM ligands. In particular, the potent antagonist 125-C9 was ad hoc synthesized through an improved synthetic procedure. The ACE method was successfully applied to verify CaM affinity for lubeluzole, a well-known neuroprotective agent recently proved useful to potentiate the activity of anti-cancer drugs. Lubeluzole was slightly less potent than 125-C9 (Kd = 2.9 ± 0.7 and 0.47 ± 0.06 μM, respectively) and displayed Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition (IC50 = 40 ± 1 μM). Possible binding modes of lubeluzole to CaM were explored by docking studies based on the X-ray crystal structures of several trifluoperazine-CaM complexes. An estimated dissociation constant in good agreement with the experimental one was found and the main aminoacidic residues and interactions contributing to complex formation were highlighted. The possibility that interference with Ca(2+) pathways may contribute to the previously observed chemosensitizing effects of lubeluzole on human ovarian adenocarcinoma and lung carcinoma cells are discussed. PMID:27043269

  18. Novel Zinc(II Complexes of Heterocyclic Ligands as Antimicrobial Agents: Synthesis, Characterisation, and Antimicrobial Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S. Yamgar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel Zn(II metal complexes derived from three novel heterocyclic Schiff base ligands 8-[(Z-{[3-(N-methylaminopropyl]imino}methyl]-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one, 2-[(E-{[4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethylphenyl]imino}methyl]phenol, and (4S-4-{4-[(E-(2-hydroxybenzylideneamino]benzyl}-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one have been described. These Schiff base ligands and metal complexes are characterised by spectroscopic techniques. According to these data, we propose an octahedral geometry to all the metal complexes. Antimicrobial activity of the Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes was studied against Gram negative bacteria: E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens, Gram positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, and also against fungi, that is, C. albicans and A. niger. Some of the metal complexes show significant antifungal activity (MIC < 0.2 μg/mL. The “in vitro” data has identified [Zn(NMAPIMHMC2]·2H2O, [Zn(TMPIMP2]·2H2O, and [Zn(HBABO2]·2H2O as potential therapeutic antifungal agents against C. albicans and A. niger.

  19. Green Chemical Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Shahid, Robina

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science and technology of manipulating materials at atomic and molecular scale with properties different from bulk. Semiconductor QDs are important class of nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties owing to the quantum confinement effect. Size dependent optical properties make research on semiconductor QDs more attractive in the field of nanotechnology. Semiconductor QDs are usually composed of combination of elements from groups II–VI, III–V, or IV–VI ...

  20. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1979-10-30

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  1. Sulfomethylated lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-26

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the sulfomethylated lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  2. Deep Raman spectroscopy for the non-invasive standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izake, Emad L; Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Sundarajoo, Shankaran; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa

    2012-05-30

    Deep Raman spectroscopy has been utilized for the standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents from a distance of 15 m under real life background illumination conditions. By using combined time and space resolved measurements, various explosive precursors hidden in opaque plastic containers were identified non-invasively. Our results confirm that combined time and space resolved Raman spectroscopy leads to higher selectivity towards the sub-layer over the surface layer as well as enhanced rejection of fluorescence from the container surface when compared to standoff spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra that have minimal interference from the packaging material and good signal-to-noise ratio were acquired within 5 s of measurement time. A new combined time and space resolved Raman spectrometer has been designed with nanosecond laser excitation and gated detection, making it of lower cost and complexity than picosecond-based laboratory systems. PMID:22608458

  3. Pretreatment of highly turbid coal mine drainage by a chemical agent free filtration system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chunhui; He Xiong; Li Kaihe; Wu Dongsheng; Guo Yanrong; Wang Can

    2012-01-01

    A filtration system used without chemical agents for the pretreatment of turbid coal mine drainage is described in this paper.The influence of different aperture sizes and different motor speeds was investigated during the study.The experimental results show that for aperture diameters of 0.4,0.6,or 0.8 mm smaller apertures provide more complete filtration.Rotations of 12,20,28,or 40 r/min show that higher speeds give more efficient filtration.Suspended solids decreased in both particle size and concentration after the filtration.The separated slime can be directly reused as a fuel.Efficient filtration pretreatment systems for coal mine drainage were investigated and the economic feasibility is analyzed in this article.

  4. Design and evaluation of hyperspectral algorithms for chemical warfare agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, Dimitris; D'Amico, Francis M.

    2005-11-01

    Remote sensing of chemical warfare agents (CWA) with stand-off hyperspectral imaging sensors has a wide range of civilian and military applications. These sensors exploit the spectral changes in the ambient photon flux produced by either sunlight or the thermal emission of the earth after passage through a region containing the CWA cloud. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, to discuss a simple phenomenological model for the radiance measured by the sensor in the case of optically thin clouds. This model provides the mathematical framework for the development of optimum algorithms and their analytical evaluation. Second, we identify the fundamental aspects of the data exploitation problem and we develop detection algorithms that can be used by different sensors as long as they can provide the required measurements. Finally, we discuss performance metrics for detection, identification, and quantification and we investigate their dependance on CWA spectral signatures, sensor noise, and background spectral variability.

  5. Comparison of Selected Methods for Individual Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Capoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the individual decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA and other hazardous substances. The individual decontamination applies to contaminated body surfaces, protective clothing and objects immediately after contamination, performed individually or by mutual assistance using prescribed or improvised devices. The article evaluates the importance of individual decontamination, security level for Fire and Rescue Service Units of the Czech Republic (FRS CR and demonstrates some of the devices. The decontamination efficiency of selected methods (sorbent, glove and sponge, two-chamber foam device and wiping with alcohol was evaluated for protective clothing and painted steel plate contaminated with O-ethyl-S-(diisopropylaminoethyl-methylthiophosphonate (VX, sulfur mustard, o-cresol and acrylonitrile. The methods were assessed from an economic point of view and with regard to specific user parameters, such as the decontamination of surfaces or materials with poor accessibility and vertical surfaces, the need for a water rinse as well as toxic waste and its disposal.

  6. Biological effects of radiation and chemical agents with special regard to repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reasonably certain that the introduction or increase of pollutants in the environment can augment mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. These effects are operationally definable, but the genetic organization and the underlying mechanisms of DNA repair, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are so complex as to make the extrapolation of results from mutagenicity test data to carcinogenicity somewhat uncertain. The subject is reviewed. Recent discoveries in gene organization and expression include overlapping genes in bacteriophages, split genes, processing of RNA and splicing, translocation of genes in eukaryotes, inactivation of the X-chromosome in mammals, etc. Apart from the genetic regulation, plasmids, insertion sequences and mutators can additionally affect mutation frequency. Cancers due to gene mutations, viruses, chemicals and physical agents are known. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved. The value of mutagenicity test data is beyond question, but in view of the extraordinary complexities encountered our extrapolations will be more sound if the data have the underpinning of basic information. (author)

  7. Trapping of organophosphorus chemical nerve agents in water with amino acid functionalized baskets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yian; Dalkiliç, Erdin; Peterson, Paul W; Pandit, Aroh; Dastan, Arif; Brown, Jason D; Polen, Shane M; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2014-04-01

    We prepared eleven amino-acid functionalized baskets and used (1) H NMR spectroscopy to quantify their affinity for entrapping dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, 118 Å(3) ) in aqueous phosphate buffer at pH=7.0±0.1; note that DMMP guest is akin in size to chemical nerve agent sarin (132 Å(3) ). The binding interaction (Ka ) was found to vary with the size of substituent groups at the basket's rim. In particular, the degree of branching at the first carbon of each substituent had the greatest effect on the host-guest interaction, as described with the Verloop's B1 steric parameter. The branching at the remote carbons, however, did not perturb the encapsulation, which is important for guiding the design of more effective hosts and catalysts in future. PMID:24616086

  8. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baderna, Diego; Lomazzi, Eleonora; Passoni, Alice; Pogliaghi, Alberto; Petoumenou, Maria Ifigeneia; Bagnati, Renzo; Lodi, Marco; Viarengo, Aldo; Sforzini, Susanna; Benfenati, Emilio; Fanelli, Roberto

    2015-10-15

    The construction of tunnels and rocks with mechanized drills produces several tons of rocky debris that are today recycled as construction material or as soil replacement for covering rocky areas. The lack of accurate information about the environmental impact of these excavated rocks and foaming agents added during the excavation process has aroused increasing concern for ecosystems and human health. The present study proposes an integrated approach to the assessment of the potential environmental impact of three foaming agents containing different anionic surfactants and other polymers currently on the market and used in tunnel boring machines. The strategy includes chemical characterization with high resolution mass spectrometry techniques to identify the components of each product, the use of in silico tools to perform a similarity comparison among these compounds and some pollutants already listed in regulatory frameworks to identify possible threshold concentrations of contamination, and the application of a battery of ecotoxicological assays to investigate the impact of each foaming mixture on model organisms of soil (higher plants and Eisenia andrei) and water communities (Daphnia magna). The study identified eleven compounds not listed on the material safety data sheets for which we have identified possible concentrations of contamination based on existing regulatory references. The bioassays allowed us to determine the no effect concentrations (NOAECs) of the three mixtures, which were subsequently used as threshold concentration for the product in its entirety. The technical mixtures used in this study have a different degree of toxicity and the predicted environmental concentrations based on the conditions of use are lower than the NOAEC for soils but higher than the NOAEC for water, posing a potential risk to the waters due to the levels of foaming agents in the muck. PMID:25917697

  9. Investigation of chemical bath deposition of CdO thin films using three different complexing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khallaf, Hani [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Chen, Chia-Ta; Chang, Liann-Be [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Green Technology Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lupan, Oleg [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Department of Microelectronics and Semiconductor Devices, Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Boulevard, MD-2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Dutta, Aniruddha; Heinrich, Helge [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Centre, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Shenouda, A. [Central Metallurgical R and D Institute (CMRDI), Tebbin, P.O. Box 87, Helwan (Egypt); Chow, Lee, E-mail: Lee.Chow@ucf.edu [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Centre, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Chemical bath deposition of CdO thin films using three different complexing agents, namely ammonia, ethanolamine, and methylamine is investigated. CdSO{sub 4} is used as Cd precursor, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is used as an oxidation agent. As-grown films are mainly cubic CdO{sub 2}, with some Cd(OH){sub 2} as well as CdO phases being detected. Annealing at 400 deg. C in air for 1 h transforms films into cubic CdO. The calculated optical band gap of as-grown films is in the range of 3.37-4.64 eV. Annealed films have a band gap of about 2.53 eV. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of as-grown films reveals cadmium to oxygen ratio of 1.00:1.74 {+-} 0.01 while much better stoichiometry is obtained after annealing, in accordance with the X-ray diffraction results. A carrier density as high as 1.89 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and a resistivity as low as 1.04 x 10{sup -2} {Omega}-cm are obtained.

  10. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG (HOC2H4)2S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion

  11. Mass spectrometric study of selected precursors and degradation products of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papousková, Barbora; Bednár, Petr; Frysová, Iveta; Stýskala, Jakub; Hlavác, Jan; Barták, Petr; Ulrichová, Jitka; Jirkovský, Jaromír; Lemr, Karel

    2007-12-01

    Selected precursors and degradation products of chemical warfare agents namely N,N-dialkylaminoethane-2-ols, N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides and some of related N-quaternary salts were studied by means of electrospray ionization-multiple tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)). Proposed structures were confirmed with accurate mass measurement. General fragmentation patterns of these compounds are discussed in detail and suggested processes are confirmed using deuterated standards. The typical processes are elimination of alkene, hydrogen chloride, or water, respectively. Besides, elimination of ethene from propyl chain under specific conditions was observed and unambiguously confirmed using exact mass measurement and labelled standard. The potential of mass spectrometry to distinguish the positional isomers occurring among the studied compounds is reviewed in detail using two different MS instruments (i.e. ion trap and hybrid quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) analyzer). A new microcolumn liquid chromatography (microLC)/MS(n) method was designed for the cases where the resolution based solely on differences in fragmentation is not sufficient. Low retention of the derivatives on reversed phase (RP) was overcome by using addition of less typical ion pairing agent (1 mM/l, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid) to the mobile phase (mixture water : acetonitrile). PMID:18085550

  12. Surface studies of aminoferrocene derivatives on gold: electrochemical sensors for chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad A K; Long, Yi-Tao; Schatte, Gabriele; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    The cystamine conjugate [(BocNH)Fc(CO)CSA]2 was prepared by coupling cystamine with the N-protected ferrocene amino acid derivative BocHN-Fc-COOH and was fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cystamine conjugate forms films on gold substrates, which upon deprotection of the amino group, react with chemical warfare agent (CWA) mimics, upon which the redox properties of the Fc group are affected significantly. Cyclic voltammetry shows 50(5) mV anodic shifts of the Fc redox potentials after exposure to EtSCH2CH2Cl, a simulant for sulfur mustard HD (MA), and (NC)(EtO)2P(O), a simulant for nerve agent Tabun (NA). Exposure to MA and NA causes an increase in 2.3 and 4.5 ng mass, respectively, in QCM which indicates ca. 70% efficiency in Boc-deprotection. Ellipsometry measured a film thickness increase from 6(+/-1) A for the deprotected film to 10(+/-4) A for the film modified with MA and to 7(+/-2) A for the film modified with NA. AFM measurements show changes in the thickness and morphology of the film after reaction with MA and NA. The surfaces were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and clearly show the attachment of the cystamine conjugate on the surface and its reaction with CWA mimics. PMID:17319647

  13. Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Konieczko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Material and Methods: Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. Results: In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year were reported. Conclusions: The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene , and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definitione of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers. Med Pr 2013;64(2:181–192

  14. Transuranium element production. II. Chemical processing of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical processing described concerns small experimental targets irradiated in OSIRIS or EL-III and industrial targets irradiated in the CELESTIN reactors. In view of the difficulties encountered when processing highly irradiated targets (760MWd.kg-1) by liquid-liquid extraction (interface sludges leading to stable emulsion) the new processes developed are based on inverse phase chromatography. This technique applied to targets of americium 241, plutonium 239 and a plutonium mixture rich in isotope 242 has given tens of milligrams of curium 242, grams of americium 243 and curium 244 and micrograms of californium 252

  15. Chemical abundances in LMC stellar populations. II. The bar sample

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Swaelmen, M; Primas, F; Cole, A A

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares the chemical evolution of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to that of the Milky Way (MW) and investigates the relation between the bar and the inner disc of the LMC in the context of the formation of the bar. We obtained high-resolution and mid signal-to-noise ratio spectra with FLAMES/GIRAFFE at ESO/VLT and performed a detailed chemical analysis of 106 and 58 LMC field red giant stars (mostly older than 1 Gyr), located in the bar and the disc of the LMC respectively. We measured elemental abundances for O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Na, Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Y, Zr, Ba, La and Eu. We find that the {\\alpha}-element ratios [Mg/Fe] and [O/Fe] are lower in the LMC than in the MW while the LMC has similar [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] to the MW. As for the heavy elements, [Ba,La/Eu] exhibit a strong increase with increasing metallicity starting from [Fe/H]=-0.8 dex, and the LMC has lower [Y+Zr/Ba+La] ratios than the MW. Cu is almost constant over all metallicities and about 0.5 dex lower in the LMC than ...

  16. Effect of activation agents on the surface chemical properties and desulphurization performance of activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Flue gas pollution is a serious environmental problem that needs to be solved for the sustainable development of China.The surface chemical properties of carbon have great influence on its desulphurization performance.A series of activated carbons (ACs) were prepared using HNO3,H2O2,NH3·H2O and steam as activation agents with the aim to introduce functional groups to carbon surface in the ACs preparation process.The ACs were physically and chemically characterized by iodine and SO2 adsorption,ultimate analysis,Boehm titration,and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR).Results showed that the iodine number and desulphurization capacity of NH3·H2O activated carbon (AC-NH3) increase with both activation time,and its desulphurization capacity also increases with the concentration of activation agent.However,HNO3 activated carbon (AC-HNO3) and H2O2 activated carbon (AC-H2O2) exhibit more complex behavior.Only their iodine numbers increase monotonously with activation time.Compared with steam activated AC (AC-H2O),the nitrogen content increases 0.232% in AC-NH3 and 0.077% in AC-HNO3.The amount of total basic site on AC-HNO3 is 0.19 mmol·g-1 higher than that on AC-H2O.H2O2 activation introduces an additional 0.08 mmol·g-1 carboxyl groups to AC surface than that introduced by steam activation.The desulphurization capacity of ACs in simulate flue gas desulphurization decreases as follows: AC-NH3 > AC-HNO3 > AC-H2O2 > AC-H2O.This sequence is in accord with the SO2 catalytic oxidation/oxidation ratio in the absence of oxygen and the oxidation property reflected by TPR.In the presence of oxygen,all adsorbed SO2 on ACs can be oxidized into SO3.The desulphurization capacity increases differently according to the activation agents;the desulphurization capacity of AC-NH3 and AC-HNO3 improves by 4.8 times,yet AC-H2O increases only by 2.62 as compared with the desulphurization of corresponding ACs in absence of oxygen.

  17. Applying radiation approaches to the control of public risks from chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    risks from chemical and biological agents, the technical people involved should make certain that the major scientific considerations have a prominent role in the decision-making processes, not just assumptions, hypotheses and axioms adopted in lieu of facts

  18. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1

    OpenAIRE

    Qidi Zhu; Yulong Song; Gaisheng Zhang; Lan Ju; Jiao Zhang; Yongang Yu; Na Niu; Junwei Wang; Shoucai Ma

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the world's most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating) species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther tra...

  19. Statistical models for LWIR hyperspectral backgrounds and their applications in chemical agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, D.; Jairam, L. G.; Zhang, D.; Rossacci, M.

    2007-04-01

    Remote detection of chemical vapors in the atmosphere has a wide range of civilian and military applications. In the past few years there has been significant interest in the detection of effluent plumes using hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy in the 8-13μm atmospheric window. A major obstacle in the full exploitation of this technology is the fact that everything in the infrared is a source of radiation. As a result, the emission from the gases of interest is always mixed with emission by the more abundant atmospheric constituents and by other objects in the sensor field of view. The radiance fluctuations in this background emission constitute an additional source of interference which is much stronger than the detector noise. In this paper we develop and evaluate parametric models for the statistical characterization of LWIR hyperspectral backgrounds. We consider models based on the theory of elliptically contoured distributions. Both models can handle heavy tails, which is a key stastical feature of hyperspectral imaging backgrounds. The paper provides a concise description of the underlying models, the algorithms used to estimate their parameters from the background spectral measurements, and the use of the developed models in the design and evaluation of chemical warfare agent detection algorithms.

  20. Functionalized gold nanoparticle supported sensory mechanisms applied in detection of chemical and biological threat agents: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Venkata K K

    2012-02-17

    There is a great necessity for development of novel sensory concepts supportive of smart sensing capabilities in defense and homeland security applications for detection of chemical and biological threat agents. A smart sensor is a detection device that can exhibit important features such as speed, sensitivity, selectivity, portability, and more importantly, simplicity in identifying a target analyte. Emerging nanomaterial based sensors, particularly those developed by utilizing functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a sensing component potentially offer many desirable features needed for threat agent detection. The sensitiveness of physical properties expressed by GNPs, e.g. color, surface plasmon resonance, electrical conductivity and binding affinity are significantly enhanced when they are subjected to functionalization with an appropriate metal, organic or biomolecular functional groups. This sensitive nature of functionalized GNPs can be potentially exploited in the design of threat agent detection devices with smart sensing capabilities. In the presence of a target analyte (i.e., a chemical or biological threat agent) a change proportional to concentration of the analyte is observed, which can be measured either by colorimetric, fluorimetric, electrochemical or spectroscopic means. This article provides a review of how functionally modified gold colloids are applied in the detection of a broad range of threat agents, including radioactive substances, explosive compounds, chemical warfare agents, biotoxins, and biothreat pathogens through any of the four sensory means mentioned previously. PMID:22244163

  1. H II Regions and Protosolar Abundances in Galactic Chemical Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Carigi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos modelos de evolución química del disco galáctico con diferentes rendimientos dependientes de Z. Encontramos que una tasa moderada de pérdida de masa en estrellas masivas de metalicidad solar produce un excelente ajuste con los gradientes de C/H y C/O del disco de la Galaxia. El mejor modelo reproduce: las abundancias de H, He, C y O derivadas de líneas de recombinación en M17, las abundancias protosolares y las relaciones C/O-O/H, C/Fe-Fe/H y O/Fe-Fe/H derivadas de estrellas de la vecindad solar. La concordancia del modelo con las abundancias protosolares implica que el Sol se originó a una distancia galactocéntrica similar a la actual. El modelo para r = 3 kpc implica que una fracción de las estrellas en la dirección del bulbo se formó en el disco interno. Nuestro modelo reproduce la relación C/O-O/H derivada de regiones H II extragalácticas en galaxias espirales.

  2. Manganese(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazones as potential anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carolina G; da S Maia, Pedro Ivo; Souza, Paula C; Pavan, Fernando R; Leite, Clarice Q F; Viana, Rommel B; Batista, Alzir A; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Deflon, Victor M

    2014-03-01

    Through a systematic variation on the structure of a series of manganese complexes derived from 2-acetylpyridine-N(4)-R-thiosemicarbazones (Hatc-R), structural features have been investigated with the aim of obtaining complexes with potent anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity. The analytical methods used for characterization included FTIR, EPR, UV-visible, elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility measurement and single crystal X-ray diffractometry. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed in order to evaluate the contribution of the thiosemicarbazonate ligands on the charge distribution of the complexes by changing the peripheral groups as well as to verify the Mn-donor atoms bond dissociation predisposition. The results obtained are consistent with the monoanionic N,N,S-tridentate coordination of the thiosemicarbazone ligands, resulting in octahedral complexes of the type [Mn(atc-R)2], paramagnetic in the extension of 5 unpaired electrons, whose EPR spectra are consistent for manganese(II). The electrochemical analyses show two nearly reversible processes, which are influenced by the peripheral substituent groups at the N4 position of the atc-R(1-) ligands. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of these compounds against M. tuberculosis as well as their in vitro cytotoxicity on VERO and J774A.1 cells (IC50) was determined in order to find their selectivity index (SI) (SI=IC50/MIC). The results evidenced that the compounds described here can be considered as promising anti-M. tuberculosis agents, with SI values comparable or better than some commercial drugs available for the tuberculosis treatment. PMID:24188534

  3. Preparation and characteristics of chemical bath deposited ZnS thin films: Effects of different complexing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seung Wook [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Agawane, G.L.; Gang, Myeng Gil [Photonics Technology Research Institute, Department of Materials Science Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Moholkar, A.V. [Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416-004 (India); Moon, Jong-Ha [Photonics Technology Research Institute, Department of Materials Science Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hyeok, E-mail: jinhyeok@chonnam.ac.kr [Photonics Technology Research Institute, Department of Materials Science Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Yong, E-mail: j.y.lee@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thick ZnS thin films were successfully prepared by chemical bath deposition in a basic medium using less toxic complexing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of different complexing agents such as no complexing agent, Na{sub 3}-citrate and a mixture of Na{sub 3}-citrate and EDTA on the properties of ZnS thin films was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS thin film deposited using two complexing agent showed the outstanding characteristics as compared to those using no and one complexing agent. - Abstract: Zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films were prepared on glass substrates by a chemical bath deposition technique using aqueous zinc acetate and thiourea solutions in a basic medium (pH {approx} 10) at 80 Degree-Sign C. The effects of different complexing agents, such as a non-complexing agent, Na{sub 3}-citrate, and a mixture of Na{sub 3}-citrate and ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (EDTA), on the structural, chemical, morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ZnS thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the ZnS thin film deposited without any complexing agent was grown on an amorphous phase. However, the ZnS thin films deposited with one or two complexing agents showed a polycrystalline hexagonal structure. No secondary phase (ZnO) was observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that all ZnS thin films exhibited both Zn-S and Zn-OH bindings. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images showed that ZnS thin films deposited with complexing agents had thicker thicknesses than that deposited without a complexing agent. The electrical resistivity of ZnS thin films was over 10{sup 5} {Omega} cm regardless of complexing agents. The average transmittance of the ZnS thin films deposited without a complexing agent, those with Na{sub 3}-citrate, and those with a mixture of Na{sub 3}-citrate and EDTA was approximately 85%, 65%, and 70%, respectively, while the band gap

  4. A decontamination system for chemical weapons agents using a liquid solution on a solid sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decontamination system for chemical warfare agents was developed and tested that combines a liquid decontamination reagent solution with solid sorbent particles. The components have fewer safety and environmental concerns than traditional chlorine bleach-based products or highly caustic solutions. The liquid solution, based on Decon GreenTM, has hydrogen peroxide and a carbonate buffer as active ingredients. The best solid sorbents were found to be a copolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and n-lauryl methacrylate (Polytrap 6603 Adsorber); or an allyl methacrylate cross-linked polymer (Poly-Pore E200 Adsorber). These solids are human and environmentally friendly and are commonly used in cosmetics. The decontaminant system was tested for reactivity with pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (Soman, GD), bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (Mustard, HD), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by using NMR Spectroscopy. Molybdate ion (MoO4-2) was added to the decontaminant to catalyze the oxidation of HD. The molybdate ion provided a color change from pink to white when the oxidizing capacity of the system was exhausted. The decontaminant was effective for ratios of agent to decontaminant of up to 1:50 for VX (t1/2 ≤ 4 min), 1:10 for HD (t1/2 1/2 < 2 min). The vapor concentrations of GD above the dry sorbent and the sorbent with decontamination solution were measured to show that the sorbent decreased the vapor concentration of GD. The E200 sorbent had the additional advantage of absorbing aqueous decontamination solution without the addition of an organic co-solvent such as isopropanol, but the rate depended strongly on mixing for HD

  5. Reações tegumentares adversas relacionadas aos agentes antineoplásicos: parte II Adverse mucocutaneous reactions related to chemotherapeutic agents: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo Criado

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Os eventos e reações envolvendo quimioterapia são frequentes na prática oncológica. Agentes quimioterápicos são uma modalidade de tratamento amplamente utilizada. Efeitos colaterais podem variar de frequência e também ser confundidos com outras manifestações tegumentares do tratamento oncológico. Este artigo objetiva expor as informações sobre reações cutâneas à quimioterapia, em especial, aqueles para os quais o dermatologista é requisitado a emitir parecer e a comentar sobre a segurança e a viabilidade da readministração de uma droga específica. Os autores descrevem os aspectos associados a esses eventos, fazendo uma análise detalhada de cada um deles.Events and reactions involving chemotherapy are common in clinical oncology. Chemotherapeutic agents are widely used in therapy. Side effects range from the common to the rare and may be confused with other mucocutaneous manifestations resulting from the oncological treatment. The objective of this paper was to present data on skin reactions to chemotherapy, particularly those cases in which the dermatologist is requested to issue a report and asked to comment on the safety and viability of readministration of a specific drug. The authors describe aspects associated with these events, presenting a detailed analysis of each one of them.

  6. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  7. In vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diphenylarsinic acid [DPAs(V)], a degradation product of diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, both of which were developed as chemical warfare agents, was investigated in terms of its capacity to induce cytotoxic effects, numerical and structural changes of chromosomes, and abnormalities of centrosome integrity and spindle organizations in conjunction with the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. DPAs(V) had toxic effects on cultured human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells at concentrations more than 0.5 mM. Depletion of GSH reduced the toxic effects of DPAs(V) as well as dimethylarsinic acid [DMAs(V)] toxicity, while toxicity by arsenite [iAs(III)] was enhanced. Exogenously added sulfhydryl (SH) compounds, such as dimercapropropane sulfonate (DMPS), GSH, and dithiothreitol (DTT), enhanced the toxic effects of DPAs(V) while they suppressed iAs(III) toxicity. DPAs(V) caused an increase in the mitotic index, and also structural and numerical changes in chromosomes in V79 Chinese hamster cells. Abnormality of centrosome integrity in mitotic V79 cells and multipolar spindles was also induced by DPAs(V) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. These results suggested that highly toxic chemicals were generated by the interaction of DPAs(V) with SH compounds. Moreover, enhancements of toxicity by a combination of DPAs(V) and SH compounds suggested a risk in the use of SH compounds as a remedy for intoxication by diphenylarsenic compounds. Investigations on the effects of SH compounds on animals intoxicated with DPAs(V) are warranted

  8. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  9. HIGHLY SELECTIVE SENSORS FOR CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AGENTS, INSECTICIDES AND VOCS BASED ON A MOLECULAR SURFACE IMPRINTING TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract was given as an oral platform presentation at the Pittsburgh Conference, Orlando FL (March 5-9, 2006). Research described is the development of sensors based on molecular surface imprinting. Applications include the monitoring of chemical and biological agents and inse...

  10. Decomposition kinetics of dimethyl methylphospate(chemical agent simulant) by supercritical water oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bambang VERIANSYAH; Jae-Duck KIM; Youn-Woo LEE

    2006-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) has been drawing much attention due to effectively destroy a large variety of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization and complex industrial chemical. An important design consideration in the development of supercritical water oxidation is the information of decomposition rate. In this paper, the decomposition rate of dimethyl methylphosphonate(DMMP), which is similar to the nerve agent VX and GB(Sarin) in its structure, was investigated under SCWO conditions. The experiments were performed in an isothermal tubular reactor with a H2O2 as an oxidant. The reaction temperatures were ranged from 398 to 633 ℃ at a fixed pressure of 24 MPa. The conversion of DMMP was monitored by analyzing total organic carbon (TOC) on the liquid effluent samples. It is found that the oxidative decomposition of DMMP proceeded rapidly and a high TOC decomposition up to 99.99% was obtained within 11 s at 555℃. On the basis of data derived from experiments, a global kinetic equation for the decomposition of DMMP was developed. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental data.

  11. Structural, energetic and electrical properties of boron nitride nanotubes interacting with DMMP chemical agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ab initio DFT calculations were used for interaction of DMMP with BNNTs. • Full structural optimization was performed for several possible active sites. • Electronic structure of the energetically favorable complexes was analyzed. • The stability of the most stable complex was evaluated at ambient condition. • First-principles calculations showed that DMMP is strongly bound to the small diameter BNNTs. - Abstract: The adsorption of DMMP as an intoxicating chemical warfare agent onto the boron nitride nanotube has been investigated by using density functional theory calculations. Several active sites were considered for both interacting systems and full structural optimization was performed to accurately find the energetically favorable state. It is found that DMMP molecule prefers to be adsorbed strongly on the top site above the B atom of a (5, 0) BNNT with a binding energy of about −103.24 kJ mol−1 and an O–B binding distance of 1.641 Å. We have performed a comparative investigation of BNNTs with different diameters and the results indicate that the DMMP adsorption ability for the side wall of the tubes significantly decreases for higher diameters BNNTs. Furthermore, the adsorption properties of DMMP molecule onto the BNNT have been investigated using the ab initio MD simulation at room temperature. Our result showed that BNNTs facilitates the DMMP detection at ambient conditions for practical applications

  12. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System2 (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry3. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure

  13. Chemical Warfare Agents Analyzer Based on Low Cost, Room Temperature, and Infrared Microbolometer Smart Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Corsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced IR emitters and sensors are under development for high detection probability, low false alarm rate, and identification capability of toxic gases. One of the most reliable techniques to identify the gas species is absorption spectroscopy, especially in the medium infrared spectral range, where most of existing toxic compounds exhibit their strongest rotovibrational absorption bands. Following the results obtained from simulations and analysis of expected absorption spectra, a compact nondispersive infrared multispectral system has been designed and developed for security applications. It utilizes a few square millimeters thermal source, a novel design multipass cell, and a smart architecture microbolometric sensor array coupled to a linear variable spectral filter to perform toxic gases detection and identification. This is done by means of differential absorption spectroscopic measurements in the spectral range of the midinfrared. Experimental tests for sensitivity and selectivity have been done with various chemical agents (CAs gases and a multiplicity of vapour organic compounds (VOCs. Detection capability down to ppm has been demonstrated.

  14. Experimental study on detecting the explosives and chemical warfare agents by using neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some cases, some small security inspection systems for detecting explosives or chemical warfare agents are useful. By using the 252Cf neutron source, some thermal neutron captured γ rays of 10.83 and 6.6 MeV could be observed as the indicator of the existence of nitrogen and chlorine, respectively. As a result of the experiment, the detecting limit for TNT and the mustard gas is 200 g and 20 g, respectively. It is observed that by the use of LaBr3(Ce) scintillation crystal to detect the inelastic scattering γ rays of 5.1 MeV from nitrogen, of which the single escape and double escape peaks could be discriminated from the inelastic scattering peak of 4.43 MeV from carbon, since the energy resolution of LaBr3 is much better than that of other scintillators. In the case of nitrogen, it is better to detect the inelastic scattering γ rays induced by fast neutrons than to detect thermal neutron captured γ rays, since the counting rate is much higher. For the detection of mustard gas bomb, thermal neutron captured γ rays of 1.95 MeV is better than that of 6.6 MeV, since the interference of the background from the iron shell of the mustard gas bomb is smaller. These studies are useful for the establishment of the practical systems. (authors)

  15. NMIS With Gamma Spectrometry for Attributes of Pu and HEU, Explosives and Chemical Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, J. T.; Mattingly, J. K.; Mullens, J. A.; Neal, J. S.

    2002-05-10

    The concept for the system described herein is an active/passive Nuclear Materials Identification System{sup 2} (NMIS) that incorporates gamma ray spectrometry{sup 3}. This incorporation of gamma ray spectrometry would add existing capability into this system. This Multiple Attribute System can determine a wide variety of attributes for Pu and highly enriched uranium (HEU) of which a selected subset could be chosen. This system can be built using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components. NMIS systems are at All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center Institute of Technical Physics, (VNIITF) and measurements with Pu have been performed at VNIIEF and analyzed successfully for mass and thickness of Pu. NMIS systems are being used successfully for HEU at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The use of active gamma ray spectrometry for high explosive HE and chemical agent detection is a well known activation analysis technique, and it is incorporated here. This report describes the system, explains the attribute determination methods for fissile materials, discusses technical issues to be resolved, discusses additional development needs, presents a schedule for building from COTS components, and assembly with existing components, and discusses implementation issues such as lack of need for facility modification and low radiation exposure.

  16. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schuetze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Magnetic hydrophilic-lipophilic balance sorbent for efficient extraction of chemical warfare agents from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud D, Raghavender; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-02-19

    Magnetic hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (MHLB) hybrid resin was prepared by precipitation polymerization using N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and divinylbenzene (DVB) as monomers and Fe2O3 nanoparticles as magnetic material. These resins were successfully applied for the extraction of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their markers from water samples through magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction (MDSPE). By varying the ratios of monomers, resin with desired hydrophilic-lipophilic balance was prepared for the extraction of CWAs and related esters of varying polarities. Amongst different composites Fe2O3 nanoparticles coated with 10% PVP+90% DVB exhibited the best recoveries varying between 70.32 and 97.67%. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiencies, such as extraction time, desorption time, nature and volume of desorption solvent, amount of extraction sorbent and the effect of salts on extraction were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, linearity was obtained in the range of 0.5-500 ng mL(-1) with correlation ranging from 0.9911-0.9980. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were 0.5-1.0 and 3.0-5.0 ng mL(-1) respectively with RSDs varying from 4.88-11.32% for markers of CWAs. Finally, the developed MDSPE method was employed for extraction of analytes from water samples of various sources and the OPCW proficiency test samples. PMID:26814366

  18. Software algorithms for false alarm reduction in LWIR hyperspectral chemical agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, D.; Model, J.; Rossacci, M.; Zhang, D.; Ontiveros, E.; Pieper, M.; Seeley, J.; Weitz, D.

    2008-04-01

    The long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperpectral sensing modality is one that is often used for the problem of detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWA) which apply to both military and civilian situations. The inherent nature and complexity of background clutter dictates a need for sophisticated and robust statistical models which are then used in the design of optimum signal processing algorithms that then provide the best exploitation of hyperspectral data to ultimately make decisions on the absence or presence of potentially harmful CWAs. This paper describes the basic elements of an automated signal processing pipeline developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. In addition to describing this signal processing architecture in detail, we briefly describe the key signal models that form the foundation of these algorithms as well as some spatial processing techniques used for false alarm mitigation. Finally, we apply this processing pipeline to real data measured by the Telops FIRST hyperspectral (FIRST) sensor to demonstrate its practical utility for the user community.

  19. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions—II. parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, F.P.H. van; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and co

  20. Mass transfer with complex reversible chemical reactions. II: Parallel reversible chemical reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, G.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Beckum, van F.P.H.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1990-01-01

    An absorption model has been developed which can be used to calculate rapidly absorption rates for the phenomenon mass transfer accompanied by multiple complex parallel reversible chemical reactions. This model can be applied for the calculation of the mass transfer rates, enhancement factors and co

  1. Biotechnology for producing fuels and chemicals from biomass. Volume II. Fermentation chemicals from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villet, R. (ed.)

    1981-02-01

    The technological and economic feasibility of producing some selected chemicals by fermentation is discussed: acetone, butanol, acetic acid, citric acid, 2,3-butanediol, and propionic acid. The demand for acetone and butanol has grown considerably. They have not been produced fermentatively for three decades, but instead by the oxo and aldol processes. Improved cost of fermentative production will hinge on improving yields and using cellulosic feedstocks. The market for acetic acid is likely to grow 5% to 7%/yr. A potential process for production is the fermentation of hydrolyzed cellulosic material to ethanol followed by chemical conversion to acetic acid. For about 50 years fermentation has been the chief process for citric acid production. The feedstock cost is 15% to 20% of the overall cost of production. The anticipated 5%/yr growth in demand for citric acid could be enhanced by using it to displace phosphates in detergent manufacture. A number of useful chemicals can be derived from 2,3-butanediol, which has not been produced commercially on a large scale. R and D are needed to establish a viable commercial process. The commercial fermentative production of propionic acid has not yet been developed. Recovery and purification of the product require considerable improvement. Other chemicals such as lactic acid, isopropanol, maleic anhydride, fumarate, and glycerol merit evaluation for commercial fermentative production in the near future.

  2. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  3. Chemical analysis of bleach and hydroxide-based solutions after decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F B; Gravett, M R; Self, A J; Wang, M; Chua, Hoe-Chee; Hoe-Chee, C; Lee, H S Nancy; Sim, N Lee Hoi; Jones, J T A; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    Detailed chemical analysis of solutions used to decontaminate chemical warfare agents can be used to support verification and forensic attribution. Decontamination solutions are amongst the most difficult matrices for chemical analysis because of their corrosive and potentially emulsion-based nature. Consequently, there are relatively few publications that report their detailed chemical analysis. This paper describes the application of modern analytical techniques to the analysis of decontamination solutions following decontamination of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). We confirm the formation of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine following decontamination of VX with hypochlorite-based solution, whereas they were not detected in extracts of hydroxide-based decontamination solutions by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We report the electron ionisation and chemical ionisation mass spectroscopic details, retention indices, and NMR spectra of N,N-diisopropylformamide and N,N-diisopropylamine, as well as analytical methods suitable for their analysis and identification in solvent extracts and decontamination residues. PMID:24633585

  4. Chemical characteristics of negative-tone chemically amplified resist for advanced mask making: II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Kazumasa; Tanabe, Masahito; Inokuchi, Daisuke; Fukushima, Yuichi; Okumoto, Yasuhiro; Okuda, Yoshimitsu

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the film property and the lithographic performance of five commercialized NCARs. This report focused on Cr effect and PCD stability which are critical issues on advanced mask making. Results confirmed to solve the Cr effect by controlled dissolution rate of resist film. Furthermore, PCD was occurred by PAG moving and unsuitable reaction in the resist film standing delay time. This report suggests the strategy that was design of chemical structure for the next generation NCARs.

  5. Ni(II immobilization by bio-apatite materials: Appraisal of chemical, thermal and combined treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šljivić-Ivanović Marija

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal bones are natural and rich source of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP, which was found to be a good sorbent material for heavy metals and radionuclides. Various treatments can reduce the content of bone organic phase and improve sorption properties. In this study, sorption capacities of raw bovine bones (B and samples obtained by chemical treatment with NaOH (BNaOH, by heating at 400 oC (B400 and by combined chemical and thermal treatment (BNaOH+400, were compared, using Ni(II ions as sorbates. Maximum sorption capacities increased in the order BII sorption was found to be complex, with participation of both HAP and organic phase (when present. Sequential extraction analysis was applied for testing the stability of Ni(II ions sorbed by BNaOH+400. Majority of Ni(II was found in residual phase (65% at lower level of sorbent loading, while with the increase of sorbent saturation carbonate fraction became dominant (39 %. According to the results, BNaOH+400 can be utilized in water purification systems. As an apatite based material with low organic content and high efficiency for Ni(II sorption, it is also a good candidate for in-situ soil remediation, particularly at lower contamination levels. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43009

  6. Type II ligands as chemical auxiliaries to favor enzymatic transformations by P450 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Amélie; Fabra, Camilo; Huang, Yue; Auclair, Karine

    2012-11-26

    The remarkable ability of P450 enzymes to oxidize inactivated C-H bonds and the high substrate promiscuity of many P450 isoforms have inspired us and others to investigate their use as biocatalysts. Our lab has pioneered a chemical-auxiliary approach to control the promiscuity of P450 3A4 and provide product predictability. The recent realization that type II ligands are sometimes also P450 substrates has prompted the design of a new generation of chemical auxiliaries with type II binding properties. This approach takes advantage of the high affinity of type II ligands for the active site of these enzymes. Although type II ligands typically block P450 activity, we report here that type II ligation can be harnessed to achieve just the opposite, that is, to favor biocatalysis and afford predictable oxidation of small hydrocarbon substrates with P450 2E1. Moreover, the observed predictability was rationalized by molecular docking. We hope that this approach might find future use with other P450 isoforms and yield complimentary products. PMID:23129539

  7. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

    1999-09-01

    There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

  8. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  9. Multifunctional ultra-high vacuum apparatus for studies of the interactions of chemical warfare agents on complex surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fundamental understanding of the surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents is needed to fully predict the interaction of these toxic molecules with militarily relevant materials, catalysts, and environmental surfaces. For example, rules for predicting the surface chemistry of agents can be applied to the creation of next generation decontaminants, reactive coatings, and protective materials for the warfighter. Here, we describe a multifunctional ultra-high vacuum instrument for conducting comprehensive studies of the adsorption, desorption, and surface chemistry of chemical warfare agents on model and militarily relevant surfaces. The system applies reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to study adsorption and surface reactions of chemical warfare agents. Several novel components have been developed to address the unique safety and sample exposure challenges that accompany the research of these toxic, often very low vapor pressure, compounds. While results of vacuum-based surface science techniques may not necessarily translate directly to environmental processes, learning about the fundamental chemistry will begin to inform scientists about the critical aspects that impact real-world applications

  10. Equilibrium and thermodynamic studies of Cd (II) biosorption by chemically modified orange peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arbind; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-03-01

    Agricultural wastes have great potential of removing heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. Removal of Cd (II) from aqueous solutions onto chemically modified orange peel was studied at different pH, contact time, initial metal concentrations, adsorbent doses and temperature. Batch experiments were carried out under optimized conditions to evaluate the adsorption capacity of orange peel chemically modified with NaOH. The results showed that maximum adsorption capacity of modified orange peel, approximately 97.0%, was observed 3 mg 1⁻¹ of initial Cd(II) concentration pH 6 for 4 g 1⁻¹ adsorbent dosage, 200 min contact time and 298 K temperature. Adsorption efficiency of modified orange peel decreased with increase in temperature indicated exothermic nature of adsorption. A negative value of ΔG⁰(-8.59 kJ mol⁻¹) confirmed the feasibility of adsorption process and spontaneous nature of adsorption. A negative value of ΔH⁰ (-28.08 kJ mol⁻¹) indicated exothermic nature while a negative ΔS⁰ (-66.86 J K⁻¹ mol⁻¹) value suggested decrease in degree of freedom of the adsorbed species. The results showed that biosorption process of Cd(II) ions by chemically modified orange peel is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions. Chemically by modified orange peel investigated in the present study showed good potential for the removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions. PMID:27097438

  11. State-of-the-art of non-hormonal methods of contraception: II. Chemical barrier contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batár, István

    2010-04-01

    Chemical contraceptives mainly known as spermicides are one of the oldest types of contraceptives. The industrial revolution facilitated new developments, and they became a leading and widespread method. However, their use declined in the second half of the 20th century, and came under focus again only with the upsurge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The effectiveness of spermicides depends on the users' compliance and pregnancy rates vary widely: from 6/100 woman-year (with perfect use) to 26/100 woman-year (with typical use). Preparations consist of two components: an excipient (foam, cream, jelly, soluble film, suppository or tablet); and a chemical agent with spermicidal properties (acidic compound, microbicidal agent, detergent). The most widely used active agent has been the surface active (detergent) nonoxynol-9 (N-9). Based on their mode of action (surfactant effect of detergents, enzymatic action of microbicides on cell metabolism) spermicides were thought to provide protection against STIs including HIV. Recent studies have, however, shown that detergents may actually increase the risk. Because of this, there is an urgent need for a suitable non-detergent spermicide, and research should focus on developing new compounds to replace N-9 and other agents having similar undesired effects. This paper reviews the latest studies reporting results on these recent developments. PMID:20055729

  12. Nanoparticle-based optical biosensors for the direct detection of organophosphate chemical warfare agents and pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurotoxic organophosphates (OP) have found widespread use in the environment for insect control. In addition, there is the increasing threat of use of OP based chemical warfare agents in both ground based warfare and terrorist attacks. Together, these trends necessitate the development of simple and specific methods for discriminative detection of ultra low quantities of OP neurotoxins. In our previous investigations a new biosensor for the direct detection of organophosphorus neurotoxins was pioneered. In this system, the enzymatic hydrolysis of OP neurotoxins by organophosphate hydrolase (OPH) generated two protons in each hydrolytic turnover through reactions in which P-X bonds are cleaved. The sensitivity of this biosensor was limited due to the potentiometric method of detection. Recently, it was reported that a change in fluorescence properties of a fluorophore in the vicinity of gold nanoparticles might be used for detection of nanomolar concentrations of DNA oligonucleotides. The detection strategy was based on the fact that an enhancement or quenching of fluorescence intensity is a function of the distances between the gold nanoparticle and fluorophore. While these reports have demonstrated the use of nanoparticle-based sensors for the detection of target DNA, we observed that the specificity of enzyme-substrate interactions could be exploited in similar systems. To test the feasibility of this approach, OPH-gold nanoparticle conjugates were prepared, then incubated with a fluorescent enzyme inhibitor or decoy. The fluorescence intensity of the decoy was sensitive to the proximity of the gold nanoparticle, and thus could be used to indicate that the decoy was bound to the OPH. Then different paraoxon concentrations were introduced to the OPH-nanoparticle-conjugate-decoy mixtures, and normalized ratio of fluorescence intensities were measured. The greatest sensitivity to paraoxon was obtained when decoys and OPH-gold nanoparticle conjugates were present at

  13. A chemically labeled cytotoxic agent: Two-photon fluorophore for optical tracking of cellular pathway in chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Krebs, Linda J.; Al-Nuri, Mohammed; Pudavar, Haridas E.; Ghosal, Saswati; Liebow, Charles; Nagy, Attila A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Prasad, Paras N.

    1999-01-01

    Chemotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of cancers. However, the mechanism of action of many of these agents is not well understood. We present the synthesis of a two-photon fluorophore (C625) and its biological application when chemically linked to a chemotherapeutic agent (AN-152). By using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy, the drug:fluorophore conjugate can be observed directly as it interacts with receptor-positive cell lines. The results of this project visually show the recep...

  14. Preliminary screening of alternative technologies to incineration for treatment of chemical-agent-contaminated soil, Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shem, L.M.; Rosenblatt, D.H.; Smits, M.P.; Wilkey, P.L.; Ballou, S.W.

    1995-12-01

    In support of the U.S. Army`s efforts to determine the best technologies for remediation of soils, water, and structures contaminated with pesticides and chemical agents, Argonne National Laboratory has reviewed technologies for treating soils contaminated with mustard, lewisite, sarin, o-ethyl s-(2- (diisopropylamino)ethyl)methyl-phosphonothioate (VX), and their breakdown products. This report focuses on assessing alternatives to incineration for dealing with these contaminants. For each technology, a brief description is provided, its suitability and constraints on its use are identified, and its overall applicability for treating the agents of concern is summarized. Technologies that merit further investigation are identified.

  15. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer,, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing non-classical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore non-classical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry and with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-treat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanodelivery particles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also reflect our optimism that the next generation of platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  16. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing nonclassical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown, and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this Review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore nonclassical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry or with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-threat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanoparticles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations, including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers, will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also will reflect our optimism that the next generation of approved platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  17. Semi-continuous high speed gas analysis of generated vapors of chemical warfare agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trap, H.C.; Langenberg, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented for the continuous analysis of generated vapors of the nerve agents soman and satin and the blistering agent sulfur mustard. By using a gas sampling valve and a very short (15 cm) column connected to an on-column injector with a 'standard length' column, the system can either b

  18. Direct synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose and their performance as NMR contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Delmarcio Gomes; Hiroshi Toma, Sergio; de Melo, Fernando Menegatti; Carvalho, Larissa Vieira C.; Magalhães, Alvicler; Sabadini, Edvaldo; dos Santos, Antônio Domingues; Araki, Koiti; Toma, e. Henrique E.

    2016-01-01

    Iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has been successfully employed in the synthesis of hydrophylic magnetite nanoparticles stabilized with a biopolymer coating, aiming applications in NMR imaging. The new method encompasses a convenient one-step synthetic procedure, allowing a good size control and yielding particles of about 10 nm (core size). In addition to the biocompatibility, the nanoparticles have promoted a drastic reduction in the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water protons. The relaxivity rates have been investigated as a function of the nanoparticles concentration, showing a better performance in relation to the common NMR contrast agents available in the market.

  19. The effect of biological and chemical control agents on the health status of the very early potato cultivar Rosara

    OpenAIRE

    Cwalina-Ambroziak Bożena; Damszel Marta Maria; Głosek-Sobieraj Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The external appearance and quality of table potatoes are determined, among other factors, by the health status of the plants during the growing season. Chemical control methods are often combined with biocontrol agents to effectively fight potato pathogens. Potatoes of the very early cultivar Rosara were grown in experimental plots. The plots were located in Tomaszkowo (NE Poland, 2007-2009). The experiment involved the following treatments: 1) biological control − mycorrhizal Glomus spp. in...

  20. Indirect complexometric determination of mercury(II) using potassium bromide as selective masking agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complexometric method for the determination of mercury in presence of other metal ions based on the selective masking ability of potassium bromide towards mercury is described. Mercury(II) present in a given sample solution is first complexed with a known excess of EDTA and the surplus EDTA is titrated against zinc sulfate solution at pH 5-6 using xylenol orange as the indicator. A known excess of 10 % solution of potassium bromide is then added and the EDTA released from Hg-EDTA complex is titrated against standard zinc sulfate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 8 mg to 250 mg of mercury(II) with a relative error ±0.28 % and standard deviations /leg 0.5 mg. The interference of various ions is studied. This method was applied to the determination of mercury(II) in its alloys. (author)

  1. How Do I Know? A Guide to the Selection of Personal Protective Equipment for Use in Responding to A Release of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, C.B.

    1999-05-01

    An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with an HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and monitoring devices used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel.

  2. EcoBot-II: An artificial agent with a natural metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Melhuish

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the development of the robot EcoBot-II, which exhibits a primitive form of artificial symbiosis. Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs were used as the onboard energy supply, which consisted of bacterial cultures from sewage sludge and employed oxygen from free air for oxidation at the cathode. EcoBot-II was able to perform sensing, information processing, communication and actuation when fed (amongst other substrates with flies. This is the first robot in the world, to utilise unrefined substrate, oxygen from free air and exhibit four different types of behaviour.

  3. Removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemically modified chitosan namely epichlorohydrin cross-linked xanthate chitosan (ECXCs) has been used for the removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous medium. The influence of various operating parameters such as pH, temperature, sorbent dosage, initial concentration of Cu(II) ions and contact time on the adsorption capacity of ECXCs has been investigated. Thermodynamic parameters namely ΔGo, ΔHo and ΔSo of the Cu(II) adsorption process have been calculated. Differential anodic stripping voltammetric technique was used to determine the concentration of Cu(II) in the test solution before and after adsorption. The nature of the possible adsorbent-metal ion interactions was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The studies showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) on ECXCs strongly depends on pH and temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 5.0 and the adsorption capacity of ECXCs increased with increasing temperature indicating the endothermic nature of adsorption process. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption equations were used to fit the experimental data. The adsorption process is found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 43.47 mg g-1 from the Langmuir isotherm model at 50 deg. C. During desorption studies 97-100% of adsorbed copper ion is released into solution in presence of 1N EDTA, HCl and H2SO4.

  4. The importance of chemical components in cleaning agents for the indoor environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejrup, Karl Ventzel

    concentrations of surface active agents in combination with other compounds affect the tearfilm and the mucous membranes of the airways means that it is impossible to assess the importance of the concentrations found here. Moreover, there is a lack of knowledge about the amounts o surface active agents other...... VOCs. In one experiment, the concentration of nonpolar VOCs in the breathing zone of a person who treated the floor in a large climate chamber (45 m3) using a water based polish product was found to be 3,9 mg/m3. Use of scented cleaning agents usually means that odour thresholds of some compounds are...... exceeded, which means that the perception of the air in the cleaned room is changed and the indoor air quality is affected.The group of polar VOCs consists of the different water miscible solvents frequently used in cleaning agents to improve the properties of the products. The two wash and vax products...

  5. Role of chelating agent in chemical and fluorescent properties of SnO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-Bo; Wang, Shi-Fa; Ding, Qing-Ping; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Wan-Guo; Xiang, Xia; Li, Zhi-Jie; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2013-05-01

    A modified Polyacrylamide gel route is applied to synthesize SnO2 nanoparticles. High-quality SnO2 nanoparticles with a uniform size are prepared using different chelating agents. The average particle size of the samples is found to depend on the choice of the chelating agent. The photoluminescence spectrum detected at λex = 230 nm shows a new peak located at 740 nm due to the surface defect level distributed at the nanoparticle boundaries.

  6. Ruthenium (II) complexes of thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, biosensor applications and evaluation as antimicrobial agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Hatice [Dokuz Eylul University, The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Guler, Emine [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Yavuz, Murat, E-mail: myavuz@dicle.edu.tr [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Dicle University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 21280 Diyarbakir (Turkey); Ozturk, Nurdan; Kose Yaman, Pelin [Dokuz Eylul University, The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Subasi, Elif; Sahin, Elif [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey); Timur, Suna [Ege University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Ege University, Institute on Drug Abuse, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science (BATI), 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    A conformationally rigid half-sandwich organoruthenium (II) complex [(η{sup 6}-p-cymene)RuClTSC{sup N–S}]Cl, (1) and carbonyl complex [Ru(CO)Cl(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}TSC{sup N–S}] (2) have been synthesized from the reaction of [{(η"6-p-cymene)RuCl}{sub 2}(μ-Cl){sub 2}] and [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}] with thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazon (TSC) respectively and both novel ruthenium (II) complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. The peripheral TSC in the complexes acts as an electrochemical coupling unit providing the ability to carry out electrochemical deposition (ED) and to form an electro-deposited film on a graphite electrode surface. The biosensing applicability of complexes 1 and 2 was investigated by using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. Electrochemical measurements at − 0.9 V versus Ag/AgCl electrode by following the ED Ru(II) reduction/oxidation due to from the enzyme activity, in the presence of glucose substrate. The designed biosensor showed a very good linearity for 0.01–0.5 mM glucose. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of complexes 1 and 2 were also investigated against nine bacterial strains and one fungus by the disc diffusion test method. No activity was observed against the Gram-negative strains and fungus, whereas complex 1 showed moderate antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains. - Highlights: • Novel Ru (II) thiosemicarbazone complexes were synthesized and characterized. • Electrochemical depositions were performed. • Rigid half-sandwich Ru (II) complex showed enhanced antibacterial activity.

  7. Ruthenium (II) complexes of thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, biosensor applications and evaluation as antimicrobial agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conformationally rigid half-sandwich organoruthenium (II) complex [(η6-p-cymene)RuClTSCN–S]Cl, (1) and carbonyl complex [Ru(CO)Cl(PPh3)2TSCN–S] (2) have been synthesized from the reaction of [{(η6-p-cymene)RuCl}2(μ-Cl)2] and [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(PPh3)3] with thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazon (TSC) respectively and both novel ruthenium (II) complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. The peripheral TSC in the complexes acts as an electrochemical coupling unit providing the ability to carry out electrochemical deposition (ED) and to form an electro-deposited film on a graphite electrode surface. The biosensing applicability of complexes 1 and 2 was investigated by using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. Electrochemical measurements at − 0.9 V versus Ag/AgCl electrode by following the ED Ru(II) reduction/oxidation due to from the enzyme activity, in the presence of glucose substrate. The designed biosensor showed a very good linearity for 0.01–0.5 mM glucose. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of complexes 1 and 2 were also investigated against nine bacterial strains and one fungus by the disc diffusion test method. No activity was observed against the Gram-negative strains and fungus, whereas complex 1 showed moderate antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains. - Highlights: • Novel Ru (II) thiosemicarbazone complexes were synthesized and characterized. • Electrochemical depositions were performed. • Rigid half-sandwich Ru (II) complex showed enhanced antibacterial activity

  8. ORAL HYPOGLYCAEMIC AGENTS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgaprasad M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic globally. The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014, the rise seen more rapidly in developing and under developed countries. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM being the most common type, accounting for an estimated 85-95% of all diabetes cases. Diabetes remains a major cause of blindness, renal failure, and cardiovascular events including heart attacks, stroke and limb amputations. 1 Being an heterogeneous disorder, many adults with T2DM have difficulty controlling their blood sugar levels and associated complications as most of available antidiabetic agents aim to achieve only normoglycaemia and relieve diabetes symptoms, such as polydipsia, polyuria, weight loss, ketoacidosis while the longterm goals to prevent the development of or slow the progression of longterm complications of the disease is often unaddressed, therefore, there remains, a significant unmet demand for new agents that will help diabetic patients achieve treatment targets without increasing the risk for weight gain or hypoglycaemia. Among the new classes of oral agents, SGLT-2 inhibitors and mTOT insulin sensitisers appear to hold some good promise. However, recent articles published describing its adverse effect profile of SGLT-2 inhibitors had put a question mark on its utility. In this article, we have reviewed the plethora of available OHAs along with the newer OHAs for managing T2DM optimally.

  9. Toxins as weapons of mass destruction. A comparison and contrast with biological-warfare and chemical-warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J M

    2001-09-01

    Toxins are toxic chemical compounds synthesized in nature by living organisms. Classifiable by molecular weight, source, preferred targets in the body, and mechanism of action, they include the most potent poisons on the planet, although considerations of production, weaponization, delivery, environmental stability, and host factors place practical limits on their use as WMD. The two most important toxin threats on the battlefield or in bioterrorism are probably botulinum toxin (a series of seven serotypes, of which botulinum toxin A is the most toxic for humans) and SEB, an incapacitating toxin. Ricin and the trichothecene mycotoxins, including T-2 mycotoxin, are of lesser concern but are still potential threats. Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin, ricin and trichothecene mycotoxins are membrane-damaging proteins, and SEB is a superantigen capable of massive nonspecific activation of the immune system. The clinical intoxications resulting from exposure to and absorption (usually by inhalation) of these agents reflect their underlying pathophysiology. Because of the hybrid nature of toxins, they have sometimes been considered CW agents and sometimes BW agents. The current trend seems to be to emphasize their similarities to living organisms and their differences from CW agents, but examination of all three groups relative to a number of factors reveals both similarities and differences between toxins and each of the other two categories of non-nuclear unconventional WMD. The perspective that groups toxins with BW agents is logical and very useful for research and development and for administrative and treaty applications, but for medical education and casualty assessment, there are real advantages in clinician use of assessment techniques that emphasize the physicochemical behavior of these nonliving, nonreplicating, intransmissible chemical poisons. PMID:11577702

  10. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  11. In vivo phase II-enzymes inducers, as potential chemopreventive agents, based on the chalcone and furoxan skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Mauricio; Mastandrea, Ignacio; Otero, Gabriel; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2016-04-15

    Cancer chemoprevention involves prevention/delay/reverse of the carcinogenic process through administration of cancer chemopreventive agents (CCA). Compounds which are able to induce detoxification-enzymes, especially monofunctional phase II enzymes, have become in excellent approaches for new CCA. Herein, we report the synthesis of new furoxanyl chalcone-like hybrid compounds as CCA. In vitro studies showed that phenylfuroxanyl derivatives 6 and 9 displayed the best activities being 9 the greatest monofunctional-inducer. Additionally, compounds were non-mutagenic against TA98 Salmonella typhimurium strain (Ames test) and could be used in the prevention of the progression of pre-malignant lesions for their cytotoxic activity against tumoral cells. In vivo proof of concept showed increment on phase II-enzymes activities in liver, colon and mammary gland having derivative 9 the best induction profiles. We probed Nrf2 nuclear translocation is operative for both compounds allowing to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes. PMID:26970663

  12. Palladium(II) Complexes of NS Donor Ligands Derived from Steroidal Thiosemicarbazones as Antibacterial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah M. Asiri; Khan, Salman A

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the antibacterial activity of some new steroidal thiosemicarbazones and their Pd(II) metal complexes were prepared by the reaction of the thiosemicarbazones with [Pd(DMSO)2Cl2]. The steroidal thiosemicarbazones were prepared by the reaction of thiosemicarbazides with a steroidal ketone. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FAB mass spectroscopic methods, elemental analyses and TGA analysis. The antibacterial activity of these compounds...

  13. Ruthenium (II) complexes of thiosemicarbazone: synthesis, biosensor applications and evaluation as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Hatice; Guler, Emine; Yavuz, Murat; Ozturk, Nurdan; Kose Yaman, Pelin; Subasi, Elif; Sahin, Elif; Timur, Suna

    2014-11-01

    A conformationally rigid half-sandwich organoruthenium (II) complex [(η(6)-p-cymene)RuClTSC(N-S)]Cl, (1) and carbonyl complex [Ru(CO)Cl(PPh3)2TSC(N-S)] (2) have been synthesized from the reaction of [{(η(6)-p-cymene)RuCl}2(μ-Cl)2] and [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(PPh3)3] with thiophene-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazon (TSC) respectively and both novel ruthenium (II) complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. The peripheral TSC in the complexes acts as an electrochemical coupling unit providing the ability to carry out electrochemical deposition (ED) and to form an electro-deposited film on a graphite electrode surface. The biosensing applicability of complexes 1 and 2 was investigated by using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. Electrochemical measurements at -0.9V versus Ag/AgCl electrode by following the ED Ru(II) reduction/oxidation due to from the enzyme activity, in the presence of glucose substrate. The designed biosensor showed a very good linearity for 0.01-0.5mM glucose. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of complexes 1 and 2 were also investigated against nine bacterial strains and one fungus by the disc diffusion test method. No activity was observed against the Gram-negative strains and fungus, whereas complex 1 showed moderate antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains. PMID:25280673

  14. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  16. Effect of different complexing agents on the properties of chemical-bath-deposited ZnS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun; Wei, Aixiang, E-mail: weiax@gdut.edu.cn; Zhao, Yu

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • To fabricate high quality ZnS films need to promote the ion-by-ion process and restrain cluster-by-cluster process. • The complexation ability of tri-sodium citrate is stronger than that of hydrazine hydrate. • The nucleation density of nuclei determine the performance of ZnS thin films. -- Abstract: Zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films were deposited on glass substrates using the chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The effects of different complexing agents (tri-sodium citrate, hydrazine hydrate) and their concentrations on the structure, composition, morphology, optical properties and growth mechanism of ZnS thin films were investigated. The results indicated that the chemical-bath-deposited ZnS thin films exhibit poor crystallinity and a high Zn/S atomic ratio with an average transmittance of 75% in the range of visible light. The ZnS thin films prepared using hydrazine hydrate as the complexing agent present a more compact surface, a smaller average particle size, and a sharper absorption edge at 300–340 nm compared with those prepared using tri-sodium citrate. Based on our experimental observations and analysis, we conclude that the predominant growth mechanism of ZnS thin films is an ion-by-ion process. The nucleation density of Zn(OH){sub 2} nuclei on the substrate in the initial stage produces the different morphologies and properties of the ZnS thin films prepared using the two complexing agents.

  17. Physico-chemical properties and toxic effect of fruit-ripening agent calcium carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ripening is the final stage of the maturation process, when the fruit changes color, softens and develops the flavor, texture and aroma that constitute optimum eating quality. This study was conducted to discuss the use of unsatisfactory calcium carbide to ripen fruits for domestic markets as well as their toxic effects on human health. The commonly used ripening agents are calcium carbide, acetylene, ethylene, propylene, ethrel (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid, glycol, ethanol and some other agents. The calcium carbide is one of the most commonly used ripening agent for fruits, while other calcium salts like calcium ammonium nitrate, calcium chloride and calcium sulfate are used to delay fruit ripening agents for local fruit industries. The use of calcium carbide is being discouraged worldwide, due to associated health hazards. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous, and once dissolved in water, it produces acetylene gas. Arsenic, phosphorous and acetylene gas may affect the different body organs and causes various health problems like headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema, seizures and prolonged hypoxia.

  18. Removal of Zn(II) and Hg(II) from aqueous solution on a carbonaceous sorbent chemically prepared from rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbonaceous sorbent was prepared from rice husk via sulfuric acid treatment. Sorption of Zn(II) and Hg(II) from aqueous solution was studied varying time, pH, metal concentration, temperature and sorbent status (wet and dry). Zn(II) sorption was found fast reaching equilibrium within ∼2 h while Hg(II) sorption was slow reaching equilibrium within ∼120 h with better performance for the wet sorbent than for the dry. Kinetics data for both metals were found to follow pseudo-second order model. Sorption rate of both metals was enhanced with temperature rise. Activation energy, Ea, for Zn(II) sorption, was ∼13.0 kJ/mol indicating a diffusion-controlled process ion exchange process, however, for Hg(II) sorption, Ea was ∼54 kJ/mol indicating a chemically controlled process. Sorption of both metals was low at low pH and increased with pH increase. Sorption was much higher for Hg(II) than for Zn(II) with higher uptake for both metals by rising the temperature. Hg(II) was reduced to Hg(I) on the sorbent surface. This was confirmed from the identification of Hg2Cl2 deposits on the sorbent surface by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. However, no redox processes were observed in Zn(II) sorption. Sorption mechanism is discussed.

  19. Understanding evaporation characteristics of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) chemical agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Evaporation rates of HD are obtained from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. • The rates increase with temperature and are linearly proportional to drop size. • HD evaporation from stainless steel follows only constant contact area mechanism. • HD evaporation from aluminum proceeds by a combined mechanism. - Abstract: We report herein the evaporation rates and mechanism of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. For systematic analysis, we used a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, thermal desorption (TD) connected to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and drop shape analysis (DSA). We found that the evaporation rates of HD from stainless steel and aluminum increased with temperature. The rates were also linearly proportional to drop size. The time-dependent contact angle measurement showed that the evaporation of the drop of HD proceeded only by constant contact area mechanism from stainless steel surface. On the other hand, the evaporation of HD from aluminum proceeded by a combined mechanism of constant contact area mode and constant contact angle mode. Our experimental data sets and analysis could be used to predict vapor and contact hazard persistence of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the air and on exterior surfaces with chemical releases, which assists the military decision influencing personnel safety and decontamination of the site upon a chemical attack event

  20. Chemical Abundances in our Galaxy and Other Galaxies Derived from H II Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Peimbert, M.; L. Carigi; Peimbert, A.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the accuracy of the abundance determinations of H II regions in our Galaxy and other galaxies. We focus on the main observational constraints derived from abundance determinations that have implications for models of galactic chemical evolution: a) the helium to hydrogen abundance ratio, He/H; b) the oxygen to hydrogen abundance ratio, O/H; c) the carbon to oxygen abundance ratio, C/O; d) the helium to oxygen and helium to heavy elements abundance ratios, Delta Y/ Delta O and Delta...

  1. Comparison of the mutagenic potential of 17 physical and chemical agents analyzed by the flow cytometry mutation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C. Tenley [Cytomation GTX Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Ross, Carley D. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Keysar, Stephen B. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Joshi, Dhanashree D. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Lim, Chang-Uk [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fox, Michael H. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States) and Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1618 (United States)]. E-mail: mfox@colostate.edu

    2006-12-01

    Several methods to assess genotoxicity of physical and chemical agents have been developed, most of which depend on growing colonies in selective medium. We recently published a new method for detecting mutations in the CD59 gene in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line that contains a single copy of human chromosome 11 (CHO A{sub L}). The assay is based on detecting the surface expression of CD59 with monoclonal antibodies using flow cytometry. The capabilities of this flow cytometry mutation assay (FCMA) to detect mutations from a wide variety of genotoxic agents are described here. There was a 400-fold separation between CD59{sup -} and CD59{sup +} populations based on fluorescence intensity. Small numbers of negative cells mixed in with positive cells were detected in a highly linear fashion. Mutation dose response curves over a dose range yielding 80% to 20% survival are shown for ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), mitomycin C (MMC) and lead acetate. EMS and lead acetate exhibited a threshold in response while MMC had a linear dose response over the full dose range. The mutant fraction was measured over time periods ranging up to 35 days following treatment. The mutant fraction peaked at different times ranging from 6 to 12 days after treatment. An additional 14 chemical and physical agents including point mutagens, heavy metals, ionizing and UV radiation, and DNA intercalators and cross linkers, were analyzed for mutagenic potential after doses giving 80% to 20% survival. The results presented here demonstrate the sensitivity and broad-ranging capability of the FCMA to detect mutations induced by a variety of genotoxic agents.

  2. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny; Wengel, Jesper; Kool, Eric T; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open...... remains elusive. Here we employed synthetic nucleotide analogues as 'chemical mutation' tools coupling with α-amanitin transcription inhibition assay to systematically dissect the key chemical interactions and structural signatures governing the substrate-coupled TL closure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol...

  3. Hexadentate bispidine derivatives as versatile bifunctional chelate agents for copper(II) radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Stefanie; Walther, Martin; Stephan, Holger; Bergmann, Ralf; Steinbach, Jörg; Kraus, Werner; Emmerling, Franziska; Comba, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The preparation and use of bispidine derivatives (3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane) as chelate ligands for radioactive copper isotopes for diagnosis (64Cu) or therapy (67Cu) are reported. Starting from the hexadentate bispidine-based bis(amine)tetrakis(pyridine) ligand 1 with a keto and two ester substituents, the corresponding mono-ol 2 and two dicarboxylic acid derivatives 3 and 5 have been synthesized. A range of techniques, including single-crystal X-ray structure analysis, UV/vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, thin-layer- (TLC), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), have been used to characterize the structure and stability of the copper(II)-bispidine complexes. A rapid formation (within 1 min) of stable copper(II)-bispidine complexes under mild conditions (ambient temperature, aqueous solution) has been observed. Challenge experiments of these complexes in the presence of a high excess of competing ligands, such as glutathione, cyclam, or superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as in rat plasma, gave no evidence of demetalation or transchelation. The bifunctional bispidine derivative 5 can be readily functionalized with biologically active molecules at the pendant carboxylate groups. The coupling of a bombesin analogue betahomo-Glu-betaAla-betaAla-[Cha(13),Nle(14)]BBN(7-14), by condensation of a carboxylate of the bispidine backbone with the N-terminus of the peptide produced the bifunctional ligand 6. The radiocopper(II) complex of this bombesin-bispidine conjugate has a considerable hydrophilicity (log D(o/w) < -2.4), and this leads to a very fast blood clearance (blood: 0.28 +/- 0.02 SUV, 1 h p.i.), low liver tissue accumulation (liver: 1.20 +/- 0.27 SUV, 1 h p.i.), and rapid renal-urinary excretion (kidneys: 6.06 +/- 2.96 SUV, 1 h p.i.) as shown by biodistribution studies of 64Cu-6 in Wistar rats. Preliminary in vivo studies of 64Cu-6 in NMRI nu/nu mice, bearing the human prostate tumor PC-3 showed an accumulation of the conjugate in the tumor (2

  4. Influence of complexing agent on the growth of chemically deposited Ni3Pb2S2 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Soonmin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ni3Pb2S2 thin films were prepared by chemical bath deposition method. Here, the objective of this research was to investigate the influence of complexing agent on the properties of films.These films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, UV-Visible spectro photometer and X-ray diffraction. It was found that, as the concentration of tartaric acid increased, film thickness increased, but, the band gap reduced. For the films prepared using 0.1M of tartaric acid, the films were uniform and completely covered the substrates.

  5. Application and appreciation of chemical sand fixing agent-poly (aspartic acid) and its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jun; Cao Hui; Wang Fang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tan Tianwei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)], E-mail: twtan@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-12-15

    The sand fixing agent-poly (aspartic acid) (PASP) and its composites were applied in the field by two forms (spraying around by PASP solution and PASP powder directly). It was found that the sand fixing effect in powder form was not as good as in solution form, but it was more practical in dry region. It needed 9, 6 and 7 days for PASP, xanthan gum-PASP (X2) and ethyl cellulose-PASP (E3) to attain the maximal mechanical strength after they were applied, respectively. The sand fixing effect decreased when the material was subjected to repeated hydration-dehydration cycles and the material had no negative influence on plant growth. The PASP and its composites had water-retaining ability and could reduce the water evaporation. - The sand fixing agent was applied in powder form and it had no negative influence on plant growth.

  6. Application and appreciation of chemical sand fixing agent-poly (aspartic acid) and its composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sand fixing agent-poly (aspartic acid) (PASP) and its composites were applied in the field by two forms (spraying around by PASP solution and PASP powder directly). It was found that the sand fixing effect in powder form was not as good as in solution form, but it was more practical in dry region. It needed 9, 6 and 7 days for PASP, xanthan gum-PASP (X2) and ethyl cellulose-PASP (E3) to attain the maximal mechanical strength after they were applied, respectively. The sand fixing effect decreased when the material was subjected to repeated hydration-dehydration cycles and the material had no negative influence on plant growth. The PASP and its composites had water-retaining ability and could reduce the water evaporation. - The sand fixing agent was applied in powder form and it had no negative influence on plant growth

  7. Palladium(II Complexes of NS Donor Ligands Derived from Steroidal Thiosemicarbazones as Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Asiri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the antibacterial activity of some new steroidal thiosemicarbazones and their Pd(II metal complexes were prepared by the reaction of the thiosemicarbazones with [Pd(DMSO2Cl2]. The steroidal thiosemicarbazones were prepared by the reaction of thiosemicarbazides with a steroidal ketone. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FAB mass spectroscopic methods, elemental analyses and TGA analysis. The antibacterial activity of these compounds were tested in vitro by the disk diffusion assay against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that steroidal complexes are better inhibitors of both types of the bacteria (Gram-positive and Gram-negative as compared to steroidal thiosemicarbazones. Compound Ia displays remarkable antibacterial activity as compared to amoxicillin.

  8. Rapid response behavior, at room temperature, of a nanofiber-structured TiO2 sensor to selected simulant chemical-warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingfa; Zhu, Tao; Xu, Huizhong; Li, Guang; Zheng, Junbao; Liu, Aiyun; Zhang, Jianqin; Du, Huatai

    2008-02-01

    A chemical prototype sensor was constructed based on nanofiber-structured TiO2 and highly sensitive quartz resonators. The gas-sensing behavior of this new sensor to selected simulant warfare agents was investigated at room temperature. Results showed rapid response and good reversibility of this sensor when used with high-purity nitrogen. This provides a simple approach to preparation of materials needed as chemical sensors for selected organic volatiles or warfare agents. PMID:18094961

  9. Development of the HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS method for analysis of chemical warfare agent and their degradation products in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawała, Jakub; Czupryński, Krzysztof; Popiel, Stanisław; Dziedzic, Daniel; Bełdowski, Jacek

    2016-08-24

    After World War II approximately 50,000 tons of chemical weapons were dumped in the Baltic Sea by the Soviet Union under the provisions of the Potsdam Conference on Disarmament. These dumped chemical warfare agents still possess a major threat to the marine environment and to human life. Therefore, continue monitoring of these munitions is essential. In this work, we present the application of new solid phase microextraction fibers in analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products. It can be concluded that the best fiber for analysis of sulfur mustard and its degradation products is butyl acrylate (BA), whereas for analysis of organoarsenic compounds and chloroacetophenone, the best fiber is a co-polymer of methyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate (MA/MMA). In order to achieve the lowest LOD and LOQ the samples should be divided into two subsamples. One of them should be analyzed using a BA fiber, and the second one using a MA/MMA fiber. When the fast analysis is required, the microextraction should be performed by use of a butyl acrylate fiber because the extraction efficiency of organoarsenic compounds for this fiber is acceptable. Next, we have elaborated of the HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS method for analysis of CWA degradation products in environmental samples using laboratory obtained fibers The analytical method for analysis of organosulfur and organoarsenic compounds was optimized and validated. The LOD's for all target chemicals were between 0.03 and 0.65 ppb. Then, the analytical method developed by us, was used for the analysis of sediment and pore water samples from the Baltic Sea. During these studies, 80 samples were analyzed. It was found that 25 sediments and 5 pore water samples contained CWA degradation products such as 1,4-dithiane, 1,4-oxathiane or triphenylarsine, the latter being a component of arsine oil. The obtained data is evidence that the CWAs present in the Baltic Sea have leaked into the general marine environment. PMID

  10. Development of electrochemical sensors for trace detection of explosives and for the detection of chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, T.; Ziegler, H.; Krausa, Michael

    2000-08-01

    A huge number of chemical sensors are based on electrochemical measurement methods. Particularly amperometric sensorsystems are employed for the fast detection of pollutants in industry and environment as well as for analytic systems in the medical diagnosis. The large number of different applications of electrochemical sensors is based on the high sensitivity of electrochemical methods and on the wide of possibilities to enhance the selectivity by variation of electrochemical and chemical parameters. Besides this, electrochemical sensorsystems are frequently simple to operate, transportable and cheap. Up to now the electrochemical method of cyclic voltammetry is used only seldom for sensors. Clearly the efficiency of cyclic voltammetry can be seen at the sensorsystem for the detection of nitro- and aminotoluenes in solids and waters as presented here. The potentiodynamic sensors system can be employed for the fast and easy risk estimation of contaminated areas. Because of the high sensitivity of electrochemical methods the detection of chemical substances with a low vapor pressure is possible also. The vapor pressure of TNT at room temperature is 7 ppb for instances. With a special electrochemical set-up we were able to measure TNT approximately 10 cm above a TNT-sample. In addition we were able to estimate TNT in the gaseous phase approximately 10 cm above a real plastic mine. Therefore it seems to be possible to develop an electrochemical mien detection. Moreover, we present that the electrochemical detection of RDX, HMX and chemical warfare agents is also possible.

  11. Chiral copper(II) complex based on natural product rosin derivative as promising antitumour agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Bao-Li; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Wu-Shuang; Li, Dong-Dong; Lu, Yang; Gao, Wei-Lin; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qing-Bo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the biological preference of chiral drug candidates for molecular target DNA, the synthesis and characterization of a chiral copper(II) complex (2) of a chiral ligand N,N'-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene) dehydroabietylamine (1) was carried out. The interactions of 1 and 2 with salmon sperm DNA were investigated by viscosity measurements, UV, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Absorption spectral, emission spectral and viscosity analysis reveal that 1 and 2 interacted with DNA through intercalation and 2 exhibited a higher DNA binding ability. In the absence/presence of ascorbic acid, 1 and 2 cleaved supercoiled pBR322 DNA by single-strand and 2 displayed stronger DNA cleavage ability. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against HeLa, SiHa, HepG-2 and A431 cancer cell lines study show that they exhibited effective cytotoxicity against the tested cell lines, notably, 2 showed a superior cytotoxicity than the widely used drug cisplatin under identical conditions, indicating it has the potential to act as effective anticancer drug. Flow cytometry analysis indicates 2 produced death of HeLa cancer cells through an apoptotic pathway. Cell cycle analysis demonstrates that 2 mainly arrested HeLa cells at the S phase. The study represents the first step towards understanding the mode of the promising chiral rosin-derivative based copper complexes as chemotherapeutics. PMID:27088508

  12. A comparison of {sup 252}Cf and 14-MeV neutron excitation to identify chemical warfare agents by PGNAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Harlow, B.D.; Edwards, A.J.; Krebs, K.M.; Jones, J.L.; Yoon, W.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Dougan, A.D.

    2000-07-01

    Since 1992, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's portable isotopic neutron spectrometry (PINS) system has been widely used for the nondestructive assessment of munitions suspected to contain chemical warfare agents, such as the nerve agent sarin. PINS is a {sup 252}Cf-based prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system. The standard PINS system employs a partially moderated 5-{micro}g {sup 252}Cf source emitting 10{sup 7} n/s to excite the atomic nuclei inside the item under test. The chemical elements inside the item are revealed by their characteristic gamma-ray spectrum, measured by a high-resolution high-purity germanium gamma-ray spectrometer. The system computer then infers the fill compound or mixture from the elemental data extracted from the gamma-ray spectrum. Reliable PINS assessments can be completed in as little as 100 s for favorable cases such as white phosphorus smoke munitions, but normally, a 1000 to 3000 live-second counting interval is required. To improve PINS throughput when hundreds or more munitions must be assessed, they are evaluating the possible advantages of 14-MeV neutron excitation over their current radioisotopic source.

  13. Bridging the gap between sample collection and laboratory analysis: using dried blood spots to identify human exposure to chemical agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Blake, Thomas A.; Perez, Jonas W.; Crow, Brian S.; Shaner, Rebecca L.; Coleman, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-05-01

    Public health response to large scale chemical emergencies presents logistical challenges for sample collection, transport, and analysis. Diagnostic methods used to identify and determine exposure to chemical warfare agents, toxins, and poisons traditionally involve blood collection by phlebotomists, cold transport of biomedical samples, and costly sample preparation techniques. Use of dried blood spots, which consist of dried blood on an FDA-approved substrate, can increase analyte stability, decrease infection hazard for those handling samples, greatly reduce the cost of shipping/storing samples by removing the need for refrigeration and cold chain transportation, and be self-prepared by potentially exposed individuals using a simple finger prick and blood spot compatible paper. Our laboratory has developed clinical assays to detect human exposures to nerve agents through the analysis of specific protein adducts and metabolites, for which a simple extraction from a dried blood spot is sufficient for removing matrix interferents and attaining sensitivities on par with traditional sampling methods. The use of dried blood spots can bridge the gap between the laboratory and the field allowing for large scale sample collection with minimal impact on hospital resources while maintaining sensitivity, specificity, traceability, and quality requirements for both clinical and forensic applications.

  14. Ionization mechanism of the ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) and its applications to chemical nerve agent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidholdt, Evan L; Beauchamp, J L

    2009-11-01

    We present studies of the ionization mechanism operative in the ambient pressure pyroelectric ionization source (APPIS), along with applications that include detection of simulants for chemical nerve agents. It is found that ionization by APPIS occurs in the gas-phase. As the crystal is thermally cycled over a narrow temperature range, electrical discharges near the surface of the crystal produce energetic species which, through reactions with atmospheric molecules, result in reactant ions such as protonated water clusters or clusters of hydroxide and water. Reactant ions can be observed directly in the mass spectrometer. These go on to react with trace neutrals via proton transfer reactions to produce the ions observed in mass spectra, which are usually singly protonated or deprotonated species. Further implicating gas-phase ionization, observed product distributions are highly dependent on the composition of ambient gases, especially the concentration of water vapor and oxygen surrounding the source. For example, basic species such as triethylamine are observed as singly protonated cations at a water partial pressure of 10 torr. At a water pressure of 4 torr, reactive oxygen species are formed and lead to observation of protonated amine oxides. The ability of the APPIS source to detect basic molecules with high proton affinities makes it highly suited for the detection of chemical nerve agents. We demonstrate this application using simulants corresponding to VX and GA (Tabun). With the present source configuration pyridine is detected readily at a concentration of 4 ppm, indicating ultimate sensitivity in the high ppb range. PMID:19682922

  15. Significance of stable and unstable cytogenetic biomarkers in estimation of genome damage in subjects exposed to physical and chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last few years have shown that cytogenetic biomarkers do predict increased cancer risk. The most frequently used biomarkers in genetic toxicology are chromosome aberration assay (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assay. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), in turn, enables analysis of translocation as a stable genome damage. With technological development, working environment has become associated with complex exposure to ionising and non-ionising radiation and chemical agents. A follow-up of 1200 subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation and chemical agents using CA and MN showed that the highest deviations from control values were detected in complex exposure to ionising radiation and ultrasound or to radioisotopes in medicine and in industrial radiography and to ionising radiation in specific jobs in nuclear plants. FISH used in a group of subjects exposed to gamma radiation and ultrasound showed that translocation frequency could rise even when CA frequency is within control values. This example shows that health risk is present even when results obtained by routine methods for the last few decades do not deviate from control values and that a decrease in permissible doses does not protect from accumulated genome damage during employment under different conditions. As biological effects of complex exposure are not possible to monitor by physical measurements, cytogenetic biomarkers are the only reliable tools to evaluate of genome damage and significant parameters in regulating health surveillance of exposed subjects.(author)

  16. Role of the Lysine as a Complexing Agent in Ge2Sb2Te5 Chemical Mechanical PolishingSlurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work,we investigate the polishing behavior, static dissolution and electrochemical performace of Ge2Sb2Te5 in the presense of lysine as a complexing agent with H2O2 employed as an oxidizer. Electrochemical techniques are used to investigate polishing behavior under static conditions as a function of lysine concentration .The polishing rate of GST increases with lysine concentraion increasing in acidic solutions at pH 5.2. The static dissolution rate shows the same trend. In the presence of lysine, the surface of GST film is smooth. To verify the complexes of the GST and lysine soluble, the Inductively Coupled Plasma is used which demonstrates that complexes with GST and lysine are soluble and the solubleness of Te element is increasing with lysine concentration increasing. In addition, electrochemical investigation indicates that an enhanced polishing rate and static dissolution is due to the Icorr increase varying lysine concentrations. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope results suggest that the chemical mechanism of lysine as a complexing agent is that lysine has the chemical reaction with GST oxide

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Serum Chemical Castration Agents and Testosterone Levels Using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Kyunghoon; Jeon, Sun-Hee; Song, Sang Hoon; Yun, Yeo-Min; Chun, Sail; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Jin Young; In, Moon Kyo; Song, Junghan

    2016-05-01

    Chemical castration involves administration of drugs to prevent pathological sexual behavior, reduce abnormal sexual drive and treat hormone-dependent cancers. Various drugs have been used for chemical castration; however, substantial interindividual variability and side effects are often observed. In this study, we proposed a useful monitoring method for the application of chemical castration agents using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS). Testosterone, cyproterone acetate, medroxyprogesterone, goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate and triptorelin acetate were analyzed by UPLC-MS-MS. The target drugs were extracted from serum samples by double protein precipitation using methanol. Testosterone-1,2-d2 and buserelin acetate were used as internal standards. Parameters of analytical performance were evaluated, including imprecision, linearity, ion suppression and detection capabilities. Testosterone measurements were compared with the results of immunoassays. Serum specimens from 51 subjects who underwent chemical castration were analyzed. All drugs and testosterone were well extracted and separated using our method. The method was essentially free from potential interferences and ion suppression. Within-run and between-run imprecision values were <15%. The lower limits of quantification were 0.125 and 0.5-1.0 ng/mL for testosterone and other drugs, respectively. Good correlations with pre-existing immunoassays for testosterone measurement were observed. Sera from subjects who underwent androgen deprivation therapy showed variable levels of drugs. We successfully developed a UPLC-MS-MS-based monitoring method for chemical castration. The performance of our method was generally acceptable. This method may provide a novel monitoring strategy for chemical castration to enhance expected effects while reducing unwanted side effects. PMID:26989223

  18. Aerogel nanoscale magnesium oxides as a destructive sorbent for toxic chemical agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Maříková, Monika; Šubrt, Jan; Oplustil, F.; Olšanská, M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2004), s. 16-33. ISSN 1644-3624 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : nanostructures * organometallic compounds * chemical synthesis Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.171, year: 2004

  19. Treatment of chemical warfare agents by zero-valent iron nanoparticles and ferrate(VI)/(III) composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Ferrate(VI) has been found to be highly efficient to decontaminate chemical warfare agents. ► Fast degradation of sulfur mustard, soman and compound VX by ferrate(VI). ► Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles are considerably less efficient in degradation of studied warfare agents compared to ferrate(VI). - Abstract: Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles and a composite containing a mixture of ferrate(VI) and ferrate(III) were prepared by thermal procedures. The phase compositions, valence states of iron, and particle sizes of iron-bearing compounds were determined by combination of X-ray powder diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The applicability of these environmentally friendly iron based materials in treatment of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) has been tested with three representative compounds, sulfur mustard (bis(2-chlorethyl) sulfide, HD), soman ((3,3′-imethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate, GD), and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate (VX). Zero-valent iron, even in the nanodimensional state, had a sluggish reactivity with CWAs, which was also observed in low degrees of CWAs degradation. On the contrary, ferrate(VI)/(III) composite exhibited a high reactivity and complete degradations of CWAs were accomplished. Under the studied conditions, the estimated first-order rate constants (∼10−2 s−1) with the ferrate(VI)/(III) composite were several orders of magnitude higher than those of spontaneous hydrolysis of CWAs (10−8–10−6 s−1). The results demonstrated that the oxidative technology based on application of ferrate(VI) is very promising to decontaminate CWAs.

  20. Overcoming Heterogeneity Effects Through Polymer-Enhanced Groundwater Remediation Techniques: Coupling Polymer Floods with Chemical Oxidants and Bio-agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. M.; Silva, J. A.; Munakata-Marr, J.; McCray, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Even small heterogeneity contrasts in contaminated systems (resulting from differences in permeability or contaminant saturation) can affect the distribution of injected remediation agents by channeling fluids through high-permeability flowpaths, thus bypassing some regions and leaving contaminants uncontacted. The addition of a viscous polymer solution to the remediation agent may enhance agent delivery as a result of increased cross-flow (or "sweep efficiency") into different layers of the system, if the polymer solution remains stable in the presence of the remediation agent. Our research combines various non-toxic, food- grade polymer solutions with the remediation techniques of chemical oxidation and bio-remediation, to increase the effectiveness of treatment at sites contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The coupling of polymer floods with oxidants may help to combat contaminant "rebound" sometimes associated with incomplete contaminant destruction in low-permeability zones. Initial compatibility testing has shown that certain robust polymer/oxidant mixtures possess stable viscosities and pose low additional oxidant demands over multi-day timescales. Transport of these solutions through natural porous media was studied in column experiments, and small two-dimensional experiments with heterogeneous layering were conducted to assess effectiveness of contaminant destruction. Limitations of these compatible polymer/oxidant combinations as well as possible experimental strategies to optimize delivery are also discussed. In addition, results of polymer/microbial screening tests reveal that polymer solutions do not inhibit the dechlorinating capabilities of a microbial consortium. Preliminary findings have also raised the possibility that certain polymers may successfully serve as electron donors in the subsurface. The implications of these results for either bioaugmentation or delivery of biostimulants are presented.

  1. Infrared differential absorption lidar for stand-off detection of chemical agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Razdan; S Veerabuthiran; M K Jindal; R K Sharma

    2014-02-01

    A compact trolley-mounted pulsed transverse electric atmospheric pressure (TEA) carbon dioxide laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system capable of stand-off detection of chemical clouds in aerosol and vapour form upto about 200 m range in the atmosphere has been developed and assembled at Laser Science and Technology Centre (LASTEC), Delhi. The system was tested successfully with diethyl ether (DEE) (a toxic industrial chemical (TIC)) and differential absorption signals at on (strong absorption, 9R16) and off (weak absorption, 10R26) wavelengths were recorded for stand-off distances upto ∼100 m (open air ground path). This paper discusses the technical details of trolley-mounted CO2 DIAL system and the data generated during the test and evaluation of this sensor using DEE aerosols.

  2. Fast neutron sensor for detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once the presence of the anomaly on the bottom of the shallow coastal sea water has been confirmed it is necessary to establish if it contains explosive or chemical warfare charge. We propose that this be performed by using neutron sensor installed within an underwater vessel. When positioned above the object, or to its side, the system can inspect the object for the presence of the threat materials by using alpha particle tagged neutrons from the sealed tube d+t neutron generator.

  3. Fast neutron sensor for detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkovic, Vladivoj [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: valkovic@irb.hr; Sudac, Davorin [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Matika, Dario [Institute for Researches and Development of Defense Systems, Ilica 256b, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-04-15

    Once the presence of the anomaly on the bottom of the shallow coastal sea water has been confirmed it is necessary to establish if it contains explosive or chemical warfare charge. We propose that this be performed by using neutron sensor installed within an underwater vessel. When positioned above the object, or to its side, the system can inspect the object for the presence of the threat materials by using alpha particle tagged neutrons from the sealed tube d+t neutron generator.

  4. Biological effects of radiation in combination with other physical, chemical or biological agents. Annex L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annex considers the combined action of radiation with potentially important environmental conditions. Since there is a scarcity of systematic data on which an analysis of combined effects can be based, this Annex will be more hypothetical and will attempt to suggest definitions, to identify suitable methods of analysis, to select from a large amount of diffuse information the conditions and the data of importance for further consideration and to provide suggestions for future research. For humans in environmental circumstances the UNSCEAR Committee has been unable to document any clear case of synergistic interaction between radiation and other agents, which could lead to substantial modifications of the risk estimates for significant sections of the population

  5. Evaluation of aziridine bonding agent by means of chemical and instrumental techniques of analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Cortes Pires

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method using wet chemistry and instrumental analysis has been developed for evaluating the ring-opening of aziridine tris [1-(2 methyl aziridinyl] phosphide oxide (MAPO of the bonding agent used in composite propellant. A reduction was observed in the intensity absorption bands in 1400 and 1040 cm-1, characteristic of aziridinic ring. It was also observed, in some cases, that when the number of open aziridinyl ring increases, the NH band in the range 3400-3300 cm-1, that appears with ring-opening, is located in the region of lower wave numbers. The study of the synthesis of MAPO derivative indicated side reactions such as homopolymerization of rings and also, with secondary hydroxyl of the 12-hydroxy stearic acid and probable humidity existent in the original sample.

  6. Chemical dechlorination of pesticides at a superfund site in Region II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selecting technologies for cleaning up hazardous waste sites is a complex task, due in part to the rapidly changing nature of the state-of-the-art in technology. There is strong support for use of innovative technologies as specified in Section 121(b) of CERCLA. However, use of an innovative technology requires overcoming a variety of challenges. These challenges include: Screening potentially appropriate technologies, including innovative technologies, and selecting one or more potential innovative technologies for which preliminary results are promising; however, site-specific data are needed prior to technology evaluation. Evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed technology for the site through the use of treatability studies. Gaining acceptance for the innovative technology, which may employ new or unfamiliar concepts. Determining optimal design and operating parameters for full-scale remediation. This paper discusses the technology evaluation process and how that process supported the selection of an innovative technology for the Myers Property site, a Superfund site in Region II. A case study is presented showing how technology screening and laboratory treatability studies were used to evaluate an innovative technology (chemical dechlorination), which was selected as the technology for remediation of soils and sediments contaminated with pesticides at this environmentally sensitive site in New Jersey. The remedy selected by the U.S. EPA for this site designates chemical dechlorination as the selected technology, but does not specify any particular vendor or process. Rather, the remedy sets forth technology performance standards and recommends certain design tasks which may be used to select a particular chemical process. This paper discusses he of these design tasks as they might apply to innovative technologies, using chemical dechlorination as a model

  7. Secondary ionization of chemical warfare agent simulants: atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Wes E; Clowers, Brian H; Haigh, Paul E; Hill, Herbert H

    2003-11-15

    For the first time, the use of a traditional ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (radioactive nickel ((63)Ni) beta emission ionization) and three alternative ionization sources (electrospray ionization (ESI), secondary electrospray ionization (SESI), and electrical discharge (corona) ionization (CI)) were employed with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM(tof)MS) to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants from both aqueous- and gas-phase samples. For liquid-phase samples, ESI was used as the sample introduction and ionization method. For the secondary ionization (SESI, CI, and traditional (63)Ni ionization) of vapor-phase samples, two modes of sample volatilization (heated capillary and thermal desorption chamber) were investigated. Simulant reference materials, which closely mimic the characteristic chemical structures of CWA as defined and described by Schedule 1, 2, or 3 of the Chemical Warfare Convention treaty verification, were used in this study. A mixture of four G/V-type nerve simulants (dimethyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and 2-(butylamino)ethanethiol) and one S-type vesicant simulant (2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide) were found in each case (sample ionization and introduction methods) to be clearly resolved using the IM(tof)MS method. In many cases, reduced mobility constants (K(o)) were determined for the first time. Ion mobility drift times, flight times, relative signal intensities, and fragmentation product signatures for each of the CWA simulants are reported for each of the methods investigated. PMID:14615983

  8. Distribution of chemical warfare agent, energetics, and metals in sediments at a deep-water discarded military munitions site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Christian; Shjegstad, Sonia M.; Silva, Jeff A. K.; Edwards, Margo H.

    2016-06-01

    There is a strong need to understand the behavior of chemical warfare agent (CWA) at underwater discarded military munitions (DMM) sites to determine the potential threat to human health or the environment, yet few studies have been conducted at sites in excess of 250 m, the depth at which most U.S. chemical munitions were disposed. As part of the Hawai'i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA), sediments adjacent to chemical and conventional DMM at depths of 400-650 m were sampled using human occupied vehicles (HOVs) in order to quantify the distribution of CWA, energetics, and select metals. Sites in the same general area, with no munitions within 50 m in any direction were sampled as a control. Sulfur mustard (HD) and its degradation product 1,4-dithiane were detected at each CWA DMM site, as well as a single sample with the HD degradation product 1,4-thioxane. An energetic compound was detected in sediment to a limited extent at one CWA DMM site. Metals common in munitions casings (i.e., Fe, Cu, and Pb) showed similar trends at the regional and site-wide scales, likely reflecting changes in marine sediment deposition and composition. This study shows HD and its degradation products can persist in the deep-marine environment for decades following munitions disposal.

  9. The effect of biological and chemical control agents on the health status of the very early potato cultivar Rosara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cwalina-Ambroziak Bożena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The external appearance and quality of table potatoes are determined, among other factors, by the health status of the plants during the growing season. Chemical control methods are often combined with biocontrol agents to effectively fight potato pathogens. Potatoes of the very early cultivar Rosara were grown in experimental plots. The plots were located in Tomaszkowo (NE Poland, 2007-2009. The experiment involved the following treatments: 1 biological control − mycorrhizal Glomus spp. inoculum was applied to the roots, − tubers were dressed and plants were sprayed with Polyversum three times during the growing season, 2 chemical control - at two-week intervals, plants were sprayed with the following fungicides: Infinito 687.5 SC and Tanos 50 WG, Valbon 72 WG and Tanos 50 WG. In the control treatment, potato plants were not protected against pathogens. During the growing season, the severity of late blight and early blight was evaluated on a nine-point scale. The composition of fungal communities colonising potato stems was analysed. The fungistatic properties of the fungicides used in the field experiment were evaluated in an in vitro test. The symptoms of infections caused by Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria spp. were significantly reduced in the treatment which used the integrated chemical and biological control. The least diverse fungal community was isolated from fungicide-treated plants. In the in vitro test, fungicides at all analysed concentrations inhibited the linear mycelial growth of selected pathogens.

  10. Tracers: the use of chemical agents for hydrological environmental, petrochemical and biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a revision of the history, definitions, and classification of tracers (natural and artificial, internal and external). The fundamental ideas concerning tracers are described, followed by their application illustrated by typical examples. The advantages and disadvantages of five classes among the most frequently used external tracers (fluorescent, microbial, chemical, radioactive and activable isotopes) are also described in detail. This review also presents some interesting and modern applications of tracers in the areas of diagnostics in medical practice, environmental pollution, hydrology and petroleum chemistry. (author)

  11. Metal-Based Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents: Synthesis, Characterization, and In Vitro Biological Evaluation of Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) Complexes With Amino Acid-Derived Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Zahid H. Chohan; Arif, M.; Akhtar, Muhammad A.; Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2006-01-01

    A series of antibacterial and antifungal amino acid-derived compounds and their cobalt(II), copper(II), nickel(II), and zinc(II) metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by their elemental analyses, molar conductances, magnetic moments, and IR, and electronic spectral measurements. Ligands (L1)−(L5) were derived by condensation of β-diketones with glycine, phenylalanine, valine, and histidine and act as bidentate towards metal ions (cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc) via the azo...

  12. Chemical and biological effects of heavy distillate recycle in the SRC-II process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Anderson, R.P.; Freel, J.

    1983-12-01

    Recent work from the Merriam Laboratory continuous coal liquefaction units shows that heavy distillate from the SRC-II process can be recycled to extinction, and hence a distillate product boiling entirely below 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) (or other selected boiling points) is feasible. In these runs distillate yield was not reduced; gas make was unaffected; and hydrogen consumption was increased only slightly, in keeping with the generally higher hydrogen content of lighter end products. Total distillate yield (C/sub 5/-590/sup 0/F) was 56 wt %, MAF coal in runs with subbituminous coal from the Amax Belle Ayr mine. Product endpoint is well below 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), the temperature above which coal distillates appear to become genotoxic; and the product was shown to be free of mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Chemical analyses showed both the < 270/sup 0/C (< 518/sup 0/F) and the < 310/sup 0/C (< 590/sup 0/F) distillates to be essentially devoid of several reference polycyclic compounds known to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Tests for tumorigenic or carcinogenic activity were not carried out on these materials. However, a comparison of chemical data from the Merriam heavy distillate samples with data on the other SRC-II distillates where carcinogenesis or tumorigenesis data is available leads to the expectation that < 371/sup 0/C (< 700/sup 0/F) materials from the Merriam Laboratory will have greatly reduced tumorigenic and carcinogenic activity in skin painting tests. Other studies suggest the product should be more readily upgraded than full-range (C/sub 5/-900/sup 0/F) distillate.

  13. Chemical functionalization of ceramic tile surfaces by silane coupling agents: polymer modified mortar adhesion mechanism implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ancelmo Piscitelli Mansur

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between tiles and mortars are crucial to the stability of ceramic tile systems. From the chemical point of view, weak forces such as van der Waals forces and hydrophilic interactions are expected to be developed preferably at the tiles and polymer modified Portland cement mortar interface. The main goal of this paper was to use organosilanes as primers to modify ceramic tile hydrophilic properties to improve adhesion between ceramic tiles and polymer modified mortars. Glass tile surfaces were treated with several silane derivatives bearing specific functionalities. Contact angle measurements and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR were used for evaluating the chemical changes on the tile surface. In addition, pull-off tests were conducted to assess the effect on adhesion properties between tile and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate, EVA, modified mortar. The bond strength results have clearly shown the improvement of adherence at the tile-polymer modified mortar interface, reflecting the overall balance of silane, cement and polymer interactions.

  14. Chemical stability of a cold-active cellulase with high tolerance toward surfactants and chaotropic agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís V. Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CelE1 is a cold-active endo-acting glucanase with high activity at a broad temperature range and under alkaline conditions. Here, we examined the effects of pH on the secondary and tertiary structures, net charge, and activity of CelE1. Although variation in pH showed a small effect in the enzyme structure, the activity was highly influenced at acidic conditions, while reached the optimum activity at pH 8. Furthermore, to estimate whether CelE1 could be used as detergent additives, CelE1 activity was evaluated in the presence of surfactants. Ionic and nonionic surfactants were not able to reduce CelE1 activity significantly. Therefore, CelE1 was found to be promising candidate for use as detergent additives. Finally, we reported a thermodynamic analysis based on the structural stability and the chemical unfolding/refolding process of CelE1. The results indicated that the chemical unfolding proceeds as a reversible two-state process. These data can be useful for biotechnological applications.

  15. [Technology upgrades and exposure to chemical agents: results of the PPTP study in the footwear industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoli, Enrica; Brusoni, Daniela; Cornaggia, Nicoletta; Saretto, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    In the present work the chemical compositions of the products used in shoes manufacturing are reported. The data were collected over the period 2004-2007 in 156 shoe factories in Vigevano area during a study aiming the evaluation of safety conditions and occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals of the employees. The study was part of a regional project for "Occupational cancer prevention in the footwear industry". In the first phase of the study an information form on production cycle, products used and their composition was filled during preliminary audit. In the second phase of the study an in depth qualitative/quantitative evaluation of professional exposure was conducted in 13 selected shoe factories. Data analysis showed the increase in use of water-based adhesives at expense of solvent-based adhesives, the reduction to less than 3.5 weight %, and up to 1 weight %, of n-hexane concentration in solvent mixtures, the increase in use of products containing less hazardous ketones, esters, cyclohexane and heptane. Only in very few cases, products containing from 4 to 12 weight% of toluene were used. These data attest a positive trend in workers risks prevention in shoes industry. PMID:22697030

  16. ADSORPTION CHARACTERIZATION OF CO(II) IONS ONTO CHEMICALLY TREATED QUERCUS COCCIFERA SHELL: EQUILIBRIUM, KINETIC AND THERMODYNAMIC STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    M. Hamdi Karaoglu; Mehmet Uğurlu; İbrahim Kula

    2011-01-01

    Quercus coccifera shell (QCS), a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent to remove cobalt(II) from water. Before the adsorption experiments, QCS was subjected to chemical treatment to provide maximum surface area. Then, the kinetics and adsorption mechanism of Co(II) ions on QCS were studied using different parameters such as adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, temperature, contact time, and solution pH. The loaded metals could be des...

  17. STUDY OF MICROBIAL DIVERSITY OF FUNGAL COMMUNITIES FROM RHIZOSPHERE AND PHYLOSPHERE OF STRAWBERRY TREATED WITH CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS FOR THE CONTROL OF PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi-Mirela Matei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative impact of long term utilization of pesticides on yields quality, as well as on the human health made scientific community to seek new ways, less expensive and environmental friendly for protecting cultivated plants against pathogens. Biological control agents of microbial origin represented by living selected strains or their metabolites are more and more frequently utilized for protecting horticultural plants intensely consumed by European population, such as strawberry. A green house experiment was designed to compare the structure of rhizospheric and phylospheric microflora of strawberry cv. Senga Sengana, sensible to Botrytis cinerea (the agent of grey mould treated with systemic and contact fungicides, as well as with four biological control preparations of microbial origin administrated on plant leaves or in the soil. The structure of fungal communities in rhizosphere and phylosphere of strawberry cv. Senga Sengana varied as a function of the nature of control agent and the method of administration. Non significant influence on soil fungal community diversity index and species number was registered after the treatment with chemical and biological control agents, but significant increments were induced in time by control agents as compared with both non-treated control and chemical pesticides. Fungal community structure from strawberry leaves was not significantly influenced by chemical and biological control agents. The most favourable influence on fungal communities registered for bio-control agents E1 and E2 due to

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of phase II drug metabolizing/antioxidant enzymes gene response by anticancer agent sulforaphane in rat lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-Yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-10-01

    This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (iv) administration of an anticancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN). SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of each of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted and converted to cDNA, quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed, and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko's indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus and bootstrap method. SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5-fold) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increases (>5-fold) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus and the bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after iv administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD response of lymphocyte mRNA expression is

  19. Crucial steps to life: From chemical reactions to code using agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzany, Guenther

    2016-02-01

    The concepts of the origin of the genetic code and the definitions of life changed dramatically after the RNA world hypothesis. Main narratives in molecular biology and genetics such as the "central dogma," "one gene one protein" and "non-coding DNA is junk" were falsified meanwhile. RNA moved from the transition intermediate molecule into centre stage. Additionally the abundance of empirical data concerning non-random genetic change operators such as the variety of mobile genetic elements, persistent viruses and defectives do not fit with the dominant narrative of error replication events (mutations) as being the main driving forces creating genetic novelty and diversity. The reductionistic and mechanistic views on physico-chemical properties of the genetic code are no longer convincing as appropriate descriptions of the abundance of non-random genetic content operators which are active in natural genetic engineering and natural genome editing. PMID:26723230

  20. Phase II trial of the regulatory T cell-depleting agent, denileukin diftitox, in patients with unresectable stage IV melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telang Sucheta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously found that administration of an interleukin 2/diphtheria toxin conjugate (DAB/IL2; Denileukin Diftitox; ONTAK to stage IV melanoma patients depleted CD4+CD25HIFoxp3+ regulatory T cells and expanded melanoma-specific CD8+ T cells. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy of DAB/IL2 in an expanded cohort of stage IV melanoma patients. Methods In a single-center, phase II trial, DAB/IL2 (12 μg/kg; 4 daily doses; 21 day cycles was administered to 60 unresectable stage IV melanoma patients and response rates were assessed using a combination of 2-[18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG-positron emission tomography (PET and computed tomography (CT imaging. Results After DAB/IL2 administration, 16.7% of the 60 patients had partial responses, 5% stable disease and 15% mixed responses. Importantly, 45.5% of the chemo/immuno-naïve sub-population (11/60 patients experienced partial responses. One year survival was markedly higher in partial responders (80 ± 11.9% relative to patients with progressive disease (23.7 ± 6.5%; p value Conclusions These data support the development of multi-center, randomized trials of DAB/IL2 as a monotherapy and in combination with other immunotherapeutic agents for the treatment of stage IV melanoma. Trial registration NCT00299689

  1. Thiosemicarbazone Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as potential anticancer agents: syntheses, crystal structure, DNA cleavage, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jia; Ma, Zhong-Ying; Li, Ang; Liu, Ya-Hong; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Qiang, Zhao-Yan; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Four novel thiosemicarbazone metal complexes, [Cu(Am4M)(OAc)]·H2O (1), [Zn(HAm4M)Cl2] (2), [Zn2(Am4M)2Br2] (3) and [Zn2(Am4M)2(OAc)2]·2MeOH (4) [HAm4M=(Z)-2-(amino(pyridin-2-yl)methylene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide], have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis, ESI-MS and IR. X-ray analysis revealed that complexes 1 and 2 are mononuclear, which possess residual coordination sites for Cu(II) ion in 1 and good leaving groups (Cl(-)) for Zn(II) ion in 2. Both 3 and 4 displayed dinuclear units, in which the metal atoms are doubly bridged by S atoms of two Am4M(-) ligands in 3 and by two acetate ions in bi- and mono-dentate forms, respectively, in 4. Their antiproliferative activities on human epithelial cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG-2) and human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) were screened. Inspiringly, IC50 value (11.2±0.9 μM) of complex 1 against HepG-2 cells was nearly 0.5 fold of that against human hepatic cell lines LO2, showing a lower toxicity to human liver cells. Additionally, it displayed a stronger inhibition on the viability of HepG-2 cells than cisplatin (IC50=25±3.1 μM), suggesting complex 1 might be a potential high efficient antitumor agent. Furthermore, fluorescence microscopic observation and flow cytometric analysis revealed that complex 1 could significantly suppress HepG-2 cell viability and induce apoptosis. Several indexes, such as DNA cleavage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, comet assay and cell cycle analysis indicated that the antitumor mechanism of complex 1 on HepG-2 cells might be via ROS-triggered apoptosis pathway. PMID:24690556

  2. Gallic Acid as a Complexing Agent for Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing Slurries at Neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yung Jun; Kang, Min Cheol; Kwon, Oh Joong; Kim, Jae Jeong

    2011-05-01

    Gallic acid was investigated as a new complexing agent for copper (Cu) chemical mechanical polishing slurries at neutral pH. Addition of 0.03 M gallic acid and 1.12 M H2O2 at pH 7 resulted in a Cu removal rate of 560.73±17.49 nm/min, and the ratio of the Cu removal rate to the Cu dissolution rate was 14.8. Addition of gallic acid improved the slurry performance compared to glycine addition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and contact angle measurements showed that addition of gallic acid enhanced the Cu polishing behavior by suppressing the formation of surface Cu oxide.

  3. Chemical Diversity in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Tucana II

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Alexander P; Ezzeddine, Rana; Casey, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Tucana II based on high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of four red giant stars. The metallicity of these stars ranges from [Fe/H] = -3.2 to -2.6, and all stars are low in neutron-capture abundances ([Sr/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] < -1). However, a number of anomalous chemical signatures are present. Three stars are carbon-enhanced, including the most metal-rich star. This star ([Fe/H]=-2.6) shows [Na,$\\alpha$,Sc/Fe] < 0, suggesting an extended star formation history with contributions from AGB stars and Type Ia supernovae. The other carbon-enhanced stars have [Fe/H] < -3 and may be consistent with enrichment by faint supernovae, if such supernovae can produce neutron-capture elements. A fourth star with [Fe/H] = -3 is carbon-normal, and exhibits distinct light element abundance ratios from the carbon-enhanced stars. The carbon-normal star implies that at least two distinct nucleosynthesis sources, both possibly associated w...

  4. The effect of different chemical and physical agents on the viability of Cysticercus bovis: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebrekidan, H

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro comparative effect of 23 chemicals and 5 physical agents on the viability of Cysticerci of Taenia saginata was investigated. Accordingly the effects of Vinegar, "Kosso-Araki", "Senafitch", "Dagim-Araki", "Datta", Gin, Lemon-juice, Cognac, Fernet Whisky, Bitter, Brandy, Kilikil, "Feto", ArakiUzo, Araki-Double Uzo, Vermouth, Metta Beer, Pilsner Beer, "Awazie", "Tella", "Tej", and Sarris Wine Red and White; was assessed on the basis of minimum exposure time (in minutes) required to render viable cysticerci nonevaginable, and was found to be 5, 20, 20, 25, 40, 40, 45, 50, 55, 75, 80, 90, 90, 90, 105, 105, 110 respectively with the remaining showing no deleterious effects on the cysts up to 180 minutes of exposure. Similarly, viable bovine cysticerci were subjected to the physical forces of x-ray radiation, electricity, UV light radiation, centrifugation and vibration, and the effect of the individual agent on the cysts was assessed on the basis of minimum applicable force required to render bovine cysticerci non-evaginable. And it was found that, whereas 500 grays (Gy) of absorbed xray radiation dose and electric current measuring 0.1 mA applied for 1/2 a minute were required to render cysts nonviable. A relative decrease in evagination time and increased viger and motility of the evaginated cysticerci was observed with the other physical forces. On the basis of these results, it is suggested that an attempt to understand the mechanism of action and may be elucidation of the active principle of the more potent agents will be a step forward towards a successful break in the life cycle of the parasite. PMID:1563360

  5. High-throughput identification of chemical inhibitors of E. coli Group 2 capsule biogenesis as anti-virulence agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos C Goller

    Full Text Available Rising antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli, the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs, has placed a new focus on molecular pathogenesis studies, aiming to identify new therapeutic targets. Anti-virulence agents are attractive as chemotherapeutics to attenuate an organism during disease but not necessarily during benign commensalism, thus decreasing the stress on beneficial microbial communities and lessening the emergence of resistance. We and others have demonstrated that the K antigen capsule of E. coli is a preeminent virulence determinant during UTI and more invasive diseases. Components of assembly and export are highly conserved among the major K antigen capsular types associated with UTI-causing E. coli and are distinct from the capsule biogenesis machinery of many commensal E. coli, making these attractive therapeutic targets. We conducted a screen for anti-capsular small molecules and identified an agent designated "C7" that blocks the production of K1 and K5 capsules, unrelated polysaccharide types among the Group 2-3 capsules. Herein lies proof-of-concept that this screen may be implemented with larger chemical libraries to identify second-generation small-molecule inhibitors of capsule biogenesis. These inhibitors will lead to a better understanding of capsule biogenesis and may represent a new class of therapeutics.

  6. Broad-Spectrum Liquid- and Gas-Phase Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents by One-Dimensional Heteropolyniobates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weiwei; Lv, Hongjin; Sullivan, Kevin P; Gordon, Wesley O; Balboa, Alex; Wagner, George W; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Bacsa, John; Hill, Craig L

    2016-06-20

    A wide range of chemical warfare agents and their simulants are catalytically decontaminated by a new one-dimensional polymeric polyniobate (P-PONb), K12 [Ti2 O2 ][GeNb12 O40 ]⋅19 H2 O (KGeNb) under mild conditions and in the dark. Uniquely, KGeNb facilitates hydrolysis of nerve agents Sarin (GB) and Soman (GD) (and their less reactive simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP)) as well as mustard (HD) in both liquid and gas phases at ambient temperature and in the absence of neutralizing bases or illumination. Three lines of evidence establish that KGeNb removes DMMP, and thus likely GB/GD, by general base catalysis: a) the k(H2 O)/k(D2 O) solvent isotope effect is 1.4; b) the rate law (hydrolysis at the same pH depends on the amount of P-PONb present); and c) hydroxide is far less active against the above simulants at the same pH than the P-PONbs themselves, a critical control experiment. PMID:27061963

  7. A cleaning method to minimize contaminant luminescence signal of empty sample carriers using off-the-shelf chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signals acquired during thermoluminescence or optically stimulated luminescence measurements must be completely free of any spurious and/or contamination signals to assure the credibility of the results, especially during exploratory research investigating the luminescence behavior of new materials. Experiments indicate that such unwanted signals may also stem from new (unused) and used empty sample carriers, namely cups and discs, which are widely used for such measurements, probably due to contamination from a fluorite and/or silica-related source. Fluorite and/or silicone oil appear to be the most likely sources of contamination, thus, their removal, along with any other possible source that exhibits undesirable luminescence behavior, is necessary. Conventional cleaning methods fail to eliminate such contaminants from empty cups and discs. In this work a new cleaning method is proposed incorporating off-the-shelf chemical agents. Results of thermoluminescence measurements highlight the efficiency of the new cleaning process, since it can completely remove any observed contaminants from both new and used sample carriers, of various shapes and/or materials. Consequently their signal is minimized even at relatively high beta-doses, where it is prominent, resulting in a clean and only sample-attributed signal. - Highlights: • New and used empty sample carriers suffer from contamination from a fluorite and silica-related source. • A new cleaning method for empty sample carriers is proposed using off-the-shelf chemical agents. • The new method can eliminate any contamination from empty sample holders of various shapes and/or materials. • Contamination signals are reduced to the background level even at relatively high doses (100 Gy)

  8. Synthesis, Biological, and Quantum Chemical Studies of Zn(II) and Ni(II) Mixed-Ligand Complexes Derived from N,N-Disubstituted Dithiocarbamate and Benzoic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony C. Ekennia; Damian C. Onwudiwe; Aderoju A Osowole; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Eno E. Ebenso

    2016-01-01

    Some mixed-ligand complexes of Zn(II) and Ni(II) derived from the sodium salt of N-alkyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate and benzoic acid have been prepared. The complexes are represented as ZnMDBz, ZnEDBz, NiMDBz, and NiEDBz (MD: N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, ED: N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, and Bz: benzoate); and their coordination behavior was characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements, and quantum chemical calculatio...

  9. Chemical composition and biological evaluation of Physalis peruviana root as hepato-renal protective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gengaihi, Souad E; Hassan, Emad E; Hamed, Manal A; Zahran, Hanan G; Mohammed, Mona A

    2013-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential of Physalis peruviana root as a functional food with hepato-renal protective effects against fibrosis. The chemical composition of the plant root suggested the presence of alkaloids, withanolides and flavonoids. Five compounds were isolated and their structures elucidated by different spectral analysis techniques. One compound was isolated from the roots: cuscohygrine. The biological evaluation was conducted on different animal groups; control rats, control treated with ethanolic root extract, CCl(4) group, CCl(4) treated with root extract, and CCl(4) treated with silymarin as a standard herbal drug. The evaluation used the oxidative stress markers malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and nitric oxide (NO). The liver function indices; aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST & ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), bilirubin, and total hepatic protein were also estimated. Kidney disorder biomarkers; creatinine, urea, and serum protein were also evaluated. The results suggested safe administration, and improvement of all the investigated parameters. The liver and kidney histopathological analysis confirmed the results. In conclusion, P. peruviana succeeded in protecting the liver and kidney against fibrosis. Further studies are needed to discern their pharmacological applications and clinical uses. PMID:23419022

  10. Partial chemical characterization of antigenic preparations of chromoblastomycosis agents Caracterização química parcial de preparações antigênicas de agentes da cromoblastomicose

    OpenAIRE

    Tania Fraga BARROS; de Resende, Maria Aparecida

    1999-01-01

    Antigenic preparations (saline, methylic, metabolic and exoantigens) of four agents of chromoblastomycosis, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladophialophora (Cladosporium) carrionii and Rhinocladiella aquaspersa were obtained. Partial chemical characterization of these antigenic preparations was obtained by determination of the levels of total lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, and identification of the main sterols and carbohydrates. Methylic antigens presented the highest lipid ...

  11. Studies of the chemical and biological properties of the bone and acute myocardial imaging agent 99mTc-PYP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlation between the in vivo distribution and the chemical formulation of 99mTc-PYP complex was studied. Mice was chosen to evaluate in vivo biodistribution and gel chromatography column scanning technique for radiochemical analysis. The influence of the pH, Sn(II), pyrophosphate concentration and molar ratios of Sn : PYP on the labelling of PYP with 99mTc was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Induced myocardial infarction was evaluated in rats. The clinical evaluation showed excellent definition of sternum and ribs with little blood background activity with normal subjects. Discrete localization of abnormally high activity was shown in the site of recent infarction of the left ventricular myocardium. (author)

  12. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  13. Mechanistic insights into the luminescent sensing of organophosphorus chemical warfare agents and simulants using trivalent lanthanide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Genevieve H; Johnston, Martin R

    2015-04-20

    Organophosphorus chemical warfare agents (OP CWAs) are potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that can cause incapacitation and death within minutes of exposure, and furthermore are largely undetectable by the human senses. Fast, efficient, sensitive and selective detection of these compounds is therefore critical to minimise exposure. Traditional molecular-based sensing approaches have exploited the chemical reactivity of the OP CWAs, whereas more recently supramolecular-based approaches using non-covalent interactions have gained momentum. This is due, in part, to the potential development of sensors with second-generation properties, such as reversibility and multifunction capabilities. Supramolecular sensors also offer opportunities for incorporation of metal ions allowing for the exploitation of their unique properties. In particular, trivalent lanthanide ions are being increasingly used in the OP CWA sensing event and their use in supramolecular sensors is discussed in this Minireview. We focus on the fundamental interactions of simple lanthanide systems with OP CWAs and simulants, along with the development of more elaborate and complex systems including those containing nanotubes, polymers and gold nanoparticles. Whilst literature investigations into lanthanide-based OP CWA detection systems are relatively scarce, their unique and versatile properties provide a promising platform for the development of more efficient and complex sensing systems into the future. PMID:25649522

  14. Concise and Efficient Fluorescent Probe via an Intromolecular Charge Transfer for the Chemical Warfare Agent Mimic Diethylchlorophosphate Vapor Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjun; Fu, Yanyan; Xu, Wei; Fan, Tianchi; Gao, Yixun; He, Qingguo; Zhu, Defeng; Cao, Huimin; Cheng, Jiangong

    2016-02-16

    Sarin, used as chemical warfare agents (CWAs) for terrorist attacks, can induce a number of virulent effects. Therefore, countermeasures which could realize robust and convenient detection of sarin are in exigent need. A concise charge-transfer colorimetric and fluorescent probe (4-(6-(tert-butyl)pyridine-2-yl)-N,N-diphenylaniline, TBPY-TPA) that could be capable of real-time and on-site monitoring of DCP vapor was reported in this contribution. Upon contact with DCP, the emission band red-shifted from 410 to 522 nm upon exposure to DCP vapor. And the quenching rate of TBPY-TPA reached up to 98% within 25 s. Chemical substances such as acetic acid (HAc), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PAMP), and triethyl phosphate (TEP) do not interfere with the detection. A detection limit for DCP down to 2.6 ppb level is remarkably achieved which is below the Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health concentration. NMR data suggested that a transformation of the pyridine group into pyridinium salt via a cascade reaction is responsible for the sensing process which induced the dramatic fluorescent red shift. All of these data suggest TBPY-TPA is a promising fluorescent sensor for a rapid, simple, and low-cost method for DCP detection, which could be easy to prepare as a portable chemosensor kit for its practical application in real-time and on-site monitoring. PMID:26776457

  15. Metal-Based Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents: Synthesis, Characterization, and In Vitro Biological Evaluation of Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, and Zn(II Complexes with Amino Acid-Derived Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid H. Chohan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of antibacterial and antifungal amino acid-derived compounds and their cobalt(II, copper(II, nickel(II, and zinc(II metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by their elemental analyses, molar conductances, magnetic moments, and IR, and electronic spectral measurements. Ligands (L1–(L5 were derived by condensation of β-diketones with glycine, phenylalanine, valine, and histidine and act as bidentate towards metal ions (cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc via the azomethine-N and deprotonated-O of the respective amino acid. The stoichiometric reaction between the metal(II ion and synthesized ligands in molar ratio of M: L (1: 1 resulted in the formation of the metal complexes of type [M(L(H2O4]Cl (where M = Co(II, Cu(II, and Zn(II and of M: L (1: 2 of type [M(L2(H2O2] (where M = Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, and Zn(II. The magnetic moment data suggested for the complexes to have an octahedral geometry around the central metal atom. The electronic spectral data also supported the same octahedral geometry of the complexes. Elemental analyses and NMR spectral data of the ligands and their metal(II complexes agree with their proposed structures. The synthesized ligands, along with their metal(II complexes, were screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella flexeneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhi and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains and for in vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani, and Candida glaberata. The results of these studies show the metal(II complexes to be more antibacterial/antifungal against one or more species as compared to the uncomplexed ligands. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in vitro cytotoxic properties. Five compounds, (3, (7, (10, (11, and (22, displayed potent cytotoxic

  16. Metal-Based Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents: Synthesis, Characterization, and In Vitro Biological Evaluation of Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) Complexes With Amino Acid-Derived Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Zahid H; Arif, M; Akhtar, Muhammad A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2006-01-01

    A series of antibacterial and antifungal amino acid-derived compounds and their cobalt(II), copper(II), nickel(II), and zinc(II) metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by their elemental analyses, molar conductances, magnetic moments, and IR, and electronic spectral measurements. Ligands (L(1))-(L(5)) were derived by condensation of beta-diketones with glycine, phenylalanine, valine, and histidine and act as bidentate towards metal ions (cobalt, copper, nickel, and zinc) via the azomethine-N and deprotonated-O of the respective amino acid. The stoichiometric reaction between the metal(II) ion and synthesized ligands in molar ratio of M : L (1 : 1) resulted in the formation of the metal complexes of type [M(L)(H(2)O)(4)]Cl (where M = Co(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II)) and of M : L (1 : 2) of type [M(L)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] (where M = Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II)). The magnetic moment data suggested for the complexes to have an octahedral geometry around the central metal atom. The electronic spectral data also supported the same octahedral geometry of the complexes. Elemental analyses and NMR spectral data of the ligands and their metal(II) complexes agree with their proposed structures. The synthesized ligands, along with their metal(II) complexes, were screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Shigella flexeneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhi) and two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial strains and for in vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani, and Candida glaberata. The results of these studies show the metal(II) complexes to be more antibacterial/antifungal against one or more species as compared to the uncomplexed ligands. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in vitro cytotoxic properties. Five compounds, (3), (7), (10), (11), and (22

  17. Utilization of ventilation air methane as an oxidizing agent in chemical looping combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel ancillary method for mitigating VAM was proposed and evaluated. • The effect of variations in VAM on the system was assessed thermodynamically. • The combustion of VAM with and without Fe2O3/Al2O3 were studied experimentally. • Ventilation air methane abatement can be achieved by the proposed system. - Abstract: Release of fugitive methane (CH4) emissions from ventilation air in coal mines is a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Approximately 64% of methane emissions in coal mine operations are the result of VAM (i.e. ventilation air methane) which is difficult for use as a source of energy. A novel ancillary utilization of VAM was thereby proposed. In this proposal, the VAM was utilized instead of air as a feedstock to a chemical looping combustion (CLC) process of coal. In this case, Fe2O3/Fe3O4 particles were shuttled between two interconnected reactors for combustion of syngas produced by an imbedded coal gasifier. The effect of VAM flow rate and methane concentration on the performance of CLC was analyzed thermodynamically using Aspen Plus software. Results indicated that the variations of air reactor temperature with VAM flow rate and methane concentration can be minimized as expected. The effect of temperature and inlet methane concentration on the conversion of CH4 was examined experimentally in a fixed bed reactor with the presence of particles of Fe2O3/Al2O3. Not surprisingly, the reaction temperature put a significant influence on the conversion of CH4. The conversion started at the temperature about 300 °C and the temperature to achieve full conversion was around 500 °C while the temperature in empty reactor between 665 °C and 840 °C. This is due to the catalytic effect of oxygen carriers (i.e. Fe2O3/Al2O3) on the conversion of methane. Moreover, it was observed that the methane conversion rate decreased with the increase in inlet methane concentration while increasing with Fe2O3 loading content

  18. Acute environmental toxicity and persistence of DEM, a chemical agent simulant: Diethyl malonate. [Diethyl malonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Harvey, S.D.; Fellows, R.J.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Van Voris, P.; Wentsel, R.S.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the following chemical simulant studies is to assess the potential acute environmental effects and persistence of diethyl malonate (DEM). Deposition velocities for DEM to soil surfaces ranged from 0.04 to 0.2 cm/sec. For foliar surfaces, deposition velocities ranged from 0.0002 cm/sec at low air concentrations to 0.05 cm/sec for high dose levels. The residence times or half-lives of DEM deposited to soils was 2 h for the fast component and 5 to 16 h for the residual material. DEM deposited to foliar surfaces also exhibited biphasic depuration. The half-life of the short residence time component ranged from 1 to 3 h, while the longer time component had half-times of 16 to 242 h. Volatilization and other depuration mechanisms reduce surface contaminant levels in both soils and foliage to less than 1% of initial dose within 96 h. DEM is not phytotoxic at foliar mass loading levels of less than 10 {mu}m/cm{sup 2}. However, severe damage is evident at mass loading levels in excess of 17 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}. Tall fescue and sagebrush were more affected than was short-needle pine, however, mass loading levels were markedly different. Regrowth of tall fescue indicated that the effects of DEM are residual, and growth rates are affected only at higher mass loadings through the second harvest. Results from in vitro testing of DEM indicated concentrations below 500 {mu}g/g dry soil generally did not negatively impact soil microbial activity. Short-term effects of DEM were more profound on soil dehydrogenase activity than on soil phosphatase activity. No enzyme inhibition or enhancement was observed after 28 days in incubation. Results of the earthworm bioassay indicate survival to be 86 and 66% at soil doses of 107 and 204 {mu}g DEM/cm{sup 2}, respectively. At higher dose level, activity or mobility was judged to be affected in over 50% of the individuals. 21 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. ADSORPTION OF Cu(II FROM THE AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY CHEMICAL ACTIVATED ADSORBENT OF ARECA CATECHU SHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSLIM A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Areca catechu shell (ACS was utilised as adsorbent for removal of Cu(II from aqueous solution. FTIR and SEM analysis were conducted to characterise the surface morphology of chemical activated ACS adsorbent. The ACS adsorbent has been investigated in terms of contact time and Cu(II initial concentration. As a result, the efficiency of Cu(II removal in solution exponentially increased with contact time reaching equilibrium at 9.6 ks. Cu (II adsorption capacity increased over the increasing Cu(II initial concentration in solution from 0 to 14 mg/L, and it decreased for the decreasing Cu(II initial concentration in solution from 14 to 25 mg/L. The highest Cu(II adsorption capacity for the Cu(II initial concentration being in the range of 1-25 mg/L was 1.33 mg/g at 14 mg/L Cu(II initial concentration. The kinetics study showed the Cu(II adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics with the correlation coefficients (R2 being 0.999 and the rate constant, kH being 0.18 g/mg.ks. Meanwhile, the pseudo-first-order rate constant, kL being 0.52 /ks with the R2 being 0.807. Moreover, the Cu(II adsorption isotherm followed the Langmuir model with the R2 being 0.98, and the mono-layer adsorption capacity being approximately 0.964 mg/g. The Langmuir over-all adsorption capacity is approximately 2.788 L/mg.

  20. Synthesis and physico-chemical characterization of zinc(II, nickel(II and cobalt(II complexes with 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podunavac-Kuzmanović Sanja O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorides and nitrates of zinc(II, nickel(II and cobalt(II react with 2-phenyl-2-imidazoline to give complexes of the type [ML2X2]·nH2O (M=Zn, Ni or Co; L=2-phenyl-2-imidazoline; X=Cl or NO3; n=0, 1 or 2. The complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis of the metal molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility measurements and IR spectra. The molar conductances of the zinc(II complexes in DMF solutions indicate that the complexes behave as non-electrolytes. The values of magnetic conductivity in the case of nickel(II complexes indicate that one of the coordinated anions (chloride or nitrate has been replaced by DMF molecule. The molar conductivity values of cobalt(II complexes indicate the partial substitution of coordinated anions with solvent molecules. The room temperature effective magnetic moments and IR data of the complexes suggest that all Zn(II, Ni(II and Co(II complexes have a tetrahedral configuration, which is realized by participation of the pyridine nitrogen of two organic ligand molecules, and two chloride or nitrate anions typical for these classes of organic ligands.

  1. Phase II trial of the regulatory T cell-depleting agent, denileukin diftitox, in patients with unresectable stage IV melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously found that administration of an interleukin 2/diphtheria toxin conjugate (DAB/IL2; Denileukin Diftitox; ONTAK) to stage IV melanoma patients depleted CD4+CD25HIFoxp3+ regulatory T cells and expanded melanoma-specific CD8+ T cells. The goal of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy of DAB/IL2 in an expanded cohort of stage IV melanoma patients. In a single-center, phase II trial, DAB/IL2 (12 μg/kg; 4 daily doses; 21 day cycles) was administered to 60 unresectable stage IV melanoma patients and response rates were assessed using a combination of 2-[18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. After DAB/IL2 administration, 16.7% of the 60 patients had partial responses, 5% stable disease and 15% mixed responses. Importantly, 45.5% of the chemo/immuno-naïve sub-population (11/60 patients) experienced partial responses. One year survival was markedly higher in partial responders (80 ± 11.9%) relative to patients with progressive disease (23.7 ± 6.5%; p value < 0.001) and 40 ± 6.2% of the total DAB/IL2-treated population were alive at 1 year. These data support the development of multi-center, randomized trials of DAB/IL2 as a monotherapy and in combination with other immunotherapeutic agents for the treatment of stage IV melanoma. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00299689

  2. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  3. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidi Zhu

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L., one of the world's most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1-induced wheat male sterility.

  4. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qidi; Song, Yulong; Zhang, Gaisheng; Ju, Lan; Zhang, Jiao; Yu, Yongang; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the world's most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating) species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1-induced wheat male sterility. PMID:25898130

  5. Structural, spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies of acetyl hydrazone oxime and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yunus; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2015-09-01

    Acetyl hydrazone oxime, [(1E,2E)-2-(hydroxyimino)-1-phenylethylidene]acetohydrazone (hipeahH2) and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes, [M(hipeahH)2] (M = PdII and PtII), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis IR, NMR and LC-MS techniques. X-ray diffraction analysis of [Pd(hipeahH)2] shows that the two hipeahH2 ligands are not equal; one of the ligands loses the hydrazone proton, while the other one loses the oxime proton, resulting in a different coordination behavior to form five- and six-membered chelate rings. The molecular geometries from X-ray experiments in the ground state were compared using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method combined with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the ligand and the LanL2DZ basis set for the complexes. Comprehensive theoretical and experimental structural studies on the molecule have been carried out by FT-IR, NMR and UV-vis spectrometry. In addition, the isomer studies of ligand and its complexes were made by DFT.

  6. Stochastic theory of nonequilibrium steady states. Part II: Applications in chemical biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical theory of nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) has a natural application in open biochemical systems which have sustained source(s) and sink(s) in terms of a difference in their chemical potentials. After a brief introduction in Section , in Part II of this review, we present the widely studied biochemical enzyme kinetics, the workhorse of biochemical dynamic modeling, in terms of the theory of NESS (Section ). We then show that several phenomena in enzyme kinetics, including a newly discovered activation–inhibition switching (Section ) and the well-known non-Michaelis–Menten-cooperativity (Section ) and kinetic proofreading (Section ), are all consequences of the NESS of driven biochemical systems with associated cycle fluxes. Section is focused on nonlinear and nonequilibrium systems of biochemical reactions. We use the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC), one of the most important biochemical signaling networks, as an example (Section ). It starts with a brief introduction of the Delbrück–Gillespie process approach to mesoscopic biochemical kinetics (Sections ). We shall discuss the zeroth-order ultrasensitivity of PdPC in terms of a new concept — the temporal cooperativity (Sections ), as well as PdPC with feedback which leads to biochemical nonlinear bistability (Section ). Also, both are nonequilibrium phenomena. PdPC with a nonlinear feedback is kinetically isomorphic to a self-regulating gene expression network, hence the theory of NESS discussed here could have wide applications to many other biochemical systems.

  7. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO2 samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within ±10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for 242Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  8. The chemically controlled synthesis of dust in type II-P supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial mass of 12, 15, 19 and 25 Msun that explode as supernovae with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulphides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the 56Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesised dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O2, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Hersc...

  9. Chemical Characterization and Removal of Carbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite II - 13023

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (C-14), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates C-14 is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented last year and updated here is to identify the chemical form of C-14 in irradiated graphite and develop a practical method by which C-14 can be removed. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoamR, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of C-14 precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). Finer grained NBG-25 was not exposed to liquid nitrogen prior to irradiation at a neutron flux on the order of 1014 /cm2/s. Characterization of pre- and post-irradiation graphite was conducted to determine the chemical environment and quantity of C-14 and its precursors via the use of surface sensitive characterization techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological features of graphite samples. The concentration, chemical composition, and bonding characteristics of C-14 and its precursors were determined through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis Spectroscopy (EDX). Results of post-irradiation characterization of these materials indicate a variety of surface functional groups containing carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During thermal treatment, irradiated graphite samples are heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products

  10. Analysis of chemical warfare agents in organic liquid samples with magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry for verification of the chemical weapons convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud, Raghavender D; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-05-27

    A simple, sensitive and low temperature sample preparation method is developed for detection and identification of Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and scheduled esters in organic liquid using magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The method utilizes Iron oxide@Poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) resin (Fe2O3@Poly(MAA-co-EGDMA)) as sorbent. Variants of these sorbents were prepared by precipitation polymerization of methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (MAA-co-EGDMA) onto Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Fe2O3@poly(MAA-co-EGDMA) with 20% MAA showed highest recovery of analytes. Extractions were performed with magnetic microspheres by MDSPE. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, method showed linearity in the range of 0.1-3.0μgmL(-1) (r(2)=0.9966-0.9987). The repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviations (RSDs) %) were in the range of 4.5-7.6% and 3.4-6.2% respectively for organophosphorous esters in dodecane. Limits of detection (S/N=3/1) and limit of quantification (S/N=10/1) were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1μgmL(-1) and 0.1-0.12μgmL(-1) respectively in SIM mode for selected analytes. The method was successfully validated and applied to the extraction and identification of targeted analytes from three different organic liquids i.e. n-hexane, dodecane and silicon oil. Recoveries ranged from 58.7 to 97.3% and 53.8 to 95.5% at 3μgmL(-1) and 1μgmL(-1) spiking concentrations. Detection of diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP) and O-Ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) in samples provided by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons Proficiency Test (OPCW-PT) proved the utility of the developed method for the off-site analysis of CWC relevant chemicals. PMID:27113675

  11. Effect Of Inorganic, Synthetic And Naturally Occurring Chelating Agents On Fe(II) Mediated Advanced Oxidation Of Chlorophenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the feasibility and application of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs) for the treatment of chlorophenols that are included in US EPA priority pollutant list. A novel class of sulfate/hydroxyl radical-based homogeneous AOTs (Fe(II)/PS, Fe(II)/PMS, Fe(II)/H...

  12. Holo- and hemidirected lead(II) in the polymeric [Pb(4)(mu-3,4-TDTA)2(H2O)2]*4H2O complex. N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate ligands derived from o-phenylenediamines as sequestering agents for lead(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchiz, Joaquín; Esparza, Pedro; Villagra, Diego; Domínguez, Sixto; Mederos, Alfredo; Brito, Felipe; Araujo, Lorena; Sánchez, Agustin; Arrieta, Juan Manuel

    2002-11-18

    The coordinating ability of the ligands 3,4-toluenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate (3,4-TDTA), o-phenylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate (o-PhDTA), and 4-chloro-1,2-phenylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate (4-Cl-o-PhDTA) (H4L acids) toward lead(II) is studied by potentiometry (25 degrees C, I = 0.5 mol x dm(-3) in NaClO4), UV-vis spectrophotometry, and 207Pb NMR spectrometry. The stability constants of the complex species formed were determined. X-ray diffraction structural analysis of the complex [Pb4(mu-3,4-TDTA)4(H2O)2]*4H2O (1) revealed that 1 has a 2-D structure. The layers are built up by the polymerization of centrosymmetric [Pb4L2(H2O)2] tetranuclear units. The neutral layers have the aromatic rings of the ligands pointing to the periphery, whereas the metallic ions are located in the central part of the layers. In compound 1, two types of six-coordinate lead(II) environments are produced. The Pb(1) is coordinated to two nitrogen atoms and four carboxylate oxygens from the ligand, whereas Pb(2) has an O6 trigonally distorted octahedral surrounding. The lead(II) ion is surrounded by five carboxylate oxygens and a water molecule. The carboxylate oxygens belong to four different ligands that are also joined to four other Pb(1) ions. The selective uptake of lead(II) was analyzed by means of chemical speciation diagrams as well as the so-called conditional or effective formation constants K(Pb)eff. The results indicate that, in competition with other ligands that are strong complexing agents for lead(II), our ligands are better sequestering agents in acidic media. PMID:12425632

  13. Fabrication and electrical characteristics of TFTs based on chemically deposited CdS films, using glycine as a complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report on the fabrication and electrical characteristics of thin film transistors (TFTs) using chemically deposited cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films as the semiconductor active layer in back-gated devices. The CdS thin films were deposited by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique using glycine as the complexing agent. The CdS layers were deposited on SiO2/Si-n substrates and lift-off was used to define the source and drain contacts (Au) on top of these layers. The Si-n wafer with a chromium-gold back contact served as the common gate for the transistors. Several devices with different channel lengths ranging from 10 to 80 µm were fabricated by this process. We studied the properties of the CdS layers deposited by this glycine-based CBD process and the electrical behavior of the transistors as a function of the channel length. The experimental results show that as-deposited CdS are n-type in character and devices exhibit typical pinch-off in drain current versus source–drain voltage (IDS–VDS) curves for several gate voltages. The values of the threshold voltage of the devices were in the range from 8.5 to 8.9 V, depending on the channel length. Channel mobility was between 4.3 and 5.2 cm2 V−1 s−1. This research implies that CdS TFTs produced by a simple and low-cost technique could be applicable to electronic devices

  14. Remote Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Raman Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants and Toxic Industrial Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rivera, William; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2010-09-01

    This study describes the design, assembly, testing and comparison of two Remote Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) systems intended for standoff detection of hazardous chemical liquids. Raman spectra of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants (CWAS) and Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) were measured in the laboratory at a 6.6 m source-target distance using continuous wave (CW) laser detection. Standoff distances for pulsed measurements were 35 m for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection and 60, 90 and 140 m for cyclohexane detection. The prototype systems consisted of a Raman spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector (for CW measurements) and an I-CCD camera with time-gated electronics (for pulsed laser measurements), a reflecting telescope, a fiber optic assembly, a single-line CW laser source (514.5, 488.0, 351.1 and 363.8 nm) and a frequency-doubled single frequency Nd:YAG 532 nm laser (5 ns pulses at 10 Hz). The telescope was coupled to the spectrograph using an optical fiber, and filters were used to reject laser radiation and Rayleigh scattering. Two quartz convex lenses were used to collimate the light from the telescope from which the telescope-focusing eyepiece was removed, and direct it to the fiber optic assembly. To test the standoff sensing system, the Raman Telescope was used in the detection of liquid TIC: benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and carbon disulfide. Other compounds studied were CWAS: dimethylmethyl phosphonate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-(butylamino)-ethanethiol. Relative Raman scattering cross sections of liquid CWAS were measured using single-line sources at 532.0, 488.0, 363.8 and 351.1 nm. Samples were placed in glass and quartz vials at the standoff distances from the telescope for the Remote Raman measurements. The mass of DMMP present in water solutions was also quantified as part of the system performance tests.

  15. Chemical modification of silica gel with synthesized new Schiff base derivatives and sorption studies of cobalt (II) and nickel (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, three Schiff base ligands and their complexes were synthesized and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis and magnetic susceptibility apparatuses. Silica gel was respectively modified with Schiff base derivatives, (E)-2-[(2-chloroethylimino)methyl]phenol, (E)-4-[(2-chloroethylimino)methyl]phenol and N,N'-[1,4-phenilendi(E)methylidene]bis(2-chloroethanamine), after silanization of silica gel by (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTS) by using a suitable method. Characterization of the surface modification was also performed with IR, TGA and elemental analysis. The immobilized surfaces were used for Co(II) and Ni(II) sorption from aqueous solutions and values of sorption were detected by atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS).

  16. Mass spectrometry as a tool for characterization of N,N-dialkylaminoethane-2-thiols - precursors and degradation products of chemical warfare agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papoušková, B.; Bednář, P.; Stýskala, Jakub; Hlaváč, J.; Barták, P.; Lemr, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 11 (2009), s. 1604-1612. ISSN 1076-5174 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : mass spectrometry * chemical warfare agents * N,N-dialkylaminoethane-2-thiols Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2009

  17. Anomalous chemical shifts in X-ray photoelectron spectra of sulfur-containing compounds of silver (I) and (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ag 3d5/2 binding energy for Ag(II)SO4 is as large as 370.1 eV. • This is the largest value ever measured for a silver (II) compound. • Large shift is connected with the extreme oxidizing nature of Ag(II) species. • Ag(I)2S2O7 exhibits both positive and negative shifts with respect to metallic Ag. • Two distinct Ag(I) sites are responsible for large BE difference of 3.6 eV. - Abstract: Anomalous chemical shifts, i.e. cases when binding energy decreases with the increase of the oxidation state, have been well-documented for selected compounds of silver, and well understood based on analysis of initial- and final-state effects in the XPS spectra. Here we report two examples of even more exotic behaviour of chemical shifts for two silver compounds. The first one is Ag2S2O7 which exhibits both positive and negative substantial shifts with respect to metallic Ag for two distinct Ag(I) sites in its crystal structure, which differ by as much as 3.6 eV. Another is AgSO4, a rare example of oxo silver (II) salt, which exhibits “normal” chemical shift but the Ag 3d5/2 binding energy takes the largest value measured for a silver (II) compound (370.1 eV). This property is connected predominantly with the extremely strongly oxidizing nature of Ag(II) species

  18. Anomalous chemical shifts in X-ray photoelectron spectra of sulfur-containing compounds of silver (I) and (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzelak, A. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteur 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Jaroń, T. [Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 93, 02089 Warsaw (Poland); Mazej, Z. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Michałowski, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteur 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 93, 02089 Warsaw (Poland); Szarek, P. [Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 93, 02089 Warsaw (Poland); Grochala, W., E-mail: w.grochala@cent.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteur 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Żwirki i Wigury 93, 02089 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Ag 3d{sub 5/2} binding energy for Ag(II)SO{sub 4} is as large as 370.1 eV. • This is the largest value ever measured for a silver (II) compound. • Large shift is connected with the extreme oxidizing nature of Ag(II) species. • Ag(I){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibits both positive and negative shifts with respect to metallic Ag. • Two distinct Ag(I) sites are responsible for large BE difference of 3.6 eV. - Abstract: Anomalous chemical shifts, i.e. cases when binding energy decreases with the increase of the oxidation state, have been well-documented for selected compounds of silver, and well understood based on analysis of initial- and final-state effects in the XPS spectra. Here we report two examples of even more exotic behaviour of chemical shifts for two silver compounds. The first one is Ag{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 7} which exhibits both positive and negative substantial shifts with respect to metallic Ag for two distinct Ag(I) sites in its crystal structure, which differ by as much as 3.6 eV. Another is AgSO{sub 4}, a rare example of oxo silver (II) salt, which exhibits “normal” chemical shift but the Ag 3d{sub 5/2} binding energy takes the largest value measured for a silver (II) compound (370.1 eV). This property is connected predominantly with the extremely strongly oxidizing nature of Ag(II) species.

  19. Fragmentation of molecular ions in differential mobility spectrometry as a method for identification of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziejuk, M; Puton, J; Szyposzyńska, M; Witkiewicz, Z

    2015-11-01

    The subject of the work is the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWA). Studies were performed for mustard gas, i.e., bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (HD), sarin, i.e., O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB) and methyl salicylate (MS) used as test compounds. Measurements were conducted with two ceramic DMS analyzers of different constructions allowing the generation of an electric field with an intensity of more than 120 Td. Detector signals were measured for positive and negative modes of operation in a temperature range from 0 to 80 °C. Fragmentations of ions containing analyte molecules were observed for all tested compounds. The effective temperatures of fragmentation estimated on the basis of dispersion plots were equal from about 148 °C for GB to 178 °C for MS. It was found that values of separation voltage (SV) and compensation voltage (CV) at which the fragmentation of sample ions is observed may be the parameters improving the certainty of detection for different analytes. The DMS analyzers enabling the observation of ion fragmentation can be successfully used for effective CWA detection. PMID:26452948

  20. THE APPLICATION OF SINGLE PARTICLE AEROSOL MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES AND CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A

    2006-10-23

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle ({approx}1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of military, commercial and novel skin decontamination products against a chemical warfare agent simulant (methyl salicylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Hazem; Guerreiro, Antonio; Piletsky, Sergey A; Price, Shirley C; Chilcott, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    Rapid decontamination is vital to alleviate adverse health effects following dermal exposure to hazardous materials. There is an abundance of materials and products which can be utilised to remove hazardous materials from the skin. In this study, a total of 15 products were evaluated, 10 of which were commercial or military products and five were novel (molecular imprinted) polymers. The efficacies of these products were evaluated against a 10 µl droplet of (14)C-methyl salicylate applied to the surface of porcine skin mounted on static diffusion cells. The current UK military decontaminant (Fuller's earth) performed well, retaining 83% of the dose over 24 h and served as a benchmark to compare with the other test products. The five most effective test products were Fuller's earth (the current UK military decontaminant), Fast-Act® and three novel polymers [based on itaconic acid, 2-trifluoromethylacrylic acid and N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide)]. Five products (medical moist-free wipes, 5% FloraFree™ solution, normal baby wipes, baby wipes for sensitive skin and Diphotérine™) enhanced the dermal absorption of (14)C-methyl salicylate. Further work is required to establish the performance of the most effective products identified in this study against chemical warfare agents. PMID:26339920

  2. Biosorption of Cu (II onto chemically modified waste mycelium of Aspergillus awamori: Equilibrium, kinetics and modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA VELKOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption potential of chemically modified waste mycelium of industrial xylanase-producing strain Aspergillus awamori for Cu (II removal from aqueous solutions was evaluated. The influence of pH, contact time and initial Cu (II concentration on the removal efficiency was evaluated. Maximum biosorption capacity was reached by sodium hydroxide treated waste fungal mycelium at pH 5.0. The Langmuir adsorption equation matched very well the adsorption equilibrium data in the studied conditions. The process kinetic followed the pseudo-firs order model.

  3. Background chemistry for chemical warfare agents and decontamination processes in support of delisting waste streams at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblatt, D.H.; Small, M.J.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1996-04-01

    The State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), has declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues have been designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). The RCRA regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist,{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. The U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (TECOM) believes that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous and has obtained assistance from Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to make the delisting demonstration. The objective of this project is to delist chemical agent decontaminated residues resulting from materials testing activities and to delist a remediation residue (e.g., contaminated soil). To delist these residues, it must be demonstrated that the residues (1) do not contain hazardous quantities of the listed agents; (2) do not contain hazardous quantities of constituents listed in 40 CFR Part 261, Appendix VIII; (3) do not exhibit other characteristics that could define the residues as hazardous; and (4) do not fail a series of acute toxicity tests. The first phase will focus on a subset of the F999 wastes generated at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), where the Army tests the effects of military chemical agents and agent-decontamination procedures on numerous military items. This effort is identified as Phase I of the Delisting Program. Subsequent phases will address other DPG chemical agent decontaminated residues and remediation wastes and similar residues at other installations.

  4. Norspermidine and novel Pd(II and Pt(II polynuclear complexes of norspermidine as potential antineoplastic agents against breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Magalhães Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New strategies are needed for breast cancer treatment and one initial step is to test new chemotherapeutic drugs in breast cancer cell lines, to choose candidates for further studies towards clinical use. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: The cytotoxic effects of a biogenic polyamine analogue - norspermidine - and its trinuclear Pd(II and Pt(II complexes - Pd(3NSpd(2 and Pt(3NSpd(2, respectively - were investigated in one immortalized normal-like and three breast cancer cell lines. The normal-like MCF-10A cells were least sensitive to the compounds, while growth inhibition and cell death was observed in the cancer cell lines. Norspermidine and its Pd(II complex were generally shown to have stronger antiproliferative effects than the corresponding Pt(II complex. Moreover, both norspermidine and the Pd(II complex reduced the cellular activity of the growth-related enzyme, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC to a lower level than the Pt(II complex in most of the cell lines examined. Treatment with norspermidine or the Pd(II complex reduced the number of colonies formed in a soft agar assay performed with the breast cancer cell lines, indicating that these compounds reduced the malignancy of the breast cancer cells. The effect of norspermidine or the Pd(II complex on colony formation was much stronger than that observed for the Pt(II complex. The results from a new mammalian genotoxicity screen together with those of a single cell gel electrophoresis assay indicated that none of the drugs were genotoxic at a 25 µM concentration. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: Overall, norspermidine and its Pd(II complex were shown to have strong antiproliferative effects. In comparison, the effects obtained with the Pd(II complex were much stronger than that of the Pt(II complex. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that the trinuclear Pd(II complex of norspermidine (Pd(3NSpd(2 may be regarded as a potential new metal-based drug against breast cancer, coupling a

  5. Synthesis, Biological, and Quantum Chemical Studies of Zn(II and Ni(II Mixed-Ligand Complexes Derived from N,N-Disubstituted Dithiocarbamate and Benzoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C. Ekennia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some mixed-ligand complexes of Zn(II and Ni(II derived from the sodium salt of N-alkyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate and benzoic acid have been prepared. The complexes are represented as ZnMDBz, ZnEDBz, NiMDBz, and NiEDBz (MD: N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, ED: N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate, and Bz: benzoate; and their coordination behavior was characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, IR, electronic spectra, magnetic and conductivity measurements, and quantum chemical calculations. The magnetic moment measurement and electronic spectra were in agreement with the four proposed coordinate geometries for nickel and zinc complexes and were corroborated by the theoretical quantum chemical calculations. The quantum chemically derived thermodynamics parameters revealed that the formation of N-methyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes is more thermodynamically favourable than that of the N-ethyl-N-phenyl dithiocarbamate complexes. The bioefficacy of the mixed-ligand complexes examined against different microbes showed moderate to high activity against the test microbes. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant studies of the metal complexes showed that the ethyl substituted dithiocarbamate complexes exhibited better anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties than the methyl substituted dithiocarbamate complexes.

  6. Evaluation of thiosemicarbazone derivative as chelating agent for the simultaneous removal and trace determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in food and water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Lee, Kap Duk

    2014-05-01

    In the present investigation, prepared N-ethyl-3-carbazolecarbaxaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone (ECCT) and employed for the simultaneous removal and determination of trace amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from food and water samples. Cd(II) and Pb(II) gave yellow and orange colored complexes with ECCT in acetate buffer at pH 6.0 with λmax, 380 and 440nm, respectively. Both complexes were easily extractable into kerosene at 1:1(M:L) composition. It was in accordance with Beer's law in the range of 0.0-12.0 and 0.0-10.0μgmL(-1) with 0.999 and 0.997 correlation coefficient for Cd(II) and Pb(II) complexes, respectively, indicated a good linearity between the two variables. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity were found to be 0.740×10(4)Lmol(-1)cm(-1), 1.52×10(-3)μgcm(-2) for Cd(II) and 1.809×10(4)L mol(-1)cm(-1), 1.15×10(-3)μgcm(-2) for Pb(II). The precision and accuracy of the method was checked for both metal ions by finding the relative standard deviations (n=8), which were 0.689% and 0.443%, with detection limits of 0.00151μgL(-1) and 0.00264μgL(-1) for Cd(II) and Pb(II), respectively. Further validation using certified reference material, NIST 1568b, resulted in determined concentrations of 0.028±0.253μgg(-1) for Cd(II) and 0.046±0.325μgg(-1) for Pb(II). These determined values agree well with the certified values in the reference materials. The interfering effects of various cations and anions were also studied. The proposed method performance was also evaluated in terms of Student 'T' test and Variance 'F' test, which indicated the significance of the present method parameters, as an inter comparison of the experimental values using ICP-OES. PMID:24360411

  7. TRUPACT-II Content Codes (TRUCON), Revision 8 and list of chemicals and materials in TRUCON (chemical list), Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transuranic Package Transporter (TRUPACT-II) Content Codes document (TRUCON) represents the development of a new content code system for shipping contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in TRUPACT-II. It will be used to convert existing waste forms, content codes, and any other identification codes into a system that is uniform throughout for all the Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These various codes can be grouped under the newly formed shipping content codes without any loss of waste characterization information. The TRUCON document provides a parametric description for each content code for waste generated and compiles this information for all ten DOE sites. Compliance with waste generation, processing and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in the TRUCON document for each content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The content code essentially gives a description of the CH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and packaging, and the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability of the waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the TRUPACT-II package can be performed

  8. Use of chemically derivatized n-type silicon photoelectrodes in aqueous media: photooxidation of iodide, hexacyanoiron(II), and hexaammineruthenium(II) at ferrocene-derivatized photoanodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocarsly, A.B.; Walton, E.G.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1980-05-07

    A procedure is described for the chemical derivatization of the surface of n-type semiconductor photoanodes to yield photosensitive interfaces for use in a large number of thermodynamically uphill oxidation processes. (1,1'-ferrocenediyl)dichlorosilane was used to derivatize n-type Si to yield a photoanode that can be used under conditions where the naked (nonderivatized) n-type Si undergoes photoanodic corrosion yielding an insulating SiO/sub x/ surface layer. The results of use of this derivatized n-type Si in aqueous solutions to investigate the photooxidation of iodide, hexacyanoiron(II), and hexaammineruthenium(II) are reported. This type photoelectrode has an operation range that is nearly ideal from the point of solar energy conversion. (BLM)

  9. The promising chemical kinetics for the simulation of propane-air combustion with KIVA-II code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, S. J.; Gorla, Rama S. R.; Kundu, Krishna P.

    1993-01-01

    The development of chemical kinetics for the simulation of propane-air combustion with the use of computer code KIVA-II since 1989 is summarized here. In order to let readers understand the general feature well, a brief description of the KIVA-II code, specially related with the chemical reactions is also given. Then the results of recent work with 20 reaction mechanism is presented. It is also compared with the 5 reaction mechanism. It may be expected that the numerical stability of the 20 reaction mechanism is better as compared to that of 5 reaction mechanism, but the CPU time of the CRAY computer is much longer. Details are presented in the paper.

  10. Role of VI/II ratio on the growth of ZnO nanostructures using chemical bath deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgessa, Z.N., E-mail: zelalem.urgessa@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Oluwafemi, O.S. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha Campus, Private Bag XI, 5117 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper the growth process and morphological evolution of ZnO nanostructures were investigated in a series of experiments using chemical bath deposition. The experimental results indicate that the morphological evolution depends on the reaction conditions, particularly on OH{sup -} to Zn{sup 2+} ratio (which directly affects the pH). For low VI/II ratios, quasi-spherical nanoparticles of an average diameter 30 nm are obtained, whereas for larger VI/II ratios, nanorods with an average diameter less than 100 nm are produced, which indicates that by systematically controlling the VI/II ratio, it is possible to produce different shapes and sizes of ZnO nanostructures. A possible mechanism for the nanostructural change of the as-synthesized ZnO from particle to rod was elucidated based on the relative densities of H{sup +} and OH{sup -} in the solution.

  11. Role of VI/II ratio on the growth of ZnO nanostructures using chemical bath deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the growth process and morphological evolution of ZnO nanostructures were investigated in a series of experiments using chemical bath deposition. The experimental results indicate that the morphological evolution depends on the reaction conditions, particularly on OH− to Zn2+ ratio (which directly affects the pH). For low VI/II ratios, quasi-spherical nanoparticles of an average diameter 30 nm are obtained, whereas for larger VI/II ratios, nanorods with an average diameter less than 100 nm are produced, which indicates that by systematically controlling the VI/II ratio, it is possible to produce different shapes and sizes of ZnO nanostructures. A possible mechanism for the nanostructural change of the as-synthesized ZnO from particle to rod was elucidated based on the relative densities of H+ and OH− in the solution.

  12. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical study of the structure of a new paramagnetic dimeric palladium(II,III) complex with creatine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitewa, Mariana; Enchev, Venelin; Bakalova, Tatyana

    2002-05-01

    The structure and coordination mode of the newly synthesized dimeric paramagnetic Pd(II,III) complex are studied using magneto-chemical, EPR and IR spectroscopic methods. In order to perform reliable assignment of the IR bands, the structure and IR spectrum of the free creatine were calculated using ab initio method. For calculation of the configuration of its deprotonated and doubly deprotonated forms the semiempirical AM1 method was used.

  13. 3-Bromopyruvic acid, a hexokinase II inhibitor, is an effective antitumor agent on the hepatoma cells : in vitro and in vivo findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lei; Wei, Yuhua; Yu, Xin; Peng, Jirun; Leng, Xisheng

    2014-06-01

    Over-expressed in cancer cells, hexokinase II (HK II) forms a mitochondrial complex, which promotes cancer survival. 3- Bromopyruvic acid (3-BrPA) dissociates HK II from this complex, causing cell death, and thus, having an anti-tumor effect. The design of this study was to first analyze the expression of HK II in the hepatoma cell line, BEL-7402, then investigate the effects of 3-Br-PA on these cells, and finally, discuss its potential for clinical usage. HK II expression was detected in BEL-7402 cells by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In vitro treatment of cells with 3-BrPA significantly inhibited their growth, as evaluated by MTT assay and adenosine triphosphate-tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA). To analyze the in vivo function and safety of this drug, a tumor model was established by subcutaneously implanting hepatic cancer cells into nude mice. 3-BrPA treatment (50 mg/kg ip. daily, 6 days/week for three weeks) was effective in the animal model by attenuating tumor growth and causing tumor necrosis. Toxic signs were not observed. The acute toxicity study provided an LD50 of 191.7 mg/kg for 3-BrPA. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo analyses suggest that 3-BrPA exerts anti-hepatoma effects, and may be an effective pharmacological agent for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24738957

  14. Application of Zr/Ti-Pic in the adsorption process of Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) using adsorption physico-chemical models and thermodynamics of the process; Aplicacao de Zr/Ti-PILC no processo de adsorcao de Cu(II), Co(II) e Ni(II) utilizando modelos fisico-quimicos de adsorcao e termodinamica do processo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Denis Lima; Airoldi, Claudio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica]. E-mail: dlguerra@iqm.unicamp.br; Lemos, Vanda Porpino; Angelica, Romulo Simoes [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPa), Belem (Brazil); Viana, Rubia Ribeiro [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra. Dept. de Recursos Minerais

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study how Zr/Ti-Pic adsorbs metals. The physico-chemical proprieties of Zr/Ti-Pic have been optimized with pillarization processes and Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) adsorption from aqueous solution has been carried out, with maximum adsorption values of 8.85, 8.30 and 7.78 x-1 mmol g{sup -1}, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption isotherm models have been applied to fit the experimental data with a linear regression process. The energetic effect caused by metal interaction was determined through calorimetric titration at the solid-liquid interface and gave a net thermal effect that enabled the calculation of the exothermic values and the equilibrium constant. (author)

  15. Synthesis and characterization of N-acylaniline derivatives as potential chemical hybridizing agents (CHAs) for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Devakumar, C

    2006-09-01

    Induction of male sterility by deployment of chemical hybridizing agents (CHAs) are important in heterosis breeding of self-pollinated crops like wheat, wherein the male and female organs are in the same flower. Taking a lead from the earlier work on rice, a total of 25 N-acylanilines comprising of malonanilates, acetoacetanilides, and acetanilides (including halogenated acetanilides) were synthesized and screened as CHAs on three genotypes of wheat, viz., PBW 343, HD 2046, and HD 2733 at 1500 ppm in the winter of 2001-2002. The N-acylanilines containing variations at the acyl and aromatic domain were synthesized by condensation of substituted anilines with appropriate diesters, acid chlorides, or monoesters. The test compounds with highly electronegative groups such as F/Br at the para position of the aryl ring were identified as the most potent CHAs, causing higher induction of male sterility. A variation of N-substitution at the side chain generally furnished analogues like 4'-fluoroacetoacetanilide (7) and ethyl 4'-fluoromalonanilate (1), which induced 89.12 and 84.66% male sterility, respectively, in PBW 343. Among halogenated acetanilides, the increasing number of chlorine atoms in the side chain led to an increase in the activity of 4'-fluoro (23) and 4'-bromo (24) derivatives of trichoroacetanilides, which induced >87% male sterility. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models indicated the positive contributions of the field effect exemplified by the Swain-Lupton constant (Fp) and negative contributions of the Swain-Lupton resonance constant (R) for the aromatic substitution. The positive influences of parachor (P) for the acyl domain have been underlined. These leads will be significant in explaining the CHA fit in the macromolecular receptor site. The CHAs appeared to act by causing an imbalance in the acid-base equilibrium in pollen mother cells resulting in dissolution of the callose wall by premature callase secretion. PMID:16939342

  16. Handheld and mobile hyperspectral imaging sensors for wide-area standoff detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Nathaniel R.; Gardner, Charles W.; Nelson, Matthew P.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a valuable tool for the investigation and analysis of targets in complex background with a high degree of autonomy. HSI is beneficial for the detection of threat materials on environmental surfaces, where the concentration of the target of interest is often very low and is typically found within complex scenery. Two HSI techniques that have proven to be valuable are Raman and shortwave infrared (SWIR) HSI. Unfortunately, current generation HSI systems have numerous size, weight, and power (SWaP) limitations that make their potential integration onto a handheld or field portable platform difficult. The systems that are field-portable do so by sacrificing system performance, typically by providing an inefficient area search rate, requiring close proximity to the target for screening, and/or eliminating the potential to conduct real-time measurements. To address these shortcomings, ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS) is developing a variety of wide-field hyperspectral imaging systems. Raman HSI sensors are being developed to overcome two obstacles present in standard Raman detection systems: slow area search rate (due to small laser spot sizes) and lack of eye-safety. SWIR HSI sensors have been integrated into mobile, robot based platforms and handheld variants for the detection of explosives and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In addition, the fusion of these two technologies into a single system has shown the feasibility of using both techniques concurrently to provide higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates. This paper will provide background on Raman and SWIR HSI, discuss the applications for these techniques, and provide an overview of novel CISS HSI sensors focused on sensor design and detection results.

  17. Structural Studies on Acetylcholinesterase and Paraoxonase Directed Towards Development of Therapeutic Biomolecules for the Treatment of Degenerative Diseases and Protection Against Chemical Threat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joel L.; Silman, Israel

    Acetylcholinesterase and paraoxonase are important targets for treatment of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis, respectively, both of which impose major burdens on the health care systems in Western society. Acetylcholinesterase is the target of lethal nerve agents, and paraoxonase is under consideration as a bioscavenger for their detoxification. Both are thus the subject of research and development in the context of nerve agent toxicology. The crystal structures of the two enzymes are described, and structure/function relationships are discussed in the context of drug development and of development of means of protection against chemical threats.

  18. XV International conference on chemical thermodynamics in Russia. RCCT-2005. Summary of reports. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proceedings of the XV International conference on chemical thermodynamics are performed. The release covers wide frame on physical chemistry and chemical thermodynamics, and present-day conception on properties as individual substances, so their mixtures on phase and chemical equilibriums, surface effects in different systems is demonstrated. Solutions and melts, complex fluid systems (polymer solutions, liquid crystals, micellar solutions), new materials are part of concerned problems. Theoretical and experimental methods of chemical thermodynamics, automated experimental databases are among discussed problems

  19. Demonstration of spread-on peel-off consumer products for sampling surfaces contaminated with pesticides and chemical warfare agent signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Deborah L; Smith, Deborah L; Katona, Vanessa R; Lewis, Alan T; Hernon-Kenny, Laura A; Crenshaw, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    A terrorist attack using toxic chemicals is an international concern. The utility of rubber cement and latex body paint as spray-on/spread-on peel-off collection media for signatures attributable to pesticides and chemical warfare agents from interior building and public transportation surfaces two weeks post-deposition is demonstrated. The efficacy of these media to sample escalator handrail, stainless steel, vinyl upholstery fabric, and wood flooring is demonstrated for two pesticides and eight chemicals related to chemical warfare agents. The chemicals tested are nicotine, parathion, atropine, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, dipinacolyl methylphosphonate, ethyl methylphosphonic acid, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, methylphosphonic acid, and thiodiglycol. Amounts of each chemical found are generally greatest when latex body paint is used. Analytes with low volatility and containing an alkaline nitrogen or a sulfur atom (e.g., nicotine and parathion) usually are recovered to a greater extent than the neutral phosphonate diesters and acidic phosphonic acids (e.g., dimethyl methylphosphonate and ethyl methylphosphonic acid). PMID:24835029

  20. Occurrence and possible sources of arsenic in seafloor sediments surrounding sea-disposed munitions and chemical agents near O´ahu, Hawai´i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Michael S.; De Carlo, Eric Heinen

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Defense disposed of conventional and chemical munitions as well as bulk containers of chemical agents in US coastal waters including those surrounding the State of Hawai´i. The Hawai´i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment has been collecting biota, water, and sediment samples from two disposal areas south of the island of O´ahu in waters 500 to 600 m deep known to have received both conventional munitions and chemical agents (specifically sulfur mustard). Unlike a number of other sea-disposed munitions investigations which used grabs or corers lowered from surface vessels, we used manned submersibles to collect the samples. Using this approach, we were able to visually identify the munitions and precisely locate our samples in relation to the munitions on the seafloor. This paper focuses on the occurrence and possible sources of arsenic found in the sediments surrounding the disposed military munitions and chemical agents. Using nonparametric multivariate statistical techniques, we looked for patterns in the chemical data obtained from these sediment samples in order to determine the possible sources of the arsenic found in these sediments. The results of the ordination technique nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicate that the arsenic is associated with terrestrial sources and not munitions. This was not altogether surprising given that: (1) the chemical agents disposed of in this area supposedly did not contain arsenic, and (2) the disposal areas studied were under terrestrial influence or served as dredge spoil disposal sites. The sediment arsenic concentrations during this investigation ranged from <1.3 to 40 mg/kg-dry weight with the lower concentrations typically found around control sites and munitions (not located in dredge disposal areas) and the higher values found at dredge disposal sites (with or without munitions). During the course of our investigation we did, however, discover that mercury appears to be loosely associated

  1. Influence of the nature of the oxidizing agents on the mechanism of the oxidation of carbon monoxide in the presence of an aqua complex of palladium (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the oxidation of CO in the presence of an aqua complex of Pd(II) by VO+2 and Fe(III) ions and by heteropolyacids (HPA) viz., H3PMo12O40,H4PMo11 VO40, and H4PW11VO40, was studied. A comparison of the data obtained with the results of the oxidation of CO by strong oxidizing agents - Cr2O72- and Ce(IV) ions - made it possible to conclude that rapid occurrence of the reaction requires an optimum potential of the oxidizing agent 0.7 < E < 1 V. This confirms the assumption that the intermediate carbonyl complexes of partially reduced palladium are the most active in this reaction

  2. Chemical Rescue of Enzymes: Proton Transfer in Mutants of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    OpenAIRE

    Maupin, C. Mark; Castillo, Norberto; Taraphder, Srabani; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    In human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) the mutation of position 64 from histidine to alanine (H64A) disrupts the rate limiting proton transfer (PT) event, resulting in a reduction of the catalytic activity of the enzyme as compared to the wild-type. Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations utilizing the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) methodology for H64A HCA II give a PT free energy barrier significantly higher than that found in the wild-type enzyme. This high barrier, determi...

  3. Effects of some chelating agents on the uptake and distribution of 54Mn(II) in the brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of humic acids, which are natural metal-complexing compounds, and potassium ethylxanthate, sodium diethyldithiophosphate, sodium dimethyldithicarbamate, which are sulphur-containing man-made chelating agents, on the uptake and tissue distribution of 54Mn(II) were studied in brown trout (Salmo trutta). Fish were exposed for 7 days to 0.1 μg Mn(II)x.-2 as NmCl2 (l μCia 54Mnxl-1) with or without chelat agents. Examination of the partition of Mn between octanol and a Tris-HCl buffer in the presence of these compounds was also performed. Humic acids had only small effects on Mn uptake and distribution in trout, probably because of the low stability of Mn-humate complexes. Partition of Mn in the presence of potassium ethylxanthate, sodium diethyldithiophosphate, sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate, and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate between octanol and Tris-HCl buffer showed formation of lipophilic complex with the latter two compounds, but not with the former. However, these four chelating agents all decreased Mn uptake in the trout by 40-45%. These substances also changed the distribution of Mn within the fish, with a higher proportion of the metal being present in some visceral organs and a smaller proportion being localized in some non-parenchymateous tissues, such as skin, fins and bones. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not known. however, the interaction of chelating agents with the Mn, although weak, may have partially withdrawn the metal from the uptake process inthe gills. The redistribution of Mn in the fish may be due to the binding of the metal to complexing compounds which have reached the intestinal lumen. Previous studies with other metals have shown increased or unchanged metal levels in tissues of fish at exposure together with potasium ethylxanthate, sodium diethyldithiophosphate, sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate, and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, but decreased metal levels have not been observed before. (au) (37 refs.)

  4. Dendritic chelating agents. 1. Cu(II) binding to ethylene diamine core poly (amidoamine) denderimers in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall results of the proton and metal ion binding measurements suggest that the uptake of Cu(II) by EDA core PAMAM dendrimers involves both the dendrimer tertiary amine and terminal groups. However, the extents of protonation of these groups control the ability of the dentrimers to bind Cu(II). Analysis of the EXAFS spectra suggests that Cu(II) forms octahedral complexes involving the tertiary amine groups of Gx-NH2 EDA core PAMAM dendrimers at pH 7.0. The central Cu(II) metal ion of each of these complexes appears to be coordinated to 2-4 dendrimer tertiary amine groups located in the equatorial plane and 2 axial water molecules. Finally, we combine the results of our experiments with literature data to formulate and evaluate a phenomenological model of Cu(II) uptake by Gx-NH2 PAMAM dendrimers in aqueous solutions. At low metal ion-dendrimer loadings, the model provides a good fit of the measured extent of binding of Cu(II) in aqueous solutions of G4-NH2 PAMAM dendrimers at pH 7.0

  5. Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances: System Realisation and Validation II

    OpenAIRE

    Toet C; de Nijs ACM; Vermeire TG; Poel P van der; Tuinstra J

    1991-01-01

    In the project "Evaluation System new substances", methods are developed to systematically predict and assess the hazards for man and environment related to the production and use of new chemical substances. Part of the project is the realisation of a Risk Assessment System for New Chemical Substances, which is described in this report. This system is a computer program, available for advisory tasks concerning the assessment of hazard and risk of new chemical substances (level 0). A...

  6. Morphological analysis of microcellular PP produced in a core-back injection process using chemical blowing agents and gas counter pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Reglero Ruiz, José Antonio; Vincent, Michel; Agassant, Jean-François; Claverie, Aurore; Huck, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    A complete experimental analysis of the microcellular injection process using Chemical Blowing Agents (CBA) with Gas Counter Pressure (GCP) and core-back expansion is presented. Three different types of polypropylene, neat and charged, were mixed with two different CBAs and injected into a plate mold with varying process parameters. First, an exhaustive cartographical mapping of the plate morphology is analyzed. In a second step, the relation between injection parameters and the resulting mor...

  7. MODELING OF THE HEAT PUMP STATION CONTROLABLE LOOP OF AN INTERMEDIATE HEAT-TRANSFER AGENT (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is studied the model of the heat pump station controllable loop of an intermediate heat-transfer agent for the use in wineries. There are demonstrated transients after the disturbing action of the temperature on the input of cooling jacket of the fermentation stirred tank. There are compared different control laws of the object.

  8. MODELING OF THE HEAT PUMP STATION CONTROLABLE LOOP OF AN INTERMEDIATE HEAT-TRANSFER AGENT (Part II)

    OpenAIRE

    Sit M.L.; Andronaty N. R.; Sit B.M.

    2011-01-01

    It is studied the model of the heat pump station controllable loop of an intermediate heat-transfer agent for the use in wineries. There are demonstrated transients after the disturbing action of the temperature on the input of cooling jacket of the fermentation stirred tank. There are compared different control laws of the object.

  9. Risk Assessment of New Chemical Substances: System Realisation and Validation II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet C; de Nijs ACM; Vermeire TG; van der Poel P; Tuinstra J

    1991-01-01

    In the project "Evaluation System new substances", methods are developed to systematically predict and assess the hazards for man and environment related to the production and use of new chemical substances. Part of the project is the realisation of a Risk Assessment System for New Chemic

  10. The effect of bulking agents on the chemical stability of acid-sensitive compounds in freeze-dried formulations: sucrose inversion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Enxian; Ewing, Susan; Gatlin, Larry; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2009-09-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of amorphous bulking agents on the chemical stability of freeze-dried materials. Polyvinylpyrrolidone and dextran of different molecular weights and lactose were used as bulking agents, and sucrose was used as an example of an acid-sensitive compound. Lyophiles containing bulking agent and sucrose at 10:1 (w/w) ratio, citrate buffer, and optionally bromophenol blue (pH indicator) were tested by X-ray powder diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. Diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy was used to obtain the concentration ratio of the deprotonated (In(2-)) to the protonated (HIn(-)) indicator species, from which the Hammett acidity function (H(2-)) was calculated. The extent of sucrose inversion in lyophiles stored at 60 degrees C was quantified by HPLC. The bulking agent had a major impact on both the apparent solid-state acidity (H(2-)) and the degradation rate, with the degradation rate constants value highest for dextran lyophiles (most "acidic", lower H(2-)) followed by lactose and polyvinylpyrrolidone lyophile (least "acidic", higher H(2-)). The Hammett acidity function can be used as an empirical solid-state acidity scale, to predict the rank-order stability of acid-sensitive compounds in lyophiles prepared with different bulking agents. PMID:19544366

  11. Las Metalotioneínas de mamífero como agentes detoxificadores de plomo(II)

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Zúñiga, Catalina Trinidad

    2013-01-01

    El plomo es uno de los metales más nocivos para la salud humana y su incidencia en la misma deber ser tenida en cuenta debido a su amplia distribución en el medio ambiente. El catión Pb(II) interactúa preferentemente con proteínas que contienen Zn(II) (ALAD, CadC, GATA, dedos de Zn) y Ca(II) (CaM, PKC, syt) causando no sólo interferencias en algunos procesos metabólicos (principalmente la biosíntesis de hemoglobina), sino que también inhibe varias enzimas, provocando daños en el sistema nervi...

  12. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.(KEYSPAN R AND D INITIATIVE)

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  13. Speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in Contaminated Aquifer Sediments Using Chemical Extraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, Gorm; Crouzet, Catherine.; Bourg, Alain C. M.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    nine aquifer sediments from different redox environments sampled in a landfill leachate plume. Ion-exchangeable Fe(I1) is easily quantified by anaerobic CaClz extraction. A rapid indication of the redox status of a sediment sample can be achieved by a 0.5 M HC1 extraction. This extraction gives an......The iron mineralogy of aquifer sediments was described by chemical extraction techniques. Single-step extractions including 1 M CaC12, NaAc, oxalate, dithionite, Ti(II1)- EDTA, 0.5 M HC1,5 M HC1, hot 6 M HC1, and a sequential extraction by HI and CrIIHC1 were tested on standard iron minerals and...... indication of the content of amorphous Fe(II1) and reduced Fe(I1) species such as FeS and FeC03, though the fractions are not quantified. A good estimate of the iron(II1) oxide content contributing to the oxidation capacity (OXC) of the sediment is given by the Ti(II1)-EDTA extraction. The iron(I1) sulfide...

  14. Rapid and ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of mercury(II) by chemically initiated aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes a method for rapid and visual determination of Hg(II) ion using unmodified gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). It involves the addition of Au-NPs to a solution containing Hg(II) ions which, however, does not induce a color change. Next, a solution of lysine is added which induces the aggregation of the Au-NPs and causes the color of the solution to change from wine-red to purple. The whole on-site detection process can be executed in less than 15 min. Other amines (ethylenediamine, arginine, and melamine) were also investigated with respect to their capability to induce aggregation. Notably, only amines containing more than one amino group were found to be effective, but a 0.4 μM and pH 8 solution of lysine was found to give the best results. The detection limits for Hg (II) are 8.4 pM (for instrumental read-out) and 10 pM (for visual read-out). To the best of our knowledge, this LOD is better than those reported for any other existing rapid screening methods. The assay is not interfered by the presence of other common metal ions even if present in 1000-fold excess over Hg(II) concentration. It was successfully applied to the determination of Hg(II) in spiked tap water samples. We perceive that this method provides an excellent tool for rapid and ultrasensitive on-site determination of Hg(II) ions at low cost, with relative ease and minimal operation. (author)

  15. A New Generation of Thermal Desorption Technology Incorporating Multi Mode Sampling (NRT/DAAMS/Liquid Agent) for Both on and off Line Analysis of Trace Level Airbone Chemical Warfare Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi functional, twin-trap, electrically-cooled thermal desorption (TD) system (TT24-7) will be discussed for the analysis of airborne trace level chemical warfare agents. This technology can operate in both military environments (CW stockpile, or destruction facilities) and civilian locations where it is used to monitor for accidental or terrorist release of acutely toxic substances. The TD system interfaces to GC, GCMS or direct MS analytical platforms and provides for on-line continuous air monitoring with no sampling time blind spots and within a near real time (NRT) context. Using this technology enables on-line sub ppt levels of agent detection from a vapour sample. In addition to continuous sampling the system has the capacity for off-line single (DAAMS) tube analysis and the ability to receive an external liquid agent injection. The multi mode sampling functionality provides considerable flexibility to the TD system, allowing continuous monitoring of an environment for toxic substances plus the ability to analyse calibration standards. A calibration solution can be introduced via a conventional sampling tube on to either cold trap or as a direct liquid injection using a conventional capillary split/splitless injection port within a gas chromatograph. Low level (linearity) data will be supplied showing the TT24-7 analyzing a variety of CW compounds including free (underivitised) VX using the three sampling modes described above. Stepwise changes in vapor generated agent concentrations will be shown, and this is cross referenced against direct liquid agent introduction, and the tube sampling modes. This technology is in use today in several geographies around the world in both static and mobile analytical laboratories. (author)

  16. Mitocans as anti-cancer agents targeting mitochondria: lessons from studies with vitamin E analogues, inhibitors of complex II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dyason, J.C.; Freeman, R.; Dong, L.F.; Procházka, L.; Wang, X. F.; Scheffler, I.; Ralph, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 1 (2007), s. 65-72. ISSN 0145-479X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mitocans * mitochondria * complex II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.634, year: 2007

  17. Indirect complexometric determination of mercury(II in synthetic alloys and complexes using ethanethiol as a selective masking agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. KARTHIKEYAN

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Acomplexometric method for the determination of mercury(II in presence of other metal ions, based on the selective masking action of ethanethiol towards mercury(II is described. Mercury(II present in a given sample solution is first complexed with an excess of EDTAand the unreacted EDTAis titrated against zinc sulphate solution at pH 5–6 (hexamine buffer using xylenol orange as the indicator. An excess of a 0.3 % solution of ethanethiol is then added to displace EDTA from the Hg(II–EDTA complex. The released EDTAis titrated with a standard zinc sulphate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 4–85 mg of mercury(II with a relative error of less than ± 0.46 % and coefficient of variation of not more than 0.47 %. The effects of the presence of various ions were studied. The method can be used for the analysis of mercury in its synthetic alloy mixtures and also in complexes.

  18. Toxicology studies of a chemical mixture of 25 groundwater contaminants. II. Immunosuppression in B6C3F1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germolec, D.R.; Yang, R.S.; Ackermann, M.F.; Rosenthal, G.J.; Boorman, G.A.; Blair, P.; Luster, M.I. (National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Concern over the potential adverse health effects of chemically contaminated groundwater has existed for many years. In general, these studies have focused on retrospective epidemiological studies for cancer risk. In the present studies, immune function was monitored in female B6C3F1 mice exposed to a chemical mixture in drinking water for either 14 or 90 days. The mixture consisted of 25 common groundwater contaminants frequently found near toxic waste dumps, as determined by EPA surveys. None of the animals developed overt signs of toxicity such as body or liver weight changes. Mice exposed to the highest dose of this mixture for 14 or 90 days showed immune function changes which could be related to rapidly proliferating cells, including suppression of hematopoietic stem cells and of antigen-induced antibody-forming cells. Some of these responses, e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony formation, were also suppressed at lower concentrations of the chemical mixture. There were no effects on T cell function or T and B cell numbers in any of the treatment groups. Altered resistance to challenge with an infectious agent also occurred in mice given the highest concentration, which correlated with the immune function changes. Paired-water studies indicated that the immune effects were related to chemical exposure and not to decreased water intake. These results suggest that long-term exposure to contaminated groundwater may represent a risk to the immune system in humans.

  19. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  20. Dust as interstellar catalyst - II. How chemical desorption impacts the gas

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S; Dulieu, F; Hocuk, S

    2015-01-01

    Context. Interstellar dust particles, which represent 1% of the total mass, are recognized to be very powerful interstellar catalysts in star-forming regions. The presence of dust can have a strong impact on the chemical composition of molecular clouds. While observations show that many species that formed onto dust grains populate the gas phase, the process that transforms solid state into gas phase remains unclear. Aims. The aim of this paper is to consider the chemical desorption process, i.e. the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, in astrochemical models. These models allow determining the chemical composition of star-forming environments with an accurate treatment of the solid-phase chemistry. Methods. In paper I we derived a formula based on experimental studies with which we quantified the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process. Here we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results. The simulations of astrophysical environments show that the abundances of gas-p...

  1. Ni(II) immobilization by bio-apatite materials: Appraisal of chemical, thermal and combined treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Šljivić-Ivanović Marija; Milenković Aleksandra; Jović Mihajlo; Dimović Slavko; Mraković Ana; Smičiklas Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Animal bones are natural and rich source of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP), which was found to be a good sorbent material for heavy metals and radionuclides. Various treatments can reduce the content of bone organic phase and improve sorption properties. In this study, sorption capacities of raw bovine bones (B) and samples obtained by chemical treatment with NaOH (BNaOH), by heating at 400 oC (B400) and by combined chemical and thermal treatment (BNaOH+400),...

  2. A concept study on identification and attribution profiling of chemical threat agents using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry applied to Amanita toxins in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Daniel; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Herrmann, Anders; Nilsson, Calle

    2012-09-10

    Accidental or deliberate poisoning of food is of great national and international concern. Detecting and identifying potentially toxic agents in food is challenging due to their large chemical diversity and the complexity range of food matrices. A methodology is presented whereby toxic agents are identified and further characterized using a two-step approach. First, generic screening is performed by LC/MS/MS to detect toxins based on a list of selected potential chemical threat agents (CTAs). After identifying the CTAs, a second LC/MS analysis is performed applying accurate mass determination and the generation of an attribution profile. To demonstrate the potential of the methodology, toxins from the mushrooms Amanita phalloides and Amanita virosa were analyzed. These mushrooms are known to produce cyclic peptide toxins, which can be grouped into amatoxins, phallotoxins and virotoxins, where α-amanitin and β-amanitin are regarded as the most potent. To represent a typical complex food sample, mushroom stews containing either A. phalloides or A. virosa were prepared. By combining the screening method with accurate mass analysis, the attribution profile for the identified toxins and related components in each stew was established and used to identify the mushroom species in question. In addition, the analytical data was consistent with the fact that the A. virosa specimens used in this study were of European origin. This adds an important piece of information that enables geographic attribution and strengthens the attribution profile. PMID:22503887

  3. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  4. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks II. Gas-rich environments

    CERN Document Server

    Molano, Germán Chaparro

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims. Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the main source of ionization in the midplane of the disk, in a way that is consistent with current knowledge of the gas and grain environment present in those regions. We trace the effects of cosmic rays by identifying the main chemical reaction channels and also the main contributors to the gas opacity to cosmic-ray-induced UV photons. This information is crucial in implementing gas opacities for cosmic-ray-induced reactions in full 2D protoplanetary disk models. Methods. We considered time-dependent chemical models within the range 1-10 AU in the midplane of a T Tauri disk. The extinction of cosmic-ray-induced UV photons by gaseous species was included in the calculation of photorates at each timestep. We integrated...

  5. Current evaluation of the millennium phytomedicine- ginseng (II): Collected chemical entities, modern pharmacology, and clinical applications emanated from traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lee; Zhao, Yuqing; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2009-01-01

    This review, a sequel to part 1 in the series, collects about 107 chemical entities separated from the roots, leaves and flower buds of Panax ginseng, quinquefolius and notoginseng, and categorizes these entities into about 18 groups based on their structural similarity. The bioactivities of these chemical entities are described. The 'Yin and Yang' theory and the fundamentals of the 'five elements' applied to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are concisely introduced to help readers understand how ginseng balances the dynamic equilibrium of human physiological processes from the TCM perspectives. This paper concerns the observation and experimental investigation of biological activities of ginseng used in the TCM of past and present cultures. The current biological findings of ginseng and its medical applications are narrated and critically discussed, including 1) its antihyperglycemic effect that may benefit type II diabetics; in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated protection of ginseng on beta-cells and obese diabetic mouse models. The related clinical trial results are stated. 2) its aphrodisiac effect and cardiovascular effect that partially attribute to ginseng's bioactivity on nitric oxide (NO); 3) its cognitive effect and neuropharmacological effect that are intensively tested in various rat models using purified ginsenosides and show a hope to treat Parkinson's disease (PD); 4) its uses as an adjuvant or immunotherapeutic agent to enhance immune activity, appetite and life quality of cancer patients during their chemotherapy and radiation. Although the apoptotic effect of ginsenosides, especially Rh2, Rg3 and Compound K, on various tumor cells has been shown via different pathways, their clinical effectiveness remains to be tested. This paper also updates the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and immune-stimulatory activities of ginseng, its ingredients and commercial products, as well as common side effects of ginseng mainly due to its

  6. ADSORPTION CHARACTERIZATION OF CO(II IONS ONTO CHEMICALLY TREATED QUERCUS COCCIFERA SHELL: EQUILIBRIUM, KINETIC AND THERMODYNAMIC STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamdi Karaoglu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Quercus coccifera shell (QCS, a relatively abundant and inexpensive material, is currently being investigated as an adsorbent to remove cobalt(II from water. Before the adsorption experiments, QCS was subjected to chemical treatment to provide maximum surface area. Then, the kinetics and adsorption mechanism of Co(II ions on QCS were studied using different parameters such as adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, temperature, contact time, and solution pH. The loaded metals could be desorbed effectively with dilute hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and 0.1 M EDTA. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the uptake of cobalt on QCS. The equilibrium adsorption data were better fitted to Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm of QCS for Co(II was 33 mg g-1. Various kinetic models were used to describe the adsorption process. The adsorption followed pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion was found to be the rate-limiting step in the adsorption process. The diffusion coefficients were calculated and found to be in the range of 3.11×10−6 to 168.78×10−6 cm2s-1. The negative DH* value indicated exothermic nature of the adsorption.

  7. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Carolina H. Andrade; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop ...

  8. Investigations on the adsorbents for uremic middle molecular toxins (II) —Influences of crosslinking agent chain length on the adsorption capacities of crosslinked chitosan adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Chitosan resins, which clinically served as adsorbents in hemoperfusion therapy, were prepared with reversed-phase suspension methodology using three differently structured crosslinking agents, methanal, glyoxal and glutaraldehyde. And the glyoxal and glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan resins were reduced with NaBH4 afterwards. By analyzing the results from FTIR and SEM, it was found that the reduction treatment to the adsorbents efficiently improved the chemical stability of these chitosan resins, and the shifts in crosslinking agents exerted influences over the morphologies of the adsorbents obviously. After being put to use in the adsorption tests upon some model uremic middle molecular toxins and BSA in vitro, all three adsorbents demon- strated a fairly realistic adsorption capability to the model toxins but little to BSA. And the adsorp- tion process reached the equilibrium in a clinically qualified short time. But the adsorption capaci- ties of these adsorbents to the model toxins were quite different. It had been found that with the growing of fatty chain length of crosslinking agent, these adsorbents showed a gradually increased adsorption capacity to the model toxins, and the glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan resin be- haved best.

  9. Low corrosive chemical decontamination method using pH control. 2. Decomposition of reducing agent by using catalyst with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of a new chemical decontamination method which provides a high decontamination effect, less corrosion of base metal, and less radioactive waste generation, we developed a decomposition method for oxalic acid coexisting with hydrazine to decrease the amount of radioactive waste. Using a catalyst of 0.5wt% Ru supported by activated carbon grains, we decomposed oxalic acid and hydrazine, simultaneously and efficiently, with a stoichiometric concentration of H2O2. The decomposition ratios were decreased by the deposition of oxides. But even if the simulated reducing agent solution with high concentrations of coexisting Fe and K ions, which negatively effect decomposition ratio, was decomposed, the decomposition ratios of oxalic acid and hydrazine were kept high during decomposition of the amount of reducing agent used in actual chemical decontamination. Additionally, we examined the deposition ratios of metal ions on the catalyst as metal oxides. These results indicated about 2% of the radioactive species which were removed by the chemical decontamination were deposited on the catalyst column. 59Fe and 51Cr were estimated to be about 90% of the total deposited amount of radioactive species and about 60% of the dose equivalent in the model calculation. But this problem should be easily dealt with by using shielding. (author)

  10. Iso-chemical potential trajectories in the P-T plane for He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, B.; Nissen, J. A.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Trajectories of constant chemical potential in the P-T plane serve as an integral formulation of London's equation. The trajectories are useful for analysis and synthesis of fountain effect pump performance. A family of trajectories is generated from available numerical codes.

  11. Innovations in bonding to zirconia-based materials. Part II: focusing on chemical interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Aboushelib; H. Mirmohamadi; J.P. Matinlinna; E. Kukk; H.F. Ounsi; Z. Salameh

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The zirconia-resin bond strength was enhanced using novel engineered zirconia primers in combination with selective infiltration etching as a surface pre-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of artificial aging on the chemical stability of the established bond and

  12. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  13. Superhydrophobic powder additives to enhance chemical agent resistant coating systems for military equipment for the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) Corrosion Prevention and Control (CPAC) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Haynes, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The primary goal of the CPAC program at ORNL was to explore the feasibility of introducing various silica-based superhydrophobic (SH) powder additives as a way to improve the corrosion resistance of US Department of Defense (DOD) military-grade chemical agent resistant coating (CARC) systems. ORNL had previously developed and patented several SH technologies of interest to the USMC, and one of the objectives of this program was to identify methods to incorporate these technologies into the USMC’s corrosion-resistance strategy. This report discusses findings of the CPAC and their application.

  14. Apoptosis and clonogenic survival in three tumour cell lines exposed to gamma rays or chemical genotoxic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the extent to which apoptosis is induced and clonogenicity reduced in three tumour cell lines - the human melanoma Me45 and promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60, and the rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1 - after exposure to the anticancer drugs etoposide and cis-platinum or to gamma radiation; each induces different types of DNA damage. Cells which readily underwent apoptosis did not necessarily show a correlated loss of clonogenicity; for example, Me45 cells showed the highest sensitivity to all three agents in clonogenic assays but much lower levels of apoptotic cells than R1 or HL-60 cells. These results show that the efficiency of the eradication of clonogenic cells by genotoxic agents does not solely depend on the induction of apoptotic processes, and suggest that the induction of apoptosis and suppression of clonogenicity are independent processes. (author)

  15. Synthesis, characterization and application of a novel chemical sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jun [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Fang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Fang Li [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tan Tianwei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)]. E-mail: twtan@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    A novel sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites were synthesized to improve sand particles compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties. The relationship between the concentration of sand-fixing agent and the sand-fixing properties was studied by three kinds of aging tests. Some composites were choose to improve the sand-fixing property and the composition of 40% xanthan gum and 60% ethyl cellulose were chosen to compare sand-fixing property with lignosulfonate. The results showed that the sand-fixing and water-retaining properties of xanthan gum and ethyl cellulose composites were better than that of lignosulfonate. The biodegradability experiment showed that the PASP and its composites were environment-friendly products and the field test showed that the PASP composites could improve wind erosion disturbance. - A novel biodegradability polymer significantly improved sand particles' compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and application of a novel chemical sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites were synthesized to improve sand particles compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties. The relationship between the concentration of sand-fixing agent and the sand-fixing properties was studied by three kinds of aging tests. Some composites were choose to improve the sand-fixing property and the composition of 40% xanthan gum and 60% ethyl cellulose were chosen to compare sand-fixing property with lignosulfonate. The results showed that the sand-fixing and water-retaining properties of xanthan gum and ethyl cellulose composites were better than that of lignosulfonate. The biodegradability experiment showed that the PASP and its composites were environment-friendly products and the field test showed that the PASP composites could improve wind erosion disturbance. - A novel biodegradability polymer significantly improved sand particles' compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties

  17. High-Throughput Identification of Chemical Inhibitors of E. coli Group 2 Capsule Biogenesis as Anti-Virulence Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Goller, Carlos C.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2010-01-01

    Rising antibiotic resistance among Escherichia coli, the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), has placed a new focus on molecular pathogenesis studies, aiming to identify new therapeutic targets. Anti-virulence agents are attractive as chemotherapeutics to attenuate an organism during disease but not necessarily during benign commensalism, thus decreasing the stress on beneficial microbial communities and lessening the emergence of resistance. We and others have demonstrated that...

  18. Exclusion of cosmic rays in protoplanetary disks. II. Chemical gradients and observational signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Adams, Fred C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The chemical properties of protoplanetary disks are especially sensitive to their ionization environment. Sources of molecular gas ionization include cosmic rays (CRs), stellar X-rays, and short-lived radionuclides, each of which varies with location in the disk. This behavior leads to a significant amount of chemical structure, especially in molecular ion abundances, which is imprinted in their submillimeter rotational line emission. Using an observationally motivated disk model, we make predictions for the dependence of chemical abundances on the assumed properties of the ionizing field. We calculate the emergent line intensity for abundant molecular ions and simulate sensitive observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for a disk at D = 100 pc. The models readily distinguish between high ionization rates (ζ ≳ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1} per H{sub 2}) and below, but it becomes difficult to distinguish between low ionization models when ζ ≲ 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. We find that H{sub 2}D{sup +} emission is not detectable for sub-interstellar CR rates with ALMA (6h integration), and that N{sub 2}D{sup +} emission may be a more sensitive tracer of midplane ionization. HCO{sup +} traces X-rays and high CR rates (ζ{sub CR} ≳ 10{sup –17} s{sup –1}), and provides a handle on the warm molecular ionization properties where CO is present in the gas. Furthermore, species like HCO{sup +}, which emits from a wide radial region and samples a large gradient in temperature, can exhibit ring-like emission as a consequence of low-lying rotational level de-excitation near the star. This finding highlights a scenario where rings are not necessarily structural or chemical in nature, but simply a result of the underlying line excitation properties.

  19. Exclusion of cosmic rays in protoplanetary disks. II. Chemical gradients and observational signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical properties of protoplanetary disks are especially sensitive to their ionization environment. Sources of molecular gas ionization include cosmic rays (CRs), stellar X-rays, and short-lived radionuclides, each of which varies with location in the disk. This behavior leads to a significant amount of chemical structure, especially in molecular ion abundances, which is imprinted in their submillimeter rotational line emission. Using an observationally motivated disk model, we make predictions for the dependence of chemical abundances on the assumed properties of the ionizing field. We calculate the emergent line intensity for abundant molecular ions and simulate sensitive observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for a disk at D = 100 pc. The models readily distinguish between high ionization rates (ζ ≳ 10–17 s–1 per H2) and below, but it becomes difficult to distinguish between low ionization models when ζ ≲ 10–19 s–1. We find that H2D+ emission is not detectable for sub-interstellar CR rates with ALMA (6h integration), and that N2D+ emission may be a more sensitive tracer of midplane ionization. HCO+ traces X-rays and high CR rates (ζCR ≳ 10–17 s–1), and provides a handle on the warm molecular ionization properties where CO is present in the gas. Furthermore, species like HCO+, which emits from a wide radial region and samples a large gradient in temperature, can exhibit ring-like emission as a consequence of low-lying rotational level de-excitation near the star. This finding highlights a scenario where rings are not necessarily structural or chemical in nature, but simply a result of the underlying line excitation properties.

  20. A survey of chemical compositions of H II regions in the Magellanic Clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative line intensities have been measured for six H II regions in the LMC and 17 in the SMC using the IDS and IPCS on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The results, together with similar measurements by other authors, are analysed to derive electron temperatures and densities and abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulphur, chlorine and argon. The resulting abundances of oxygen, nitrogen and neon agree with those previously derived by other authors; the present work extends these results to additional H II regions, especially in the SMC, where oxygen is deficient by a factor of 4 relative to the Orion Nebula, while nitrogen is deficient relative to oxygen by a factor of about 4 in both Clouds. Sulphur, chlorine and argon have the same (approximately solar) abundances relative to oxygen as in Orion. A spatial abundance gradient, analogous to those found in spiral galaxies, is small or absent in the Large Cloud and is conspicuously absent in the Small Cloud. Average abundances in the two Clouds are similar to those found in M33 and M101 in zones having the same ratio of mass (or surface density) of gas relative to total mass; both are consistent with the simple galactic-enrichment model provided that the yield is small, about 0.003, if temperature fluctuations are assumed to be negligible. (author)

  1. Pb(II) adsorption by biomass from chemically modified aquatic macrophytes, Salvinia sp. and Pistia stratiotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Ferreira, Rachel; de Souza, Michael Douglas Peçanha; Takase, Iracema; de Araujo Stapelfeldt, Danielle Marques

    2016-01-01

    This study used two biosorbents obtained from the aquatic plants Salvinia sp. and Pistia stratiotes to establish a sustainable and alternative treatment for industrial wastewater and other water bodies that contain Pb(II). The biosorbent named Salvinia with NaOH (SOH) was obtained from Salvinia sp., and Salvinia and Pistia mixture with NaOH (SPOH) was obtained from a mixture of the two plants in a 1:1 ratio. The biosorbents were characterized by zeta potential, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy and Boehm titration. The results of Boehm titration and IR analysis indicated the presence of basic functional groups, whereas those of SEM analysis indicated that the biosorbents have a structure conducive to adsorption. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to observe the effects of pH, contact time, initial lead concentration and temperature on the metal removal process. The results revealed that the biosorbents efficiently removed Pb(II) from aqueous solutions, with a maximum observed adsorption capacity (saturation limits, qmax) of 202 mg g(-1) and 210.1 mg g(-1) for SPOH and SOH, respectively. The Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were applied to the data; these biosorbent studies did not satisfactorily adjust to either of the models, but the information obtained helped us understand the adsorption mechanism. PMID:27232403

  2. Effect of milk preacidification on low fat mozzarella cheese: II. Chemical and functional properties during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, L E; Barbano, D M; Kindstedt, P S; Guo, M R

    2001-06-01

    The effect of milk preacidification on cheese manufacturing, chemical properties, and functional properties of low fat Mozzarella cheese was determined. Four vats of cheese were made in 1 d using no preacidification (control), preacidification to pH 6.0 and pH 5.8 with acetic acid, and preacidification to pH 5.8 with citric acid. This process was replicated four times. Modifications in the typical Mozzarella manufacturing procedures were necessary to accommodate milk preacidification. The chemical composition of the cheeses was similar among the treatments, except the calcium content and calcium as a percentage of protein were lower in the preacidified treatments. During refrigerated storage, the chemical and functional properties of low fat Mozzarella were affected the most by milk preacidification to pH 5.8 with citric acid. The amount of expressible serum, unmelted cheese whiteness, initial unmelted hardness, and initial apparent viscosity were lower with preacidification. The reduction in initial unmelted cheese hardness and initial apparent viscosity in the pH 5.8 citric treatments represents an improvement in the quality of low fat Mozzarella cheese that allows the cheese to have better pizza bake characteristics with shorter time of refrigerated storage. PMID:11417692

  3. Chemical analysis of CH stars - II: atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Karinkuzhi, Drisya

    2014-01-01

    We present detailed chemical analyses for a sample of twelve stars selected from the CH star catalogue of Bartkevicius (1996). The sample includes two confirmed binaries, four objects that are known to show radial velocity variations and the rest with no information on the binary status. A primary objective is to examine if all these objects exhibit chemical abundances characteristics of CH stars, based on detailed chemical composition study using high resolution spectra. We have used high resolution (R ~ 42000) spectra from the ELODIE archive. These spectra cover 3900 to 6800 Angstrom in the wavelength range. We have estimated the stellar atmospheric parameters, the effective temperature Teff, the surface gravity log g, and metallicity [Fe/H] from LTE analysis using model atmospheres. Estimated temperatures of these objects cover a wide range from 4200 K to 6640 K, the surface gravity from 0.6 to 4.3 and metallicity from -0.13 to -1.5. We report updates on elemental abundances for several heavy elements, Sr,...

  4. REMOVAL OF Pb (II FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION WITH ORANGE SUB-PRODUCTS CHEMICALLY MODIFIED AS BIOSORBENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Valdir Tadioto Miranda De Souza,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical modification of orange peel, bagasse, and a mixture of peel and bagasse for lead ion removal from aqueous medium were evaluated. The chemical modification of biomass was carried out with sodium hydroxide and citric acid to introduce carboxylate groups on the surface of the biomass. Infrared spectra confirmed the presence of carboxylate groups at 1735 cm-1. Adsorption isotherms performed by static adsorption experiments fitted very well to the linear Langmuir and Freundlich models. The experiments were carried out at pH 5 during 500 min of shaking time. Orange modified peel (O-MP presented the highest adsorption capacity (84.5 mg g-1, notably higher than other biosorbents described in the literature. The kinetic studies showed that the process obeyed a pseudo-second-order rate expression, thus indicating a strong interaction between the biosorbent and adsorbate. It was found that the chemical modifications of sorbents promoted an adsorption energetically more spontaneous, as indicated by negative values of Gibbs free energy. On the other hand, desorption studies showed low leaching of lead ions from the biosorbent, thus confirming the strong interaction of lead ions and the biosorbent. The satisfactory maximum adsorption capacity obtained and negligible cost of biosorbent makes the sub-products of orange a reliable natural material for the removal of lead ions from aqueous effluents.

  5. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab, Gregory S; Kern, Gunther H; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall; Kutschke, Amy; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Perros, Manos; Singh, Renu; Schuck, Virna J A; Tommasi, Ruben; Walkup, Grant; Newman, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resistant to other topoisomerase inhibitors were not cross-resistant with ETX0914 nor were spontaneous resistant mutants to ETX0914 cross-resistant with other topoisomerase inhibitor classes, including the widely used fluoroquinolone class. Preclinical evaluation of ETX0914 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed distribution into vascular tissues and efficacy in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model that served as a surrogate for predicting efficacious exposures for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. A wide safety margin to the efficacious exposure in toxicological evaluations supported progression to Phase 1. Dosing ETX0914 in human volunteers showed sufficient exposure and minimal adverse effects to expect a highly efficacious anti-gonorrhea therapy. PMID:26168713

  6. CHEMICALS

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  7. A potential anticancer agent: 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinolinium dichlorido(5-chloro-7-iodoquinolin-8-olato-κ2N,Opalladium(II dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vranec

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The title PdII coordination compound, (C9H6ClINO[PdCl2(C9H4ClINO]·2H2O, was prepared as a potential anticancer agent. Its structure is ionic and consists of a square-planar [PdCl2(CQ]− complex anion (CQ is 5-chloro-7-iodoquinolin-8-olate, with the PdII atom surrounded by two chloride ligands in a cis configuration and one N,O-bidentate CQ molecule, a protonated anion of CQ as counter-cation and two non-coordinated water molecules. The water molecules are involved in O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds, which interconnect the HCQ+ cations into a chain parallel to [010]. Apart from these interactions, the structure is also stabilized by face-to-face π–π interactions [centroid–centroid = 3.546 (3 Å], which occur between the phenolic parts of the complex anions and cations.

  8. Chemical consequences of pyrazole orientation in Ru(II) complexes of unsymmetric quinoline-pyrazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg Wallenstein, Joachim; Fredin, Lisa A; Jarenmark, Martin; Abrahamsson, Maria; Persson, Petter

    2016-08-01

    A series of homoleptic Ru(II) complexes including the tris-bidentate complexes of a new bidentate ligand 8-(1-pyrazol)-quinoline (Q1Pz) and bidentate 8-(3-pyrazol)-quinoline (Q3PzH), as well as the bis-tridentate complex of bis(quinolinyl)-1,3-pyrazole (DQPz) was studied. Together these complexes explore the orientation of the pyrazole relative to the quinoline. By examining the complexes structurally, photophysically, photochemically, electrochemically, and computationally by DFT and TD-DFT, it is shown that the pyrazole orientation has a significant influence on key properties. In particular, its orientation has noticeable effects on oxidation and reduction potentials, photostability and proton sensitivity, indicating that [Ru(Q3PzH)3](2+) is a particularly good local environment acidity-probe candidate. PMID:27240703

  9. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cement...

  10. Copper(II)-Bis(Thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes as Antibacterial Agents: Insights into Their Mode of Action and Potential as Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoko, Karrera Y; Goytia, Maira M; Donnelly, Paul S; Schembri, Mark A; Shafer, William M; McEwan, Alastair G

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of lipophilic copper (Cu)-containing complexes to combat bacterial infections. In this work, we showed that Cu complexes with bis(thiosemicarbazone) ligands [Cu(btsc)] exert antibacterial activity against a range of medically significant pathogens. Previous work using Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed that Cu(btsc) complexes may act as inhibitors of respiratory dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain. We now show that these complexes are also toxic against pathogens that lack a respiratory chain. Respiration in Escherichia coli was slightly affected by Cu(btsc) complexes, but our results indicate that, in this model bacterium, the complexes act primarily as agents that deliver toxic Cu ions efficiently into the cytoplasm. Although the chemistry of Cu(btsc) complexes may dictate their mechanism of action, their efficacy depends heavily on bacterial physiology. This is linked to the ability of the target bacterium to tolerate Cu and, additionally, the susceptibility of the respiratory chain to direct inhibition by Cu(btsc) complexes. The physiology of N. gonorrhoeae, including multidrug-resistant strains, makes it highly susceptible to damage by Cu ions and Cu(btsc) complexes, highlighting the potential of Cu(btsc) complexes (and Cu-based therapeutics) as a promising treatment against this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:26239980

  11. Plant-Derived Antimalarial Agents: New Leads and Efficient Phytomedicines. Part II. Non-Alkaloidal Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaíde Braga de Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is still the most destructive and dangerous parasitic infection in many tropical and subtropical countries. The burden of this disease is getting worse, mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against the widely available antimalarial drugs. There is an urgent need for new, more affordable and accessible antimalarial agents possessing original modes of action. Natural products have played a dominant role in the discovery of leads for the development of drugs to treat human diseases, and this fact anticipates that new antimalarial leads may certainly emerge from tropical plant sources. This present review covers most of the recently-published non-alkaloidal natural compounds from plants with antiplasmodial and antimalarial properties, belonging to the classes of terpenes, limonoids, flavonoids, chromones, xanthones, anthraquinones, miscellaneous and related compounds, besides the majority of papers describing antiplasmodial crude extracts published in the last five years not reviewed before. In addition, some perspectives and remarks on the development of new drugs and phytomedicines for malaria are succinctly discussed.

  12. An isomer-specific high-energy collision-induced dissociation MS/MS database for forensic applications: a proof-of-concept on chemical warfare agent markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Raja; Östin, Anders; Nygren, Yvonne; Juhlin, Lars; Nilsson, Calle; Åstot, Crister

    2011-09-01

    Spectra database search has become the most popular technique for the identification of unknown chemicals, minimizing the need for authentic reference chemicals. In the present study, an isomer-specific high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS spectra database of 12 isomeric O-hexyl methylphosphonic acids (degradation markers of nerve agents) was created. Phosphonate anions were produced by the electrospray ionization of phosphonic acids or negative-ion chemical ionization of their fluorinated derivatives and were analysed in a hybrid magnetic-sector-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer. A centre-of-mass energy (E(com)) of 65 eV led to an optimal sequential carbon-carbon bond breakage, which was interpreted in terms of charge remote fragmentation. The proposed mechanism is discussed in comparison with the routinely used low-energy CID MS/MS. Even-mass (odd-electron) charge remote fragmentation ion series were diagnostic of the O-alkyl chain structure and can be used to interpret unknown spectra. Together with the odd-mass ion series, they formed highly reproducible, isomer-specific spectra that gave significantly higher database matches and probability factors (by 1.5 times) than did the EI MS spectra of the trimethylsilyl derivatives of the same isomers. In addition, ionization by negative-ion chemical ionization and electrospray ionization resulted in similar spectra, which further highlights the general potential of the high-energy CID MS/MS technique. PMID:21915956

  13. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target

    OpenAIRE

    Fedeles, Bogdan I.; Zhu, Angela Y.; Young, Kellie S.; Hillier, Shawn M.; Proffitt, Kyle D.; Essigmann, John M.; Croy, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action...

  14. Characterization of nanostructured As{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films synthesized at room temperature by chemical bath deposition method using various complexing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubale, Ashok U., E-mail: ashokuu@yahoo.com; Kantale, J.S.; Choudhari, D.M.; Mitkari, V.N.; Nikam, M.S.; Belkhedkar, M.R.

    2013-09-02

    Nanostructured binary As{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were deposited onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition method from complexed and uncomplexed baths using complexing agents acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid. The effect of complexing agent on structural, electrical, morphological and optical properties of As{sub 2}S{sub 3} is reported. The synthesized films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrical resistivity and optical absorption measurements. The deposited films are nanocrystalline in nature with monoclinic lattice. The films deposited from uncomplexed bath and from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid complexes are non-porous and become porous for other complexes. The electrical resistivity and optical band gap is also found complex dependent. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline n-type As{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were grown by chemical bath deposition method. • Effect of complex on structural, electrical and optical properties was reported. • The film morphology highly depends on complex used in deposition process.

  15. Development of Laser Warning and Detection Technology for Chemical/Biological Agents%生化战剂激光侦检技术的发展概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴慧云; 孙振海; 黄志松; 生甡; 王华; 徐卸古

    2013-01-01

    Application of chemical/biological agents in terrorism and unmilitary fields induce serious impact to the public safety. Principles of laser warning and detection technology for chemical/biological agents based on Mie scattering signals, Rayleigh scattering signals, Raman scattering signals, absorption signals and laser induced fluorescence signals are described. The key technologies in the laser warning and detection system are analyzed, the laser warning and detection technology development profiles in the United States, Russia, German and France are introduced.%生化战剂在恐怖主义活动和非军事领域的非法使用对社会公共安全造成了严重的威胁.分析了基于米氏散射、瑞利散射、拉曼散射、吸收光谱和诱导荧光光谱信号的生化战剂激光侦察报警和快速检测技术的基本原理,说明了生化战剂激光侦检系统的关键技术,回顾了美、俄、德、法等国生化战剂激光侦检技术的发展情况.

  16. Effects of textural properties on the response of a SnO2-based gas sensor for the detection of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Chool; Kim, Seong Yeol; Lee, Woo Suk; Jung, Suk Yong; Hwang, Byung Wook; Ragupathy, Dhanusuraman; Lee, Duk Dong; Lee, Sang Yeon; Kim, Jae Chang

    2011-01-01

    The sensing behavior of SnO(2)-based thick film gas sensors in a flow system in the presence of a very low concentration (ppb level) of chemical agent simulants such as acetonitrile, dipropylene glycol methyl ether (DPGME), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), and dichloromethane (DCM) was investigated. Commercial SnO(2) [SnO(2)(C)] and nano-SnO(2) prepared by the precipitation method [SnO(2)(P)] were used to prepare the SnO(2) sensor in this study. In the case of DCM and acetonitrile, the SnO(2)(P) sensor showed higher sensor response as compared with the SnO(2)(C) sensors. In the case of DMMP and DPGME, however, the SnO(2)(C) sensor showed higher responses than those of the SnO(2)(P) sensors. In particular, the response of the SnO(2)(P) sensor increased as the calcination temperature increased from 400 °C to 800 °C. These results can be explained by the fact that the response of the SnO(2)-based gas sensor depends on the textural properties of tin oxide and the molecular size of the chemical agent simulant in the detection of the simulant gases (0.1-0.5 ppm). PMID:22163991

  17. Effects of Textural Properties on the Response of a SnO2-Based Gas Sensor for the Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duk Dong Lee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The sensing behavior of SnO2-based thick film gas sensors in a flow system in the presence of a very low concentration (ppb level of chemical agent simulants such as acetonitrile, dipropylene glycol methyl ether (DPGME, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, and dichloromethane (DCM was investigated. Commercial SnO2 [SnO2(C] and nano-SnO2 prepared by the precipitation method [SnO2(P] were used to prepare the SnO2 sensor in this study. In the case of DCM and acetonitrile, the SnO2(P sensor showed higher sensor response as compared with the SnO2(C sensors. In the case of DMMP and DPGME, however, the SnO2(C sensor showed higher responses than those of the SnO2(P sensors. In particular, the response of the SnO2(P sensor increased as the calcination temperature increased from 400 °C to 800 °C. These results can be explained by the fact that the response of the SnO2-based gas sensor depends on the textural properties of tin oxide and the molecular size of the chemical agent simulant in the detection of the simulant gases (0.1–0.5 ppm.

  18. Treatment of paraffin problems in petroleum production with chemicals; Tratamento de problemas parafinicos com agentes quimicos na producao de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, David; Yin, Ralph; Weispfennig, Klaus; Newberry, Mike [Baker Petrolite, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Paraffin problems can greatly reduce production of certain crude oils, if correct methods to control the problems are not used. These problems are primarily related to flow line deposition and reduction in crude oil flow properties caused by wax network growth. Deep water production and production of high-wax content crude oils can be especially problematic. Much of the petroleum production in Brazil falls in these categories: in the Campos Basin and in Bahia. Paraffin problems can be controlled with diverse methods. These methods include use of: pigging, insulation, heating, and chemicals. Sometimes, the use of chemicals can be very practical, alone or in combination with other methods. This paper discusses the use of chemicals for the treatment of paraffin problems. Three types of treatments are discussed: prevention of deposition in flow lines with paraffin inhibitors; improvement in flow properties of crude oils with pour point depressants, and removal of paraffin deposits with dispersants. The discussion includes the physical effects of the treatment chemicals and field examples. (author)

  19. INDUCTION OF MUTATIONS BY CHEMICAL AGENTS AT THE HYPOXANTHINE-GUANINE PHOSPHORIBOSYL TRANSFERASE LOCUS IN HUMAN EPITHELIAL TERATOMA CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Induction of 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance by chemical mutagens was examined in a line of cells derived from a human epithelial teratocarcinoma cell clone. The cells, designated as P3 cells, have a stable diploid karyotype with 46(XX) chromosomes, including a translocation betwee...

  20. Amyloid fibrillation in native and chemically-modified forms of carbonic anhydrase II: role of surface hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Haghi, Ali; Shariatizi, Sajad; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2012-03-01

    Chemical modification or mutation of proteins may bring about significant changes in the net charge or surface hydrophobicity of a protein structure. Such events may be of major physiological significance and may provide important insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases. In the present study, fibrillation potential of native and chemically-modified forms of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCA II) were investigated. Initially, various denaturing conditions including low pH and high temperatures were tested to induce fibrillation. At a low pH of around 2.4, where the protein is totally dissociated, the apo form was found to take up a pre-molten globular (PMG) conformation with the capacity for fibril formation. Upon increasing the pH to around 3.6, a molten globular (MG) form became abundant, forming amorphous aggregates. Charge neutralization and enhancement of hydrophobicity by methylation, acetylation and propionylation of lysine residues appeared very effective in promoting fibrillation of both the apo and holo forms under native conditions, the rates and extents of which were directly proportional to surface hydrophobicity, and influenced by salt concentration and temperature. These modified structures underwent more pronounced fibrillation under native conditions, than the PMG intermediate form, observed under denaturing conditions. The nature of the fibrillation products obtained from intermediate and modified structures were characterized and compared and their possible cytotoxicity determined. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of surface net charge and hydrophobicity in controlling protein aggregation. A discussion on the physiological significance of the observations is also presented. PMID:22251892

  1. Phase II clinical study on sup 99m Tc-GSA, a new agent for functional imaging of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torizuka, Kanji (Fukui Medical School (Japan)); Ha-Kawa, S.K.; Kudo, Masatoshi; Kitagawa, Shinichi; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Hino, Megumu; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    1992-01-01

    Phase II study of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA-galactosyl human serum albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-GSA), a new radiopharmaceutical which binds to the asialoglycoprotein receptors on the hepatocytes, was performed in 81 patients with liver diseases to validate its safety and possibility for the evaluation of hepatic function. None of adverse reactions, abnormal clinical laboratory findings and anti-{sup 99m}Tc-GSA antibody production due to {sup 99m}Tc-GSA was recognized. Immediately after the injection of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA, the dynamic data and serial hepatic images were obtained for 60 min. The indices for blood clearance and liver accumulation were calculated based on the counts in the regions of interest on the hearts and livers. In 54 patients with chronic hepatic disorders such as liver cirrhosis, the blood clearance and liver accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA were retarded according to the progress of the hepatic disorders. The findings of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA scintigraphy also reflected the hepatic functions of the patients with large hepatic tumors, obstructive jaundice and acute hepatitis. These results suggest that {sup 99m}Tc-GSA has the clinical potentials to evaluate the liver functions in the patients with hepatic disorders. (author).

  2. ANALYSIS OF TWO SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD H II REGIONS CONSIDERING THERMAL INHOMOGENEITIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETERMINATIONS OF EXTRAGALACTIC CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present long-slit spectrophotometry considering the presence of thermal inhomogeneities (t2) of two H II regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): NGC 456 and NGC 460. Physical conditions and chemical abundances were determined for three positions in NGC 456 and one position in NGC 460, first under the assumption of uniform temperature and then allowing for the possibility of thermal inhomogeneities. We determined t2 values based on three different methods: (1) by comparing the temperature derived using oxygen forbidden lines with the temperature derived using helium recombination lines (RLs), (2) by comparing the abundances derived from oxygen forbidden lines with those derived from oxygen RLs, and (3) by comparing the abundances derived from ultraviolet carbon forbidden lines with those derived from optical carbon RLs. The first two methods averaged t2 = 0.067 ± 0.013 for NGC 456 and t2 = 0.036 ± 0.027 for NGC 460. These values of t2 imply that when gaseous abundances are determined with collisionally excited lines they are underestimated by a factor of nearly two. From these objects and others in the literature, we find that in order to account for thermal inhomogeneities and dust depletion, the O/H ratio in low-metallicity H II regions should be corrected by 0.25-0.45 dex depending on the thermal structure of the nebula or by 0.35 dex if such information is not available.

  3. Optical clearing effect on gastric tissues immersed with biocompatible chemical agents investigated by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiangqun [Institute of Bioscience and Technology, Cranfield University at Silsoe, Bedfordshire MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Wang Ruikang [Institute of Bioscience and Technology, Cranfield University at Silsoe, Bedfordshire MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Elder, James B [Department of Surgery, North Staffordshire Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    In order to understand the role of water desorption in optical clearing effect on gastric tissues after the application of hyperosmotic agents, dynamics of water loss in porcine stomach administrated with glycerol was investigated with the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. It is found that the progress of optical clearing of various samples corresponds very well with the individual pattern of water desorption. The changes in optical properties are almost linear with time in frozen-thawed cardiac mucosa immersed in 80% glycerol whilst the water inside the tissue is displaced at the same rate. For the same samples immersed in 50% glycerol, after 30 min, when the dehydration equilibrates with time, optical clearing tends to lever out. The overall water loss in frozen porcine stomach at 60 min after the immersion of 80% and 50% glycerol is approximately 38% and 13%, respectively. The more significant effect of optical clearing by 80% glycerol is due to its high refractive index and high dehydration capability. In fresh pyloric mucosa samples, treated with 50% glycerol through the topical application, the changes of optical properties at the initial stage are very slow due to the mucous barrier. However, once the solution has penetrated into tissue, optical clearing is achieved significantly with time. The results indicate that optical clearing induced by hyperosmotic agents is strongly correlated with dehydration.

  4. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet II: Implications of a non-zero baryon chemical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Goethe-University, Ruth-Moufang Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Mishustin, Igor N. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Goethe-University, Ruth-Moufang Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Kurchatov Institute, Russian Research Center, Akademika Kurchatova Sqr., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Døssing, Thomas [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 København Ø (Denmark)

    2014-03-01

    We present an extended version of the dynamical model for a multi-quark droplet evolution described in our proceeding paper. The model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension, and now a non-zero baryon number. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We consider evolutions of droplets with different initial temperatures and net baryon number. It is found that the introduction of a non-zero net baryon number does not change the lifetime of the droplets significantly. Only when we consider an initially very baryon-rich, low-temperature droplets is the lifetime is decreased significantly. We have, furthermore, found a convergence of both baryon chemical potential and temperature toward the values μ{sub B}≈450 MeV and T≈150 MeV. This convergence is linked to the competing emission of baryons versus mesons.

  5. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet II: Implications of a non-zero baryon chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J; Døssing, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present an extended version of the dynamical model for a multi-quark droplet evolution described in our proceeding paper. The model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension, and now a non-zero baryon number. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical model. We consider evolutions of droplets with different initial temperatures and net baryon number. It is found that the introduction of a non-zero net baryon number does not change the lifetime of the droplets significantly. Only when we consider an initially very baryon-rich, low-temperature droplets is the lifetime is decreased significantly. We have, furthermore, found a convergence of both baryon chemical potential and temperature toward the values $T \\approx 150$ MeV and $\\mu_{\\rm B} \\approx$ 450 MeV. This convergence seems to be linked to the competing emission of baryons versus mesons.

  6. A physical chemical approach to understanding cellular dysfunction in type II diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranker, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The conversion of soluble protein into b-sheet rich amyloid fibers is the hallmark of a number of serious diseases. Precursors for many of these systems (e.g. Ab from Alzheimer's disease) reside in close association with a biological membranes. Membrane bilayers are reported to accelerate the rate of amyloid assembly. Furthermore, membrane permeabilization by amyloidogenic peptides can lead to toxicity. Given the b-sheet rich nature of mature amyloid, it is seemingly paradoxical that many precursors are either intrinsically b-helical, or transiently adopt an a-helical state upon association with membrane. We have investigated these phenomena in islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). IAPP is a 37-residue peptide hormone which forms amyloid fibers in individuals with type II diabetes. We report here the discovery of an oligomeric species that arises through stochastic nucleation on membranes, and results in disruption of the lipid bilayer. These species are stable, result in all-or-none leakage, and represent a definable protein/lipid phase that equilibrates over time. To characterize the reaction pathway of assembly, we apply an experimental design that includes ensemble and single particle evaluations in vitro and correlate these with quantitative measures of cellular toxicity.

  7. Chemical enrichment of the intracluster medium by FR II radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Heath, D; Alexander, P; Heath, David; Krause, Martin; Alexander, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We present 2D axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations investigating the long term effect of FR II radio galaxies on the metal distribution of the surrounding intra-cluster medium (ICM). A light jet is injected into a cooling flow atmosphere for 10-30 Myr. We then follow the subsequent evolution for 3 Gyr on a spherical grid spanning 3 Mpc in radius. A series of passive tracer particles were placed in an annulus about the cluster core to simulate metal carrying clouds in order to calculate the metallicity (Z) as a function of time and radial distance from the cluster centre. The jet has a significant effect on the ICM over the entire 3 Gyr period. By the end of the simulations, the jets produced metallicities of ~10% of the initial metallicity of the cluster core throughout much of the cluster. The jets transport the metals not only in mixing regions, but also through upwelling ICM behind the jet, enriching the cluster over both long and short distances.

  8. Studies on intracellular transport of secretory proteins in the rat exocrine pancreas. II. Inhibition of antimicrotubular agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, J; Bieger, W; Kern, H F

    1975-11-28

    The possible role of microtubules and microfilaments in the secretory process of the rat exocrine pancreas was analysed in vitro using isolated pancreatic lobules. Colchicine and vinblastine as microtubule inhibitors, hexylene glycol as a microtubule stabilizer, and cytochalasin B as a disruptive agent for microfilaments were used in increasing concentrations to test their effects on protein synthesis, intracellular transport, zymogen discharge, and cellular respiration. Colchicine only at 10(-2) M concentrations inhibits protein synthesis, while vinblastine inhibits at 10(-6) and 10(-5) M by 20% and at 10(-4) M by 55%. A similar inhibition is observed with 1.5% concentrations of hexylene glycol while cytochalasine B at 1,5 and 10 mug/ml is without effect on protein synthesis. Colchicine and vinblastine have their major effects on intracellular transport both in secretion studies and cell fractionation experiments. Colchicine in concentrations between 10(-3) to 10(-5) M inhibits discharge of newly synthesized proteins by 50%, while vinblastine shows a dose-response relationship of 40% inhibition of 10(-6) M to 90% at 10(-4) M. Discharge of amylase is uniformly reduced by 30% by both colchicine and vinblastine in the whole dose range. The pronounced effect of colchicine and vinblastine is evident in cell fractionation studies: both drugs inhibit the disappearance of protein radioactivity from microsomes and its appearance in zymogen granules; similarly the peak radioactivity in smooth microsomes (Golgi) appears delayed. No differential effect on the secretory process was observed with 1.5% concentrations of hexylene glycol or cytochalasin B at 1.5 and 10 mug/ml concentrations. A fines tructural analysis of microtubules and microfilaments in the exocrine pancreatic cell reveals their distribution in all parts of the cytoplasm and in relation to all cell organelles. Both systems (microtubules, microfilaments) seem to be connected, at least in certain areas of the

  9. Characterization of Cu–Ni nanostructured alloys obtained by a chemical route. Influence of the complexing agent content in the starting solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, Alejo C., E-mail: acarreras@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola (IFEG), Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba—CONICET, Medina Allende s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016 Córdoba (Argentina); Cangiano, María de los A.; Ojeda, Manuel W.; Ruiz, María del C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Qumica (INTEQUI), Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis—CONICET, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-03-15

    The influence of the amount of complexing agent added to the starting solution on the physicochemical properties of Cu–Ni nanostructured alloys obtained through a chemical route, was studied. For this purpose, three Cu–Ni nanoalloy samples were synthesized by a previously developed procedure, starting from solutions with citric acid to metal molar ratios (C/Me) of 0.73, 1.00 and 1.50. The synthesis technique consisted in preparing a precursor via the citrate-gel method, and carrying out subsequent thermal treatments in controlled atmospheres. Sample characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray nanoanalysis and electron diffraction. In the three cases, copper and nickel formed a solid solution with a Cu/Ni atomic ratio close to 50/50, and free of impurities inside the crystal structure. The citric acid content of the starting solution proved to have an important influence on the morphology, size distribution, porosity, and crystallinity of the Cu–Ni alloy microparticles obtained, but a lesser influence on their chemical composition. The molar ratio C/Me = 1.00 resulted in the alloy with the Cu/Ni atomic ratio closest to 50/50. - Highlights: • We synthesize Cu–Ni nanoalloys by a chemical route based on the citrate-gel method. • We study the influence of the complexing agent content of the starting solution. • We characterize the samples by electron microscopy and X-ray techniques. • Citric acid influences the shape, size, porosity and crystallinity of the alloys.

  10. Characterization of Cu–Ni nanostructured alloys obtained by a chemical route. Influence of the complexing agent content in the starting solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the amount of complexing agent added to the starting solution on the physicochemical properties of Cu–Ni nanostructured alloys obtained through a chemical route, was studied. For this purpose, three Cu–Ni nanoalloy samples were synthesized by a previously developed procedure, starting from solutions with citric acid to metal molar ratios (C/Me) of 0.73, 1.00 and 1.50. The synthesis technique consisted in preparing a precursor via the citrate-gel method, and carrying out subsequent thermal treatments in controlled atmospheres. Sample characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray nanoanalysis and electron diffraction. In the three cases, copper and nickel formed a solid solution with a Cu/Ni atomic ratio close to 50/50, and free of impurities inside the crystal structure. The citric acid content of the starting solution proved to have an important influence on the morphology, size distribution, porosity, and crystallinity of the Cu–Ni alloy microparticles obtained, but a lesser influence on their chemical composition. The molar ratio C/Me = 1.00 resulted in the alloy with the Cu/Ni atomic ratio closest to 50/50. - Highlights: • We synthesize Cu–Ni nanoalloys by a chemical route based on the citrate-gel method. • We study the influence of the complexing agent content of the starting solution. • We characterize the samples by electron microscopy and X-ray techniques. • Citric acid influences the shape, size, porosity and crystallinity of the alloys

  11. Medical countermeasure against respiratory toxicity and acute lung injury following inhalation exposure to chemical warfare nerve agent VX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop therapeutics against lung injury and respiratory toxicity following nerve agent VX exposure, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a number of potential pulmonary therapeutics. Guinea pigs were exposed to 27.03 mg/m3 of VX or saline using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min and then the toxicity was assessed. Exposure to this dose of VX resulted in a 24-h survival rate of 52%. There was a significant increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, total cell number, and cell death. Surprisingly, direct pulmonary treatment with surfactant, liquivent, N-acetylcysteine, dexamethasone, or anti-sense syk oligonucleotides 2 min post-exposure did not significantly increase the survival rate of VX-exposed guinea pigs. Further blocking the nostrils, airway, and bronchioles, VX-induced viscous mucous secretions were exacerbated by these aerosolized treatments. To overcome these events, we developed a strategy to protect the animals by treatment with atropine. Atropine inhibits muscarinic stimulation and markedly reduces the copious airway secretion following nerve agent exposure. Indeed, post-exposure treatment with atropine methyl bromide, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, resulted in 100% survival of VX-exposed animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage from VX-exposed and atropine-treated animals exhibited lower protein levels, cell number, and cell death compared to VX-exposed controls, indicating less lung injury. When pulmonary therapeutics were combined with atropine, significant protection to VX-exposure was observed. These results indicate that combinations of pulmonary therapeutics with atropine or drugs that inhibit mucous secretion are important for the treatment of respiratory toxicity and lung injury following VX exposure

  12. Chemical reactivity at buried-interfaces. II. Iron on nonstoichiometric and/or defected molybdenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabinski, J. S.; George, T.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of defects and nonstoichioinetries in molybdenite substrates, and their influence on the chemical reactivity at buried MoS 2Fe interfaces, were investigated using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Defects in the molybdenite crystal structure intentionally introduced by Ar + bombardment, or from the inherent structure of small MoS 2 crystallites, provide pathways for the diffusion and reaction of surface iron into the bulk of MoS 2 to form FeMo 2S 4. In comparison, iron overlayers do not react appreciably with undamaged molybdenite single crystals. Excess sulfur within molybdenite, when present, migrates towards deposited iron overlayers where it forms Fe 1- xs (pyrrhotite) and FeS (troilite). Annealing temperature determines the relative fraction of pyrrhotite to troilite and the orientational relationship between the ĉ-axis of the iron sulfide and the ĉ-axis of the molybdenite substrate. The stoichiometry of the molybdenite substrate, the presence of defects, and the annealing temperature provide a number of means to adjust the properties of the MoS 2Fe interface. Therefore, it may be possible to optimize/control processing conditions so as to impact either the tribochemical or catalytic properties of this important materials.

  13. Chemical gradients in the Milky Way from the RAVE data. II. Giant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Boeche, C; Piffl, T; Just, A; Steinmetz, M; Grebel, E K; Sharma, S; Kordopatis, G; Gilmore, G; Chiappini, C; Freeman, K; Gibson, B K; Munari, U; Siviero, A; Bienaymé, O; Navarro, J F; Parker, Q A; Reid, W; Seabroke, G M; Watson, F G; Wyse, R F G; Zwitter, T

    2014-01-01

    We provide new constraints on the chemo-dynamical models of the Milky Way by measuring the radial and vertical chemical gradients for the elements Mg, Al, Si, Ti, and Fe in the Galactic disc and the gradient variations as a function of the distance from the Galactic plane ($Z$). We selected a sample of giant stars from the RAVE database using the gravity criterium 1.7$<$log g$<$2.8. We created a RAVE mock sample with the Galaxia code based on the Besan\\c con model and selected a corresponding mock sample to compare the model with the observed data. We measured the radial gradients and the vertical gradients as a function of the distance from the Galactic plane $Z$ to study their variation across the Galactic disc. The RAVE sample exhibits a negative radial gradient of $d[Fe/H]/dR=-0.054$ dex kpc$^{-1}$ close to the Galactic plane ($|Z|<0.4$ kpc) that becomes flatter for larger $|Z|$. Other elements follow the same trend although with some variations from element to element. The mock sample has radial...

  14. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary disks II. Line diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kamp, I; Woitke, P; Thi, W -F; Hogerheijde, M

    2009-01-01

    Methods. We use the recently developed disk code ProDiMo to calculate the physico-chemical structure of protoplanetary disks and apply the Monte-Carlo line radiative transfer code RATRAN to predict observable line profiles and fluxes. We consider a series of Herbig Ae type disk models ranging from 10^-6 M_Sun to 2.2 10^-2 M_Sun (between 0.5 and 700 AU) to discuss the dependency of the line fluxes and ratios on disk mass for otherwise fixed disk parameters. Results. We find the [CII] 157.7 mum line to originate in LTE from the surface layers of the disk, where Tg > Td . The total emission is dominated by surface area and hence depends strongly on disk outer radius. The [OI] lines can be very bright (> 10^-16 W/m^2) and form in slightly deeper and closer regions under non-LTE conditions. The high-excitation [OI] 145.5 mum line, which has a larger critical density, decreases more rapidly with disk mass than the 63.2 mum line. Therefore, the [OI] 63.2 mum/145.5 mum ratio is a promising disk mass indicator, especi...

  15. A new comprehensive set of elemental abundances in DLAs - II. Data analysis and chemical variation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, M; D'Odorico, S; Calura, F; Matteucci, F

    2005-01-01

    We present new elemental abundance studies of seven damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). Together with the four DLAs analyzed in Dessauges-Zavadsky et al. (2004), we have a sample of eleven DLA galaxies with uniquely comprehensive and homogeneous abundance measurements. These observations allow one to study the abundance patterns of 22 elements and the chemical variations in the interstellar medium of galaxies outside the Local Group. Comparing the gas-phase abundance ratios of these high redshift galaxies, we found that they show low RMS dispersions, reaching only up 2-3 times the statistical errors for the majority of elements. This uniformity is remarkable given that the quasar sightlines cross gaseous regions with HI column densities spanning over one order of magnitude and metallicities ranging from 1/55 to 1/5 solar. The gas-phase abundance patterns of interstellar medium clouds within the DLA galaxies detected along the velocity profiles show, on the other hand, a high dispersion in several abundance rat...

  16. Features in chemical kinetics. II. A self-emerging definition of slow manifolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Paolo; Frezzato, Diego

    2013-06-21

    In the preceding paper of this series (Part I [P. Nicolini and D. Frezzato, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234101 (2013)]) we have unveiled some ubiquitous features encoded in the systems of polynomial differential equations normally applied in the description of homogeneous and isothermal chemical kinetics (mass-action law). Here we proceed by investigating a deeply related feature: the appearance of so-called slow manifolds (SMs) which are low-dimensional hyper-surfaces in the neighborhood of which the slow evolution of the reacting system occurs after an initial fast transient. Indeed a geometrical definition of SM, devoid of subjectivity, "naturally" follows in terms of a specific sub-dimensional domain embedded in the peculiar region of the concentrations phase-space that in Part I we termed as "attractiveness region." Numerical inspections on simple low-dimensional model cases are presented, including the benchmark case of Davis and Skodje [J. Chem. Phys. 111, 859 (1999)] and the preliminary analysis of a simplified model mechanism of hydrogen combustion. PMID:23802946

  17. Thiohydrazide as complexing agents. Part-IV. Complexes of nickel-, copper-, zinc-, cadmium- and mercury (II) with phenyl and p-anisidyl and thiohydrazides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexes of some bivalent metal ions with phenylthiohydrazide (pthH) and p-anisidylthiohydrazide (pathH) of the general formula, ML2 (M = CuII, NiII, ZnII, CdII, HgII or PbII and LH = pthH or pathH), [M(LH)Cl2] (M = CuII, CdII or HgII and LH = pthH or pathH) and [Ni(LH)2]X2 (LHpthH or pathH) and X = Cl- or 1/2 SO42- have been prepared and characterised. (author)

  18. Brain temperature and pH measured by 1H chemical shift imaging of a thulium agent

    OpenAIRE

    Coman, Daniel; Trubel, Hubert K.; Rycyna, Robert E.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2009-01-01

    Temperature and pH are two of the most important physiological parameters and are believed to be tightly regulated because they are intricately related to energy metabolism in living organisms. Temperature and/or pH data in mammalian brain are scarce, however, mainly due to lack of precise and non-invasive methods. At 11.7T, we demonstrate that a thulium-based macrocyclic complex infused through the blood stream can be used to obtain temperature and pH maps of rat brain in vivo by 1H chemical...

  19. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Scholtz, M. Trevor; Yang, Fuquan; Sloan, James J.

    2011-07-01

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  20. CSO and CARMA Observations of L1157. II. Chemical Complexity in the Shocked Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Corby, Joanna F.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Loomis, Ryan A.; Booth, Shawn Thomas; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Herbst, Eric; Remijan, Anthony J.; McGuire, Brett A.

    2016-08-01

    L1157, a molecular dark cloud with an embedded Class 0 protostar possessing a bipolar outflow, is an excellent source for studying shock chemistry, including grain-surface chemistry prior to shocks, and post-shock, gas-phase processing. The L1157-B1 and B2 positions experienced shocks at an estimated ∼2000 and 4000 years ago, respectively. Prior to these shock events, temperatures were too low for most complex organic molecules to undergo thermal desorption. Thus, the shocks should have liberated these molecules from the ice grain-surfaces en masse, evidenced by prior observations of SiO and multiple grain mantle species commonly associated with shocks. Grain species, such as OCS, CH3OH, and HNCO, all peak at different positions relative to species that are preferably formed in higher-velocity shocks or repeatedly shocked material, such as SiO and HCN. Here, we present high spatial resolution (∼3″) maps of CH3OH, HNCO, HCN, and HCO+ in the southern portion of the outflow containing B1 and B2, as observed with Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy. The HNCO maps are the first interferometric observations of this species in L1157. The maps show distinct differences in the chemistry within the various shocked regions in L1157B. This is further supported through constraints of the molecular abundances using the non-LTE code radex. We find that the east/west chemical differentiation in C2 may be explained by the contrast of the shock’s interaction with either cold, pristine material or warm, previously shocked gas, as seen in enhanced HCN abundances. In addition, the enhancement of the HNCO abundance toward the the older shock, B2, suggests the importance of high-temperature O-chemistry in shocked regions.

  1. Discovery of novel antiviral agents directed against the influenza A virus nucleoprotein using photo-cross-linked chemical arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of the influenza virus is expressed in the early stage of infection and plays important roles in numerous steps of viral replication. NP is relatively well conserved compared with viral surface spike proteins. This study experimentally demonstrates that NP is a novel target for the development of new antiviral drugs against the influenza virus. First, artificial analogs of mycalamide A in a chemical array bound specifically with high affinity to NP. Second, the compounds inhibited multiplication of the influenza virus. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance imaging experiments demonstrated that the binding activity of each compound to NP correlated with its antiviral activity. Finally, it was shown that these compounds bound NP within the N-terminal 110-amino acid region but their binding abilities were dramatically reduced when the N-terminal 13-amino acid tail was deleted, suggesting that the compounds might bind to this region, which mediates the nuclear transport of NP and its binding to viral RNA. These data suggest that compound binding to the N-terminal 13-amino acid tail region may inhibit viral replication by inhibiting the functions of NP. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that chemical arrays are convenient tools for the screening of viral product inhibitors.

  2. Discovery of novel antiviral agents directed against the influenza A virus nucleoprotein using photo-cross-linked chemical arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Kyoji [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondoh, Yasumitsu [Chemical Biology Core Facility, RIKEN, Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ueda, Atsushi; Yamada, Kazunori [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Medical Genome Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Goto, Hideo [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshiki [Department of Medical Genome Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Nakata, Tadashi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Osada, Hiroyuki [Chemical Biology Core Facility, RIKEN, Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aida, Yoko, E-mail: aida@riken.jp [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Medical Genome Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2010-04-09

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of the influenza virus is expressed in the early stage of infection and plays important roles in numerous steps of viral replication. NP is relatively well conserved compared with viral surface spike proteins. This study experimentally demonstrates that NP is a novel target for the development of new antiviral drugs against the influenza virus. First, artificial analogs of mycalamide A in a chemical array bound specifically with high affinity to NP. Second, the compounds inhibited multiplication of the influenza virus. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance imaging experiments demonstrated that the binding activity of each compound to NP correlated with its antiviral activity. Finally, it was shown that these compounds bound NP within the N-terminal 110-amino acid region but their binding abilities were dramatically reduced when the N-terminal 13-amino acid tail was deleted, suggesting that the compounds might bind to this region, which mediates the nuclear transport of NP and its binding to viral RNA. These data suggest that compound binding to the N-terminal 13-amino acid tail region may inhibit viral replication by inhibiting the functions of NP. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that chemical arrays are convenient tools for the screening of viral product inhibitors.

  3. [RuII(η⁵-C₅H₅)(bipy)(PPh₃)]⁺, a promising large spectrum antitumor agent: cytotoxic activity and interaction with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Ana Isabel; Jakusch, Tamás; Morais, Tânia S; Marques, Fernanda; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Mendes, Filipa; Enyedy, Eva A; Santos, Isabel; Pessoa, João Costa; Kiss, Tamás; Garcia, M Helena

    2012-12-01

    Ruthenium complexes hold great potential as alternatives to cisplatin in cancer chemotherapy. We present results on the in vitro antitumor activity of an organometallic 'Ru(II)Cp' complex, [Ru(II)Cp(bipy)(PPh(3))][CF(3)SO(3)], designated as TM34 (PPh(3) = triphenylphosphine; bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine), against a panel of human tumor cell lines with different responses to cisplatin treatment, namely ovarian (A2780/A2780cisR, cisplatin sensitive and resistant, respectively), breast (MCF7) and prostate (PC3) adenocarcinomas. TM34 is very active against all tumorigenic cell lines, its efficacy largely surpassing that of cisplatin (CisPt). The high activity of TM34 towards CisPt resistant cell lines possibly suggests a mechanism of action distinct from that of CisPt. The effect of TM34 on the activity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) involved in DNA repair mechanisms and apoptotic pathways was also evaluated, and it was found to be a strong PARP-1 ruthenium inhibitor in the low micromolar range (IC(50)=1.0 ± 0.3 μM). TM34 quickly binds to human serum albumin forming a 1:1 complex with a conditional stability constant (log K'~4.0), comparable to that of the Ru(III) complex in clinical trial KP1019. This indicates that TM34 can be efficiently transported by this protein, possibly being involved in its distribution and delivery if the complex is introduced in the blood stream. Albumin binding does not affect TM34 activity, yielding an adduct that maintains cytotoxic properties (against A2780 and A2780cisR cells). Altogether, the properties herein evaluated suggest that TM34 could be an anticancer agent of highly relevant therapeutic value. PMID:22877927

  4. Influence of bulking agents on physical, chemical, and microbiological properties during the two-stage composting of green waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Sun, Xiangyang

    2016-02-01

    A recyclable organic bulking agent (BA) that can be screened and was developed to optimize green waste (GW) composting. This study investigated the use of wood chips (WC) (at 0%, 15%, and 25%) and/or composted green waste (CGW) (at 0%, 25%, and 35%) as the BAs in the two-stage composting of GW. The combined addition of WC and CGW improved the conditions of composting process and the quality of compost product in terms of composting temperature, porosity, water retention, particle-size distribution, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), nitrogen losses, humification indices, microbial numbers, enzyme activities, macro- and micro-nutrient contents, and toxicity to germinating seeds. The compost matured in only 22days with the optimized two-stage composting method rather than in the 90-270days typically required for traditional composting. The optimal two-stage composting process and the best quality of compost product were obtained with the combined addition of 15% WC and 35% CGW. PMID:26644164

  5. In vitro evaluation of different chemical agents for the decontamination of gutta-percha cones Avaliação in vitro de diferentes agentes de descontaminação de cones de guta-percha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Emílio de Souza

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effectiveness of three disinfectants used in Dentistry for decontamination of gutta-percha cones. Sixty gutta-percha cones were contaminated with standardized pure cultures of five species of microorganisms (Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Candida albicans ATCC CBS-ICB/USP 562, Bacillus subtilis spores ATCC 6633 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175. The cones were treated with 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine aqueous solution (PVP-I; Groups 1 and 2, 5.25% aqueous sodium hypochlorite (Groups 3 and 4 and paraformaldehyde tablets (Group 5. All chemical agents were efficient for the cold sterilization of gutta-percha cones in short time periods.A eficiência de três desinfetantes usados em Odontologia foi estudada na descontaminação de 60 cones de guta-percha contaminados com culturas puras e padronizadas de cinco cepas de microrganismos (Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Candida albicans ATCC CBS-ICB/USP 562, Bacillus subtilis em esporos ATCC 6633 e Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175. Os cones foram tratados com solução aquosa de polivinilpirrolidona-iodo 10% (PVP-I; Grupos 1 e 2, solução aquosa de hipoclorito de sódio 5,25% (Grupos 3 e 4 e pastilhas de formaldeído (Grupo 5. Nossos resultados indicam que todos os agentes químicos foram eficientes para a esterilização a frio dos cones de guta-percha em curtos espaços de tempo.

  6. 2,4-Difluoro anisole. A promising complexing agent for boron isotopes separation by chemical exchange reaction and distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although methods of boron isotopes separation were intensively pursued about 60 years, the chemical exchange distillation is the only method that has been applied in industrial scale production of 10B. The present anisole BF3 system suffers from the drawbacks like high melting point, relatively low separation coefficient and instability under reaction conditions, which demand a continuous search for more effective and efficient donors for boron isotope separation. A series of fluoro-substituted anisole derivatives were screened in this paper, among which 2,4-difluoro anisole exhibited good properties compared with anisole. Studies on the boron trifluoride and 2,4-difluoro anisole adduct, its thermodynamic and physical properties related to large-scale isotopic separation is reported. The results showed that 2,4-difluoro anisole is better than anisole in separation coefficient, freezing point and stability under pyrolysis conditions, which suggest a further detailed investigations on boron trifluoride and 2,4-difluoro anisole adduct. (author)

  7. A radiobiological approach to cancer treatment. Possible chemical and physical agents modifying radiosensitivity in comparison with high LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological characteristics of high LET radiations are summarized to be low oxygen enhancement ratio, high RBE, low repair and low cell cycle dependency of radiosensitivity. Various chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity and radiological effect of hyperthermia are classified into these four properties. It is evident that we have now various means to mimic high LET radiations as far as biological response is concerned though some of them are still in experimental stage. Among them, the means to cope with hypoxia and repair which are assumed to be the most important causes of radioresistance of human tumors are discussed in some detail. It is expected that through the present seminar we would have consensus to concentrate our effort of development for new modifying means available and useful in developing countries. (author)

  8. Portable Solid Phase Micro-Extraction Coupled with Ion Mobility Spectrometry System for On-Site Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples.

  9. On the need to assess cancer risk in populations environmentally and occupationally exposed to virus and chemical agents in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Netto Guilherme

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence exists that exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses may produce elevated cancer mortality in human populations, particularly excesses of cancer of lung and excesses of cancer of lymphopoietic tissues. To date, this potential risk is unknown in populations from the developing countries. This paper suggests the need to assess cancer risk in populations of developing countries with reported environmental exposure to chicken meat products and eggs; the need to assess risk of cancer in populations inoculated with vaccines from infected chicken embryos; and the need to assess risk of cancer in occupational populations highly exposed to poultry oncogenic viruses, and with potential concurrent exposure to chemical agents known or suspected to be carcinogens.

  10. Effect of Top Slag Basicity on Quality of Steel Treated by Exothermic Agent SiFe and SiCaBa during Chemical Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of top slag basicity on quality of steel treated with SiFe and SiCaBa alloy as exothermic agent in chemical heating was studied. These experiments were carried out in MoSi2 laboratory furnace with 0.2kg molten steel for equilibrium test and 2kg molten steel for simulation test respectively. These results showed that the adjusting basicity of top slag with CaO is effective to prevent rephosphorization and resulphurization, and it is possible to dephosphorize and desulphurize and remove the inclusions from molten steel when basicity R of the top slag is adjusted to 2.0-3.10, and SiCaBa alloy is better than SiFe alloy in this relation.

  11. DNA-membrane complex damages in mammalian cells after gamma irradiation and chemical agent action and role of the complex in DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sedimentation behavior of the DNA-membrane complex (DMC) from Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after gamma irradiation and carminomycin (CM) treatment was studied. The DNA and membrane containing material released by alkaline lysis from EAT cells had an anomalous sedimentation relative to denatured DNA. The DMC sediments with a great sedimentation constant (255 S). Both the chemical and physical agents induced DNA single-strand breaks and damage of the DMC. It was shown that 0.01 g/ml CM did not affect the incorporation of exogenic thymidine into DNA but the DMC was completely disrupted by this CM dose. There was no correlation between postirradiation repair kinetics of the DMC and the kinetics of 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of ETA cells. (author)

  12. Portable solid phase micro-extraction coupled with ion mobility spectrometry system for on-site analysis of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  13. Physico-chemical characterisation of 99mTc-SnF2 colloid agent used for labelling white cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For more than fifteen years, Tc-stannous fluoride (SnF2) has been used to successfully label patient whole blood for the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The physico-chemical characteristics of this radiocolloid are still poorly understood. Using filters of specific composition, the particle size distribution (PSD) of SnF2 was found to be 6.1% >5μm, 5.2% 1-5μm, 0% 0.2-1μm and 88.7% 5μm, 14.1% 1-5μm, 0% 0.2-1μm and 85.9% 99mTc-SnF2 was found to be 0.8% >5μm, 96.7% 1 -5mm, 2.3% 0.2-1 μm and 0.4% 2 is used in colloidal particle formation, and of the radioactivity added, all Tc is associated with the 1-5μm diameter particles. The growth of these colloidal particles depends upon the surface chemistry of SnF2. There is a slow initial rate of accretion of SnF2 during colloid formation, which is a slow hydrolysis reaction in water, to yield fewer yet larger particles. Subsequently, reduction of 99mTc-pertechnetate by Sn2+ present, yields [Tc3+] that binds to the growing colloid surface. The chemical units comprising the colloidal surface are probably SnO-SnF2 or Sn2O2F2 or SnF3- and Sn2F5-. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  14. An in vitro systematic spectroscopic examination of the photostabilities of a random set of commercial sunscreen lotions and their chemical UVB/UVA active agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpone, Nick; Salinaro, Angela; Emeline, Alexei V; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Hidaka, Hisao; Zhao, Jincai

    2002-12-01

    The photostabilities of a random set of commercially available sunscreen lotions and their active ingredients are examined spectroscopically subsequent to simulated sunlight UV exposure. Loss of filtering efficacy can occur because of possible photochemical modifications of the sunscreen active agents. Changes in absorption of UVA/ UVB sunlight by agents in sunscreen lotions also leads to a reduction of the expected photoprotection of human skin and DNA against the harmful UV radiation. The active ingredients were investigated in aqueous media and in organic solvents of various polarities (methanol, acetonitrile, and n-hexane) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions The UV absorption features are affected by the nature of the solvents with properties closely related to oil-in-water (o/w) or water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions actually used in sunscreen formulations, and by the presence of molecular oxygen. The photostabilities of two combined chemical ingredients (oxybenzone and octyl methoxycinnamate) and the combination oxybenzone/titanium dioxide were also explored. In the latter case, oxybenzone undergoes significant photodegradation in the presence of the physical filter TiO2. PMID:12661594

  15. Differential cytotoxic pathways of topoisomerase I and II anticancer agents after overexpression of the E2F-1/DP-1 transcription factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, K; Petersen, B O; Falck, J;

    2000-01-01

    The transcription factor complex E2F-1/DP-1 regulates the G1-to-S-phase transition and has been associated with sensitivity to the S-phase-specific anticancer agents camptothecin and etoposide, which poison DNA topoisomerase I and II, respectively. To investigate the relationship between E2F-1 and...... drug sensitivity in detail, we established human osteosarcoma U-20S-TA cells expressing full-length E2F-1/ DP-1 under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter, designated UE1DP-1 cells. Topoisomerase I levels and activity as well as the number of camptothecin-induced DNA single- and double......-strand breaks were unchanged in UEIDP-1/tc- cells with >10-fold E2F-1/DP-1 overexpression. However, UE1DP-1/tc- cells were hypersensitive to camptothecin in both a clonogenic assay and four different apoptotic assays. This indicates that camptothecin-induced toxicity in this model is due to the activation of an...

  16. THE PEROXYMONOCARBONATE ANIONS AS PULP BLEACHING AGENTS. PART 1. RESULTS WITH LIGNIN MODEL COMPOUNDS AND CHEMICAL PULPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis K Attiogbe

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The peroxymonocarbonate mono-anion (HCO4─ is generated when the bicarbonate anion is added to a H2O2 solution. The mono-anion is believed to have a pKa value of ca. 10 and as such would start dissociating to the di-anion (CO42─ at pH ca. 8. The mono-anion should demonstrate electrophilic properties, while the di-anion should be a nucleophile. In an alkaline, non-sulfur pulping process such as soda/AQ, Na2CO3 could be obtained from the chemical recovery system and carbonated with CO2 from a flue gas stream to produce NaHCO3. In such a case only H2O2 would need to be purchased to generate the peroxymonocarbonate (PMC anions. Bicarbonate anions could also be produced from the carbonation of solutions containing NaOH, Mg(OH2 or mined Na2CO3. One or both of the PMC anions was found to be effective in oxidizing two lignin model compounds as well as lowering the lignin content of kraft and soda/AQ hardwood pulps. The PMC anions were generated in-situ by NaHCO3 or Na2CO3 + CO2 addition to dilute H2O2 solutions.

  17. Enhanced Electrochemical Performance of Lithium Iron(II) Phosphate Modified Cooperatively via Chemically Reduced Graphene Oxide and Polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •LiFePO4 was modified cooperatively with reduced graphene oxide and PANI •LiFePO4/ reduced graphene oxide /PANI composites showed unique 3D network structures •The composites exhibited enhanced electrochemical performances as cathode •The enhanced property is from unique structure and inherent properties of components -- Abstract: It is essential to improve the electron and lithium ion conductivities of Lithium iron(II) phosphate (LiFePO4) used as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. In the work, we designed and fabricated a series of composites of LiFePO4 modified cooperatively with chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and polyaniline. It was demonstrated that the composites have a three dimensional network structures in which the CRGO and the polyaniline were intertwined and coated uniformly on the surface of LiFePO4. Comparably, as cathode for lithium-ion batteries, the as-prepared composites showed better electrochemical performances than the bare LiFePO4 and the LiFePO4 modified simply with CRGO or polyaniline alone. The elaboration of the underneath mechanism on the pronounced electrochemical properties of the composites was also attempted and discussed

  18. Non-surgical treatment of deep wounds triggered by harmful physical and chemical agents: a successful combined use of collagenase and hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesti, Maria G; Fino, Pasquale; Ponzo, Ida; Ruggieri, Martina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-02-01

    Some chronic ulcers often occur with slough, not progressing through the normal stages of wound healing. Treatment is long and other therapies need to be performed in addition to surgery. Patients not eligible for surgery because of ASA class (American Society of Anesthesiologists class) appear to benefit from chemical therapy with collagenase or hydrocolloids in order to prepare the wound bed, promoting the healing process. We describe four cases of traumatic, upper limb deep wounds caused by different physical and chemical agents, emphasising the effectiveness of treatment based on topical application of collagenase and hyaluronic acid (HA) before standardised surgical procedures. We performed careful disinfection of lesions combined with application of topical cream containing hyaluronic acid, bacterial fermented sodium hyaluronate (0·2%w/w) salt, and bacterial collagenase obtained from non-pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus (>2·0 nkat1/g). In one patient a dermo-epidermal graft was used to cover the wide loss of substance. In two patients application of a HA-based dermal substitute was done. We obtained successful results in terms of wound healing, with satisfactory aesthetic result and optimal recovery of the affected limb functionality. Topical application of collagenase and HA, alone or before standardised surgical procedures allows faster wound healing. PMID:24698215

  19. The physico-chemical characteristics of the phosphocholine-containing glycoglycerolipid MfGL-II govern the permeability properties of Mycoplasma fermentans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Menachem, G; Byström, T; Rechnitzer, H; Rottem, S; Rilfors, L; Lindblom, G

    2001-07-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans seems to be involved in several pathogenic conditions in humans, and is among other things capable of fusing with T-cells and lymphocytes. The choline-containing phosphoglycolipid 6'-O-(3"-phosphocholine-2"-amino-1"-phospho-1",3"-propanediol)-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1'-->3)-1,2-diacylglycerol (MfGL-II) in the membrane of M. fermentans has been suggested to enhance the fusion process, and the characteristics of MfGL-II were therefore investigated. When a cell culture ages the fraction of MfGL-II increases, and the fraction of the other major membrane lipid, phosphatidylglycerol (PtdGro), decreases concomitantly. Swelling experiments showed that the permeability and osmotic fragility are markedly reduced in aged cells. MfGL-II is selectively released into the surrounding medium when aged M. fermentans cells are incubated in buffer containing EDTA. The physico-chemical properties of MfGL-II were studied by NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, and they can explain the biochemical results. The temperature for the transition between gel and lamellar liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phases is 35-45 degrees C higher for MfGL-II than for PtdGro, which most probably gives rise to the reduced permeability in aged cells. At high water contents MfGL-II forms an Lalpha phase and isotropic aggregates which were interpreted to be vesicles with a radius of approximately 450 A. It is proposed that MfGL-II forms vesicles in the surrounding medium when it is released from the cell membrane. Neither EDTA nor Ca2+ ions have a significant influence on the aggregate structures formed by MfGL-II. Our results indicate that MfGL-II has no fusogenic properties. It is more probable that a recently identified lysolipid in the M. fermentans membrane acts as a fusogen. PMID:11432735

  20. Assessment of Semi-Quantitative Health Risks of Exposure to Harmful Chemical Agents in the Context of Carcinogenesis in the Latex Glove Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Saeed; Fallah Asadi, Ayda; Varmazyar, Sakineh

    2016-01-01

    Excessive exposure to chemicals in the workplace can cause poisoning and various diseases. Thus, for the protection of labor, it is necessary to examine the exposure of people to chemicals and risks from these materials. The purpose of this study is to evaluate semi-quantitative health risks of exposure to harmful chemical agents in the context of carcinogenesis in a latex glove manufacturing industry. In this cross-sectional study, semi-quantitative risk assessment methods provided by the Department of Occupational Health of Singapore were used and index of LD50, carcinogenesis (ACGIH and IARC) and corrosion capacity were applied to calculate the hazard rate and the biggest index was placed as the basis of risk. To calculate the exposure rate, two exposure index methods and the actual level of exposure were employed. After identifying risks, group H (high) and E (very high) classified as high-risk were considered. Of the total of 271 only 39 (15%) were at a high risk level and 3% were very high (E). These risks only was relevant to 7 materials with only sulfuric acid placed in group E and 6 other materials in group H, including nitric acid (48.3%), chromic acid (6.9%), hydrochloric acid (10.3%), ammonia (3.4%), potassium hydroxide (20.7%) and chlorine (10.3%). Overall, the average hazard rate level was estimated to be 4 and average exposure rate to be 3.5. Health risks identified in this study showed that the manufacturing industry for latex gloves has a high level of risk because of carcinogens, acids and strong alkalisand dangerous drugs. Also according to the average level of risk impact, it is better that the safety design strategy for latex gloves production industry be placed on the agenda. PMID:27165227

  1. Decontamination Strategy for Large Area and/or Equipment Contaminated with Chemical and Biological Agents using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoske, Richard [ORNL; Kennedy, Patrick [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Smith, Rob R [ORNL; Huxford, Theodore J [ORNL; Bonavita, Angelo M [ORNL; Engleman, Greg [ORNL; Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Griest, Wayne H [ORNL; Ilgner, Ralph H [ORNL; Brown, Gilbert M [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    A strategy for the decontamination of large areas and or equipment contaminated with Biological Warfare Agents (BWAs) and Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) was demonstrated using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) photolysis system. This strategy offers an alternative that is potentially quicker, less hazardous, generates far less waste, and is easier to deploy than those currently fielded by the Department of Defense (DoD). For example, for large frame aircraft the United States Air Force still relies on the combination of weathering (stand alone in environment), air washing (fly aircraft) and finally washing the aircraft with Hot Soapy Water (HSW) in an attempt to remove any remaining contamination. This method is laborious, time consuming (upwards of 12+ hours not including decontamination site preparation), and requires large amounts of water (e.g., 1,600+ gallons for a single large frame aircraft), and generates large amounts of hazardous waste requiring disposal. The efficacy of the HEAL system was demonstrated using diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP) a G series CWA simulant, and Bacillus globigii (BG) a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. Experiments were designed to simulate the energy flux of a field deployable lamp system that could stand-off 17 meters from a 12m2 target area and uniformly expose a surface at 1360 W/m2. The HEAL system in the absence of a catalyst reduced the amount of B. globigii by five orders of magnitude at a starting concentration of 1.63 x 107 spores. In the case of CWA simulants, the HEAL system in the presence of the catalyst TiO2 effectively degraded DIMP sprayed onto a 100mm diameter Petri dish in 5 minutes.

  2. A new method of inhibiting pollutant release from source water reservoir sediment by adding chemical stabilization agents combined with water-lifting aerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beibei Chai; Tinglin Huang; Weihuang Zhu; Fengying Yang

    2011-01-01

    Source water reservoirs easily become thermally and dynamically stratified.Internal pollution released from reservoir sediments is the main cause of water quality problems.To mitigate the internal pollution more effectively,a new method,which combined chemical stabilization with water lifting aerator (WLA) technology,was proposed and its efficiency in inhibiting pollutant release was studied by controlled sediment-water interface experiments.The results showed that this new method can inhibit pollutant release from sediment effectively.The values of mean efficiency (E) in different reactors 2#-5# (1# with no agent,2# 10 mg/L polymeric aluminum chloride (PAC) was added,3# 20 mg/L PAC was added,4# 30 mg/L PAC was added,5# 20 mg/L PAC and 0.2 mg/L palyacrylamide (PAM)were added) for PO43- were 35.0%,43.9%,50.4% and 63.6%,respectively.This showed that the higher the PAC concentration was,the better the inhibiting efficiency was,and PAM addition strengthened the inhibiting efficiency significantly.For Fe2+,the corresponding values of E for the reactors 2#-5# were 22.9%,47.2%,34.3% and 46.2%,respectively.The inhibiting effect of PAC and PAM on Mn release remained positive for a relatively short time,about 10 days,and was not so effective as for PO43- and Fe2+.The average efliciencies in inhibiting the release of UV254 were 35.3%,25.9%,35.5%,38.9% and 39.5% for reactors 2#-5#,respectively.The inhibiting mechanisms of the agents for different pollutants varied among the conditions and should be studied further.

  3. Radiation sensitizations at DNA-level by chemical and biological agents. Coordinated programme on improvement of radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation sensitization by chemical agents at DNA level is discussed. Procaine, Halothan and Metronidazole showed no significant effect on unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mouse spleen cells, investigated by autoradiography and no effect on rejoining of DNA single strand breaks after gamma or UV irradiation. Oxyphenbutazon and prednisolone reduced the replicative DNA synthesis in vitro and in vivo but there was only little effect on DNA repair in the in vivo experiments. These two substances showed also a small reduction in poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis (PAR synthesis). 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) in combination with UV irradiation showed that 5-MOP was more toxic than mutagen, but induced much less DNA crosslinks than 8-MOP. Autoradiographic studies of radiation sensitization by biological agents showed significant inhibition of UDS in Yoshida tumor cells after acute mycoplasma infection in rats. Nucleoid sedimentation studies showed only in the case of Yoshida tumor cells after mycoplasma infection a dramatic effect in the sedimentation behaviour. Sensitization of cells by changing chromatin structure was also studied. Benzamide, 3-NH2-benzamide, 3-Methoxybenzamide, Spermine, Theophyllin and Caffeine were tested in different concentrations on replicative DNA synthesis, UDS after UV irradiation and PAR synthesis Chinese hamster ovary cells. 5-Methoxybenzamide was the strongest sensitizer and inhibitor of the PAR synthesis, and was used in further experiments. Results of KFA Juelich on sensitization of a mamma-adenocarcinoma EO 771 on C57 B1 mice are given. Replicative DNA synthesis, DNA repair and PAR synthesis were compared in spleen cells and adenocarcinoma cells after treatment with 5-Methoxybenzamide. An inhibitory effect on UDS could be shown only in adenocarcinoma cells but not in the mice spleen cells

  4. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pKas and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pKa = 5.94, logβ120 = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pKa = 9.34, logβl20 = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is logβ110 = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of 242Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods

  5. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, M.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK{sub a}s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 5.94, log{beta}{sub 120} = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK{sub a} = 9.34, log{beta}{sub l20} = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is log{beta}{sub 110} = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of {sup 242}Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  6. Non-toxic complexing agent Tri-sodium citrate's effect on chemical bath deposited ZnS thin films and its growth mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agawane, G.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seung Wook [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Moholkar, A.V. [Electrochemical Mat. Lab., Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004 (India); Gurav, K.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jae Ho, E-mail: yunjh92@kier.re.kr [Photovoltaic Research Group, KIER, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Yong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hyeok, E-mail: jinhyeok@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnS thin films were prepared by CBD using non-toxic complexing agent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology of ZnS thin film was improved with Na{sub 3}-citrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The growth mechanism of ZnS thin films is depends upon the concentration of Na{sub 3}-citrate. - Abstract: This study demonstrates the growth and characterizations of chemical bath deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin films prepared at pH 10. Aqueous zinc acetate and thiourea were used as precursors along with the non-toxic complexing agent, Na{sub 3}-citrate. The effects of different concentrations of Na{sub 3}-citrate from 0 to 0.2 M on the structural, morphological, compositional, chemical, and optical properties of ZnS thin films were studied. It was revealed through field emission scanning electron microscopy studies that an increase in the concentration of Na{sub 3}-citrate leads to an improvement of the uniformity of the ZnS thin films and decrease in the grain size. Atomic force microscopy showed that the RMS value decreases with an increase in Na{sub 3}-citrate concentration. X-ray diffraction study revealed that crystallinity of ZnS thin films improves upon increasing concentration of Na{sub 3}-citrate and that the films exhibit a hexagonal polycrystalline ZnS phase while deposited with 0.2 and 0.1 M Na{sub 3}-citrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the signal intensity decreases for Zn 2p{sub 3/2} and S 2p{sub 1/2} as the concentration of Na{sub 3}-citrate decreases from 0.2 to 0 M. It was shown by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy that approximately 80% transmission in the visible region and absorption edge shifts towards blue when the concentration of Na{sub 3}-citrate increases from 0 to 0.2 M. The band gap energy of the ZnS film deposited without Na{sub 3}-citrate was found to be 3.53 eV, while it increases from 3.73 to 3.80 eV with a decrease in Na{sub 3}-citrate concentration from 0.2 to 0.025 M. The

  7. Induced Expression of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes by Preventive Agents: Role of the Antioxidant Response Element

    OpenAIRE

    Lubet, Ronald A; Yao, Ruisheng; Grubbs, Clinton J; You, Ming; Wang, Yian

    2009-01-01

    Identifying agents that block tumor initiation is a goal of cancer prevention. The ability of a chemically varied group of agents to induce various drug metabolizing genes in livers of rats was examined. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for seven days with various agents in the diet or by gavage. The agents examined, which might be expected to respond via specific nuclear receptors (CAR, AhR) as well as antioxidant response elements (AREs), included Phase I/II inducers [5,6 benzoflavone (BF, ...

  8. 32P-Postlabeling test for covalent DNA binding of chemicals in vivo: Application to a variety of aromatic carcinogens and methylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogen--DNA adducts were detected and determined by 32P-postlabeling assay after exposure of mouse or rat tissues in vivo to a total of 28 compounds comprising 7 arylamines and derivatives, 3 azo compounds, 2 nitroaromatics, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 4 methylating agents. DNA was isolated from mouse skin, mouse liver, and rat liver after treatment with the individual carcinogens, then digested enzymatically to deoxyribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates, which were converted to 5'-32P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed [32P]phosphate transfer from [gamma-32P]ATP. The nucleotides were resolved by anion-exchange t.l.c. on polyethyleneimine-cellulose and detected by autoradiography. The determination of low levels of DNA binding of the aromatic carcinogens entailed the removal of normal nucleotides prior to the resolution of adduct nucleotides. For this purpose, an alternative procedure employing reversed-phase t.l.c. was devised which offered advantages for the detection of quantitatively minor adducts. The procedures described enabled the detection of 1 aromatic DNA adduct in approximately 10(8) normal nucleotides, while the limit of detection of methylated adducts was 1 adduct in approximately 6 X 10(5) nucleotides. The results show that a great number of carcinogen-DNA adducts of diverse structure are substrates for 32P-labeling by polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation. Because covalent DNA adduct formation in vivo appears to be an essential property of the majority of chemical carcinogens, 32P-postlabeling analysis of carcinogen--DNA adducts in mammalian tissues may serve as a test for the screening of chemicals for potential carcinogenicity

  9. Toxicology and pharmacology of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard - a review. Final technical report, 29 September 1994-31 January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacre, J.C.; Beers, R.; Goldman, M.

    1995-04-05

    Sulfur mustard is a poisonous chemical agent which exerts a local action on the eyes, skin and respiratory tissue with subsequent systemic action on the nervous, cardiac, and digestive and endocrine systems in man and laboratory animals causing lacrimation, malaise, anorexia, salivation, respiratory distress, vomiting, hyperexcitability, cardiac distress, and death. Sulfur mustard is a cell poison which causes disumption and impairment of a variety of cellular activities which are dependent upon a very specific integral relationship. These cytotoxic effects are manifested in widespread metabolic disturbances whose variable characteristics are observed in enzymatic deficiencies, vesicant action, abnormal mitotic activity and cell division, bone marrow disruption, disturbances in hematopoietic activity and systemic poisoning. Indeed, mustard gas readily combines with various components of the cell such as amino acids, amines and proteins. Sulfur mustard has been shown to be mainly a lung carcinogen in various test animal species; this effect is highly dependent of size of the dose and the route of exposure. In the human, there is evidence of cancers of the respiratory tract in men exposed to mustard gas. Mutagenicity of sulfur mustard, due to the strong alkylating activity, has been reported to occur in many different species of animals, plants, bacteria, and fungi. There is no strong evidence that sulfur mustard is a teratogen but much further research, with particular emphasis on maternal and fetal toxicity, is needed and recommended.

  10. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO. PMID:26653465

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of a membrane-enriched fraction from flag leaves reveals responses to chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qilu; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Gaisheng; Li, Ying; Li, Zheng; Guo, Jialin; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    The induction of wheat male fertile lines by using the chemical hybridizing agent SQ-1 (CHA-SQ-1) is an effective approach in the utilization of heterosis; however, the molecular basis of male fertility remains unknown. Wheat flag leaves are the initial receptors of CHA-SQ-1 and their membrane structure plays a vital role in response to CHA-SQ-1 stress. To investigate the response of wheat flag leaves to CHA-SQ-1 stress, we compared their quantitative proteomic profiles in the absence and presence of CHA-SQ-1. Our results indicated that wheat flag leaves suffered oxidative stress during CHA-SQ-1 treatments. Leaf O2 (-), H2O2, and malonaldehyde levels were significantly increased within 10 h after CHA-SQ-1 treatment, while the activities of major antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase were significantly reduced. Proteome profiles of membrane-enriched fraction showed a change in the abundance of a battery of membrane proteins involved in multiple biological processes. These variable proteins mainly impaired photosynthesis, ATP synthesis protein mechanisms and were involved in the response to stress. These results provide an explanation of the relationships between membrane proteomes and anther abortion and the practical application of CHA for hybrid breeding. PMID:26379693

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of a membrane-enriched fraction from flag leaves reveals responses to chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilu eSong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The induction of wheat male fertile lines by using the chemical hybridizing agent SQ-1 (CHA-SQ-1 is an effective approach in the utilization of heterosis; however, the molecular basis of male fertility remains unknown. Wheat flag leaves are the initial receptors of CHA-SQ-1 and their membrane structure plays a vital role in response to CHA-SQ-1 stress. To investigate the response of wheat flag leaves to CHA-SQ-1 stress, we compared their quantitative proteomic profiles in the absence and presence of CHA-SQ-1. Our results indicated that wheat flag leaves suffered oxidative stress during CHA-SQ-1 treatments. Leaf O2-, H2O2, and malonaldehyde levels were significantly increased within 10 h after CHA-SQ-1 treatment, while the activities of major antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase were significantly reduced. Proteome profiles of membrane-enriched fraction showed a change in the abundance of a battery of membrane proteins involved in multiple biological processes. These variable proteins mainly impaired photosynthesis, ATP synthesis protein mechanisms and were involved in the response to stress. These results provide an explanation of the relationships between membrane proteomes and anther abortion and the practical application of CHA for hybrid breeding.

  13. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL FOAMING AGENTS ON THE PHYSICO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF BAMBOO POWDER-POLYPROPYLENE FOAMED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaxing Zhou,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To make full use of bamboo resources in China and explore the foaming mechanism of bamboo powder-polypropylene (PP foamed composites, a foamed composite of 54 wt% PP and 13 wt% HMSPP containing 33 wt% bamboo powder blends was prepared by injection moulding. Effects of chemical foaming agents (CFA on the mechanical properties and rheological behavior of foamed composites were investigated. The mechanical measurements and ESEM test results indicated that the composite with 1% modified exothermic FA had smaller cell size and better cell distribution compared with endothermic FA. It also had better physico-mechanical properties, with a decrease of 14.2% in density and an increase of 16.8% to 40.2% in the specific tensile, bending, and notched impact strength compared with the non-foamed composite. The frequency sweep results indicated that all composites had a shear- thinning behavior, and both the modulus and complex viscosity of composite with 1% exothermic FA decreased compared with those of the non-foamed composite. The shear rate scans revealed that the non-Newtonian fluid index increased with the increase of exothermic FA content. The viscous activation energy of the modified composite with 1% exothermic FA was 46.41KJ•mol-1. This was an increase of 8.9% compared with that of the non-foamed analogue.

  14. Chemical synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite (HAp)-poly (ethylene co vinyl alcohol) (EVA) nanocomposite using a phosphonic acid coupling agent for orthopedic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Nabakumar; Mohapatra, Sasmita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur - 721302, West Bengal (India); Bhargava, Parag [Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai-400076 (India); Pramanik, Panchanan [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur - 721302, West Bengal (India)], E-mail: pramanik@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2009-01-01

    A novel bio-analogue hydroxyapatite (HAp)-poly (ethylene co vinyl alcohol) (EVA) nanocomposite has been synthesized by a solution-based chemical methodology with varying HAp contents from 10 to 60% (w/w). The surface of HAp particles has been modified with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid in order to enhance the interfacial bonding interaction between HAp and EVA, and hence to improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The interfacial modification has been investigated through Fourier transform infrared absorption spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analyses. The surface morphology of the composite and the homogeneous dispersion of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix have been investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively. The use of phosphonic acid coupling agent promotes the uniform dispersion of HAp particles in the polymer matrix with strong particle-polymer interfacial bonding, which leads to a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the composite. The cell viability test indicates that the HAp-EVA nanocomposite is cytocompatible. The developed HAp-EVA nanocomposite may be potentially used as bone substitutes.

  15. Chemical synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite (HAp)-poly (ethylene co vinyl alcohol) (EVA) nanocomposite using a phosphonic acid coupling agent for orthopedic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel bio-analogue hydroxyapatite (HAp)-poly (ethylene co vinyl alcohol) (EVA) nanocomposite has been synthesized by a solution-based chemical methodology with varying HAp contents from 10 to 60% (w/w). The surface of HAp particles has been modified with 2-carboxyethylphosphonic acid in order to enhance the interfacial bonding interaction between HAp and EVA, and hence to improve the mechanical properties of the composite. The interfacial modification has been investigated through Fourier transform infrared absorption spectra (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analyses. The surface morphology of the composite and the homogeneous dispersion of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix have been investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively. The use of phosphonic acid coupling agent promotes the uniform dispersion of HAp particles in the polymer matrix with strong particle-polymer interfacial bonding, which leads to a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the composite. The cell viability test indicates that the HAp-EVA nanocomposite is cytocompatible. The developed HAp-EVA nanocomposite may be potentially used as bone substitutes

  16. Chemicals agents and human male fertility: Review of the past thirty years literature; Sostanze chimiche e infertilita` maschile: Rassegna degli studi condotti negli ultimi trenta anni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traina, Maria Elsa; Urbani, Elisabetta [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Igiene Ambientale; Petrelli, Grazia; Pasquali, Massimo; Pace, Francesca [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Epidemiologia e Biostatistica

    1997-03-01

    The effects of several industrial and environmental pollutants on the male reproductive system are known from animal studies, but to date the impact on human fertility is still scarcely documented by epidemiological studies. The literature of the past thirty years on the adverse effects of occupational chemical factors on human male fertility is reviewed. Eighty-nine studies have been analysed with the purpose to identify the substances and/or the working categories investigated and to evaluate the methods used. Since 1977 the interest has been focused on the human exposures to 1,2-dibromochloropropane, a powerful spermatotoxic agent, but a consistent number of studies was also related to other active ingredients of pesticides (lindane, carbaryl, 2,4-dichlorofenoxiacetic acid), solvents (glycol ethers, carbon disulfide) and heavy metals (lead, cadmium). Among the indicators used in these studies to evaluate the effects on male fertility, the seminal parameters are analysed in 67 % of the reports; blood hormonal tests are done in 54 % of the cases. The literature suggests that further epidemiological studies need to be conducted in other working categories; more attention should be paid to the sensitivity and biological significance of the male reproductive parameters used in human studies.

  17. Use of stannous fluoride (II) like reducer agent for 99mTc-labelling ciprofloxacin. Animal pharmacokinetic and biodistribution in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is based on 99mTc-labelling of ciprofloxacin using stannous fluoride (SnF2) like a reducer agent and to evaluate the biological activity, pharmacokinetic and biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical obtained. Stannous (II) chloride (SnCl2), formamidine sulfinic acid (FSA) as an alternative to stannous chloride and redox polymers were used like reducers agents of pertechnetate but SnF2 is an advantageous agent due it high stability. Five to sixty micrograms (μg) of SnF2 and 2 milligrams (mg) of ciprofloxacin lactate were mixed in a vacuum vial in 1 milliliter (ml) of NaCl 0.9%. Freshly eluted sodium pertechnetate solution, 370 megabecquerel (MBq), were added and incubated for 10 minutes (min) into boiling water. After purification through sephadex G50 column, UV-visible spectrum was made to the fraction of larger activity. Quality control and in-vitro stability study of labelled up to 6 h (h) using tin layer chromatography (TLC-SG) and Watman 3 was carrier out. Six male wistar rats were divided into two groups to made abscess model: Three were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) and the others with Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536). After 18-20 h, 666-740 MBq/ kilograms (MBq/kg) of 99mTc-ciprofloxacin were administered. Planar scintigraphic images were acquired at 1, 2, 4 and 18 h using a gamma camera. Abscess to counter-lateral thigh (A/C) ratio of activity was calculated. Pharmacokinetic study in blood, serum and plasma was performed in 30 wistar rats males, separated in 10 groups. They took samples of blood at different times intervals up to 24 h after injection of 666-740 MBq/Kg of 99mTc-ciprofloxacin. A model of two compartments was assumed. The calculated pharmacokinetic parameters were volume apparent of distribution (Vd) and half time of clearing of the distribution and elimination phase's of the blood depuration curve. Organ biodistribution study was carried out in 24 male healthy wistar rats divided into 8 groups. The animals

  18. Chemical and spectroscopic characterizations, ESI-QTOF mass spectrometric measurements and DFT studies of new complexes of palladium(II) with tryptamine and mefenamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marcos A.; Arruda, Eduardo G. R.; Profirio, Daniel M.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio C.; Formiga, André L. B.; Corbi, Pedro P.

    2015-11-01

    New palladium(II) complexes with tryptamine (Pd-tra) and mefenamic acid (Pd-mef) were prepared and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Elemental, ESI-QTOF mass spectrometric and thermogravimetric analyses of the compounds confirm the composition [PdCl2(tra)2] for Pd-tra and [Pd(mef)2(bipy)] for Pd-mef. Infrared data indicate the coordination of tryptamine to Pd(II) by the nitrogen atom of the amino group, while for mefenamic acid coordination occurs by the oxygen atom of carboxylate group in a monodentate form. The 1H, 13C and {15N,1H} NMR spectroscopic data confirm the nitrogen coordination of the NH2 group of trypatmine to Pd(II) in the Pd-tra complex and also the oxygen coordination of the carboxylate group of mefenamic acid to Pd(II) in the Pd-mef complex. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were applied to determine the difference in energy between the geometric isomers (cis/trans) of Pd-tra and to optimize the structure of the Pd-mef complex. Raman spectroscopic measurements reinforce the nitrogen coordination of tryptamine to Pd(II) in the Pd-tra complex and confirms the presence of the cis-[PdCl2(tra)2] isomer in the solid state. The complexes are insoluble in water.

  19. Electrochromic and colorimetric properties of nickel(II) oxide thin films prepared by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialvi, Muhammad Z; Mortimer, Roger J; Wilcox, Geoffrey D; Teridi, Asri Mat; Varley, Thomas S; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Kirk, Caroline A

    2013-06-26

    Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) was used for the first time in the preparation of thin-film electrochromic nickel(II) oxide (NiO). The as-deposited films were cubic NiO, with an octahedral-like grain structure, and an optical band gap that decreased from 3.61 to 3.48 eV on increase in film thickness (in the range 500-1000 nm). On oxidative voltammetric cycling in aqueous KOH (0.1 mol dm(-3)) electrolyte, the morphology gradually changed to an open porous NiO structure. The electrochromic properties of the films were investigated as a function of film thickness, following 50, 100, and 500 conditioning oxidative voltammetric cycles in aqueous KOH (0.1 mol dm(-3)). Light modulation of the films increased with the number of conditioning cycles. The maximum coloration efficiency (CE) for the NiO (transmissive light green, the "bleached" state) to NiOOH (deep brown, the colored state) electrochromic process was found to be 56.3 cm(2) C(-1) (at 450 nm) for films prepared by AACVD for 15 min followed by 100 "bleached"-to-colored conditioning oxidative voltammetric cycles. Electrochromic response times were bleaching process. The films showed good stability when tested for up to 10 000 color/bleach cycles. Using the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) system of colorimetry the color stimuli of the electrochromic NiO films and the changes that take place on reversibly oxidatively switching to the NiOOH form were calculated from in situ visible spectra recorded under electrochemical control. Reversible changes in the hue and saturation occur on oxidation of the NiO (transmissive light green) form to the NiOOH (deep brown) form, as shown by the track of the CIE 1931 xy chromaticity coordinates. As the NiO film is oxidized, a sharp decrease in luminance was observed. CIELAB L*a*b* coordinates were also used to quantify the electrochromic color states. A combination of a low L* and positive a* and b* values quantified the perceived deep brown

  20. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  1. The Chemical Abundances of the Stellar Populations in the Leo I and Leo II dSph Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Bosler, Tammy L.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Stetson, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of 102 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) and 74 RGB stars in the Leo II dSph using LRIS on the Keck I 10-meter Telescope. We report on the calcium abundances [Ca/H] derived from the strengths of the Ca II triplet absorption lines at 8498, 8542, 8662 angstroms in the stellar spectra using a new Ca II triplet calibration to [Ca/H]. The two galaxies have different average [Ca/H] values of -1.34 +/- 0.02 for Leo I and -1.65 +/- 0.02 ...

  2. Comparison of latex body paint with wetted gauze wipes for sampling the chemical warfare agents VX and sulfur mustard from common indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernon-Kenny, Laura A; Behringer, Deborah L; Crenshaw, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    Comparison of solvent-wetted gauze with body paint, a peelable surface sampling media, for the sampling of the chemical warfare agents VX and sulfur mustard from nine surfaces was performed. The nine surfaces sampled are those typical of interior public venues and include smooth, rough, porous, and non-porous surfaces. Overall, solvent-wetted gauze (wipes) performed better for the recovery of VX from non-porous surfaces while body paint (BP) performed better for the porous surfaces. The average percent VX recoveries using wipes and BP, respectively, are: finished wood flooring, 86.2%, 71.4%; escalator handrail, 47.3%, 26.7%; stainless steel, 80.5%, 56.1%; glazed ceramic tile, 81.8%, 44.9%; ceiling tile, 1.77%, 13.1%; painted drywall 7.83%, 21.1%; smooth cement, 0.64%, 10.3%; upholstery fabric, 24.6%, 23.1%; unfinished wood flooring, 9.37%, 13.1%. Solvent-wetted gauze performed better for the recovery of sulfur mustard from three of the relatively non-porous surfaces while body paint performed better for the more porous surfaces. The average percent sulfur mustard recoveries using wipes and BP, respectively, are: finished wood flooring, 30.2%, 2.97%; escalator handrail, 4.40%, 4.09%; stainless steel, 21.2%, 3.30%; glazed ceramic tile, 49.7%, 16.7%; ceiling tile, 0.33%, 11.1%; painted drywall 2.05%, 10.6%; smooth cement, 1.20%, 35.2%; upholstery fabric, 7.63%, 6.03%; unfinished wood flooring, 0.90%, 1.74%. PMID:26990562

  3. Cytological and comparative proteomic analyses on male sterility in Brassica napus L. induced by the chemical hybridization agent monosulphuron ester sodium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Cheng

    Full Text Available Male sterility induced by a chemical hybridization agent (CHA is an important tool for utilizing crop heterosis. Monosulphuron ester sodium (MES, a new acetolactate synthase-inhibitor herbicide belonging to the sulphonylurea family, has been developed as an effective CHA to induce male sterility in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.. To understand MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed better, comparative cytological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Cytological analysis indicated that defective tapetal cells and abnormal microspores were gradually generated in the developing anthers of MES-treated plants at various development stages, resulting in unviable microspores and male sterility. A total of 141 differentially expressed proteins between the MES-treated and control plants were revealed, and 131 of them were further identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Most of these proteins decreased in abundance in tissues of MES-treated rapeseed plants, and only a few increased. Notably, some proteins were absent or induced in developing anthers after MES treatment. These proteins were involved in several processes that may be crucial for tapetum and microspore development. Down-regulation of these proteins may disrupt the coordination of developmental and metabolic processes, resulting in defective tapetum and abnormal microspores that lead to male sterility in MES-treated plants. Accordingly, a simple model of CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed was established. This study is the first cytological and dynamic proteomic investigation on CHA-MES-induced male sterility in rapeseed, and the results provide new insights into the molecular events of male sterility.

  4. The Chemical Abundances of the Stellar Populations in the Leo I and Leo II dSph Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bosler, T L; Stetson, P B; Bosler, Tammy L.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of 102 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) and 74 RGB stars in the Leo II dSph using LRIS on the Keck I 10-meter Telescope. We report on the calcium abundances [Ca/H] derived from the strengths of the Ca II triplet absorption lines at 8498, 8542, 8662 angstroms in the stellar spectra using a new Ca II triplet calibration to [Ca/H]. The two galaxies have different average [Ca/H] values of -1.34 +/- 0.02 for Leo I and -1.65 +/- 0.02 for LeoII with intrinsic abundance dispersions of 1.2 and 1.0 dex, respectively. The typical random and total errors in derived abundances are 0.10 and 0.17 dex per star. For comparison to existing literature, we also converted our Ca II measurements to [Fe/H] on the scale of Carretta and Gratton (1997) though we discuss why this may not be the best determinant of metallicity; Leo I has a mean [Fe/H] = -1.34 and Leo II has a mean [Fe/H] = -1.59. The metallicity distribution function of Leo I is approximately Gaussian in s...

  5. A study of the effects of enhanced oil recovery agents on the quality of Strategic Petroleum Reserves crude oil. [Physical and chemical interactions of Enhanced Oil Recovery reagents with hydrocarbons present in petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The project was initiated on September 1, 1990. The objective of the project was to carry out a literature search to estimate the types and extents of long time interactions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents, such as surfactants, caustics and polymers, with crude oil. This information is necessary to make recommendations about mixing EOR crude oil with crude oils from primary and secondary recovery processes in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Data were sought on both adverse and beneficial effects of EOR agents that would impact handling, transportation and refining of crude oil. An extensive literature search has been completed, and the following informations has been compiled: (1) a listing of existing EOR test and field projects; (2) a listing of currently used EOR agents; and (3) evidence of short and long term physical and chemical interactions of these EOR-agents with hydrocarbons, and their effects on the quality of crude oil at long times. This information is presented in this report. Finally some conclusions are derived and recommendations are made. Although the conclusions are based mostly on extrapolations because of lack of specific data, it is recommended that the enhancement of the rates of biodegradation of oil catalyzed by the EOR agents needs to be further studied. There is no evidence of substantial long term effects on crude oil because of other interactions. Some recommendations are also made regarding the types of studies that would be necessary to determine the effect of certain EOR agents on the rates of biodegradation of crude oil.

  6. Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Determination Of Copper (II) At Glassy Carbon Electrode In The Presence Of Bis(Benzylidene)Ethylenediamine As A Novel Complexing Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the application of synthesized Schiff base bis(benzylidene)ethylenediamine (BBE) to increase the detection sensitivity of copper (II) at 0.01 V vs Ag/ AgCl using glassy carbon electrode. Aliquot of 2.0x10-3 M of BBE in DMF solution containing BR buffer pH 6 was introduced into the voltammetric cell followed by the addition of Cu(II) ions and then further proceeded to differential pulse anodic-stripping scan from -1.4 V to +0.3 V vs Ag/ AgCl. The optimum parameters obtained were; scan rate; 25 mV/ s, accumulation time; 200 sec and accumulation potential; -0.6 V. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of 0.4 μgL-1 and a linear response in the range of 1-10 μgL-1 were obtained. The effects of interfering ions such as Cd(II), Cr(III), Fe(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) were also investigated. The practical applicability of this technique was illustrated by the determination of Cu(II) ions at 3 μgL-1 concentration level in tap water with 94.43 % of recovery. (author)

  7. Comparison of the efficiency of the action of ionizing radiation and chemical toxic agents (Cu and phenol) on the pigment system of red algae from the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of various deleterious agents such as gamma-radiation, phenol, and copper on the Black Sea red algae is studied by using the general unit, Grey-ecoequivalent. The comparison of their effective doses that cause the same effect on the algae is made, and the arrangement of the toxic agents is presented according to their toxic properties

  8. Partial chemical characterization of antigenic preparations of chromoblastomycosis agents Caracterização química parcial de preparações antigênicas de agentes da cromoblastomicose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Fraga BARROS

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic preparations (saline, methylic, metabolic and exoantigens of four agents of chromoblastomycosis, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladophialophora (Cladosporium carrionii and Rhinocladiella aquaspersa were obtained. Partial chemical characterization of these antigenic preparations was obtained by determination of the levels of total lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, and identification of the main sterols and carbohydrates. Methylic antigens presented the highest lipid contents, whereas metabolic antigens showed the highest carbohydrate content. Total lipid, protein, and carbohydrate levels were in the range of 2.33 to 2.00mg/ml, 0.04 to 0.02 mg/ml and 0.10 to 0.02 mg/ml, respectively, in the methylic antigens and in the range of 0.53 to 0.18mg/ml, 0.44 to 0.26mg/ml, and 1.82 to 1.02 mg/ml, respectively, in saline antigens. Total lipid, protein, and carbohydrate contents were in the range of 0.55 to 0.20mg/ml, 0.69 to 0.57mg/ml and 10.73 to 5.93mg/ml, respectively, in the metabolic antigens, and in the range of 0.55 to 0.15mg/ml, 0.62 to 0.20mg/ml and 3.55 to 0.42mg/ml, respectively, in the exoantigens. Phospholipids were not detected in the preparations. Saline and metabolic antigens and exoantigens presented hexose and the methylic antigen revealed additional pentose units in their composition. The UV light absorption spectra of the sterols revealed squalene and an ergosterol fraction in the antigens. The characterization of these antigenic preparations may be useful for serological evaluation of patients of chromoblastomycosis.Preparações antigênicas (antígenos salinos, metílicos, metabólicos e exoantígenos de quatro agentes da cromoblastomicose, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladophialophora (Cladosporium carrionii e Rhinocladiella aquaspersa foram obtidos e foi determinada a caracterização química parcial dos mesmos. Os antígenos metílicos apresentaram os maiores teores de lípides enquanto os

  9. Chemical Leukoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Romita, Paolo; Filoni, Angela; Foti, Caterina; Angelini, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Chemical leukoderma, often clinically mimicking idiopathic vitiligo and other congenital and acquired hypopigmentation, is an acquired form of cutaneous pigment loss caused by exposure to a variety of chemicals that act through selective melanocytotoxicity. Most of these chemicals are phenols and aromatic or aliphatic catechols derivatives. These chemicals, however, are harmful for melanocytes in individuals with an individual susceptibility. Nowadays, chemical leukoderma is fairly common, caused by common domestic products. The presence of numerous acquired confetti- or pea-sized macules is clinically characteristic of chemical leukoderma, albeit not diagnostic. Other relevant diagnostic elements are a history of repeated exposure to a known or suspected depigmenting agent at the sites of onset and a macules distribution corresponding to sites of chemical exposure. Spontaneous repigmentation has been reported when the causative agent is avoided; the repigmentation process is perifollicular and gradual, taking place for a variable period of weeks to months. PMID:27172302

  10. Validation of DSMC results for chemically nonequilibrium air flows against measurements of the electron number density in RAM-C II flight experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionized flow around the RAM C-II vehicle in the range of altitudes from 73 to 81 km is studied by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with three models of chemical reactions. It is demonstrated that vibration favoring in reactions of dissociation of neutral molecules affects significantly the predicted values of plasma density in the shock layer, and good agreement between the results of experiments and DSMC computations can be achieved in terms of the plasma density as a function of the flight altitude

  11. The population of planetary nebulae and H II regions in M 81. A study of radial metallicity gradients and chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, L.; Magrini, L.; Villaver, E.; Galli, D.

    2010-10-01

    Context. M 81 is an ideal laboratory to investigate the galactic chemical and dynamical evolution through the study of its young and old stellar populations. Aims: We analyze the chemical abundances of planetary nebulae and H ii regions in the M 81 disk for insight on galactic evolution, and compare it with that of other galaxies, including the Milky Way. Methods: We acquired Hectospec/MMT spectra of 39 PNe and 20 H ii regions, with 33 spectra viable for temperature and abundance analysis. Our PN observations represent the first PN spectra in M 81 ever published, while several H ii region spectra have been published before, although without a direct electron temperature determination. We determine elemental abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon in PNe and H ii regions, and determine their averages and radial gradients. Results: The average O/H ratio of PNe compared to that of the H ii regions indicates a general oxygen enrichment in M 81 in the last ~10 Gyr. The PN metallicity gradient in the disk of M 81 is Δlog(O/H)/ΔRG = -0.055 ± 0.02 dex/kpc. Neon and sulfur in PNe have a radial distribution similar to that of oxygen, with similar gradient slopes. If we combine our H ii sample with the one in the literature we find a possible mild evolution of the gradient slope, with results consistent with gradient steepening with time. Additional spectroscopy is needed to confirm this trend. There are no type I PNe in our M 81 sample, consistently with the observation of only the brightest bins of the PNLF, the galaxy metallicity, and the evolution of post-AGB shells. Conclusions: Both the young and the old populations of M 81 disclose shallow but detectable negative radial metallicity gradient, which could be slightly steeper for the young population, thus not excluding a mild gradients steepening with the time since galaxy formation. During its evolution M 81 has been producing oxygen; its total oxygen enrichment exceeds that of other nearby

  12. HUMIC ACID-LIKE MATTER ISOLATED FROM GREEN URBAN WASTES. PART II: PERFORMANCE IN CHEMICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Enzo Montoneri; Piero Savarino; Stefano Bottigliengo; Giorgia Musso; Vittorio Boffa; Alessandra Bianco Prevot; Debora Fabbri; Edmondo Pramauro

    2008-01-01

    Novel uses of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes for diversified technological applications are reported. A humic acid-like substance (cHAL2) isolated from green urban wastes was tested as a chemical auxiliary for fabric cleaning and dyeing, and as a catalyst for the photodegradation of dyes. The results illustrate the fact that biomass wastes can be an interesting source of products for the chemical market. Process and product development in this direction are likely to offer hig...

  13. Synthesis of 195mPt radiolabelled cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) of high chemical and radiochemical purity using high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method is described for the synthesis of 195mPt-radiolabelled cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). An amount of 10 mg of 95% enriched 194Pt was irradiated for 75 h in the hydraulic conveyer of the Kyoto University Reactor at a thermal neutron flux of approximately 8.15x1013 n.cm-2.sec-1 and the 195mPt-radiolabelled CDDP was purified using HPLC. The chemical yield is 61%, chemical purity is greater than 99.74%, the radiochemical purity is nearly 100%, and the specific activity is 7.4x106 Bq mg-1 CDDP (200 μCi mg-1 CDDP). (author) 9 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Preparation and use of chemically modified MCM-41 and silica gel as selective adsorbents for Hg(II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorbents for Hg(II) ion extraction were prepared using amorphous silica gel and ordered MCM-41. Grafting with 2-(3-(2-aminoethylthio)propylthio)ethanamine was used to functionalize the silica. The functionalized adsorbents were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, 13C MAS NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption properties of the modified silica gel and MCM-41 were compared using batch method. The effect of pH, stirring time, ionic strength and foreign ions were studied. The extraction of Hg(II) ions occurred rapidly with the modified MCM-41 and the optimal pH range for the extraction by the modified materials was pH 4-7. Foreign ions, especially Cl- had some effect on the extraction efficiency of the modified silica gel and the modified MCM-41. The adsorption behavior of both adsorbents could be described by a Langmuir model at 298 K, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the modified silica gel and MCM-41 at pH 3 was 0.79 and 0.70 mmol g-1, respectively. The modified MCM-41 showed a larger Langmuir constant than that of the modified silica gel, indicating a better ability for Hg(II) ion adsorption. The results indicate that the structure of the materials affects the adsorption behavior. These materials show a potential for the application as effective and selective adsorbents for Hg(II) removal from water

  15. Effect of A Polymer Chemical Agent on Natural Settlement of Dredged Soil%一种高分子化学剂对疏浚土自然沉降的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张骞; 董志良; 鲍树峰

    2013-01-01

    在疏浚土的化学加固研究中,化学剂的加入会直接影响疏浚土的沉降过程.以不同剂量、含水量、疏浚土组成为影响因素,观测并推算了各组试样的沉降过程中泥面高度、沉降速率、孔隙比、含水量、湿密度等参数随时间的变化情况,试验研究结果表明:化学剂在沉降速率和沉降稳定时间方面有很大的提高;化学剂的作用效果,随粘粒含量增加而降低.%In the study of dredged soil being reinforced by chemical process,adding chemical agent will affect the settlement of the soil directly.As agent consumption,water content and composition of dredged soil are the affecting factors,how the parameters of each group of sample,including mud surface height,settlement velocity,void ratio,water content,wet density,change with the time was observed and calculated.The study result shows that chemical agent could improve the settlement velocity and stabilization time but its effect will decrease with increase of clay content.

  16. Chemical Speciation of the System Cu(II)-Indomethacin in Ethanol and Water by UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Rodríguez-Laguna; Reyes-García, Luis I.; Rosario Moya-Hernández; Alberto Rojas-Hernández; Rodolfo Gómez-Balderas

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that the metal-drug complexes could be in fact the active agents displaying therapeutic effects of drugs. The characterization of the global formation equilibrium of complexes formed between metal ions and species with biological activity such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provides essential information to understand the mechanism of action of drugs. Since equilibrium constants determine the relative predominance of species, they provide crucial information to i...

  17. Mound Facility activities in chemical and physical research: January-June 1980. [OLECULES; VIRIAL EQUATION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DEUTERIUM; TRITIUM; CALCIUM NITRATES; HEAVY WATER; THERMAL DIFFUSION; WATER; CROSS SECTIONS; MOLECULAR BEAMS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; CHELATING AGENTS; CHLOROFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-29

    I. Low temperature research covered Hydrogen Intermolecular Potential Functions: five potentials have been compared to bound state energies, second virial coefficients, and total and differential scattering cross sections, but none of them consistently fits all of the data. Using a Hartree-Fock-Dispersion form with a modified damping function, three out of the four sets of data can be represented with a single potential function. Reaction Rates of Deuterium-Tritium Mixtures: two mixing chambers are being designed and built for studying D/sub 2/-T/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/-T/sub 2/. Low Temperature Trennschaukel: a bench model trennschaukel has been instrumented. II. Separation research covered Liquid Thermal Diffusion: Isotopic separations as functions of time were measured for methyl chloride, ethyl chloride, 1-chloropropane and 1-chlorobutane. The campaign to enrich chlorine-37 by liquid thermal diffusion of methyl chloride was concluded after 240 g of enriched isotope had been produced. Calcium Isotope Separation: Calcium isotope separation in the Ca(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O and -D/sub 2/O systems was measured using a 36.5 cm liquid phase thermal diffusion column. The largest separation was a 15% change in the calcium-48 abundance. Molecular Beam Scattering: a supersonic Ne beam through a cell containing Ar was used to measure low-energy, elastic, total cross sections of neon/argon in the velocity range of 4 to 10 (x 10/sup 4/) cm/s. Cross sections at onset of clustering were 7% higher than at minimum cluster conditions. Mutual Diffusion: Study continues on the temperature dependence of the mutal diffusion coefficients for binary noble gas mixtures, particularly argon with helium, neon, and xenon. Metal Chemical Exchange With Macrocyclic Ligands: The equilibrium single-stage separation factor was determined for two additional LiTFA/221 cryptand/CHCl/sub 3/ and two LiTFA/211 cryptand/CHCl/sub 3/ exchange systems.

  18. Probing the solvent shell with 195Pt chemical shifts: density functional theory molecular dynamics study of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) anionic complexes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-03-17

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on a set of five anionic platinum complexes in aqueous solution. (195)Pt nuclear magnetic shielding constants were computed with DFT as averages over the aiMD trajectories, using the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) in order to treat relativistic effects on the Pt shielding tensors. The chemical shifts obtained from the aiMD averages are in good agreement with experimental data. For Pt(II) and Pt(IV) halide complexes we found an intermediate solvent shell interacting with the complexes that causes pronounced solvent effects on the Pt chemical shifts. For these complexes, the magnitude of solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant can be correlated with the surface charge density. For square-planar Pt complexes the aiMD simulations also clearly demonstrate the influence of closely coordinated non-equatorial water molecules on the Pt chemical shift, relating the structure of the solution around the complex to the solvent effects on the metal NMR chemical shift. For the complex [Pt(CN)(4)](2-), the solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant are surprisingly small. PMID:20166712

  19. Intrinsic dependence of the magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles prepared via chemical methods with addition of chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, E.C. [Núcleo de Pós-Graduação em Física, Campus Prof. José Aluísio de Campos, UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Tenório, Mayara A. [Departamento de Física, Campus Prof. Alberto Carvalho, UFS, 49500-000 Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Mecena, S.G.; Zucolotto, B.; Silva, L.S. [Núcleo de Pós-Graduação em Física, Campus Prof. José Aluísio de Campos, UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Jesus, C.B.R. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, UNICAMP, C. P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Meneses, C.T. [Núcleo de Pós-Graduação em Física, Campus Prof. José Aluísio de Campos, UFS, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); and others

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the effect of addition of different chelating agents on the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles produced by the combining of both co-precipitation and hydrothermal methods is reported. The Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that our samples are single phase (space group: Fd-3m) with small average sizes. The weight losses observed in the thermogravimetric measurements together with the M×H curves show that the organic contamination coming from chelating agent decomposition can give rise to misinterpretation of the magnetization measurements. Besides, analyses of the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) magnetization measurements and the M×H curves measured at room temperature allows us to state that both the average blocking temperature and particles size distribution are sensitive to the kind of chelating agent. - Highlights: Superparamagnetism. Chelating agents. Organic contamination.

  20. Studies on guinea-pig macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). II. Purification of MIF after treatment with reducing and denaturing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Pick, E

    1979-09-01

    Treatment of guinea-pig macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) containing culture supernatants with the denaturing agents guanidine hydrochloride (Gu HCl) or urea, in the presence or absence of the reducing agent 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), or with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), does not destroy biological activity. Alkylation of reduced MIF preparations results in a considerable decrease or total loss of MIF activity. Treatment of supernatants with the combinations, Gu HCl and 2-ME or urea and 2-ME results in the recovery of MIF activity in association with molecules less than 30,000 in molecular weight (mol. wt). After removal of the agents by dialysis, MIF activity is found associated with molecules larger than 30,000. The reduction in mol. wt is dependent on the presence of 2-ME. When MIF-containing supernatants are treated with urea and SDS and fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in the presence of the same agents, MIF activity is recovered in the mol. wt range of 42,000--80,000. When supernatants are treated with 2-me, in addition to urea and SDS, and preparative PAGE is performed in their presence, MIF activity is found associated with material having a mol. wt of 15,000--18,000. Analytical SDS-PAGE of this fraction reveals two or three closely grouped bands corresponding to the above mol. wt range. PMID:389497

  1. Bauxitas refratárias: composição química, fases e propriedades - parte II Refractory bauxites: chemical composition, phases and properties - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pascoal

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A bauxita apresenta uma ampla faixa de aplicações industriais, de acordo com sua composição química e mineralógica. No setor de refratários, esta matéria-prima tem adquirido grande importância, uma vez que pode substituir parcial ou totalmente agregados de alumina eletrofundida em formados e monolíticos, devido a sua alta refratariedade e custo inferior. Entre os maiores produtores mundiais encontram-se a China, a Guiana e o Brasil. Embora seja um dos maiores produtores mundiais de bauxita refratária, no Brasil pouco se conhece de suas características químicas e mineralógicas, bem como suas propriedades em serviço a altas temperaturas. Esta seqüência de artigos apresenta uma revisão sobre as aplicações, fases cristalinas, características e propriedades a alta temperatura de bauxitas refratárias chinesas e sul-americanas. Nesta segunda parte serão consideradas suas propriedades mecânicas a alta temperatura e um problema freqüente na utilização de bauxitas refratárias, a expansão térmica secundária.Bauxite shows a wide range of applications, according to its chemical and mineralogical composition. In the refractory industry, this raw material has partially or totally substituted fused alumina in bricks and castables, due to its high refractoriness and low cost. The major producers of refractory grade bauxite are, in this order, China, Guyana and Brazil. Although Brazil is one of the major suppliers of this raw material, very few studies have been carried out to understand its chemical, mineralogical and high-temperature properties. These papers present a review regarding the applications of South American and Chinese refractory grade bauxites, including the microchemistry of their crystalline phases and their hot properties. This second part will focus mechanical properties at high temperatures, and a common problem in refractory bauxites, the secondary thermal expansion.

  2. HUMIC ACID-LIKE MATTER ISOLATED FROM GREEN URBAN WASTES. PART II: PERFORMANCE IN CHEMICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Montoneri

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel uses of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes for diversified technological applications are reported. A humic acid-like substance (cHAL2 isolated from green urban wastes was tested as a chemical auxiliary for fabric cleaning and dyeing, and as a catalyst for the photodegradation of dyes. The results illustrate the fact that biomass wastes can be an interesting source of products for the chemical market. Process and product development in this direction are likely to offer high economic and environmental benefits in a modern, more sustainable waste treatment strategy.

  3. Type II Cepheids in the Milky Way disc. Chemical composition of two new W Vir stars: DD Vel and HQ Car

    CERN Document Server

    Lemasle, B; Bono, G; François, P; Saviane, I; Yegorova, I; Genovali, K; Inno, L; Galazutdinov, G; da Silva, R

    2015-01-01

    A robust classification of Cepheids into their different sub-classes and, in particular, between classical and Type II Cepheids, is necessary to properly calibrate the period-luminosity relations and for populations studies in the Galactic disc. Type II Cepheids are, however, very diverse, and classifications based either on intrinsic (period, light curve) or external parameters (e.g., [Fe/H], |z|) do not provide a unique classification. We want to ascertain the classification of two Cepheids, HQ Car and DD Vel, that are sometimes classified as classical Cepheids and sometimes as Type II Cepheids. To achieve this goal, we examine both their chemical composition and the presence of specific features in their spectra. We find emission features in the H{\\alpha} and in the 5875.64 {\\AA} He I lines that are typical of W Vir stars. The [Na/Fe] (or [Na/Zn]) abundances are typical of thick-disc stars, while BL Her stars are Na-overabundant ([Na/Fe]>+0.5 dex). Finally, the two Cepheids show a possible (HQ Car) or prob...

  4. Chemical Effects of Nuclear Transformations. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the chemical changes consequent upon the nuclear transformation of an atom that is linked with other atoms in a molecule and surrounded by other similar or dissimilar molecules has intrigued chemists for a number of years. This interest is certainly not static but if anything is increasing. The main theme of this meeting was a discussion of the suggestions and theories that have been advanced to explain the wealth of experimental observations on the behaviour of atoms at energies and in situations not normally accessible in the laboratory. Though the subject has some practical implications in the preparation of radioisotopes, this was not an important consideration at this Symposium. The first Symposium on hot-atom chemistry organized by the Agency was held in Prague in October 1960. Comparison of the past and the present state of the subject shows that a greater variety and sophistication of techniques are now being applied as the simpler approaches used in the past have been shown to be inadequate. Progress has been made in the understanding of the simpler gas system, but in liquids and solids there is still much to clarify. It is also of interest that for the majority of the work reported in these Proceedings a reactor was the radiation source, and in this field much experimental work still remains to be done. The Symposium on Chemical Effects Associated with Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Transformations was held from 7 to 11 December 1964 in Vienna, and was attended by 136 participants from 29 countries and 4 international organizations. It was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in co-operation with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity. The publication of these Proceedings makes the content of the papers and discussion available to a wider audience than was possible at the meeting in Vienna

  5. The critical review of methodologies and approaches to assess the inherent skin sensitization potential (skin allergies) of chemicals. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre;

    2012-01-01

    To identify specific cases, classes or specific use situations of chemicals for which 'safety thresholds' or 'safety limits' were set (in regulations, standards, in scientific research/clinical work, etc.) and critically review the scientific and methodological parameters used to set those limits....

  6. Chemical Analysis of High Burn-up PuO2 Fuel. II Results on Dragon-Fuel. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a chemical analysis with respect to isotopic composition and total content of the elements Zr, Mo, Ru, Cs, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu and Pu in a batch of irradiated pyro-carbon / silicon-carbide-coated PuO2 fuel particles are reported and discussed. (author)

  7. Caracterização por FT-IR de agentes de cura utilizados em resinas epoxídicas-II-polimercaptana, poliaminoamida e amina modificada Characterization by FT-IR of curing agents used in epoxy resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedita M. V. Romão

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Amostras de resina epoxídica (EP curadas com compostos à base depolimercaptana (SH, SH na presença de poliamino amida, e amina modificada, constituindo, respectivamente, os sistemas epoxídicos (SE 1, 2 e 3, foram preparadas segundo condições estabelecidas pelas curvas de calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC de EP e agentes de cura, ou endurecedores (AC e analisadas, antes e após preparação do SE, por espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FT-IR por meio de técnicas de transmissão (pastilha de KBr, pirólise por bico de Bunsen, e pirólisecontrolada (CONTROLPIR/FT-IR dentro da faixa de temperatura fornecida pela análise termogravimétrica (TG dos SE 1, 2 e 3, para a caracterização de cada AC. Para tal fim, as absorções FT-IR do pirolisado líquido obtido pela metodologia CONTROLPIR/FT-IR foram avaliadas, em comparação ao espectro do AC de referência. A caracterização dos agentes de cura foi feita com a técnica TG/FT-IR do gás liberado de cada SE, em comparação ao espectro de referência do produto de degradação do respectivo AC.Samples of epoxy resin (EP cured with polymercaptans (SH, SH in presence of polyamine amide, and polyamine modified compounds , respectively, SE 1,2 and 3, were prepared according to established conditions by DSC analysis of EP and curing agent (AC or hardeners, and analyzed by FT-IR transmission techniques (KBr pellets, uncontroled pyrolysis and controled pyrolysis-FT-IR (CONTROLPIR/FT-IR, in the temperature range found from TG analysis of SE 1,2 and 3, for characterizing the AC. The FT-IR absorptions of liquid pyrolysate obtained by CONTROLPIR/FT-IR were evaluated, in comparison to reference spectrum of AC The characterization of hardeners was also possible by the analysis of each SE with TG/FT-IR technique, in comparison to the reference spectrum of degradation product for each AC used.

  8. Aminopropyl-modified mesoporous silica SBA-15 as recovery agents of Cu(II)-sulfate solutions: Adsorption efficiency, functional stability and reusability aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, M.V. [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Videla, M. [Rhein Chemie Argentina, Luis Maria Drago 1555 - (B1852LGS) Burzaco, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Calvo, A.; Requejo, F.G. [INIFTA-CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 16 Sucursal 4 (1900), La Plata (Argentina); Soler-Illia, G.J.A.A., E-mail: gsoler@cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); DQIAyQF, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II (C1428EHA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produce mesoporous amino-silica as Cu(II) adsorbent (1.15-1.75 mmol Cu(II) g{sup -1}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental analysis and XPS demonstrate that amino groups concentrate at the material surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The integrity of the adsorbent through the adsorption, desorption and recycling processes is assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These materials can be regenerated by exposure to acidic media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A careful thermal processing of the material is central to better durability during reprocessing. - Abstract: Hybrid mesoporous materials are potentially useful for metal ion scavenging and retrieval because of their high surface areas, controlled accessibility and tailored functionalization. Some aspects that are linked to the performance of HMM include pore accessibility, stability of the organic functions and reusability. Knowledge of these aspects is critical in the design of adsorption-desorption protocols. In this work we produce and characterize propylamino-substituted large pore silica (SBA-15-N), which is submitted to Cu(II) adsorption from copper sulfate solutions, followed by desorption in acid media and material regeneration. We find that the hybrid material is an efficient adsorbent (1.15-1.75 mmol Cu(II) g{sup -1}), although a fraction of the organic groups is lost during the adsorption process. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study demonstrates that the contents of amino groups are higher in the material surface, leading to different behaviors in Cu(II) complexation along the material. These materials can be regenerated by exposure to acidic media. Thermal processing of the hybrid materials leads to better durability in aqueous solutions during reprocessing, due to enhanced polycondensation of the inorganic framework. Thermally treated samples, once regenerated, are efficient adsorbents in a second step of Cu(II) adsorption. We discuss the

  9. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2 = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin sensitization and skin

  10. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Vinicius M. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Muratov, Eugene [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry, A.V. Bogatsky Physical–Chemical Institute NAS of Ukraine, Odessa 65080 (Ukraine); Fourches, Denis [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole [ILS/Contractor supporting the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM), P.O. Box 13501, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Andrade, Carolina H. [Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Design, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, GO 74605-220 (Brazil); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  11. El Escudete de la aceituna II: caracterización morfológica, fisiológica y patogénica del agente causal

    OpenAIRE

    Trapero Casas, Antonio; González, N.

    2006-01-01

    Morphological observations on the causal agent of the Dalmatian disease of olive fruits in Andalucia, southern Spain, confirm its identification as Camarosporium dalmaticum. This species was identified in Greece and it has been recently reclassified as Botryosphaeria dothidea (anamorph Fusicoccum aesculi). Physiological characterization of the pathogen demonstrated that the fungus has a wide range of temperatures for growth and germination of conidia. The optimum temperature was 26ºC for grow...

  12. Compression wood in Pinus radiata II: Density and chemical composition Madera de compresión en Pinus radiata II: Densidad y compuestos químicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E Díaz-vaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten 22 year old radiata pine trees growing in two stands in Chile, one in clay and the other in humid sand soils showing some lean, were assessed for chemical composition and wood density of compression wood. Significant differences in type of wood in density (33 kg/m³, lignin (1.944 %, alpha-cellulose (-2.634 %, ethanol toluene extractives (0.567 % and pentose (0.742 % were found between matched sample of compression and opposite woods. Differences in juvenile and mature wood were significant for both density (-4 kg/m³ and pentose (1.628 %, and site differences were found for wood density (28 kg/m³, extractives (0.978 % and apparent for alpha cellulose (1.223%. In comparison with other studies, our results suggested that the compression wood formed from trees with light visible lean corresponded to a mild compression class.Se analizó la madera de compresión en diez árboles de 22 años de edad de Pinus radiata D Don creciendo en dos sitios en Chile, uno en suelo de arena húmeda y el otro en suelo arcilloso. Singularidades de la madera de compresión y madera opuesta se compararon en estos árboles con inclinaciones menores a 10º y excentricidades reducidas. Diferencias significativas se registraron entre madera de compresión y opuesta en los valores registrados para la densidad básica de 33 (kg/m³, en proporción de lignina de 1.944 (%, en alfa-celulosa de -2.634 (%, en pentosanos de 0.742 (% y en extraíbles en etanol-tolueno de 0.978 (% y aparentemente diferente en el caso de alfa celulosa en 1.223 (%. Las diferencias entre madera juvenil y madera madura fueron significativas en los casos de la densidad de -4 (kg/m³ y en pentosanos en 1.628 (%, y diferencias entre los dos sitios para los casos de la densidad con 28 (kg/m³, en extractivos con 0.978 (% y diferencias moderadas en alfa celulosa con 1.223 (%. Las diferencias y coincidencias de estos resultados con los de otros autores se han considerado para estimar que la madera de

  13. Kinetic measurements and quantum chemical calculations on low spin Ni(II)/(III) macrocyclic complexes in aqueous and sulphato medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuradha Sankaran; E J Padma Malar; Venkatapuram Ramanujam Vijayaraghavan

    2015-07-01

    Cu(II) ion catalyzed kinetics of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIIIL2] (L2 = 1,8-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,3,6,8,10,13-hexaazacyclotetradecane) was studied in aqueous acidic medium in the presence of sulphate ion. The rate of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIIIL2] is faster than that by [NiIIIL1] (L1 = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclote-tradecane) in sulphate medium. DFT calculations at BP86/def2-TZVP level lead to different modes of bonding between [NiL]II/III and water ligands (L = L1 and L2). In aqueous medium, two water molecules interact with [NiL]II through weak hydrogen bonds with L and are tilted by ∼23° from the vertical axis forming the dihydrate [NiL]2+.2H2O. However, there is coordinate bond formation between [NiL1]III and two water molecules in aqueous medium and an aqua and a sulphato ligand in sulphate medium leading to the octahedral complexes [NiL1(H2O)2]3+ and [NiL1(SO4)(H2O)]+. In the analogous [NiL2]III, the water molecules are bound by hydrogen bonds resulting in [NiL2]3+.2H2O and [NiL2(SO4)]+.H2O. As the sulphato complex [NiL2(SO4)]+.H2O is less stable than [NiL1(SO4)(H2O)]+ in view of the weak H-bonding interactions in the former it can react faster. Thus the difference in the mode of bonding between Ni(III) and the water ligand can explain the rate of oxidation of H2O2 by [NiIIIL] complexes.

  14. Agent engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiming; Zhong, Ning; Wang, Patrick S P

    2001-01-01

    Agent engineering concerns the development of autonomous computational or physical entities capable of perceiving, reasoning, adapting, learning, cooperating and delegating in a dynamic environment. It is one of the most promising areas of research and development in information technology, computer science and engineering. This book addresses some of the key issues in agent engineering: What is meant by "autonomous agents"? How can we build agents with autonomy? What are the desirable capabilities of agents with respect to surviving (they will not die) and living (they will furthermore enjoy

  15. Preparation of an antitumor and antivirus agent: chemical modification of α-MMC and MAP30 from Momordica Charantia L. with covalent conjugation of polyethyelene glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Y

    2012-06-01

    virus-1. Furthermore, both PEGylated proteins showed about 60%–70% antitumor and antivirus activities, and at the same time decreased 50%–70% immunogenicity when compared with their unmodified counterparts.Conclusion/significance: α-MMC and MAP30 obtained from this novel purification strategy can meet the requirement of a large amount of samples for research. Their chemical modification can solve the problem of strong immunogenicity and meanwhile preserve moderate activities. All these findings suggest the potential application of PEGylated α-MMC and PEGylated MAP30 as antitumor and antivirus agents. According to these results, PEGylated RIPs can be constructed with nanomaterials to be a targeting drug that can further decrease immunogenicity and side effects. Through nanotechnology we can make them low-release drugs, which can further prolong their half-life period in the human body.Keywords: ribosome-inactivating proteins, alpha-momorcharin, momordica anti-HIV protein, antitumor, antivirus, (mPEG2-Lys-NHS (20 kDa, immunogenicity

  16. A Review of Class I and Class II Pet Food Recalls Involving Chemical Contaminants from 1996 to 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Rumbeiha, Wilson; Morrison, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Commercial pet food in USA is generally safe, but adulteration does occur. Adulterated food has to be recalled to protect pets and public health. All stakeholders, including food firms, distributors, and government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) participate in food recall. The objective of this review is to describe the pet food recall procedure from start to finish, and to review class I and II pet food recalls from 1996 to 2008, with a specific focus on those due to...

  17. 99mTc bone scanning agents preparation and chemical analysis of Tc(Sn)pyrophosphate, Tc(Sn)MDP and Tc(Sn)HMDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a comparison of the preparation, composition and properties of three bone scanning agents: 99mTc(Sn)pyrophosphate, 99mTc(Sn)MDP and 99mTc(Sn)HMDP. This study has been performed for two reasons: First to investigate the preparation and composition of the radiopharmaceuticals as a function of experimental conditions. Together with previously reported results for 99mTc(Sn)EHDP, obtained in a similar way, this enables to use well-defined preparations of the bone scanning agents. Secondly to gain an insight in the mechanism in which the agents behave 'in vivo'. Because the 'in vivo' process is too complicated to study directly, it seemed more appropriate to perform 'in vitro' investigations as simplifications of the 'in vivo' situation. 304 refs.; 26 figs.; 31 tabs

  18. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  19. Quantum chemical and kinetic study of the oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene initiated by hydroxyl radicals. II. The H abstraction pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shiroudi, Abolfazl; DELEUZE, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Reaction mechanisms for the initial stages of naphthalene oxidation at high temperatures (T> 600 K) have been studied theoretically using density functional theory along with various exchange-correlation functionals, as well as the benchmark CBS-QB3 quantum chemical approach. These stages correspond to the removal of hydrogen atoms by hydroxyl radical and the formation thereby of 1- and 2-naphthyl radicals. The oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene by OH radicals under inert (He) conditions and...

  20. Studies in the Chemical Constituents of Azadirachta indica Part II: Isolation and Structure of the New Triterpenoid Azadirachtol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S; Siddiqui, B S; Faizi, S

    1985-12-01

    A new triterpenoid named azadirachtol ( 1) has been isolated from the fruits of AZADIRACHTA INDICA Juss. (neem) of which the structure is reported on the basis of chemical and spectral data. Azadirachtol appears to be the first apo-tirucallol (apo-euphol) derivative possessing an eight carbons side-chain with an oxygenated ring system isolated from neem. Moreover, it is the first instance of the isolation of an 11-hydroxy triterpenoid from any of the various parts of neem. PMID:17345262

  1. Evolution of an alumina-magnesia/self-forming spinel castable. Part II: physico-chemical and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-Campos D.; Diaz J. I.; Rodriguez R. M.

    1999-01-01

    This study was carried out in conjunction with the investigation, reported in Part I, on the microstructural characteristics of an alumina-spinel castable with several percentages of MgO content. Bulk density and cold crushing strength of samples were evaluated dried and at three fired states (1000, 1200, 1400 °C). Results indicate little influence of MgO additions on physico-chemical properties of the alumina-magnesia/self-forming spinel castable. Characteristics compared with those reported...

  2. Chemical and biological profiles of novel copper(II) complexes containing S-donor ligands for the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnini, Lorena; Sitran, Sergio; Montopoli, Monica; Caparrotta, Laura; Corsini, Maddalena; Rosani, Claudia; Zanello, Piero; Dou, Q Ping; Fregona, Dolores

    2008-07-21

    In the last years, we have synthesized some new platinum(II), palladium(II), gold(I/III) complexes with dithiocarbamato derivatives as potential anticancer drugs, to obtain compounds with superior chemotherapeutic index in terms of increased bioavailability, higher cytotoxicity, and lower side effects than cisplatin. On the basis of the obtained encouraging results, we have been studying the interaction of CuCl2 with methyl-/ethyl-/tert-butylsarcosine-dithiocarbamato moieties in a 1:2 molar ratio; we also synthesized and studied the N,N-dimethyl- and pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamato copper complexes for comparison purposes. The reported compounds have been successfully isolated, purified, and fully characterized by means of several spectroscopic techniques. Moreover, the electrochemical properties of the designed compounds have been studied through cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the behavior in solution was followed by means of UV-vis technique to check the stability with time in physiological conditions. To evaluate their in vitro cytotoxic properties, preliminary biological assays (MTT test) have been carried out on a panel of human tumor cell lines. The results show that cytotoxicity levels of all of the tested complexes are comparable or even greater than that of the reference drug (cisplatin). PMID:18572881

  3. Systematic reduction of complex tropospheric chemical mechanisms, Part II: Lumping using a time-scale based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Whitehouse

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a formal method of species lumping that can be applied automatically to intermediate compounds within detailed and complex tropospheric chemical reaction schemes. The method is based on grouping species with reference to their chemical lifetimes and reactivity structures. A method for determining the forward and reverse transformations between individual and lumped compounds is developed. Preliminary application to the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv2.0 has led to the removal of 734 species and 1777 reactions from the scheme, with minimal degradation of accuracy across a wide range of test trajectories relevant to polluted tropospheric conditions. The lumped groups are seen to relate to groups of peroxy acyl nitrates, nitrates, carbonates, oxepins, substituted phenols, oxeacids and peracids with similar lifetimes and reaction rates with OH. In combination with other reduction techniques, such as sensitivity analysis and the application of the quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA, a reduced mechanism has been developed that contains 35% of the number of species and 40% of the number of reactions compared to the full mechanism. This has led to a speed up of a factor of 8 in terms of computer calculation time within box model simulations.

  4. The hypoxia imaging agent CuII(atsm) is neuroprotective and improves motor and cognitive functions in multiple animal models of Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Lin W.; Victor L Villemagne; Cheng, Lesley; Nicki A. Sherratt; Ayton, Scott; White, Anthony R.; Peter J Crouch; Lim, SinChun; Leong, Su Ling; Wilkins, Simon; George, Jessica; Blaine R. Roberts; Chi L L Pham; Liu, Xiang(Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, 730000, Lanzhou , China); Chiu, Francis C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, chronic disease characterized by dyskinesia, rigidity, instability, and tremors. The disease is defined by the presence of Lewy bodies, which primarily consist of aggregated α-synuclein protein, and is accompanied by the loss of monoaminergic neurons. Current therapeutic strategies only give symptomatic relief of motor impairment and do not address the underlying neurodegeneration. Hence, we have identified CuII(atsm) as a potential therapeutic for P...

  5. Ion release from a composite resin after exposure to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Plá Rizzolo Bueno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents - a commercial product (Opalescence PF; Ultradent Products, Inc. and a bleaching agent prepared in a compounding pharmacy - on the chemical degradation of a light-activated composite resin by determining its release of ions before and after exposure to the agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty composite resin (Filtek Z250; 3M/ESPE samples were divided into three groups: group I (exposed to Opalescence PF commercial bleaching agent, group II (exposed to a compounded bleaching agent and group III (control - Milli-Q water. After 14 days of exposure, with a protocol of 8 h of daily exposure to the bleaching agents and 16 h of immersion in Milli-Q water, the analysis of ion release was carried out using a HP 8453 spectrophotometer. The values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, Tukey's test and the paired t-tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: After 14 days of the experiment, statistically significant difference was found between group II and groups I and III, with greater ion release from the composite resin in group II. CONCLUSIONS: The compounded bleaching agent had a more aggressive effect on the composite resin after 14 days of exposure than the commercial product and the control (no bleaching.

  6. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  7. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  8. A Chemical Eight Group Separation Method for Routine Use in Gamma Spectrometric Analysis. II. Detailed analytical schema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed ion-exchange procedure for the separation of chemical elements in eight groups suitable for subsequent gamma spectrometric analysis is described. The method has been in use for gamma spectrometry of some inorganic - but mostly organic - samples for one year. The separation time for inorganic samples, is usually about 1.5 hours and for organic samples as least 2 hours. One man can separate and count three samples per day. In comparative measurements of short-lived isotopes in biological material 10-12 elements can be analysed thus making possible 30 - 35 determinations per day for one man

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and antioxidant/cytotoxic activity of new chromone Schiff base nano-complexes of Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M.; El-Shafiy, Hoda F.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Nabeel, A. I.; Fouad, R.

    2016-08-01

    A chromone Schiff base complexes of Zn(II) (1), Cu(II) (2), Ni(II) (3) and Co(II) (4) were successfully prepared in nano domain with crystalline or amorphous structures. The spectroscopic data revealed that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometry. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Cu(II) complex have aggregated nanospheres morphology. The obtained nano-complexes were tested as antioxidant and antitumor agents. The H2L and its Cu(II) complex (2) were found to be more potent antioxidant (IC50(H2L) = 0.93 μM; IC50(Cu(II) complex) = 1.1 μM than standard ascorbic acid (IC50 = 2.1 μM) as evaluated by DPPH• method. The H2L and its complexes (1-4) were tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cell line (EAC). The Cu(II) nano-complex (2) effectively inhibited EAC growth with IC50 value of 47 μM in comparison with its parent compound and other prepared complexes. The high antioxidant activity and antitumor activity of Cu(II) nano-complex (2) were attributed to their chemical structure, Cu(II) reducing capacity, and nanosize property. The toxicity test on mice showed that Zn(II) (1) and Cu(II) (2) nano-complex have lower toxicity than the standard cis-platin.

  10. Collisions of small ice particles under microgravity conditions (II): Does the chemical composition of the ice change the collisional properties?

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, C R; Blum, J; Fraser, H J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Understanding the collisional properties of ice is important for understanding both the early stages of planet formation and the evolution of planetary ring systems. Simple chemicals such as methanol and formic acid are known to be present in cold protostellar regions alongside the dominant water ice; they are also likely to be incorporated into planets which form in protoplanetary disks, and planetary ring systems. However, the effect of the chemical composition of the ice on its collisional properties has not yet been studied. Aims: Collisions of 1.5 cm ice spheres composed of pure crystalline water ice, water with 5% methanol, and water with 5% formic acid were investigated to determine the effect of the ice composition on the collisional outcomes. Methods: The collisions were conducted in a dedicated experimental instrument, operated under microgravity conditions, at relative particle impact velocities between 0.01 and 0.19 m s^-1, temperatures between 131 and 160 K and a pressure of around 10^-5...

  11. Induced mutagenesis of plasmid and chromosomal genes inserted into the plasmid DNA. II. Mutagenic action of chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the study of the mutagenic action of UV and γ-radiation on plasmid DNA in vitro, they investigated the induction of mutations under the influence of chemical mutagens on the same DNA of plasmid RSF2124, determining the synthesis of colicine E1 and resistance to ampicillin. The inactivating action of the mutagen was assessed from the yield of transformants resistant to the antibiotic and the mutagenic effect from the loss by colonies of transformants that were capable of releasing colicine into the external medium. In these experiments they mainly used chemical compounds whose mutagenic effect if well known in other systems (transforming and transfecting DNA, microbial viruses). As a result all mutagens tested for their activity were divided into four groups: first group, those exceeding the level of mutagenesis by more than 100-fold above the spontaneous background (hydroxylamine, O-methylhydroxylamine); second group, those exceeding it by a factor of 10 (UV radiation (λ = 254 nm), W-mutagenesis, ionizing radiation, nitrous acid, mitomycin C); third group, those exceeding it by a factor of <10 (indirect UV mutagenesis, nitrous acid, β-chloroethyldiethylamine hydrochloride, nitrosoguanidine); fourth group, no mutagenic effect (acridine orange, ethyl methane sulfonate, sodium azide, 0-β-diethylaminoethylhydroxylamine)

  12. Spectropolarimetric measurements of the mean longitudinal magnetic field of chemically peculiar stars. II. Phase relating the magnetic and luminosity variabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, F.; Catanzaro, G.

    2001-01-01

    For a sample of chemically peculiar stars, we report time-resolved measurements of the effective magnetic field which were obtained with the spectropolarimetry operating at the Catania Astrophysical Observatory. These observations are combined with data from the literature for better pointing out that periodic magnetic variability which characterises this class of stars. Periods given in the literature have been checked and, if possible, re-determined, not only by means of the magnetic measurements but referring also to the Hipparcos photometry. The variability of the effective magnetic field of the already known magnetic star 25 Sex is pointed out for the first time. As to the suspected magnetic chemically peculiar star EP UMa, our measurements confirm that this is really a magnetic star and we indicate a possible variability period. The accuracy of the variability period for CS Vir and FF Vir is improved. The suggestion that light variability is due to the re-distribution of ultraviolet flux towards the visible wavelengths in metal rich regions, which are not homogeneously distributed on the stellar surface, appears not always and straightly valid. Local line-blocking is certainly important in the case of CS Vir and a direct influence of the magnetic field on the infrared photometric variability cannot be ruled out for 25 Sex. Based on observations collected at the Catania Astrophysical Observatory, Italy.

  13. Dual Bioactivities of Essential Oil Extracted from the Leaves of Artemisia argyi as an Antimelanogenic versus Antioxidant Agent and Chemical Composition Analysis by GC/MS

    OpenAIRE

    Long-Zen Chang; Kuang-Hway Yih; Hsiao-Fen Wang; Huey-Chun Huang; Tsong-Min Chang

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the antimelanogenic and antioxidant properties of essential oil when extracted from the leaves of Artemisia argyi, then analyzing the chemical composition of the essential oil. The inhibitory effect of the essential oil on melanogenesis was evaluated by a mushroom tyrosinase activity assay and B16F10 melanoma cell model. The antioxidant capacity of the essential oil was assayed by spectrophotometric analysis, and the volatile chemical composition of the es...

  14. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  15. Prevention of enzymatic browning of yacon flour by the combined use of anti-browning agents and the study of its chemical composition

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Romero Lopes Rodrigues; Eduardo Ramirez Asquieri; Daniela Castilho Orsi

    2014-01-01

    Yacon roots present functional properties because of the high levels of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), which are considered as prebiotic fibers. In addition, yacon roots are rich in phenolic compounds. During the processing of yacon, the freshly cut surface undergoes rapid enzymatic browning. Control of enzymatic browning during processing is very important to preserve the appearance of yacon flour. In this study, it was evaluated the combined effect of anti-browning agents (ascorbic acid, cit...

  16. Enhancement of Biocontrol Activities and Cyclic Lipopeptides Production by Chemical Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis XF-1, a Biocontrol Agent of Plasmodiophora brassicae and Fusarium solani

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xing-Yu; Yang, Jing-Jing; Mao, Zi-Chao; Ho, Hon-Hing; Wu, Yi-Xing; He, Yue-qiu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis XF-1 has been used as a biocontrol agent of clubroot disease of crucifers infected by Plasmodiophora brassicae, an obligate pathogen. In order to maximize the growth inhibition of the pathogen, random mutagenesis using N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine was applied to strain XF-1. The efficacy of 226 selected mutants was assessed against the growth of an indicator fungal pathogen: Fusarium solani using agar plate assay and the disruptive effects on the resting spores of P....

  17. Synthesis and characterization of mixed-ligand diimine-piperonal thiosemicarbazone complexes of ruthenium(II): Biophysical investigations and biological evaluation as anticancer and antibacterial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckford, Floyd A.; Thessing, Jeffrey; Shaloski, Michael, Jr.; Canisius Mbarushimana, P.; Brock, Alyssa; Didion, Jacob; Woods, Jason; Gonzalez-Sarrías, Antonio; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-04-01

    We have used a novel microwave-assisted method developed in our laboratories to synthesize a series of ruthenium-thiosemicarbazone complexes. The new thiosemicarbazone ligands are derived from benzo[ d][1,3]dioxole-5-carbaldehyde (piperonal) and the complexes are formulated as [(diimine) 2Ru(TSC)](PF 6) 2 (where the TSC is the bidentate thiosemicarbazone ligand). The diimine in the complexes is either 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline. The complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic means (NMR, IR and UV-Vis) as well as by elemental analysis. We have studied the biophysical characteristics of the complexes by investigating their anti-oxidant ability as well as their ability to disrupt the function of the human topoisomerase II enzyme. The complexes are moderately strong binders of DNA with binding constants of 10 4 M -1. They are also strong binders of human serum albumin having binding constants on the order of 10 4 M -1. The complexes show good in vitro anticancer activity against human colon cancer cells, Caco-2 and HCT-116 and indeed show some cytotoxic selectivity for cancer cells. The IC 50 values range from 7 to 159 μM (after 72 h drug incubation). They also have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains of pathogenic bacteria with IC 50 values as low as 10 μM; little activity was seen against Gram-negative strains. It has been established that all the compounds are catalytic inhibitors of human topoisomerase II.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of pyridine 2-carboxamide: Their application as catalyst in peroxidative oxidation and antimicrobial agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suvendu Samanta; Shounak Ray; Sutapa Joardar; Supriya Dutta

    2015-08-01

    Four water soluble copper(II) complexes, [Cu(HL)2 (H2O)2]Cl2 (1), [Cu(HL) 2 (ClO4)2 ] (2), [Cu(HL)2 (SCN)2] (3) and [CuL 2 ]·8H 2 O (4), where HL is pyridine 2–carboxamide, have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. Structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The pH induced inter-conversion of Cu(HL)2 (H2O)2 ]Cl2 (1) and [CuL2]·8H2O (4) through co-ordination mode switching was investigated thoroughly with the help of absorption spectroscopy. Complexes 1–3 were found to be active catalysts for the oxidation of toluene, ethyl benzene and cyclohexane in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant under mild conditions. Toluene was oxidized to benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde, ethyl benzene was oxidized to 1-phenylethanol and acetophenone and cyclohexane was oxidized to yield cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone Antimicrobial activities have been investigated with these copper(II) complexes against gram + ve bacteria, gram − ve bacterial and fungal species.

  19. Principles of processes used for coal gas cleaning and recovery of chemical products of coking. Part II. [Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulatowski, R.

    1983-02-01

    This paper discusses removal of tars, ammonia, benzene and desulfurization of coal gas from black coal coking. About 30% of coal gas produced by coking plants in Poland is desulfurized. The average content of hydrogen sulfide in coal gas ranges from 6 to 8 g/m/sup 3/. After desulfurization hydrogen sulfur content does not exceed 0.2 g/m/sup 3/. Two processes are used in Poland for coal gas desulfurization: the vacuum carbonate process and the Thylox process. Chemical reactions during gas desulfurization with the two processes are discussed. Regeneration systems, productivity and efficiency of gas desulfurization using the two processes are compared. The following processes used in other countries are comparatively evaluated: the Fumaks-Rodax process in Japan, the Perox process, the Stretford process, the Sulfiban process in the USA and the Claus process.

  20. Candidate chemical systems for air cooled, solar powered, absorption air conditioner design. Part II. Solid absorbents, high latent heat refrigerants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermann, W. J.

    1978-04-01

    Work done in attempting to qualify absorption refrigeration systems based on refrigerants with intermediate latent heats of vaporization is summarized. In practice, these comprise methanol, ammonia, and methylamine. A wide variety of organic substances, salts, and mixtures were evaluated in as systematic a manner as possible. Several systems of interest are described. The system, LiClO/sub 3/--LiBr--H/sub 2/O, is a good back up system to our first choice of an antifreeze additive system, and thermodynamically promising but subject to some inconvenient materials limitations. The system, LiBr/ZnBr/sub 2/--methanol, is thermodynamically promising but requires additional kinetic qualification. Chemical stability of the system, LiCNS--ammonia/methylamine with various other third components, does not appear to be adequate for a long-lived system.