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Sample records for chelated uranyl antibody

  1. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO22+ was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab)2 fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire κ light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab)2 protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab)2 fragments that bound to the UO22+-DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab)2 fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the canonical structures method detailed by Morea et al

  2. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-04-18

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire {kappa} light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab){sub 2} protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragments that bound to the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab){sub 2} fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the

  3. New chelation strategies for the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional approaches to the design of metal-ion-specific complexing agents have relied to a great extent on the creation of a ligand cavity of the appropriate size and coordination number to accommodate the targeted metal ion. Oxo-metal ions, such as uranyl, cannot be dealt with as spherically symmetric charged atoms and thus present both a special challenge and offer a unique advantage for specific chelation in solution. To maximize recognition of the anisotropic UO22+ ion, new tripodal hexadentate ligands have been prepared providing three carboxyl moieties each to act as a bidentate donor group. The novel ligand design concept, ligand syntheses, and thermodynamic results related to the uranyl complex characterization are presented

  4. Sequestering agent for uranyl chelation: new bi-naphtyl ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of phosphonate, sulfocatecholamide (CAMS) and hydroxy-pyridinone (HOPO) bi-naphtyl ligands is presented. Their binding abilities for uranyl cation were determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media versus pH. These titrations showed that the efficiency of these chelating agents depends on the nature of the chelating group. Each ligand shows a more or less pronounced affinity towards uranium. While the bis-phosphonate compound did not show any affinity towards the uranyl ion, the BINHOPO derivative exhibits significant affinity at acidic and neutral pH while the BINCAMS is more efficient at basic pH. (authors)

  5. High-affinity uranyl-specific antibodies suitable for cellular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proved to be valuable models for the study of protein-metal interactions, and previous reports have described very specific antibodies to chelated metal ions, including uranyl. We raised specific mAbs against UO22+-DCP-BSA (DCP, 1, 10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) to generate new sets of antibodies that might cross-react with various complexed forms of uranyl in different environments for further application in the field of toxicology. Using counter-screening with UO22+-DCP-casein, we selected two highly specific mAbs against uranyl-DCP (KD = 10-100 pM): U04S and U08S. Competitive assays in the presence of different metal ions (UO22+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Ca2+) showed that uranyl in solution can act as a good competitor, suggesting some antibody ability to cross-react with chelating groups other than DCP in the UO22+ equatorial coordination plane. Interestingly, one of the antibodies could be used for revealing uranyl cations in cell samples. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses after immuno-labeling revealed the interaction of uranyl with human kidney cells HK2. The intracellular accumulation of uranyl could be directly visualized by metal-immunostaining using fluorescent-labeled mAb. Our results suggest that U04S mAb epitopes mostly include the uranyl fraction and its para-topes can accommodate a wide variety of chelating groups. (authors)

  6. Deciphering the Energy Landscape of the Interaction Uranyl-DCP with Antibodies Using Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the D...

  7. Synthesis of New Bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) Ligands as Chelating Agents for Uranyl Complexation

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Jin; Rongzong Zheng; Rufang Peng; Shijin Chu

    2016-01-01

    Five new bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) tetradentate chelators were synthesized in this study. The structures of these tetradentate chelators were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, and mass spectral analyses. The binding abilities of these tetradentate chelators for uranyl ion at pH 7.4 were also determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media. Results showed that the efficiencies of these chelating agents are dependent on the linker length. Ligand 4b is the best chelator and ...

  8. Synthesis of New Bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) Ligands as Chelating Agents for Uranyl Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Zheng, Rongzong; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Shijin

    2016-01-01

    Five new bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) tetradentate chelators were synthesized in this study. The structures of these tetradentate chelators were characterized by ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, and mass spectral analyses. The binding abilities of these tetradentate chelators for uranyl ion at pH 7.4 were also determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media. Results showed that the efficiencies of these chelating agents are dependent on the linker length. Ligand 4b is the best chelator and suitable for further studies. PMID:27005598

  9. Deciphering the energy landscape of the interaction uranyl-DCP with antibodies using dynamic force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teulon, J.M.; Parot, P.; Odorico, M.; Pellequer, J.L. [CEA, DSV, Inst Biotechnol et Environm Biol IBEB, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO{sub 2}-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO{sub 2} and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands. (authors)

  10. Conjugates of monoclonal antibodies and chelating polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of protein modification with chelating polymers is to prepare monoclonal antibodies labeled with heavy metal isotopes (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting metal and paramagnetic ions for NMR tomography). Conventional binding of metals to proteins via chelating agents directly coupled to proteins does not permit binding of a large number of metal atoms per protein molecule without causing alterations in the specific properties of the protein molecules. On the other hand, metal ion binding to proteins via intermediate chelating polymers should permit binding of several dozens of the metal atoms per protein molecule without affect the specific properties adversely. Moreover, the biodistribution and clearance rates can be regulated by varying the polymer properties. Modified antibodies may be used successfully in nuclear and NMR diagnostic applications and in radiotherapy. Possible applications of this approach shall be demonstrated with monoclonal antibody R11D10 for visualization of acute myocardial infarction. Use of this modification with other monoclonal antibodies is also discussed. The chemistry of protein modification with these polymers is presented

  11. New thermo-sensitive chelating surfactants for selective solvent-free extraction of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional surfactants were synthesised by grafting a chelating group (amino-acid residue) to the tip of a poly-ethoxylated nonionic surfactant chain (CiEj: CiH2i+1(OCH2CH2)jOH)) or in a branched position. CiEj nonionic surfactants are known to be thermo-reversible and to exhibit a clouding phenomenon associated to phase separation of micelles. The functional surfactants retain both surface-active properties, characteristic thermo-reversible behaviour and have efficient complexing properties toward uranyl. In the presence of uranyl nitrate, small micelles are formed at ambient temperature and the de-mixing leads to a separation of the target ion trapped by the functional surfactant (cloud point extraction). Those surfactants are more efficient than mixture of classical CiEj and complexing agent solubilized in the micelles. This reveals a synergistic effect of the covalent bond between the chelating group and the nonionic surfactant CiEj. This paper presents a systematic study of the extraction and aggregation properties and the influence of the nature of the ions. (authors)

  12. Tumor targeting of radiolabeled antibodies using HYNIC chelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing interest in the use of labeled antibodies for diagnosis of cancers as well as for therapy. Various radiolabeling methods have been used in order to obtain better tumor specific targeting for detection and therapy. It was generally used to tumor targeted immunotherapy and immunodetection that lym-1, mouse monoclonal antibody, was specific binding to surface antigen of Raji. The 3E8 antibody was produced from humanized anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody (AKA) by amino acid change in 95-99 residues of heavy chain complementary determinant regions (HCDRs) 3 using phage displayed library technology. In this study, we are investigating the usefulness of HYNIC chelate as a bifunctional chelating agent in radioimmunodetecton of tumor. Two types of antibodies, Lym-1 and 3E8, were used for the conjugation with HYNIC chelate. Lym-1 and 3E8 are specific antibodies to surface antigen of Non-Hogkin's lymphoma and TAG-72 antigen of colorectal carcinoma, respectively. We prepare HYNIC-antibody conjugates, determine radiolabeling yield with 99mTc and evaluate tumor targeting in tumor bearing nude mice model

  13. Chlorimetric studies on the chelation of uranyl ion with 2:4-dihydroxy acetophenone oxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a non-aqueous medium, uranyl ion forms an orange yellow complex with 2:4-dihydroxy acetophenone oxime (DHAO). The composition of the complex has been found to be UO2(DHAO)2. The stability constant of the complex was found to be 3.78x108 and the free energy formation ΔF=11.90K. cal at 300C. the phenolic hydrogen has been replaced by uranyl ion and coordinated through the oxime's nitrogen. (author)

  14. Adsorption of uranyl ion by chelate-type adsorbent with amidoxime and amidoxime/carboxyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Uranium recovery from seawater is important for security of future energy supply. The main difficulty in the recovery process arises from the low concentration (∼3 ppb) of the uranyl ion in seawater, whereas other metal ions are abundantly present. Thus, development of selective adsorbents with a high adsorption rate and a large adsorption capacity is essential for the economic recovery uranyl ion. The polymeric adsorbents containing the amidoxime group are mostly promising, but information on their adsorption characterization in the presence of other abundantly metal ions such as sodium, calcium, etc. is still insufficient. In order to obtain uranium from seawater, the resins with amidoxime and amidoxime/carboxylic acid group were prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of aclylonitrile (AN) and AN/acrylic acid and by the subsequent amidoximation of cyano group of poly(AN), respectively. The resins with amidoxime and amidoxime/carboxylic acid groups were characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, solid state 13C-NMR, SEM, thermal (TGA/DSC) analysis, and elemental analysis, respectively. The adsorption of uranyl ion was examined. In resin with amidoxime group, the uranyl uptake increased with increasing amidoxime content. The adsorption rate of uranyl ion by resin with amidoxime/carboxylic acid was higher than that of resin with amidoxime group

  15. Metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies, wherein the metal is an α emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of manufacturing and purifying metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies are described, wherein the chelated metal emits alpha radiation. The conjugates are suited for therapeutic uses being substantially free of nonchelated radiometal. (author)

  16. Potentiometric studies on mixed-ligand chelates of uranyl ion with carboxylic acid phenolic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed ligand complexes of UO22+ with bidentate carboxylic and phenolic acids have been studied potentiometrically at 30 ± 0.1degC and μ=0.2M (NaClO4). 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of UO22+ with phthalic acid (PTHA), maleic acid (MAE), malonic acid (MAL), quinolinic acid (QA), 5-sulphosalicylic acid (5-SSA), salicylic acid (SA), and only 1:1 complexes in the case of mandelic acid (MAD) have been detected. The formation of 1:1:1 mixed ligand complexes has been inferred from simultaneous equilibria in the present study. The values of ΔlogK, Ksub(DAL), Ksub(2LA) or Ksub(2AL) for the ternary complexes have been calculated. The stabilities of mixed ligand complexes depend on the size of the chelate ring and the stabilities of the binary complexes. (author). 15 refs

  17. Comparison of bifunctional chelates for {sup 64}Cu antibody imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cara L.; Crisp, Sarah; Bensimon, Corinne [MDS Nordion, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yapp, Donald T.T.; Ng, Sylvia S.W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columba, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Sutherland, Brent W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Gleave, Martin [Prostate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E. [Macrocyclics Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Improved bifunctional chelates (BFCs) are needed to facilitate efficient {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under mild conditions and to yield stable, target-specific agents. The utility of two novel BFCs, 1-Oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-5-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-4,7,10-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A) and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-4-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-3,6,9-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-PCTA), for mAb imaging with {sup 64}Cu were compared to the commonly used S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA). The BFCs were conjugated to trastuzumab, which targets the HER2/neu receptor. {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of the conjugates was optimized. Receptor binding was analyzed using flow cytometry and radioassays. Finally, PET imaging and biodistribution studies were done in mice bearing either HER2/neu-positive or HER2/neu-negative tumors. {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab were prepared at room temperature in >95% radiochemical yield (RCY) in <30 min, compared to only 88% RCY after 2 h for the preparation of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab under the same conditions. Cell studies confirmed that the immunoreactivity of the mAb was retained for each of the bioconjugates. In vivo studies showed that {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab had higher uptake than the {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab at 24 h in HER2/neu-positive tumors, resulting in higher tumor to background ratios and better tumor images. By 40 h all three of the {sup 64}Cu-BFC-trastuzumab conjugates allowed for clear visualization of the HER2/neu-positive tumors but not the negative control tumor. The antibody conjugates of PCTA and Oxo-DO3A were shown to have superior {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling efficiency and stability compared to the analogous DOTA conjugate. In addition, {sup 64}Cu-PCTA and Oxo-DO3A antibody conjugates may facilitate earlier imaging with greater target to background ratios than

  18. Effect of chelating agents on the distribution of monoclonal antibodies in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for altering the biodistribution of radiolabel from gallium- and indium-labeled mouse monoclonal antibodies was investigated in mice using metal chelating agents. The chelating agents used were desferrioxamine (DFO), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediamine-di (O-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (EDHPA), and 2,2' dipyridyl (DIPY). The mouse monoclonal antibody LICR-LON-M8 was labeled with 111In after conjugation to DTPA, and with 67Ga after conjugation to DFO. All the chelating agents except DIPY altered the biodistribution of [67Ga]citrate and [111In]citrate but did not affect the 48-hr tissue uptake of label from [111In]DTPA-M8 or [67Ga]DFO-M8, confirming the in vivo stability of the antibody conjugates. Label fixed in the tissues was inaccessible to the chelating agents, indicating that they will not be suitable for reducing the high background liver radioactivity in patients undergoing scanning with indium-labeled antibodies

  19. Chelate chase of radiopharmaceuticals reversibly bound to monoclonal antibodies improves dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred micrograms of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA 255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 109 was complexed with indium-111 labeled BLEDTA II, GLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-hour tumor and organ distribution in BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumors was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 hours following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole-body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-hour whole-body counts dropped 20-60% within 3 hours of administering the chelate chase. Blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 hours of administering the chase and there was a decrease in concentration in all organs, except the kidneys, of 10 to 85%. Theoretical equivalent human doses were calculated from the 24-hour organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads per millicurie. The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labeled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies, greatly improves the radiation dosimetry of tumor imaging agents. 28 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  20. The antibody-linked chelating polymers for nuclear therapy and diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review deals with the problem of protein modification with chelating polymers. The main purpose of this approach is the preparation of monoclonal antibodies labeled with heavy metal isotopes (α-, β-, and δ-emitting metals and metals used for NMR-tomography). Traditional binding of metals with proteins via chelating agents directly coupled to protein molecule does not allow binding a high number of metal atoms per single protein molecule and can also alter protein specific properties. At the same time, metal-to-protein binding via intermediate chelating polymer makes possible the binding of several dozen metal atoms per single protein without affecting its specific properties. Moreover, the variations in polymer properties and molecular weight allow controlled modified antibody biodistribution and clearance rate. Modified antibodies can be used successfully for nuclear and NMR diagnostics and for nuclear therapy. The following problems are discussed: the chemistry of the coupling of chelating groups to polymer backbone; the binding of chelating polymers to proteins, including monoclonal antibodies; the ability of chelating polymer-to-protein conjugates to bind heavy metals; the influence of the modification on protein conformation and specific properties; the behavior of metal-containing conjugates in vivo; the practical use of conjugates obtained for radioimmunoimaging, radioimmunotherapy, NMR-tomography, and in vitro immunoassays. Future prospects of the approach are also discussed.101 references

  1. Characterization of Tumor-Avid Antibody Fragments Genetically Engineered for Mono-Specific Radionuclide Chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful clinical application of targeted-radiopharmaceuticals depends on the development of molecules that optimize tumor specific radionuclide deposition and minimize non-specific organ irradiation. To this end, this proposal outlines a research effort to identify and evaluate novel antibodies and antibody fragments that bind breast tumors. The tumor-avid antibodies will be investigated for as imaging and therapeutic agents and to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabeled tumor-avid antibody fragments through the use of site-specifically labeled molecules. Antibodies or antibody fragments, that bind breast carcinoma carbohydrate antigens, will be obtained from hybridoma or bacteriophage library screening. More specifically, antibody fragments that bind the carcinoma-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen will be radiolabeled with 99mTc and 188Re at a natural amino acid chelation site and will be investigated in vivo for their abilities to target human breast tumors. In addition, site-specific radiolabeled antibody fragments will be biosynthesized using misacylated suppressor tRNAs. Homogeneously radiolabeled populations of antibody fragments will be used to investigate the effects of radionuclide location and chelation chemistries on their biodistribution and metabolism. It is hypothesized that site-specifically radiolabeled antibody fragments will possess enhanced tumor imaging and therapeutic properties due to optimal label location and conjugation chemistries. New insights into the factors that govern antibody metabolism in vivo are also expected from this work. Results from these studies should enhance our ability to design and synthesize radiolabeled antibody fragments that have improved pharmacokinetic properties. The studies in this proposal involve basic research into the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals, with the ultimate goal of application in humans. This type of basic nuclear

  2. Characterization of Tumor-Avid Antibody Fragments Genetically Engineered for Mono-Specific Radionuclide Chelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, T.P.

    2003-12-31

    The successful clinical application of targeted-radiopharmaceuticals depends on the development of molecules that optimize tumor specific radionuclide deposition and minimize non-specific organ irradiation. To this end, this proposal outlines a research effort to identify and evaluate novel antibodies and antibody fragments that bind breast tumors. The tumor-avid antibodies will be investigated for as imaging and therapeutic agents and to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabeled tumor-avid antibody fragments through the use of site-specifically labeled molecules. Antibodies or antibody fragments, that bind breast carcinoma carbohydrate antigens, will be obtained from hybridoma or bacteriophage library screening. More specifically, antibody fragments that bind the carcinoma-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen will be radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}Re at a natural amino acid chelation site and will be investigated in vivo for their abilities to target human breast tumors. In addition, site-specific radiolabeled antibody fragments will be biosynthesized using misacylated suppressor tRNAs. Homogeneously radiolabeled populations of antibody fragments will be used to investigate the effects of radionuclide location and chelation chemistries on their biodistribution and metabolism. It is hypothesized that site-specifically radiolabeled antibody fragments will possess enhanced tumor imaging and therapeutic properties due to optimal label location and conjugation chemistries. New insights into the factors that govern antibody metabolism in vivo are also expected from this work. Results from these studies should enhance our ability to design and synthesize radiolabeled antibody fragments that have improved pharmacokinetic properties. The studies in this proposal involve basic research into the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals, with the ultimate goal of application in humans. This type of basic

  3. Immunoreactivity and Radioimmunoscintigraphy of 4-Lysine Single Chain (Fv) Lym-1 Antibody for the Radiometal Chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small size of recombinant scFv, composed of VH and VL region of IgG, has many advantages such as faster blood clearance, improved tumor localization and reduced human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. On the other hand, owing to small size, number of amino group, which was not involved in binding site, of ScFv lym-1 was insufficient in conjugation with CITC-DTPA chelator for radio metal labeling. The goal of this study is to introduce 4-lysine tag to the end of ScFv lym-1 sequence for radio metal conjugation and to evaluate the immunoreactivity and radioimmunoscintigraphy of chelator conjugated 4-lysine taq scFv lym-1 (4-lys scFv)

  4. Deferoxamine as a chelator for {sup 67}Ga in the preparation of antibody conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindan, Serengulam V. [Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ 07950 (United States); Michel, Rosana B. [Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Belleville, NJ 07109 (United States); Griffiths, Gary L. [Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ 07950 (United States); Goldenberg, David M. [Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Belleville, NJ 07109 (United States); Mattes, M. Jules [Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Belleville, NJ 07109 (United States)]. E-mail: mjmattes@gscancer.org

    2005-07-01

    {sup 67}Ga antibodies (Abs) have been shown to be effective agents for single-cell killing due to the Auger electrons emitted, but their specific activities have not been as high as desired. We therefore evaluated deferoxamine (DFO) as a chelator, as opposed to the cyclic chelator NOTA, which was used previously. Use of DFO for Ab conjugation to {sup 67}Ga was reported previously by several laboratories. DFO was conjugated to Abs by two methods, one using Ablysine conjugation and another using mild reduction of Abs to generate thiols in the hinge region. Labeling with {sup 67}Ga was efficient, and the specific activities obtained under nonoptimized conditions were twice as high as those achieved previously. However, analysis of these conjugates revealed two problems that appear to prevent their further development. First, the stability was inadequate for the 3-day half-life of the nuclide. Second, the labels were poorly retained within cells after Ab internalization and catabolism. Also, it was found that stability was significantly affected by the incubation buffer used: buffers lacking physiological concentrations of divalent cations Ca and Mg resulted in much lower stability than buffers including them. In conclusion, DFO does not seem to be a suitable chelator for {sup 67}Ga conjugation for our purposes.

  5. Considerations in the radioiodination and chelation labeling of an antiplatelet monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabeling of antibodies in particular with iodine nuclides frequently alters their biological behavior and compromises the specificity of binding to the in vivo antigens. Sensitivity to labeling chemistry however, is quite variable for different antibodies. This study was carried out to investigate the various factors affecting the binding to platelets (P) of an anti-P monoclonal antibody, 7E3, following iodination with I-123, I-125, I-131 and chelation labeling with In-111 and Tc-99m. Parameters such as the nature and amount of oxidant, reaction times, substitution level, specific activity etc., were studied. Results showed that each factor in addition to affecting chemical labeling yields also affected the binding of labeled 7E3 to P in whole blood and their blood clearance and clot uptake. With increasing I/7E3 or DTPA/7E3 molar ratios, a progressive decrease in binding to P resulted. Chloramine T (5-10 μg/100 μg 7E3) was superior to other oxidizing agents but the reaction times had to be ≤2 min (labeling yields 70 +- 10%). 7E3 appeared unaffected by specific activities of up to 40 μCi/μg (I-131 and In-111) and 300 μCi/μg (I-123). Satisfactory In-111-, I-131-, or I-123-7E3-P preparations were obtained that show considerable promise for localizing in vivo thrombi. Results of this study and prior experience with other antibodies indicate that in order to achieve maximum efficacy in imaging or therapy applications, individual antibodies may require a careful optimization of labeling procedures with different radionuclides

  6. Nature of the bifunctional chelating agent used for radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-88 monoclonal antibodies: critical factors in determining in vivo survival and organ toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One factor that is critical to the potential effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy is the design of radiometal-chelated antibodies that will be stable in vivo. Stability in vivo depends on the condition that both the chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures not alter antibody specificity and biodistribution. In addition, synthesis and selection of the chelating agent is critical for each radiometal in order to prevent inappropriate release of the radiometal in vivo. In the present study, we compare the in vivo stability of seven radioimmunoconjugates that use different polyaminocarboxylate chelating agents to complex yttrium-88 to the mouse anti-human interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac. Chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures did not alter the immunospecificity of anti-Tac. In order to assess whether yttrium was inappropriately released from the chelate-coupled antibody in vivo, iodine-131-labeled and yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies were simultaneously administered to the same animals to correlate the decline in yttrium and radioiodinated antibody activity. The four stable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies studied displayed similar iodine-131 and yttrium-88 activity, indicating minimal elution of yttrium-88 from the complex. In contrast, the unstable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies had serum yttrium-88 activities that declined much more rapidly than their iodine-131 activities, suggesting loss of the radiolabel yttrium-88 from the chelate. Furthermore, high rates of yttrium-88 elution correlated with deposition in bone. Four chelating agents emerged as promising immunotherapeutic reagents: isothiocyanate benzyl DTPA and its derivatives 1B3M, MX, and 1M3B

  7. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Cieslewicz, Maryelise [Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bhushan, Kumar R. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Frangioni, John V. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Wittrup, K. Dane, E-mail: wittrup@mit.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods: We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to DOTA, reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results: Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten-binding affinity of 100 pM is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nM to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2{+-}1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a {sup 111}In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions: We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity, DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals.

  8. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods: We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to DOTA, reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results: Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten-binding affinity of 100 pM is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nM to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2±1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen, pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a 111In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions: We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity, DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals.

  9. Molecular design of Calix[4]arene derivatives for uranyl ion extraction from aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion extraction is an important part of nuclear waste reprocessing. Use of organic ligands having chelating property with uranyl ions is a promising tool in this area, because of the possibility to improve the selectivity and the affinity of the ligands towards uranyl ions. In this study, Calix[4]arene derivatives containing B, Al, C, Si, N, P, O and S elements in bridging positions were designed and their chelating energetics with uranyl cation are calculated by means of DFT methods.

  10. Indirect labeling of monoclonal antibodies employing N2-diethylentriamine-pentaacetil lysine amide as 99mTc chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeled monoclonal antibodies and their fragments are been widely employed for the diagnosis and follow up of different kinds of neoplasm. The aim of the present work was to develop a method for indirect labeling of antibodies with 99mTc, using N2-diethylentriamine-pentaacetil lysine amide as chelating agent. By reactions with a 200-fold molar excess of 2-iminothiolane, and the reduction using a 2000-fold molar excess of 2-mercaptoethanol, 3.5 ± 0.6 and 5.8 ± 0.5 sulfhydryl groups, respectively, were generated in the antibody. Thus, work was continued using the second procedure. Reduced h-R3 was incubated for 12 h with N6-cyclohexylmaleimide-N2-diethylentriamine-pentaacetil lysine amide, previously obtained by the reaction of N2-diethylentriamine-pentaacetil lysine amide with sodium sulfosuccinimidyl-4(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate. Labeling efficiency of h-R3 monoclonal antibody, modified by this method with 99mTc, was (98.6 ± 1.4) %. A satisfactory stability of the label was observed up to 24 h in presence of a 300-fold molar excess of L-cysteine. Conclusions: Developed procedure allowed satisfactory indirect labeling of the humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 with 99mTc, using N2-diethylentriamine-pentaacetil lysine amide as bifunctional chelating agent

  11. Transfer of copper from a chelated 67Cu-antibody conjugate to ceruloplasmin in lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lym-1 monoclonal antibody was conjugated with the bifunctional chelating agent 6-[p-(bromoacetamido)benzyl]-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N' -tetraacetic acid (BAT), using 2IT as a linker, and radiolabeled with 67Cu to make the radiopharmaceutical, 67Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1. Ten patients received a total of 18 doses of 67Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1 as targeted, systemic radiotherapy. The beta phase of blood clearance, when corrected for 67Cu decay, was positive or flat, a phenomenon not observed in similar patients treated with 131I-Lym-1. The flat beta phase of blood clearance suggested recycling of 67Cu from 67Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1 to another plasma protein. Therefore, the amount of 67Cu transferred from the radiopharmaceutical to CP, Alb, and TF was measured using affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies. The fraction of plasma 67Cu precipitated by anti-human CP increased daily; most blood radioactivity was 67Cu-CP after a median of 4 days (range 2-7 days). The transfer of 67Cu to CP was observed in all patients and was consistent from dose to dose within the same patient. An average of 2.8±1.5% (range 0.8-7.8%) of the 67Cu dose (%ID) was transferred to CP. The release rate of 67Cu-CP from the liver into the blood was 0.9±0.4 %ID/day for the first 3 days. The 67Cu-CP effective clearance half-life was 3.7 ± 0.7 days. Subtraction of the 67Cu-CP activity from the total blood radioactivity yielded a biphasic blood clearance similar to that obtained for patients given 131I-Lym-1. Cu-67-CP increased the AUC for whole blood by 24 ± 10%. The %ID of 67Cu recycled correlated with GGT, ALT, and alkaline phosphatase levels; r=0.958 (p67Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1 and recycles a small fraction of the 67Cu, transferring it to CP

  12. Imaging cancer using PET - the effect of the bifunctional chelator on the biodistribution of a 64Cu-labeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Use of copper radioisotopes in antibody radiolabeling is challenged by reported loss of the radionuclide from the bifunctional chelator used to label the protein. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the thermodynamic stability of the 64Cu-complexes of five commonly used bifunctional chelators (BFCs) and the biodistribution of an antibody labeled with 64Cu using these chelators in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: The chelators [S-2-(aminobenzyl)1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (p-NH2-Bn-NOTA): 6-[p-(bromoacetamido)benzyl]-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (BAT-6): S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododocane tetraacetic acid (p-NH2-Bn-DOTA): 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododocane-N, N', N', N''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA): and 1-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane-1, 8-diamine (SarAr)] were conjugated to the anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18, and the modified antibody was labeled with 64Cu and injected into mice bearing subcutaneous human melanoma tumors (M21) (n = 3-5 for each study). Biodistribution data were obtained from positron emission tomography images acquired at 1, 24 and 48 hours post-injection, and at 48 hours post-injection a full ex vivo biodistribution study was carried out. Results: The biodistribution, including tumor targeting, was similar for all the radioimmunoconjugates. At 48 h post-injection, the only statistically significant differences in radionuclide uptake (p 64Cu]ch14.18-p-NH2-Bn-NOTA was 4.74 ± 0.77 per cent of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), and for [64Cu]ch14.18-SarAr was 8.06 ± 0.77 %ID/g. Differences in tumor targeting correlated with variations in tumor size rather than which BFC was used. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that differences in the thermodynamic stability of these chelator-Cu(II) complexes were not associated with significant differences in uptake of the tracer by the tumor

  13. Development and validation of the 57Co assay for determining the ligand to antibody ratio in bifunctional chelate/antibody conjugates for use in radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The ligand to antibody ratio is an important characteristic of a chelate/antibody conjugate. It has been widely reported that if the ratio is too high, there will be detrimental effects on immunoreactivity and biodistribution; conversely, if the ratio is too low, the radionuclide may not bind efficiently, and the stability and the specific activity will be reduced. There are little published data on the accuracy or precision of the 57Co assay. The UK Clinical Trials Regulations state that “systems with procedures that assure the quality of every aspect of the trial should be implemented”. The aims of this study were to assess the reliability and accuracy of the 57Co binding assay and validate it against defined criteria. Method: Thirty-two serial assays were assessed for reliability. Two batches of conjugated antibody were also analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to allow the comparison of the functional test with a physical method. Results: Reliability: The coefficient of variation was 0.13. Accuracy: There was 9% variation between the 57Co binding assay and MALDI-TOF MS results. Conclusion: A detailed method for the 57Co ligand to antibody test is described that allows a discrete value to be obtained. The assay was validated as fit for purpose against target values of coefficient of variation <0.20, accuracy±10%, over a permissive range of 0.5–3.0 ligand to antibody ratio.

  14. Association of uranyl with the cell wall of Pseudomonas fluorescens inhibits metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh-Latmani, Rizlan; Leckie, James O.

    2003-11-01

    Citric acid is found along with uranyl in the subsurface of former nuclear facilities because of its use as a decontamination agent in the nuclear industry. Citrate's metal chelating properties affect the mobility of uranyl in the subsurface and consequently, citrate biodegradation may significantly impact uranyl fate and transport. Under the non-growth conditions considered, low (micromolar) uranyl concentrations inhibit the biodegradation of citrate by Pseudomonas fluorescens, a common subsurface denitrifying bacterium. Additionally, uranyl is found readily associated with the cell envelope of P. fluorescens. The observed inhibition appears to be linked to the binding of uranyl to the cell surface and is reversible by desorbing cell-bound uranyl. This study establishes a link between uranyl association with the cell surface and the observed inhibitory effect of uranyl on cell metabolism.

  15. DOTA-Functionalized Polylysine: A High Number of DOTA Chelates Positively Influences the Biodistribution of Enzymatic Conjugated Anti-Tumor Antibody chCE7agl

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgen Grünberg; Simone Jeger; Dikran Sarko; Patrick Dennler; Kurt Zimmermann; Walter Mier; Roger Schibli

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific enzymatic reactions with microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) lead to a homogenous species of immunoconjugates with a defined ligand/antibody ratio. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of different numbers of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N-N'-N''-N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelats coupled to a decalysine backbone on the in vivo behavior of the chimeric monoclonal anti-L1CAM antibody chCE7agl. The enzymatic conjugation of (DOTA)1-decalysine, (DOTA)3-decaly...

  16. DOTA-Functionalized Polylysine: A High Number of DOTA Chelates Positively Influences the Biodistribution of Enzymatic Conjugated Anti-Tumor Antibody chCE7agl

    OpenAIRE

    Grünberg, Jürgen; Jeger, Simone; Sarko, Dikran; Dennler, Patrick; Zimmermann, Kurt; Mier, Walter; Schibli, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific enzymatic reactions with microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) lead to a homogenous species of immunoconjugates with a defined ligand/antibody ratio. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of different numbers of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N-N′-N′′-N′′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelats coupled to a decalysine backbone on the in vivo behavior of the chimeric monoclonal anti-L1CAM antibody chCE7agl. The enzymatic conjugation of (DOTA)1-decalysine, (DOTA)3-decaly...

  17. Imaging cancer using PET - the effect of the bifunctional chelator on the biodistribution of a {sup 64}Cu-labeled antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearling, Jason L.J., E-mail: jason.dearling@childrens.harvard.ed [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Voss, Stephan D. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dunning, Patricia; Snay, Erin [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fahey, Frederic [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Smith, Suzanne V. [Australian National Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), New Illawarra Road, PMB1, Menai, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Huston, James S. [EMD Serono Research Center, 45A Middlesex Turnpike, Billerica, MA 01821-3936 (United States); Boston Biomedical Research Institute, Watertown, MA 02472-2899 (United States); Meares, Claude F. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-5295 (United States); Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Introduction: Use of copper radioisotopes in antibody radiolabeling is challenged by reported loss of the radionuclide from the bifunctional chelator used to label the protein. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the thermodynamic stability of the {sup 64}Cu-complexes of five commonly used bifunctional chelators (BFCs) and the biodistribution of an antibody labeled with {sup 64}Cu using these chelators in tumor-bearing mice. Methods: The chelators [S-2-(aminobenzyl)1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (p-NH{sub 2}-Bn-NOTA): 6-[p-(bromoacetamido)benzyl]-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid (BAT-6): S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododocane tetraacetic acid (p-NH{sub 2}-Bn-DOTA): 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododocane-N, N', N', N''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA): and 1-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane-1, 8-diamine (SarAr)] were conjugated to the anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18, and the modified antibody was labeled with {sup 64}Cu and injected into mice bearing subcutaneous human melanoma tumors (M21) (n = 3-5 for each study). Biodistribution data were obtained from positron emission tomography images acquired at 1, 24 and 48 hours post-injection, and at 48 hours post-injection a full ex vivo biodistribution study was carried out. Results: The biodistribution, including tumor targeting, was similar for all the radioimmunoconjugates. At 48 h post-injection, the only statistically significant differences in radionuclide uptake (p < 0.05) were between blood, liver, spleen and kidney. For example, liver uptake of [{sup 64}Cu]ch14.18-p-NH{sub 2}-Bn-NOTA was 4.74 {+-} 0.77 per cent of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), and for [{sup 64}Cu]ch14.18-SarAr was 8.06 {+-} 0.77 %ID/g. Differences in tumor targeting correlated with variations in tumor size rather than which BFC was used. Conclusions: The results of this

  18. Standardization of methodology to derivatization and radiolabeling of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody from bifunctional chelator DOTA-NHS-Ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymphomas are cancers of the lymphatic system, being the most common the non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), that increase the cytotoxic effect of monoclonal antibodies (mAb), therefore labeling these Mab with different radioisotopes. RIT combines the specificity of the antibody and the toxicity of the radionuclides. The mAb anti-CD20 is used for treatment of relapse or refractory NHL. The labeling of anti- CD20 with 177Lu, requires a bifunctional chelating agent that is designed to make a 'connect bridge' between the mAb and the radionuclide. The incorporation of the chelating group in mAb structure is called derivatization. The aim of this work is to study the derivatization of anti-CD20 antibody with DOTA-NHS-ester chelating group and labeling parameters to produce 177Lu-DOTA-Anti CD20. Five milligrams of anti-CD20 were purified by dialysis against phosphate buffer pH 8.0 and derivatized with DOTA-NHS-ester in 1:250, 1:500 and 1:1000 molar ratios. The reaction was conducted for 1 hour in gently mixing at room temperature and remained under refrigeration for 48 hours. The reaction mixture was purified in gel column Sephadex G-50 ; the aliquots that presented greater protein concentration, were mixed and concentrated. The purified antibody conjugated was added to 111-185MBq (3-5mCi) of 177LuCl3 diluted in 0.4 M acetate buffer pH 5.5. Radiochemical purity was less than 95% in all the molar ratios, indicating necessity of the purification after the labeling. The mAb derivatized showed stable when stored for to 1 month to 4 deg C and 4 days at -20 deg C. (author)

  19. Pretargeting of human mammary carcinoma xenografts with bispecific anti-MUC1/anti-Ga chelate antibodies and immunoscintigraphy with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of combining enhanced tumor-to-tissue contrast and PET imaging for immunoscintigraphic tumor localization in pancreas and colon carcinoma bearing nude mice. Contrast enhancement was obtained with a multistep targeting technique that consists of the sequential administration of an antitumor/antihapten bispecific antibody (BS-MAb), a blocker to saturate the antihapten binding sites of the BS-MAb that remains in circulation, and a low molecular weight Ga chelate, labeled with the positron emitter 68Ga, which serves as the hapten. To evaluate the efficacy of this pretargeting technique for breast cancer localization, we synthesized a BS-MAb from the F(ab')2 fragments of the anti-MUC1 MAb 12H12 which reacts with the vast majority of human breast carcinomas, and the F(ab') fragment of an anti-Ga chelate MAb using a bifunctional chemical linker. The BS-MAb was tested for its affinity and its biokinetics in nude mice bearing a human mammary carcinoma. Equilibrium binding of the BS-MAb for mammary carcinoma cells was low (1.2 x 107 M-1) while the binding capacity of cells was high (8.4 x 106 BS-MAbs per cell). Tumor uptake of the 67Ga labeled chelate in pretargeted animals was to 5.8 ± 0.8% iD/g resulting in a tumor-to-blood ratio of 2.6 at 1h postinjection. This compares with a ratio of 0.65 and 0.85 obtained with 125I-labeled native 12H12 at 24h and 48h postinjection. No difference in the tumor uptake of both the 68Ga and 67Ga labeled chelate was observed. PET imaging of mice, started 1h postinjection of the 68Ga chelate, clearly visualized all tumors

  20. DOTA-functionalized polylysine: a high number of DOTA chelates positively influences the biodistribution of enzymatic conjugated anti-tumor antibody chCE7agl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Grünberg

    Full Text Available Site-specific enzymatic reactions with microbial transglutaminase (mTGase lead to a homogenous species of immunoconjugates with a defined ligand/antibody ratio. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of different numbers of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N-N'-N''-N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA chelats coupled to a decalysine backbone on the in vivo behavior of the chimeric monoclonal anti-L1CAM antibody chCE7agl. The enzymatic conjugation of (DOTA1-decalysine, (DOTA3-decalysine or (DOTA5-decalysine to the antibody heavy chain (via Gln295/297 gave rise to immunoconjugates containing two, six or ten DOTA moieties respectively. Radiolabeling of the immunoconjugates with (177Lu yielded specific activities of approximately 70 MBq/mg, 400 MBq/mg and 700 MBq/mg with increasing numbers of DOTA chelates. Biodistribution experiments in SKOV3ip human ovarian cancer cell xenografts demonstrated a high and specific accumulation of radioactivity at the tumor site for all antibody derivatives with a maximal tumor accumulation of 43.6±4.3% ID/g at 24 h for chCE7agl-[(DOTA-decalysine]2, 30.6±12.0% ID/g at 24 h for chCE7agl-[(DOTA3-decalysine]2 and 49.9±3.1% ID/g at 48 h for chCE7agl-[(DOTA5-decalysine]2. The rapid elimination from the blood of chCE7agl-[(DOTA-decalysine]2 (1.0±0.1% ID/g at 24 h is associated with a high liver accumulation (23.2±4.6% ID/g at 24 h. This behavior changed depending on the numbers of DOTA moieties coupled to the decalysine peptide with a slower blood clearance (5.1±1.0 (DOTA3 versus 11.7±1.4% ID/g (DOTA5, p<0.005 at 24 h and lower radioactivity levels in the liver (21.4±3.4 (DOTA3 versus 5.8±0.7 (DOTA5, p<0.005 at 24 h. We conclude that the site-specific and stoichiometric uniform conjugation of the highly DOTA-substituted decalysine ((DOTA5-decalysine to an anti-tumor antibody leads to the formation of immunoconjugates with high specific activity and excellent in vivo behavior and is a valuable option for

  1. p-carboxyethyl-phenylglyoxal bis(n-methylthiosemicarbazone) (CE-DTS), a bifunctional chelating agent for Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the search for bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) with better affinity, selectivity and stability as for Tc-99m, synthesis of a novel BCA containing di-thio-semicarbazone as for Tc-99m chelating site has offered interesting characteristics for the labeling of macromolecules. In the present paper, monoclonal IgG (MoAb) against human thyroglobulin was selected as a model and conditions for coupling, labeling reactions were tested along with immunological reactivity. CE-DTS was coupled to MoAb by the azido method and effect of conjugation on the MoAb immunoreactivity was followed by RIA. When CE-DTS was coupled to MoAb at the molar ratio of 1:1, no loss of its original immunoreactivity was observed. Tc-99m labeling, using the stannous ion reducing method, indicated the reaction pH as being a determinant parameter. The reducing agent prepared in tartrate buffer (pH 3) offered high yield and stable Tc-99m-CE-DTS-MoAb, as evidence by HPLC. In vivo studies in mice indicated percent of injected dose and blood clearance alike the I-131-MoAb. This good labeled state of Tc-99m-CE-DTS-MoAb was also demonstrated by using second antibody reaction in serum of mice. The newly synthesized CE-DTS offered good basis for the Tc-99m labeling of monclonal antibodies with preserved immunological properties, as desirable for the radioimmunodetection. Work with tumor related monoclonal antibodies is under progress

  2. {sup 177}Lu-labeled-VG76e monoclonal antibody in tumor angiogenesis: a comparative study using DOTA and DTPA chelating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, M.; Psimadas, D. [Inst. of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' ' Demokritos' ' , Athens (Greece); Biomedica Life Sciences S.A., Athens (Greece); Bouziotis, P.; Gourni, E.; Varvarigou, A.D. [Inst. of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostic Products, National Centre for Scientific Research ' ' Demokritos' ' , Athens (Greece); Harris, A.L. [Weatherall Inst. of Molecular Medicine, Cancer Research U.K., Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Loudos, G. [Biomedical Simulations and Imaging Lab., National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Maecke, H.R. [Div. of Radiological Chemistry, Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the molecules which regulate angiogenesis, a phenomenon observed in many diseases, including cancer. VG76e, an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, was labeled with {sup 177}Lu via p-SCN-Bz-DOTA and CHX-A''-DTPA chelating systems, in order to investigate its possible therapeutic use. Labeling was performed by a 30 min incubation of {sup 177}LuCl{sub 3} and each immunoconjugate, at 37 C. Radiochemical analysis showed the formation of a single radioactive species, at a yield higher than 98%, for both immunoconjugates. Kits have been formulated for both VG76e-DOTA and VG76e-DTPA. Stability studies, in the presence of a competitor excess, showed that both radiolabeled species remained sufficiently stable (95%) for at least 48 h. Biodistribution results in normal mice were similar for both radioimmunoconjugates, with no significant bone uptake. Gamma camera images of tumor-bearing mice showed satisfactory visualization of the tumor 24 h p.i., while a higher uptake was observed at 48 h p.i. Our findings indicate that both the bifunctional chelating agents p-SCN-Bz-DOTA and CHX-A''-DTPA can be used for the labeling of VG76e with {sup 177}Lu, with high labeling yield and stability. Their in vivo behaviour in normal and tumor-bearing mice looks promising and they can be successfully used for tumor imaging studies. (orig.)

  3. Tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Soderholm, L

    2012-11-01

    Three tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates, [(CH(3))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (1), [(C(2)H(5))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (2), and [(C(3)H(7))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (3), have been synthesized from aqueous solution and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the compounds consist of the uranyl cation equatorially coordinated to five N-bound thiocyanate ligands, UO(2)(NCS)(5)(3-), and charge-balanced by three tetraalkylammonium cations. Raman spectroscopy data have been collected on compounds 1-3, as well as on solutions of uranyl nitrate with increasing levels of sodium thiocyanate. By tracking the Raman signatures of thiocyanate, the presence of both free and bound thiocyanate is confirmed in solution. The shift in the Raman signal of the uranyl symmetric stretching mode suggests the formation of higher-order uranyl thiocyanate complexes in solution, while the solid-state Raman data support homoleptic isothiocyanate coordination about the uranyl cation. Presented here are the syntheses and crystal structures of 1-3, pertinent Raman spectra, and a discussion regarding the relationship of these isothiocyanates to previously described uranyl halide phases, UO(2)X(4)(2-). PMID:23072277

  4. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to other Siderophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-05-27

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  5. Specific uranyl binding by macrocyclic ligands attached to resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrocyclic polydentates have attracted enormous attention from chemists because of their unique and significant characteristics of the strong and selective binding of a variety of metal ions. The metal binding is governed mostly by the size of the macroring and the nature of heteroatoms involved. The most important role of the macrocyclic structure is, in general, the so-called macrocyclic effect - to increase (making less negative) a large negative entropy change involved in the polydentate chelation. Basic strategy of uranium binding, is to design a ligand of very strong metal binding to take advantage of this macrocyclic effect, where number of chelating heteroatoms and their spatial arrangement is designed to be most appropriate for uranyl (UO22+) binding, since in natural sea water uranium is dissolved mostly in a form of uranyl carbonate. The following macrocylic ligands, hexamine, hexaketone, hexacarboxylic acid, were prepared and tested. The macrocyclic hexacarboxylic ligand was the most promising. The addition of hexacarboxylic acid to a uranyl tricarbonate solution gave a change of visible absorption due to the competitive formation of the uranyl complex. From this competitive binding, a relative formation constant was estimated to be 10-5, giving a log K/sub f/ value of 16.4 at 250C for the uranyl complex. This value is the largest among the hosts ever reported to bind uranyl ion.The selectivity of the macrocyclic hexacarboxylic ligand was also ascertained by testing with other metal cations. Results indicate that uranyl ions can be extracted efficiently from sea water using the hexacarboxylic acid ligands which are attached to a polymer insoluble in water

  6. Ionothermal synthesis of uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ernest M.; Dustin, Megan K.; Smith, Jeremy S.; Burns, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate with various salts in methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids have produced single crystals of three uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives as charge-balancing cations. (C4H7N2)[(UO2)(PO3F)(F)] (1) crystallizes in space group C2, a=17.952(1) Å, b=6.9646(6) Å, c=8.5062(7) Å, β=112.301(1)°, (C6H11N2)2[(UO2)(SO4)2] (2) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=31.90(1) Å, b=9.383(5) Å, c=13.770(7) Å, β=93.999(7)° and (C6H11N2)[(UO2)2(PO4)(HPO4) (3) crystallizes in space group P21/n, a=9.307(2), b=18.067(4), c=9.765(2), β=93.171(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by three O atoms and two F atoms in 1 and five O atoms in 2 and 3 to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in 1 is composed of F-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through corner-sharing fluorophosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in 2 is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating sulfate tetrahedron linked into chains by three other corner-sharing sulfate tetrahedra. In 3, the structural unit is composed of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through edge- and corner-sharing phosphate and hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. N-methylimidazolium cations occupy the interstitial space between the uranyl fluorophosphate sheets in 1, whereas 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations link the uranyl sulfate and phosphate units in 2 and 3 into extended structures.

  7. 8102 and 7601 as antidotes for acute uranyl nitrate intoxication in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of phenolic chelating agents, 8102 and 7601, as antidotes for acute uranyl nitrate (100-500 mg/kg) intoxication was examined. The results show that after intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg of uranyl nitrate per kg, all the control rats died at 3rd and 4th days and exhibited acute renal tubular necrosis and protein casts. 8102 and 7601 could promote the animals survival and reduce the histologic lesion of kidneys in rats intoxicated with uranyl nitrate (100-350 mg/kg). 8102 is more effective than 7601

  8. EDTA and DTPA modified ligands as sequestering agents for uranyl decorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of modified EDTA and DTPA ligands and determination of their binding affinities for the uranyl cation are described. Thanks to a screening method, based on a chromophoric complex displacement procedure, chelating properties were studied in aqueous media under various pH conditions for evaluation of their in vivo uranyl-removal efficacy. Each ligand showed a more or less pronounced affinity for uranium. Specific ligands based on EDTA or DTPA analogues containing sulfo-catechol-amide (CAMS) were found to exhibit a significant affinity towards uranyl ion in acidic, neutral or basic conditions. (authors)

  9. Ionothermal synthesis of uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate with various salts in methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids have produced single crystals of three uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives as charge-balancing cations. (C4H7N2)[(UO2)(PO3F)(F)] (1) crystallizes in space group C2, a=17.952(1) Å, b=6.9646(6) Å, c=8.5062(7) Å, β=112.301(1)°, (C6H11N2)2[(UO2)(SO4)2] (2) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=31.90(1) Å, b=9.383(5) Å, c=13.770(7) Å, β=93.999(7)° and (C6H11N2)[(UO2)2(PO4)(HPO4) (3) crystallizes in space group P21/n, a=9.307(2), b=18.067(4), c=9.765(2), β=93.171(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by three O atoms and two F atoms in 1 and five O atoms in 2 and 3 to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in 1 is composed of F-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through corner-sharing fluorophosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in 2 is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating sulfate tetrahedron linked into chains by three other corner-sharing sulfate tetrahedra. In 3, the structural unit is composed of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through edge- and corner-sharing phosphate and hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. N-methylimidazolium cations occupy the interstitial space between the uranyl fluorophosphate sheets in 1, whereas 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations link the uranyl sulfate and phosphate units in 2 and 3 into extended structures. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of uranyl compounds by ionothermal treatment is explored, and provides three novel compounds and insights concerning the role of water in controlling the structural units. Highlights: ► Ionothermal syntheses have produced three new uranyl compounds. ► Imidazole derivatives are incorporated as charge-balancing agents. ► X-ray and spectroscopic analyses reveal variability between imidazole derivatives. ► This method offers synthetic insight in the

  10. Role of chelates in treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Laxmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelates are used in cancer as cytotoxic agent, as radioactive agent in imaging studies and in radioimmunotherapy. Various chelates based on ruthenium, copper, zinc, organocobalt, gold, platinum, palladium, cobalt, nickel and iron are reported as cytotoxic agent. Monoclonal antibodies labeled with radioactive metals such as yttrium-90, indium-111 and iodine-131 are used in radioimmunotherapy. This review is an attempt to compile the use of chelates as cytotoxic drugs and in radioimmunotherapy.

  11. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO2C2O4, 3H2O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO2C2O4 (log β1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log β1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10-8 to 9.2 10-9 and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H+] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10-8. (authors)

  12. Effect of chelator conjugation level and injection dose on tumor and organ uptake of 111In-labeled MORAb-009, an anti-mesothelin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Radiolabeling of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a metallic radionuclide requires the conjugation of a bifunctional chelator to the mAb. The conjugation, however, can alter the physical and immunological properties of the mAb, consequently affecting its tumor-targeting pharmacokinetics. In this study, we investigated the effect of the amount of 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-cyclohexyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A″) conjugated to MORAb-009, a mAb directed against mesothelin, and the effect of MORAb dose on the biodistribution of 111In-labeled MORAb-009. Methods: We used nude mice bearing the A431/K5 tumor as a mesothelin-positive tumor model and the A431 tumor as a mesothelin-negative control. To find the optimal level of CHX-A″ conjugation, CHX-A″-MORAb-009 conjugates with 2.4, 3.5 and 5.5 CHX-A″ molecules were investigated. To investigate the effect of injected MORAb-009 dose on neutralizing the shed mesothelin in the circulation, biodistribution studies were performed after the intravenous co-injection of 111In-labeled MORAb-009 (2.4 CHX-A″/MORAb-009) with three different doses: 0.2, 2 and 30 μg of MORAb-009. Results: The tumor uptake in A431/K5 tumor was four times higher than that in A431 tumor, indicating that the tumor uptake in A431/K5 was mesothelin mediated. The conjugate with 5.5 CHX-A″ showed a lower isoelectric point (pI) and lower immunoreactivity (IR) than the 2.4 CHX-A″ conjugate. These differences were reflected in the biodistribution of the 111In label. The 111In-labeled MORAb-009 conjugated with 2.4 CHX-A″ produced higher tumor uptake and lower liver and spleen uptakes than the 5.5 CHX-A″ conjugate. The biodistribution studies also revealed that the tumor uptake was significantly affected by the injected MORAb-009 dose and tumor size. The 30-μg dose produced higher tumor uptake than the 0.2- and 2-μg doses, whereas the 30-μg dose produced lower liver and spleen uptakes than the 0.2-μg dose

  13. Using lanthanide chelates and uranyl compounds for diagnostic by fluoroimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the luminescence of lanthanide ions and UO22+ is related to its peculiar characteristics, e.g. long lifetime and line-like emission bands in the visible, which make these ions unique among the species that are known to luminescence. Recent developments in the field of supramolecular chemistry have allowed the design of ligands capable of encapsulating lanthanide ions, thus forming kinetically inert complexes. By introduction of chromophoric groups in these ligands, an intense luminescence of the ion can be obtained via the 'antenna effect', defined as a light conversion process involving distinct absorbing (ligand) and emitting (metal ion) components. In such a process, the quantities that contribute to the luminescence intensity are the efficiency of the absorption, the efficiency of the ligand-metal energy transfer, and the efficiency of the metal luminescence. Encapsulation of lanthanide ions with suitable ligands may therefore give rise to 'molecular devices' capable to emit strong, long-lived luminescence. Besides the intrinsic interest in their excited state properties, compounds of lanthanide ions, in particular of the Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions, and now UO22+ are important for their potential use as luminescent labels for biological species in fluoroimmunoassays (FIAs). This is most interesting because fluorimetric labeling represents an alternative method to the use of radioactive labels, which has long been the most common way of quantifying immunoreactions. In this article we report information about luminescent materials, which gave a good signal to quantify biological molecules by TR-FIA, DELFIA , DSLFIA, RIA and FRET. (author)

  14. Preparation of {sup 105}Rh labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb B72.3) using aminobenzylpropyleneamineoxime as the bifunctional chelating agent; comparison to {sup 131}I labeled MAb B72.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Isotope Div.; Schlemper, E.O.; Jurisson, S.S. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Ketring, A.R. [Missouri Univ. Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Volkert, W.A. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Radiology Research; H.S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, MO (United States); Corlija, M. [H.S. Truman Memorial VA Hospital, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody(MAb) B72.3 was labeled with {sup 105}Rh using aminobenzylpropyleneamineoxime (PnAO-{phi}-NH{sub 2}) as the bifunctional chelating agent. {sup 105}Rh-PnAO-{phi}-NH{sub 2} was formed at {proportional{underscore}to} 80 C at pH 5-6 and purified by extraction into chloroform. The excess unreacted ligand was retained in the aqueous phase by addition of Cu{sup 2+} ions by forming a charged complex. The amine group on {sup 105}Rh complex was activated and conjugated with MAb at pH 8.5 {proportional{underscore}to}90% complexation and 40-60% conjugation were realised. Radiolabeled antibody was purified by gel filtration. B72.3 MAb was labeled with {sup 131}I and used for comparison of biodistribution in normal mice. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of 177Lu-DOTA-labeled aglycosylated monoclonal anti-L1-CAM antibody chCE7: influence of the number of chelators on the in vitro and in vivo properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In this study, we optimized the 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N-N'-N''-N''''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelator-to-antibody (c/a) ratio for the aglycosylated variant of the anti-L1-CAM antibody chCE7 (chCE7agl), providing high specific activity and low liver uptake in 177Lu-labeled form. Methods: chCE7agl was substituted with increasing molar excess of DOTA-NCS. The number of chelators coupled to the antibody and the binding affinities to target tumor cells (IC5 values) of the resulting immunoconjugates were determined. The different immunoconjugates were labeled with 177Lu; specific activity was measured, and metabolic stability was analyzed in human plasma. The effect of different c/a ratios on blood clearance and liver uptake was tested in nude mice. Changes of the protein backbone structure were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results: chCE7agl was substituted with 7, 12 or 15 DOTA ligands. The IC5 concentrations displacing radioiodinated chCE7 antibody increased with the number of chelators (1.5-fold with 7 ligands, 2.5-fold with 12 ligands and a 5-fold increase with 15 ligands). The highest specific activity for 177Lu-DOTA-chCE7agl was obtained with a c/a ratio of 12 (106 MBq/mg). Radioimmunoconjugates were stable in human plasma for at least 24 h. Blood clearance and liver uptake were measured after 24 h (c/a ratios of 12 and 15) or 48 h (c/a ratio of 7). The liver-to-blood ratios were 0.35±0.14 (7 ligands), 0.77±0.19 (12 ligands) and 17.85±3.44 (15 ligands). Conclusions: DOTA-chCE7agl conjugates with a c/a ratio of 12 combined high specific activity with good in vitro and in vivo properties. The rapid elimination rate from the blood and the high uptake in the liver of chCE7agl substituted with 15 DOTA ligands were found not to be due to conformational changes of the antibody backbone structure

  16. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  17. Uranyl complexes of n-alkanediaminotetra-acetic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranyl complexes of n-propanediaminetetra-acetic acid, n-butanediaminetetra-acetic acid and n-hexanediaminetetra-acetic acid have been studied by potentiometry, with computer evaluation of the titration data by the MINIQUAD program. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 2:1 metal:ligand chelates have been determined as well as the respective hydrolysis and polymerization constants at 25 deg in 0.10M and 1.00M KNO3. The influence of the length of the alkane chain of the ligands on the complexes formed is discussed. (author)

  18. Layered metal uranyl phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUO2PO4·4H2O (HUP) forms a laminar intercalate with butylamine, c = 29.30(5) angstrom, which accepts cationic metals in exchange for the n-butylammonium ions. Hydrated uranyl metal phosphates M(UO2PO4)2·nH2O (M=Mn,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn,Cd) are obtained by ionic exchange and were studied by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The tetragonal structures of all these product compounds are derived from HUP. The diffuse electronic reflectance spectra of every sample show characteristic UO22+ absorption bands. In the spectra of the Co, Ni and Cu phosphates there are other bands in the 500-800 nm zone compatible with their observed aquocation transitions

  19. Uranyl ion uptake by polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline (Pani) was synthesized by the chemical oxidation of aniline. The batch mode experiments showed that Pani could be used for the separation of metal ions like uranyl from a mixture. UO22+ was converted into its anionic complex using suitable complexing agent like thiocyanate and the anionic complex is taken up by Pani. Interference studies showed that uranyl ion can be selectively taken up in presence of transition metal ions present in some binary mixtures. (author)

  20. Detoxication and removal of uranium by phenolic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of phenolic chelating agents for detoxication and removal of uranyl nitrate in mice and rats is reported. Antidotal test: 8102, 7601 and 811 were given 2 mM/kg subcutaneously to mice and 1 mM/kg intramuscularly to rats when the animals were injected i.p. with different doses (100-500 mg/kg) of uranyl nitrate. The results showed that the antidotal effects of 8102 and 7601 were better than 811 in augmenting survival, survival time (day) and renal factor (kidney weight/body weight x100). 8102 was superior to 7601 against higher dose of uranyl nitrate intoxication. Removal test: five phenolic chelating agents (8102, 7601, 811, 7603 and 8307) were studied in rats. The results obtained demonstrated that 8102 and 7601 were better than 811, 7603 and 8307 in increasing U excretion in the urine after acute uranyl nitrate intoxication. The effects of different doses (300-1000 μM/kg) of 8102 was superior to 7601 in increasing U excretion in the urine and decreasing U deposition in the tissues. The toxicity and dose of 8102 in treating uranium intoxication are discussed

  1. Preparation and near-quantitative Y-90 labelings of monoclonal antibody-macrocylic chelator (MAb-DOTA) conjugates for radioimmunotherapy (RAIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindan, S.V.; Griffiths, G.L.; Losman, M.J. [Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The importance of kinetically inert Y-90-DOTA chelate for RAIT is well recognized. The aim of this study was to adapt a published procedure to overcome long-standing problems related to practical preparation of DOTA-MAb conjugates and poor Y-90 incorporation, and further improve upon labeling efficiencies. Using monoactivated DOTA, we have prepared conjugates of a CEA MAb (MN-14), a lymphoma MAb (LL2), their humanized versions (hMN-14 and hLL2), and the respective divalent fragments, and systematically examined the Y-90-labeling parameters. The DOTA/Mab ratios in conjugates were in the 3.0-6.8 range. In competitive CEA-binding assays, unmodified MN-14, MN-14-DOTA (6.8 chelators) and hMN-14-DOTA (4.4 chelators) exhibited very similar binding patterns. Y-90 labeling yields of >90% were obtained using a labeling time of 2 h at 40-45{degrees}C, pH {approximately}5.5, and DOTA/MAb ratio >3. Incorporations (specific activities):>99%for hMN-14-DOTA (103-170 MBa/mg), 94-97% for hLL2-DOTA (107-185 MBa/mg), 93-98%for hLL2F(ab`){sub 2}-DOTA (111 MBa/mg), and >90% for MN14-DOTA (37-185 MBq/mg). Aggregate content was usually less than 5%. Observed high incorporations are due both to the higher temperature used and DOTA/Y-90 molar ratios which readily exceeded a threshold requirement of three. Labeling efficiencies also depended upon the level of trace metal contaminants in the Y-90 shipment. Incubations of Y-90 labeled DOTA conjugates of hMN-14 and hLL2 in serum and in 1 mM DTPA at 37{degrees}C showed no detectable loss of metal over a 10-day period. These results should allow us to routinely use Y-90-DOTA-MAb conjugates in future preclinical and clinical RAIT studies.

  2. ESR study of irradiated uranyl salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of ESR measurements on gamma-irradiated single crystals of ammonium uranyl nitrate and potassium uranyl nitrate are reported. In ammonium uranyl nitrate, the observed radical is found to have a similar behaviour to irradiated rubidium uranyl nitrate. However, a pair of satellites to the main lines have been observed and they have been interpreted as the simultaneous proton spin-flips. In the case of potassium uranyl nitrate, the observed radicals are also assigned to NO3. The directions of the principal axes of the g-tensor and their values are reported. These results support theoretical predictions based on the electronic structure. (K.B.)

  3. Antibodies conjugated with new highly luminescent Eu3+ and Tb3+ chelates as markers for time resolved immunoassays. Application to simultaneous determination of clenbuterol and free cortisol in horse urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupo, M A; Meroni, G; Secundo, F; Scalera, C; Quici, S

    2009-12-15

    Highly luminescent Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) complexes of 10-[4-(3-isothiocyanatopropoxy)benzoylmethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7 triacetic acid Eu(3+) is a subset of 1 and Tb(3+) is a subset of 1 were conjugated with a goat anti-rabbit IgG and a rabbit anti-mouse IgG, respectively, and applied as markers in a time resolved immunoassay for simultaneous quantitative determination of anabolic compounds clenbuterol (CL) and hydrocortisone (HC). The assay was performed in horse urine, using a monoclonal antibody specific to CL and a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific to the free HC. These lanthanide chelates are very stable and highly luminescent in aqueous solution and allowed to reach 10 microg L(-1) and 40 microg L(-1) sensitivities for CL and for HC, respectively. Application to the horse urine, that is a very complex matrix, has a considerable interest in the control of illegal use of these compounds. PMID:19836578

  4. Chelation in Metal Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Flora, Swaran J.S.; Vidhu Pachauri

    2010-01-01

    Chelation therapy is the preferred medical treatment for reducing the toxic effects of metals. Chelating agents are capable of binding to toxic metal ions to form complex structures which are easily excreted from the body removing them from intracellular or extracellular spaces. 2,3-Dimercaprol has long been the mainstay of chelation therapy for lead or arsenic poisoning, however its serious side effects have led researchers to develop less toxic analogues. Hydrophilic chelators like meso-2,3...

  5. Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic characterization of three uranyl phosphates with unique structural units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of Zn4(OH)2[(UO2)(PO4)2(OH)2(H2O)] (UZnP), Cs[(UO2)(HPO4)NO3] (UCsP), and In3[(UO2)2(PO4)4OH(H2O)6].2H2O (UInP) were obtained from hydrothermal reactions and have been structurally and chemically characterized. UZnP crystallizes in space group Pbcn, a=8.8817(7), b=6.6109(5), c=19.569(1) Å; UCsP crystallizes in P−1, a=7.015(2), b=7.441(1), c=9.393(2) Å, α=72.974(2), β=74.261(2), γ=79.498(2); and UInP crystallizes in P−1, a=7.9856(5), b=9.159(1), c=9.2398(6) Å α=101.289(1), β=114.642(1), γ=99.203(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by five O atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in UZnP is a finite cluster containing a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in UCsP is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating nitrate group that are linked into chains by three bridging hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. In UInP, the structural unit contains pairs of edge-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with two chelating phosphate tetrahedra that are linked into chains through two bridging phosphate tetrahedra. Indium octahedra link these uranyl phosphate chains into a 3-dimensional framework. All three compounds exhibit unique structural units that deviate from the typical layered structures observed in uranyl phosphate solid-state chemistry. - Graphical abstract: Three new uranyl phosphates with unique structural units are reported. ▪ Highlights: ► Three new uranyl phosphates have been synthesized hydrothermally. ► Single crystal analyses reveal unique structural units. ► The dimensionality of these compounds deviate from typical U6+ layered structures

  6. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO2F2. Studies on the effect of added LiNO3 or Na2WO4·2H2O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF6 content of WF6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF6

  7. On the Formation of "Hypercoordinated" Uranyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gibson, John K.; Rios, Daniel; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2011-09-05

    Recent gas phase experimental studies suggest the presence of hypercoordinated uranyl complexes. Coordination of acetone (Ace) to uranyl to form hypercoordinated species is examined using density functional theory (DFT) with a range of functionals and second order perturbation theory (MP2). Complexes with up to eight acetones were studied. It is shown that no more than six acetones can bind directly to uranium and that the observed uranyl complexes are not hypercoordinated.

  8. Hybrid uranyl-vanadium nano-wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchyk, G A; Wylie, E M; Prizio, S; Szymanowski, J E S; Sigmon, G E; Burns, P C

    2015-06-25

    Hybrid uranyl-vanadium oxide clusters intermediate between transition metal polyoxometalates and uranyl peroxide cage clusters were obtained by dissolving uranyl nitrate in the ionic liquid 3-ethyl-1-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate mixed with an aqueous solution containing vanadium. Where sulfate was present, wheel-shaped {U20V20} crystallized and contains ten sulfate tetrahedra, and in the absence of added sulfate, {U2V16}, a derivative of {V18}, was obtained. PMID:26008125

  9. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy

  10. Uranyl ion complexation by citric and citramalic acids in the presence of di-amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl nitrate reacts with citric (H4cit) or D-(-)-citramalic (H3citml) acids under mild hydrothermal conditions and in the presence of di-amines to give different complexes which are all characterized by the presence of 2:2 uranyl/poly-carboxylate di-anionic dimers or of polymeric chains based on the same dimeric motif. Each uranium ion is chelated by the two ligands through the alkoxide and the α- or β-carboxylate groups, the second β-carboxylic group in citrate being uncoordinated. The uranium coordination sphere is completed by either a water molecule or the β-carboxylate group of a neighboring unit, thus giving zero- or one-dimensional assemblages, respectively. The evidence for [UO2(Hcit)]2 dimers in the solid state confirms previous results from potentiometric and EXAFS measurements on solutions. Depending on the diamine used (DABCO, 2,2'- and 4,4'-bipyridine, [2.2.2]cryptand) and its ability to form divergent hydrogen bonds or not, different uranyl/poly-carboxylate topologies are obtained, thus evidencing template effects, and extended hydrogen bonding gives two- or three-dimensional assemblages. These results, together with those previously obtained with NaOH as a base, add to the knowledge of the uranyl/citrate system, which is much investigated for its environmental relevance. (author)

  11. Macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meares, Claude F.; DeNardo, Sally J.; Cole, William C.; Mol, Min K.

    1987-01-01

    A copper chelate conjugate which is stable in human serum. The conjugate includes the copper chelate of a cyclic tetraaza di-, tri-, or tetra-acetic acid, a linker attached at one linker end to a ring carbon of the chelate, and a biomolecule joined at the other end of the linker. The conjugate, or the linker-copper chelate compound used in forming the conjugate, are designed for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications which involve Cu(II) localization via the systemic route.

  12. Thermal analysis studies of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis of the ammonium uranyl carbonate powder were performed with heat balance in the following atmosphers: Air, Ar and Ar-8%H2. The thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis curves of the ammonium uranyl carbonate powder obtained from different source were reported and discussed

  13. Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of uranyl metaborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard enthalpy of formation of crystalline UO2(BO2)2 (-2542.5 ± 3.5 kJ/mol) at 298.15 K was determined by reaction calorimetry. The heat capacity of this compound was measured over the temperature range 6-302 K by adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. The thermodynamic functions were calculated, including the standard entropy (502.8 ± 2.1 J/(mol K)) and Gibbs function of formation (-2392.5 ± 4.0 kJ/mol) at 298.15 K. The standard thermodynamic functions of reactions with the participation of uranyl metaborate were calculated and analyzed

  15. Synthesis and characterization of uranyl acetate complexes with some potentially bidentate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexes of uranyl acetate with three potentially bidentate ligands-nicotinic acid (NA), 2,2'-bipyridyl(2,2'-Bipy) and 4,4'-bipyridyl N,N'-dioxide (4,4'-BipyO2) have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of analytical data, electrical conductance, electronic and IR spectral studies. Uranyl acetate forms 1:1 complexes with 2,2'-Bipy and 4,4'-BipyO2 and a 1:2 complex with NA. It is shown that UO2(NA)2(CH3COO)2 and UO2(2,2'-Bipy)(CH3COO)2 have monomeric structures while UO2(4,4'-BipyO2)(CH3COO)2 has a polymeric chain structure. The acetate groups act as bidentate chelating ligands in these complexes. All the compounds studied are considered to have an overall coordination number eight around uranium(VI). (author). 16 refs

  16. Synthetic and structural studies of uranyl complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex chemistry of uranyl nitrate with mono and bi-functional neutral extractants shows, that it forms 1:2 and 1:1 complexes respectively. The structures of the isolated complexes show, that the water molecules from the primary coordination sphere of (UO2(NO3)2.2H2O) are replaced by the extractants completely and adopt a hexagonal bi-pyramidal geometry. However, the structural chemistry of uranyl nitrate with the tri-functional extractants show, that one of the nitrates acts as a monodentate ligand to maintain the hexagonal bi-pyramidal geometry. The complex chemistry of uranyl bis(β-diketonates) with the neutral monodentate extractants shows that the water molecule from the primary sphere of (UO2(β-diketonate)2.H2O) is replaced by the ligands, to form a pentagonal bi-pyramidal geometry around uranyl group. However, the structural chemistry of bi-functional neutral extractants with uranyl bis(β-diketonates) shows either mono or bi-nuclear uranyl complexes depending upon the stoichiometry of the uranyl ion used. (author)

  17. Complexation effects on uranyl ion spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranyl complexes of (i) mono furfural 4-(2-pyridyl thio semicarbazonato), (ii) bis-3-methyl-4-(p-methyl phenylazo)-5-pyrazolonato, (iii) bis-2-AC-benzofuranato and (iv) bis-3-acetyl-4-hydroxy coumarinate, are prepared, isolated and characterized by chemical analysis for the first time. The spectra of these complexes along with uranyl nitrate have been recorded at 293 K by using nujol mull technique. The force constants are evaluated by Wilson's FG matrix method and the effects of complexation on U-O force constants and bond distances in uranyl nitrate are discussed. (author)

  18. Chelation in metal intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Cao, yang;

    2015-01-01

    The present review provides an update of the general principles for the investigation and use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications by metals. The clinical use of the old chelators EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate) and BAL (2,3-dimercaptopropanol) is now limited due to the...... inconvenience of parenteral administration, their own toxicity and tendency to increase the neurotoxicity of several metals. The hydrophilic dithiol chelators DMSA (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) and DMPS (2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate) are less toxic and more efficient than BAL in the clinical treatment...... of heavy metal poisoning, and available as capsules for oral use. In copper overload, DMSA appears to be a potent antidote, although d-penicillamine is still widely used. In the chelation of iron, the thiols are inefficient, since iron has higher affinity for ligands with nitrogen and oxygen, but the...

  19. Ferrocene base metal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the works, devoted to different types of ferrocene metal chelates and to a possibility of ferrocene-containing ligand modification by means of complexing, is presented. Structure, properties and spectral characteristics of transitional metal, rare earth element, Cd2+, UO22+, Th4+ etc. complexes with ferrocene diketones, ferrocene acyl derivatives based on thiosemicarbazones and hydrazones and other heterometal ferrocene-containing metal chelates, are considered. 134 refs., 1 tab

  20. Chelating polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-01-22

    The present application offers a solution to the current problems associated with recovery and recycling of precious metals from scrap material, discard articles, and other items comprising one or more precious metals. The solution is premised on a microporous chelating polymeric membrane. Embodiments include, but are not limited to, microporous chelating polymeric membranes, device comprising the membranes, and methods of using and making the same.

  1. A propeller-like uranyl metallomesogen

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinaels, Thomas; Ramaekers, Jan; Guillon, Daniel; Donnio, Bertrand; Binnemans, Koen

    2005-01-01

    Uranyl triflate forms with three imidazo[4,5-f]-1,10-phenanthroline ligands a propeller-like complex that exhibits a hexagonal columnar phase. The ligand is not liquid-crystalline, but a mesophase is induced upon complex formation with the uranyl salt. The thermal behavior has been investigated by polarizing optical microscopy and by high-temperature X-ray diffraction. A model of the stacking of the molecules in the mesophase is proposed.

  2. New 111In labeling of IgG: 111In-oxine mediated chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current methods of 111In chelate conjugation labeling of antibodies expose the protein to pH 5-6 during 111In chelation. These conditions could be detrimental if the antibody is acid labile. We have successfully labeled human IgG via the cyclic anhydride of DPTA and 111In-oxyquinoline(oxine). Chelation was achieved at pH 6.9-8.4 and was complete within 1 min at room temperature. The chelation was sensitive to trace metal contamination on labware and in some reagents (including commercial 111In-oxine). (author)

  3. Synergistic extraction of uranyl ion with acylpyrazolones and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synergistic extraction of uranyl ion with acylpyrazolones such as 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-trifluoroacetylpyrazolone-5 (HPMTFP, pKa=2.7), 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-acetylpyrazolone (HPMAP, pKa=3.8) or 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoylpyrazolone-5 (HPMBP, pKa=4.2) in combination with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18-C6) was studied at various fixed temperatures. The results indicate that the equilibrium constants of the organic phase addition reaction, log Ks, at 30 deg C are almost constant for the above three systems. Thermodynamic data for chelate extraction with HPMTFP evaluated by the temperature coefficient method indicates that a hydrated chelate is extracted into the organic phase. (author) 19 refs.; 6 figs

  4. Comments on chelation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of actinide chelation is to decrease the risk from radiation-induced cancer. While occupational exposures in the past have mainly involved low specific activity 239Pu, future exposures will increasingly involve high specific activity plutonium, americium, and curium - all of which clear more rapidly from the lung. This will tend to shift the cancer risk from lung to bone and liver. Although therapy with Ca- or Zn-DTPA rapidly removes 241Am from the canine, the sub-human primate, and the human liver, improved methods for removal from bone and lung are needed. DTPA can remove 241Am more easily from the growing skeleton of a child than from the mature skeleton of an adult. Investigators at Karlsruhe are developing chelation agents for oral administration and are investigating the reduction in local dose to bone resulting from chelation therapy

  5. Thermochemical investigations on uranyl phosphates and arsenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are described of a study of the thermochemical stability of anhydrous uranyl phosphates and arsenates. A number of aspects of chemical technological importance are indicated in detail. The synthesized anhydrous uranyl phosphates and arsenates were very hygroscopic, so that experiments on these compounds had to be carried out under moisture-free conditions. Further characterisation of these compounds are given, including a study of their thermal stabilities and phase relations. The uranyl phosphates reduced reversibly at temperatures of the order of 1100 to 16000C. This makes it possible to express their relative stabilities quantitatively, in terms of the oxygen pressures of the reduction reactions. The thermal decomposition of uranyl arsenates did not occur by reduction, as for the phosphates, but by giving off arsenic oxide vapour. The results of measurements of enthalpies of solution led to the determination of the enthalpies of formation, heat capacity and the standard entropies of the uranyl arsenates. The thermochemical functions at high-temperatures could consequently be calculated. Attention is paid to the possible formation of uranium arsenates, whose uranium has a valency lower than six, hitherto not reported in literature. It was not possible to prepare arsenates of tetravalent uranium. However, three new compounds were observed, one of these, UAsO5, was studied in some detail. (Auth.)

  6. Denitration of Uranyl Nitrate Using Tridodecyl Amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate extraction from uranyl nitrate using extractant tridodecyl amine and paraffin has been carried out. The aim of this research was to prepare uranyl nitrate with low nitrate content (acid deficiency uranyl nitrate/ADUN). ADUN is a raw material for making kernels uranium oxide in a spherical from which cannot easily be broken/cracked. This ADUN was prepared by extracting nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution with tridodecyl amine (TDA) and paraffin. Nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution moved into organic phase due to the complex formation with TDA. The aqueous phase was ADUN, it was than analyzed its nitric and uranium contents using titration method. Tree variables were observed, i.e. uranium contents (80-125 g/l), process temperature (50-100 oC) and TDA/Nitrate molar ratio (0.5-1). Experiment results showed that optimum condition accurate at uranium content of 100 g/l, temperature extraction 60-70 oC and TDA to Nitrate molar ratio 0.75-0.80 with an efficiency of 77 %. (author)

  7. Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2011-03-07

    Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

  8. Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine has been studied in acetone-water medium in the presence of sulphuric acid at 346nm, 400nm and 434nm wavelengths. The photochemical reduction is of second order and increases with increase in hydrogen ion concentration. Absorption spectra of uranyl ion in acidic medium and uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine do not show any ground state complex formation. The value of quantum yield increases with the wavelength of the radiation increase from 346 to 434nm. Plots of reciprocal of quantum yield for the formation of U(IV) versus reciprocal [triphenylphosphine] are linear. Products characterized by UV and visible, IR and TLC show the formation of U(IV) and triphenylphosphine oxide. On the basis of above observations mechanism of the photochemical reduction has been proposed. (author)

  9. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Guan; Han Dai

    2009-01-01

    Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role o...

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Anita K. Gianotto; Michael E. McIlwain; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Michael Kullman; Travis J. Cooper; David T. Moore; Nick Polfer; Jos Oomens; Ivan Infante; Lucas Visscher; Bertrand Siboulet; Wibe A. de Jong

    2007-12-01

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments, FELIX, was used to study the wavelength-resolved multiphoton dissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO22+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The apparent uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide or acetate, S was water, ammonia, acetone or acetonitrile, and n = 0-2. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations using B3LYP predicted values that were 30 – 40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis set and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which resulted only very modest changes to the uranyl frequency, and did not universally shift values lower. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  11. Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2008-01-24

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30–40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30-40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity

  13. Physico-chemical study of new functionalized surfactants having thermo sensitive de-mixing behaviour: use in extraction of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New thermo-sensitive functionalized surfactants with metal-chelating properties have been developed and their physical-chemistry studied. They associate a polyethoxylated nonionic surfactant (CiEj) block and a amino-acid residue as a chelating group. Functionalization preserves both properties of the thermo-sensitive surfactant moiety and the chelating group, a diamide closed to uranyl ionophore.The complexing group participates to the polar head group of the surfactant, increasing the area per molecule. As a result, functionalized surfactants form spherical micelles when diluted in water, and the concentrated part of their phase diagrams exhibits structures having higher curvatures than the nonionic precursor CiEj. The structure of the uranyl - diamide complex has been elucidated by NMR and ESI-MS and is of the type UO2(NO3)2.L; the associated complexation constant, which is very low, has been evaluated by 1H NMR.A nitrate salt, LiNO3, is added at high concentration to improve complexation. The effect of this salt has been analyzed, and was found to be rather similar to the effect on classical CiEj. When uranyl nitrate complexation occurs, the cloud point decreases dramatically, together with the reduction of the area per head group at micelle/solution interface. This effect can be minimized by using a nonionic precursor having a larger polar head group. The functionalized surfactants have been tested in the cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate, and have proved their efficiency. Those results demonstrate the viability of the functionalized surfactants design, with a covalent link between a thermo-sensitive surfactant block and a chelating group. (author)

  14. Binding of uranyl by humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of tracer level UO2+2 to a soil humic acid was measured by a solvent extraction technique. The binding is interpreted as involving only the carboxylate groups of the humate and both 1:1 and 1:2 UO2+2:CO2-binding is observed. Estimates based on these values indicate that uranyl complexing by humic and/or fulvic materials is not significant in sea water but may play a role in fresh water systems. Retention of uranyl from ground water by soil humics would be strong. (author)

  15. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H3PO4, H2SO4, HCIO4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO2 (C6H5COO)3)- having D3h symmetry. (author)

  16. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs

  17. Adsorption equilibrium of uranium from seawater on chelating resin containing amide oxime group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelating resins containing amide oxime group were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization. The amount of the amide oxime groups was controlled below about 0.1 mol per kg of base polymer. The adsorption equilibrium of uranium from seawater on this resin was investigated. It was suggested that two neighboring amide oxime groups on the grafted chain captured one uranyl ion, and that single amide oxime ligand had little capacity for the adsorption of uranium. The adsorption equilibrium was correlated by a Langmuir-type equation. The content of neighboring amide oxime groups was 0.406 x 10-3 mol per kg of base polymer, which corresponded to 0.39 % of the total amount of amide oxime groups. The apparent stoichiometric stability constant for the complex of uranyl ion with the neighboring amide oxime groups in seawater was calculated to be 10-21.7. (author)

  18. Chelated minerals for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confusion when decision-making becomes necessary. Organic minerals include any mineral bound to organic compounds, regardless of the type of existing bond between mineral and organic molecules. Proteins and carbohydrates are the most frequent candidates in organic mineral combinations. Organic fraction size and bond type are not limitations in organic mineral definition; however, essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Mn can form coordinated bonds, which are stable in intestinal lumen. Metals bound to organic ligands by coordinated bonds can dissociate within animal metabolism whereas real covalent bonds cannot. Chelated minerals are molecules that have a metal bound to an organic ligand through coordinated bonds; but many organic minerals are not chelates or are not even bound through coordinated bonds. Utilization of organic minerals is largely dependent on the ligand; therefore, amino acids and other small molecules with facilitated access to the enterocyte are supposed to be better utilized by animals. Organic minerals with ligands presenting long chains may require digestion prior to absorption. After absorption, organic minerals may present physiological effects, which improve specific metabolic responses, such as the immune response. Many studies have demonstrated the benefits of metal-amino acid chelates on animal metabolism, but the detection positive effects on live performance is less consistent.

  19. The bare uranyl(2+) ion, UO22+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-molecule reactions between U2+ and oxygen donors or charge-stripping collisions between singly charged UO22 ions and O2 collision partners generate uranyl(2+) ions in the gas phase. These do not readily dissociate into singly charged fragments. The standard enthalpy of formation for UO22+ is estimated to be 371±60 kcal mol-1, in accord with the results of ab initio calculations. (orig.)

  20. Thermochemical investigations on uranyl phosphates and arsenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are described of a study of the thermochemical stability of anhydrous phosphates and arsenates. The results of phase studies deal with compound formation and characterization, coexisting phases and limiting physical or chemical properties. The uranyl phosphates evolve oxygen at higher temperatures and the arsenates lose arsenic oxide vapour. These phenomena give the possibility to describe their thermodynamic stabilities. Thus oxygen pressures of uranyl phosphates have been measured using a static, non-isothermal method. Having made available the pure anhydrous compounds in the course of this investigation, molar thermodynamic quantities have been measured as well. These include standard enthalpies of formation from solution calorimetry and high-temperature heat-capacity functions derived from enthalpy increments measured. Some attention is given to compounds with uranium in valencies lower than six which have been met during the investigation. An evaluation is made of the thermodynamics of the compounds studied, to result in tabulized high-temperature thermodynamic functions. Relative stabilities within the systems are discussed and comparisons of the uranyl phosphates and the arsenates are made. (Auth.)

  1. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core. PMID:18067253

  2. Densities concentrations of aqueous of uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio density-concentration of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions expressed as U3O8 grams/liter, U grams/liter and hexahydrate uranyl nitrate weight percent at different temperatures, are established. Experimental values are graphically correlated and compared whit some published data. (Author) 2 refs

  3. New insights into the acid mediated disproportionation of pentavalent uranyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougel, Victor; Biswas, Biplab; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, SCIB, UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF FRE 3200 CNRS, INAC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The reaction of benzoic acid with the uranyl(V) complex [(UO{sub 2}Py{sub 5})(KI{sub 2}Py{sub 2})] in pyridine leads to immediate disproportionation with formation of a hexa-nuclear U(IV) benzoate cluster, a bis-benzoate complex of uranyl(VI) and water. (authors)

  4. Efficacy of chelating agents for treatment of acute uranium intoxication in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelating agents (8102, 7601, 811, 7603, 8307, DTPA) were tested for treatment of acute uranium intoxication in rats. All phenolic chelating agents distinctively increased removal of uranium when they were injected immediately after intoxication of uranyl nitrate. 8102 was the best of them on removing uranium. After a single i.m. injection of 8102 at dose of 500 mg/kg, the excretion of uranium in the urine was 2.9 times higher than that for control, and the retention of uranium in kidneys was their 29%. When 8102 was administered 1 h before and up to 4 h after intoxication, it markedly increased the removal of uranium. When 8102 was administered to rats 1 h before intoxication, the histological lesion in kidneys was only a slight hydropic degeneration of the tubule epithelial cells. On the contrary, there wa a severe necrosis of the tubule epithelial cells in kidneys for controls

  5. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Rapid Screening of Uranyl Affine Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive immunoassay based on SPR analysis was developed to measure uranyl cation (UO22+) affinity for any protein in a free state under physiological conditions. The technique involves immobilization of a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against UO22+ and 1, 10-phenanthroline-2, 9-dicarboxylic acid (DCP) used as a probe of UO22+ captured by the mAb. Calibration curves were established for accurate determination of UO22+ concentrations with a detection limit of 7 nM. The remaining free UO22+ could be accurately quantified from the different protein-metal equilibrium and a dose-response curve established for KD determination. This generic method was applied not only to proteins such as transferrin and albumin but also to small phosphonated ligands. Its robustness allows the fast UO22+ KD determination of any kind of macromolecules and small ligands using very few amount of compounds, thus opening new prospects in the field of uranium toxicity. (authors)

  6. Pro-oxidative, genotoxic and cytotoxic properties of uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide are formed under the action of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions containing no reducing agents. In the presence of uranyl ions, formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA and long-lived protein radicals are observed in vitro. It is shown that the pro-oxidant properties of uranyl at micromolar concentrations mostly result from the physico-chemical nature of the compound rather than its radioactive decay. Uranyl ions lead to damage in DNA and proteins causing death of HEp-2 cells by necrotic pathway. It is revealed that the uranyl ions enhance radiation-induced oxidative stress and significantly increase a death rate of mice exposed to sublethal doses of X-rays

  7. Biomineralization of uraninite and uranyl phosphate controlled by organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomineralization of uraninite (UO2) and uranyl phosphate minerals are both able to decrease the mobility of uranium in the environment. We examined biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate by Shewanella putrefaciens in the basic medium containing lactate as an electron donor, β- glycerolphosphate as a phosphorous source, and uranyl nitrate in the absence and presence of weak or strong complexing organic acids (WCOA or SCOA) under an anaerobic condition. In the basic medium, only biomineralization of UO2 was observed because of rapid reduction of U(VI). Biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate occurred in the media with WCOA, however the no biomineralization was occurred in the presence of SCOA. It is thought that formation of stable U(VI)-, and U(IV)- organic complexes prevents the biomineralization. These finding suggest that coexisting organic acids control the biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate minerals by microorganisms. (author)

  8. Quantification of uranyl in presence of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the influence that has the organic matter of the soil on the uranyl sorption on some solids is necessary to have a detection technique and quantification of uranyl that it is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For that in this work, it intends to carry out the uranyl quantification in presence of citric acid modifying the Fluorescence induced by UV-Vis radiation technique. Since the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it, (speciation, pH, ionic forces, etc.) it was necessary to develop an analysis technique that stands out the fluorescence of uranyl ion avoiding the out one that produce the organic acids. (Author)

  9. Some aspects of chelation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notions used in chelation chemistry are defined and the possibilities of the experimental recognition of complex formation are described. A review of the quantitative aspects of chelation is given, especially under biological conditions. Some rules concerning the general behaviour of the various metal ions and the organic ligands in chelation phenomena are presented and the specificity problem is discussed. The present status of the decontamination of the main fission products, e.g. rare-earth metals and strontium, with the aid of complexing agents is analysed from a chemical point of view. (author)

  10. The Scientific Basis for Chelation: Animal Studies and Lead Chelation

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Donald; Strupp, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation summarizes several of the rodent and non-human studies that we have conducted to help inform the efficacy and clinical utility of succimer (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccincinic acid) chelation treatment. We address the following questions: (1) What is the extent of body lead, and in particular brain lead reduction with chelation, and do reductions in blood lead accurately reflect reductions in brain lead? (2) Can succimer treatment alleviate the neurobehavioral impacts of lead poi...

  11. Uranyl photofootprinting of triple helical DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, P E

    1992-01-01

    Two triple helix structures (15-mers containing only T.A-T triplets or containing mixed T.A-T and C.G-C triplets) have been studied by uranyl mediated DNA photocleavage to probe the accessibility of the phosphates of the DNA backbone. Whereas the phosphates of the pyrimidine strand are at least as accessible as in double stranded DNA, in the phosphates of the purine strand are partly shielded and more so at the 5'-end of the strand. With the homo A/T target increased cleavage is observed towa...

  12. Preparation and characterization of a volatile uranyl compound, Bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)dioxouranium-tetrahydrofuran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A volatile uranyl compound UO2[(CF3CO)2CH]2.THF with a vapor pressure of 0.7 torr at 1000C has been prepared. The compound has high thermal stability and is suitable for studies of laser-induced isotope separation. The compound has been characterized by its IR, UV, NMR, fluorescence, and mass spectra and other physical and chemical properties including an X-ray structural determination. The molecule contains a linear uranyl ion equatorially surrounded by a pentagon of oxygen atoms. The chelating anions are tilted slightly in a boatlike configuration from this plane. The crystals are monoclinic,P2/sub 1/c, with a = 8.540 (3) A, b = 9.110 (4) A, c = 28.884 (11) A, β = 94.26 (3)0, and Z = 4

  13. Electronic structure and properties of uranyl compounds. Quasi-relativistic calculation of uranyl by the MO LCAO method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix elements of non-relativiitic secular equation of MO LCAO method of uranyl and the means to correct molecular integrals included in them, taking account of relativistic effects, are described. In the bais 7ssub(1/2), 6dsub(5/2), 6dsub(3/2), 5fsub(7/2), 5fsub(5/2), 6psub(3/2), 6psub(1/2), 6ssub(1/2)-AO of uranium and 2ssub(1/2), 2psub(1/2), and 2psub(3/2)-AO of of oxygen the calculations of quasirelativistic MO of uranyl and clusters, modelling real compounds of uranyl, are made. On the basis of analysis of the chemical bonding nature a conclusion is drawn that in uranyl the contribution of internal 6p-AO of uranium into population of OUO bonds can reach 40% of total population of uranyl MO

  14. Production and chelation properties of Lu-177, the isotope suitable for nuclear medicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutetium-177 is one of the most favoured radionuclides for radiotherapeutic applications due to its suitable nuclear characteristics. It has been mainly used in three areas: labelling of biomolecules (i.e., somatostatine analogues and monoclonal antibodies), palliative therapy of bone skeletal metastases, and radiation synovectomy. At present, Lu- labelled chelates with aminocarboxylates, like a DOTA or DTPA have been deeply investigated from the point of view of chelation properties. This research has been targeted on finding the optimal conditions of chelation to obtain high yields of chelates and on monitoring their kinetic stability, depending on particular factors (i.e., pH, molar ratios metal: ligand or duration of the reaction). The Lu-DTPA and Lu-DOTA chelates were prepared and detected radiochromatographically by TLC. For this purpose ITLC SG plates were used as a solid phase, and a mixture of hydroxylamine:methanol:water (0.2:2:4) was used as a liquid phase. (author)

  15. Overview of current chelation practices

    OpenAIRE

    Aydinok, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Deferoxamine (DFO) is reference standard therapy for transfusional iron overload since the 1980s. Although it is a highly effective iron chelator, the compliance problem to subcutaneous administration of DFO remains as the major problem. The oral chelator Deferiprone (DFP) has no marketing licence in North America, however, it has been licensed in India since 1994 and the European Union (EU) granted marketing approval for DFP in 1999, specifically for patients with thalassemia major when DFO ...

  16. Bifunctional Chelates for Metal Nuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    The use of “non-standard” metallic radionuclides continues to be an expanding field of investigation. Radiolabeling small molecules, peptides, proteins, and up to nano-particles are all areas of active investigation for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. All require a common variable – the need for appropriate chelation chemistry for adequate sequestration of the metallic radionuclide that is equal to the intended application. A brief overview of the array of the chelation chemistr...

  17. Alarming use of chelation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Crisponi, Guido; Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Lachowicz, Joanna I.; Crespo-Alonso, Miriam; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Peana, Massimiliano Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Chelation therapy is a consolidated medical procedure used primarily to hinder the effects of toxic metal ions on human tissues. Its application spans a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from acute metal intoxication to genetic metal-overload. The use of chelating agents is compromised by a number of serious side effects, mainly attributable to perturbed equilibrium of essential metal ion homeostasis and dislocation of complexed metal ions to dangerous body sites. For this reason, chelatio...

  18. Structure and spectroscopy of uranyl salicylaldiminate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamasi, A.L.; Barnes, C.L.; Walensky, J.R. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of uranyl complexes coordinated to tridentate, monoanionic salicylaldiminate (Schiff base) ligands was achieved by the reaction of UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, 1, with one equivalent of the corresponding sodium salicylaldiminate salts affording [(C{sub 9}H{sub 6}N)N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 2, [(NC{sub 5}H{sub 4})N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 3, and [(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SCH{sub 3})N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 4. These are uncommon examples of uranyl complexes with a monoanionic ancillary ligand to stabilize the coordination sphere and one chloride ligand. Compounds 2-4 have been characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy as well as IR and UVVis spectroscopy and their structures determined by X-ray crystallography. (orig.)

  19. Cement encapsulation of uranyl nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During decontamination of the former nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at West Valley, New York, low-level radioactive waste streams are being identified which require disposal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One such waste stream, consisting essentially of uranyl nitrate, has been located in one of the processing cells. A study was conducted on this waste stream to determine if it could be stably encapsulated in cement. First, a recipe was developed for cement-encapsulating this highly acidic waste. Samples were then made to perform waste qualification testing as described in the NRC Branch Technical Position-Waste Form to determine the stability of this waste form. The testing showed that the waste form had a compressive strength much greater than the 345 kPA (50 psi) minimum guideline after room-temperature cure, irradiation, thermal cycling, immersion, and biodegradation. In addition, the encapsulated waste had uranium and cerium leachability index values greater than six, which is the minimum recommended by the NRC position paper. The cement-encapsulated uranyl nitrate waste thus met the NRC stability guidelines for the disposal of Class B and Class C radioactive wastes

  20. Method of producing weakly acidic cation exchange resin particles charged with uranyl ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelmonem, N.; Ringel, H.; Zimmer, E.

    1981-07-21

    Weakly acidic cationic ion exchange resin particles are charged with uranyl ions by contacting the particles step wise with aqueous uranyl nitrate solution at higher uranium concentrations from stage to stage. An alkaline medium is added to the uranyl nitrate solution in each stage to increase the successive pH values of the uranyl nitrate solution contacting the particles in dependence upon the uranium concentration effective for maximum charging of the particles with uranyl ions.

  1. [Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105, Au-199, and other metallic radionuclides as potential radiotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress during this period is reported under the following headings: Diethylenetriamine based and related bifunctional chelating agents and their complexation with Rh-105, Au-198, Pd-109, cu-67, In-111, and Co-57; studies of Pd-109, Rh-105 and Tc-99m with bifunctional chelates based on phenylenediamine; establishment of an appropriate protein assay method for conjugated proteins; studies of new bifunctional Bi, Tri and tetradentate amine oxime ligands with Rh-105; IgG and antibody B72.3 conjugation studies by HPLC Techniques with bifunctional metal chelates; and progress on ligand systems for Au(III)

  2. [Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105, Au-199, and other metallic radionuclides as potential radiotherapeutic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Progress during this period is reported under the following headings: Diethylenetriamine based and related bifunctional chelating agents and their complexation with Rh-105, Au-198, Pd-109, cu-67, In-111, and Co-57; studies of Pd-109, Rh-105 and Tc-99m with bifunctional chelates based on phenylenediamine; establishment of an appropriate protein assay method for conjugated proteins; studies of new bifunctional Bi, Tri and tetradentate amine oxime ligands with Rh-105; IgG and antibody B72.3 conjugation studies by HPLC Techniques with bifunctional metal chelates; and progress on ligand systems for Au(III).

  3. (Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105, Au-199, and other metallic radionuclides as potential radiotherapeutic agents)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Progress during this period is reported under the following headings: Diethylenetriamine based and related bifunctional chelating agents and their complexation with Rh-105, Au-198, Pd-109, cu-67, In-111, and Co-57; studies of Pd-109, Rh-105 and Tc-99m with bifunctional chelates based on phenylenediamine; establishment of an appropriate protein assay method for conjugated proteins; studies of new bifunctional Bi, Tri and tetradentate amine oxime ligands with Rh-105; IgG and antibody B72.3 conjugation studies by HPLC Techniques with bifunctional metal chelates; and progress on ligand systems for Au(III).

  4. Production of chelating agents by Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in the presence of thorium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelating agents produced by microorganisms enhance the dissolution of iron increasing the mobility and bioavailability of the metal. Since some similarities exist in the biological behavior of ferric, thorium and uranyl ions, microorganisms resistant to these metals and which grow in their presence may produce sequestering agents of Th and U, and other metals in a manner similar to the complexation of iron by siderophores. The ability of P. aeruginosa to elaborate sequestering agents in medium containing thorium or uranium salts was tested. Uranium has a stronger inhibitory effect on growth of the organism than thorium at similar concentrations. Analyses of the culture media have shown, that relative to the control, and under the experimental conditions used, the microorganisms have produced several new chelating agents for thorium and uranium. Extracts containing these chelating agents have been tested for their decorporation potential. In vitro mouse liver bioassay and in vivo mouse toxicity tests indicate that their efficiency is comparable to DTPA and DFOA and that they are virtually non-toxic to mice. The bacterially produced compounds resemble, but are not identical to the known iron chelating siderophores isolated from microorganisms. Some of their chemical properties are also discussed. (author)

  5. Flotation of uranyl ions by alkylcarboxylic acid salts of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical and chemical features of uranyl cation flotation by potassium salts of fatty acids from diluted solutions are presented. Maximum degree of uranyl flotation is shown to occur in the range of pH=5-6 which corresponds to flotoactive forms of UO22+(OH)+ and to the form of collector as RCOO-. Efficiency of collector first increases with the length of hydrocarbon radical (due to decreasing sublate solubility) and then declines (due to increasing electrokinetic potential). Increase of the temperature of solutions leads to an increase in sublate solubility and to a decrease in the extent of uranyl flotation. 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Catalytic hydrogenation of uranyl nitrate - engineering scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranous nitrate is employed as partitioning agent for the separation of plutonium from uranium in PUREX process, the conventional process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It is currently produced from uranyl nitrate solution by the electrochemical route. Since the conversion is only 50%, an innovative method based on catalytic hydrogenation has been developed. Parametric studies have been carried out on 5 L scale using natural uranyl nitrate solution as fed. Based on these studies, number of runs were carried out on engineering scale using contaminated uranyl nitrate solution. More than 100 kg of uranous nitrate has been made. Performance of the reduction process is described in detail. (author)

  7. METHOD OF INHIBITING CORROSION IN URANYL SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlmann, E.G.; Griess, J.C. Jr.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for treating a uranyl sulfate solution to inhibit the corrosiveness of the solution and elevate the phase separation temperature of the solution. Lithium sulfate is added to the solution in an amount ranging from 0.25 to 1.3 times the uranyl sulfate concentration. The corrosiveness of the solution with respect to stainless steel is substantially decreased by this means. This treatment also serves to raise the phase separation temperature of the solution (above 250 deg C), at which time the uranyl sulfate solution separates into two liquid phases of unequal uranium concentration and thus becomes unsuitable as nuclear reactor fuel.

  8. Complexes of uranyl chloride and uranyl nitrate with neutral oxygen-containing bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions of complex preparation from uranyl chloride and nitrate crystallohydrates with various neutral organic bases, such as dimethyl sulfoxide, diethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, acetone, diethyl ether are studied. It is shown that the composition of the products formed depends on organic molecule basicity: with its increase neutral ligand is able to replace water from uranyl crystallohydrate. Absorption frequencies ν(UO22+) and ν(X=0), responsible for the complexing, are analyzed. It is shown that the values ν3(UO22+) do not manifest linear dependence on donor ability of organic base. Thermal stability of the products prepared is studied. Complexes of the composition UO2X2x2L are shown to decompose in two stages with splitting off of organic base molecule and destruction of monosolvate. Increase in the temperatures of the above- mentioned processes with an increase in the base donor ability is detected

  9. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss. PMID:25906363

  10. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  11. Solid solutions of hydrogen uranyl phosphate and hydrogen uranyl arsenate. A family of luminescent, lamellar hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate, HUO2PO4 x 4H2O (HUP), and hydrogen uranyl arsenate, HUO2AsO4 x 4H2O (HUAs), form solid solutions of composition HUO2(PO4)1-x(AsO4)x (HUPAs), representing a family of lamellar, luminescent solids that can serve as hosts for intercalation chemistry. The solids are prepared by aqueous precipitation reactions from uranyl nitrate and mixtures of phosphoric and arsenic acids; thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the phases are tetrahydrates, like HUP and HUAs. Powder x-ray diffraction data reveal the HUPAs solids to be single phases whose lattice constants increase with X, in rough accord with Vegard's law Spectral shifts observed for the HUPAs samples. Emission from the solids is efficient (quantum yields of ∼ 0.2) and long-lived (lifetimes of ∼ 150 μs), although the measured values are uniformly smaller than those of HUP and HUAs; unimolecular radiative and nonradiative rate constants for excited-state decay of ∼ 1500 and 5000 s-1, respectively, have been calculated for the compounds. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Thermal decomposition of ammonium diuranate, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and uranyl peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of three types of starting powder had been investigated during their thermal decomposition processes in nitrogen, air, and hydrogen. The powder types were the products of uranyl nitrate precipitation, i.e. ADU (ammonium diuranate), UNH (uranyl nitrate hexahydrate), and UPO (uranyl peroxide). The objective of the investigation was to find out the best atmosphere that would result in good quality powder in a thermal decomposition process with the lowest temperature and the shortest period of time in order to reduce the cost of UO2 powder preparation. Before the thermal decomposition process was initiated, all powder types were characterized for their crystal structures. The investigation was conducted by TG-DTA instrument at temperature up to 800°C and the heating rate of 10°C/minute. The crystal structures were identified by X-Ray Diffractometer with Cu-Ka radiation. The specific surface area of the powder was also observed using BET method, especially for the powder that underwent the process in hydrogen heated up to 800°C. The Results showed that the process took place faster in hydrogen, and UNH required lower thermal decomposition temperature in relations with other types of powder. (author)

  13. Recycling of uranyl from contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many separation processes are related to the behavior of ions close to charged surfaces. In this work, we examine uranyl ions, which can be considered as rod-like molecular ions with a spatially distributed charge, embedded in a system of like charged surfaces. The analysis of the system is based on an approximate field theory which is accurate from the weak to the strong electrostatic coupling regimes. The numerical results show that close to the charged surface the ions are oriented parallel to the surface, whereas at distances greater than half of the ion length, they are randomly oriented. Due to the restriction of the orientational degrees of freedom, the density of ions at the charged surface decreases to zero. For large surface charge densities, the force between like charged surfaces becomes attractive, as a result of charge correlations. The theoretical results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation results. (authors)

  14. Adsorption isotherm of uranyl ions by fish scales of corvina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish scale is by-product of fishery. The scales are mainly formed by hydroxyapatite and collagen forming a kind of natural composite with a large specific surface area that intensifies the adsorption process. In this paper the potential of adsorption of scales of Corvina fish for uranyl ions from nitric solutions was studied. The scales were washed several times with faucet water, sun-dried, triturated and sieved. Equilibrium and kinetic studies in adsorption of uranyl ions in batch systems were carried out at room temperature. Equilibrium time was reached at 5 min for 0.1 g L-1 uranyl solution with removal efficiency over 82%, and at 1 min of contact was observed about 60% of removal. The equilibrium isotherm was obtained and the Langmuir model fitted best. These preliminary results are very promising, showing great perspectives of application of the fish scales as biosorbent for uranyl ions in radioactive wastewater treatment processes with a sustainable technology. (author)

  15. Electroreduction of uranyl ion in aqueous calcium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electroreduction of uranyl ions in buffered and unbuffered 0.5 M calcium nitrate has been studied using polarography, cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry. The results are compared with those in molten calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. (author)

  16. Adsorption isotherm of uranyl ions by fish scales of corvina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Caroline Hastenreiter; Santos, Bruno Zolotareff dos; Yamamura, Amanda Pongeluppe Gualberto; Yamaura, Mitiko, E-mail: hc.caroline@gmail.co, E-mail: bzsantos@gmail.co, E-mail: amandaifusp@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: myamaura@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Fish scale is by-product of fishery. The scales are mainly formed by hydroxyapatite and collagen forming a kind of natural composite with a large specific surface area that intensifies the adsorption process. In this paper the potential of adsorption of scales of Corvina fish for uranyl ions from nitric solutions was studied. The scales were washed several times with faucet water, sun-dried, triturated and sieved. Equilibrium and kinetic studies in adsorption of uranyl ions in batch systems were carried out at room temperature. Equilibrium time was reached at 5 min for 0.1 g L{sup -1} uranyl solution with removal efficiency over 82%, and at 1 min of contact was observed about 60% of removal. The equilibrium isotherm was obtained and the Langmuir model fitted best. These preliminary results are very promising, showing great perspectives of application of the fish scales as biosorbent for uranyl ions in radioactive wastewater treatment processes with a sustainable technology. (author)

  17. Complexation of the uranyl ion with aquatic humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation of the uranyl(VI) ion with aquatic humic acid from Gorleben groundwater (Gohy-573) is studied in 0.1 M NaClO4 at pH 4 under argon atmosphere. The concentration range investigated is from 1 x 10-7 to 1 x 10-5 mol/l for the uranyl ion and from 1 x 10-6 to 1.12 x 10-5 mol/l for the humic acid. Three different experimental methods are applied to separate the uncomplexed uranyl ion from the uranyl humate complex, using differences of the two species in size by ultrafiltration at the pore size of about 1 nm, in charge by anion exchange separation and in spectroscopic properties by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). No reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is observed in the course of the humate complexation process. The experimental results confirm that the prevailing complexation reaction is charge neutralization of the UO2+2 ion with two proton exchanging sites of humic acid. At pH 4 in 0.1 M NaClO4, where the hydrolysis of the uranyl ion appears negligible, the fraction of proton exchanging sites of the humic acid that can be occupied by the uranyl ion (called the loading capacity (LC) of the uranyl ion) is determined to be 0.185±0.003. The complexation constant evaluated by taking the loading capacity into account is found to be logβ = 6.16±0.13, which is a grand average of all values determined by the three experimental procedures under consideration. This value is valid for the humate complexation of the non-hydrolyzed uranyl ion, being independent of pH and ionic strength. (orig.)

  18. Some thermodynamic characteristics of uranyl haloacetates and their crystal hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on values of standard formation enthalpies for some uranyl carboxylates, acetates, chloroacetates, trichloroacetates and trifluoroacetates, their crystal hydrates and respective acids and their anions in gaseous state are presented. Thermochemical cycle is suggested, and calculation for lattice enthalpies of mentioned uranyl carboxylates is made. Errors of key and obtained values are discussed. It is shown, that the basic contribution into lattice enthalpies changing in the series considered is determined by anion electrodonor ability changing

  19. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  20. EXAFS Study of Uranyl Complexation at Pseudomonas fluorescens Cell Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, R.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the roles of microbial biomass as a sink and source for uranium in contaminated aquifers, nor of the impact of bacterial biochemistry on uranium speciation in the subsurface. A significant role is implied by the high affinities of both Gram positive and Gram negative cells for binding uranyl (UO2{ 2+}). In the present study, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to identify membrane functional groups involved in uranyl binding to the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens from pH 3 to pH 8. Throughout this pH-range, EXAFS spectra can be described primarily in terms of coordination of carboxylic groups to uranyl. U-C distances characteristic of 4-, 5- and 8- membered rings were observed, as well as the possibility of phosphato groups. Both shell-by-shell fits and principle component analyses indicate that the functional groups involved in binding of uranyl to the cell surface do not vary systematically across the pH range investigated. This result contrasts with EXAFS results of uranyl sorbed to Gram positive bacteria, and suggests an important role for long-chain carboxylate-terminated membrane functional groups in binding uranyl.

  1. Overview of current chelation practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Aydinok

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Deferoxamine (DFO is reference standard therapy for transfusional iron overload since the 1980s. Although it is a highly effective iron chelator, the compliance problem to subcutaneous administration of DFO remains as the major problem. The oral chelator Deferiprone (DFP has no marketing licence in North America, however, it has been licensed in India since 1994 and the European Union (EU granted marketing approval for DFP in 1999, specifically for patients with thalassemia major when DFO is inadequate, intolerable or unacceptable. There are still limited data available on the use of DFP in children between 6 and 10 years of age, and no data on DFP use in children under 6 years of age. Subsequently the oral chelator Deferasirox (DFX was approved by FDA and EMA for the treatment of patients with transfusional iron overload -older than 2 years of age- as first line therapy, in 2005 and 2006 respectively. The primary objective of iron chelation is to maintain body iron at safe levels at all times but once iron is accumulated, the objective of iron chelation is to reduce tissue iron to safe levels which is a slow process. The chelation regimen, dose and frequency of administration, of the chelator(s are mainly determined based on body iron burden, presence of myocardial iron and the transfusional iron loading rate. A proper monitoring of chelation is of importance for measuring the response rate to a particular regimen and providing dose adjustments to enhance chelation efficacy and to avoid toxicity. Efficacy of a chelation regimen may exhibit individual variability resulting from factors such as absorbtion and metabolism of the chelator. Tolerability and compliance are also individual variables effecting the response to chelation. Understanding of advantages and limitations of chelators, accurately determining chelation needs of patients with iron overload and designing individualized chelation regimens with less toxicity but optimum efficacy

  2. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey J. Weigel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen.

  3. Synthesis and complexation properties towards uranyl cation of carboxylic acid derivatives of p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the fuel reprocessing plants radioactive metals, and more particularly, uranium in UO22+ form in the various installations, have many varied physico-chemical forms and there is a risk of exposure and internal contamination in the nuclear industry. It is necessary to exert a medical control to ensure the protection of the health of the workers. This medical control is done by dosing uranyl cation in the urine of the exposed people. This work forms part of this context. Indeed, we prepared a ligand able to complex the ion uranyl and which is also to be grafted on a solid support. In the family of calixarenes, the calix[6]arenes functionalized by three or four carboxylic functions were selected like chelating molecules of the ion uranyl. The properties of complexation of these calixarenes were studied by potentiometry in methanol, under these conditions balances of protonation and complexation were determined and the constant partners were obtained using the Hyperquad program. We synthesized tri-carboxylic calix[6]arenes comprising of the groupings nitro (NO2) in para position of phenol in order to see the influence of a substitution in para position on the complexation. We also synthesized calix[6]arenes tetra-carboxylic in order to show the role of an additional carboxylic acid grouping. The potentiometric study determined thermodynamic parameters of protonation and complexation of carboxylic calix[6]arenes. The results of the complexation highlighted which complex UO2L corresponding to the ligand para-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene tetra-acid is more stable than that corresponding to the ligand mono-nitro calix[6]arene tri-acid (ΔlogΒ110 = 4.3), and than the effect of the groupings nitro in para position has low influence on the complexation of UO22+. This makes it possible to consider as possible the grafting of the calix[6]arenes which one knows the behaviour of trapping. To this end we synthesized the ligand 23. (author)

  4. Advances in 99mTc-labeling of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods have been developed to label antibodies with 99mTc. Direct labeling results in 99mTc binding to multiple sites of various affinities that are often weaker than the binding to strong chelating agents. Attempts to overcome this disadvantage involve conjugation of strong chelating agents to the antibodies. While stability is usually enhanced, this approach suffers from alteration of antibody properties as well as non-specific binding of 99mTc to the antibody instead of to the conjugation chelating agent. This has been of concern for studies with DTPA as the chelating agent. In this study the loss of 99mTc by N2S2 challenge shows that a fraction to the 99mTc is nonspecifically bound to the antibody. An advantage of the approach of labeling antibodies containing a bifunctional chelating agent is the simplicity of the labeling procedure and the apparent high yields that in reality are the sum of chelating agent and non-specifically bound radioactivity. The last approach described in our work of conjugation of a preformed chelate has advantages of characterizable 99mTc complex chemistry and conjugation by standard protein derivatization chemistry. Slow chelation kinetics can be overcome in the small molecule stage and then conjugation performed under mild conditions with respect to the antibody of fragments. This approach, however, suffers from greater complexity of the labeling process including multiple steps, purifications and non-quantitative yields. The use of ligands for 99mTc in which the complexes are of high stability and predictable chemistry is likely to result in eventual optimal labeling technologies. Processes which are non-specific may work in some cases, but are likely to present difficulties in optimization and general applicability from antibody to antibody. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of renal function following administration of ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-biphosphonate (EHBP) in animals submitted to oral intoxication with uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workers involved in the processes of extraction, purification and manufacture of uranium of nuclear plants are occupationally exposed to both natural and enriched uranium. Several chelating agents (TIRON, EDTA, BAI, etc.) have been tested in terms of their capacity to sequester uranium before it reaches its target organs. Our laboratory has studied a first generation biphosphonate, ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-biphosphonate (EHBP). We have shown that treatment with EHBP induces survival rates of 75% and 100% in adult and suckling rats respectively intoxicated with an intraperitoneal injection of uranyl nitrate. There are no data available to date on the renal function following treatment with EBHP to counteract the toxic effects of an oral lethal dose of uranyl nitrate. The aim of the present study was to assay creatininemia and uremia as end-points to assess renal function. The results obtained reveal that the alterations in renal function induced by oral uranyl nitrate intoxication can be reduced at 48 hours and reverted at 14 days by subcutaneous or oral administration of EHBP. (author)

  6. Serum stability of 67Cu chelates: comparison with 111In and 57Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple chelates and chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies labeled with 111In, 57Co and 67Cu demonstrate marked differences in stability when exposed to a serum environment. Among these radiometals, on DTPA, the order of stability is 111In > 57Co >> 67Cu. On benzyl-EDTA, the order of stability is 111In approx. 57Co >> 67Cu. Among those investigated, the only serum stable 67Cu chelate found was 67>Cu-TETA. The order of stability observed for 57Co vs 67Cu is contrary to published equilibrium constants. These in vitro studies suggest that the in vivo behavior of metal chelates exposed to a complex molecular environment may not be predicted by classically determined equilibrium constants. (author)

  7. Imaging tumors with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a metallic radionuclide, either directly bound to a monoclonal antibody, or to a chelating agent (such as di-ethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)) conjugated to the antibody, a tumor can be traced rapidly and with high specificity. The labelled antibody is injected into the host. In some cases, a localization of distant metastases is possible, giving an indication of tumor spreading. Detection occurs by photoscanning. (Auth.)

  8. Complex formation reactions of uranyl(VI) with neutral N-donors in dimethyl sulfoxide. Influence of small amounts of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative information about the existence and thermodynamic stability of uranyl(VI) ion complexes based solely upon nitrogen coordination has been obtained in the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide. Calorimetric, potentiometric, and FT-IR investigations, under controlled anhydrous conditions, show that the uranyl(VI) ion can form both mono and bis chelates with the ethylenediamine ligand and only a mono chelate of rather low stability with propylenediamine. With the monodentate ligand n-butylamine only a very weak metal-ligand interaction has been detected. The stability constants and the enthalpy and entropy changes have been calculated for the identified coordinated species. All data refer to 25.0 degree C and a tetraethylammonium perchlorate medium of ionic strength 0.1 M. All the complexes are enthalpy stabilized whereas the entropy contributions oppose the complex formation. Calorimetric and FT-IR measurements carried out to investigate the effects of small amounts of water present show that a very low water concentration, comparable to that of the coordinating metal ion, can give rise to hydrolysis reactions that may compete with complex formation. This is due to the combined action of different factors that are discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  9. Solid state and aqueous behavior of uranyl peroxide cage clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Kristi Lynn

    Uranyl peroxide cage clusters include a large family of more than 50 published clusters of a variety of sizes, which can incorporate various ligands including pyrophosphate and oxalate. Previous studies have reported that uranyl clusters can be used as a method to separate uranium from a solid matrix, with potential applications in reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Because of the potential applications of these novel structures in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle and their likely presence in areas of contamination, it is important to understand their behavior in both solid state and aqueous systems, including complex environments where other ions are present. In this thesis, I examine the aqueous behavior of U24Pp 12, as well as aqueous cluster systems with added mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. The resulting solutions were analyzed using dynamic light scattering and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering to evaluate the species in solution. Precipitates of these systems were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses demonstrate the importance of cation size, charge, and concentration of added cations on the aqueous behavior of uranium macroions. Specifically, aggregates of various sizes and shapes form rapidly upon addition of cations, and in some cases these aggregates appear to precipitate into an X-ray amorphous material that still contains U24Pp12 clusters. In addition, I probe aggregation of U24Pp12 and U60, another uranyl peroxide cage cluster, in mixed solvent water-alcohol systems. The aggregation of uranyl clusters in water-alcohol systems is a result of hydrogen bonding with polar organic molecules and the reduction of the dielectric constant of the system. Studies of aggregation of uranyl clusters also allow for comparison between the newer uranyl polyoxometalate family and century-old transition metal polyoxometalates. To complement the solution studies of uranyl

  10. Some thermodynamic characteristics of uranyl benzenesulfonate and uranyl p-toluenesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enthalpy of dissolution of the anhydrous and hydrated salts in 4 M hydrochloric acid was determined. Based on experimental and published data, the enthalpy of water addition to the anhydrous salts and lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulfonate (UPTS) was evaluated. The enthalpy of addition of a water molecule to UPTS monohydrate was found to be approximately two times lower than in the case of UPTS trihydrate. This is in a good agreement with published data on formation of fairly stable coarse crystals of UPTS pentahydrate in slow crystallization in air. We did not find any published data on the standard enthalpy of formation of the sulfonate ions. However, according to the presented thermo-chemical cycles, from the experimental data we can evaluated the enthalpies of formation of sulfonates from the components, i.e. from amorphous uranium trioxide and aqueous solutions of benzenesulfonic and p-toluenesulfonic acids. It was shown that considering all approximations used in the evaluation, the enthalpy of formation of UPTS is by approximately 20 kJ.mole-1 more negative than in the case of uranyl benzenesulfonate. Along with thermochemical characteristics of hydrates, this allows us to conclude that electron-donor power of p-toluenesulfonate ion is noticeably greater than that of the benzenesulfonate ion, which is responsible for the differences in the characteristics of these salts

  11. Synthesis and some physicochemical characteristics of uranyl benzenesulphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Krylov, S.G.; Suglobova, I.G.; Taranov, A.P.

    1984-11-01

    Crystallohydrate of uranyl benzenesulfonate has been synthesized by the interaction of stoichiometric quantities of UO/sub 3/ with benzene sulphonic acid. The prepared fine crystalline light yellow color powder has the UO/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/S/sub 3/)/sub 2/xH/sub 2/O composition and 73.3 mass% solubility in water at 25 deg C. The salt DT. curve has an intensive endoeffect at 215 deg C which corresponds to the dehydration process and two exo-effects at 350 and 390 deg C corresponding to ion-sulfanate decomposition. The IR-spectra analysis has shown that benzine sulfonate-ion binds two uranyl groupings of the UO/sub 2/-O-S-O-UO/sub 2/ type by two oxygen atoms. The third oxygen atom of the sulfonate group forms stable hydrogen bonds with a water molecule coordinated to uranyl. The uranyl coordination number in the crystallohydrate is 5. The anhydrous uranyl benzene sulfonate is prepared by monohydrate vacuum dehydration at a 1 to 2 Pa pressure, 130 to 150 deg C temperature during 15 h.

  12. Synthesis and some physicochemical characteristics of uranyl benzenesulphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallohydrate of uranyl benzenesulfonate has been synthesized by the interaction of stoichiometric qulntities of UO3 with benzene sulphonic acid. The prepared f1ne crystalline light yellow color powder has the UO2(C6H5S3)2xH2O composition and 73.3 mass% solubility in water at 25 deg C. The salt DT. curve has an intensive endoeffect at 215 deg C which corresponds to the dehydration process and two exo-effects at 350 and 390 deg C corresponding to ion-sulfanate decomposition. The IR-spectra analysis has shown that benzine sulfonate-ion binds two uranyl groupings of the UO2-O-S-O-UO2 type by two oxygen atoms. The third oxygen atom of the sulfonate group forms stable hydrogen bonds with a water molecule coordinated to uranyl. The uranyl coordination number in the crystallohydrate is 5. The anhydrous uranyl benzene Sulfonate is prepared by monohydrate vacuum dehydration at a 1 to 2 Pa pressure, 130 to 150 deg C temperature during 15 h

  13. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halada Gary P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization.

  14. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvin, Paul R. (Berkeley, CA); Hearst, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  15. Development of chelate tagging method of protein at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed at development of a protein labelling method at a low temperature, available for functional proteins, such as antibodies and enzymes mostly unstable at high temperatures. A solution of anti-mouse IgG antibody added with EDTA was incubated with 51CrCl3 at 4degC for 24 hours. After stopping the reaction with 100-fold amount of EDTA-2Na, the solution was fractionated into antibody fraction and metal fraction by HPLC. After incubation, non-specific Cr adsorption on the antibody in no relation to the chelate reagent was chased with 10-fold amount of CrCl3. To remove free Cr, the sample solution was incubated with 10 to 50-fold ICB-EDTA solution containing N,N-dimethyl-formamide. Then, the amount of Cr-labelling on the antibody was determined. In Western-blotting, chick actin was applied onto SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One part of the lane was stained with brilliant-blue and the other was transferred on nitrocellulose membrane by semi-dry method and stained with panceau-S. Anti-actin monoclonal antibody and anti-mouse IgG antibody were used as the first antibody and the second one, respectively. When incubated with ICB-EDTA for 3 days, labelling reached the maximum level. Although labelling of the second antibody was performed with maleimido-C3-benzyl EDTA and 45Ca as a substitute for 51Cr, the rate of labelling was lower than the rate for a combination of ICB-EDTA and 51Cr. Autoradiography of the anti-mouse IgG preparation after SDS-acrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that radioactivity was detected on the site of H-chain but not L-chain. This indicates that 51Cr labelling of protein is stable even under the conditions of SDS denaturation. (M.N.)

  16. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  17. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsey J. Weigel; Sharon G. Lynch; Steven M. LeVine

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis) patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular prote...

  18. Some Linguistic Detail on Chelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Daniel T.

    1998-01-01

    The term chelate was first applied by Morgan and Drew in 1920 to describe the heterocyclic rings formed from bidentate ligands bonding to a central atom. The history of the word ch_l_ is traced from its original Greek meaning through the Latin language to its anglicized form, chela. This word has a very rich history and has been cited by both Greek (Aristotle) and Latin (Cicero, Vergil) philosophers and poets.

  19. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are iron (Fe)-binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium-binding properties. Previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl (UO2)-binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of UO2, yet they have not been widely studied. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore that is not commercially available and so was obtained from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe-depleted conditions. The relative affinity for UO2 binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between UO2 acetate and different concentrations of Fe(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A), were studied to understand their relative affinities for the UO2(2+) ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxamate siderophores to UO2(2+) ions were observed to decrease with increasing Fe(III)Cl3 concentration at the lower pH. On the other hand, decreasing the pH has a smaller impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and the UO2(2+) ion. Desmalonichrome in particular was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for UO2 at all pH and Fe(III) concentrations examined. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are important for strong chelation with UO2 at lower pH. PMID:27232848

  20. Photostimulated oxygen exchange of uranyl in aqueous-ethanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl oxygen exchange (18O/16O) in solution 1 mol/l HClO4 in the presence of ethanol small additions (up to 0.4 mol/l) when irradiated by the light with λmax=400 nm is investigated. Quantum yield of the exchange increases rapidly with an increase in ethanol concentration and reaches the limiting value of ∼ 3500 at ethanol concentrations of ∼ 0.2 mol/l. The conclusion is made that in similar soltuons ethanol oxidation by excited uranyl proceeds mainly with one electron transfer in the unit event. The rate constant of uranyl extinction by ethanol is evaluated to be ∼ 5x107 lxmol-1xs-1

  1. The polarographic electroreduction of uranyl ion in arsenic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electroreduction of uranyl ion in arsenic acid studied by d.c. polarography shows one reduction wave at all the used arsenic acid concentrations corresponding to one electron reduction mechanism. At low arsenic acid concentration (0,1 - 0,3 M)UO2(ClO4)2 is reduced to HUO2AsO4. At higher acid concentration (0,6 M) the HUO2AsO4 molecules are reduced to UO2+ (pentavalent uranium). It is also reliable to study polarographic behaviour of uranyl ions in arsenic acid solutions up to pH 3,01. It is also possible to apply this method for the analytical determination of uranyl ion concentrations up to 2 mM. (Author)

  2. Mechanistic studies on uranyl ion initiated photopolymerization of acrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the uranyl ion photoinitiated polymerization of acrylamide has been studied in aqueous solutions and in acetone. Steady-state and dynamic luminescence quenching studies show that initiation proceeds through a thermally activated bimolecular interaction between *UO22+ and monomer involving electron or charge transfer. Results from various studies show that the mechanism previously suggested for this process, involving energy transfer, is incorrect. ESR studies suggest that initiation involves formation of a uranium(V)-radical pair. Polymerization then proceeds through a radical mechanism in both solvents. With the exception of the chloride, the yields do not depend upon the counter-ion. Polymer is frequently produced with adsorbed uranyl ions, which can be separated by dialysis. In agreement with previous studies, photopolymerization proceeds without significant overall reduction in the uranyl concentration. It is shown that this is probably due to any intermediate uranium(V) being reoxidized by monomer, with concurrent thermal initiation of polymerization. (orig.)

  3. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bracken, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; West, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freeman, Corey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Matthew R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourret, Steven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rothrock, Richard B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL; Schuh, Denise [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  4. Raman spectroscopic studies of some uranyl nitrate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Raman spectra of uranyl trinitrate complexes (KUO2(NO3)3, RbUO2(NO3)3 CsUO2(NO3)3, NH4UO2(NO3)3) have been measured in the region from 2000 to 10 cm-1. Vibrational assignments have been made on the assumption that all the complexes contain discrete UO2X3- (X = NO3) ions belonging to a point group of D/sub 3h/. A brief discussion is made on the ligation effect of nitrate group on the uranyl bond order from a point of view of molecular orbital theory

  5. Some thermodynamic characteristics of uranyl haloacetates and their crystal hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.

    1988-11-01

    Data on the values of the standard heats of formation of a number of uranyl carboxylates and their crystal hydrates, as well as the corresponding acids and their anions in the gaseous state, have been presented. A thermochemical cycle has been proposed, and a calculation of the lattice heats of the uranyl carboxylates indicated has been carried out. The errors of the tabulated values and the values obtained have been discussed. It has been shown that the main contribution to the changes in the lattice heats in the series under consideration is determined by the changes in the electron-donor ability of the anion.

  6. Status of chelation research: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of research on the removal of actinide elements from the body is reviewed. Items occurring prior to 1980 include evidence for fetal toxicity from Ca-DTPA, the FDA approval of Zn-DTPA for human therapy, the mixed ligand fiasco, and the abrupt wipeout of chelation funding. New concepts that should be explored include improvements in removing radioactivity from lung and bone, the effectiveness of DTPA inside cells, simultaneous therapy with mobilizing agents and chelating agents, prolonging the retention of chelating agents within the body, the oral administration of chelating agents, the effectiveness of LICAM and other new chelating agents, the safety of decorporation procedures, and the effectiveness of chelation therapy on reducing the risk from radionuclide-induced cancer. Some physicians give DTPA by intravenous injection, a safe procedure that should be officially sanctioned

  7. Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

    2005-05-11

    The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

  8. Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Saglio; Daniela Cilloni; Emanuela Messa

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, frequently characterized by anemia and transfusion dependency. In low-risk patients, transfusion dependency can be long lasting, leading to iron overload. Iron chelation therapy may be a therapeutic option for these patients, especially since the approval of oral iron chelators, which are easier to use and better accepted by the patients. The usefulness of iron chelation in MDS patients is still unde...

  9. Beliefs about chelation among thalassemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Trachtenberg Felicia L; Mednick Lauren; Kwiatkowski Janet L; Neufeld Ellis J; Haines Dru; Pakbaz Zahra; Thompson Alexis A; Quinn Charles T; Grady Robert; Sobota Amy; Olivieri Nancy; Horne Robert; Yamashita Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Understanding patients’ views about medication is crucial to maximize adherence. Thalassemia is a congenital blood disorder requiring chronic blood transfusions and daily iron chelation therapy. Methods The Beliefs in Medicine Questionnaire (BMQ) was used to assess beliefs in chelation in thalassemia patients from North America and London in the Thalassemia Longitudinal Cohort (TLC) of the Thalassemia Clinical Research Network (TCRN). Chelation adherence was based on patie...

  10. Environmental biogeochemistry of chelating agents and recommendations for the disposal of chelated radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental chemistry of the three most common aminopolycarboxylic acid chelating agents, NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid), EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), and DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) is reviewed. This review includes information on their persistence in the environment, as well as their tendency to form complexes with actinides. Data on the sorption of chelated actinides by geologic substrates and on the uptake of chelated actinides by plants are also presented. Three different technical options for disposing chelated low-level radioactive wastes are proposed: bind the solidified chelated waste in some kind of solid matrix that has a slow leach rate and bury the waste in a ''dry'' disposal site; substitute biodegradable chelating agents in the decontamination reagent for the chelating agents that are persistent in the environment; chemically or thermally degrade the chelating agents in the waste prior to disposal. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each of these options are discussed. 81 refs

  11. Uranyl salophenes as ionophores for phosphate-selective electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wroblewski, Wojciech; Wojciechowski, Kamil; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Egberink, Richard J.M.; Snellink-Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Anion selectivities of poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) plasticized membranes containing uranyl salophene derivatives were presented. The influence of the membrane components (i.e. ionophore structure, dielectric constant and structure of plasticizer, the amount of incorporated ammonium salt) on its phosph

  12. Density functional study of uranyl (VI) amidoxime complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl (VI) amidoxime complexes are investigated using relativistic density functional theory. The equilibrium structures, bond orders, and Mulliken populations of the complexes have been systematically investigated under a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Comparison of (acet) uranyl amidoxime complexes ([UO2(AO)n]2−n, 1 ≤ n ≤ 4) with available experimental data shows an excellent agreement. In addition, the U−O(1), U−O(3), C(1)−N(2), and C(3)−N(4) bond lengths of [UO2(CH3AO)4]2− are longer than experimental data by about 0.088, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.056 Å. The angles of N(3)−O(3)−U, O(2)−N(1)−C(1), N(3)−C(3)−N(4), N(4)−C(3)−C(4), and C(4)−C(3)−N(3) are different from each other, which is due to existing interaction between oxygen in uranyl and hydrogen in amino group. This interaction is found to be intra-molecular hydrogen bond. Studies on the bond orders, Mulliken charges, and Mulliken populations demonstrate that uranyl oxo group functions as hydrogen-bond acceptors and H atoms in ligands act as hydrogen-bond donors forming hydrogen bonds within the complex

  13. Preparation of pure uranyl chloride from crude yellow cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for the preparation of pure uranyl chloride solution from crude yellow cake. The process involves dissolution of the latter in hydrochloric acid followed by uranium extraction using TBP-kerosene mixture. A series of experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimum conditions for both the dissolution and the extraction steps

  14. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dingyuan

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2 2+) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2 2+) with a detection limit of 1.86 ÎM. In the absence of UO2 2+, the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2 2+, this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2 2+ was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2 2+ and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2 2+ from seawater.

  15. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  16. Metal ions, Alzheimer's disease and chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Ana

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, various studies have been providing evidence that metal ions are critically involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson). Metal ion chelators have been suggested as potential therapies for diseases involving metal ion imbalance. Neurodegeneration is an excellent target for exploiting the metal chelator approach to therapeutics. In contrast to the direct chelation approach in metal ion overload disorders, in neurodegeneration the goal seems to be a better and subtle modulation of metal ion homeostasis, aimed at restoring ionic balance. Thus, moderate chelators able to coordinate deleterious metals without disturbing metal homeostasis are needed. To date, several chelating agents have been investigated for their potential to treat neurodegeneration, and a series of 8-hydroxyquinoline analogues showed the greatest potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21406339

  17. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab)2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  18. Importance of iron chelation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    A. Varoğlu

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to remember that today patients have different options of chelation treatment, as desferrioxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox are available. However, a patient has to be compliant with treatments. They have always to remember that too much iron causes different complications and could be a barrier for a definitive cure from thalassemia. 由于出现了去铁胺、去铁酮和去铁斯若等药物,病人现在可以选择不同的螯合治疗方式。 然而,病人必须适应这几种治疗方式。 他们必须时刻记住太多的铁元素会引发多种并发症,并对地中海贫血的彻底治疗造成阻碍。...

  19. Radioimmunotherapy with engineered antibody fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have developed and begun evaluating radiometal-chelated (213Bi) engineered antibody fragments as radioimmunotherapy agents that target the HER2/neu (c-erbB-2) antigen. The diabody format was found to have 40-fold greater affinity for HER2/neu and to be associated with significantly greater tumor localization than is achieved with scFv molecule. It is shown that short-lived isotopes like 213Bi would be most effective when used in conjunction with antibodies that targeted diffuse malignancies (leukemia or lymphoma) or when used for very rapid pretargeted radioimmunotherapy application in which the radioisotope is conjugated to a very small ligand

  20. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  1. Dynamic interplay between uranyl phosphate precipitation, sorption, and phase evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In all experiments, final concentrations of uranium were lower than U.S. EPA standards. • U–P minerals more stable than chernikovite were slow to develop without sorption. • Heterogeneous nucleation was not observed. • U sorbs much more readily to the goethite than mica in the absence of phosphate. • Nucleation-growth-sorption cycles occur over weeks, not hours, at room temperature. - Abstract: Natural examples demonstrate uranyl-phosphate minerals can maintain extremely low levels of aqueous uranium in groundwaters due to their low solubility. Therefore, greater understanding of the geochemical factors leading to uranyl phosphate precipitation may lead to successful application of phosphate-based remediation methods. However, the solubility of uranyl phosphate phases varies over >3 orders of magnitude, with the most soluble phases typically observed in lab experiments. To understand the role of common soil/sediment mineral surfaces in the nucleation and transformation of uranyl phosphate minerals under environmentally relevant conditions, batch experiments were carried out with goethite and mica at pH 6 in mixed electrolyte solutions ranging from 1–800 μM U and 1–800 μM P. All experiments ended with uranium concentrations below the USEPA MCL for U, but with 2–3 orders of magnitude difference in uranium concentrations. Despite the presence of many cations that are well known to incorporate into less soluble autunite-group minerals, chernikovite rapidly precipitated in all experiments containing U and P, except for solutions with 1 μM U and 1 μM P that were calculated to be undersaturated. Textures of uranyl phosphates observed by AFM and TEM indicate that nucleation was homogenous and independent of the initial mineral content. Comparison of time-course U and P concentrations from the experiments with thermodynamic modeling of solution equilibria demonstrated that aqueous uranium concentrations in the experimental systems evolved

  2. Coordination number of uranium in crystal hydrates and hydratoetherates of uranyl halogen acetates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coordination number (CN) of uranyl in some crystal hydrates and crystal solvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. When there is no steric hindrance from the carboxylate ion, the probability of a maximum CN of 6 increases with decrease of the electron-donating capacity of the anion, which can be associated with giometric factors and redistribution of electron density in the inner coordination sphere of uranyl

  3. Coordination number of uranium in crystallohydrates and hydratoethers of uranyl halogenacetates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of coordination number (c. n.) of uranyl in the series of crystallohydrates and crystallosolvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. The probability of the maximum c. n. 6 in the absence of steric obstacles on the part of carboxylate-ion increases with the decrease of electron-donor ability of anion which can be connected both with geometric factors and with electron density redistribution in the internal coordination sphere of uranyl.

  4. On coordination number of uranium in crystallohydrates and hydratoethers of uranyl halogenacetates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of coordination number (c. n.) of uranyl in the series of crystallohydrates and crystallosolvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. The probability of the maximum c. n. 6 in the absence of steric obstacles on the part of carboxylate-ion increases with the decrease of electron-donor ability of anion which can be connected both with geometric factors and with electron density redistribution in the internal coordination sphere of uranyl

  5. Phase equilibria in the ternary uranyl trichloroacetate -water - methylisobutylketone system at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigation into mutual solubility within uranyl trichloroacetate - water - methylisobutylketone (MIBK) ternary system under 25 ged C, are presented. The obtained phase diagram is considered from the point of available data on uranyl nitrate - water - organic solvents systems including MIBK, as well as, on similar systems with uranyl trichloroacetonate. Occurrences of anion effects at extraction based on hydrate-solvate mechanism result mainly from the properties of extractants

  6. Coordination number of uranium in crystal hydrates and hydratoetherates of uranyl halogen acetates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    The coordination number (CN) of uranyl in some crystal hydrates and crystal solvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. When there is no steric hindrance from the carboxylate ion, the probability of a maximum CN of 6 increases with decrease of the electron-donating capacity of the anion, which can be associated with giometric factors and redistribution of electron density in the inner coordination sphere of uranyl.

  7. 13C NMR spectra of the uranyl tricarbonate-bicarbonate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C NMR identification of the uranyl tricarbonate complex (important in solution mining of U from ore and conventional carbonate leaching) is reported. The NMR spectra show the transition from slow to fast carbonate exchange between uranyl ion and bulk water in an accessible temperature range. The taller NMR peak at 162.31 ppM is frm HCO3- and the smaller peak at 168.86 ppM is from the uranyl tricarbonate complex

  8. Uranyl sorption by smectites: spectroscopic assessment of thermodynamic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Brause, C J; Berg, J M; Little, K M; Matzner, R A; Morris, D E

    2004-09-15

    Batch sorption experiments and thermodynamic modeling of the interaction of UO2(2+) and its hydrolysis products with two smectitic clay minerals, the reference material SWy-1 [McKinley et al., Clays Clay Miner. 43 (1995) 586] and the soil isolate LK-1 [Turner et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 30 (1996) 3399], have established a conceptual framework for uranyl/smectite surface complexation based on general reactions between aqueous uranyl species and the reactive sites on the mineral surfaces. In this report, we have formulated and spectroscopically tested a set of hypotheses based on this conceptual framework using samples prepared under similar or identical conditions to evaluate the agreement between surface complexation/speciation as enumerated by spectroscopic characterization and that elaborated by the surface complexation model. Both steady-state and time-resolved optical emission spectral data are presented for uranyl on both smectite minerals as well as on the analogue phases SiO2 and Al(OH)3 spanning the pH range from approximately 4 to 8 and the background electrolyte concentrations from approximately 0.001 to 0.1 M. The spectral data enable the explicit identification of an outer-sphere exchange-site population of the hydrated cation [UO2(OH2)5(2+) ] in SWy-1. Spectral data also clearly establish the existence of inner-sphere surface complexes on the analogue phases and on the amphoteric clay crystallite edge sites [aluminol (>Al-OH) and silanol (>Si-OH)]. Based on the spectral characteristics of these uranyl edge-site populations, it is possible to readily infer for the SiO2, Al(OH)3, and SWy-1 samples the evolution in surface speciation with increasing pH to more hydrolyzed uranyl-surface complexes consistent with the conceptual model. The spectral domain characteristics of the edge-site populations on LK-1 with increasing pH suggest that there is no change in the hydrolysis of the uranyl-surface species. However, emission lifetime data are interpreted

  9. Evaluation of uranyl nitrate crystallization for spent nuclear fuel separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work in Germany and Japan has indicated that crystallization of uranyl nitrate at low temperatures from nitric acid solution could be a useful process for removing most of the uranium from spent LWR fuel after the fuel is dissolved in nitric acid. The crystallization process potentially could reduce the cost of LWR fuel partitioning because it provides a selective and compact process for removing most of the uranium which is about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass. Subsequent separation processes would only need to handle the smaller volume of remaining actinides and the fission products. We are evaluating an approach to separating uranyl nitrate that uses a continuous adiabatic reduced-pressure crystallizer to concentrate and cool a nitric acid solution from dissolution of spent fuel. Initial work to define the process flowsheet and obtain data on optimum crystallization conditions and the purity of the uranium product will be presented. (authors)

  10. New chemistry of the uranyl ion in non aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with new aspects of the chemistry of the uranyl(VI) ion {UO2}2+ in anhydrous polar organic solvents such as the activation of the reputedly inert U-Oyl bond and the controlled reduction of this species which represent a particularly active field of research that attracts much attention for both its fundamental aspects and applications. Treatment of uranyl(VI) compounds UO2X'2 (X' = I, OTf, Cl) with Me3SiX (X = Cl, Br, I) reagents, in various anhydrous polar organic solvents, has been first considered. In most cases, reduction into tetravalent species with complete de-oxygenation of the uranyl {UO2}2+ ion is observed. The reaction is particularly efficient in acetonitrile where the tetravalent [UX4(MeCN)4] complexes, which are useful precursors in uranium chemistry, are isolated. In the course of these reactions, the influence of the solvent, the nature of X' and X in the UO2X'2 precursor and the Me3SiX reagent are pointed out. Reaction of the uranyl(VI) UO2X2 (X = I, Cl, OTf, NO3) precursors with the anionic MC5R5 (M = K, R = H, Me; M= Li, R = Me; M= Tl, R = H) reagents did not lead to the organometallic [(η5-C5R5)nUO2X2-n] species (n = 1, 2) but to pentavalent uranyl(V) complexes. This method is a facile and rapid route towards the formation of stable pentavalent uranyl which offers promising sources for further U(V) chemical developments and for fundamental and applied interests. Their structure is strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent, the additional ligands X and of the M+ cation. In pyridine, the {UO2(py)5}+ ion appears to be an ubiquitous and a quite stable entity. The coordinating properties of the basic oxo groups, which coordinate easily to M+ ions (M= Li, K, Tl), favour structural diversity with formation of hetero-polymetallic complexes such as [{UO2(py)5}{MX(py)2}] (M= Li, X I), [{UO2(py)5}{MX2(py)2}]∞ (M= K, Tl, X= OTf; M= K, X= I), [{UO2(py)5}(M2X3)]∞ (M= Li, X= OTf) or [{UO2(py)5}2(M3X5)]∞ (M= K; X= OTf). With

  11. Structural determination of some uranyl compounds by vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds has been studied and of it spectral information has been used the fundamental asymmetric vibrational frequency, to determine the length and constant bond force U=O by means of the combination of the concept of absorbed energy and the mathematical expression of Badger modified by Jones. It is intended a factor that simplifies the mathematical treatment and the results are compared with the values obtained for other methods. (Author)

  12. In vitro dissolution of uranyl acetate using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution rate of a material in the lung is an important parameter in evaluating the risk to humans following accidental inhalation of a substance and is also a parameter that may be useful in characterizing particles for nuclear forensics analysis. Conventional methods of measuring dissolution rates in vitro involve exposing the material or particles to a solvent, such as water, saline, or solutions that simulate lung fluid, and measuring the fraction of material that dissolves with time. A new device for measuring dissolution rates for small samples, especially individual particles, was evaluated that incorporates a regenerated cellulose dialysis membrane fixed to the bottom of a small, 2 mL plastic cup that fits into the top of a 50 mL plastic centrifuge tube. The cup is easily transferred among a series of tubes containing solvent to measure rate of dissolution. The dialysis membrane has a diffusion rating of 20 kDa molecular weight cut off which greatly exceeds the size of the dissolved uranium molecule. The performance of the dialysis cup device was evaluated by measuring the dissolution rate of uranyl acetate in distilled water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and simulated lung fluid (SLF). These results were compared to the dissolution rate measured using the traditional filter sandwich method in which a sample is sealed between two hydrophilic membranes. Although the majority of uranyl acetate dissolved in SLF within 30 min using the filter sandwich method, most of the uranyl acetate was undissolved in PBS and SLF using the dialysis membrane device. Reactions between the dissolved uranyl acetate, solvent, and the dialysis membrane likely caused the membrane to swell, shrinking the pore size, and thus reducing the transport of dissolved uranium across the membrane. Use of the dialysis cup device for evaluating dissolution rates for uranium-bearing materials in solvents containing a high concentration of salts is therefore not recommended. (author)

  13. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP), a solid proton electrolyte, getters tritium gas and water vapor from air by DC electrical action. We have reduced the formation of residual tritiated water to less than 2%, and demonstrated that HUP can clean a 5.5 m3 working glove box. Data are presented to illustrate the parameters of the gettering and a model is derived. Two other tritium gettering electrolytes have been discovered. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. PMID:27439180

  15. Chelating agents in pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 71 abstracts of papers. Fourteen abstracts were inputted in INIS. The topics covered include: the effects of chelating agents on the retention of 63Ni, 109Cd, 203Hg, 144Ce, 95Nb and the excretion of 210Po, 63Ni, 48V, 239Pu, 241Am, 54Mn; the applications of tracer techniques for studies of the efficacy of chelation therapy in patients with heart and brain disorders; and the treatment of metal poisoning with chelating agents. (J.P.)

  16. Variable Denticity in Carboxylate Binding to the Uranyl Coordination Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tris-carboxylate complexes of the uranyl (UO2)2+ cation with acetate and benzoate were generated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and then isolated in a Fourier transformion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of the tris-acetatouranyl anion resulted in a redox elimination of an acetate radical, which was used to generate an IR spectrum that consisted of six prominent absorption bands. These were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations in terms of symmetric and antisymmetric -CO2 stretches of both the monodentate and bidentate acetate, CH3 bending and umbrella vibrations, and a uranyl O-U-O asymmetric stretch. The comparison of the calculated and measured IR spectra indicated that the tris-acetate complex contained two acetate ligands bound in a bidentate fashion, while the third acetate was monodentate. In similar fashion, the tris-benzoate uranyl anion was formed and photodissociated by loss of a benzoate radical, enabling measurement of the infrared spectrum that was in close agreement with that calculated for a structure containing one monodentate, and two bidentate benzoate ligands.

  17. Variable Denticity in Carboxylate Binding to the Uranyl Coordination Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G. S.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Oomens, Jos; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Tris-carboxylate complexes of the uranyl [UO2]2+ cation with acetate and benzoate were generated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and then isolated in a Fourier transformion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of the tris-acetatouranyl anion resulted in a redox elimination of an acetate radical, which was used to generate an IR spectrum that consisted of six prominent absorption bands. These were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations in terms of symmetric and antisymmetric -CO2 stretches of both the monodentate and bidentate acetate, CH3 bending and umbrella vibrations, and a uranyl O-U-O asymmetric stretch. The comparison of the calculated and measured IR spectra indicated that the tris-acetate complex contained two acetate ligands bound in a bidentate fashion, while the third acetate was monodentate. In similar fashion, the tris-benzoate uranyl anion was formed and photodissociated by loss of a benzoate radical, enabling measurement of the infrared spectrum that was in close agreement with that calculated for a structure containing one monodentate, and two bidentate benzoate ligands.

  18. Design of one evaporation system for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors propose an instant evaporation system with recirculation of the concentrated solution to raise the concentration from 50 to 1500 g of uranium per litre of solution. The capacity of the plant is to be 14.1 kg of uranium per hour. The main equipment used in the system is as follows: 1. Ring-type heat exchanger, for increasing the temperature of the mixture of fresh and recirculated solution from 80 to 1150C; 2. Separation tank, in which instant evaporation is carried out. The absolute pressure inside the tank will be 500 mmHg, with steam separation from a concentrated (78.5 wt.%) uranyl nitrate solution; 3. Desuperheater-condenser of horizontal tubular type for condensing water vapour and recovering any uranyl nitrate that may have been entrained; 4. Storage tank for the concentrate, with a capacity for one day's normal operation, and a heating coil to prevent crystallization of the concentrated solution; 5. Two storage tanks for feed and condensate with capacity for one day's normal operation; 6. Supporting structure for the above components. Virtually all equipment in contact with the uranyl nitrate solution will be made of 304 stainless steel. Saturated steam at 143.30C will be required. The cost of the proposed system is $543 030.00. (author)

  19. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiec, Andrew; Kirkegaard, Marie C; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W; Trowbridge, Lee; Rondinone, Adam; Anderson, Brian

    2015-12-10

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxyfluoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl fluoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures followed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous structure), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielastic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform restricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O-H bond (r = 0.92 Å). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps(-1)) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps(-1)). PMID:26575434

  20. Uranyl-organic assemblies with acetate-bearing phenyl- and cyclohexyl-based ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six novel complexes formed under hydrothermal conditions by uranyl ions with three ligands comprising a rigid phenyl- or cyclohexyl-containing platform, and two to four acetate arms have been obtained. 1,3,5-Benzene-triacetic acid (H3BTA) yielded the complex [NMe4][UO2(BTA)].H2O (1), in which the structure-directing counter-ion induces a two-dimensional, bilayer-type structure different from that previously reported, with both the tris-chelating ligand and the metal ion as trigonal nodes. Two complexes were obtained with 1,2-phenylenedioxy-diacetic acid (H2PDDA), [UO2(PDDA)(H2O)] (2) and [H2DABCO][(UO2)2(PDDA)3].1.5H2O (3). Complex 2 is a simple, ribbon-like, one-dimensional polymer, while 3 is a nano-tubular assembly built around the hydrogen-bonded, structure-directing counterions. Three complexes were obtained with trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (H4DCTA), a polyamino-poly-carboxylic acid, with different bases, [UO2(H2DCTA)(H2O)2].H2O (4), [UO2(H2DCTA)(H2O)].1.5H2O (5), and [UO2Na(HDCTA)(H2O)] (6). The nitrogen atoms are not coordinated, both of them (4) or only one (5 and 6) being protonated, and the carboxylic/ate groups are monodentate, except for one chelating in 6 and one nonbonding in 4. These differences in bonding result in various assemblies, one-dimensional in 4 and two-dimensional in 5 and 6. The layers in 5 are strongly corrugated, with the cyclohexyl groups pointing on either side, and their packing displays oval-shaped channels, while the layers in 6 are planar, with the cyclohexyl groups located on one side, and further assembled into dimeric units by the disordered sodium ions. These are the first crystal structures of actinide ion complexes with both H2PDDA and H4DCTA. (authors)

  1. Investigation of the role of chelating ligand in the synthesis of ion-imprinted polymeric resins on the selective enrichment of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion-imprinted polymeric (IIP) resins were prepared by dissolving stoichiometric amounts of uranyl nitrate and selected chelating ligands, viz. salicylaldoxime, catechol, succinicacid, 5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol and 4-vinyl pyridine in 2-methoxy ethanol (porogen) and copolymerizing thermally in the presence of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and ethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate (EGDMA), using 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). Again, IIP resins were also prepared on similar lines by utilizing ternary [uranium-non-vinylated ligand-vinylated ligand (4-vinyl pyridine)] complexes. Non-imprinted polymeric resins were identically prepared in both cases without the use of uranyl imprint ion. The percent enrichment and retention capacity studies showed significant imprinting effect in all cases. However, ion-imprinted polymeric resins formed with succinic acid (SA) or 5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol (DCQ) and 4-vinylpyridine (VP) alone gave quantitative enrichment and various parameters that influence the enrichment and elution were then optimized. The percent enrichment of uranium from synthetic seawater solutions was found to be 25.0 ± 0.5 and 83.0 ± 0.8 for SA-VP and DCQ-VP systems, respectively. The DCQ-VP-based IIP resins were successfully tested for the recovery of uranium from real seawater samples

  2. Synthesis of a Functional Metal-Chelating Polymer and Steps towards Quantitative Mass Cytometry Bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Majonis, Daniel; Herrera, Isaac; Ornatsky, Olga; Schulze, Maren; Lou, Xudong; Soleimani, Mohsen; Nitz, Mark; Mitchell A. Winnik

    2010-01-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of metal-chelating polymers with a degree of polymerization of 67 and 79, high DTPA functionality, Mw/Mn ≤ 1.17, and a maleimide as an orthogonal functional group for conjugation to antibodies. The polymeric disulfide form of the DPn = 79 DTPA polymer was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis to determine moisture and sodium-ion content, and by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to determine the Gd3+ binding capacity. These results showed ea...

  3. Chelation therapy after the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy: results of a unique trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maria D. Avila; Escolar, Esteban; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review EDTA chelation therapy has been in off-label use for the treatment of atherosclerosis. We review the results of the first large-scale randomized trial of this treatment. Recent findings The trial to assess chelation therapy was a $30 million National Institutes of Health-funded study of the safety and efficacy of EDTA-based chelation infusions in 1708 post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The trial to assess chelation therapy demonstrated a significant (P = 0.035) 18% re...

  4. Fluid extraction using carbon dioxide and organophosphorus chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Neil G.; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe; Kwang, Yak Hwa

    1998-01-01

    Methods for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical CO.sub.2, and a chelating agent are described. The chelating agent forms a chelate with the species, the chelate being soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical CO.sub.2 and the chelating agent comprises an organophosphorous chelating agent, particularly sulfur-containing organophosphorous chelating agents, including mixtures of chelating agents. Examples of chelating agents include monothiophosphinic acid, di-thiophosphinic acid, phosphine sulfite, phosphorothioic acid, and mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metal and metalloids from industrial waste solutions, particularly acidic solutions. Both the chelate and the supercritical fluid can be regenerated and the contaminant species recovered to provide an economic, efficient process.

  5. Current Use of Chelation in American Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Wax, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Health Statistics estimates that more than 100,000 Americans receive chelation each year, although far fewer than 1 % of these cases are managed by medical toxicologists. Unfortunately, fatalities have been reported after inappropriate chelation use. There are currently 11 FDA-approved chelators available by prescription although chelation products may also be obtained through compounding pharmacies and directly over the internet. Promotion of chelation training is pro...

  6. Radiometallating antibodies and biologically active peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N-benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have on functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies, and we have also developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides. The autoantigenic peptides, fragments of the acetylcholine receptor, are under investigation for myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules and the radiometallation chemistry will be discussed

  7. SERS detection of uranyl using functionalized gold nanostars promoted by nanoparticle shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Grace; Forbes, Tori Z; Haes, Amanda J

    2016-08-15

    The radius of curvature of gold (Au) nanostar tips but not the overall particle dimensions can be used for understanding the large and quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the uranyl (UO2)(2+) moiety. The engineered roughness of the Au nanostar architecture and the distance between the gold surface and uranyl cations are promoted using carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiols containing 2, 5, and 10 methylene groups. By systematically varying the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) thickness with these molecules, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectral properties are used to quantify the SAM layer thickness and to promote uranyl coordination to the Au nanostars in neutral aqueous solutions. Successful uranyl detection is demonstrated for all three functionalized Au nanostar samples as indicated by enhanced signals and red-shifts in the symmetric U(vi)-O stretch. Quantitative uranyl detection is achieved by evaluating the integrated area of these bands in the uranyl fingerprint window. By varying the concentration of uranyl, similar free energies of adsorption are observed for the three carboxylic acid terminated functionalized Au nanostar samples indicating similar coordination to uranyl, but the SERS signals scale inversely with the alkanethiol layer thickness. This distance dependence follows previously established models assuming that roughness features associated with the radius of curvature of the tips are considered. These results indicate that SERS signals using functionalized Au nanostar substrates can provide quantitative detection of small molecules and that the tip architecture plays an important role in understanding the resulting SERS intensities. PMID:27326897

  8. Exploring the uranyl organometallic chemistry: from single to double uranium carbon bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl organometallic complexes featuring uranium(VI) carbon single and double bonds have been obtained from uranyl UO2X2 precursors by avoiding reduction of the metal center. X-ray diffraction and density functional theory analyses of these complexes showed that the UC and UdC bonds are polarized toward the nucleophilic carbon. (authors)

  9. Two uranyl-organic frameworks with pyridinecarboxylate ligands. A novel hetero-metallic uranyl-copper(II) complex with a cation-cation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction of uranyl nitrate with pyridine-2-carboxylic acid (HL1) under hydrothermal conditions gives the complex [(UO2)3(L1)4(NO3)2], 1, which differs from the previously reported molecular complex, obtained at room temperature, by the absence of water, coordinated and free, and the extended carboxylate bridging. Although the tri-metallic basic unit is similar in both cases, 1 crystallizes as a two-dimensional assembly. A hetero-metallic complex results from the reaction of uranyl nitrate and copper(II) trifluoromethanesulfonate with nicotinic acid (pyridine-3-carboxylic acid, HL2), [UO2Cu(L2)2(NO3)2], 2, in which copper nicotinate two-dimensional subunits are bridged by uranyl nitrate groups to give a three-dimensional framework. The copper atom environment geometry is elongated octahedral. with one of the axial donors being a uranyl oxo group (cation-cation interaction). (author)

  10. Quantification of uranyl in presence of citric acid; Cuantificacion de uranilo en presencia de acido citrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N.; Barrera D, C.E. [UAEM, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ordonez R, E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: nidgg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    To determine the influence that has the organic matter of the soil on the uranyl sorption on some solids is necessary to have a detection technique and quantification of uranyl that it is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For that in this work, it intends to carry out the uranyl quantification in presence of citric acid modifying the Fluorescence induced by UV-Vis radiation technique. Since the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it, (speciation, pH, ionic forces, etc.) it was necessary to develop an analysis technique that stands out the fluorescence of uranyl ion avoiding the out one that produce the organic acids. (Author)

  11. Spectroscopic studies on uranyl complexes with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexes formed from uranyl salts and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in ionic liquids (ILs) were studied by spectroscopic methods. [UO2(TBP)4]2+ is formed from UO2(ClO4)2· xH2O with excess of TBP in ILs. The coordination number of uranyl in [UO2(TBP)4]2+ is determined as 4 by ATR-FTIR study. In [Bmim][NTf2], though TBP cannot replace the NO3- coordinated to uranyl, TBP/[Bmim][NTf2] can extract 'nitrate-free' uranyl complex from diluted HNO3 medium and the extracted complex is converted into [UO2(TBP)4]2+ after drying. The formation of [UO2(TBP)4]2+ provides spectroscopic evidence for the cation-exchange mechanism of uranyl extraction by TBP/[Bmim][NTf2] from diluted HNO3 medium. (author)

  12. Solution thermodynamic evaluation of hydroxypyridinonate chelators 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO) for UO{sub 2}(VI) and Th(IV) decorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, M.; Deblonde, G.J.P.; Abergel, R.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    2013-08-01

    Solution thermodynamic studies were performed to characterize the coordination of U(VI) and Th(IV) by the multidentate hydroxypyridinonate chelating agents 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO). Species distribution and conditional stability pM profiles were calculated based on the determined formation constants, showing that both ligands form extremely stable uranyl and thorium complexes in solution. At physiological pH, the formation of 1:1 ligand:uranyl complexes is favored for both ligands, while a 2:1 ligand:thorium complex is predominant with the tetradentate 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO). Comparisons with functionally similar bidentate ligands as well as with the common actinide chelator diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid emphasized the superior affinity for U(VI) and Th(IV) of both experimental compounds over a wide pH range. These analytical results corroborate the in vivo chelation efficacy of 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO) and validate their selection for further development as therapeutic actinide decorporation agents. (orig.)

  13. Mineral replacement reactions in naturally occurring hydrated uranyl phosphates from the Tarabau deposit: Examples in the Cu–Ba uranyl phosphate system

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, André Filipe Jorge; Conçalves, Mário A.; Praceres, Cátia; Astilleros García-Monge, José Manuel; Batista, Maria Joao

    2012-01-01

    Uranyl phosphates are a mineral group which include a wide range of different species, each containing specific cations within the hydrated interlayer, and often display a geochemical/mineralogical relationship with Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides. The environmental relevance of these U-phases arises from their low solubility at most surface and groundwater conditions, where they can ultimately control aqueous U levels. In the present work, samples of naturally occurring uranyl phosphates ...

  14. Existence, characterization and decomposition of uranyl difluoride hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heart of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is composed of assemblies of fuel rods of principally uranium dioxide powder. The 'pyro-hydrolysis process' is currently a preferred route for the preparation of UO2 from enriched uranyl hexafluoride UF6. In this technology, the reaction is carried out under flow of dihydrogen (for its reducing function) and in the presence of water. Between the gaseous fluoride UF6 and the ceramic UO2, uranyl difluoride, UO2F2, is the solid intermediate, that contains the oxygen, but in which uranium is not yet reduced. The study of the interactions between this intermediate and water is of academic interest but is clearly of importance to the industrial process. The aim of this work was to specify the conditions of existence of the hydrates of uranyl fluoride and the reaction mechanism leading from the hydrates to anhydrous UO2F2, precursor in the industrial reaction. The study has been performed using a combination of X-ray diffraction as a function of hygrometry, temperature or pressure and gravimetric analysis. Several hydrated phases have been characterized: two solid solutions, the compositions of which can vary respectively between UO2F2.5 H2O and UO2F2. 4 H2O and between UO2F2. 2.5 H2O and UO2F2.1.6 H2O and one hydrate of defined composition UO2F2.3.5 H2O. Thermal dehydration from the higher hydrates shows the existence of a new phase termed δ, the structure of which is similar to that of UO2F2.3.5 H2O. Hydration of the anhydrous compound under a controlled atmosphere enables us to observe this phase and confirms the strongly lamellar character of these hydrates. (authors)

  15. Pharmacological selection of antibodies for immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development of hybridoma technology has resulted in the production of monoclonal antibodies that recognize a variety of tumor antigens. Many antibodies have been developed and some of them are used with different success in clinical practice. A list of criteria is proposed for the selection of antibodies suitable for imaging studies illustrated with the example of two monoclonal antibodies anti-CEA and 19.9 used in colorectal carcinoma imaging. Monoclonal antibodies obtained today are not truly tumor-specific, they are tumor-associated; this suggests that some cross-reactions with normal tissues exist. For immunoscintigraphical use it is important to select antibodies which procedure high tumor cell staining with limited reactivity against normal tissues. Antibodies can be separated into F(ab')2 and Fab fragments which diffuse more easily into the tumor with a rapid clearance from the circulation giving higher tumor to normal tissues ratio at an early time. Antibodies with both high affinity and avidity towards tumor cell receptors produce better imaging results. Antibodies can be labelled directly with iodine or technetium and with indium using chelating agents. In vivo kinetics of radiolabelled antibodies are very different considering the nuclide and the labelling method used. Pharmacokinetics on nude mice grated with human tumors are very useful for selecting the most appropriate nuclide antibody fragment and the most efficient labelling technique for a given application. (author)

  16. Copper Chelation in Alzheimer's Disease Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of people in the U.S. AD is primarily characterized at the cellular level by densely tangled fibrils of amyloid- β protein. These protein clusters have been found in association with elevated levels of multiple transition metals, with copper being the most egregious. Interestingly, metal chelation has shown promise in attenuating the symptoms of AD in recent clinical studies. We investigate this process by constructing an atomistic model of the amyloid- β-copper complex and profile the energetic viability in each of its subsequent disassociation stages. Our results indicate that five energetic barriers must be overcome for full metal chelation. The energy barriers are biologically viable in the presence water mediated bond and proton transfer between the metal and the protein. We model the chelation reaction using a consecutive path nudged elastic band method implemented in our ab initio real-space multi-grid code to obtain a viable sequence. This reaction model details a physically consistent explanation of the chelation process that could lead to the discovery of more effective chelation agents in the treatment of AD.

  17. Biosolubilization of uranyl ions in uranium ores by hydrophyte plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigated the bioleaching of uranyl ions from uranium ores, in aqueous medium by hydrophyte plants: Lemna minor, Azolla caroliniana and Elodea canadensis under different experimental conditions. The oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) species was done by the atomic oxygen generated in the photosynthesis process by the aquatic plants in the solution above uranium ores. Under identical experimental conditions, the capacity of bioleaching of uranium ores decreases according to the following series: Lemna minor > Elodea canadensis > Azolla caroliniana. The results of IR spectra suggest the possible use of Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis as a biological decontaminant of uranium containing wastewaters. (author)

  18. Spectroscopy and Photochemistry in Single Crystals of Uranyl Formate Monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jack Neal

    1982-03-01

    UO(,2)CH(OO)(,2)(.)H(,2)O, (UFM) is an orthorhombic crystal (Fdd2, C(,2v)('19)) with two uranyls per unit cell. Above 210(DEGREES)K, when uranyl is excited by visible light, a two-step reaction occurs. The primary photochemical step is. U(VI)O(,2)('++) + HCOO('-) (--->) U(V) + (HCOO(.) or CO(,2)('-)). (1). A study of UFM in the oriented solid explores one of the most basic chemical reactions--the redox reaction. High resolution, polarized absorption and excitation specta were taken on single crystals at liquid helium temperatures. Eight electronic origins are identified, each split into doublets by factor group interactions. Uranyl (a)symmetric stretch vibronic progressions (do not) preserve the factor group splittings and polarizations of their origins. The spectrum of UFM lies closer to the (omega)-(omega) limit, as opposed to Russell-Saunders, than Cs(,2)UO(,2)Cl(,4). Low site symmetry depolarizes the B-symmetry components of the origins. Below 2(DEGREES)K, where UFM exhibits non-single exponential luminescence decay, migration to traps is limited. By 20(DEGREES)K, where the curves become single exponential and drop tenfold in the value of the lifetime, emission is occurring from UFM in thermal equilibrium with a population of killer traps. Above 70(DEGREES)K, the lifetime slowly rises. It peaks at 135(DEGREES)K, and then drops steeply, falling below detectability by 210(DEGREES)K. The drop is accompanied by the onset of photoreactivity. The rise in emission is attributed either to a decrease in trapping efficiency or to a hindered migration to traps due to a thermal population of bound (DELTA)(,g) excitons. ESR studies show that a signal at g = 2.0 observed at 77(DEGREES)K is from surface radicals. Below 20(DEGREES)K, a signal near g = 2.1 is due to organic radicals in the bulk generated by the photochemical step. Studies on a single crystal resolve these signals into components that reflect the crystallographic symmetry elements. A signal near g = 3.4 is

  19. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF6) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF6 and UO2F2 exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF6, UO2F2, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Construction of Uranyl Selective Electrode Based on Complex of Uranyl Ion with New Ligand Carboxybenzotriazole in PVC Matrix Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Dalo, M. A.; Al-Rawashdeh, N. A. F.; Al-Mheidat, I. R.; Nassory, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    In the present study uranyl selective electrodes in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix membrane were prepared based on a complex of uranyl ion (UO2) with carboxybenzotriazole (CBT) as ligand. The effect of the nature of plasticizer in PVC matrix were evaluated using three different plasticizers, these are dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BHS). The results of this study indicated that the best plasticizer could be used is the DBP, which may be attributed to its lowest viscosity value compared to DOP and BHS. The electrodes with DBP as plasticizer exhibits a Nernstian response with a slope of 28.0 mV/ decade, over a wide range of concentration from 3.0×10-5-6.0×10-2 M and a detection limit of 4.0×10-6 M. It can be used in the pH range of 4.0-10.0 with a response time of less than 10 s for DBP and 25 s for both DOP and BHS. The effects of ions interferences on the electrode response were evaluated. The di- and tri-valent cations were found to interfere less than univalent cations, which was attributed to the high diffusion and the exchange rate between the univalent ions and the uranyl ion solution. The electrodes were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). The results of the standard addition method were satisfactory with errors less than 7%. The developed electrode was found to be fast, sensitive and reliable indicated its potential use in measuring the uranly ion concentration in the field.

  1. Optimisation and status of chelation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calcium trisodium salt of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Ca-DTPA) remains the chelating agent of choice for treatment of incorporated actinides. The zinc trisodium salt (Zn-DTPA) represents a less toxic alternative, when Ca-DTPA is contra-indicated as well as for prolonged chelation therapy; in acute incorporation cases it would be less effective than Ca-DTPA. Specific ion binding chelators such as desferrioxamine (DFOA) and linear tetracatechoylamides, e.g., LICAM(C) proved more effective in animals injected with Pu, Th and Np (not with Am!) but only concerning the radioactivity in the bone; that in the kidneys was substantially increased. The combinations of DFOA or LICAM(C) with Ca-DTPA exerted the best overall effects. After incorporation of soluble uranium-compounds, an infusion of sodium bicarbonate seems at present the most reasonable for enhancing the uranium-excretion and prevention of kidney damage. (author)

  2. Lanthanon chelates of monoprotic tridentate schiff base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-(N-thiophene-2-aldimino)propanoic acid (HTP), and its lanthanon chelates were synthesised and studied by physico-chemical techniques. Irving-Rossotti method was followed to determine the dissociation constants of the ligand and formation constants of its lanthanon chelates in aqueous medium (ionic strength μ = 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 M NaClO4) at 25 0C, 35 0C and 45 0C. Solid lanthanon chelates were characterised by molecular mass, elemental analyses, conductance, magnetic, thermal and spectral analyses and were assigned 1 : 3 (metal-ligand) stoichiometry in which the lanthanon shows nine coordination numbers. Covalent nature of metal-ligand bond was found to increase with increase in atomic number of central lanthanide ion. (author)

  3. Trypanotoxic activity of thiosemicarbazone iron chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Samuel; Sexton, Darren W; Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-03-01

    Only a few drugs are available for treating sleeping sickness and nagana disease; parasitic infections caused by protozoans of the genus Trypanosoma in sub-Saharan Africa. There is an urgent need for the development of new medicines for chemotherapy of these devastating diseases. In this study, three newly designed thiosemicarbazone iron chelators, TSC24, Dp44mT and 3-AP, were tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei and human leukaemia HL-60 cells. In addition to their iron chelating properties, TSC24 and Dp44mT inhibit topoisomerase IIα while 3-AP inactivates ribonucleotide reductase. All three compounds exhibited anti-trypanosomal activity, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging between 1 and 100 µM and 50% growth inhibition (GI50) values of around 250 nM. Although the compounds did not kill HL-60 cells (MIC values >100 µM), TSC24 and Dp44mT displayed considerable cytotoxicity based on their GI50 values. Iron supplementation partly reversed the trypanotoxic and cytotoxic activity of TSC24 and Dp44mT but not of 3-AP. This finding suggests possible synergy between the iron chelating and topoisomerase IIα inhibiting activity of the compounds. However, further investigation using separate agents, the iron chelator deferoxamine and the topoisomerase II inhibitor epirubicin, did not support any synergy for the interaction of iron chelation and topoisomerase II inhibition. Furthermore, TSC24 was shown to induce DNA degradation in bloodstream forms of T. brucei indicating that the mechanism of trypanotoxic activity of the compound is topoisomerase II independent. In conclusion, the data support further investigation of thiosemicarbazone iron chelators with dual activity as lead compounds for anti-trypanosomal drug development. PMID:25595343

  4. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  5. Development of a new radiolabel (lead-203) and new chelating agents for labeling monoclonal anntibodies for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Steplewski, Z.

    1988-01-01

    High liver uptake and slow body clearance presently limit the usefulness of /sup 111/In labeled antibodies for tumor imaging. We have investigated /sup 203/Pb as an alternate and better antibody label. The DTPA and cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) conjugates of an anticolon carcinoma antibody, 17-1A were labeled (bicyclic anhydride method) with /sup 203/Pb and /sup 111/In with 60 and 90% labeling yields, respectively. The biodistribution of /sup 203/Pb-17-1A conjugates was compared with the corresponding /sup 111/In-labeled preparations and with /sup 203/Pb-DTPA, /sup 203/Pb-nitrate and nonrelevant antibody controls in normal and human tumor (SW948) xenografted nude mice at 24, and 96 hr. Lead-203-labeled CDTA and DTPA antibody conjugates gave similar in vivo distributions. Even though the lead bound to these chelate-antibody conjugates was more labile in serum and in vivo, compared to indium, it cleared much faster from the liver and the whole body. A new series of chelating agents based on the incorporation of a trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane moiety into the carbon backbone of polyaminocarboxylates is being synthesized. These are expected to provide stronger complexing ability for lead and produce greater in vivo stability. These ligands are also expected to be superior to EDTA and DTPA for labeling antibodies with other radiometals, including indium. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Intrinsic hydration of monopositive uranyl hydroxide, nitrate, and acetate cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Winnie; Anbalagan, Victor; Zandler, Melvin; Van Stipdonk, Michael; Hanna, Dorothy; Gresham, Garold; Groenewold, Gary

    2004-06-01

    The intrinsic hydration of three monopositive uranyl-anion complexes (UO(2)A)(+) (where A = acetate, nitrate, or hydroxide) was investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). The relative rates for the formation of the monohydrates [(UO(2)A)(H(2)O)](+), with respect to the anion, followed the trend: Acetate > or = nitrate > hydroxide. This finding was rationalized in terms of the donation of electron density by the strongly basic OH(-) to the uranyl metal center, thereby reducing the Lewis acidity of U and its propensity to react with incoming nucleophiles, viz., H(2)O. An alternative explanation is that the more complex acetate and nitrate anions provide increased degrees of freedom that could accommodate excess energy from the hydration reaction. The monohydrates also reacted with water, forming dihydrates and then trihydrates. The rates for formation of the nitrate and acetate dihydrates [(UO(2)A)(H(2)O)(2)](+) were very similar to the rates for formation of the monohydrates; the presence of the first H(2)O ligand had no influence on the addition of the second. In contrast, formation of the [(UO(2)OH)(H(2)O)(2)](+) was nearly three times faster than the formation of the monohydrate. PMID:15144967

  7. Modulation of the unpaired spin localization in Pentavalent Uranyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetere, V.; Maldivi, P.; Mazzanti, M. [CEA Grenoble, INAC, SCIB, laboratoire de reconnaissance ionique et chimie de coordination, 38 (France); Vetere, V. [UMR5626, laboratoire de chimie et physique quantique, universite de Toulouse, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-06-15

    The electronic structure of various complexes of pentavalent uranyl species, namely UO{sub 2}{sup +}, is described, using DFT methods, with the aim of understanding how the structure of the ligands may influence the localisation of the unpaired 5f electron of uranium (V) and, finally, the stability of such complexes towards oxidation. Six complexes have been inspected: [UO{sub 2}py{sub 5}]{sup +} (1), [(UO{sub 2}py{sub 5})KI{sub 2}] (2), [UO{sub 2}(salan-{sup t}Bu{sub 2})(py)K] (3), [UO{sub 2}(salophen-{sup t}Bu{sub 2})(thf)K] (4), [UO{sub 2}(salen-{sup t}Bu{sub 2})(py)K] (5), [and UO{sub 2}-cyclo[6]pyrrole]{sup 1-} (6), chosen to explore various ligands. In the five first complexes, the UO{sub 2}{sup +} species is well identified with the unpaired electron localized on the 5f uranium orbital. Additionally, for the salan, salen and salophen ligands, some covalent interactions have been observed, resulting from the presence of both donor and acceptor binding sites. In contrast, the last complex is best described by a UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} uranyl (VI) coordinated by the anionic radical cyclo-pyrrole, the highly delocalized p orbitals set stabilizing the radical behaviour of this ligand. (authors)

  8. Reaction of uranyl fluoride with sodium fluoride in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of complex uranyl fluorides in the system NaF-VO2F2-H2O has been studied and some of their properties have been investigated. It has been shown that, depending on the mole ratio of the components (from 0.5:1 to 5:1), fluorouranylates Na(VO2)2F5x4H2O, Na3(VO2)2F7x2H2O, and Na3VO2F5 are formed. Infrared spectra have demonstrated that H2O molecules are not coordinated by the central atom. Dehydration of hydrated complexes proceeds in two stages. Non-aqueous Na3(VO2)2F5 melts at 540 deg C. The synthesized complexes are studied by X-ray structural analysis. The compositions of complex uranyl fluorides formed in the systems MF-VO2F2-H2O (M=Na,K,Rb,Cs,NH4, CN3H6) have been compared

  9. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Siegel, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  10. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption

  11. Synthesis of chelating agents for actinium 225 complexation and its application in radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunotherapy with radiolabeled antibodies should allow fairly specific targeting of certain cancers. However, iodine 131 may not be the best isotope for tumor therapy because of its limited specific activity, low beta-energy, relatively long half life and strong gamma emission. Another approach to improve therapeutic efficacy is the use of replacement isotopes with better physical properties. Chelator that can hold radio-metals with high stability under physiological conditions are essential to avoid excessive damage to non-target cells; Moreover, the development of new bifunctional chelating agents is essential for this purpose. Accordingly, our efforts have been directed, for several years, to the synthesis of original chelating agents likely to form stable complexes in vivo with the numerous potential candidates for such applications. Therefore, we have developed a new simple and efficient synthesis pathway of 2-(4-iso-thio-cyanate-benzyl)-1,4,7,10,13,16- hexa-aza-cyclo-hexadecane- 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexa-acetic acid, though functionalized on the cycle by a termination allowed coupling to an antibody or any other biological substance such as a hapten. (author)

  12. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics study of the uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jeangros, Nicolás; Seminario, Jorge M

    2014-03-01

    The detection of uranium is very important, especially in water and, more importantly, in the form of uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺, which is one of its most abundant moieties. Here, we report analyses and simulations of uranyl in water using ab initio modified force fields for water with improved parameters and charges of uranyl. We use a TIP4P model, which allows us to obtain accurate water properties such as the boiling point and the second and third shells of water molecules in the radial distribution function thanks to a fictitious charge that corrects the 3-point models by reproducing the exact dipole moment of the water molecule. We also introduced non-bonded interaction parameters for the water-uranyl intermolecular force field. Special care was taken in testing the effect of a range of uranyl charges on the structure of uranyl-water complexes. Atomic charges of the solvated ion in water were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations taking into account the presence of nitrate ions in the solution, forming a neutral ensemble. DFT-based force fields were calculated in such a way that water properties, such as the boiling point or the pair distribution function stand. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations of a water box containing uranyl cations and nitrate anions are performed at room temperature. The three peaks in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function for water were found to be kept in the presence of uranyl thanks to the improvement of interaction parameters and charges. Also, we found three shells of water molecules surrounding the uranyl ion instead of two as was previously thought. PMID:24573498

  13. Recent developments centered on orally active iron chelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years there has been a growing interest in the orally active iron chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox, both have been extensively studied. The ability of these compounds to mobilize iron from the heart and endocrine tissue has presented the clinician with some advantages over desferrioxamine, the first therapeutic iron chelator. Other orally active iron chelators are currently under development. The critical features necessary for the design of therapeutically useful orally active iron chelators are presented in this review, together with recent studies devoted to the design of such chelators. This newly emerging range of iron chelators will enable clinicians to apply iron chelation methodology to other disease states and to begin to design personalized chelation regimes.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of 2-thenoyltrifluoro acetonate of uranyl salts doped with europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl compounds present a great potential as luminescence materials. Some examples of applications are: in laser technology, cathode ray tube, X-rays diagnostic. In this work it was studied the synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic properties study of uranyl 2-thenoyl trifluoroacetonate and uranyl 2- thenoyl trifluoroacetonate doped with europium. The compounds were synthesized and characterized by infrared absorption spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electronic microscopy, and electronic spectroscopy of emission and excitation. The Eu3+ ion acted as an effective luminescent probe, however the process of energy transfer from UO22+ to Eu3+ ion has not been efficient. (author)

  15. Effect of organic solvent properties on enthalpies of their mixing with uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of studying dissolution enthalpies of anhydrons uranyl nitrate and its hexahydrate in different organic solvents and water are generalized. Analysis of different solvation effects during uranyl nitrate and its hexahydrate dissolution in 26 solvents shows that the main contribution to dissolution enthalpy is made by acidic-basic interaction of uranyl-nitrates with donor lone electron pairs. The obtained equations permit to predict with acceptable accuracy the values of dissolution enthalpies of the mentioned compounds in other midea on the basis of their physico-chemical properties

  16. Preparation of thin {alpha}-particle sources using poly-pyrrole films functionalized by a chelating agent; Preparation de sources minces d'emetteurs alpha a l'aide de films de polypyrrole fonctionnalises par un ligand chelatant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariet, C. [CEA Saclay, INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-07-01

    This work takes place in the scope of analysis of the {alpha}-particle emitting elements U, Pu and Am present in compound environmental matrix like sols and sediments. The samples diversity and above all the {alpha}-ray characteristics require the analyst to implement a sequence of chemical steps in which the more restricting is the actinides concentration in a uniform and thin layer en allowing an accurately measure of alpha activity. On this account, we studied a new technique for radioactive sources preparation based on tow steps: preparation of a thin film as source support; incorporation of radioactive elements by a chelating extraction mechanism. The thin films were obtained through electro-polymerization of pyrrole monomer functionalized by an chelating ligand able to extract actinides from concentrated acidic solutions. Polymerization conditions of this monomer were perfected, then obtained films were characterized from a physico-chemical point of view. We point out their extracting properties were comparable to (retention capacity, distribution coefficient) to those of usual ion-exchange resins. The underscore of uranyl and americium nitrate complexes formed in the thin layer allowed to calculate the extraction constants in case acid extraction is negligible. Thanks to this results, the values of the coefficients distribution D{sub U} and D{sub Am} could be provided for all nitric solutions in which acid extraction is negligible. Optimal actinides retention conditions in the polymer were defined and used to settle a protocol for plutonium analysis in environmental samples. (author)

  17. Development of an upconverting chelate assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xudong; Haushalter, Jeanne P.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2005-04-01

    We report progress on performing a cell-based assay for the detection of EGFR on cell surfaces by using upconverting chelates. An upconversion microscope has been developed for performing assays and testing optical response. A431 cells are labeled with europium DOTA and imaged using this upconverting microscope.

  18. Questions and Answers on Unapproved Chelation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it Email Print The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises consumers to be wary of so-called “chelation” products that are marketed over-the-counter (OTC) to prevent or treat diseases. Companies are marketing unapproved OTC chelation therapy products to ...

  19. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals for the 3-year project period are (1) to test and validate the present uranium sensor and develop protocols for its use at the NABIR Field Research Center; (2) to develop new reagents that will provide superior performance for the present hand-held immunosensor; and (3) to develop new antibodies that will permit this sensor to also measure other environmental contaminants (chromium, mercury, and/or DTPA). Sensor design modifications are underway via international collaborations. New reagents that will provide superior performance for the present hand-held immunosensor are being prepared and tested. New methods have been developed, to produce recombinant forms of metal-specific monoclonal antibodies for use with the sensor. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments are underway to determine the mechanisms of binding. Immunization experiments with sheep and rabbits to develop new recombinant forms of antibodies to metal-chelate complexes (chromium, mercury, and/or DTPA) have been initiated

  20. Overview of chelation recommendations for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease

    OpenAIRE

    Banu Kaya

    2014-01-01

    The long term consequences of iron toxicity are mostly reversible with effective iron chelation therapy. Recommendations for use of chelation therapy in transfusion dependent thalassaemia (TDT), sickle cell disease (SCD) and non transfusion dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) continue to evolve as our knowledge and clinical experience increases. Improved chelation options including drug combinations and a better understanding of condition specific factors may help to improve efficiency of chelation...

  1. Overview of chelation recommendations for thalassaemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The long term consequences of iron toxicity are mostly reversible with effective iron chelation therapy. Recommendations for use of chelation therapy in transfusion dependent thalassaemia (TDT, sickle cell disease (SCD and non transfusion dependent thalassaemia (NTDT continue to evolve as our knowledge and clinical experience increases. Improved chelation options including drug combinations and a better understanding of condition specific factors may help to improve efficiency of chelation regimens and meet the needs of patients more effectively.

  2. Preparation of thin α-particle sources using poly-pyrrole films functionalized by a chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work takes place in the scope of analysis of the α-particle emitting elements U, Pu and Am present in compound environmental matrix like sols and sediments. The samples diversity and above all the α-ray characteristics require the analyst to implement a sequence of chemical steps in which the more restricting is the actinides concentration in a uniform and thin layer en allowing an accurately measure of alpha activity. On this account, we studied a new technique for radioactive sources preparation based on tow steps: preparation of a thin film as source support; incorporation of radioactive elements by a chelating extraction mechanism. The thin films were obtained through electro-polymerization of pyrrole monomer functionalized by an chelating ligand able to extract actinides from concentrated acidic solutions. Polymerization conditions of this monomer were perfected, then obtained films were characterized from a physico-chemical point of view. We point out their extracting properties were comparable to (retention capacity, distribution coefficient) to those of usual ion-exchange resins. The underscore of uranyl and americium nitrate complexes formed in the thin layer allowed to calculate the extraction constants in case acid extraction is negligible. Thanks to this results, the values of the coefficients distribution DU and DAm could be provided for all nitric solutions in which acid extraction is negligible. Optimal actinides retention conditions in the polymer were defined and used to settle a protocol for plutonium analysis in environmental samples. (author)

  3. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of [C10H26N2][(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)](H2SeO4)0.85(H2O)2 (1), [C10H26N2][(UO2)(SeO4)2] (H2SeO4)0.50(H2O) (2), and [C8H20N]2[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)] (H2O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO7 and SeO4 polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO2(SeO4)2(H2O)]2- chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH3(CH2)10NH3]2+ molecules, H2O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H2SeO4) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO2(SeO4)2]2- sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H2SeO4) groups but is based upon alternating [UO2(SeO4)2(H2O)]2- sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH3(CH2)7CH3]+. The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in general, actinyl) chemistry, it requires specific additional mechanisms: (a) in long-chain-amine-templated compounds, protonated amine molecules inter-digitate; (b) in long-chain-diamine-templated compounds, incorporation of acid-water interlayers into an organic substructure is necessary; (c) the inclination angle of the amine chains may vary in order to modify

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CHELATION VALUE OF SEVENTEEN PERCENT SELF DEVELOPED AND COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ROOT CANAL LUBRICANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ingale Satish Dinkarrao; Kankariya Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to compare chelation values of 17% self developed & commercially available root canal Lubricants or dental chelating gels as well as to see whether their performance depends on the chelation value or not. The Chelating agent bounds Ca2+ ions of the smear layer & the extent of chelate formation between chelating agent and metal ion is nothing but Chelation Value. Sodium carbonate indicator method is used for determinations of chelation value. Commercially av...

  5. First Synthesis of Uranyl Aluminate nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes, for the first time, a simple method for the synthesis of uranyl aluminate (URAL) nano-particles. URAL was prepared by U(VI) hydrolytic precipitation with ammonia at pH = 11 in the presence of meso-porous alumina MSU-X under 20 kHz of sonication followed by annealing of the obtained solids at 800 C. TEM, XAFS, powder XRD, and 27Al MAS NMR studies revealed that the speciation of uranium in this system strongly depends on uranium concentration. The sample with 5 wt % of uranium yields air-stable nano-particles (similar to 5 nm) of URAL. Presumably, UO22+ cations in this compound are coordinated with bidentate AlO2- groups. The increase of uranium concentration to 30 wt % causes mostly formation of U3O8 fine particles (similar to 50 nm) and small amounts of URAL. (authors)

  6. First Synthesis of Uranyl Aluminate nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chave, T.; Nikitenko, S. I. [UMII, ICSM, CEA, CNRS, ENSCM, Ctr Marcoule, UMR 5257, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Scheinost, A. C. [European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, Rossendorf Beamline CRG BM20, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Scheinost, A. C. [FZD, Inst Radiochem, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Berthon, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DRCP, Ctr Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes, for the first time, a simple method for the synthesis of uranyl aluminate (URAL) nano-particles. URAL was prepared by U(VI) hydrolytic precipitation with ammonia at pH = 11 in the presence of meso-porous alumina MSU-X under 20 kHz of sonication followed by annealing of the obtained solids at 800 C. TEM, XAFS, powder XRD, and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR studies revealed that the speciation of uranium in this system strongly depends on uranium concentration. The sample with 5 wt % of uranium yields air-stable nano-particles (similar to 5 nm) of URAL. Presumably, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cations in this compound are coordinated with bidentate AlO{sub 2}{sup -} groups. The increase of uranium concentration to 30 wt % causes mostly formation of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} fine particles (similar to 50 nm) and small amounts of URAL. (authors)

  7. On extraction of uranyl trichloroacetate with tri-n-butylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between uranium distribution coefficient and salt concentration in an aqueous phase has been studied during the extraction of uranyl trichloroacetate with trbutylphosphate (TBP). Extraction has been performed at (25.00+-0.05)deg C in glass ampoules kept from light due to the tendency of salt to hydrolysis. The equilibrium between phases has been attained for 60 minutes. It is shown that UO2(CCl3COO)2 is extracted from aqueous solutions in TBP much better than UO2(NO3)2 in the concentration range of 0-0.3 mol/kg in the aqueous phase. Maximum value of the uranium distribution coefficient for UO2(CCl3OO)2 is about 90

  8. Complex formation between uranyl and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between hexavalent uranium and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L), salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q), S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide(H/sub 2/Z), and thiosemicarbazidodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/R) has been studied spectrophotometrically in solution. Stability constants for complexes having the composition UO/sub 2/A have been calculated. Solid uranyl derivatives having the composition UO/sub 2/L x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Q x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Z x 2H/sub 2/O, and UO/sub 2/R x 2H/sub 2/O have been obtained. These derivatives were isolated and their IR spectroscopic behavior and thermal properties were investigated.

  9. Decontamination of metal surface contaminated by uranyl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination degrees was measured for the metallic equipments in the uranium conversion plant by a chemical decontamination and contamination degrees also measured. Most equipments was made of stainless steel and contacted with uranium(VI) and nitric acid solution. So, metallic surfaces was contaminated with uranium(VI) materials. And decontamination degrees can be expressed by alpha activity measurements. For the alpha activity measurements, metallic specimens were selected in the three representative processes, dissolution process, solvent extraction, and Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate(AUC) precipitation and were prepared to rectangular parallelepipeds with 18mm width and 18mm length and 5mm height. The metallic surfaces can be decontaminated under 10 Bq/cm2 alpha activity due to uranium by only water decontamination, and under 0.04 Bq/cm2 alpha activity by 10% nitric acid decontamination that is ground activity level

  10. Investigation of the Uranyl(II)-3-Hydroxyflavone complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the application of suitable spectrophotometric methods and pH-metric measurements it has been established that uranyl ion and 3-hydroxyflavone from a [UO2(C15H9O3)]+ complex. The concentration stability constant of the complex was determined by Bent-French's (β1 = 8,59 at pH = 3,5) and Bjerrum's (from 8,68 at pH = 4 to 6,14 at pH = 7) methods. Conditions are given for the spectrophotometric determination of 3-hydroxyflavone by means of the complex. The regression equation is calculated and the accuracy of the method is determined. All investigations were carried out with 80 % ethanolic solutions at room temperature (20 %), the spectrophotometric measurements being performed at a constant pH (3,5) and a constant ionic strength (0,01 M). (Authors)

  11. On thermal decomposition of double manganese and uranyl sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal decomposition of MnUO2(SO4)2x5H2O was studied by differential thermal, thermogravimetric, and X-ray phase analysis. The parameters of rhombic unit cells of α-MnU3O10 a=6.563, b=3.790, c=8.273 A, Z=1; β-MnU3O10 - a=6.564, b=7.581, c=16.54 A, Z=4; (U,Mn)3O8 - a=6.389, b=11.32, c=8.262 A, Z=4; and MnUO4 - a=6.645, b=6.747, c=6.980 A, Z=4; space group Imam were determined. The interplane distances for anhydrous manganese sulphate and uranyl are given

  12. Investigation into uranyl sulfate crystallohydrate interaction with pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product of UO2SO4x2.5H2O interaction with pyridine is investigated. It is detected that as a result of interaction one of the aqueous molecules of band hydrate of uranyl sulfate is subjected to intramolecular dissociation with the formation of hydroxy compound and transfer of proton to pyridine. Protonated amine is kept in the structure of the compound investigated in the interlayer space by means of hydrogen bonds. The (PyH((UO2SO4xOHH2O) formula is prescribed to the complex prepared. The substance is characterized by the methods of chemical, X-ray phase, spectral and thermal analyses. Decomposition of the sulfate group is established to begin about 450 deg C with separation of pyridinium sulfate to the gaseous phase. Change in pyridinium and water molecule removal in thermal decomposition of the complex is discussed

  13. Pilot scale for preparation of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure adopted for obtaining Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) from uranium hexafluoride (UF sub(6)) or aqueous solutions of uranylnitrate (UO sub(2)(NO sub(3)) sub(2)) is described in the present work. This procedure involves the precipitation of AUC in a chemical reactor by the addition of gaseous UF sub(6) or solutions of uranylnitrate to NH sub(3) and CO sub(2) gases in a solution containing ammonium bicarbonate, where pH and temperature are controlled. Details regarding the characterization and quality control methods in the preparation of AUC are presented along with their physical and chemical properties. Some informations about effluents generated during the process are presented too. An attempt is made to correlate the parameters involved in the precipitation process of AUC and their characteristics. (author)

  14. Reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions was studied spectrophotometrically in slightly acid or neutral solutions of 40% (m/m) ethanol. A violet complex of UO2L2 is formed at pH>5. The conditional stability constants of the complex in the pH range 6-7.4 and the equilibrium constants of the coordination reaction were derived from the concentration curves and the continuous variations curves. The optimum conditions were sought for the spectrophotometric determination of uranium based on the occurrence of the UO2L2 complex. The relative standard deviation obtained for a uranium concentration of 106 μg.l-1 was ssub(r)=2.13%. (author)

  15. Reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotoucek, M.; Hrbkova, M. (Palackeho Univ., Olomouc (Czechoslovakia). Prirodovedecka Fakulta)

    1984-09-01

    The reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions was studied spectrophotometrically in slightly acid or neutral solutions of 40% (m/m) ethanol. A violet complex of UO/sub 2/L/sub 2/ is formed at pH>5. The conditional stability constants of the complex in the pH range 6-7.4 and the equilibrium constants of the coordination reaction were derived from the concentration curves and the continuous variations curves. The optimum conditions were sought for the spectrophotometric determination of uranium based on the occurrence of the UO/sub 2/L/sub 2/ complex. The relative standard deviation obtained for a uranium concentration of 106 ..mu..g.l/sup -1/ was ssub(r)=2.13%.

  16. Evaluation of lanthanide salts as alternative stains to uranyl acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Naoki; Nishioka, Hideo; Nakakoshi, Masamichi

    2015-12-01

    Uranyl acetate (UAc) has been generally used not only as a superb staining reagent for ultrathin sections of plastic-embedded biological materials, but also as high-contrast negative stains for biological macromolecules such as particles of protein or virus. However, the use and purchase of radioactive UAc have been restricted. In this study, we determine the performance of ytterbium triacetate, lutetium triacetate, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate as new staining reagents for biological electron microscopy. We observed chemically fixed spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves stained with these reagents. Ultrathin sections were stained with these reagents. Some of them were counterstained with lead citrate. The transmission electron microscopy contrast of spinach organelles was evaluated in sections exposed to the conventional stain and new stains. We show acetate salts of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium and lutetium could be excellent substitutes for UAc for thin section staining and for negative staining. In addition, each reagent showed appreciable negative-staining effects. PMID:26374081

  17. Mutual solubility in the system uranyl trifluoroacetate--water--diethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovenko, V.M.; Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of mutual solubility in the system uranyl trifluoroacetate--water--diethyl ether at 25/sup 0/C. It was found that uranyl trifluoroacetate, like the trichloroacetate which was investigated previously, is extracted by diethyl ether much better than uranyl nitrate over a wide range of concentrations. The solubility of UO/sub 2/(CF/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/ in ether depends strongly on the water content of the system. While the anhydrous salt is practically insoluble, the addition of two H/sub 2/O molecules to a molecule of UO/sub 2/(CF/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/ leads to an increase in solubility to approximately 75 wt. percent. On the basis of the ir spectra of ether solutions of uranyl trifluoroacetate in the presence of semiheavy water (HDO) it was established that the hydration envelope of the complex in diethyl ether has a layer structure.

  18. On extraction of uranyl trifluoro- and monochloracetate with tri-n-butylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studied is the distribution of uranyl trifluorine-and monochlorineacetate between the water phase and the tributylphosphate phase. It has been shown that UO2(CF3COO)2 can be extracted, when there are no salinators from diluted aqueous solutions (the maximum distribution coefficient, α, is approximately equal to 16), more effectively than uranyl nitrate (αmax approximately equal to 4), but less effectively than uranyl trichlorineacetate. The extraction capacity of UO2(Ch2ClCOO)2 is about the same at low salt concentration in the water phase as that of UO2(NO3)2 (αmax approximately equal to 3.5). It was found that the extraction row of anions changed in case of the extraction to TBP when there was a change of salt concentration in such a way that among the concentrated solutions the greatest distribution coefficient in the studied row of salts possessed uranyl monochlorineacetate

  19. The uranyl influence on a mutation process in germ and somatic cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic effect of uranyl was revealed by the chromosome rearrangement test in germ and somatic cells of mice. The effect value depended on duration of substance administration into organism. (authors)

  20. Uranyl determination using pyridylazoresorcinol as complexing active by adsorb voltametry technique with cathodic redissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development method for uranyl ion determination by the optimization of chemical reaction and instrumental parameters is shown. This method is based on preconcentration stage, where in adsorptive accumulation of metallic complex in a static electrode is presented. (author)

  1. Influence of Chelating Agents on Chromium Fate in Sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXIAOCHANG; SUNJINHE; 等

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory investigation on reaction between chelating agents and chromium was conducted to evaluate the effect of chelating agents on the adsorption and desorption of chromium in sediment.The amount of adsorbed chromium(VI) in sediment decreased slightly by 5%-10% because of addition of chelating agents.Chelating agents inhibited the removal of Cr(Ⅲ)by sediment from solutions and the inhibiting effect was in the order:citric acid>tartaric acid>EDTA,Salicylic acid.No effect of chelating agents on desorption of chromium in sediment was observed.

  2. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO2)(W2O7)(H2O)3 (1) and (UO2)3(W2O8)F2(H2O)3 (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) circle. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO2)2+ uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO2F2O3]-6 or [UO2FO4]-5, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  3. Critical experiments on STACY homogeneous core containing 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate criticality properties of low enriched uranyl nitrate solution treated in the reprocessing facility for LWR fuel cycle, systematic and high precision critical experiments have been performed at the Static Experiment Critical Facility, STACY since 1995. Criticality benchmark data on 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution for single core and multiple core systems have been accumulated using cylindrical and slab type core tanks. This paper overviews mains data and related criticality calculation results using standard criticality safety calculation code system. (author)

  4. Mutual solubility in the system uranyl trichloroacetate--water--diethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovenko, V.M.; Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of mutual solubility in the system uranyl trichloroacetate--water--diethyl ether at 25/sup 0/C. It was found that the solubility of the salt in ether and the composition of the lower phase depend on the water content of the ternary system. On the basis of ir spectra of ether solutions of uranyl trichloroacetate in the presence of semiheavy water (HDO) the structure of the hydration envelope of the complex in diethyl ether was established.

  5. Studies of crystalline water at low temperatures by selective laser excitation of impurity uranyl ion fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine-structure fluorescence spectrum of uranyl aqueous solution is obtained for the first time at low temperatures. It is established that the uranyl local surrounding in crystals of ice is characterized by low ordering, more typical for glasses. Temperature dependence of the width of the fluorescence resonance 0-0 line is measured. This dependence at temperatures above 20 K is described by interaction with phonons within the frames of the Debye model

  6. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of actinide complexes. Communication 1. SFE of uranyl trifluoroacetylacetonate adduct with pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison of some methods of ascertaining the solubility of metal complexes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was made. It is shown that solubility of uranyl trifluoroacetylacetonate adduct with pyridine exceeds 100 g/l (36 mg of uranium per ml) of SC-CO2 under the pressure of 300 atm and temperature of 60 deg C. Partial degrading of the uranyl trifluoroacetylacetonate adduct with pyridine is pointed out

  7. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2015-11-01

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO{sub 2})(W{sub 2}O{sub 7})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(W{sub 2}O{sub 8})F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) {sup circle}. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sup -6} or [UO{sub 2}FO{sub 4}]{sup -5}, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  8. Archetypes for actinide-specific chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexes of uranium and thorium with monomeric hydroxamic acids can serve as archetypes for an optimized macrochelate designed for tetravalent actinides. The eight-coordinate complexes, Th(i-PrN(O)C(O)R)4, where R = tert-butyl or R = neopentyl, have been synthesized and their structures have been determined by x-ray diffraction. The bulky alkyl substituents impart remarkable volatility and hydrocarbon solubility to these complexes, and the steric interactions of these substituents largely determine the structures. When R = tert-butyl, the substituents occupy the corners of a tetrahedron and force the complex into a distorted cubic geometry with crystallographic S4 symmetry. Insertion of a methylene group between the carbonyl carbon and the tert-butyl group relaxes the steric requirements, and the coordination polyhedron of the neopentyl derivative is close to the mmmm isomer of the trigonal-faced dodecahedron. Uranium tetrachloride was quantitatively oxidized via an oxygen transfer reaction with two equivalents of N-phenylbenzohydroxamic acid anion (PBHA) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) to form UO2 Cl(PBHA)(THF)2 and benzanilide. The structure of the uranyl complex has been determined from x-ray diffraction data; the linear uranyl ion is surrounded by a planar pentagonal array composed of two hydroxamate oxygen atoms, a chloride ion and two THF oxygens, such that the chloride ion is opposite the hydroxamate group. That the THF and phenyl rings are twisted from this equatorial plane limits the molecular geometry to that of the C1 point group. Some aspects of the chemistry of hydroxamic acids and of their incorporation into molecules that may serve as precursors of tetravalent actinide specific sequestering agents have also been investigated

  9. Uranyl coordination environment in hydrophobic ionic liquids: an in situ investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ann E; Jensen, Mark P; Laszak, Ivan; Nash, Kenneth L; Choppin, Gregory R; Rogers, Robin D

    2003-04-01

    Different inner-sphere coordination environments are observed for the uranyl nitrate complexes formed with octyl-phenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and tributyl phosphate in dodecane and in the hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) [C(4)mim][PF(6)] and [C(8)mim][N(SO(2)CF(3))(2)]. Qualitative differences in the coordination environment of the extracted uranyl species are implied by changes in peak intensity patterns and locations for uranyl UV-visible spectral bands when the solvent is changed. EXAFS data for uranyl complexes in dodecane solutions is consistent with hexagonal bipyramidal coordination and the existence of UO(2)(NO(3))(2)(CMPO)(2). In contrast, the complexes formed when uranyl is transferred from aqueous nitric acid solutions into the ILs exhibit an average equatorial coordination number of approximately 4.5. Liquid/liquid extraction results for uranyl in both ILs indicate a net stoichiometry of UO(2)(NO(3))(CMPO)(+). The concentration of the IL cation in the aqueous phase increases in proportion to the amount of UO(2)(NO(3))(CMPO)(+) in the IL phase, supporting a predominantly cation exchange mechanism for partitioning in the IL systems. PMID:12665350

  10. Effect of the temperature and oxalic acid in the uranyl sorption in zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the results of the temperature effect study are presented on uranyl solutions adsorbed on zirconium silicate (ZrSiO4) and also on the compounds formed in surface with oxalic acid. The adsorption isotherms of uranyl on hydrated zircon with NaClO4 0.5 M, show an increase of the uranyl sorption efficiency when increasing the temperature from 20 to 4 C with a sudden descent in this efficiency when changing the temperature at 60 C. The uranyl sorption efficiency increases to hydrate the zircon with a solution of oxalic acid 0.1 M, maintaining the same tendency regarding to the temperatures of the sorption in medium NaClO4 0.5 M. The complex formation in the zircon surface with organic acids of low molecular weight increases the fixation of the uranyl in solution due to the formation of ternary systems, in the order Zircon/A. Organic/Uranyl, without altering their response to the temperature. (Author)

  11. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H+ or OH- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal the mutual orientation of the uranyl ions.

  12. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  13. Photochemical study on uranyl(VI) tributylphosphate in supercritical CO2 and the first uranyl(VI) photoreduction carried out in supercritical fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photochemistry of uranyl(VI)-tributylphosphate (TBP) complex in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) was studied in the pressure range of 8-40 MPa and from 289 to 336 K. Deactivation rate constants decreased with the increase of pressure. Temperature dependence analysis of the deactivation rate constants indicated that scCO2 contributes differently to deactivation processes from liquid phase CO2 based on activation barriers. An UV irradiation experiment proved photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)-TBP complex by ethanol in scCO2. (author)

  14. Pentaarylcyclopentadiene und chirale Ruthenium-Chelat-Komplexe

    OpenAIRE

    Kanthak, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Die Synthese von mono-ortho-funktionalisierten Pentaphenylcyclopentadienen gelang durch eine Abwandlung der klassischen Tetracyclon-Route. Durch die Umsetzung der funktionalisierten Cyclopentadiene mit Ru3(CO)12 als Metallquelle konnten entsprechende Ruthenium-Komplexe erhalten werden. Die geeignete Wahl der Substituenten an der Phenylgruppe erlaubte die Bildung von Chelat-Komplexen mit chirotopem Metallzentrum. Enantiomerenreine Oxazolin-Seitenarme führten zu diastereomerenreinen...

  15. Federal Regulation of Unapproved Chelation Products

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Chelation products can be helpful in the treatment of metal poisoning. However, many unapproved products with unproven effectiveness and safety are marketed to consumers, frequently via the internet. This paper describes the primary responsibility of the Health Fraud and Consumer Outreach Branch of the United States Food and Drug Administration to identify and address health fraud products. Efforts to prevent direct and indirect hazards to the population’s health through regulatory actions ar...

  16. EDTA: the chelating agent under environmental scrutiny

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Oviedo; Jaime Rodríguez

    2003-01-01

    The chelating agent EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) is a compound of massive use world wide with household and industrial applications, being one of the anthropogenic compounds with highest concentrations in inland European waters. In this review, the applications of EDTA and its behavior once it has been released into the environment are described. At a laboratory scale, degradation of EDTA has been achieved; however, in natural environments studies detect poor biodegradability. It is...

  17. Decorporation of metal ions by chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple model designs to simulate the effect of therapeutical chelating agents on the behaviour of metals in mammal organisms with and without excretion have been derived and analytical solutions given for the corresponding differential equations. The possibilities of these models in the short-term description of plasma kinetics of various metals, the competition of the therapeutical ligands with proteins for the metal and of the metabolism of chelating agents were tested and the properties applying extreme conceivable parameters were analyzed. The simple models were successsively expanded in logical sequence, so that it was possible to qualitatively well describe over a long period of time, the metallic kinetics in plasma, organs and urine, the retention of the ligands and their effect on the metal excretion. Two suggestions were given to describe the so-called after-effect, an increased excretion of the metal at times when the ligand is almost completely excreted and their different behaviour after injecting the metal chelate is given. Calculations on the therapy with several ligand data as well as on dose fractionation are described resting on the ratios in the plutonium-239 chosen model parameters and the determining mechanisms analyzed. (orig./MG)

  18. IRON CHELATION THERAPY IN THALASSEMIA SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cianciulli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as  thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce  complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients

  19. Phase equilibria at 25 degree C in the three-component system uranyl trichloroacetate-water-methylisobutylketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of an investigation of the mutual solubility in the three-component system uranyl trichloroacetate-water-methylisobutylketone (MIBK) at 25 degree C. The resulting phase diagram is examined from the viewpoint of existing data for uranyl nitrate-water-organic solvent systems, including those with MIBK, in addition to analogous systems with uranyl trichloroacetate. Manifestations of anion effects during extraction by a hydrate-solvate mechanism are largely mediated through extractant properties

  20. Increasing the Net Negative Charge by Replacement of DOTA Chelator with DOTAGA Improves the Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Second-Generation Synthetic Affibody Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Kristina; Honarvar, Hadis; Norrström, Emily; Strand, Joanna; Mitran, Bogdan; Orlova, Anna; Eriksson Karlström, Amelie; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A promising strategy to enable patient stratification for targeted therapies is to monitor the target expression in a tumor by radionuclide molecular imaging. Affibody molecules (7 kDa) are nonimmunoglobulin scaffold proteins with a 25-fold smaller size than intact antibodies. They have shown an apparent potential as molecular imaging probes both in preclinical and clinical studies. Earlier, we found that hepatic uptake can be reduced by the incorporation of negatively charged purification tags at the N-terminus of Affibody molecules. We hypothesized that liver uptake might similarly be reduced by positioning the chelator at the N-terminus, where the chelator-radionuclide complex will provide negative charges. To test this hypothesis, a second generation synthetic anti-HER2 ZHER2:2891 Affibody molecule was synthesized and labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga using DOTAGA and DOTA chelators. The chelators were manually coupled to the N-terminus of ZHER2:2891 forming an amide bond. Labeling DOTAGA-ZHER2:2891 and DOTA-ZHER2:2891 with (68)Ga and (111)In resulted in stable radioconjugates. The tumor-targeting and biodistribution properties of the (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled conjugates were compared in SKOV-3 tumor-bearing nude mice at 2 h postinjection. The HER2-specific binding of the radioconjugates was verified both in vitro and in vivo. Using the DOTAGA chelator gave significantly lower radioactivity in liver and blood for both radionuclides. The (111)In-labeled conjugates showed more rapid blood clearance than the (68)Ga-labeled conjugates. The most pronounced influence of the chelators was found when they were labeled with (68)Ga. The DOTAGA chelator gave significantly higher tumor-to-blood (61 ± 6 vs 23 ± 5, p DOTA chelator. This study demonstrated that chelators may be used to alter the uptake of Affibody molecules, and most likely other scaffold-based imaging probes, for improvement of imaging contrast. PMID:27010700

  1. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO3 solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 μmol/m2) to high (26 μmol/m2) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range ≅ 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 μM). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 μmol/m2). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  2. Binary copper(II) and uranyl(VI) complexes of glycocyamine, taurine and pyridoxal and ternary complexes involving 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline or nitrilotriacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelating tendencies of several biologically important compounds viz. glycocyamine (GCN: N-amidino-aminoethanoic acid) taurine (TRN: 2-aminoethanesulphonic acid) and pyridoxal [PDL: 3-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methyl-pyridine-4-carbaldehyde] have been examined by pH-metric titration technique in their binary complex formation with copper(II) and uranyl(VI) ions. The work has further been extended to investigating the ternary complex formation involving 2.2'-bipyridine. 1,10-phenanthroline or nitrilotriacetic acid as a primary and TRN and PDL as secondary ligands. All the experiments were carried out at 250C and at an ionic strength of 0.1M (NaCl04) in aqueous or 50% (v/v) aqueous-ethanol medium according to the suitability of the experimental conditions. Stabilities of ternary complexes as compared to those of the corresponding binary complexes of the secondary ligands have also been discussed. (author)

  3. Determination of uranium in environmental matrices by chelation ion chromatography using a high performance substrate dynamically modified with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelation ion chromatography, involving a high efficiency neutral polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin dynamically coated with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, has been developed as a novel technique for the quantitative determination of uranium in complex matrices. An isocratic separation method, using an eluent consisting of 1M KNO3, 0.5 M HNO3 and 0.1 mM 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, allowed the uranyl ion to elute away from matrix interferences in under ten minutes. Detection was achieved using an Arsenazo III post column reaction system. Good recoveries were obtained from spiked mineral water and sea water and the standard addition curves produced good linearity (r2 > 0.997) with a detection limit, calculated as twice baseline noise, of 20 μg L-1. The procedure was applied to the determination of trace uranium in standard reference water and sediment samples. The results obtained compared well with the certified values for uranium. (orig.)

  4. The determination of the rate of conjugation immunoglobuline with bifunctional chelator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málek, Z.; Miler, V.; Budský, F.

    2006-01-01

    The work was performed under the GACR project: "Technology of preparation of radionuclides and their labelled compounds for nuclear medicine and pharmacy with the use of the reactor LVR-15" reg. no. 104/03/0499. Imaging of cell’s antigens with the use of labelled immunoglobulines allows imaging of specific receptors on cell membrane and specific tumours. It is necessary to carry out the labelling of the immunoglobulines with radionuclides of suitable physical properties, which form cations (e.g., 111In, 90Y, 177Lu) that form very strong chelates of sufficiently high stability constant preventing the dissociation of complexes or the radionuclide under “in-vivo” conditions. The immunoglobuline must be conjugated with the bifunctional chelator (BCH), which contains both chelating unit and reactive group for binding to the immunoglobuline. In our laboratory we have conjugated human IgG and monoclonal antibody CD20 with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid dianhydride (cDTPAA). Radionuclides 90Y and 177Lu prepared on the LVR-15 reactor in NRI Rez were used for labelling. After conjugation and labelling the yields in relation to the amount of isotopic carrier have been determined.

  5. Complexation or uranyl ion. II. Complexation of uranyl ion in the VP-IAp anion exchanger phase during sorption from carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complicated process of increased uranium sorption from carbonate medium by the strongly basic anion exchanger VP-1Ap after additional treatment with alkaline solution was studied by IR spectroscopy. The process is related to the formation of certain complex forms of uranyl, differing in degree of polymerization, in which polynuclear forms predominate

  6. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies with technetium-99 m via metallothionein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallothionein (MT), a small cysteine-rich protein, was used as a bifunctional chelating agent in the radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies with Tc-99m. The efficiency of the conjugation reaction of MT with antibodies (Ab) was found as 58%. The yield of radiolabelling of Tc-99m to MT-Ab by reduction method was higher than 90%, while the unspecific radiolabelling occurred less than 10%. The Tc-99m-MT-Ab has proven to be satisfactory stable in Vitro in the presence of a couple of strong chelating agents. The preliminary biological experimental results in tumor-bearing nude mice indicated that the Tc-99m-labelled anti-colorectal carcinoma monoclonal antibody 2C10 had strong affinity toward tumor and was stable in vivo

  7. REGIONAL SIDEROSIS: A NEW CHALLENGE FOR IRON CHELATION THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    ZviIoavCabantchik; ArnoldMunnich; MoussaB.Youdim; DavidDevos

    2013-01-01

    The traditional role of iron chelation therapy has been to reduce body iron burden via chelation of excess metal from organs and fluids and its excretion via biliary-fecal and/or urinary routes. In their present use for hemosiderosis, chelation regimens might not be suitable for treating disorders of iron maldistribution, as those are characterized by toxic islands of siderosis appearing in a background of normal or subnormal iron levels (e.g. sideroblastic anemias, neuro- and cardio-siderosi...

  8. Modern problems of chelate water conditions for TPPs and NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of investigations devoted to the application of chelate water conditions for TPPs and NPPs is given. Chelates (mainly EDTA and its salts) are used for increasing corrosion resistance of steels, operation and pre-start-up chemical purifications, correction of water conditions and coolant circuit purification under operation (without shutdown). It is stressed that under certain conditions the optimal continuous chelate water conditions are possible under water conditions are possible under which deposits are not produced

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Metal-Chelating Polymers for Mass Cytometric Bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majonis, Daniel

    This thesis describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of metal-chelating polymers for mass-cytometric bioassays. Mass cytometry is a cell characterization technique in which cells are injected individually into an ICP-MS detector. Signal is provided by staining cell-surface or intracellular antigens with metal-labeled antibodies (Abs). These Abs are labeled through the covalent attachment of metal-chelating polymers which carry multiple copies of a lanthanide isotope. In this work, my first goal was to develop a facile, straightforward synthesis of a new generation of metal-chelating polymers. The synthesis began with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, and was followed by numerous post-polymerization pendant group transformations to introduce DTPA lanthanide chelators to every repeat unit, and a maleimide at the end of the chain. The second goal was to apply these metal-chelating polymers in bioassay experiments. The DTPA groups were loaded with lanthanide ions, and the maleimide group was used to covalently attach the polymer to an Ab. This goat anti-mouse conjugate was found to carry an average of 2.4 +/- 0.3 polymer chains. Then, primary Ab conjugates were prepared and used in an 11-plex mass cytometry assay in the characterization of umbilical cord blood cells. The third goal was to expand the multiplexity of the assay. In current technology, the number of Abs that can be monitored simultaneously is limited to the 31 commercially available, stable lanthanide isotopes. Thus, I had an interest in preparing metal-chelating polymers that could carry other metals in the 100-220 amu range. I synthesized polymers with four different polyaminocarboxylate ligands, and investigated the loading of palladium and platinum ions into these polymers. Polymer-Ab conjugates prepared with palladium- and platinum-loaded polymers gave curious results, in that only dead cells were recognized. The fourth goal was to create dual

  10. Ultrastructural and metabolic changes in osteoblasts exposed to uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to uranium is an occupational hazard to workers who continually handle uranium and an environmental risk to the population at large. Since the cellular and molecular pathways of uranium toxicity in osteoblast cells are still unknown, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the adverse effects of uranyl nitrate (UN) on osteoblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Herein we studied the osteoblastic ultrastructural changes induced by UN in vivo and analyzed cell proliferation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (APh) activity in osteoblasts exposed to various UN concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 μM) in vitro. Cell proliferation was quantified by means of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, ROS was determined using the nitro blue tetrazolium test, apoptosis was morphologically determined using Hoechst 3332 and APh activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of active and inactive osteoblasts exposed to uranium presented cytoplasmic and nuclear alterations. In vitro, 1-100 μM UN failed to modify cell proliferation ratio and to induce apoptosis. ROS generation increased in a dose-dependent manner in all tested doses. APh activity was found to decrease in 1-100 μM UN-treated cells vs. controls. Our results show that UN modifies osteoblast cell metabolism by increasing ROS generation and reducing APh activity, suggesting that ROS may play a more complex role in cell physiology than simply causing oxidative damage. (orig.)

  11. Removal of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions using barium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of water sources contaminated with radioactive waste products is a major environmental issue that demands new and more efficient technologies. For this purpose, we report a highly efficient ion-exchange material for the removal of radioactive nuclides from aqueous solutions. The kinetic characteristics of adsorption of uranyl ions on the surface of barium titanate were investigated using a spectrophotometric method under a wide range of conditions. By controlling the pH it was possible to exert fine control over the speciation of uranium, and by optimizing the temperature and grain size of the exchanger, almost total removal was achieved in a matter of just hours. The highest efficiency (>90 % removal) was realized at high temperature (80 deg C). Moreover, the effect of competitive ion adsorption from a range of different cations and anions was quantified. Adsorption was found to follow first-order kinetics and both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms could be applied to this system. The results of a mathematical treatment of the kinetic data combined with the observation that adsorption was independent of stirring speed and dependent on the ion-exchanger grain size, indicate that the dominant mechanism influencing adsorption is particle spreading. The adsorption behavior was not influenced by exposure to high-intensity gamma radiation, indicating potential for use of this ion-exchanger in systems containing radioactive material. These results will be of use in the development of uranium extraction systems for contaminated water sources. (author)

  12. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The managers of all tritium facilities now worry about their emissions into the atmosphere. The only method for cleaning tritium out of air is to catalyze the formation of tritiated water which is adsorbed, along with the overwhelming bulk of naturally occurring water vapor, on a zeolite molecular sieve. This method generally costs several million dollars for a small system, because of the necessary steel ducting, compressors and holding tanks. We have long had the dream of finding another getter that might be cheaper to use and would, hopefully, not make tritiated water (HTO). In a previous paper, we discovered that hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP, with the formula HUO2PO4 x 4H2O) getters 1 ppM of tritium gas out of moist air. This makes HUP the first known ''direct'' tritium getter to work in air. However, the tritium enters a hydroxyl network within the HUP, so that it is effectively still in ''water'' form within the HUP. Worse yet, we found up to 10% tritiated water formed during the previous gettering experiments. HUP is unusual in possessing the exceptionally low vapor pressure of 0.6 torr water vapor at 2980K. This allows HUP to be used in fairly dry environments. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Ultrastructural and metabolic changes in osteoblasts exposed to uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasat, D.R. [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Pcia de Bs.As. (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Orona, N.S. [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Pcia de Bs.As. (Argentina); Mandalunis, P.M. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cabrini, R.L. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Radiobiologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ubios, A.M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Radiobiologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-05-15

    Exposure to uranium is an occupational hazard to workers who continually handle uranium and an environmental risk to the population at large. Since the cellular and molecular pathways of uranium toxicity in osteoblast cells are still unknown, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the adverse effects of uranyl nitrate (UN) on osteoblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Herein we studied the osteoblastic ultrastructural changes induced by UN in vivo and analyzed cell proliferation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (APh) activity in osteoblasts exposed to various UN concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M) in vitro. Cell proliferation was quantified by means of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, ROS was determined using the nitro blue tetrazolium test, apoptosis was morphologically determined using Hoechst 3332 and APh activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of active and inactive osteoblasts exposed to uranium presented cytoplasmic and nuclear alterations. In vitro, 1-100 {mu}M UN failed to modify cell proliferation ratio and to induce apoptosis. ROS generation increased in a dose-dependent manner in all tested doses. APh activity was found to decrease in 1-100 {mu}M UN-treated cells vs. controls. Our results show that UN modifies osteoblast cell metabolism by increasing ROS generation and reducing APh activity, suggesting that ROS may play a more complex role in cell physiology than simply causing oxidative damage. (orig.)

  14. Adsorption of uranyl in SiO2 porous glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitreous SiO2 porous matrices can be used in many applications involving the uptake of chemical species on its solid surface. In this work, vitreous silica sponges were prepared from a sodium borosilicate glass manufactured in our laboratory. The product obtained was then separated into phases with subsequent leaching of the soluble phase rich in B and Na. The resulting porous matrices have a specific surface of 35 m2/gr. Adsorption of uranyl ions onto the SiO2 porous surface was studied to evaluate the use of this material as a filter for treatment of uranium containing water. The effects of contact time, adsorbent mass and equilibrium concentration of solution were studied. The porous adsorbent exhibits a pseudo-second-order kinetic behavior. The sponges with adsorbed uranium were thermally sealed as a way of U immobilization. Retention of uranium was confirmed during the matrix sealing by TGA. Uranium concentration before and after adsorption tests were made by means of ICP-OES. For uranium concentration of 800 ppm, 72 hours contact time and pH of 3.5, the amount of uranium adsorbed was 21.06 ± 0.02 mg U per gram of vitreous porous SiO2. (author)

  15. Status Update: Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful completion of a field trial of safeguards monitoring equipment at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) demonstrated the need for a facility in which to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of safeguards systems at additional plants. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in an NUCP. In addition to calibrating instruments such as the neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, UNCLE will be used to test other in-line instruments (mass and volumetric flowmeters, spectrophotometers, etc.). UNCLE will be able to test commercially available equipment, such as the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter that was used in the field test and other equipment that is presently under development. UNCLE is designed to accommodate different pipe sizes, flow rates, solution concentrations, and other variables of interest. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of September 2008 with initial testing beginning later that year. The design and current status of UNCLE will be presented, along with the capabilities of the facility and the proposed test plans.

  16. Trypanotoxic activity of thiosemicarbazone iron chelators

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Samuel; Sexton, Darren; Steverding, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Only a few drugs are available for treating sleeping sickness and nagana disease; parasitic infections caused by protozoans of the genus Trypanosoma in sub-Saharan Africa. There is an urgent need for the development of new medicines for chemotherapy of these devastating diseases. In this study, three newly designed thiosemicarbazone iron chelators, TSC24, Dp44mT and 3-AP, were tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of T. brucei and human leukaemia HL-60 cells. In addition to t...

  17. Novel Terbium Chelate Doped Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Qiaoyu; Meng Jianxin; Wang Haiming; Liu Yingliang; Man Shiqing

    2006-01-01

    Novel terbium chelate doped silica fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared and characterized.The preparation was carried out in water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion containing monomer precursor (pAB-DTPAA-APTEOS), Triton X-100, n-hexanol, and cyclohexane by controlling copolymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate and 3-aminopropyl-triethyloxysilane.The nanoparticles are spherical and uniform in size, about 30 nm in diameter, strongly fluorescent, and highly stable.The amino groups directly introduced to the surface of the nanoparticles using APTEOS during preparation made the surface modification and bioconjugation of the nanoparticles easier.The nanoparticles are expected as an efficient time-resolved luminescence biological label.

  18. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  19. Structure and Reactivity of X-ray Amorphous Uranyl Peroxide, U2O7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoh, Samuel O; Shamblin, Jacob; Colla, Christopher A; Hickam, Sarah; Lobeck, Haylie L; Lopez, Rachel A K; Olds, Travis; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Neuefeind, Joerg; Casey, William H; Lang, Maik; Gagliardi, Laura; Burns, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    Recent accidents resulting in worker injury and radioactive contamination occurred due to pressurization of uranium yellowcake drums produced in the western U.S.A. The drums contained an X-ray amorphous reactive form of uranium oxide that may have contributed to the pressurization. Heating hydrated uranyl peroxides produced during in situ mining can produce an amorphous compound, as shown by X-ray powder diffraction of material from impacted drums. Subsequently, studtite, [(UO2)(O2)(H2O)2](H2O)2, was heated in the laboratory. Its thermal decomposition produced a hygroscopic anhydrous uranyl peroxide that reacts with water to release O2 gas and form metaschoepite, a uranyl-oxide hydrate. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the most stable U2O7 conformer consists of two bent (UO2)(2+) uranyl ions bridged by a peroxide group bidentate and parallel to each uranyl ion, and a μ2-O atom, resulting in charge neutrality. A pair distribution function from neutron total scattering supports this structural model, as do (1)H- and (17)O-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The reactivity of U2O7 in water and with water in air is higher than that of other uranium oxides, and this can be both hazardous and potentially advantageous in the nuclear fuel cycle. PMID:26974702

  20. Kinetic studies of uranyl ion adsorption on acrylonitrile (AN) / polyethylene glycol (PEG) interpenetrating networks (IPN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the adsorption of uranyl ions on amidoximated acrylonitrile (AN)/ polyethylene glycol (PEG) interpenetrating network (IPNs) from aqueous solutions was studied as a function of time and temperature. Adsorption analyses were performed for definite uranyl ion concentrations of 1x10-2M and at four different temperatures as 290K, 298K, 308K and 318K. Adsorption time was increased from zero to 48 hours. Adsorption capacities of uranyl ions by PEG/AN IPNS were determined by gamma spectrometer. The results indicate that adsorption capacity increases linearly with increasing temperature. The max adsorption capacity was found as 602 mgu/g IPN at 308K. Adsorption rate was evaluated from the curve plotted of adsorption capacity versus time, for each temperature. Rate constants for uranyl ions adsorption on amidoximated ipns were calculated for 290K, 298K, 308K and 318K at the solution concentration of 1x10-2M . The results showed that as the temperature increases the rate constant increases exponentially too. The mean activation energy of uranyl ions adsorption was found as 34.6 kJ/mole by using arrhenius equation. (author)

  1. Electron microscopy studies of natural and synthetic zeolites impregnated with uranyl dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. The use of Y zeolite and erionite to remove uranyl dioxide ions from aqueous solution is focussed on catalysis and energy transfer problems but it can be oriented to recovery uranyl dioxide ions, among other radioactive compounds. The samples impregnated with uranyl dioxide at several concentrations and contact times were studied using conventional, high resolution and scanning electron microscopy in order to detect changes as consequence of contact with a radioactive material and to verify mechanical stability of zeolites. Also X ray diffraction, thermal analysis, neutron activation were used to characterize the samples at several steps of treatment. The crystallinity of zeolites was maintained only when using dilute uranyl nitrate solution (up to 0.0100 N for y zeolite and 0.0300 N for erionite). The samples impregnated with highest nitrate concentrations partially lost their crystallinity. From selected area electron diffraction pattern, lattice parameter variations were detected and from high resolution electron microscopy localization of uranyl ions in and on zeolite structure was determined. Surface modification in zeolites was observed by scanning electron microscopy just for samples with long contact time with radioactive solutions. (author)

  2. Synthesis of uranyl ion imprinted polymer and its application in analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion imprinted polymer beads were prepared by the copolymerization of styrene monomer and divinyl benzene as crosslinking agent in methanol solution,with the UO22+-o-dihydroxybenzene-4-vinyl pyridine ternary complex as template, the 2, 2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as initiator and UO22+ as the imprinting ion. The uranyl ions were removed from the polymer beads by treating with 6 mol/L HCl, leaving behind cavities that match uranyl ion in size. The treated polymer beads can preconcentrate uranyl ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The adsorption efficiency can reach 99% or above with good selectivity when pH is in the range of 5-7 and the adsorption time is more than 20 min. The elution rate can reach above 99% under the conditions of concentration of HCl being above 1.0 mol/L, elution time more than 20 min and the elution Janume more than 5 times the Janume of ion imprinted polymer. The uranyl ion imprinted polymer beads have been successfully applied to determine micro-uranium in brine samples. The results are satisfactory compared with NBS method.(authors)

  3. Transmission electron microscopy to visualize the localisation of uranyl phosphate precipitate in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial bioremediation of heavy metal waste can be a superior alternative to physiochemical methods due to its high efficiency and in situ applicability. Among the various processes employed, bioprecipitation of heavy metals with ions like inorganic phosphate is considered to be particularly promising approach for bioremediation of uranium (U). As uranium phosphate precipitate (U(VI)) remains insoluble, it can be a long term and stable sink for U in the environment. Bacterial phosphatases can be efficiently expressed in appropriate host systems and consequently these engineered microbes can be utilized for bioremediation. Our research group has expressed two different phosphatases in E. coli and evaluated the bioremediation potential of these recombinant strains. PhoN, a non-specific acid phosphatase (from Salmonella) exists as a cell-associated protein when expressed in E. coli. On the other hand, when PhoK (alkaline phosphatase from Sphingomonas) is expressed in E. coli, the protein is secreted extracellularly. E. coli-PhoN cells, when incubated with 1 mM uranyl nitrate (pH 6.8) and p-glycerophosphate (GP) as substrate, showed cell-associated uranyl phosphate precipitate. In contrast, E. coli -PhoK cells, exposed to 1 mM uranyl carbonate (pH 9) and β-GP, showed extracellular uranyl phosphate precipitate in solution. Thus, TEM can be effectively used to obtain a vivid pictorial representation of the location of uranyl phosphate precipitate in bacteria. (author)

  4. Plutonium-237: comparative uptake in chelated and non-chelated form by channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelation can either enhance or reduce the uptake of ingested plutonium relative to PuOH (monomer) in channel catfish. Reduced uptake of 237Pu-fulvate is due either to the molecular weight of the complex or its stability in metabolic systems. Increased uptake of 237Pu-citrate is attributable to instability of the complex in metabolic systems. (author)

  5. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.; Shi, Y.

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH{sub 3}. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: (a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20 and 90 C to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution. 34 figs.

  6. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CHELATION VALUE OF SEVENTEEN PERCENT SELF DEVELOPED AND COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ROOT CANAL LUBRICANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingale Satish Dinkarrao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to compare chelation values of 17% self developed & commercially available root canal Lubricants or dental chelating gels as well as to see whether their performance depends on the chelation value or not. The Chelating agent bounds Ca2+ ions of the smear layer & the extent of chelate formation between chelating agent and metal ion is nothing but Chelation Value. Sodium carbonate indicator method is used for determinations of chelation value. Commercially available gel incorporated in this study was File Rite which has little bit higher chelation value. Self developed chelating gel or root canal lubricants have comparatively lower chelation value. Root canal lubricants having higher chelation value should perform better in shaping & cleaning of root canal better. However because of slight difference in chelation value of self developed & commercially available gel, no significant difference was found out as root canal lubricants, when applied in root canal for 5 minutes.

  7. The first uranyl-lanthanide hetero metallic complexes: metal-organic frameworks with DOTA and oxalato ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction of uranyl and lanthanide nitrates with DOTA (H4L) under hydrothermal conditions gave the first uranyl-lanthanide hetero metallic complexes, [(UO2)2Ln(L)(C2O4)(OH)(H2O)]· 3H2O [Ln = Gd (1) or Eu (2)]. (author)

  8. Decorporation of inhaled actinides by chelation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes recent work in NRPB laboratories that has identified some of the factors influencing the behaviour of plutonium, americium and curium compounds in the body after inhalation, together with a number of experimental approaches that are being developed to optimise their treatment with DTPA. It is concluded that the most effective treatment has yet to be developed, but progress must depend on a better understanding of the factors governing the transport of actinides in the body. It cannot be assumed that because the inhaled material is readily translocated to blood, that treatment regimens with Ca-DTPA based solely on previous understanding of the metabolic fate of soluble actinide complexes will be successful. In fact, depending on the nature of the material involved in the accident, inhalation alone or combined with prolonged infusion of DTPA may be more effective than the periodic intravenous injections of the chelating agent alone. For poorly transportable materials such as insoluble plutonium-239 dioxide, chelation treatment remains essentially ineffective. (U.K.)

  9. Chemical treatment of chelated metal finishing wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael J; Glarborg, Christen; Ross, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated two chemical approaches for treatment of commingled cadmium-cyanide (Cd-CN) and zinc-nickel (Zn-Ni) wastewaters. The first approach, which involved application of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), focused on elimination of chelating substances. The second approach evaluated the use of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDTC) to specifically target and precipitate regulated heavy metals. Results demonstrated that by maintaining a pH of 10.0 and an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) value of +600 mV, NaOCl treatment was effective in eliminating all chelating substances. Cadmium, chromium, nickel, and zinc solution concentrations were reduced from 0.27, 4.44, 0.06, and 0.10 ppm to 0.16, 0.17, 0.03, and 0.06 ppm, respectively. Similarly, a 1% DMDTC solution reduced these same metal concentrations in commingled wastewater to 0.009, 1.142, 0.036, and 0.320 ppm. Increasing the DMDTC concentration to 2% improved the removal of all regulated heavy metals except zinc, the removal of which at high pH values is limited by its amphotericity. PMID:23342939

  10. Photocontrolled selective isolation of uranyl cation from aqueous solution onto a photo-responsive Langmuir-Blodgett film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied a photo-responsive Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film to selective isolation of uranyl cation from aqueous solutions. Uranyl cation was isolated onto a quartz plate covered with 5-octadecyloxy-2-(2-pyridylazo)phenol (PARC18) LB film which possesses the potential to form a complex with transition metal cations. The isolation process could be switched on by photoillumination. On the other hand, lanthanides (La, Ce, Nd, Gd, Er and Yb) were hardly isolated onto this film. Therefore, it was suggested that uranyl can selectively be collected from mixed solutions containing uranyl and lanthanides and that this process can be controlled by photoillumination. Detection limit of uranyl concentration in this system was also determined to be about 1.5 ppb. (author)

  11. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study of the uranyl behaviour at the gibbsite/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lectez, Sébastien; Roques, Jérôme; Salanne, Mathieu; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-01

    The uranyl cation UO22+ adsorption on the basal face of gibbsite is studied via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. In a first step, we study the water sorption on a gibbsite surface. Three different sorption modes are observed and their hydrogen bond patterns are, respectively, characterized. Then we investigate the sorption properties of an uranyl cation, in the presence of water. In order to take into account the protonation state of the (001) gibbsite face, both a neutral (001) face and a locally deprotonated (001) face are modeled. In the first case, three adsorbed uranyl complexes (1 outer sphere and 2 inner spheres) with similar stabilities are identified. In the second case, when the gibbsite face is locally deprotonated, two adsorbed complexes (1 inner sphere and 1 outer one) are characterized. The inner sphere complex appears to be the most strongly linked to the gibbsite face.

  12. Sorption of uranyl and thorium(IV) ions by dodecavanadium acid from diluted nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of uranyl by dodecavanadium acid (DDVA) proceeds according to ion exchange mechanism in the region of relatively low values of its concentration - (0.8-2.0) x 10-3 mol/l. Th(IV) sorption practically not depends on solution pH value in interval of pH 1.5-2.5 and changes significantly in dependence on its initial concentration. Maximal values of DDVA capacity differ for Th(IV) and UO22+ (9 and 6.3 mg-equi/g) respectively. X-ray phase analysis establishes the composition of uranyl compounds obtained during DDVA contact with concentrated solutions of uranyl nitrate that is UO2(VO3)2·nH2O

  13. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of trace uranyl in wet sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project was to develop a technique to observe and characterize the behaviour of uranium in unsaturated groundwater flow systems, particularly with regard to unstable ''fingered'' flow, which could drastically reduce time of travel. The actual experimental work described was a study of the feasibility of detecting uranyl at the parts-per-billion level in aqueous solution by means of its luminescence spectrum. A high-power UV laser was used to excite aqueous uranyl in a wet sand mixture; the characteristic green phosphorescence emitted in the decay transition was detected by a photomultiplier tube; and the amplified signal was sent to an oscilloscope in communication with Macintosh data acquisition software. At the time of the conference, a more sophisticated sample configuration for imaging the flow of uranyl was already under development. 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles with an imprinted polymer coating for the selective extraction of uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized ferromagnetic nanoparticles with an imprinted polymer coating that is capable of adsorbing and extracting uranyl ions. The adsorbent was characterized using infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of sample pH, sample volume, weight of the adsorbent, contact time and of other ions have been investigated in the batch extraction mode. The performance of the material was compared to that of particles coated with a non-imprinted polymer. The adsorbent containing the imprinted coating displays higher sorption capacity and better selectivity to uranyl ions. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranyl ions in water samples. (author)

  15. Contribution to the study of uranyl salts in butyl phosphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectroscopic study in the normal infrared region and involving the following associations: tri-alkyl phosphates (tri-butyl, tri-ethyl, tri-methyl), uranyl salts (nitrate, chloride, acetate) has confirmed the existence of an interaction between the phosphoryl group and the uranium atom, as shown by a movement of absorption band for the valency P = 0 from ∼ 1270 cm-1 to ∼ 1180 cm-1. A study of the preparation, analysis and spectroscopy of the solids obtained by the precipitation of uranyl salts by acid butyl phosphates has been carried out. By infrared spectrophotometry it has been shown that the tri-butyl and di-butyl phosphates are associated in non-polar diluents even before the uranium is introduced. The extraction of uranyl salts from acid aqueous solutions by a diluted mixture of tri-butyl and di-butyl phosphates proceeds by different mechanisms according to the nature of the ion (nitrate or chloride). (author)

  16. Copper(I) and copper(II) uranyl heterometallic hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zhehui; Zhang, Zhi-hui; Olds, Travis; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Burns, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    Two copper-uranium heterometallic compounds, [(UO2)3Cu(II)O2(C6NO2)5] (1) and [(UO2)Cu(I)(C6NO2)3] (2), have been synthesized by the reaction of uranyl acetate with copper salts in the presence of isonicotinic acid. Both compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. In compound 1, interactions between copper and uranium centers occur and result in a three-dimensional pillar layered structure. Compound 1 is also the first example of a heterometallic uranyl organic framework with a trinuclear U3O18 building block. Compound 2 is the first uranyl organic framework that contains monovalent copper, which arises from the reaction of Cu(II) chloride and is assumed to be due to the oxidation of chloride at low pH. PMID:25029287

  17. Acceptor extraction of uranyl salts with mixtures of organophosphoric acids with neutral additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium solvent extraction by mixtures of organophosphoric acids (HX) with neutral additives (L) (phosphine oxides, sulfoxides, tbp) excibits, along with the widely known synergic effect at low HX saturation with uranium, a new synergic effect occurring after complete HX saturation. Three types of isotherms of uranyl salt extraction by benzene solutions of HX and mixtures of HX with L were revealed. Their forms depend on superposition of cation-exchange and noncation-exchange synergic effects. Similarity of synergic effect of acid and neutral mixture components during solvent extraction from diluted and concentrated solutions of uranyl salts testified to the same nature of these two effects; both of them are determined by acceptor properties of uranium atom in monomeric UO2(HX2)2 and polymeric (UO2X2)p complexes. The established reqularities were confirmed, when studying uranyl sulfate extraction by UO2X2 mixture with L

  18. Synthesis and complexation properties towards uranyl cation of carboxylic acid derivatives of p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene; Synthese et proprietes complexantes vis-a-vis de l'ion uranyle de derives carboxyliques du p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souane, R

    2005-03-15

    In the fuel reprocessing plants radioactive metals, and more particularly, uranium in UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} form in the various installations, have many varied physico-chemical forms and there is a risk of exposure and internal contamination in the nuclear industry. It is necessary to exert a medical control to ensure the protection of the health of the workers. This medical control is done by dosing uranyl cation in the urine of the exposed people. This work forms part of this context. Indeed, we prepared a ligand able to complex the ion uranyl and which is also to be grafted on a solid support. In the family of calixarenes, the calix[6]arenes functionalized by three or four carboxylic functions were selected like chelating molecules of the ion uranyl. The properties of complexation of these calixarenes were studied by potentiometry in methanol, under these conditions balances of protonation and complexation were determined and the constant partners were obtained using the Hyperquad program. We synthesized tri-carboxylic calix[6]arenes comprising of the groupings nitro (NO{sub 2}) in para position of phenol in order to see the influence of a substitution in para position on the complexation. We also synthesized calix[6]arenes tetra-carboxylic in order to show the role of an additional carboxylic acid grouping. The potentiometric study determined thermodynamic parameters of protonation and complexation of carboxylic calix[6]arenes. The results of the complexation highlighted which complex UO{sub 2}L corresponding to the ligand para-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene tetra-acid is more stable than that corresponding to the ligand mono-nitro calix[6]arene tri-acid ({delta}log{beta}110 = 4.3), and than the effect of the groupings nitro in para position has low influence on the complexation of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. This makes it possible to consider as possible the grafting of the calix[6]arenes which one knows the behaviour of trapping. To this end we synthesized the ligand 23

  19. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: Is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radio toxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from 30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites. (authors)

  20. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Christian; Averseng, Olivier; Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Richaud, Nicolas; Hagège, Agnès; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2013-05-20

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radiotoxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from ∼30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites. PMID:23527557

  1. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  2. Characterization of osteopontin-uranyl interaction: role of multiple phosphorylations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While some metals are essential for Life, other ones are only toxicants for living organisms, tolerated below well-definite concentrations. This is the case for uranium, a natural element which has no known biological function. It is a low α emitter and its chemical toxicity rather than its radiological toxicity is a subject of concern. Once in the body, this metal reaches the blood and accumulates in the bones under the action of unknown mechanisms. Uranium mainly exists in form of uranyl ion (UO22+) in aqueous media and particularly reacts with carboxylates, phenolates and phosphates of the proteins. Previous studies have highlighted that UO22+ modulates the SPP1 expression, a gene which codes for osteopontin (OPN). This highly phosphorylated glycoprotein plays an important role in bone homeostasis. This role and its biochemical properties led us to hypothesize that OPN might be a potential target of UO22+ and involved in its accumulation in bones. A simple and original purification process was optimized to produce very highly purified OPN starting from human and bovine milk. Various biophysical approaches were set up and confirmed that both bovine and human OPN display very high affinity for UO22+. Moreover, the formation of stable UO2-protein complexes originating from structural changes was evidenced. The major role of phosphorylations, both on the OPN's affinity for UO22+ and the stability of the UO2-protein complexes, was confirmed. These results demonstrate that OPN presents all the characteristics to be a major UO22+ binding-protein in vitro, and they open new insights in the understanding of the UO22+ mineralization process mechanisms. (author)

  3. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigorous numerical description of multi-species diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication for imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multi-species diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl (U(VI)) species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multi-species diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multi-species U(VI) diffusion under steady-state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that a fully coupled diffusion model can be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model, which considers difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be rigorously enforced, if necessary, by adding an artificial kinetic reaction term induced by the charge separation. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from US Department of Energy's Hanford 300A where intragrain diffusion is a rate-limiting process controlling U(VI) adsorption and desorption. The grain-scale reactive diffusion model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetics that has been described using a semi-empirical, multi-rate model

  4. Structure and vibrational spectra of uranyl dinitrate complexes with water and DMSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural models were designed and spectral characteristics were computed based on DFT calculations for uranyl dinitrate complexes with H2O and DMSO [UO2(NO3)2×2DMSO, UO2(NO3)2×2H2O×2DMSO, UO2(NO3)2×2H2O×4DMSO]. Vibrational IR and Raman spectra of UO2(NO3)2×2DMSO were interpreted using models for bidentate and monodentate coordination of nitrate ions to uranyl. Several spectral signatures that characterized DMSO complexation in the second coordination sphere were identified and had analytical significance. (authors)

  5. A method for separating uranium from an aqueous solution containing uranyl ions and contaminating ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description is given of a method for separating uranium from contaminating ions in an aqueous solution containing uranyl ions. In a first step, the contaminating ions are extracted by a first solvent containing a reagent capable of forming a soluble complex with the uranyl ions. The solvent is separated by means of a separator liquid, which is subsequently extracted by a solvent containing an amine, then, said amine is separated by means of a sufficient amount of ammonium carbonate solution for precipitating an uranium complex which is subsequently recovered. This can be applied to the extraction of uranium from phosphoric or sulphuric solutions or from sodium carbonate

  6. an investigation of the ammonium poly uranate precipitation via uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a series of experiments were made concerning the interaction of uranyl nitrate with ammonium hydroxide solution, with the aim of preparing ammonium poly uranate (APU) as an intermediate product during nuclear reactors fuel fabrication. the particle size and final product characteristics of the uranium oxide depend greatly on the ways of preparation of the APU , in the present work, the kinetics of deposition and the composition of the formed products upon adding increasing amounts of ammonium hydroxide to uranyl nitrate solution have been followed in a trial to understand the prevailing mechanisms

  7. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40: An Intergrowth Uranyl Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Gregory; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    Single crystals of K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 were grown from a mixed alkali halide flux. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 is the first intergrowth uranyl silicate, being composed of alternating slabs related to two previously reported uranyl silicates: Cs2USiO6 and [Na9F2][(UO2)(UO2)2(Si2O7)2]. It exhibits intense luminescence, which is influenced by the [(UO2)2O] dimers present in the structure. PMID:26974872

  8. Synthesis, dehydration and hydration processes of uranyl p-toluenesulfonate and its crystal hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl p-toluenesulfonate was synthesized and studied. This salt crystallizes from aqueous solution as pentahydrate. Its solubility is 2.57 mol/kg at 25 Deg C. Anhydrous salt and lower hydrates were prepared. Hydration of the anhydrous salt in the air at various steam pressures are studied. Thermogravimetric data show that uranyl p-toluenesulfonate pentahydrate has the layered structure of hydration shell. IR spectra of crystal hydrates with the same composition obtained by means of dehydration-hydration procedure are the same in the region of frequencies of sulfonate group and differ in the region of water vibrations

  9. Mutual solubility in the system uranyl monochloroacetate--water--diethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovenko, V.M.; Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual solubility in the system uranyl monochloroacetate--water--diethyl ether at the temperature 25/sup 0/C was studied. It was found that UO/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/ClCOO)/sub 2/ is extracted by diethyl ether substantially less effectively than uranyl trifluoro- and trichloroacetates. An attempt was made to explain the difference in extractability and solubility in the series of haloacetates studied from the standpoint of the influence of the change in the electron donor capacity of the anion on processes of association, hydration, and solvation.

  10. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d(0)f(0) uranyl ion [UO(2)](2+) in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo grou...

  11. Complete removal of uranyl nitrate from tissue matrix using supercritical fluid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of uranyl nitrate from tissue matrix has been studied with supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol alone as well as complexing reagents dissolved in methanol. A systematic study of various complexing agents led to the development of an extraction procedure for the quantitative recovery of uranium from tissue matrix with supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol containing small quantities of acetylacetone. The drying time and temperature employed in loading of uranyl nitrate onto tissue paper were found to influence the extraction efficiency significantly

  12. Complexation of uranyl ion by polyvinylimidazole. Electrochemical preparation and leaching tests investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we intend to check the claims of an U.S. Patent (Westinghouse E.C.) which describes an original treatment for low level activity radioactive wastes. The process deals with electrochemical preparation of polyvinylimidazole (PVI) which is a polymer capable of complexing uranyl ions. We confirm the complexation of uranyl ions by PVI in various media by FT-IR and UV-Visible analysis but all these complexes were found to be soluble in water so we put forward new complexes with an additional polymer to shape out insoluble complex. Leaching tests demonstrate the efficiency of our process. (author)

  13. Complexation of uranyl ion by three polyacrylamide type polymers. Electrochemical preparation and leaching tests investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original process for the treatment of low level activity radioactive liquid waste is described. Electrochemical preparation of three polyacrylate polymers: polyacrylamide (PAam), polyacrylamidoglycolic acid (PAAG), polyacrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid (PAMPS) which are capable of complexing uranyl ions is delt with. Complexation of uranyl is demonstrated by FT-IR and UV-Visible spectroscopy. All these complexes are soluble in water and we insolubilize in turn the complexes by crosslinking or by neutralization of positively charged complexes by the addition of polyanions to the medium. Dynamic and static leaching tests on these insoluble complexes were then done. (author)

  14. Extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous nitrate solutions by open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate into open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS) from aqueous solution, in the presence of salting agents, was examined. The extraction efficiency was observed to depend on the concentration of uranyl and nitrate ions. The charge of the cation was also found to influence the distribution ratio. The effect of the change in temperature and pH was also studied. The results are interpreted in terms of OCPUFS acting as a viscous organic ether of moderate dielectric constant. (author) 14 refs.; 6 figs

  15. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Ioana-Carmen [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Petru, Filip [“C.D. Nenitescu” Institute of Organic Chemistry, Splaiul Independentei 202B, Sector 6, Bucharest 71141 (Romania); Humelnicu, Ionel [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Mateescu, Marina [National R and D Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Splaiul Independenţei No. 202, Bucharest 060021 (Romania); Militaru, Ecaterina [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2014-10-15

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  16. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  17. Bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  18. Chelation Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tonya N.; O'Reilly, Mark; Kang, Soyeon; Lang, Russell; Rispoli, Mandy; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Copeland, Daelynn; Attai, Shanna; Mulloy, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Chelation treatment is used to eliminate specific metals from the body, such as mercury. It has been hypothesized that mercury poisoning may be a factor in autism and data suggest that perhaps 7% of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have received chelation treatment. It would therefore seem timely to review studies investigating the…

  19. Macrocyclic Chelator Assembled RGD Multimers for Tumor Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaofen; Liu, Hongguang; Miao, Zheng; Kimura, Richard; Fan, Feiyue; Cheng, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Macrocyclic chelators have been extensively used for complexation of metal ions. A widely used chelator, DOTA, has been explored as a molecular platform to assemble multiple bioactive peptides in this paper. The multivalent DOTA-peptide bioconjugates demonstrate promising tumor targeting ability.

  20. Inapplicability of high pressure spray injection for chelate administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-pressure spray injector was tested for use in injecting chelating agents around radionuclides in wounds. It was difficult to employ because of the force required for proper injection, and it did not improve the effectiveness of the injected chelate in removing intramuscularly injected 238Pu. (U.S.)

  1. Adsorptive separation of rare earths by using chelating chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of chelating chitosan were prepared by chemically modifying chitosan with functional groups of EDTA or DTPA, abbreviated as EDTA- and DTPA-chitosan hereafter, respectively, to investigate the adsorption behaviour for rare earths the mutual separation of which is the most difficult among metal ions on these chelating chitosan from dilute hydrochloric or sulfuric acid solution. The plots of the distribution ratio of a series of rare earths against equilibrium pH lay on different straight lines with slope of 3 corresponding to each earth for both of two chelating chitosan, suggesting that 3 hydrogen ions are released for the adsorption of unit ion of each rare earth by chelate formation with the functional group of EDTA or DTPA and that mutual adsorptive separation between adjacent rare earth is possible with these chelating chitosan. Apparent equilibrium constants of the adsorption were evaluated from the intercepts of these straight lines with the ordinate for each rare earth and for both chelating chitosan. It was found that the equilibrium constants of adsorption on EDTA- or DTPA-chitosan are quite analogous to those of chelate formation with EDTA or DTPA themselves, suggesting that chelating characteristics of these complexones is still maintained after their immobilization on polymer matrices of chitosan. (author)

  2. Potentials and drawbacks of chelate-enhanced phytoremediation of soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römkens, P.F.A.M.; Bouwman, L.A.; Japenga, J.; Draaisma, C.

    2002-01-01

    Chelate-enhanced phytoremediation has been proposed as an effective tool for the extraction of heavy metals from soils by plants. However, side-effects related to the addition of chelates, e.g. metal leaching and effects on soil micro-organisms, were usually neglected. Therefore, greenhouse and lysi

  3. Quantitative measurement of metal chelation by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika E. Miller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritionally important minerals are more readily absorbed by living systems when complexed with organic acids, resulting in higher consumer demand and premium prices for these products. These chelated metals are produced by reaction of metal oxides and acids in aqueous solution. However, unreacted dry blends are sometimes misrepresented as metal chelates, when in reality they are only simple mixtures of the reactants typically used to synthesize them. This practice has increased interest in developing analytical methods that are capable of measuring the extent of metal chelation for quality control and regulatory compliance. We describe a novel method to rapidly measure the percent chelation of citric and malic acids with calcium, magnesium, and zinc. Utilization of attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR provides for the direct, rapid measurement of solid samples. The inclusion of an internal standard allows independent determination of either free or chelated acids from integrated areas in a single spectrum.

  4. Copper, dioxouranium(VI) and lanthanide chelates of carboxymethylthiosuccinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxymethylthiosuccinic acid (CMTSA) has three dissociable - COOH groups with pK values 2.91, 3.91, 5.03. Assignment of these values to the different carboxylic groups is given. Cu(II) and UO22+ chelates with CMSTA have been studied potentiometrically at 30degC and μ = 0.1M. The effects of dielectric constant of the solvent medium (dioxane-water) and the ionic strength, on these chelates have been examined. The lanthanides form 1:1 and 1:2 chelates with CMTSA. The plots of log K1 and (log K1 + log K2) versus e2/2r show a break at gadolinium. The thermodynamic parameters for these chelates have been determined. Smaller values of DELTAH show the predominance of the entropy effect in the formation of these chelates. (author)

  5. Study of the extraction mechanisms by TBP saturated by uranyl nitrate; Etude des mecanismes d'extraction du TBP sature par le nitrate d'uranyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meze, F

    2004-02-15

    This work deals with a particular phenomenon likely to occur in the nuclear waste reprocessing process PUREX. It was shown earlier by Russian works that the extractant molecule, tributyl phosphate (TBP), saturated by uranyl nitrate keeps its extraction capacities for nitric acid and tetravalent actinides. This study is composed of three parts. Firstly, some liquid-liquid extraction experiments were conducted to verify the ability of TBP saturated by uranyl nitrate to conserve its extraction capacities for nitric acid. Then, during these experiments, the UV and infrared spectra of both phases were recorded to obtain the organic phase speciation. At last, the informations gathered during the experimental part were used to build a general species distribution model of the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3}/UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/TBP system. (author)

  6. Fixation kinetics of chelated and non-chelated zinc in semi-arid alkaline soils: application to zinc management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeigwe, Theophilus K.; Eichmann, Madeleine; Menkiti, Matthew C.

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to examine the fixation pattern and kinetics of zinc (Zn) in chelated (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) and non-chelated mixed micronutrient systems of semi-arid alkaline soils from the Southern High Plains, USA. Soils were characterized for a suite of chemical and physical properties and data obtained from extraction experiments fitted to various kinetic models. About 30 % more plant-available Zn was fixed in the non-chelated system within the first 14 days with only about 18 % difference observed between the two systems by day 90, suggesting that the effectiveness of the chelated compounds tended to decrease over time. The strengths of the relationships of change in available Zn with respect to other micronutrients (copper, iron, and manganese) were higher and more significant in the non-chelated system (average R2 of 0.83), compared to the chelated (average R2 of 0.42). Fixation of plant-available Zn was best described by the power-function model (R2 = 0.94, SE = 0.076) in the non-chelated system, and was poorly described by all the models examined in the chelated system. Reaction rate constants and relationships generated from this study can serve as important tools for micronutrient management and for future micronutrient modeling studies on these soils and other semi-arid regions of the world.

  7. Chelating impact assessment of biological ad chemical chelates on metal extraction from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil contamination is the result of uncontrolled waste dumping and poor practices by humans. Of all the pollutants heavy metals are of particular concern due to their atmospheric deposition, leaching capacity and non-biodegradability. Heavy metal containing effluent is discharged into the agricultural fields and water bodies. This results in the accumulation of heavy metals in soil and the crops grown on that soil. Studies have revealed detrimental impacts on soil fertility and the poor health of animals and humans. Phytoextraction is widely researched for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of phytoextraction heavy metals have to be available to the plants in soluble form. In this study the potential of different chelating agents was assessed in solubilizing the heavy metals making easy for plants to uptake them. For this purpose efficient chemical and biological chelating agent had to be identified. Along with that an optimum dose and application time for chemical chelating agent was determined. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), Nitriloacetic acid (NTA) were applied to the soil, containing Pb, Cr, Cu and Cd, at different concentrations and application time. Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus were incubated in soil for different time periods. In correspondence with findings of the study, Pb and Cr were best solubilized by 5mM EDTA. For Cd and Cu 5mM DTPA carried out efficient chelation. NTA showed relatively inadequate solubilisation, although for Cr it performed equal to EDTA. A. niger and A. flavus instead of solubilizing adsorbed the metals in their biomass. Adsorption was mainly carried out by A. niger. (author)

  8. The system uranyl nitrate-dietyl ether-water. Extraction by water in spray and packed columns from uranyl nitrate-either solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a continuation of the one published in Chemical Engineering Progress. Symposium Series, 50, n. 12, 127 (1954). New runs for spray columns, are given and other concentrations in uranyl nitrate for the packed columns. New correlations for the overall H.T.U. are also given. The individual H.T.U. have been grapycally calculated and show that the film resistances have similar values, being independent of the concentration of the ether phase. (Author) 24 refs

  9. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  10. Formation of Uranyl-Silicate Nanoparticles at Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, K. L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Klie, R. F.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium(VI)-silicates are the dominant crystalline form of U(VI) at and near Earth's surface, but are difficult to form as pure phases under ambient conditions because of slow reaction kinetics aided by similar thermodynamic stabilities of the many possible minerals. We have investigated the effects of pH (2 to 11) and time (1 to 10 days) on the formation of U(VI)-silicates from initial solutions with U = 0.05 M and a fixed molar ratio of U:Si = 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:5 using high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and solution thermodynamic modeling. Previously, we used HEXS to identify from solutions with U:Si = 1:2 at pH 5 to 9, aged for one day, a trimeric U-silicate structural unit, or synthon, approximately one nanometer in dimension with U-U correlation lengths of about 0.4 nm. This synthon is a structural building block in uranyl silicate minerals such as soddyite, boltwoodite, and weeksite. ATR-FTIR results on the full set of samples show systematic changes in peak positions along with appearance and disappearance of vibrational modes that occurred with reaction time, pH and/or U:Si ratio; whereas, XRD indicated only a crystalline Na-boltwoodite-like phase at pH 11 and without the correlation length-scale resolution of HEXS. HRTEM results show few particles in a matrix of material containing areas having the lower correlation length visible in HEXS data. The data show clearly different mixtures of solids, including silica, and precipitate sizes under all conditions that transform over the 1 to 10 day aging period. The experimental reactions simulate conditions in the subsurface at sites contaminated with uranium, and the results are relevant to processes of uranium adsorption and colloid formation. [This work is supported by DOE's Environmental Remediation Science Program].

  11. Kinetics of thermal decomposition and kinetics of substitution reaction of nano uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Zeinali, A.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 12 (2014), s. 718-729. ISSN 0538-8066 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranyl * Schiff base * kinetics * anticancer activity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.517, year: 2014

  12. Synthesis, structural investigation and kinetic studies of uranyl(VI) unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Asadi, M.; Zeinali, A.; Ranjkeshshorkaei, M.; Fejfarová, Karla; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Dehnokhalaji, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 6 (2014), s. 1673-1683. ISSN 0974-3626 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranyl schiff base complexes * kinetic study * kinetics of thermal decomposition * X-ray crystallography * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.191, year: 2014

  13. A note on the molecular water content in uranyl carbonate mineral andersonite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, Jakub; Čejka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2015), s. 181-187. ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : andersonite * uranyl carbonate * crystal structure * molecular water Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  14. Carbonization of solid uranyl-ascorbate gel as an indirect step of uranium carbide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brykala Marcin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of the synthesis of uranium carbide from uranyl-ascorbate gels using the complex sol-gel process (CSGP have been carried out. The synthesis of uranyl-ascorbate mixture as liquid sol from uranium trioxide and ascorbic acid and solid gel by extraction of water from sol were carefully examined. Ascorbic acid was used as a complexing agent in complex sol-gel process and as a carbon source. The crucial step to obtain final uranium carbides from the aforementioned substrates is the carbonization process. The thermal behavior of ascorbic acid and uranyl-ascorbate gels in a nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-900°C were investigated using TG-DTG. Furthermore, the products of the carbonization of uranyl-ascorbate gels in nitrogen, argon and vacuum atmosphere were identified by X-ray diffraction. TG-DTG was used also as a method for determining of carbon residues in the samples.

  15. Sorption efficiency of a new sorbent towards uranyl. Phosphonic acid grafted Merrifield resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel sorbent resin consisting of a Phosphonic Acid grafted on Merrifield Resin (PA-MR) for the extraction of uranyl from nitrate media is described. The sorption behaviour of uranyl cation on PA-MR was investigated using batch equilibrium technique. The effects of parameters such as shaking speed, pH levels, contact time, metal concentrations, ionic strength and temperature were reported. The results show that the sorption capacity increases with increasing both initial uranyl ion concentration and temperature and decreases with increasing ionic strength. Therefore, the optimum condition for the present study should be using 6.6 mg adsorbent per 1.0 mg uranyl in solution with pH 3.6 and shaking at 250 rpm for 180 min. The adsorption behavior of the system was also investigated and found to be in line with Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data was well described by the pseudo second-order. Thermodynamics data leads to endothermic process ΔH = + 31.03 kJ-1 mol-1, ΔS = + 146.64 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔG = -11.96 kJ mol-1 at 20 K. ΔG decreased to negatives values with increasing temperature indicating that the process was more favoured at high temperature. (author)

  16. On the retention of uranyl and thorium ions from radioactive solution on peat moss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [' Al.I. Cuza' University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. 11 Carol I Boulevard, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Bulgariu, Laura; Macoveanu, Matei [Technical University ' Gh. Asachi' of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Bd. D. Mangeron, 71A, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2010-02-15

    The efficiency of the radioactive uranyl and thorium ions on the peat moss from aqueous solutions has been investigated under different experimental conditions. The sorption and desorption of uranyl and thorium ions on three types (unmodified peat moss, peat moss treated with HNO{sub 3} and peat moss treated with NaOH) of peat moss were studied by the static method. Peat moss was selected as it is available in nature, in any amount, as a cheap and accessible sorbent. Study on desorption of such ions led to the conclusion that the most favourable desorptive reagent for the uranyl ions is Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} 1 M while, for the thorium ions is HCl 1 M. The results obtained show that the parameters here under investigation exercise a significant effect on the sorption process of the two ions. Also, the investigations performed recommend the peat moss treated with a base as a potential sorbent for the uranyl and thorium ions from a radioactive aqueous solution.

  17. Thermal Analysis of the Decomposition of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) in Different Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hälldahl, L.; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1979-01-01

    The intermediate products formed during thermal decomposition of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) in different atmospheres, (air, helium and hydrogen) have been determined by thermal analysis, (TG, and DTA) and X-ray analysis. The endproducts observed are U3O8 and UO2 in air/He and hydrogen...

  18. Quenching of the luminescent state of the uranyl ion (UO22+) by metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quenching of the luminescence of the uranyl ion by other metal ions has been studied in aqueous solution. The quenching is shown to be a dynamic process, and the correlation of the logarithm of the quenching rate with the metal ion ionization potential suggests that intermolecular electron transfer is the predominant mechanism. Evidence that this involves complete electron transfer comes from flash photolysis of solutions of UO2+2 and manganese (11), where a broad absorption lambdasub(max) = 505 nm) is observed which is assigned to Mn3+. Consideration of the energetics of the quenching process suggests that in the quenching of uranyl by silver(1), the products (U0+2 and Ag2+) are produced in their electronic ground states. Studies of the effect of temperature on the quenching suggest that if an intermediate complex (exciplex) is involved in the quenching then this must involve only very weak binding. With silver(I), the quenching is sensitive to the ionic strength of the solution. Further studies suggest that the lifetime of the luminescent state of the uranyl ion in aqueous solution varies with both temperature and uranyl ion concentration. (author)

  19. Nucleobase assemblies supported by uranyl cation coordination and other non-covalent interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jitendra Kumar; Sandeep Verma

    2011-11-01

    We describe synthesis and solid state structural description of uranyl complexes of carboxylate functionalized adenine and uracil derivatives. The metal coordination through carboxylate pendant leads to the formation of dimeric assemblies, whereas the directional nature of hydrogen bonding interaction supported by nucleobases and aqua ligands, result in the generation of complex 3-D architectures containing embedded nucleobase ribbons.

  20. Identification of Uranyl Minerals Using Oxygen K-Edge X Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Resch, Charles T.; Smith, Steven C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Uranium analysis is consistently needed throughout the fuel cycle, from mining to fuel fabrication to environmental monitoring. Although most of the world’s uranium is immobilized as pitchblende or uraninite, there exists a plethora of secondary uranium minerals, nearly all of which contain the uranyl cation. Analysis of uranyl compounds can provide clues as to a sample’s facility of origin and chemical history. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one technique that could enhance our ability to identify uranium minerals. Although there is limited chemical information to be gained from the uranium X-ray absorption edges, recent studies have successfully used ligand NEXAFS to study the physical chemistry of various uranium compounds. This study extends the use of ligand NEXAFS to analyze a suite of uranium minerals. We find that major classes of uranyl compounds (carbonate, oxyhydroxide, silicate, and phosphate) exhibit characteristic lineshapes in the oxygen K-edge absorption spectra. As a result, this work establishes a library of reference spectra that can be used to classify unknown uranyl minerals.

  1. Application of the NICADonnan model for proton, copper and uranyl binding to humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T.; Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, S.; Koopal, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Humic acids are natural organic materials that play an important role in the migration of heavy metal and actinide ions in aquatic and soil systems. In the present study, the binding of protons, copper ions and uranyl ions to the purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) is investigated and the results are

  2. Vibrational spectra of monouranates and uranium hydroxides as reaction products of alkali with uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational (IR absorption and Raman scattering) spectra for the reaction products of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate with NaOH and KOH have been studied. As a result of exchange reactions, the uranyl-ion coordinated nitrate groups are completely replaced by hydroxyl ions and various uranium and uranyl oxides or hydrates are formed. An analysis of the vibrations has been performed in terms of the frequencies of a free or coordinated nitrate group; comparison with the vibrations of the well-known uranium oxides and of the uranyl group UO22+ has been carried out. Vibrational spectra of a free nitrate group are characterized by four vibrational frequencies 1050, 724, 850, and 1380 cm-1, among which the frequencies at 724 and 1380 cm-1 are doubly degenerate and attributed to E’ symmetry of the point group D3h. When this group is uranium coordinated, its symmetry level is lowered to C2v, all vibrations of this group being active both in Raman and IR spectra. The doubly degenerate vibrations are exhibited as two bands and a frequency of the out-of-plane vibration is lowered to 815 cm-1. (authors)

  3. Chelation therapy for metal intoxication: comments from a thermodynamic viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Alonso, Miriam Crespo; Toso, Leonardo; Lachowicz, Joanna Izabela; Crisponi, Guido

    2013-10-01

    Chelation therapy plays a prominent role in the clinical treatment of metal intoxication. In this paper the principal causes of metal toxicity are exposed, and the chemical and biomedical requisites of a chelating agent are sketched. The chelating agents currently in use for scavenging toxic metal ions from humans belong to few categories: those characterized by coordinating mercapto groups, by oxygen groups, poliaminocarboxylic acids, and dithiocarbamates. Considering that the complex formation equilibria have been studied for less than 50% of chelators in use, some reflections on the utility of stability constants are presented, together with an evaluation of ligands under the stability profile. The competition between endogenous and toxic target metal ions for the same chelating agent is furthermore examined. A thorough examination of stability constant databases has allowed to select, for each toxic metal, the ligands distinguished by the best pMe values. Even though this selection does not consider the biomedical requisites of a chelating agent, it gives a clear picture both of the pMe values that can be attained, and of the most appropriate chelators for each metal ion. PMID:23895193

  4. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  5. Selectivity in extraction of copper and indium with chelate extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous extraction of copper and indium with chelate extractants (LIX84 and D2E11PA) was described. Stechiometry of metal-organic complexes examined using the method of equimolar ratios resulted in CuR2 and InR3 forms of hydrophobic extracting species. A linear correlation was obtained between logarithm of distribution coefficients and chelate agents and pH, respectively. Selectivity is generally higher with higher concentrations of chelate agents in the organic phase, and is decreased with increase of concentration of hydrogen ions in feeding phase. (Original)

  6. Evaluation of complexing properties of chelating agents for the bismuth-213

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bismuth-213 is an alpha- and beta-emitting radioelement of very short physical half-life (45 min) obtained by means of a (225Ac-213Bi) generator. Given its radiotoxicity, this element presents an interest in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). At present, the DTPA derivatives alone are used in radiolabelling of antibodies for RIT. This study presents the complexing properties of other chelates potentially usable to this goal. Four original chelating agents were synthesized in order to choose the families giving the best results in complexing the 213Bi: the tri-ethylene-tetra-amino-hexa-carboxylic acid (HETA), the 1, 4, 7, 10-tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic- 1- Gly-L-p-nitro Phe-amide (DOTA-pept), the 1, 4, 8, 11-tetrakis [(S)-2 hydroxy-propyl]-1, 4, 8, 11-tetra-aza-cyclo-tetra-decane (THEOH), and the ethylenediamine di-acetate di-acetamide-bis-thiophenol (EDTA-TH). Given the physical characteristics of 213Bi and the goal of our research, the studies of complexation were conducted by C.C.M. on silica, in highly diluted solution, with fixed chelates-213Bi incubation time (15 min), and variable temperature and concentrations. Analysis of the results have been done by means of a phosphor-imager by measuring the number of pixels associated to every chromatographic spot. The obtained results show that the poly-aza poly-carboxylic derivatives and poly-aza di-thio dicarboxylic derivatives are the only able ones to complex rapidly and quantitatively the 213Bi

  7. Screening wheat genotypes in response to ordinary chelate and nano-iron chelate fertilizers in nutrient solution

    OpenAIRE

    S. Omidi Nargesi; Zahedi, M; H.R. Eshghizadeh; A.H. Khoshgoftarmanesh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, attentions have been taken on the investigations regarding the use of nano-sized compounds in different fields including agricultural sector. Due to the importance of evaluating the fate and operation of nano-particles in plant systems, in this survey, responses of 13 wheat genotypes to the effect of nano-iron chelate fertilizer in the Hoagland solution under the conditions of ordinary iron chelate and nano-iron chelate, with concentration of 22.5 mg/L, was studied. This experiment ...

  8. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  9. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  10. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)-: infrared spectrum and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- compared to the mono-complex (UO2(NO3)3)-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the ν3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  11. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)-: infrared spectrum and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- compared to the mono-complex (UO2(NO3)3)-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  12. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Diane A.

    2006-01-23

    Progress Report Date: 01/23/06 (report delayed due to Hurricane Katrina) Report of results to date: The goals of this 3-year project are to: (1) update and successfully deploy our present immunosensors at DOE sites; (2) devise immunosensor-based assays for Pb(II), Hg(II), chelators, and/or Cr(III) in surface and groundwater; and (3) develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance this immunosensor program. Note: Work on this project was temporarily disrupted when Hurricane Katrina shut down the University on August 29, 2005. While most of the reagents stored in our refrigerators and freezers were destroyed, all of our hybridoma cell lines were saved because they had been stored in liquid nitrogen. We set up new tissue culture reactors with the hybridomas that synthesize the anti-uranium antibodies, and are purifying new monoclonal antibodies from these culture supernatants. Both the in-line and the field-portable sensor were rescued from our labs in New Orleans in early October, and we continued experiments with these sensors in the temporary laboratory we set up in Hammond, LA at Southeastern Louisiana University.

  13. Field-Portable Immunoassay Instruments and Reagents to Measure Chelators and Mobile Forms of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress Report Date: 01/23/06 (report delayed due to Hurricane Katrina) Report of results to date: The goals of this 3-year project are to: (1) update and successfully deploy our present immunosensors at DOE sites; (2) devise immunosensor-based assays for Pb(II), Hg(II), chelators, and/or Cr(III) in surface and groundwater; and (3) develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance this immunosensor program. Note: Work on this project was temporarily disrupted when Hurricane Katrina shut down the University on August 29, 2005. While most of the reagents stored in our refrigerators and freezers were destroyed, all of our hybridoma cell lines were saved because they had been stored in liquid nitrogen. We set up new tissue culture reactors with the hybridomas that synthesize the anti-uranium antibodies, and are purifying new monoclonal antibodies from these culture supernatants. Both the in-line and the field-portable sensor were rescued from our labs in New Orleans in early October, and we continued experiments with these sensors in the temporary laboratory we set up in Hammond, LA at Southeastern Louisiana University

  14. Effects of macromolecular chelators on intestinal cadmium absorption in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, O.; Nielsen, J.B.; Bulman, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Suppression of absorption by macromolecular chelators have been sucessful with several metals. In this paper a series of immobilized chelators ranging from DTPA to S-containing soft bases have been synthetized and investigated for ability to suppress intestinal uptake of /sup 109/Cd/sup 2+/ in mice. Dextran-O-ethyl-mercaptan, xanthates derived from polysaccharides and polyvinyl alcohol, dithiocarbamates of polyethylene imine and aminoethyl cellulose, and DTPA immobilized on aminopropyl silica were all ineffective. DTPA immobilized on aminoethyl cellulose even enhanced the intestinal uptake. The macromolecular chelators were without extensive effect on organ distribution of absorbed cadmium, except for dithiocarbamate immobilized on polyethylene imine, which enhanced the deposition of cadmium in several organs including the brain. Although the results are discouragign, they indicate that desing and synthesis of immobilized vicinal dithio compounds may represent an avenue for development of non-absorbable chelators with high affinity for cadmium.

  15. Mixed-chelate therapy of intratracheally deposited cadmium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed-chelate treatment with EDTA and salicylic acid was no more effective in accelerating the removal of intratracheally instilled 109CdO, or in protecting against CdO-induced mortality, than was EDTA given alone

  16. Comparing potential copper chelation mechanisms in Parkinson's disease protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Frisco; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented the nudged elastic band (NEB) as a guided dynamics framework for our real-space multigrid method of DFT-based quantum simulations. This highly parallel approach resolves a minimum energy pathway (MEP) on the energy hypersurface by relaxing intermediates in a chain-of-states. As an initial application we present an investigation of chelating agents acting on copper ion bound to α -synuclein, whose misfolding is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD). Copper ions are known to act as highly effective misfolding agents in a-synuclein and are thus an important target in understanding PD. Furthermore, chelation therapy has shown promise in the treatment of Alzheimer's and other neuro-degenerative diseases with similar metal-correlated pathologies. At present, our candidate chelating agents include nicotine, curcumin and clioquinol. We examine their MEP activation barriers in the context of a PD onset mechanism to assess the viability of various chelators for PD remediation.

  17. Chelated Ruthenium Catalysts for Z-Selective Olefin Metathesis

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of ruthenium-based metathesis catalysts with chelating N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands which catalyze highly Z-selective olefin metathesis. A very simple and convenient synthetic procedure of such a catalyst has been developed. An intramolecular C-H bond activation of the NHC ligand, which is promoted by anion ligand substitution, forms the appropriate chelate for stereo- controlled olefin metathesis.

  18. Μethods of iron chelation therapy: a bibliographic review

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Agapiou; Elpida Georgiadi

    2012-01-01

    "Iron Chelation Therapy" is a term used to describe the procedure of removing excess iron from the body, which is applied after a total of approximately 20 blood transfusions or when serum ferritin levels rise above 1000 ng/ml. Aim: The purpose of the present paper is a retrospective search in bibliography, concerning the methods of iron chelation treatment for patients with hemochromatosis owing to their undergoing multiple blood transfusions. Method: The methology followed, included the sea...

  19. EDTA chelation therapy for cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Ping; Seely Dugald MR; Mills Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous practitioners of both conventional and complementary and alternative medicine throughout North America and Europe claim that chelation therapy with EDTA is an effective means to both control and treat cardiovascular disease. These claims are controversial, and several randomized controlled trials have been completed dealing with this topic. To address this issue we conducted a systematic review to evaluate the best available evidence for the use of EDTA chelation ...

  20. Chelation: Harnessing and Enhancing Heavy Metal Detoxification—A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    Toxic metals such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury are ubiquitous, have no beneficial role in human homeostasis, and contribute to noncommunicable chronic diseases. While novel drug targets for chronic disease are eagerly sought, potentially helpful agents that aid in detoxification of toxic elements, chelators, have largely been restricted to overt acute poisoning. Chelation, that is multiple coordination bonds between organic molecules and metals, is very common in the body and at the...

  1. Clawing Back: Broadening the Notion of Metal Chelators in Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional notion of chelation therapy is the administration of a chemical agent to remove metals from the body. But formation of a metal-chelate can have biological ramifications that are much broader than metal elimination. Exploring these other possibilities could lead to pharmacological interventions that alter the concentration, distribution, or reactivity of metals in targeted ways for therapeutic benefit. This review highlights recent examples that showcase four general strategies...

  2. Antioxidant, Free Radical Scavenging and Metal Chelating Characteristics of Propolis

    OpenAIRE

    Hikmet Geckil; Burhan Ates; Gokhan Durmaz; Selim Erdogan; Ismet Yilmaz

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the reducing characteristics, metal chelating capability, anti-lipid peroxidative and antiradical properties of propolis compared to two widely used artificial antioxidants, Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA) and Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT). The water and ethanol extracts of propolis showed significantly a different degree of metal chelating, radical scavenging activity and reducing power. In general, ethanol extracts of propolis showed higher activity re...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide- metals- chelating agents; interactions and analytical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Rämö, J.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Information about interactions among metals, hydrogen peroxide and chelating agents is needed to develop environmental technology and the operating efficiency of modern elemental chlorine free and total chlorine free bleaching processes. The work presented here focused on the properties of metal chelates and corrosion of titanium in an alkaline hydrogen peroxide solution. A comparative study between three rapid analysis methods, ICP-AES, XRF and ISE, was performed in pulp matrix a...

  4. Investigation of the effect of the uranyl ion on proton-spin-relaxation times in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project was to determine the effect of the uranyl ion on the spin-lattice relaxation time of protons in aqueous solutions. A flowmeter using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques is being designed for monitoring the flow rate of aqueous solutions which are acidic, contain plutonium and uranium ions, chemical waste, and radioactive waste materials. The spin-lattice relaxation time is critical to the design of a flowmeter using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Experimental studies showed that spin-lattice relaxation time did not change for different molar concentrations of sample solutions of uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate prepared from pure laboratory chemicals dissolved in distilled water. Therefore, it was concluded that the uranyl ion does not contribute to the relaxation process for protons in water

  5. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics

  6. Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated β-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated β-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs

  7. Cage-like bifunctional chelators, copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and PET imaging using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Peter S.; Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Liu, Shuanglong

    2016-08-02

    Disclosed is a class of versatile Sarcophagine based bifunctional chelators (BFCs) containing a hexa-aza cage for labeling with metals having either imaging, therapeutic or contrast applications radiolabeling and one or more linkers (A) and (B). The compounds have the general formula ##STR00001## where A is a functional group selected from group consisting of an amine, a carboxylic acid, an ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene, and B is a functional group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene. Also disclosed are conjugate of the BFC and a targeting moiety, which may be a peptide or antibody. Also disclosed are metal complexes of the BFC/targeting moiety conjugates that are useful as radiopharmaceuticals, imaging agents or contrast agents.

  8. Coordination of the uranyl ion in solution and ionic liquids : a combined UV-Vis absorption and EXAFS study

    OpenAIRE

    Servaes, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    The uranyl ion (UO22+) has been extensively studied for decades and nowadays it is still a hot topic in a number of contemporary issues like nuclear waste treatment and the Balkan syndrome. Therefore, besides our fundamental interest in this complex system, the aim of this study was to provide a convenient and straightforward approach to identify the structure of various uranyl complexes formed in solution. To achieve this goal, spectroscopic techniques like UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, ...

  9. Examination on colour reaction of nicotinic acid-ethyl violet-uranyl ternary complex by solvent extraction spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The test examination was made on solvent extraction colour reaction of the ternary complex formed by nicotinic acid, ethyl violet and uranyl in cyclohexane+MIBK (methyl isobutyl ketone) or benzene+MIBK. A difference was found between the published results and the authors'. It was shown that there is no chromomagnetic dependence with uranyl ion, but the approximate linear correlation is present with NO3- ion

  10. Rapid separation of thorium-234 from uranyl nitrate hexahydrate by adsorption on filter paper from ether solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method was developed for the rapid separation of 234Th (UX1) from uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. The method is based on selective dissolution of uranyl nitrate by diethyl ether on a filter paper. It is shown that almost all UX1 is adsorbed by the filter paper which can be desorbed and brought into solution by 5N HCl or HNO3. The effect of different parameters on the separation was also investigated. (author)

  11. Density functional studies of uranyl ion sorption on TiO{sub 2} (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perron, H. [Universite Paris XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)]|[EDF-R et D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur loing Cedex (France); Domain, C.; Catalette, H. [EDF-R et D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur loing Cedex (France); Roques, J.; Vandenborre, J.; Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Universite Paris XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: One of the most important processes affecting safety during the storage of nuclear waste in underground disposal is the migration of radio-toxic elements through the geosphere. The major factor involved in the retention of these elements, in the case of water infiltration, would be their sorption at the water/mineral interface. In order to predict if a disposal will be safe, retardation process must be correctly understood. Among the radionuclides of interest, an experimental team of our laboratory is studying the interaction between uranyl ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) and the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface. Under experimental conditions, using XPS and TRLFS measurements two uranyl surface complexes were identified on the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface and it was shown that only the free aquo uranyl ion reacts with the surface sites. The relative intensities of these two structures change with the surface coverage indicating two different stabilities. The purpose of this work is to provide a theoretical support to the experimental investigation. With this aim in view, we report first principles density functional calculations on the adsorption of water and uranyl ions on the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface. Two different approaches were used. First, TiO{sub 2} (110) surface was modeled with periodic slabs in order to investigate clean surface relaxations, water adsorption, and finally interaction of uranyl ions with the mineral surface. The goal of this first step was to identify the most probable UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} adsorption sites and to establish their relative energy stabilities as a function of the surface coverage. Then, starting from the previous TiO{sub 2} (110) relaxed structure, (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters were used to simulate the (110) rutile surface. This second step was done in order to study, from a local point of view, the interaction of one uranyl ion with the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface for the different possible adsorption sites. Each

  12. THE STUDIES ON CHELATING FIBER V.ADSORPTION BEHAVIOR OF Au3+ ONTO CHELATING FIBER CONTAINING AMIDOXIME GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINWeiping; LUYun; 等

    1992-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of ionic gold onto chelating fiber containing amidoxime groups was investigated. The chelating fiber presents high adsorption capacity for ionic gold Au3+(up to 626mg/g,when the content of amidoxime group reaches 7.59mmol/g),and possesses the ability to reduce the Au3+ into metallic gold,In the redox process,the amidoxime group is oxidized into carboxyl group.

  13. Reactive transport of uranyl: fixation mode on silica and goethite; experiments in columns and closed reactors; simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium contaminated areas are found in mine waste disposal sites, former military areas, etc. The present study focuses on the identification or mechanisms which may lead contaminated soils to become a sudden potential threat to surface and ground waters. Mechanisms were studied on model material at two levels. On the molecular scale, the complexation of uranyl at trace metal concentrations was investigated with amorphous silica. Complexation is shown to occur via the formation of surface complexes, characterised by different time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectra and life times and stoichiometry. On the macro-scale the transport behaviour of uranyl in a cristobalite-goethite-carbonate-uranyl system was investigated with laboratory column and batch experiments. Uranium mobility was found to be controlled by the interaction between physical transport and a reversible, rate-controlled, fixation reaction. Sorption was shown to be an ensemble of competing solution and surface complexation reactions, leading to an apparent non-linear (Langmuir-like) adsorption isotherm. Finally the impact of a sudden change in background geochemistry was studied. Conditions leading to a dramatic mobilization of uranium from mildly contaminated systems were experimentally identified. Maximal uranyl concentration are controlled by the total extractable uranyl in the system and limited by uranyl solubility. Evolution of the background geochemical conditions is thus an important part of contaminated sites risk assessment. (author)

  14. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in τ-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium τ-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form (τ-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10-4 and 10-5 of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO4. The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the τ-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  15. Molecular mechanisms of in vivo metal chelation: implications for clinical treatment of metal intoxications.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Ole; Aaseth, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Successful in vivo chelation treatment of metal intoxication requires that a significant fraction of the administered chelator in fact chelate the toxic metal. This depends on metal, chelator, and organism-related factors (e.g., ionic diameter, ring size and deformability, hardness/softness of electron donors and acceptors, route of administration, bioavailability, metabolism, organ and intra/extracellular compartmentalization, and excretion). In vivo chelation is not necessarily an equilibri...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  17. Study of hydrolysis and complexing of uranyl ions in sulfate solutions at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of uranyl ion hydrolysis at elevated temperatures in the absence of complex formation in dilute nitrate solutions by measuring the pH. It was found that hydrolysis in the temperature range from 50 to 1500C and a total U(VI) concentration of 10-2 to 10-5 M occurs basically by the three reactions. The data was processed by computer to calculate the equilibrium constants of these reactions and to obtain equations for these constants as functions of temperature. Taking into account hydrolysis, the pH measurements for the uranyl sulfate solutions were used to calculate the equilibrium constants of the dissociation reaction of the sulfate complex. The dissociation constants as functions of temperature were also found. 22 refs., 3 tabs

  18. Extraction chemistry of uranyl nitrate and nitric acid in high concentration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HNO3 is extracted in significant quantities by uranyl nitrate solvates with diferent extractants: TBP (tributyl phosphate), TOPO (trioctyl phosphine oxide) and TDA (tetradecyl ammonium). The effect of diluent nature is not observed on extracting HNO3 and TBP saturated by uranium at equilibrium with its salt using the diluents (CCl4, C6H5Cl, C12H26, CHCl3) which are less polar than UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 . HNO3 occurs in organic phase as undissociated form and its state is similar to pure anhydrous HNO3 . Solvates of TBP and TDA with uranyl nitrate dissolve HNO3 without displacement of uranium from organic phase. (author) 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. Studies on the preparation and characterisation of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been carried out in the laboratory on the preparation of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC), using concentrated solution of uranyl nitrate. The precipitation of AUC has been done by addition of (NH4)2CO3 solution and injecting gaseous ammonia and carbon dioxide. The precipitates obtained under varying parameter have been characterised by chemical and XRD analysis and the precipitate obtained under ideal conditions have been found to have the formula [(NH4)4UO2(CO3)3]. Though the studies were mainly aimed at standardising the procedures for the identification of precipitates, some of the AUC samples have been tested to see their suitability for conversion to ceramic grade UO2 powder and its pelletisation and sintering properties of the pellets. The data collected during these studies is presented. (author). 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Determination of uranyl nitrate diffusion coefficients in organic and aqueous media using the porous diaphragm method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion coefficient is one of the parameters necessary for the obtention of the extraction exponential coefficients, that are contained within the H.T.U. (height of transfer unity) calculation expression, when operating with continuous organic phase. The organic phase used was tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) and varsol in the 35% and 65% proportions respectively. After each experiment, the uranium content present in each compartment was spectrophotometrically determined and the quantities contained in the aqueous phases were determined by means of volumetric titration. It was found out that the uranyl ion diffusion coefficient is two and one half times less in organic phase, this just being attributed to the greater interactions of the uranyl ions in organic than in aqueous medium

  1. Interaction of uranyl ions with snake venom proteins from Lachesis muta muta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction product of uranyl nitrate with whole-protein Bushmaster snake venom in nitrate buffer at pH 3.5 has been studied. The maximum uptake of uranium was 291 μmol U x g-1 of venom. The infrared spectrum of the product showed an asymmetric O-U-O vibration at 921 cm-1 typical of complex formation with the uranyl ion. Stability measurements with the UO22+-protein complex in neutral medium indicated moderate hydrolytic stability, with 14% dissociation after 16 hours at 0 deg C. Neutron irradiation and desorption studies with a 235U-labelled complex showed that generated fission products such as lanthanides and barium were readily lixiviated at pH 7, whereas Ru and Zr were highly retained by the protein substrate. (author)

  2. Flotation extraction of uranium (6) in the form of uranyl hydroxide from diluted aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of flotation extraction of uranium (6) as uranyl hydroxide, waterproofed by decyl-, dodecyl-, tetradecyl- and hexadecyl pyridine bromides is studied. It is shown that 95-100 % flotation extraction of uranium is reached at a consumption of 0.6-1.0 mole of hexadecyl pyridine bromide per a mole of uranium. It is established that at a consumption of 1.2 mole of hexadecyl pyridine bromide per a mole of uranium, the flotation of uranyl hydroxide is carried out at positive values of ξ-potential of extracted particles (in this case the degree of flotation extraction of uranium is only 10-20 %). An increase in time period of flotation results in changing the values of ξ-potential of extracted particles close to isoelectric state ( in this case the degree of flotation extraction of uranium is 95-100 % )

  3. Effect of uranyl intoxication on renal corticomedullary gradient of orthoiodohippurate in laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment is attempted of the intrarenal distribution (by means of the cortico-medullary gradient and the cortico-pelvic gradient) of a model diagnostic substance (o-125I-hippurate) for the analysis of mechanisms causing damage to the renal function during intoxication induced by uranyl ions (uranyl nitrate). The findings were correlated with other indicators of the renal lesion (creatinine and urea plasma levels). Relative shifts of different gradients, i.e. mutual shifts and shifts in relation to hippurate blood levels, make it possible to describe the stepwise character of functional changes in the damaged kidney. The method used is suitable for investigating the dynamics of substances transport during functional renal changes in particular when combined with the determination the intensity of the uptake of model substances by renal tissue slices. (author)

  4. Heating efficiency of microwave heating direct denitration of a mixture of uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixture of plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate is co-converted to MOX powder by the microwave heating method developed by JAEA. The heating efficiency is very important for improving the energy-saving performance in this conversion process. In this study, the heating efficiency was measured using both experimental and engineering-scale microwave ovens in water, nitric acid and a mixture of plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate as a function of distance between the specimen and the base of the oven. In addition, the distribution of electromagnetic field strength and its absorption concentration in the solution were numerically evaluated by an electromagnetic field analysis code, MWS 2009. The experimental results could almost be explained by the numerical analysis results. When the distance of the specimen and the base of the oven was beyond 1/4 wavelength, the efficiency became constant because the influence disappeared. (author)

  5. Simple and general procedure for the synthesis of semi-rigid chelating agents for radiometal complexation studies and its application to semi-rigid functionalised ligands (BCA) synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunotherapy with radiolabeled antibodies should allow fairly specific targeting of certain cancers. However, iodine-131 may not be the best isotope for tumour therapy because of its limited specific activity, low beta-energy, relatively long half-life and strong gamma emission. Another approach to improve therapeutic efficacy is the use of replacement isotopes with better physical properties. Chelators that can hold radiometals with high stability under physiological conditions are essential to avoid excessive radiation damage to non-target cells. Moreover, the development of new bifunctional chelating agents is essential for this purpose. Accordingly, our efforts have been directed, for several years, to the synthesis of original chelating agents likely to form stable complexes in vivo with the numerous potential candidates for such applications. The stability of a non-macrocyclic ligand can be favourably influenced by the preorganization of the open chain. In fact, a semi-rigid structure such as that of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane limits the rotation of the ethylene bridge, so that the purpose of the cyclohexane design is to preorient the four pendent arms in a skew position. Therefore, we have developed a new simple and efficient synthesis pathway from trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane to provide access to a new class of semi-rigid chelating agents. This same reactional scheme will be apply to our reactional intermediary, (1R*, 2R*, 4S*)-4-acetamido-1,2-diaminocyclohexane dihydrochloride, which will allow the synthesis of these same chelating agents, though functionalised back of the cycle by a termination allowed coupling to an antibody or any other biological substance such as a hapten. (orig.)

  6. Photosensitized decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by the uranyl ion, production of hydroperoxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photosensitized decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by the uranyl ion in sulfuric acid media has been demonstrated and the kinetics of oxygen evolution have been measured as a function of the initial concentrations. The HO2 radical stabilized by complexation with UO22+ is an intermediate in this decomposition. This reaction can be employed in the photoassisted oxidation of diverse organic molecules using UO22+ as the sensitizer

  7. Synthesis, characterization and photo luminescence studies of uranyl doped SrBPO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SrBPO5: UO22+ was synthesized using solid state reaction method and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction. PXRD data showed the formation of single phase confirming successful doping of UO22+. Photo luminescence investigation informed stabilization of Uranium as Uranyl (UO22+) in SrBPO5 matrix. Luminescence decay time data suggested two possible environments for UO22+ with two different life time values

  8. Complex formation of uranyl acetate with tetracycline and its utilization for their microdetermination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conductometric and spectrophotometric (covering the visible, uv, and ir ranges) studies as well as microanalyses of uranyl complexes with tetracycline revealed the existence of the 1:1 complex species. The mean stability constant of the 1:1 complex, as determined spectrophotometrically, amounted to 1.2 x 105. This finding permits the use of the procedure for the microdetermination of tetracycline using UO2+2 ion or vice versa. (U.S.)

  9. A bibliographical review on the radiolysis of uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographical study on the effects of ionizing radiation on uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium was performed, and the state of knowledge on this subject is presented. The main experimental and theoretical results on water, nitric acid and uranium solutions radiolysis are reviewed and critically evaluated. This paper provides a collection of references as an aid to the development of practical applications, and to stimulate new research on fundamental processes in these systems. (author)

  10. Ternary system uranyl monochloroacetate/water/tri-n-butyl phosphate (ir spectroscopic study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Lumpov, A.A.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1986-01-01

    The phase equilibria in the ternary system uranyl monochloroacetate/water/TBP are examined from the standpoint of IR spectroscopic data obtained in the present work for the equilibrium phases in various concentration regions. A number of hypotheses are advanced relative to the composition of the solvated complex of this salt in the organic phases, and also in connection with the relationship between solvation and hydration processes and the electron-donor properties of the haloacetate ions.

  11. Solubility of uranyl nitrate in nitric acid solutions of aluminum nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of uranyl nitrate in nitric acid solutions of aluminum nitrate at 250C containing 10, 20 and 30 mass % of nitric acid has been studied by the isothermal method. The Schreinemakers method has been used to establish the composition of the solid phases, which has been confirmed by crystallographic and thermographic studies. Data are presented on the viscosity and density of saturated solutions

  12. NMR study of inorganic mesophase in water-acetone solutions of uranyl fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the method of PMR spectroscopy a macroscopic ordering, dependence of orientation de.gree of acetone molecules on temperature and composition of the uranuyl fluoride-water- acetone system is investigated. It is shown that physical processes determining the formation of a mesophase in the investigated system are analogous to the processes in organic liquid crystals. It is pointed out that the matrix of the given liquid crystal is a dimeric complex of uranyl fluoride

  13. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 250C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed

  14. Calculation of phase equilibria in ternary systems uranyl salt-water-organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in modeling extraction equilibria in systems with uranyl nitrate and halogen acetates with oxygen-containing organic solvents and tributylphosphate is presented. A method of calculating the equilibria on the basis of thermodynamic approach was suggested, phase diagrams for 12 extractive mixtures being calculated. Comparative analysis with the known experimental data was concluded, efficiency of the systems, that had not been previously considered by experiments, was predicted

  15. Determination of the stability constants of uranyl/polymer complexes by differential pulse polarography

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, D.; Martinot, Lucien; Jérôme, Christine; Jérôme, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Differential pulse polarography (DPP) allows for the determination of the stability constants (K) and the stoichiometry (n) for the complexation of the UO22+ ion by various monomers and the parent polymers. The experimental observation is the shift of the totally reversible reduction wave UO22++e- UO2+ toward more cathodic potentials when the complexing monomer or polymer is added to an uranyl nitrate aqueous solution. This shift is, however, much greater when the polymer is used rather than ...

  16. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, thermal and kinetic study of uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Golzard, F.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 20 (2013), s. 3629-3646. ISSN 0095-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : X-ray crystallography * uranyl Schiff base complex * kinetics of thermal decomposition * cyclic voltammetry * kinetics and mechanism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.224, year: 2013

  17. The Uranyl Cation as a Visible-Light Photocatalyst for C(sp(3) )-H Fluorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Julian G; Bedell, T Aaron; Sorensen, Erik J

    2016-07-25

    The fluorination of unactivated C(sp(3) )-H bonds remains a desirable and challenging transformation for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and materials scientists. Previous methods for this transformation have used bench-stable fluorine atom sources; however, many still rely on the use of UV-active photocatalysts for the requisite high-energy hydrogen atom abstraction event. Uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is described as a convenient, hydrogen atom abstraction catalyst that can mediate fluorinations of certain alkanes upon activation with visible light. PMID:27320442

  18. Uranyl Solvation by a Three-Dimensional Reference Interaction Site Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Alexei; Li, Bo; Rösch, Notker

    2015-08-13

    We report an implementation of the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D RISM) that in particular addresses the treatment of the long-range Coulomb field of charged species, represented by point charges and/or a distributed charge density. A comparison of 1D and 3D results for atomic ions demonstrates a reasonable accuracy, even for a moderate size of the unit cell and a moderate grid resolution. In an application to uranyl complexes with 4-6 explicit aqua ligands and an implicit bulk solvent modeled by RISM, we show that the 3D technique is not susceptible to the deficiencies of the 1D technique exposed in our previous work [Li, Matveev, Krüger, Rösch, Comp. Theor. Chem. 2015, 1051, 151]. The 3D method eliminates the artificial superposition of explicit aqua ligands and the RISM medium and predicts essentially the same values for uranyl and uranyl-water bond lengths as a state-of-the-art polarizable continuum model. With the first solvation shell treated explicitly, the observables are nearly independent of the order of the closure relationship used when solving the set of integral equations for the various distribution functions. Furthermore, we calculated the activation barrier of water exchange with a hybrid approach that combines the 3D RISM model for the bulk aqueous solvent and a quantum mechanical description (at the level of electronic density functional theory) of uranyl interacting with explicitly represented water molecules. The calculated result agrees very well with experiment and the best theoretical estimates. PMID:26167741

  19. Anion recognition in water with use of a neutral uranyl-salophen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Cort, Antonella; Forte, Gianpiero; Schiaffino, Luca

    2011-09-16

    A new water-soluble uranyl-salophen complex incorporating two glucose units has been synthesized. This neutral derivative shows noteworthy binding affinity for fluoride in water thanks to the Lewis acid-base interaction occurring between the metal and the anion. Such interaction is strong enough to overcome the high hydration enthalpy of fluoride. Moreover this complex effectively binds hydrogen phosphate and exhibits remarkably strong association for nucleotide polyanions ADP(3-) and ATP(4-). PMID:21812437

  20. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  1. Method and apparatus for producing uranyl peroxide (U0/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium and uranium alloy pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing uranyl peroxide (UO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium-bearing metal pieces comprising: dissolving the uranium-bearing metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing nitric acid and at least 0.5% but no greater than 5.0% fluoboric acid to provide a second aqueous solution which includes uranyl ions (UO/sub 2//sup +2/) and nitric and fluoboric acids; adding hydrogen peroxide to the second aqueous solution to precipitate uranyl peroxide out of the second solution and provide a third aqueous solution containing nitric and fluoboric acids; and separating the uranyl peroxide from the third aqueous solution

  2. Selective colorimetric and fluorescent quenching determination of uranyl ion via its complexation with curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Shao-Pu; Liu, Zhong-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Under pH 4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, curcumin alone possesses extraordinary weak fluorescence emission. Nevertheless, the introduction of Triton X-100 micelles can largely enhance the fluorescence intensity of curcumin. Uranyl ions can complex with micelles-capped curcumin, along with the slight red shift of curcumin fluorescence (about 1-7 nm), a clear decrement of absorbance (424 nm) and fluorescence (507 nm) intensities, and a distinct color change from bright yellow to orange. The fluorescence decrements (ΔF, 507 nm) are positively correlated to the amount of uranyl ions in the concentration range of 3.7 × 10- 6-1.4 × 10- 5 mol L- 1. The detection limit of this fluorescence quenching methods is 3.7 × 10- 6 mol L- 1, which is nearly 9000 times lower than the maximum allowable level in drinking water proposed by World Health Organization. Good selectivity is achieved because of a majority of co-existing substances (such as Ce4 +, La3 +, and Th4 +) do not affect the detection. The content of uranyl ions in tap water samples was determined by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  3. A procedure for the preparation of an uranyl salt-based lubricant for pressing powder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lubricant based on uranyl salts can be prepared as follows. A higher fatty acid is dissolved in alcohol and neutralized. The gel formed is dissolved again by adding alcohol, and uranyl nitrate is added in a stoichiometric amount. The mixture is heated at a temperature lower than 52 degC. The precipitate formed is separated (e.g. by filtration), washed (e.g. with water, ethanol and acetone, respectively) and dried (e.g. at 40 degC), and is applicable as lubricant. In applications where the isotopic composition of lubricant residues is of importance, such as production of special kinds of nuclear fuel, care must be exercised when choosing the uranyl nitrate source. Special raw materials or sorted wastes from nuclear fuel production technology can be employed. A single fatty acid or a mixture of fatty acids can be used for the preparation; they can be saturated (unbranched or branched), with a minimum of 10 carbon atoms, or they can contain one double bond and an unbranched or branched alkyl chain with a minimum of 12 carbon atoms. (P.A.)

  4. Uranyl p-toluenesulfonate and its crystal hydrates, synthesis, and dehydration-hydration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While uranyl benzenesulfonate (UBS) crystallizes from aqueous solutions as monohydrate, uranyl p-toluenesulfonate (UPTS) crystallizes as pentahydrate, UPTS solubility in water is 2.57 mol.kg-1, which is about one-half the solubility of UBS (4.85 mol.kg-1). We synthesized the lowest hydrates of UPTS and the anhydrous salt and studied the hydration of anhydrous UPTS in air at various water vapour pressures. Thermogravimetry and gravimetry in air under standard conditions revealed that the hydrate shell of UPTS.5H2O possess a layer structure. After thorough grinding and storage of the product in air for 3-4 days we obtained stable UPTS.3H20. In conditions of slow crystallization from aqueous solutions, crystals of UO2(CH3C6H4S03)2.5H20 were obtained. Their size was 5 mm x 3 mm, the crystal had regular faces. The coordination of sulfonate ions to uranyl (apparently bidentate) in UPTS and its hydrates is similar to that in UBS

  5. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  6. The thermal denigration in fluid-bed to make uranyl product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plant used the thermal denigration to high concentration of uranyl nitrate solution in fluid-bed to make uranyl product. First the uranyl nitrate solution were concentrated in evaporator, into 300 gU/L, 600 gU/L, 750 gU/L and 1000 gU/L.When the fluid-bed was in good fluidity state at 320 degree C, the solution was sprayed all over the surface of the fine crystal seeds through the dual-channel air-blast nozzles to make new crystal seed and to make them grow up. The denigration reaction occurred when the internal temperature of the fluid-bed was kept at about 300 degree C by the outside and inside heat apparatus. The product were transported crossing the valve and spiral transfer to pack. The tail gas was purified and discharged. Through the fluid-bed's running, the variation discipline of temperature and the pressure, the effect curve of the quality of product accumulated to pressure drop were determined. At the same time, the gentrification temperature, the distributed heat and the transfer mode were tested. (authors)

  7. Determination of parameters dissolution of yellow-cake. Production of uranyl nitrate - Gas precipitation of AUC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different stages of the purification cycle of yellow-cakes have been studied thoroughly in order to obtain an ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) as an intermediate product of uranium dioxide (UO2). The optimal parameters of yellow-cake dissolution, filtration, extraction by solvent, scrubbing and stripping were determined. An original program of thermodynamic calculation was developed for the determination of the free energies of yellow-cake dissolution reactions. Different numerical methods were used to determine the kinetic constant, the reaction order and correlation equations of uranyl nitrate density as a function of U and H+ concentrations, before and after the extraction cycle. For the first time, Algerian filteraids were used for the filtration of uranyl nitrate solutions with satisfactory results. A laboratory designed installation enabled the precipitation of AUC by injection of ammonia and carbon dioxide gases. Interesting results have been obtained and further investigations should be carried out in order to optimize all the paremeters of the gas precipitation of AUC

  8. Uranyl tris-(carbohydrazide) nitrate [UO2((N2H3)2CO)3](NO3)2. Synthesis, structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl tris-(carbohydrazide) nitrate [UO2((N2H3)2CO)3](NO3)2 was prepared by the reaction of water solution of dioxouranium(VI) nitrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 with ethanol solution of carbohydrazide (N2H3)2CO in a molar ratio of 1 to 3 in an neutral medium. The substance was characterized by elemental, thermal analysis and IR and 15N MAS CP NMR spectroscopy. Ab initio crystal structure determination was carried out using X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic lattice with unit cell parameters: a = 15.193(1) Aa, b = 12.005(1) Aa, c = 10.842(1) Aa, β = 109.15(1) , V = 1868.11 Aa3, Z = 4, SG = Cc. The type of carbohydrazide coordination was additionally confirmed by 15N MAS CP NMR and IR spectroscopy. In the complex ion [UO2((N2H3)2CO)3]2+ three carbohydrazide ligands coordinate to UO22+ through oxygen and nitrogen forming three five-membered chelate rings. The carbohydrazide rings are tuned to the equatorial plane of complex. The crystal structure consists of zig-zag chains of [UO2((N2H3)2CO)3]2+ cations stretched along c-axis. The cations in the chain are linked by the hydrogen bonds between the cations themselves. The anions are located in the pores between chains and participate in hydrogen bonding between adjacent chains and additionally link the chain sections. The length of the chain section is 5.768 Aa and the angle between sections is 140 . The substance [UO2((N2H3)2CO)3](NO3)2 is thermally stable up to 215 C and then decomposes with an explosion.

  9. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO3. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O2−). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O2− may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O2− may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of two new bifunctional carboxymethylated tetraazamacrocyclic chelating agents for protein labeling with indium-111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruser, G.; Ritter, W.; Maecke, H.R. (Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland))

    1990-09-01

    The synthesis of two new N- and C-functionalized tetraazamacrocyclic ligands intended to be covalently linked to biomolecules like monoclonal antibodies and to bind the gamma-emitting isotope indium-111 in a thermodynamically and/or kinetically inert way is described. 12-(p-Nitrobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotridecane-1,4,7,10-tetraa cetic acid (L1) was synthesized by means of bimolecular cyclization with the appropriate malonic acid diethyl ester and triethylenetetraamine, followed by reduction with diborane and alkylation of the cyclic tetraamine with bromoacetic acid. The corresponding triscarboxymethylated ligand L2 was made by statistical alkylation of the tetraamine. Both ligands fulfill the criteria for antibody labeling using the bifunctional chelate approach, namely fast chelate formation, high radiochemical yield, and high stability under physiological conditions. Surprisingly the heptadentate ligand L2 confers higher stability to In3+ and exhibits faster complex formation than octadentate L1. 13C NMR spectra in solution indicate that the difference in stability is not due to incomplete coordination of all four carboxylate groups in In-L1.

  11. Structural evolution of a uranyl peroxide nano-cage fullerene: U60, at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, F.; McGrail, B.; Burns, P. C.; Mao, W. L.; Ewing, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    U60 is a uranyl peroxide nano-cage that adopts a highly symmetric fullerene topology; it is topologically identical to C60. Several studies on the aqueous-phase of U60 clusters, [UO2(O2)(OH)]6060-, have shown its persistence in complex solutions and over lengthy time scales. Peroxide enhances corrosion of nuclear fuel in a reactor accident-uranyl peroxides often form near contaminated sites. U60 (Fm-3) crystallizes with approximate formula: Li68K12(OH)20[UO2(O2)(OH)]60(H2O)310. Here, we have used the diamond anvil cell (DAC) to examine U60 to understand the stability of this cluster at high pressures. We used a symmetric DAC with 300 μm culet diamonds and two different pressure-transmitting media: a mixture of methanol+ethanol and silicone oil. Using a combination of in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron XRD, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) ex situ, we have determined the pressure-induced evolution of U60. Crystalline U60 undergoes an irreversible phase transition to a tetragonal structure at 4.1 GPa, and irreversibly amorphizes at 13 GPa. The amorphous phase likely consists of clusters of U60. Above 15 GPa, the U60 cluster is irreversibly destroyed. ESI-MS shows that this phase consists of species that likely have between 10-20 uranium atoms. Raman spectroscopy complements the diffraction measurements. U60 shows two dominant vibrational modes: a symmetric stretch of the uranyl U-O triple bond (810 cm-1), and a symmetric stretch of the U-O2-U peroxide bond (820 cm-1). As pressure is increased, these modes shift to higher wavenumbers, and overlap at 4 GPa. At 15 GPa, their intensity decreases below detection. These experiments reveal several novel behaviors including a new phase of U60. Notably, the amorphization of U60 occurs before the collapse of its cluster topology. This is different from the behavior of solvated C60 at high pressure, which maintains a hcp structure up to 30 GPa, while the clusters disorder. These results suggest

  12. Albumin microspheres labeled with Ga-67 by chelation: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albumin microspheres have been synthesized with EDTA and DTPA chelating groups covalently bound to their surface. The microspheres may be labeled with Ga-67 at high yield (97 +- 2%) by transcomplexation from a 0.1 M Ga-67 acetate solution. With EDTA microspheres the resulting label dissociates only slightly after 24 hr in 50% plasma at 370C, whereas with DTPA microspheres the label shows no detectable dissociation over this period. By contrast, microspheres without chelating groups lose their label virtually completely under these conditions. Following intravenous administration of sized Ga-67 DTPA microspheres in mice, about (84 +- 16)% of the activity localizes in the lungs at 5 min, with (60 +- 7)% remaining after 2 h. Since labeling is by chelation, the microspheres may also be tagged with other metallic radionuclides

  13. Albumin microspheres labeled with Ga-67 by chelation: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albumin microspheres have been synthesized eith EDTA and DTPA chelating groups covalently bound to their surface. The microspheres may be labeled with Ga-67 at high yield (97 +/- 2%) by transcomplexation from a 0.1 M Ga-67 acetate solution. With EDTA microspheres the resulting label dissociates only slightly after no detectable dissociation over this period. By contrast, microspheres without chelating groups lose their label virtually completely under these conditions. Following intravenous administration of sized Ga-67 DTPA microspheres in mice, about (84 +/- 16)% of the activity localizes in the lungs at 5 min, with (60 +/- 7)% remaining after 2 hr. Since labeling is by chelation, the microspheres may also be tagged with other metallic radionuclides

  14. Antioxidant, Free Radical Scavenging and Metal Chelating Characteristics of Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Geckil

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to determine the reducing characteristics, metal chelating capability, anti-lipid peroxidative and antiradical properties of propolis compared to two widely used artificial antioxidants, Butylated Hydroxyanisole (BHA and Butylated Hydroxytoluene (BHT. The water and ethanol extracts of propolis showed significantly a different degree of metal chelating, radical scavenging activity and reducing power. In general, ethanol extracts of propolis showed higher activity regarding these parameters. Synthetic antioxidants showed better activities than both propolis extracts for antioxidant properties, utilizing a -carotene bleaching method. At higher concentrations, the reducing power of ethanol extract of propolis was similar to that of artificial antioxidants. The metal chelating activity of both water and ethanol extracts of propolis was comparable to that of EDTA and significantly higher than both BHA and BHT.

  15. Encapsulation and retention of chelated-copper inside hydrophobic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervella, Pablo; Parra, Elisa; Needham, David

    2016-01-01

    Trioleate (Triolein) with copper using the hydrophobic chelator Octaethyl porphyrin (OEP). RESEARCH PLAN AND METHODS: The research plan for this study was to (1) Formulate nanoparticles and control nanoparticle size using a modification of the solvent injection technique, named fast ethanol injection; (2......) Chelate copper into the octaethyl porphyrin; (3) Encapsulate OEP-Cu in nanoparticles: the encapsulation efficiency of copper into liquid nanoparticles (LNP), solid nanoparticles (SNP) and phospholipid liposomes (PL) was evaluated by UV-Vis and atomic absorption spectroscopy; (4) Retain the encapsulated...... minimum value for the particle diameter of ∼30nm was measured. (2) Copper was chelated by OEP in a 1:1mol ratio with an association constant of 2.57×10(5)M(-1). (3) The diameter of the nanoparticles was not significantly affected by the presence of OEP or OEP-Cu. The percentage of encapsulation of copper...

  16. Timing of early chelating therapy for acute uranium intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats were treated with DTPA and H-73-10 intraperitoneal injections 15 minutes to 4 days after acute uranium intoxication. The mortality and changes in body weight, kidney weight, renal histology and histochemistry were investigated. The results show that the renal damage could be diminished significantly by chelating therapy started 15 minutes and 6 hours after urnium poisoning. Single large dose injection (1 g/kg weight) of H-73-10 yielded the best result, and daily 0.5 g/kg of H-73-10 injection for 5 days is the next, both are better than single injection of DTPA (1 g/kg body weight). One day after intoxication there was still some protective effect. On the contrary, if the chelating therapy started 2-4 days after urnium poisoning it would increase the renal damage and the mortality. This is of great value to the correct selection of timing of chelating therapy for uranium intoxication

  17. Extraction rate of metal ion by chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the extraction mechanism of metal ion by a chelating agent, it is problematic to infer the mechanism on the basis of the dependence of the extraction rate upon the concentration of the agent. For this purpose, the information as follows is essential: (1) computation of physical chemistry constants of the chelating agent, (2) the reaction rate for chelate formation with the metal ion in the water phase and the mechanism, and (3) the measurement of the extraction rate by use of the apparatus for which the oil/water interface area and the interface-material transfer coefficient are known. It is then necessary to establish the design guidance of reaction field and separation field via the accumulation of the experimental results. (Mori, K.)

  18. Inositol hexa-phosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, D.; Tapia, A.; Real, A.; Morcillo, M.A. [Radiobiology Laboratory, Radiation Dosimetry Unit, Department of Environment, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Chelation therapy is an optimal method to reduce the radionuclide-related risks. In the case of uranium incorporation, the treatment of choice is so far i.v infusion of a 1.4% sodium bicarbonate solution, but the efficacy has been proved to be not very high. In this study, we examine the efficacy of some substances: bicarbonate, citrate, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethidronate (EHBP) and inositol hexa-phosphate (phytic acid) to chelate uranium using a test developed by Braun et al. Different concentrations of phytic acid, an abundant component of plant seeds that is widely distributed in animal cells and tissues in substantial levels, were tested and compared to the same concentrations of sodium citrate, bicarbonate, EHBP and DTPA. The results showed a strong affinity of inositol hexa-phosphate for uranium, suggesting that it could be an effective chelating agent for uranium in vivo. (authors)

  19. Inositol hexa-phosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelation therapy is an optimal method to reduce the radionuclide-related risks. In the case of uranium incorporation, the treatment of choice is so far i.v infusion of a 1.4% sodium bicarbonate solution, but the efficacy has been proved to be not very high. In this study, we examine the efficacy of some substances: bicarbonate, citrate, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethidronate (EHBP) and inositol hexa-phosphate (phytic acid) to chelate uranium using a test developed by Braun et al. Different concentrations of phytic acid, an abundant component of plant seeds that is widely distributed in animal cells and tissues in substantial levels, were tested and compared to the same concentrations of sodium citrate, bicarbonate, EHBP and DTPA. The results showed a strong affinity of inositol hexa-phosphate for uranium, suggesting that it could be an effective chelating agent for uranium in vivo. (authors)

  20. Clinical monitoring and management of complications related to chelation therapy in patients with β-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Antoine N; El Rassi, Fuad; Taher, Ali T

    2016-01-01

    Iron chelating agents - deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP), and deferasirox (DFX) - are used to treat chronic iron overload in patients with β-thalassemia in an attempt to reduce morbidity and mortality related to siderosis. Each of the approved iron chelating agents has its own advantages over the others and also has its own risks, whether related to over-chelation or not. In this review, we briefly discuss the methods to monitor the efficacy of iron chelation therapy (ICT) and the evidence behind the use of each iron chelating agent. We also portray the risks and complications associated with each iron chelating agent and recommend strategies to manage adverse events. PMID:26613264

  1. Combinational chelation therapy abrogates lead-induced neurodegeneration in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead, a ubiquitous and potent neurotoxicant causes oxidative stress which leads to numerous neurobehavioral and physiological alterations. The ability of lead to bind sulfhydryl groups or compete with calcium could be one of the reasons for its debilitating effects. In the present study, we addressed: i) if chelation therapy could circumvent the altered oxidative stress and prevent neuronal apoptosis in chronic lead-intoxicated rats, ii) whether chelation therapy could reverse biochemical and behavioral changes, and iii) if mono or combinational therapy with captopril (an antioxidant) and thiol chelating agents (DMSA/MiADMSA) is more effective than individual thiol chelator in lead-exposed rats. Results indicated that lead caused a significant increase in reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and intracellular free calcium levels along with altered behavioral abnormalities in locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, learning, and memory that were supported by changes in neurotransmitter levels. A fall in membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and DNA damage indicated mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis. Most of these alterations showed significant recovery following combined therapy with captopril with MiADMSA and to a smaller extend with captopril + DMSA over monotherapy with these chelators. It could be concluded from our present results that co-administration of a potent antioxidant (like captopril) might be a better treatment protocol than monotherapy to counter lead-induced oxidative stress. The major highlight of the work is an interesting experimental evidence of the efficacy of combinational therapy using an antioxidant with a thiol chelator in reversing neurological dystrophy caused due to chronic lead exposure in rats.

  2. Heavy metal displacement in chelate-irrigated soil during phytoremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, F.; Liphadzi, M. S.; Kirkham, M. B.

    2003-03-01

    Heavy metals in wastewater sewage sludge (biosolids), applied to land, contaminate soils. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to clean up toxic heavy metals, might remove them. Chelating agents are added to soil to solubilize the metals for enhanced phytoextraction. Yet no studies follow the displacement and leaching of heavy metals in soil with and without roots following solubilization with chelates. The objective of this work was to determine the mobility of heavy metals in biosolids applied to the surface of soil columns (76 cm long; 17 cm diam.) with or without plants (barley; Hordeum vulgare L.). Three weeks after barley was planted, all columns were irrigated with the disodium salt of the chelating agent, EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) (0.5 g/kg soil). Drainage water, soil, and plants were analyzed for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). Total concentrations of the heavy metals in all columns at the end of the experiment generally were lower in the top 30 cm of soil with EDTA than without EDTA. The chelate increased concentrations of heavy metals in shoots. With or without plants, the EDTA mobilized Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which leached to drainage water. Drainage water from columns without EDTA had concentrations of these heavy metals below detection limits. Only Cu did not leach in the presence of EDTA. Even though roots retarded the movement of Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn through the EDTA-treated soil from 1 d (Cd) to 5 d (Fe), the drainage water from columns with EDTA had concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, and Pb that exceeded drinking water standards by 1.3, 500, 620, and 8.6 times, respectively. Because the chelate rendered Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn mobile, it is suggested that the theory for leaching of soluble salts, put forward by Nielsen and associates in 1965, could be applied to control movement of the heavy metals for maximum uptake during chelate-assisted phytoremediation.

  3. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM LANTHANUM BY CHELATION-EXTRACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

    1958-12-01

    Plutonium can be separated from a mixture of plutonlum and lanthanum in which the lanthanum to plutonium molal ratio ls at least five by adding the ammonium salt of N-nitrosoarylhydroxylamine to an aqueous solution having a pH between about 3 and 0.2 and containing the plutonium in a valence state of at least +3, to form a plutonium chelate compound of N-nitrosoarylhydroxylamine. The plutonium chelate compound may be recovered from the solution by extracting with an immiscible organic solvent such as chloroform.

  4. Regularities in aluminium and indium chemisorption on chelating polymeric sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexation properties of synthesized polymer chelate sorbents: substituted of polystyrene-azo-pyrocatechol are investigated and correlations between pK'OH of functional groups of sorbents as well as pH50 values of chelation and constants of stability (lgKstab) are established for studying regularities of effect of structure and acid-base properties of functional groups of sorbents on the parameters of Al3+ and In3+ chemical sorption. Established correlations make it possible to predict the physicochemical parameters of sorbents and sorption of metal ions with the aim of separation and concentration of aluminium and indium micro account from the objects of different origin

  5. Chelation therapy in intoxications with mercury, lead and copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, yang; Skaug, Marit Aralt; Andersen, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we provide an update of the appropriate use of chelating agents in the treatment of intoxications with compounds of mercury, lead and copper. The relatively new chelators meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and 2,3-dimercapto-propanesulphonate (DMPS) can effectively...... mobilize deposits of mercury as well as of lead into the urine. These drugs can be administered orally and have relatively low toxicity compared to the classical antidote dimercaptopropanol (BAL). d-Penicillamine has been widely used in copper overload, although 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid or...

  6. Physiological response of Moringa oleifera to stigmasterol and chelated zinc

    OpenAIRE

    KARIMA GAMAL EL-DIN; IMAN MAHMOUD TALAAT; MOHAMED ABDEL-GHANY BEKHETA; ABDALLA EL-MOURSI

    2012-01-01

    El-Moursi A, Talaat IM, Bekheta MA, Gamal El-Din K. 2012. Physiological response of Moringa oleifera to stigmasterol and chelated zinc. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 118-123. Two pot experiments were carried out in the screen of the National Research Centre, Dokki, Giza, Egypt, during two successive seasons (2009/2010 and 2010/2011), respectively to study the effect of foliar spray with chelated zinc (100, 200 and 300 mg/L) and stigmasterol (50, 100 and 150 mg/L) on growth and chemical constituents...

  7. Development of radioactivity labelling method of new antibody by using the antibody engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With an aim to develop a method to produce labelled antibodies with low immunogenicity, two recombinant fusion proteins; scFv-His and scFv-MTβ were produced using gene engineering techniques. The former was constructed with scFv-antibody and histidine hexamer, a metal-chelated protein (or peptide). The latter was done with scFv-antibody and β-domain of metallothionein. Then, antigen-binding activity and metal-binding activity of these fusion proteins were determined using gel-filtration chromatography and ELISA. The main antigen-binding activity of scFv-His preparation was detected in a domain of about 25-30 kDa, which agreed with the peak of 29 kDa corresponding to the presumed molecular weight for the protein. Whereas the antigen-binding activity of scFv-MTβ was found in a domain of 30-35 kDa, which agreed with 32 kDa, the presumed molecular weight of scFv-MTβ. Gel-filtration chromatography of scFv-His preparation after the addition of Cu2+ ion revealed an optical absorption at 280 nm and a Cu-peak near at 14 kDa. These results suggested that the metal affinity of the histidine-hexamer was too weak to chelate Cu2+ in a solution. The chromatography of scFv-MTβ preparation added with Cd2+ showed a peak of Cd appeared around a position of about 20 kDa but the peak was not coincident with that of the antigen-binding activity (ca. 30 kDa), suggesting that the present preparation of scFv-MTβ had no Cd-binding activity due to metal-exchange reaction. Based on these results, problems on the production of recombinant scFv-antibody fused with metal-binding domain of cystein-binding type or histidine-binding one were discussed. (M.N.)

  8. A rapid, single vessel method for preparation of clinical grade ligand conjugated monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid, single vessel method for the preparation of clinical grade chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies has been developed. By use of an Amicon concentrator with reservoir, each of the steps necessary for the preparation of the conjugated drug may be performed in a single vessel. Advantages include reduced risk of metal, pyrogen and bacterial contamination; buffer exchanges are achieved rapidly and efficiently using a continuous dilution method. The radiolabeling efficiency, the radiochemical purity, the total immunoreactivity and the affinity of the final product have been evaluated in the production of CHXA-DTPA-chelate conjugated HuM195. The characteristics compare favorably to those achieved using our conventional synthetic methods

  9. Chelating regularities in the series of chelating polymer sorbents and their complexes with vanadium, manganese, and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicochemical properties of new synthesized polymer chelation sorbents - substituted polystyrene-azo-salicylic acid are investigated. Correlations between pKCOOH of functional groups of sorbents with chelation pH50 and vanadium, manganese and chromium lgstab are established with the aim of studying interactions in the ion of element - sorbent system. Established correlations suggest physicochemical properties of the sorbents and sorption parameters of cations of metals with the aim of concentration and separation of V(5), Mn(2) and Cr(3) microamounts from natural and technical objects including environmental ones

  10. Questions and Answers: The NIH Trial of EDTA Chelation Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Trial of EDTA Chelation Therapy for Coronary Heart Disease Preliminary results from the Trial to Assess Chelation ... and complete it. Study Background What is coronary heart disease? Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  11. Iron chelating active packaging: Influence of competing ions and pH value on effectiveness of soluble and immobilized hydroxamate chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Yoshiko; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-04-01

    Many packaged foods utilize synthetic chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) to inhibit iron-promoted oxidation or microbial growth which would result in quality loss. To address consumer demands for all natural products, we have previously developed a non-migratory iron chelating active packaging material by covalent immobilization of polyhydroxamate and demonstrated its efficacy in delaying lipid oxidation. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of this hydroxamate-functionalized iron chelating active packaging to retain iron chelating capacity; even in the presence of competing ions common in food. Both immobilized and soluble hydroxamate chelators retained iron chelating capacity in the presence of calcium, magnesium, and sodium competing ions, although at pH 5.0 the presence of calcium reduced immobilized hydroxamate iron chelation. A strong correlation was found between colorimetric and mass spectral analysis of iron chelation by the chelating packaging material. Such chelating active packaging may support reducing additive use in product formulations, while retaining quality and shelf life. PMID:26593563

  12. Development of radiolabelling techniques of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to label monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with 99Tcm such as the ior-CEA-1 antibody and polyclonal IgG using a direct method, to check the radiochemical and biological behavior of labelled products, to prepare it under sterile and apyrogenic conditions as a lyophilized kit and to employ it in clinical trials. In addition, a photoactivation method was used to label polyclonal IgG with 99Tcm and to compare with the established method using mercaptoethanol (2-ME) as the reducing agent. Finally polyclonal IgG was labelled using an indirect method in which a chelator was covalently attached to the protein and the 99Tcm added as glucoheptonate complex. The properties of 99Tcm when labelled with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies by different methods were assessed by in vitro and in vivo studies

  13. MDs remain sceptical as chelation therapy goes mainstream in Saskatchewan

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, M.

    1997-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan recently agreed to allow physicians to administer chelation therapy. Supporters, relying on anecdotal evidence, say it works wonders in overcoming heart disease, but many physicians remain profoundly sceptical. In Saskatchewan, the college decision has proved popular with patients but has drawn an angry reaction from doctors.

  14. Role of Chelation During Pregnancy in the Lead Poisoned Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Mary Jean

    2013-01-01

    Cultural and environmental factors can cause lead poisoning in the pregnant patient. The data regarding the reproductive risks associated with chelation during human pregnancy are sparse. Assessment of the exposure setting, including anticipatory counseling for each pregnant woman, would help assure the ideal outcome of no added lead intake.

  15. Laccase Immobilization by Chelated Metal Ion Coordination Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, amidoxime polyacrylonitrile (AOPAN nanofibrous membrane was prepared by a reaction between PAN nanofibers and hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The AOPAN nanofibrous membranes were used for four metal ions (Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ chelation under different conditions. Further, the competition of different metal ions coordinating with AOPAN nanofibrous membrane was also studied. The AOPAN chelated with individual metal ion (Fe3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and also the four mixed metal ions were further used for laccase (Lac immobilization. Compared with free laccase, the immobilized laccase showed better resistance to pH and temperature changes as well as improved storage stability. Among the four individual metal ion chelated membranes, the stability of the immobilized enzymes generally followed the order as Fe–AOPAN–Lac > Cu–AOPAN–Lac > Ni–AOPAN–Lac > Cd–AOPAN–Lac. In addition, the immobilized enzyme on the carrier of AOPAN chelated with four mixed metal ions showed the best properties.

  16. Chelation And Extraction Of Metals For GC-MS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.

    1995-01-01

    Chelation followed by supercritical-fluid extraction enables mass-spectrometric analysis. When fully developed, method implemented in field-portable apparatus for detection and quantification of metals in various matrices without need for elaborate preparation of samples. Used to analyze soil samples for toxic metals.

  17. Sequestration of zinc oxide by fimbrial designer chelators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Sørensen, Jack K; Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2000-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are surface organelles of Escherichia coli. By engineering a structural component of the fimbriae, FimH, to display a random peptide library, we were able to isolate metal-chelating bacteria. A library consisting of 4 x 10(7) independent clones was screened for binding to Zn...

  18. Reversal of haemochromatotic cardiomyopathy in beta thalassaemia by chelation therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Politi, A; M. Sticca; Galli, M

    1995-01-01

    Haemochromatotic cardiomyopathy is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with beta thalassaemia major. Once congestive heart failure develops most patients die in a few months. Congestive heart failure was reversed and echocardiographic findings were restored to normal in a 24 year old woman with beta thalassaemia who resumed treatment with chelation therapy (desferrioxamine).

  19. f-Element Ion Chelation in Highly Basic Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large body of data has been collected over the last fifty years on the chemical behavior of f-element ions. The ions undergo rapid hydrolysis reactions in neutral or basic aqueous solutions that produce poorly understood oxide-hydroxide species; therefore, most of the fundamental f-element solution chemistry has allowed synthetic and separations chemists to rationally design advanced organic chelating ligands useful for highly selective partitioning and separation of f-element ions from complex acidic solution matrices. These ligands and new examples under development allow for the safe use and treatment of solutions containing highly radioactive species. This DOE/EMSP project was undertaken to address the following fundamental objectives: (1) study the chemical speciation of Sr and lanthanide (Ln) ions in basic aqueous media containing classical counter anions found in waste matrices; (2) prepare pyridine N-oxide phosphonates and phosphonic acids that might act as selective chelators for Ln ions in model basic pH waste streams; (3) study the binding of the new chelators toward Ln ions and (4) examine the utility of the chelators as decontamination and dissolution agents under basic solution conditions. The project has been successful in attacking selected aspects of the very difficult problems associated with basic pH solution f-element waste chemistry. In particular, the project has (1) shed additional light on the initial stages of Ln ion sol-gel-precipitate formulation under basic solution conditions; (2) generated new families of pyridine phosphonic acid chelators; (3) characterized the function of the chelators and (4) examined their utility as oxide-hydroxide dissolution agents. These findings have contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the behavior of Ln ions in basic media containing anions found in typical waste sludges as well as to the development of sludge dissolution agents. The new chelating reagents are easily made and could be

  20. Phase diagram of uranyl acetate-water-tri-n-butyl phosphate system in the region of high salt concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigations into mutual solubility in the system of uranyl acetate-water-tributyl phosphate (the range of high salt concentrations) at 25 deg C are presented. The phase diagram of the system in the solubility range is shown to differ sharply from the most of diagrams of the known systems of salt-water-tributyl phosphate. An attempt is made to associate the unusual character of the solubility isotherm with change of the role of water in extraction and dissolution processes at transition from halogenoacetates to uranyl acetate. Based on IR spectroscopic data the conclusion is made on uranyl acetate solvation in the organic phase only with one molecule of tributyl phosphate, but not two molecules, as it was considered earlier

  1. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Megan E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bowers, Delbert L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  2. Commentary on the Abuse of Metal Chelation Therapy in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Approximately half a million patients with autism spectrum disorders are subjected to chelation therapy in the US annually. The overwhelming majority of such cases are chelated for non-accepted medical indications. These patients may seek evaluation when a urine sample is assayed after the administration of a chelating agent and the values obtained have been improperly compared to references ranges for non-chelated urines, causing falsely elevated results. Legitimate practitioners confronted ...

  3. A relativistic study of the photochemistry of the uranyl(VI) ion in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, F.; Wahlgren, U. [Alballova University Center, Stockholm University, Fysikum, 104-91 Stockholm, (Sweden); Vallet, V. [Laboratoire PhLAM, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1 CNRS UMR8523, 59655 Villeneuve d Ascq Cedex, (France); Marian, C. [Institut fur Theoretische Chemie und Computerchemie Heinrich-Heine-Universitat Universitatsstr. 40225 Dusseldorf (Georgia); Grenthe, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Inorganic Chemistry Se-10044 Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: The U-O bond in the uranyl(VI) ion is in general considered to be kinetically inert in thermal reactions, such as isotope exchange reactions. However, a fast isotope exchange can take place in photochemical reactions under UV irradiation as exemplified by the reaction: U{sup 17}O{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}*0 {yields} U{sup 17}O{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O (1) Under daylight, no exchange takes place, or the rate of exchange is very slow. This suggests that the reaction involves the excited-states of the uranyl(VI). 1) A comparison between wave-function theory and density-functional theory: The first part of this talk will discuss benchmark calculations of the excited states of the bare uranyl(VI) ion so that we can choose the computational cost effective ab initio method for the study of the photochemistry of actinide compounds. Before exploring the mechanism of exchange it is necessary to have information on the chemistry of the excited states and their electronic structure. It seems reasonable to assume that 'yl'-isotope exchange is related to the U-O{sub yl} stretching modes and following the work of Pierloot and van Besien [1] we have therefore studied the a{sub g}- and a{sub u}-modes of the U-O{sub yl} bond using different methods such as CASPT2, TD-DFT and DFT-MRCI and different basis set and description of the heavy-element. The scalar-relativistic effects were included using either the Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian in the case of all-electron calculations or an RECP small core from the Stuttgart Library. The {sup 3}{gamma}{sub g} state seems to be a good candidate for the photochemically 'active' state where the increase of the U-O{sub yl} localizes the wave function and gives distant 'yl' oxygen attains radical character. 2) Photochemistry of the uranyl(VI) in aqueous solution: In the case of the photochemistry of the uranyl(VI), we suggest that the first step

  4. Chelator induced phytoextraction and in situ soil washing of Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a soil column experiment, we investigated the effect of 5 mmol kg-1 soil addition of citric acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate (DTPA) and [S,S]-stereoisomer of ethylenediamine-disuccinate (EDDS) on phytoextraction of Cu from a vineyard soil with 162.6 mg kg-1 Cu, into the test plant Brassica rapa var. pekinensis. We also examined the use of a horizontal permeable barrier, composed of layers of nutrient enriched sawdust and apatite, for reduction of chelator induced Cu leaching. The addition of all chelators, except citric acid, enhanced Cu mobility and caused leaching of 19.5-23% of initial total Cu from the soil column. However, Cu plant uptake did not increase accordingly; the most effective was the EDDS treatment, in which plant Cu concentration reached 37.8±1.3 mg kg-1 Cu and increased by 3.3-times over the control treatment. The addition of none of the chelators in the concentration range from 5 to 15 mmol kg-1 exerted any toxic effect on respiratory soil microorganisms. When EDDS was applied into the columns with horizontal permeable barriers, only 0.53±0.32% of the initial total Cu was leached. Cu (36.7%) was washed from the 18 cm soil layer above the barrier and accumulated in the barrier. Our results indicate that rather than for a reduction of Cu leaching during rather ineffective chelate induced Cu phytoextraction, horizontal permeable barriers could be more effective in a new remediation technique of controlled in situ soil washing of Cu with biodegradable chelates

  5. Chelator induced phytoextraction and in situ soil washing of Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kos, Bostjan; Lestan, Domen

    2004-11-01

    In a soil column experiment, we investigated the effect of 5 mmol kg{sup -1} soil addition of citric acid, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate (DTPA) and [S,S]-stereoisomer of ethylenediamine-disuccinate (EDDS) on phytoextraction of Cu from a vineyard soil with 162.6 mg kg{sup -1} Cu, into the test plant Brassica rapa var. pekinensis. We also examined the use of a horizontal permeable barrier, composed of layers of nutrient enriched sawdust and apatite, for reduction of chelator induced Cu leaching. The addition of all chelators, except citric acid, enhanced Cu mobility and caused leaching of 19.5-23% of initial total Cu from the soil column. However, Cu plant uptake did not increase accordingly; the most effective was the EDDS treatment, in which plant Cu concentration reached 37.8{+-}1.3 mg kg{sup -1} Cu and increased by 3.3-times over the control treatment. The addition of none of the chelators in the concentration range from 5 to 15 mmol kg{sup -1} exerted any toxic effect on respiratory soil microorganisms. When EDDS was applied into the columns with horizontal permeable barriers, only 0.53{+-}0.32% of the initial total Cu was leached. Cu (36.7%) was washed from the 18 cm soil layer above the barrier and accumulated in the barrier. Our results indicate that rather than for a reduction of Cu leaching during rather ineffective chelate induced Cu phytoextraction, horizontal permeable barriers could be more effective in a new remediation technique of controlled in situ soil washing of Cu with biodegradable chelates.

  6. Immune responses in lactating Holstein cows supplemented with Cu, Mn, and Zn as sulfates or methionine hydroxy analogue chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, L M; Richards, J D; Atwell, C A; Diaz, D E; Zanton, G I; Gressley, T F

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare effects of inorganic sulfate versus chelated forms of supplemental Cu, Mn, and Zn on milk production, plasma and milk mineral concentrations, neutrophil activity, and antibody titer response to a model vaccination. Holstein cows (n=25) were assigned in 2 cohorts based on calving date to a 12-wk randomized complete block design study. The first cohort consisted of 17 cows that had greater days in milk (DIM; mean of 77 DIM at the start of the trial) than the second cohort of 8 cows (32 DIM at the start of the trial). Diets were formulated to supplement 100% of National Research Council requirements of Cu, Mn, and Zn by either inorganic trace minerals (ITM) in sulfate forms or chelated trace minerals (CTM) supplied as metal methionine hydroxy analog chelates, without accounting for trace mineral contribution from other dietary ingredients. Intake and milk production were recorded daily. Milk composition was measured weekly, and milk Cu, Mn, and Zn were determined at wk 0 and 8. Plasma Cu and Zn concentrations and neutrophil activity were measured at wk 0, 4, 8, and 12. Neutrophil activity was measured by in vitro assays of chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and reactive oxygen species production. A rabies vaccination was administered at wk 8, and vaccine titer response at wk 12 was measured by both rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test and ELISA. Analyzed dietary Cu was 21 and 23mg/kg, Mn was 42 and 46mg/kg, and Zn was 73 and 94mg/kg for the ITM and CTM diets, respectively. No effect of treatment was observed on milk production, milk composition, or plasma minerals. Dry matter intake was reduced for CTM compared with ITM cows, but this was largely explained by differences in body weight between treatments. Milk Cu concentration was greater for CTM than ITM cows, but this effect was limited to the earlier DIM cohort of cows and was most pronounced for multiparous compared with primiparous cows. Measures of neutrophil function were

  7. Effect of temperature on the mechanisms of interaction between uranyl ion and zirconium oxo-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium sorption onto Zr2O(PO4)2 has been studied between 298 K and 363 K, in 0.1 M NaClO4 medium. Potentiometric titrations were realized to determine temperature dependency of the acid-base properties (pHpcn, acidity constants). Classical batch experiments were performed at different temperatures. The sorption experiments revealed that the uranium sorption onto Zr2O(PO4)2 is favoured with the temperature. Structural characterization of the surface complexes was performed by both Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) and EXAFS spectroscopy. The TRLIF measurements vs. temperature revealed two uranyl surface complexes. No influence of the temperature onto the nature surface complex was observed. The EXAFS analysis showed a splitting of the equatorial oxygen atoms in two shells, corresponding to uranyl bidentate, inner-sphere complexes. The obtained structural uranyl surface complex information was used to simulate (using a constant capacitance model) the sorption edges. The proposed complexes equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes: (≡ZrOH)2UO22+ and (≡PO)2UO2. Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH0 and ΔS0 were determined using the van't Hoff equation. The enthalpy values associated to the U(VI) retention onto Zr2O(PO4)2, determined by the temperature dependence of the stability constants, testify that the formation of the complex (≡PO)2UO2 (55 kJ/mol) is endothermic, while no influence of the temperature was observed for the formation of the complex (≡ZrOH)2UO22+. The adsorption reaction of the last complex is then driven by entropy. In addition, calorimetric measurements of uranium sorption onto Zr2O(PO4)2 were carried out to directly quantify the enthalpy associated to the retention processes. (author)

  8. Behind adhesion of uranyl onto montmorillonite surface: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We investigated the adsorption of uranyl onto Montmorillonite surface. • We studied the surface energy between layered Montmorillonite sheets. • We studied the work of adhesion between radionuclide and charged Montmorillonite. -- Abstract: We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the adsorption of radionuclide elements species onto substituted Montmorillonite (001) surface in the presence of different counterions. The structure and the dynamics of uranyl ion as well as its aquo, chloride ion, and carbonate complexes are analyzed. In addition, we have studied the surface energy between layered Montmorillonite sheets and the work of adhesion between radionuclide and charged Montmorillonite. The clay model used here is a Wyoming-type Montmorillonite with 0.75e negative charge per unit cell resulting from substitutions in Octahedral and Tetrahedral sheets. The system model was constructed based on CLAYFF force field potential model. To evaluate the thermodynamic work of adhesion, each surface and clay layer regions are converted to a thin film model. One and two species of radionuclide elements (UO2(H2O)5,UO2CO3(H2O)5, and UO2Cl2(H2O)5) were deposited near the clay surface in a pseudo-two-dimensional periodic cell. Analysis shows that the uranyl ion structure is preserved with two axial oxygen atoms detected at 1.8 Å. Radial distribution functions results indicate that average U-Ow distances are 2.45–2.61 Å, and 2.29–2.40 Å for U-Oc distance. Average U-Cl distances are 2.78–3.08 Å, which is relatively larger than that of Uranium atom-Oxygen atom because of electrostatic factors

  9. Features of structural function of selenito group in uranyl complexes with neutral ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structures of three uranyl selenitocomplexes are determined. All the crystals are monoclinic, in [UO2SeO3x2CO(NH2)2] (1) a=9.427 (2), b=13.855 (2), c=6.556 (2) A, #betta#=105.35 (4) deg, sp. gr. P21/m, Z=2, R=0.C36 for 1573 reflections; in [UO2(HSeO3)2H2O] (2) a=6.354 (1), b=12.578 (2), c=9.972 (2) A, #betta#=82.35 (1), sp. gr. A2/a, Z=4, R=0.046 for 975 reflections, and in [UO2SeO3CH2(CONH2)2] (3) a=8.935 (2), b=10.698 (2), c=10.037 (2) A, #betta#=90.37 (3) deg, ph. gr. P21/n, Z=4, R=0.036 for 1756 reflections. Uranium polyhedron in 1-3 has a pentagonal-bipyranidal structure, axial positions are taken by O-atoms of the uranyl group (U-O 1.76-1.79 (1) A, selenite group and the neutral ligand are coordinated in the equatorial plane. In all the compounds the motives of structures are different: in 1 - the bands are on the basis of tridentate bridge cyclic SeO32--groups (U-O bridge 2.35 (1) A, U-Osub(br-cycle) 2.45 (1) A), in 2-bands are on the basis of bridge hydroselenite groups (U-O 2.36-2.38 (1) A), and in 3-layers are on the basis of tridentate bridge SeO32--groups (U-O 2.316-2.346 (8) A). The comparison is made with uranyl phosphite complexes

  10. Synthesis and structures of new uranyl malonate complexes with carbamide derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serezhkina, L. B., E-mail: Lserezh@samsu.ru [Samara State University (Russian Federation); Grigor’ev, M. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation); Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkin, V. N. [Samara State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Crystals of new malonate-containing uranyl complexes [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] (I) and [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O4)(Meur){sub 3}] (II), where Imon is imidazolidin-2-one (ethylenecarbamide) and Meur is methyl-carbamide, have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic system with the following unit-cell parameters (at 100 K): a = 11.1147(10) Å, b = 6.9900(6) Å, c = 14.4934(12) Å, β = 92.042(2)°, V = 1125.30(17) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/n, Z = 4, R{sub 1} = 0.0398 (I); a = 16.6613(5) Å, b = 9.5635(3) Å, c = 22.9773(6) Å, β = 103.669(2)°, V = 3557.51(18) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, R{sub 1} = 0.0207 (II). The crystals are composed of electroneutral chains [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] and mononuclear groups [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Meur){sub 3}] as the structural units belonging to the crystal-chemical groups AT{sup 11}M{sub 2}{sup 1} and AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A =UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, T{sup 11} and B{sup 01} = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, M{sup 1} = Imon, H{sub 2}O, or Meur), respectively, of uranyl complexes. The packing modes of the uranyl-containing complexes were analyzed by the method of molecular Voronoi—Dirichlet polyhedra.

  11. Structural variability in uranyl-lanthanide hetero-metallic complexes with DOTA and oxalato ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four novel 4f-5f hetero-metallic complexes could be obtained from the reaction of uranyl and lanthanide nitrates with DOTA (H4L) under hydrothermal conditions. In all cases, as in the previous examples reported, additional oxalato ligands are formed in situ. Variations in the stoichiometry of the final products and the presence of hydroxo ions in some cases appear to result in a large structural variability. In the two isomorphous complexes [(UO2)2Ln2(L)2(C2O4)] with Ln = Sm(1) or Eu(2), the lanthanide ion is located in the N4O4 site and is also bound to a carboxylate oxygen atom from a neighbouring unit, to give zigzag chains which are further linked to one another by [(UO2)2(C2O4)]2+ di-cations, resulting in the formation of a 3D framework. In [(UO2)4Gd2(L)2(C2O4)3(H2O)6].2H2O (3), 2D bilayer subunits of the 'double floor' type with uranyl oxalate pillars are assembled into a 3D framework by other, disordered uranyl ions. [(UO2)2Gd(L)(C2O4)(OH)].H2O (4) is a 2D assembly in which cationic {[(UO2)2(C2O4)(OH)]+}n chains are linked to one another by the [Gd(L)]- groups. The most notable feature of this compound is the environment of the 4f ion, which is eight-coordinate and twisted square anti-prismatic (TSA'), instead of nine-coordinate mono-capped square anti-prismatic (SA), as generally observed in DOTA complexes of gadolinium(III) and similarly-sized ions. (author)

  12. Investigation of the chelation effect on the voltammetric behaviour of selected metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron, cadmium, aluminum and chromium could be easily determined by voltammetric methods. The chelation behaviour of chelating agents like hydroxyquinoline, NaDEDC, cupferron etc. have been investigated on the voltammetric behavior of these metals. The results were compared with the spectro fluorimetric investigation of these metal chelates and a relation between voltammetric and fluorimetric behaviour have been established. (author)

  13. EDTA Chelation Therapy, Without Added Vitamin C, Decreases Oxidative DNA Damage and Lipid Peroxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelation therapy is thought to not only remove contaminating metals, but also to decrease free radical production. However, in standard EDTA chelation therapy high doses of vitamin C with potential prooxidant effects are often added to the chelation solution. We demonstrated previously that the in...

  14. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  15. Interaction of 4-amino 6-hydroxy 2-thiopyrimidine with uranyl ion in presence of other ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of uranyl ion with 4-amino 6-hydroxy 2-thiopyrimidine(AHTP) in presence of other ligands such as oxalic acid (Ox), malonic acid (Mal), O-aminophenol (OAP), o-phenylenediamine (OPDA), 2, 2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), 1, 10-phenanthrolene (Phen) and ethylenediamine (En) has been investigated by potentiometric method. The ternary complexes are formed in stepwise manner in which AHTP behaves as secondary ligand. The formation constants of ternary complexes have been reported at 35 degC and μ = 0.10 M (KNO3) in aqueous medium. (author)

  16. The Complexes of Bisphosphonate and Magnetite Nanoparticles to Remove Uranyl Ions from Aqueous Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using tetraethyl-3-amino-propane-1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) as the functional molecule, we functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles via dopamine (DA) linkage to create a system with an Fe3O4-DA-BP nanostructure, which possesses high specificity for removing uranyl ions from water or blood. This work demonstrates that magnetic nanoparticles, combined with specific receptor-ligand interactions, promise a sensitive and rapid platform for the detection, recovery, and decorporation of radioactive metal toxins from biological environment

  17. Purification of uranium from fission products by ammonium uranyl carbonate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of the oxalate filtrate generated in plutonium reconversion laboratory involves recovery of plutonium by uranous oxalate carrier precipitation and uranium by ammonium diuranate precipitation. The ammonium di-uranate precipitate generally carries most of the fission products which are high energy gamma emitters. Purification of uranium from the fission products has been investigated employing ammonium carbonate which dissolves the slurry and re-precipitates uranium as ammonium uranyl carbonate. Fission product decontamination factor has been evaluated, which indicate the possibility of 99.6% recovery and purification of uranium from fission products. This method simplifies the purification process with less man-rem exposure and high quality end product. (author)

  18. Experience with a uranyl nitrate/uranium dioxide conversion pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plant for the precipitation of sinterable nuclear grade UO2 powders is described in this report. The plant has been designed, built and set up by SNIA TECHINT. ENEA has been involved in the job as nuclear consultant. Main process steps are: dissolution of UO2 powder or sintered UO2 pellets, adjustment of uranyl nitrate solutions, precipitation of uranium peroxide by means of hydrogen peroxide, centrifugation of the precipitate, drying, calcination and reduction to uranium dioxide. The report is divided in two main section: the process description and the ''hot test'' report. Some laboratory data on precipitation of ammonium diuranate by means of NH4OH, are also reported

  19. Uranyl ion behaviour in perchloric media and its extraction by TBP CCl/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahia, A. (Centre de Developpement des Materiaux, Commissariat aux Energies Nouvelles, Alger (Algeria)); Benali-Baitich, O. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Institut de Chimie, Alger (Algeria))

    The behaviour of uranyl ion in aqueous solution of perchloric acid (O < Cub(HC104) < 13 mol.1/sup -1/) shows that for an acidity higher than 9 mol.1/sup -1/, there is formation of a monoperchlorato complex. The extraction of uranly perchlorate from aqueous perchloric solutions by TBP diluted CC1/sub 4/ as a function of uranium and perchloric acid concentrations enabled us on one hand, to concluded that UO/sub 2//sup + +/ is solvated by 2 TBP molecules, and on the other hand, to determine the composition of the coextracted HC1O/sub 4/ solvated species.

  20. Cyclic voltammetric reduction studies of uranyl-di-potassium oxalate (DPO) in acetate buffered solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eletrochemical reduction of uranyl perchlorate -DPO (Di-potassium oxalate) complex was studied cyclic voltammetrically in the pH range of 1 to 6.5, by using supporting electrolyte 0.1 M KNO3. The cyclic voltammograms were recorded at different voltage scan rates, so as to understand the diffusion controlled nature of the electrode reaction as well as the reversibility of the electrode reaction. Kinetic parameters like current -potential data, transfer coefficients (αn a) and Ksh were calculated for all the pH values studied. (author)

  1. Quenching of excited uranyl ion during its photochemical reduction by triphenylphosphine: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative rates of bimolecular quenching of excited uranyl ion by some mono and di-substituted benzene derivatives have been measured during its photochemical reduction with triphenylphosphine. For the related compounds in a series it has been found that substituent groups enriching the aromatic π-electron cloud due to resonance stabilization, show an enhanced photophysical quenching action. The substituents decreasing the π-electron cloud and delocalization of positive charger over the benzene ring decrease the quenching action. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Uranyl benzosulfonate and anion effects in processes of solvent extraction and salt dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation results of mutual solubility in the ternary system of uranyl benzosulfonate (UBS)-water-tributyl phosphate at 25 deg C are given. The character of the phase diagram obtained is compared with the known types of diagrams: salt-water-TBP. Data on UBS extractability and solubility, as well as on hydration-solvation processes in the system together with IR data permit to conclude that specificity of UBS behaviour is determined by effective hydration of the oxygen atom of the sulfonate group, which is not connected at once with cation

  3. Uranyl benzenesulfonate and anionic effects in processes of salt extraction and dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are reported of an investigation of the mutual solubility in the ternary uranylbenzenesulfonate-water-tributyl phosphate system at 25 degree C. The character of the phase diagram obtained is compared with known types of salt-water-TBP diagrams. Data on the extractability and solubility of UO2(C6H5SO3)2, and also for hydration-solvation processes in the system, together with IR data, permit the inference that the specific features of the behavior of uranyl benzenesulfonate are determined by the efficiency of the hydration of an oxygen atom of the sulfonate group not directly bonded to the cation

  4. Investigation of some uranyl halogenoacetates and their crystalohydrates using the method of thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of thermogravimetry is used to study thermal stability of uranyl trichloro-, trifluoro-, and monochloroacetate and their crystallohydrates. It is established that dehydration temperature coordinated to a cation of water rises with decreasing electron-donor ability of halogenacetate-ion. The results obtained and the data of spectroscopy permit to assume that heat stability of hydrates in the salt series considered is mainly determined by the strength of water uranium-oxygen bond. Hydrogen bonds with anion play a less significant role in the process of dehydration

  5. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups. (author)

  6. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  7. Development of fluidized-bed furnace for thermal treatment of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present the ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) route is developed at a scale of 10 kg/day of UO2. This UO2 is directly compactible and sinterable to densities of 10.55-10.65 gm/cc. The equipment developed include precipitation tank with filtration and methanol washing and fluidized bed furnaces for thermal treatment of AUC and U3O8. During the design and development of these furnaces many experiments were conducted to study fluidization of AUC powder. In this paper the findings of these studies are presented. (author)

  8. New complexes of heteroaromatic N-oxides with europium, uranyl and zinc ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zbigniew Hnatejko

    2012-01-01

    New solid complexes of europium,uranyl and zinc ions with N-oxides of 4-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyridine,quinoline and 4-methoxyquinaldinic acid in presence different anions were obtained and characterized by elemental and TG analyses,IR and luminescence spectra.The compounds are crystalline,hydrated or anhydrous salts with colours typical of metal ions.Thermal studies showed that in hydrated salts lattice or coordination water molecules are present.A role of different anions in the formation of various types of the complexes is presented.

  9. Investigation of uranyl sulfate complexes with N-methyl substituted amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of IR spectroscopy, thermal and X-ray analyses were used for physicochemical investigation into UO2SO4·2L (L-N,N-dimethylformamide; N,N-dimethylacetamide or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylcarbamide). Belonging of compounds to AT11M1/2 crystallochemical group of uranyl complexes with trans-position of neutral ligands and tridentate bridge-cyclic (T11) type of sulfate-group coordination was established. Crystallographic characteristics of compounds were obtained. Spectroscopic criterion of distinguishing types of sulfate-ion coordination (T3 or T11) was suggested

  10. Uranyl hydrogel leaching as one of technological nodes of sol-gel process. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport processes are described on the basis of ideas of the mechanism of the transport of leachable components from gel particles of a solidified uranyl. A mathematical model was constructed describing the process of the leaching of the monodispersion of gel particles. An apparatus was developed for testing the process of leaching gel particles of the coarse fraction, which meets the demands of semicontinuous operation, remote control, pneumatic mixing and the pneumatic transport of leaching solutions, attaining optimal concentration gradient for leaching. The diagram of the leaching apparatus and the mode of operation are given. (J.P.)

  11. Study on the transport behavior of uranyl nitrate in aqueous and non-aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical ultracentrifuge has proven itself through diffusion measurements to be well suited for studying radioactive compounds. In the framework of this paper the extent to which the UV and schlieren optics of an analytical ultracentrifuge can be used for extraction-kinetic tests was tested. With this method there is also the possibility of determining the distribution coefficients right at the phase boundary. The results show the good possibility of application of the absorption and schlieren optics to the study of the transport behavior of uranyl nitrate in practice oriented solutions. (orig.)

  12. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  13. Recovery of uranium from uranyl nitrate raffinate. Contributed Paper PE-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At New Uranium Oxide Fuel Plant, NUOFP(O) of Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), the Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate (UNR) generated during solvent extraction process is washed with Treated Lean Solvent(TLS) to recover residual U. Earlier this UNR consisting of 0.5-1 gm/l and 2.5 FA was neutralised with vapour ammonia. The slurry was then filtered over pre coat drum filter and the resultant Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate cake (UNRC) was stored in polyethylene lined MS drums. The valuable U was thus being locked up in UNRC. Also, the storage of UNRC drums required lot of floor space which have to be repacked frequently to contain the radioactivity. Hence the need has come to avoid the generation of UNRC and the recovery of U from the already generated UNRC. The generation of UNRC was avoided by developing alternate process of UNR treatment with Treated Lean Solvent for the removal of residual U and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry (ARS) is disposed. The Uranium recovery from UNRC is done by dissolving the cake in Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate solution to leach the hexavalent Uranium by utilizing the free acidity in UNR. The leaching time is about six hours and the uranium forms uranyl nitrate. The resulting leach solutions are relatively dilute but complex acidic nitrate solutions containing wide variety of ions. Metallic ions commonly present include uranium, iron, magnesium, aluminium, sodium, calcium etc. The uranium concentration is normally 1-1.5 g/L. This uranium is separated by solvent extraction. The active agent in solvent extraction is Tri Butyl Phosphate in kerosene that can selectively extract uranium into an organic complex which is insoluble in aqueous. The organic used for extraction is Treated Lean Solvent in the quality of freshly prepared solvent and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry is disposed by sale. The leaching of Uranium from UNRC was done in plant scale and about 1200 kgs of UNRC was successfully processed in trial batch. The paper deals with details of

  14. Luminescent properties of [UO2(TFA)2(DMSO)3], a promising material for sensing and monitoring the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An uranyl complex [UO2(TFA)2(DMSO)3] (TFA=deprotonated trifluoroacetic acid; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide) has been successfully synthesized by reacting UO2(CH3COO)2 ·H2 O with one equivalent of (CF3 CO)2 O and DMSO. The complex has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and absorption and emission spectroscopies. The spectroscopic properties of the material make it suitable for its application in the sensing and monitoring of uranyl in the PUREX process. (author)

  15. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand bre...

  16. Isotherm And Kinetic Studies On The Electrosorption Of Uranyl Tricarbonate Complex [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup 4-} From Aqueous Solutions By Activated Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Aznan Fazli; Yim, Man Sung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Many types of adsorbent materials have been developed over the past 50 years, and the most recognizable is amidoxime based materials which is known to have high affinity in in chelating uranyl ions from seawater. However, the fabrication cost of amidoxime based materials was high which lead to high uranium extraction cost. In recent studies, use of porous carbon materials combined with the electrosorption technique was shown to have high selectivity for uranium separation from seawater. It is clear that the electrosorption capacity increase with the increasing of electrolyte concentration. The investigated activated carbon electrode still not reach the maximum adsorption capacity in the test condition. The morphology analysis confirmed that the fabricated activated carbon electrode has a porous structure, where BET analysis has revealed that the size of the pores can be categorized in mesopores region which is the optimum condition for electrosorption purposes. Other than that, the FT-IR analysis has enough evident that the molecular interaction of the activated carbon electrode involves the intermolecular interaction (physical crosslink/bonding) and stable for electrosorption application.

  17. Examining the fixation kinetics of chelated and non-chelated copper micronutrient and the applications to micronutrient management in semi-arid alkaline soils

    OpenAIRE

    T. K. Udeigwe; M. B. Eichmann; Menkiti, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the deficiency of a nutrient in plants and its total concentration in the soil is complex. This study examined and compared the fixation and fixation kinetics of copper (Cu) in chelated (Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, EDTA) and non-chelated mixed systems of micronutrients in the semi-arid soils of the Southern High Plains, US using findings from Cu extraction studies and kinetic models. Approximately, 22 % more Cu was fixed in the non-chelated system with...

  18. Examining the fixation kinetics of chelated and non-chelated copper and the applications to micronutrient management in semiarid alkaline soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeigwe, T. K.; Eichmann, M. B.; Menkiti, M. C.; Kusi, N. Y. O.

    2016-02-01

    This study examined and compared the fixation and fixation kinetics of copper (Cu) in chelated (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, EDTA) and non-chelated mixed systems of micronutrients in the semiarid soils of the Southern High Plains, USA, using findings from Cu extraction studies and kinetic models. Approximately, 22 % more Cu was fixed in the non-chelated system compared to the chelated within the first 14 days with only 7 % difference between the two systems by day 90. Findings suggest a decrease in the effectiveness of chelated micronutrients over time, highlighting the significance of timing even when chelated micronutrients are used. The strengths of the relationship of change in available Cu with respect to other micronutrients (iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn)) were higher in the non-chelated system (R2: 0.68-0.94), compared to the chelated (R2: 0.42-0.81), with slopes of 0.40 (Cu-Fe), 0.31 (Cu-Mn), and 1.04 (Cu-Zn) in the non-chelated system and 0.26 (Cu-Fe), 0.22 (Cu-Mn), and 0.90 (Cu-Zn) in the chelated system. Reduction in the amount of available Cu was best described by the power function model (R2 = 0.91, SE = 0.081) in the non-chelated system and second-order model (R2 = 0.95, SE = 0.010) in the chelated system. The applications generated from this study could be used as tools for improved micronutrient management and also provide baseline data for future work in other semiarid/arid alkaline soils of the world. Findings are also more applicable to field settings, an improvement over related previous studies.

  19. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660±0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46±0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 x 106±3.56 x 104 at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610±0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412±0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72±1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured

  20. Uranyl-Lanthanide Hetero-metallic Complexes with Cucurbit[6]uril and Perrhenate Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of uranyl and lanthanide nitrates with cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) in the presence of perrhenic acid and under hydrothermal conditions yields the novel hetero-metallic uranyl-lanthanide molecular complexes [UO2Ln(CB6)(ReO4)2(NO3)(H2O)7](ReO4)2 (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Lu). Both metal cations are bound to carbonyl groups of the same CB6 portal, one for UO22+ and two for Ln3+. The uranium atom is also bound to one monodentate perrhenate ion and three aquo ligands, while the lanthanide is bound to one monodentate perrhenate and one nitrate ions, and four aquo ligands. Not only are these complexes rare examples of ReO4- bonding to f element ions, but the perrhenate bound to Ln is included in the CB6 cavity, thus providing the first case of inclusion of a tetrahedral oxo-anion in this macrocycle. (author)