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Sample records for cheese milk

  1. Quality aspects of raw milk cheeses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheese has been a part of the human diet for thousands of years and over the centuries cheesemakers have relied on the indigenous microflora and enzymes in raw milk to create the signature quality traits for the many different varieties of cheese found around the world. Although most of the cheese i...

  2. 21 CFR 133.189 - Skim milk cheese for manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skim milk cheese for manufacturing. 133.189... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.189 Skim milk cheese for manufacturing. (a) Skim milk cheese for manufacturing is the food prepared from skim milk and other ingredients specified in this section, by...

  3. 7 CFR 58.438 - Cheese from pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese from pasteurized milk. 58.438 Section 58.438... Procedures § 58.438 Cheese from pasteurized milk. If the cheese is labeled as pasteurized, the milk shall be pasteurized by subjecting every particle of milk to a minimum temperature of 161 °F. for not less than...

  4. 21 CFR 133.184 - Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. 133.184 Section 133.184 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. (a) Description. (1) Roquefort...

  5. Lipase in milk, curd and cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, T.J.; Lettink, F.J.; Wouters, J.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Presence of lipase in milk, curd, whey and cheese was studied. A small amount of the product was added to a large volume of lipase-free whole milk that had been made sensitive to lipolysis by homogenization. Increase of the acidity of the fat in the mixture, determined after incubation, was interpre

  6. Cheese from Ultrafiltered Milk : whey proteins and chymosin activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsse, C.

    1999-01-01

    The manufacture of (semi-)hard cheese from ultrafiltered milk (UF-cheese) enables the partial incorporation of whey proteins in the cheese, thereby increasing its yield. The transfer of whey proteins in curd from (UF-)milk was studied in relation to the degree of ultrafiltration of the milk and the

  7. 7 CFR 58.439 - Cheese from unpasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese from unpasteurized milk. 58.439 Section 58.439... Procedures § 58.439 Cheese from unpasteurized milk. If the cheese is labeled as “heat treated”, “unpasteurized,” “raw milk”, or “for manufacturing” the milk may be raw or heated at temperatures...

  8. Using milk and cheese to demonstrate food chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Students usually do not realize how much chemistry is involved in making a food like cheese, and teachers may use milk and cheese to reveal interesting principles. Cheese is made by lowering the pH of milk, coagulating the protein with enzymes, and removing the whey with heat and pressure. Studies b...

  9. Mid-infrared predictions of cheese yield from bovine milk

    OpenAIRE

    Vanlierde, Amélie; Soyeurt, Hélène; Anceau, Christine; Vanden Bossche, sandrine; Dehareng, Frédéric; Pierre DARDENNE; Gengler, Nicolas; Sindic, Marianne; Colinet, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Economically, cheese yield (CY) is very important. Todate, empirical or theoretical formulae allow estimating the theoretical CY from milk fat and casein or protein content of milk. It would be interesting to predict CY during milk recording directly without the need to estimate milk components. Through the BlueSel project, 157 milk samples were collected in Wallonia from individual cows and analyzed using a mid-infrared (MIR) MilkoScanFT6000 spectrometer. Individual laboratory cheese yields ...

  10. Real-time evaluation of individual cow milk for higher cheese-milk quality with increased cheese yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, G; Merin, U; Bezman, D; Lavie, S; Lemberskiy-Kuzin, L; Leitner, G

    2016-06-01

    Cheese was produced in a series of experiments from milk separated in real time during milking by using the Afilab MCS milk classification service (Afikim, Israel), which is installed on the milk line in every stall and sorts milk in real time into 2 target tanks: the A tank for cheese production (CM) and the B tank for fluid milk products (FM). The cheese milk was prepared in varying ratios ranging from ~10:90 to ~90:10 CM:FM by using this system. Cheese was made with corrected protein-to-fat ratio and without it, as well as from milk stored at 4°C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8d before production. Cheese weight at 24h increased along the separation cutoff level with no difference in moisture, and dry matter increased. The data compiled allowed a theoretical calculation of cheese yield and comparing it to the original van Slyke equation. Whenever the value of Afi-Cf, which is the optical measure of curd firmness obtained by the Afilab instrument, was used, a better predicted level of cheese yield was obtained. In addition, 27 bulk milk tanks with milk separated at a 50:50 CM:FM ratio resulted in cheese with a significantly higher fat and protein, dry matter, and weight at 24h. Moreover, solids incorporated from the milk into the cheese were significantly higher in cheeses made of milk from A tanks. The influence of storage of milk up to 8d before cheese making was tested. Gross milk composition did not change and no differences were found in cheese moisture, but dry matter and protein incorporated in the cheese dropped significantly along the storage time. These findings confirm that milk stored for several days before processing is prone to physico-chemical deterioration processes, which result in loss of milk constituents to the whey and therefore reduced product yield. The study demonstrates that introducing the unknown parameters for calculating the predicted cheese yield, such as the empiric measured Afi-Cf properties, are more accurate and the increase in cheese

  11. Ewe welfare and ovine milk and cheese quality

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sevi

    2010-01-01

    Causes of welfare reduction in dairy sheep flocks are presented and their impact on ovine milk and cheese quality is discussed. Attention is focused on climatic extremes, poor housing and milking hygiene, and nutritional imbalance: mechanisms are outlined through which stress-induced reduction of immune function can result in poor milk composition, deteriorated renneting ability of milk and altered proteolysis in cheese during ripening. In particular, the impact is brought out of exposure to ...

  12. Chemical species in cheese and their origin in milk components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A R

    1995-01-01

    Cheese making is the process of concentrating milk fat and protein by separation from water and soluble components. The objective of the cheese maker is to maximize yield efficiency by optimum utilization of each milk component while not compromising cheese quality. Cheese yielding potential of milk may be increased by selective breeding for specific protein genotypes, especially the BB variant of both kappa-casein and beta-lactoglobulin. Milk fat is included in cheese by occlusion into the protein coagulum. Participation of casein in both lactic and rennet coagulation is nearly complete so that casein losses to the whey occur mainly during cutting and the early stages of cooking. In lactic cheese, excepting cottage cheese, it is possible to eliminate losses of fines by centrifugal or membrane separation of curd. In heat-acid precipitated varieties protein recovery is increased by inclusion of whey proteins but fat recovery is very dependent on coagulation conditions. In ripened cheese obtaining the correct basic structure and composition is critical to texture and flavour development during curing.

  13. Alternative to decrease cholesterol in sheep milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Viturro, E; Juárez, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2015-12-01

    The presence of cholesterol in foods is of nutritional interest because high levels of this molecule in human plasma are associated with an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease and nowadays consumers are demanding healthier products. The goal of this experiment was to diminish the cholesterol content of Manchego, the most popular Spanish cheese manufactured from ewes milk. For this purpose three bulk milks coming from dairy ewe fed with 0 (Control), 3 and 6% of linseed supplement on their diet were used. Nine cheeses (3 per bulk milk) were manufactured and ripened for 3 months. Cholesterol of ewes milk cheese from 6% to 12% linseed supplemented diets decreased by 9.6% and 16.1% respectively, therefore supplying a healthier profile. In a second experiment, different sources of unsaturated fatty acids (rich in oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acids) were supplemented to dairy ewes and no significant differences were found on cheese cholesterol levels.

  14. The use of sanitation products in milk and cheese production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Kalit

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering hygienic conditions in cheese production the aim of thispaper was to investigate the influence of using some sanitation* products in milk and cheese production on family farms. This investigation was a part of the project “Improving the quality of Tounj cheese produced on family farms”. By use of the sanitation products, during milk production, significant (P<0.01 decrease of geometrical mean of total bacterial count from 3.54 x 105 to 8 x 103 in mL of milk, as well as significant (P<0.01 decrease of geometric mean of somatic cell count from 3.1 x 105 to 2.4 x 105 in mL of milk was observed. The ratio of hygienically unacceptable cheeses, according to the Regulations of microbial standards for foods (NN 46/94., significantly (P<0.01 decreased as well. Because of the new requests and standards, the sanitation products are more in use in both milk and cheese production on family farms. Investigated sanitation products were suitable for use in milk and Tounj cheese production.

  15. Hygienic quality of goat's milk cheese produced in rural household

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željka Cvrtila

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of small-scale goat breeders produce goat's milk cheese that is sold on markets. In this study we determined the chemical composition and microbiological quality of goat's milk cheese samples. It has been found that the chemical composition of the samples were not standardised. Water content varied from 42,20 to 51,20 %, milk fat content in dry matter from 32,85 to 50,28%, while acidity varied from 15,08 to 39,36 ºSH. Only two samples (20% met the microbiological standards. In 2 samples Escherichia coli in the quantities larger than 102/g was found, whereas in all 8 samples yeasts and moulds were found in quantities larger than 102/g. The results of our study have shown that the hygienic conditions of goat's milk cheese production are often inadequate. Also, the hygienic conditions of goat keeping and milking hygiene are questionable.

  16. Effect of high pressure homogenisation of milk on cheese yield and microbiology, lipolysis and proteolysis during ripening of Caciotta cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciotti, Rosalba; Vannini, Lucia; Patrignani, Francesca; Iucci, Luciana; Vallicelli, Melania; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    The principal aim of this work was to compare Caciotta cheeses obtained from cow milk previously subjected to high pressure homogenisation (HPH) at 100 MPa with those produced from raw (R) or heat-treated (P) cow milk. HPH had both direct and indirect effects on cheese characteristics and their evolution during ripening. In particular, HPH treatment of milk induced a significant increase of the cheese yield; moreover, it affected the microbial ecology of both curd and cheese. Compared with the thermal treatment, the HPH treatment resulted in a decrease of about one log cfu/g of yeast and lactobacilli cell loads of the curd. The initial milk treatment also affected the evolution over time and the levels attained at the end of ripening of all the microbial groups studied. In fact, lactobacilli, microstaphylococci and yeast cell loads remained at lower levels in the cheeses obtained from HPH milk with respect to the other cheese types over the whole ripening period. Moreover, HPH of milk induced marked and extensive lipolysis. Cheeses from HPH milk showed the presence of high amounts of free fatty acids immediately after brining. The electrophoretic patterns of the different cheese types showed that Caciotta made from HPH-treated milk was characterized by a more extensive and faster proteolysis as well as a significant modification of its volatile molecule profile. The results obtained and the sensory analysis indicated that HPH treatment of milk was able to differentiate Caciotta cheese or to modify its ripening patterns.

  17. Ewe welfare and ovine milk and cheese quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sevi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Causes of welfare reduction in dairy sheep flocks are presented and their impact on ovine milk and cheese quality is discussed. Attention is focused on climatic extremes, poor housing and milking hygiene, and nutritional imbalance: mechanisms are outlined through which stress-induced reduction of immune function can result in poor milk composition, deteriorated renneting ability of milk and altered proteolysis in cheese during ripening. In particular, the impact is brought out of exposure to high ambient temperature on the nutritional properties of ewe milk, in terms of increased short-chain and saturated fatty acids, and decreased unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio. As well, the relationship is highlighted between ewe welfare and udder health. Especially under poor hygiene conditions the risk of mastitis markedly increases due to reduction of the natural defense mechanisms of the teat and mammary gland and increased number and pathogenicity of the micro-organisms in contact with the entrance of the teat canal. Evidence is provided that rise in milk somatic cell count, in response to bacteria penetration into the udder, can lead to decreased milk yield and altered composition of milk and cheese, due to extensive epithelium secretory cell damage.

  18. Rheology and texture of Queso Fresco cheeses made from raw and pasteurized milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queso Frescos made in Mexico from raw milk (RM) were compared with cheeses made in Mexico and the US from pasteurized milk (PM) to determine textural and rheological differences. RM cheese, considered the ideal Queso Fresco, contained more moisture than PM cheeses, displayed higher cohesiveness and...

  19. Isolation of [i]Listeria monocytogenes[/i] from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with[i] Listeria monocytogenes[/i]. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories. Isolation of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50% of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with [i]L. monocytogenes[/i]. The concentration of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  20. Detection of cheese whey and caseinomacropeptide in fermented milk beverages using high performance liquid chromatography

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    E.H.P. Andrade

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheese whey level and caseinomacropeptide (CMP index of fermented milk beverages added with four levels of cheese whey (0, 10, 20, and 40% and stored at 8-10oC for 0, 7, 14 and 21 days were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration (HPLC-GF. Additionally, the interference of the starter culture and the storage time on the detection of cheese whey and CMP were investigated. Refrigerated storage up to 21 days did not affect (P>0.05 cheese whey and CMP amounts in milk (0% of cheese whey and in fermented milk beverages added with 10 and 20% of cheese whey (P>0.05. However, cheese whey and CMP amounts were higher than expected (P<0.05 in fermented milk beverages added with 40% of cheese whey and stored for 21 days.

  1. Effect of acidulants on the recovery of milk constituents and quality of Mozzarella processed cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Karuna; Bajwa, Usha

    2015-03-01

    The investigation was undertaken to study the effect of acidulants on the recovery of milk constituents and composition of Mozzarella pre-cheese and physical, chemical and sensory characteristics and texture profile analysis (TPA) of processed cheese prepared there from. The pre-cheese was made by direct acidification technique using citric, acetic and lactic acid and processed with 1 % tri-sodium citrate. The acidulants significantly (p cheese. These also had a significant (p processed cheese.

  2. Valuation of milk composition and genotype in cheddar cheese production using an optimization model of cheese and whey production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H A; Parvin, L; Garnett, I; DePeters, E J; Medrano, J F; Fadel, J G

    2007-02-01

    A mass balance optimization model was developed to determine the value of the kappa-casein genotype and milk composition in Cheddar cheese and whey production. Inputs were milk, nonfat dry milk, cream, condensed skim milk, and starter and salt. The products produced were Cheddar cheese, fat-reduced whey, cream, whey cream, casein fines, demineralized whey, 34% dried whey protein, 80% dried whey protein, lactose powder, and cow feed. The costs and prices used were based on market data from March 2004 and affected the results. Inputs were separated into components consisting of whey protein, ash, casein, fat, water, and lactose and were then distributed to products through specific constraints and retention equations. A unique 2-step optimization procedure was developed to ensure that the final composition of fat-reduced whey was correct. The model was evaluated for milk compositions ranging from 1.62 to 3.59% casein, 0.41 to 1.14% whey protein, 1.89 to 5.97% fat, and 4.06 to 5.64% lactose. The kappa casein genotype was represented by different retentions of milk components in Cheddar cheese and ranged from 0.715 to 0.7411 kg of casein in cheese/kg of casein in milk and from 0.7795 to 0.9210 kg of fat in cheese/kg of fat in milk. Milk composition had a greater effect on Cheddar cheese production and profit than did genotype. Cheese production was significantly different and ranged from 9,846 kg with a high-casein milk composition to 6,834 kg with a high-fat milk composition per 100,000 kg of milk. Profit (per 100,000 kg of milk) was significantly different, ranging from $70,586 for a high-fat milk composition to $16,490 for a low-fat milk composition. However, cheese production was not significantly different, and profit was significant only for the lowest profit ($40,602) with the kappa-casein genotype. Results from this model analysis showed that the optimization model is useful for determining costs and prices for cheese plant inputs and products, and that it can

  3. Eff ect of homogenization on the properties and microstructure of Mozzarella cheese from buff alo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abd El-Rafee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The name pasta fi lata refers to a unique plasticizing and texturing treatments of the fresh curd in hot water that imparts to the fi nished cheese its characteristic fi brous structure and melting properties. Mozzarella cheese made from standardized homogenized and non-homogenized buffalo milk with 3 and 1.5%fat. The effect of homogenization on rheological, microstructure and sensory evaluation was carried out. Material and methods. Fresh raw buffalo milk and starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus were used. The coagulants were calf rennet powder (HA-LA. Standardized buffalo milk was homogenized at 25 kg/cm2 pressure after heating to 60°C using homogenizer. Milk and cheese were analysed. Microstructure of the cheese samples was investigated either with an application of transmission or scanning electron microscope. Statistical analyses were applied on the obtained data. Results. Soluble nitrogen total volatile free fatty acids, soluble tyrosine and tryptophan increased with using homogenized milk and also, increased with relatively decrease in case of homogenized Mozzarella cheese. Meltability of Mozzarella cheese increased with increasing the fat content and storage period and decrease with homogenization. Mozzarella cheese fi rmness increased with homogenization and also, increased with progressing of storage period. Flavour score, appearance and total score of Mozzarella cheese increased with homogenization and storage period progress, while body and texture score decreased with homogenization and increased with storage period progress. Microstructure of Mozzarella cheese showed the low fat cheese tends to be harder, more crumbly and less smooth than normal. Curd granule junctions were prominent in non-homogenized milk cheese. Conclusion. Homogenization of milk cheese caused changes in the microstructure of the Mozzarella cheese. Microstructure studies of cheese revealed that

  4. Cheese production using kefir culture entrapped in milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Kanellaki, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of kefir culture entrapped in casein and in whey protein as starter cultures for the production of Feta-type cheese. Microbiological analysis showed that counts of enterobacteria, coliforms, and staphylococci were significantly reduced due to kefir culture. In addition, the effect of kefir culture on the formation of volatile compounds, such as esters, organic acids, alcohols, carbonyl compounds, and lactones, was also investigated using the SPME GC/MS technique. Cheese samples produced with kefir culture entrapped in milk proteins presented improved profile of aroma-related compounds. Principal component analysis of the results indicated that the volatile composition of the different cheese types was dependent on the nature of the starter culture. Finally, the sensory evaluation showed that the products produced with kefir culture had a soft, fine taste, and were of improved quality.

  5. Feeding strategies to design the fatty acid profile of sheep milk and cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Nudda; Gianni Battacone; Oscar Boaventura Neto; Antonello Cannas; Ana Helena Dias Francesconi; Alberto Stanislao Atzori; Giuseppe Pulina

    2014-01-01

    The majority of sheep milk produced in the world is transformed into cheese. Feeding is a major factor affecting the quality of sheep milk and, therefore, of sheep cheese. Because fat is the main compound of cheese, this review gives an update on the effects of feeding and nutrition on milk fat content and deeply discusses feeding strategies aimed at increasing the levels of healthy fatty acids (FA), such as conjugated linoleic acid and omega-3 FA, in milk and cheese in the human diet. In add...

  6. Milk protein and cheese yield in buffalo species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Di Palo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Buffalo milk samples differing significantly for cheese yield values were analysed by 2D electrophoresis in order to outline a protein profile, with specific regards to k-casein fractions. Four buffaloes, two of which showing high cheese yield and two with low cheese yield selected from a group of 135 subjects were chosen for the proteomic analyses. Six main spots in 2D gels were recognized as αs1-, αs2-, β- and k-casein, α-lactoalbumin, β-lactoglobulin. The main visible differences in the 2D gels between buffaloes with high vs. low cheese yield were found in the appearance of the four k-casein spots (spots numbers:20, 19, 16, 18 which differ in the number of phosphorilation and glycosilation. The area and the intensity of the four spots were calculated by using Melanie II (Bio-Rad software. Samples with high cheese yield showed higher value of the by-products: area x intensity of spot 16, correspondent to k-casein with one phosphorilation site, and lower values of spots 19 and 20, of k-casein with more than one phosphorilation site and glycosilated.

  7. Microstructure and Composition of Full Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Ultrafiltered Milk Retentate

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    Lydia Ong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk protein is often standardised prior to cheese-making using low concentration factor ultrafiltration retentate (LCUFR but the effect of LCUFR addition on the microstructure of full fat gel, curd and Cheddar cheese is not known. In this work, Cheddar cheeses were made from cheese-milk with or without LCUFR addition using a protein concentration of 3.7%–5.8% w/w. The fat lost to sweet whey was higher in cheese made from cheese-milk without LCUFR or from cheese-milk with 5.8% w/w protein. At 5.8% w/w protein concentration, the porosity of the gel increased significantly and the fat globules within the gel and curd tended to pool together, which possibly contributed to the higher fat loss in the sweet whey. The microstructure of cheese from cheese-milk with a higher protein concentration was more compact, consistent with the increased hardness, although the cohesiveness was lower. These results highlight the potential use of LCUFR for the standardization of protein concentration in cheese-milk to 4%–5% w/w (equivalent to a casein to total protein ratio of 77%–79% w/w to increase yield. Beyond this concentration, significant changes in the gel microstructure, cheese texture and fat loss were observed.

  8. Major advances in concentrated and dry milk products, cheese, and milk fat-based spreads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, D R; Baer, R J; Hassan, A N; Dave, R

    2006-04-01

    Advances in dairy foods and dairy foods processing since 1981 have influenced consumers and processors of dairy products. Consumer benefits include dairy products with enhanced nutrition and product functionality for specific applications. Processors convert raw milk to finished product with improved efficiencies and have developed processing technologies to improve traditional products and to introduce new products for expanding the dairy foods market. Membrane processing evolved from a laboratory technique to a major industrial process for milk and whey processing. Ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis have been used extensively in fractionation of milk and whey components. Advances in cheese manufacturing methods have included mechanization of the making process. Membrane processing has allowed uniform composition of the cheese milk and starter cultures have become more predictable. Cheese vats have become larger and enclosed as well as computer controlled. Researchers have learned to control many of the functional properties of cheese by understanding the role of fat and calcium distribution, as bound or unbound, in the cheese matrix. Processed cheese (cheese, foods, spreads, and products) maintain their importance in the industry as many product types can be produced to meet market needs and provide stable products for an extended shelf life. Cheese delivers concentrated nutrients of milk and bio-active peptides to consumers. The technologies for the production of concentrated and dried milk and whey products have not changed greatly in the last 25 yr. The size and efficiencies of the equipment have increased. Use of reverse osmosis in place of vacuum condensing has been proposed. Modifying the fatty acid composition of milkfat to alter the nutritional and functional properties of dairy spread has been a focus of research in the last 2 decades. Conjugated linoleic acid, which can be increased in milkfat by alteration of the cow's diet, has been reported to have

  9. Feeding strategies to design the fatty acid profile of sheep milk and cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nudda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The majority of sheep milk produced in the world is transformed into cheese. Feeding is a major factor affecting the quality of sheep milk and, therefore, of sheep cheese. Because fat is the main compound of cheese, this review gives an update on the effects of feeding and nutrition on milk fat content and deeply discusses feeding strategies aimed at increasing the levels of healthy fatty acids (FA, such as conjugated linoleic acid and omega-3 FA, in milk and cheese in the human diet. In addition, the use of alternative feed resources such as by-products, aromatic plants, and phenolic compounds in the sheep diet and their effects on milk and cheese FA composition are also discussed. Among feeding strategies, grazing and the use of supplements rich in oils seem to be the best and the cheapest strategies to improve the nutritional value of the fatty acid profile in sheep cheese.

  10. Effect of jenny milk addition on the inhibition of late blowing in semihard cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, C; Paolino, R; Valentini, V; Musto, M; Ricciardi, A; Adduci, F; D'Adamo, C; Pecora, G; Freschi, P

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of late blowing defects in cheese produces negative effects on the quality and commercial value of the product. In this work, we verified whether the addition of raw jenny milk to bulk cow milk reduced the late blowing defects in semihard cheeses. During cheesemaking, different aliquots of jenny milk were poured into 2 groups of 4 vats, each containing a fixed amount of cow milk. A group of cheeses was created by deliberately contaminating the 4 vats with approximately 3 log10 cfu/mL milk of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CLST01. The other 4 vats, which were not contaminated, were used for a second group of cheeses. After 120 d of ripening, some physical, chemical, and microbiological parameters were evaluated on the obtained semihard cheeses. Differences in sensory properties among cheeses belonging to the uncontaminated group were evaluated by 80 regular consumers of cheese. Our results showed that the increasing addition of jenny milk to cow milk led to a reduction of pH and total bacterial count in both cheese groups, as well as C. tyrobutyricum spores that either grew naturally or artificially inoculated. We observed a progressive reduction of the occurrence of late blowing defects in cheese as consequence of the increasing addition of jenny milk during cheese making. Moreover, the addition of jenny milk did not affect the acceptability of the product, as consumers found no difference among cheeses concerning sensorial aspects. In conclusion, the important antimicrobial activity of lysozyme contained in jenny milk has been confirmed in the current research. It is recommend for use as a possible and viable alternative to egg lysozyme for controlling late blowing defects in cheese.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus reservoirs during traditional Austrian raw milk cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcher, Georg; Gonano, Monika; Kümmel, Judith; Barker, Gary C; Lebl, Karin; Bereuter, Othmar; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin; Stessl, Beatrix

    2014-11-01

    Sampling approaches following the dairy chain, including microbiological hygiene status of critical processing steps and physicochemical parameters, contribute to our understanding of how Staphylococcus aureus contamination risks can be minimised. Such a sampling approach was adopted in this study, together with rapid culture-independent quantification of Staph. aureus to supplement standard microbiological methods. A regional cheese production chain, involving 18 farms, was sampled on two separate occasions. Overall, 51·4% of bulk milk samples were found to be Staph. aureus positive, most of them (34·3%) at the limit of culture-based detection. Staph. aureus positive samples >100 cfu/ml were recorded in 17·1% of bulk milk samples collected mainly during the sampling in November. A higher number of Staph. aureus positive bulk milk samples (94·3%) were detected after applying the culture-independent approach. A concentration effect of Staph. aureus was observed during curd processing. Staph. aureus were not consistently detectable with cultural methods during the late ripening phase, but >100 Staph. aureus cell equivalents (CE)/ml or g were quantifiable by the culture-independent approach until the end of ripening. Enterotoxin gene PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing provided evidence that livestock adapted strains of Staph. aureus mostly dominate the post processing level and substantiates the belief that animal hygiene plays a pivotal role in minimising the risk of Staph. aureus associated contamination in cheese making. Therefore, the actual data strongly support the need for additional sampling activities and recording of physicochemical parameters during semi-hard cheese-making and cheese ripening, to estimate the risk of Staph. aureus contamination before consumption.

  12. The effect of homogenization and milk fat fractions on the functionality of Mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowney, M K; Hickey, M W; Roupas, P; Everett, D W

    2003-03-01

    Mozzarella cheese was manufactured from milk containing either a low (olein) or a high (stearin) melting point fraction of milk fat or anhydrous milk fat. The fat was dispersed into skim milk by homogenization at 2.6 MPa before being manufactured into cheese. The melting point of the milk fat did not affect the size or shape of the fat globules, nor was there any effect of homogenization on the polymorphic state of the milk fat. There were no changes in milk fat globule size and shape concomitant with the amount of free oil formed. The polymorphic state of the milk fat did affect the amount of free oil formed and the apparent viscosity of the cheese. The lower melting point fraction yielded a larger amount of free oil. The higher melting point fraction yielded a higher viscosity of melted cheese at 60 degrees C. Mozzarella cheese was also manufactured from homogenized milk, nonhomogenized milk, and a 1:1 ratio of the two, without altering the milk fat composition. Increasing the proportion of homogenized milk yielded a lower free oil content and higher viscosity of the cheese.

  13. Impact of low concentration factor microfiltration on milk component recovery and Cheddar cheese yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neocleous, M; Barbano, D M; Rudan, M A

    2002-10-01

    The effect of microfiltration (MF) on the composition of Cheddar cheese, fat, crude protein (CP), calcium, total solids recovery, and Cheddar cheese yield efficiency (i.e., composition adjusted yield divided by theoretical yield) was determined. Raw skim milk was microfiltered twofold using a 0.1-microm ceramic membrane at 50 degrees C. Four vats of cheese were made in one day using milk at lx, 1.26x, 1.51x, and 1.82x concentration factor (CF). An appropriate amount of cream was added to achieve a constant casein (CN)-to-fat ratio across treatments. Cheese manufacture was repeated on four different days using a randomized complete block design. The composition of the cheese was affected by MF. Moisture content of the cheese decreased with increasing MF CF. Standardization of milk to a constant CN-to-fat ratio did not eliminate the effect of MF on cheese moisture content. Fat recovery in cheese was not changed by MF. Separation of cream prior to MF, followed by the recombination of skim or MF retentate with cream resulted in lower fat recovery in cheese for control and all treatments and higher fat loss in whey when compared to previous yield experiments, when control Cheddar cheese was made from unseparated milk. Crude protein, calcium, and total solids recovery in cheese increased with increasing MF CF, due to partial removal of these components prior to cheese making. Calcium and calcium as a percentage of protein increased in the cheese, suggesting an increase in calcium retention in the cheese with increasing CF. While the actual and composition adjusted cheese yields increased with increasing MF CF, as expected, there was no effect of MF CF on cheese yield efficiency.

  14. Utilization of microfiltration or lactoperoxidase system or both for manufacture of Cheddar cheese from raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornkul, Y; Henning, D R

    2007-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine if application of microfiltration (MF) or raw milk lactoperoxidase system (LP) could reduce the risk of foodborne illness from Escherichia coli in raw milk cheeses, without adversely affecting the overall sensory acceptability of the cheeses. Escherichia coli K12 was added to raw milk to study its survival as a non-pathogenic surrogate organism for pathogenic E. coli. Five replications of 6 treatments of Cheddar cheese were manufactured. The 6 treatments included cheeses made from pasteurized milk (PM), raw milk (RM), raw milk inoculated with E. coli K12 (RME), raw milk inoculated with E. coli K12 + LP activation (RMELP), raw milk inoculated with E. coli K12 + MF (MFE), and raw milk inoculated with E. coli K12 + MF + LP activation (MFELP). The population of E. coli K12 was enumerated in the cheese milks, in whey/curds during cheese manufacture, and in final Cheddar cheeses during ripening. Application of LP, MF, and a combination of MF and LP led to an average percentage reduction of E. coli K12 counts in cheese milk by 72, 88, and 96%, respectively. However, E. coli K12 populations significantly increased during the manufacture of Cheddar cheese for the reasons not related to contamination. The number of E. coli K12, however, decreased by 1.5 to 2 log cycles during 120 d of ripening, irrespective of the treatments. The results suggest that MF with or without LP significantly lowers E. coli count in raw milk. Hence, if reactivation of E. coli during cheese making could be prevented, MF with or without LP would be an effective technique for reducing the counts of E. coli in raw milk cheeses. The cheeses were also analyzed for proteolysis, starter and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), and sensory characteristics during ripening. The concentration of pH 4.6 soluble nitrogen at 120 d was greater in PM cheese compared with the other treatments. The level of 12% trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen at 120 d was

  15. Characterisation and research of the milk quality in Krk cheese manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Antunac

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical-chemical composition and hygienic quality of milk are of crucial importance in cheese manufacturing. During 2007, a research was carried out with the aim to investigate manufacturing features and milk quality of Krk sheep and to describe technological procedure of manufacture and physicalchemical composition of Krk cheese. The milking capacity was checked according to AT method. Chemical composition was analyzed by infrared spectrometry and hygienic milk quality by fluoro-opto-electronic method, i.e. flow cytometry method. In 160 days of lactation, sheep produced in average 108 kg of milk (38 kg in lactating and 70 kg in milking period, 5.67 kg of milk fat and 4.12 kg of proteins. In the average, the milk contained: 19.49 % of dry matter, 8.29 % of milk fat, 5.99 % of proteins, 4.45 % of lactose and 11.32 % of dry matter without fat. Milking had a significant influence on: daily milk quantity, dry matter and milk fat share, milk freezing point and hygienic milk quality (log10MO and log10BSS. Significant correlation coefficients were determined between manufacturing features of sheep and certain milk quality indicators. Based on the research results, values of physical-chemical composition, microbiological and sensory milk and cheese quality can be suggested, necessary in standardization of technological manufacturing procedure of Krk cheese.

  16. Effect of pre-treatment of cheese milk on the composition and characteristics of whey and whey products

    OpenAIRE

    Outinen, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Cheese producers want to increase cheese yield. The yield is improved by enhanced transfer of milk proteins and fat to cheese. This requires modifications to the traditional cheese process. During high-temperature heat treatment (HH), whey proteins are partially denaturated and co-precipitated with the cheese matrix. Elevation of the protein concentration of milk enhances the formation of the protein network in which whey proteins and fat are enclosed. The protein concentration is usually inc...

  17. Bacteriological quality of raw milk used for production of a Brazilian farmstead raw milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Sobrinho, Paulo de Souza; Marçal de Faria, Camila Andreata; Silva Pinheiro, Julia; Gonçalves de Almeida, Héllen; Vieira Pires, Christiano; Silva Santos, Aline

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bacteriological quality of raw cow's milk utilized for the production of Traditional Minas Serro cheese, a Brazilian farmstead raw milk cheese. Raw milk samples were collected from six farmstead cheese operations manufacturing raw milk cheese from cow's milk. Coliform count (CC) and Escherichia coli counts were determined using Petrifilm™ EC plates, and Staphylococcus aureus counts were determined using Petrifilm™ Staph Express count plates. The standard plate count (SPC) was determined using plate count agar. The somatic cell count (SCC) was determined with a DeLaval cell counter. The detection of Listeria monocytogenes was based in the ISO 11290-1 protocol. A total of 165 samples were analyzed, and the SPC was 1.85-7.88 log CFU/mL. Coliform were detected in 140 (84.8%) of the 165 samples, with counts of 1-6.39 log CFU/mL. E. coli was detected in 17 (10.3%) samples, with counts of 1-2.18 log CFU/mL. The SCC in raw milk was 10,000-1,390,000 cells per mL, with mean and geometric mean values of 247,000 and 162,181, respectively. The SCC did not differ significantly between the seasons (p>0.05), but differed between different farms (pcount was 1.47-5.03 log CFU/mL. The median of SPC, CC, and S. aureus counts differed significantly between seasons and between farms (pbacterial (including pathogenic) presence.

  18. Probiotic Crescenza cheese containing Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus manufactured with high-pressure homogenized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, P; Patrignani, F; Serrazanetti, D; Vinderola, G C; Reinheimer, J A; Lanciotti, R; Guerzoni, M E

    2008-02-01

    High-pressure homogenization (HPH) is one of the most promising alternatives to traditional thermal treatment of food preservation and diversification. Its effectiveness on the deactivation of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in model systems and real food is well documented. To evaluate the potential of milk treated by HPH for the production of Crescenza cheese with commercial probiotic lactobacilli added, 4 types of cheeses were made: HPH (from HPH-treated milk), P (from pasteurized milk), HPH-P (HPH-treated milk plus probiotics), and P-P (pasteurized milk plus probiotics) cheeses. A strain of Streptococcus thermophilus was used as starter culture for cheese production. Compositional, microbiological, physicochemical, and organoleptic analyses were carried out at 1, 5, 8, and 12 d of refrigerated storage (4 degrees C). According to results obtained, no significant differences among the 4 cheese types were observed for gross composition (protein, fat, moisture) and pH. Differently, the HPH treatment of milk increased the cheese yield about 1% and positively affected the viability during the refrigerated storage of the probiotic bacteria. In fact, after 12 d of storage, the Lactobacillus paracasei A13 cell loads were 8 log cfu/ g, whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus H5 exhibited, in P-P cheese, a cell load decrease of about 1 log cfu/g with respect to the HPH-P cheese. The hyperbaric treatment had a significant positive effect on free fatty acids release and cheese proteolysis. Also, probiotic cultures affected proteolytic and lipolytic cheese patterns. No significant differences were found for the sensory descriptors salty and creamy among HPH and P cheeses as well as for acid, piquant, sweet, milky, salty, creamy, and overall acceptance among HPH, HPH-P, and P-P Crescenza cheeses.

  19. Milk catalase activity as an indicator of thermization treatments used in the manufacture of cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvi, Y; Griffiths, M W

    1998-02-01

    Pilot-scale studies were carried out to determine the effect of different heat treatments on catalase activity during the manufacture and maturation of Cheddar cheese. Three trials were conducted to monitor catalase activity using disk flotation and polarographic methods. Cheese was manufactured from raw milk and from milk that had been treated at 60, 65 and 72 degrees C for 16 s using a high temperature, short time heat exchanger. Catalase activity was also determined in samples of commercial milk and in samples of mild, medium, sharp, and extra sharp Cheddar cheeses obtained from different manufacturers in order to verify that the enzyme could be used as an indicator of the type of heat treatment applied to cheese milk. Catalase activity was present in cheese made from raw milk but was only present at low concentrations in cheese manufactured from thermized milk. However, high catalase activity was observed in commercial samples of sharp and extra sharp Cheddar cheese that was apparently due to the growth of catalase-producing yeasts in the cheese during maturation.

  20. Production, yield and characteristics of Feta and Domiati type cheeses produced from goat´s milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Drgalić

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Brined Feta and Domiati type cheeses were produced from whole goat´s milk. Different types of production were used; with and without goat´s milk acidification with citric acid. The effect of calcium chloride addition was also examined. Renneting of goat´s milk with 0.03% renilase was conducted at 40°C for Domiati type cheese and at 30°C for Feta type cheese. Additives (citric acid and calcium chloride presence had no effect on reneting time for Feta type cheeses while citric acid addition significantly reduced reneting time for Domiati type cheeses. Domiati type cheeses possessed softer consistency, lower acidity, lower protein and fat content than Feta type cheeses. The yield of Domiati type cheeses was approximately 18.37% higher than of Feta type cheeses. Ripening of both types of cheeses was conducted in the brine with 10% sodium chloride at 12°C for 14 days. All cheese samples had lower protein, fat and calcium content in comparison with quality of cheeses before ripening in a brine. This especially occurred in Feta type cheeses. Sensory evaluation of analysed type of cheese was determined at 7th and 14th day of ripening. Better sensory scores are obtained for both types of cheeses after 14 days of ripening, when flavour and taste improvements were significantly higher. The best scores were obtained for Domiati cheese samples from unacidified goat´s milk, regardles of calcium chloride addition.

  1. Microbiological quality of retail cheeses made from raw, thermized or pasteurized milk in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, C L; Rhoades, J R; Sagoo, S K; Harris, J; Greenwood, M; Mithani, V; Grant, K; McLauchlin, J

    2008-04-01

    Two studies of retail fresh, ripened and semi-hard cheeses made from raw, thermized or pasteurized milk were undertaken in the UK during 2004 and 2005 to determine the microbiological quality of these products. Using microbiological criteria in European Commission Recommendations 2004/24/EC and 2005/175/EC, 2% of both raw, thermized (37/1819 samples) and pasteurized (51/2618 samples) milk cheeses were of unsatisfactory quality. Raw or thermized milk cheeses were of unsatisfactory quality due to levels of Staphylococcus aureus at 10(4)cfu g(-1), Escherichia coli at 10(5)cfu g(-1), and/or Listeria monocytogenes at 10(2)cfu g(-1), whereas pasteurized milk cheeses were of unsatisfactory quality due to S. aureus at 10(3)cfu g(-1) and/or E. coli at 10(3)cfu g(-1). Salmonella was not detected in any samples. Cheeses were of unsatisfactory quality more frequently when sampled from premises rated as having little or no confidence in management and control systems, and stored/displayed at above 8 degrees C. Raw or thermized milk cheeses were also more likely to be of unsatisfactory quality when they were unripened types, and pasteurized milk cheeses when they were: semi-hard types; from specialist cheese shops or delicatessens; cut to order. These results emphasize the need for applying and maintaining good hygiene practices throughout the food chain to prevent contamination and/or bacterial growth. Labelling of cheeses with clear information on whether the cheese was prepared from raw milk also requires improvement.

  2. Genetic parameters of different measures of cheese yield and milk nutrient recovery from an individual model cheese-manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittante, G; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield (CY) is an important technological trait in the dairy industry, and the objective of this study was to estimate the genetic parameters of cheese yield in a dairy cattle population using an individual model-cheese production procedure. A total of 1,167 Brown Swiss cows belonging to 85 herds were sampled once (a maximum of 15 cows were sampled per herd on a single test day, 1 or 2 herds per week). From each cow, 1,500 mL of milk was processed according to the following steps: milk sampling and heating, culture addition, rennet addition, gelation-time recording, curd cutting, whey draining and sampling, wheel formation, pressing, salting in brine, weighing, and cheese sampling. The compositions of individual milk, whey, and curd samples were determined. Three measures of percentage cheese yield (%CY) were calculated: %CY(CURD), %CY(SOLIDS), and %CY(WATER), which represented the ratios between the weight of fresh curd, the total solids of the curd, and the water content of the curd, respectively, and the weight of the milk processed. In addition, 3 measures of daily cheese yield (dCY, kg/d) were defined, considering the daily milk yield. Three measures of nutrient recovery (REC) were computed: REC(FAT), REC(PROTEIN), and REC(SOLIDS), which represented the ratio between the weights of the fat, protein, and total solids in the curd, respectively, and the corresponding nutrient in the milk. Energy recovery, REC(ENERGY), represented the energy content of the cheese versus that in the milk. For statistical analysis, a Bayesian animal model was implemented via Gibbs sampling. The effects of parity (1 to ≥4), days in milk (6 classes), and laboratory vat (15 vats) were assigned flat priors; those of herd-test-date, animal, and residual were given Gaussian prior distributions. Intra-herd heritability estimates of %CY(CURD), %CY(SOLIDS), and %CY(WATER) ranged from 0.224 to 0.267; these were larger than the estimates obtained for milk yield (0.182) and milk fat

  3. Production optimization of probiotic soft cheese made from goat's and cow's milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Drgalić

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine optimal rennet share and fat content in milk for probiotic soft cheeseproduction made from goat's and cow's milk using DVS mixed probiotic culture ABT-4 (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium spp. and Streptococcus thermophilus, with desirable sensory properties, which will be acceptable by consumers. The best sensory scores had samples of probiotic soft cheese produced in laboratory conditions from milk with 1% of milk fat, pasteurized at 65°C/30 min., fermented at 38°C with 2% culture. To achieve characteristic consistency of traditional soft cheese, 0.01% of rennet was added to goat's milk. Probiotic soft cheese made from cow's and goat's milk, produced under optimal conditions, were 100% acceptable by the tested consumers.

  4. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand;

    experiments. Growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in heat-treated milk resulted in a bias factor (Bf) of 1.08 and an accuracy factor (Af) of 1.32, whereas the calibrated model for growth rates in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing and in raw milk resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1......Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth model...... was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter (μref at 25 °C) was fitted to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Growth rate models for milk and cottage cheese were evaluated by comparison with data from literature and new...

  5. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand;

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth model...... was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter (μref at 25 °C) was fitted to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Growth rate models for milk and cottage cheese were evaluated by comparison with data from literature and new...... experiments. Growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in heat-treated milk resulted in a bias factor (Bf) of 1.08 and an accuracy factor (Af) of 1.32, whereas the calibrated model for growth rates in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing and in raw milk resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1...

  6. Influence of addition of plasmin or mastitic milk to cheesemilk on quality of smear-ripened cheese

    OpenAIRE

    O'Farrell, Ian P.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.; Martin G. Wilkinson; Harrington, Dermot; Kelly, Alan L.

    2002-01-01

    peer-reviewed Smear-ripened cheese varieties are characterised by the growth of a smear culture, containing predominantly Brevibacterium linens, on the cheese surface during ripening. In such cheese, considerable zonal differences in biochemistry of ripening exist, due to moisture loss from, and growth and metabolic activity of smear microflora at, the cheese surface. In this study, the effects of adding exogenous plasmin or small amounts of mastitic milk to good quality milk o...

  7. Effect of commercial grape extracts on the cheese-making properties of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix da Silva, Denise; Matumoto-Pintro, Paula T; Bazinet, Laurent; Couillard, Charles; Britten, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Grape extracts can be added to milk to produce cheese with a high concentration of polyphenols. Four commercial extracts from whole grape, grape seed, and grape skin (2 extracts) were characterized and added to milk at concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% (wt/vol). The effect of grape extracts on the kinetics of milk clotting, milk gel texture, and syneresis were determined, and model cheeses were produced. Whole grape and grape seed extracts contained a similar concentration of polyphenolic compounds and about twice the amount found in grape skin extracts. Radical scavenging activity was directly proportional to the phenolic compounds content. When added to milk, grape extracts increased rennet-induced clotting time and decreased the clotting rate. Although differences were observed between the extracts, the concentration added to milk was the main factor influencing clotting properties. With increasing concentrations of grape extracts, milk gels showed increased brittleness and reduced firmness. In addition, syneresis of milk gels decreased with increasing concentrations of grape extracts, which resulted in cheeses with a higher moisture content. The presence of grape extracts in milk slightly increased protein recovery in cheese but had no effect on fat recovery. With whole grape or grape seed extracts added to milk at 0.1% (wt/vol), the recovery coefficient for polyphenols was about 0.63, and decreased with increasing extract concentration in milk. Better polyphenol recovery was observed for grape seed extracts (0.87), with no concentration effect. Commercial extracts from whole grape, grape seed, or grape skin can be added to milk in the 0.1 to 0.3% (wt/vol) concentration range to produce cheese with potential health benefits, without a negative effect on cheese yield.

  8. Eff ect of homogenization on the properties and microstructure of Mozzarella cheese from buff alo milk

    OpenAIRE

    S. Abd El-Rafee; M.M. El-Abd; Nawal S. Ahmed; Mona A.M. Abd El-Gawad

    2012-01-01

    Background. The name pasta fi lata refers to a unique plasticizing and texturing treatments of the fresh curd in hot water that imparts to the fi nished cheese its characteristic fi brous structure and melting properties. Mozzarella cheese made from standardized homogenized and non-homogenized buffalo milk with 3 and 1.5%fat. The effect of homogenization on rheological, microstructure and sensory evaluation was carried out. Material and methods. Fresh raw buffalo milk and starter cultures of ...

  9. Environmental assessment of Ultra-High Pressure Homogenisation for milk and fresh cheese production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsasina, Lucia; Pizzol, Massimo; Smetana, Sergiy

    2015-01-01

    Temperature (UHT) treatment and, at the same time, to lower energy consumptions through the combination of pasteurisation and homogenisation in a single process. Furthermore, the use of UHPH treated milk for the production of fresh cheese has been proven to increase shelf life days and increase yield...... This study provides an LCA of UHPH and UHT processing of milk and fresh cheese production from processing to end-of-life....

  10. Use of human lysozyme transgenic goat milk in cheese making: effects on lactic acid bacteria performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfen, E C; Mills, D A; Maga, E A

    2007-09-01

    Genetically engineered goats expressing elevated levels of the antimicrobial enzyme lysozyme in their milk were developed to improve udder health, product shelf life, and consumer well-being. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lysozyme on the development of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) throughout the cheese-making process. Raw and pasteurized milk from 7 lysozyme transgenic goats and 7 breed-, age-, and parity-matched nontransgenic controls was transformed into cheeses by using industry methods, and their microbiological load was evaluated. The numbers of colony-forming units of LAB were determined for raw and pasteurized goat milk, whey, and curd at d 2 and at d 6 or 7 of production. Selective plating media were used to enumerate lactococcal species separately from total LAB. Although differences in the mean number of colony-forming units between transgenic and control samples in raw milk, whey, and cheese curd were non-significant for both total LAB and lactococcal species from d 2 of production, a significant decrease was observed in both types of LAB among d 6 transgenic raw milk cheese samples. In pasteurized milk trials, a significant decrease in LAB was observed only in the raw milk of transgenic animals. These results indicate that lysozyme transgenic goat milk is not detrimental to LAB growth during the cheese-making process.

  11. Dynamics of bacterial communities during the ripening process of different Croatian cheese types derived from raw ewe's milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuka, Mirna Mrkonjić; Wallisch, Stefanie; Engel, Marion; Welzl, Gerhard; Havranek, Jasmina; Schloter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play an important role in cheese ripening and determine the flavor and taste of different cheese types to a large extent. However, under adverse conditions human pathogens may colonize cheese samples during ripening and may thus cause severe outbreaks of diarrhoea and other diseases. Therefore in the present study we investigated the bacterial community structure of three raw ewe's milk cheese types, which are produced without the application of starter cultures during ripening from two production sites based on fingerprinting in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Overall a surprisingly high diversity was found in the analyzed samples and overall up to 213 OTU97 could be assigned. 20 of the major OTUs were present in all samples and include mostly lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mainly Lactococcus, and Enterococcus species. Abundance and diversity of these genera differed to a large extent between the 3 investigated cheese types and in response to the ripening process. Also a large number of non LAB genera could be identified based on phylogenetic alignments including mainly Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcacae. Some species belonging to these two families could be clearly assigned to species which are known as potential human pathogens like Staphylococcus saprophyticus or Salmonella spp. However, during cheese ripening their abundance was reduced. The bacterial genera, namely Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Thermoanerobacterium, E. coli, Hafnia, Pseudomonas, Janthinobacterium, Petrotoga, Kosmotoga, Megasphaera, Macrococcus, Mannheimia, Aerococcus, Vagococcus, Weissella and Pediococcus were identified at a relative low level and only in selected samples. Overall the microbial composition of the used milk and the management of the production units determined the bacterial community composition for all cheese types to a

  12. Dynamics of bacterial communities during the ripening process of different Croatian cheese types derived from raw ewe's milk cheeses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mrkonjić Fuka

    Full Text Available Microbial communities play an important role in cheese ripening and determine the flavor and taste of different cheese types to a large extent. However, under adverse conditions human pathogens may colonize cheese samples during ripening and may thus cause severe outbreaks of diarrhoea and other diseases. Therefore in the present study we investigated the bacterial community structure of three raw ewe's milk cheese types, which are produced without the application of starter cultures during ripening from two production sites based on fingerprinting in combination with next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Overall a surprisingly high diversity was found in the analyzed samples and overall up to 213 OTU97 could be assigned. 20 of the major OTUs were present in all samples and include mostly lactic acid bacteria (LAB, mainly Lactococcus, and Enterococcus species. Abundance and diversity of these genera differed to a large extent between the 3 investigated cheese types and in response to the ripening process. Also a large number of non LAB genera could be identified based on phylogenetic alignments including mainly Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcacae. Some species belonging to these two families could be clearly assigned to species which are known as potential human pathogens like Staphylococcus saprophyticus or Salmonella spp. However, during cheese ripening their abundance was reduced. The bacterial genera, namely Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bifidobacterium, Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, Thermoanerobacterium, E. coli, Hafnia, Pseudomonas, Janthinobacterium, Petrotoga, Kosmotoga, Megasphaera, Macrococcus, Mannheimia, Aerococcus, Vagococcus, Weissella and Pediococcus were identified at a relative low level and only in selected samples. Overall the microbial composition of the used milk and the management of the production units determined the bacterial community composition for all

  13. Detection of cheese whey and caseinomacropeptide in fermented milk beverages using high performance liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    E.H.P. Andrade; M.R. Souza; Fonseca,L.M.; C.F.A.M. Penna; M.M.O.P. Cerqueira; T. Roza; Seridan,B.; M.F.S. Resende; Pinto, F. A.; C.N.B.C. Villanoeva; Leite,M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Cheese whey level and caseinomacropeptide (CMP) index of fermented milk beverages added with four levels of cheese whey (0, 10, 20, and 40%) and stored at 8-10oC for 0, 7, 14 and 21 days were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration (HPLC-GF). Additionally, the interference of the starter culture and the storage time on the detection of cheese whey and CMP were investigated. Refrigerated storage up to 21 days did not affect (P>0.05) cheese whey and CMP amounts in mi...

  14. Prevalence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in organic milk and cheese in Tabriz, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Rahbar Saadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disease, which is caused by consumption of contaminated food with enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (SEs. Milk and its products are known sources of food borne diseases. This study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus strains in organic milk and cheese in Tabriz - Iran.A total of 200 samples (100 milk samples and 100 cheese samples were collected from farms and milk collection points in Tabriz - Iran. The samples were cultured and identified by standard bacteriological methods, then PCR was performed to detect sea gene.Staphylococcus aureus was found in 27% of all samples (milk and cheese. Results of PCR showed that 12.96% of S. aureus isolates possessed sea gene. It suggested the potential public health threat of S. aureus resulting from contamination of dairy products. So, efforts are required to improve safety standards for preventing staphylococcal food poisoning.

  15. Amaltheys: A fluorescence-based analyzer to assess cheese milk denatured whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacotte, Pierre; Gomez, Franck; Bardeau, Floriane; Muller, Sabine; Acharid, Abdelhaq; Quervel, Xavier; Trossat, Philippe; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès

    2015-10-01

    The cheese industry faces many challenges to optimize cheese yield and quality. A very precise standardization of the cheese milk is needed, which is achieved by a fine control of the process and milk composition. Thorough analysis of protein composition is important to determine the amount of protein that will be retained in the curd or lost in the whey. The fluorescence-based Amaltheys analyzer (Spectralys Innovation, Romainville, France) was developed to assess pH 4.6-soluble heat-sensitive whey proteins (sWP*) in 5 min. These proteins are those that can be denatured upon heat-treatment and further retained in the curd after coagulation. Monitoring of sWP* in milk and subsequent adaptation of the process is a reliable solution to achieve stable cheese yield and quality. Performance of the method was evaluated by an accredited laboratory on a 0 to 7 g/L range. Accuracy compared with the reference Kjeldahl method is also provided with a standard error of 0.25 g/L. Finally, a 4-mo industrial trial in a cheese plant is described, where Amaltheys was used as a process analytical technology to monitor sWP* content in ingredients and final cheese milk. Calibration models over quality parameters of final cheese were also built from near-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic data. The Amaltheys analyzer was found to be a rapid, compact, and accurate device to help implementation of standardization procedures in the dairy industry.

  16. A molecular genetic approach for traceability of the source milk in cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pieragostini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The valorisation of typical cheeses meets the needs of preserving the local country culture and tradition as well of guaranteeing consumer health by the control of all the steps of production (herd, milk quality, cheese making technology. Among the variability factors significantly affecting cheese peculiarity, biodiversity plays an important role (Gandini et al., 1996; Pieragostini et al., 2002. The possibility of identifying or tracing the primary product, mainly the origin breed, by the use of biologic markers, is an important goal for the safeguard and valorisation of national goat cheese. In this field great interest is paid to milk protein genetic polymorphism. A first study was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of tracing the source milk in dairy products. In particular, the use of molecular techniques for the detection of casein polymorphisms.........

  17. Denaturation of milk proteins and their influence on the yield of fresh cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mejía-López

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the denaturation of milk proteins by the effects of heat treatment on pasteurization and to establish their influence on the yield of the fresh cheese manufactured, 20 laboratory- scale controlled trials and 40 plant productions were made. Crude and treated milk was used at 65 ° C for 30 minutes, 72 ° C for 15 seconds and boiled for 2 seconds, and the protein was quantified in milk to calculate percent denaturation. In the cheese the moisture content was determined and the amount of cheese obtained was quantified. The data were processed by Tukey's mean analysis (p> 0.05. The results at the laboratory level showed that the increase in temperature caused higher denaturation of the proteins, a higher yield and an increase in moisture in the cheese compared to that obtained with raw milk. However, statistically the results showed that the heat treatment does influence the denaturation of the proteins but not the performance of the cheese. The results obtained in the factory investigation revealed that at 65 and 72 ° C the yield decreases relative to the production with raw milk, but statistically does not present significant differences in the yield, concluding that the pasteurization at different temperatures denature the protein But does not influence the performance of fresh processed cheese.

  18. Composition, yield, and functionality of reduced-fat Oaxaca cheese: effects of using skim milk or a dry milk protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, I; Soto, S; Franco, M J; Meza-Nieto, M; Alfaro-Rodríguez, R H; Mateo, J

    2011-02-01

    The effect of adding either skim milk or a commercial dry milk protein concentrate (MPC) to whole milk on the composition, yield, and functional properties of Mexican Oaxaca cheese were investigated. Five batches of Oaxaca cheeses were produced. One batch (the control) was produced from whole milk containing 3.5% fat and 9% nonfat solids (SNF). Two batches were produced from milk standardized with skim milk to 2.7 and 1.8% fat, maintaining the SNF content at 9%. In the other 2 batches, an MPC (40% protein content) was used to standardize the milk to a SNF content of 10 and 11%, maintaining the milk fat content at 3.5%. The use of either skim milk or MPC caused a significant decrease in the fat percentage in cheese. The use of skim milk or MPC showed a nonsignificant tendency to lower total solids and fat recoveries in cheese. Actual, dry matter, and moisture-adjusted cheese yields significantly decreased with skim milk addition, but increased with MPC addition. However, normalized yields adjusted to milk fat and protein reference levels did not show significant differences between treatments. Considering skim milk-added and control cheeses, actual yield increased with cheese milk fat content at a rate of 1.34 kg/kg of fat (R=0.88). In addition, cheese milk fat and SNF:fat ratio proved to be strong individual predictors of cheese moisture-adjusted yield (r(2) ≈ 0.90). Taking into account the results obtained from control and MPC-added cheeses, a 2.0-kg cheese yield increase rate per kg of milk MPC protein was observed (R=0.89), with TS and SNF being the strongest predictors for moisture adjusted yield (r(2) ≈ 0.77). Reduced-fat Oaxaca cheese functionality differed from that of controls. In unmelted reduced-fat cheeses, hardness and springiness increased. In melted reduced-fat cheeses, meltability and free oil increased, but stretchability decreased. These changes were related to differences in cheese composition, mainly fat in dry matter and calcium in SNF.

  19. Homogenization and lipase treatment of milk and resulting methyl ketone generation in blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingkai; Fonseca, Leorges M; Schoenfuss, Tonya C; Rankin, Scott A

    2014-06-25

    A specific range of methyl ketones contribute to the distinctive flavor of traditional blue cheeses. These ketones are metabolites of lipid metabolism by Penicillium mold added to cheese for this purpose. Two processes, namely, the homogenization of milk fat and the addition of exogenous lipase enzymes, are traditionally applied measures to control the formation of methyl ketones in blue cheese. There exists little scientific validation of the actual effects of these treatments on methyl ketone development. The present study evaluated the effects of milk fat homogenization and lipase treatments on methyl ketone and free fatty acid development using sensory methods and the comparison of selected volatile quantities using gas chromatography. Initial work was conducted using a blue cheese system model; subsequent work was conducted with manufactured blue cheese. In general, there were modest effects of homogenization and lipase treatments on free fatty acid (FFA) and methyl ketone concentrations in blue cheese. Blue cheese treatments involving Penicillium roqueforti lipase with homogenized milk yielded higher FFA and methyl ketone levels, for example, a ∼20-fold increase for hexanoic acid and a 3-fold increase in 2-pentanone.

  20. Influence of milk quality and production protocol on proteolysis and lipolysis in Monti Dauni Meridionali Caciocavallo cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenzio, Marzia; Santillo, Antonella; Russo, Donatella Esterina; Caroprese, Mariangela; Marino, Rosaria; Sevi, Agostino

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of milk source and of cheese production protocol on proteolytic and lipolytic pattern of cheese during ripening. The study involved six dairy factories located in Monti Dauni Meridionali area of Southern Italy; three dairy factories processed the milk produced by their own cow herds, while the other three dairy factories processed the milk collected in other dairy farms located in the neighbouring area. Cow milk processed to cheese had different nutritional parameters and hygienic quality. Caciocavallo cheese showed differences in the evolution of proteolysis during ripening and in the intensity of the lipolytic process detected at the end of ripening. The main factors influencing Caciocavallo cheese features were the quality of the starting milk, differences in technological steps such as milk heating, type of starter cultures and coagulant used.

  1. Development of a Potential Probiotic Fresh Cheese Using Two Lactobacillus salivarius Strains Isolated from Human Milk

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    Nivia Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cheeses have been proposed as a good alternative to other fermented milk products for the delivery of probiotic bacteria to the consumer. The objective of this study was to assess the survival of two Lactobacillus salivarius strains (CECT5713 and PS2 isolated from human milk during production and storage of fresh cheese for 28 days at 4°C. The effect of such strains on the volatile compounds profile, texture, and other sensorial properties, including an overall consumer acceptance, was also investigated. Both L. salivarius strains remained viable in the cheeses throughout the storage period and a significant reduction in their viable counts was only observed after 21 days. Globally, the addition of the L. salivarius strains did not change significantly neither the chemical composition of the cheese nor texture parameters after the storage period, although cheeses manufactured with L. salivarius CECT5713 presented significantly higher values of hardness. A total of 59 volatile compounds were identified in the headspace of experimental cheeses, and some L. salivarius-associated differences could be identified. All cheeses presented good results of acceptance after the sensory evaluation. Consequently, our results indicated that fresh cheese can be a good vehicle for the two L. salivarius strains analyzed in this study.

  2. Effect of rate of addition of starter culture on textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kanawjia, S K; Kumar, Suryamani; Khatkar, Sunil

    2014-04-01

    The effect of rate of addition of starter culture on textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese was investigated during ripening period up to two months. The textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese in terms of hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness were analyzed by using textural profile analyzer. The maximum hardness was found with cheese made using 1% culture, while the minimum was found with 2% culture. The cohesiveness and springiness decreased as the level of addition of starter culture increased. The chewiness of cheese also decreased, as the rate of addition of starter culture increased for cheese making. In addition to this, yield, moisture, fat, FDM, protein, salt and S/M of fresh buffalo milk Feta type cheese increased with the increase in rate of addition of starter culture; however, TS of experimental cheeses decreased.

  3. Production technology and characterization of Fior di latte cheeses made from sheep and goat milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccia, M; Trani, A; Gambacorta, G; Loizzo, P; Cassone, A; Caponio, F

    2015-03-01

    Innovation in the small ruminant dairy sector faces structural challenges because dairies are often involved in breeding and produce cheeses that appeal essentially to local markets using traditional technologies and facilities. An investigation was carried out to produce Fior di latte, a traditional, soft pasta filata cheese, from sheep and goat milks at the farm level. Fior di latte is an Italian high-moisture, round mozzarella currently produced from cow and water buffalo milks; it is very popular in Europe. Cheesemaking trials were performed and the most appropriate technology proved to be a combination of direct acidification and lactic fermentation, with some modifications to the milk coagulation phase. The gross composition of the experimental cheeses was similar to that of bovine Fior di latte, and the overall hygienic quality was satisfactory even though the milk had not been pasteurized. The new cheeses were similar in appearance to the bovine type, but some specific features were detected. Besides the typical "goaty" and "sheepy" flavors, some novel and distinctive descriptors of odor, flavor, and texture were noted. Our experiment showed that good quality Fior di latte cheese that complies with microbiological requirements of the European legislation can be obtained from sheep and goat milks by appropriately modifying the cheesemaking technology.

  4. Behavior of Different Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Serotypes in Various Experimentally Contaminated Raw-Milk Cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Miszczycha, Stéphane D.; Perrin, Frédérique; Ganet, Sarah; Jamet, Emmanuel; TENENHAUS-AZIZA, Fanny; Montel, Marie-Christine; Thevenot-Sergentet, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important cause of food-borne illness. The public health implication of the presence of STEC in dairy products remains unclear. Knowledge of STEC behavior in cheeses would help to evaluate the human health risk. The aim of our study was to observe the growth and survival of experimentally inoculated STEC strains in raw-milk cheeses manufactured and ripened according to five technological schemes: blue-type cheese, uncooked pressed cheese wit...

  5. Effect of rate of addition of starter culture on textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese during ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kanawjia, S. K.; Kumar, Suryamani; Khatkar, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The effect of rate of addition of starter culture on textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese was investigated during ripening period up to two months. The textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese in terms of hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness were analyzed by using textural profile analyzer. The maximum hardness was found with cheese made using 1% culture, while the minimum was found with 2% culture. The cohesiveness and springiness...

  6. Effect of autochthonous starter cultures on the biogenic amine content of ewe's milk cheese throughout ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renes, E; Diezhandino, I; Fernández, D; Ferrazza, R E; Tornadijo, M E; Fresno, J M

    2014-12-01

    Cheese is among the most commonly implicated foods associated with biogenic amines poisoning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the type of autochthonous starter culture and ripening time on the concentration of biogenic amines (histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine, spermine and spermidine) in cheeses made from pasteurized ewe's milk. 4 cheese batches were made, in duplicate, and ripened for 7 months. The biogenic amines of 40 cheeses were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The predominant biogenic amines determined at the end of the ripening time were phenylethylamine, spermine and tryptamine. Together, these accounted for 81% of the total of biogenic amines studied. The type of starter culture used to make the ewe's cheese had a significant effect (p culture made up entirely of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris or of the same in combination with Lactobacillus plantarum.

  7. Fate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Swiss Hard and Semihard Cheese Manufactured from Raw Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Spahr, U.; Schafroth, K.

    2001-01-01

    Raw milk was artificially contaminated with declumped cells of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a concentration of 104 to 105 CFU/ml and was used to manufacture model hard (Swiss Emmentaler) and semihard (Swiss Tisliter) cheese. Two different strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were tested, and for each strain, two model hard and semihard cheeses were produced. The survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was monitored over a ripening period of 120 days by plat...

  8. Effect of homogenization of cream on composition, yield, and functionality of Cheddar cheese made from milk supplemented with ultrafiltered milk

    OpenAIRE

    Oommen, Bonney; Mistry, Vikram; Nair, Manoj

    2000-01-01

    International audience; Cheddar cheeses were made from milks supplemented with ultrafiltered skim milk to 4.57 and 5.93% protein and from milks without supplementation to serve as controls (3.18% protein). Milks were standardized (casein-to-fat ratio of 0.7) with unhomogenized cream or homogenized (6.9/3.45 MPa) cream. The six treatments were replicated five times. Rennet clotting time decreased with protein concentration and homogenization of cream increased it. $\\rm k_{20}$, the time to rea...

  9. Case study of a commercial sheep flock under extensive mountain grazing: Pasture derived lipid compounds in milk and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso, I; Bustamante, M A; Aldezabal, A; Amores, G; Virto, M; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; de Renobales, M; Barron, L J R

    2016-04-15

    Terpenoid, fat-soluble antioxidant and fatty acid (FA) composition of pasture as well as those of milk and cheese from a commercial sheep flock managed under extensive mountain grazing in the east region of the Cantabrian mountain (Northern Spain) was investigated. The grazing period lasted for 2 months and ewes were at late lactation stage. Plants, feces, bulk milk and cheese samples were collected on two sampling dates. The abundance of the dominating botanical families in the mountain pasture prevailed in the sheep diet of the commercial flock. Major terpenoids and tocols in the pasture appeared as major ones in milk and cheese, whereas C18 unsaturated FAs in milk and cheese were derived from the intake of C18 polyunsaturated FAs which were prevalent in the pasture. No carotene was detected in the dairy samples but retinol (free or esterified), derived from the intake of β-carotene present in pasture plants, was found in milk and cheese.

  10. Terpenes transfer to milk and cheese after oral administration to sheep fed indoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulopoulou, I; Zoidis, E; Massouras, T; Hadjigeorgiou, I

    2012-04-01

    Terpenes have been proposed as potential biomarkers in verifying the diets of grazing animals. A study of the relationships between the intake of terpenes and their presence in animal tissues (blood and milk) as well as in the final product (cheese) was conducted. Eight dairy sheep were divided into two equal groups, representing control (C) and treatment group (T). In T group oral administration of a mixture of terpenes, α-pinene, limonene and β-caryophyllene, was applied over a period of 18 days. Blood and milk samples were collected regularly and terpenes were identified by extraction using petroleum ether and the solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) method, respectively, followed by GC-MS analysis. Cheese was produced, from C and T animals separately, twice during the period of terpenes oral administration. Terpenes contents and chemical properties of the produced cheeses were investigated. Limonene and α-pinene were found in all blood and milk samples of the T group after a lag-phase of 2 days, while β-caryophyllene was detected in few plasma samples and in all milk samples. None of the terpenes was traced in blood and milk of C animals. The contents of cheese, in dosed terpenes, presented a more complicated pattern suggesting terpenes non-credible as biomarkers. We conclude terpenes can be used as biomarkers for authentification of ewes' milk, but further research is required on factors affecting their transfer to dairy products from grazing diets.

  11. Derivation of multivariate indices of milk composition, coagulation properties, and individual cheese yield in dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, M G; Serdino, J; Gaspa, G; Urgeghe, P; Ibba, I; Contu, M; Fresi, P; Macciotta, N P P

    2016-06-01

    Milk composition and its technological properties are traits of interest for the dairy sheep industry because almost all milk produced is processed into cheese. However, several variables define milk technological properties and a complex correlation pattern exists among them. In the present work, we measured milk composition, coagulation properties, and individual cheese yields in a sample of 991 Sarda breed ewes in 47 flocks. The work aimed to study the correlation pattern among measured variables and to obtain new synthetic indicators of milk composition and cheese-making properties. Multivariate factor analysis was carried out on individual measures of milk coagulation parameters; cheese yield; fat, protein, and lactose percentages; somatic cell score; casein percentage; NaCl content; pH; and freezing point. Four factors that were able to explain about 76% of the original variance were extracted. They were clearly interpretable: the first was associated with composition and cheese yield, the second with udder health status, the third with coagulation, and the fourth with curd characteristics. Factor scores were then analyzed by using a mixed linear model that included the fixed effect of parity, lambing month, and lactation stage, and the random effect of flock-test date. The patterns of factor scores along lactation stages were coherent with their technical meaning. A relevant effect of flock-test date was detected, especially on the 2 factors related to milk coagulation properties. Results of the present study suggest the existence of a simpler latent structure that regulates relationships between variables defining milk composition and coagulation properties in sheep. Heritability estimates for the 4 extracted factors were from low to moderate, suggesting potential use of these new variables as breeding goals.

  12. Effects of adsorbents in dairy cow diet on milk quality and cheese-making properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pirlo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of adsorbents (clinoptilolite+sepiolite in the diet of cows was evaluated in two trials. A total of 52 Italian Friesian cows were assigned to one of two dietary treatments, control and adsorbent (CON vs. ADS. Individual and bulk milk samples were collected. On individual data, no significant difference was found between treatments in milk yield, milk fat, protein, and lactose concentrations, milk protein yield, pH, and titratable acidity, both in summer and spring. In spring only, there was a trend (P = 0.07 for a higher milk fat yield and a lower somatic cell number in ADS than in CON group. In summer only, milk clotting time was higher in ADS than in CON group (P < 0.05. On bulk milk, no significant differences in components and technological features were found between the CON and ADS groups. The bulk milk contents in total and soluble Ca were 1100 vs. 1108 mg/kg and 378 vs. 369 mg/kg for CON and ADS respectively, proving to be unaffected by treatment and suggesting a lack of interference by ADS on milk Ca availability for cheese-making process.We concluded that, for a period of 12 weeks, the addition of 1% on DM of the diet for lactating cows of non-nutritional adsorbents does not negatively affect milk yield, milk composition, and cheese-making features.

  13. Effect of milk pasteurization on lipolysis during ripening of ovine cheese manufactured at different times of the year

    OpenAIRE

    Chávarri, Felisa; Angeles Bustamante, M.; Santisteban, Arantza; Virto, Mailo; Albisu, Marta; Barrón, Luis; De Renobales, Mertxe

    2000-01-01

    International audience; Lipolysis was studied in cheeses manufactured with pasteurized and raw ovine milk with a starter culture added in winter, spring and summer, up to 180 d of ripening. Pasteurized milk cheeses had significantly lower levels of lipolysis than raw milk cheeses in winter after 180 d of ripening and in spring both after 90 and 180 d of ripening. The relative amounts of individual FFA after 180 d of ripening changed from winter to summer, both in pasteurized and in raw milk c...

  14. Phenotypic analysis of cheese yields and nutrient recoveries in the curd of buffalo milk, as measured with an individual model cheese-manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2015-01-01

    Traits associated with cheese yield and milk nutrient recovery in curd are used to describe the efficiency of the cheese-making process. This is fundamental for all dairy species, including the Italian Mediterranean buffalo, which is largely used for milk production aimed at the dairy industry. To assess cheese-making traits among buffalo, a model cheese-manufacturing process was tested; it was capable of processing 24 samples per run, using 0.5-L samples of milk from individual buffalo. In total, 180 buffalo reared in 7 herds located in Northeast Italy were sampled once. Briefly, each sample was weighed and heated (35°C for 30min), inoculated with starter culture (90min), and mixed with rennet (51.2 international milk-clotting units/L of milk). After 10min of gelation, the curd was cut; 5min after the cut, the curd was separated from the whey, and the curd was subjected to draining (for 30min) and pressing (18h). The curd and whey were weighed, analyzed for pH and the total solid, fat, lactose, and protein contents, and subjected to estimation of the energy content. Three measures of cheese yield (%CY), %CYCURD, %CYSOLIDS, and %CYWATER, were computed as the ratios between the weight of the curd, the curd dry matter, and the water retained in the curd, respectively, and the weight of the milk processed. These traits were multiplied by the daily milk yield to define the 3 corresponding measures of daily cheese yield (dCY, kg/d). The milk component recoveries (REC) in the curd, RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, and RECSOLIDS, represented the ratios between the weights of the fat, protein, and total solids in the curd, respectively, and the corresponding components in the milk. Finally, energy recovery (RECENERGY) was estimated. The values for %CYCURD, %CYSOLIDS, %CYWATER, RECPROTEIN, RECFAT, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY averaged 25.6, 12.7, 12.9, 80.4, 95.1, 66.7, and 79.3%, respectively, indicating that buffalo milk has a higher aptitude to cheese-making than bovine milk. The effect

  15. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Arcobacter species in cow milk, water buffalo milk and fresh village cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilmen, Simten; Vural, Aydin; Erkan, Mehmet Emin; Yildirim, Ibrahim Halil

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the presence of Arcobacter spp. was examined in cow milk (n=50), water buffalo (WB) milk (n=50) and fresh village cheese (n=50) samples. The 16S rDNA-RFLP method was used for the identification of Arcobacter spp. The disc diffusion method was used to investigate the susceptibility of all strains identified to 18 different antimicrobial substances. The most commonly isolated Arcobacter species were found to be Arcobacter butzleri (38.89%), Arcobacter cryaerophilus (22.23%) and Arcobacter skirrowii (11.12%) in cow milk; A. cryaerophilus (33.33%), Arcobacter cibarius (20.83%) and A. butzleri (12.50%) in WB milk; and A. skirrowii (28.57%), A. butzleri (21.43%) and A. cryaerophilus (14.29%) in fresh village cheese. This is the first study to identify the presence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis, Arcobacter cloacae, Arcobacter halophilus, Arcobacter bivalviorum and A. cibarius species in analyzed samples. It was found that all of the A. cryaerophilus (n:16) isolates were resistant to cefoperazone, cloxacillin and penicillin G; all of the A. skirrowii (n:12) and A. butzleri (n:10) isolates were resistant to cefoperazone, tetracycline, ampicillin, erythromycin, cloxacillin and penicillin G. It was concluded that cow milk, WB milk and fresh village cheese samples are an important source of Arcobacter species and pose a risk to public health.

  16. Retrospective analysis of a listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in raw milk goat cheese using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhalle, L; Ellouze, M; Yde, M; Clinquart, A; Daube, G; Korsak, N

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, the Belgian authorities reported a Listeria monocytogenes contamination episode in cheese made from raw goat's milk. The presence of an asymptomatic shedder goat in the herd caused this contamination. On the basis of data collected at the time of the episode, a retrospective study was performed using an exposure assessment model covering the production chain from the milking of goats up to delivery of cheese to the market. Predictive microbiology models were used to simulate the growth of L. monocytogenes during the cheese process in relation with temperature, pH, and water activity. The model showed significant growth of L. monocytogenes during chilling and storage of the milk collected the day before the cheese production (median increase of 2.2 log CFU/ml) and during the addition of starter and rennet to milk (median increase of 1.2 log CFU/ml). The L. monocytogenes concentration in the fresh unripened cheese was estimated to be 3.8 log CFU/g (median). This result is consistent with the number of L. monocytogenes in the fresh cheese (3.6 log CFU/g) reported during the cheese contamination episode. A variance-based method sensitivity analysis identified the most important factors impacting the cheese contamination, and a scenario analysis then evaluated several options for risk mitigation. Thus, by using quantitative microbial risk assessment tools, this study provides reliable information to identify and control critical steps in a local production chain of cheese made from raw goat's milk.

  17. RESEARCHES REGARDING THE SOMATIC CELLS NUMBER FROM RAW MILK USED IN TELEMEA CHEESE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRA SULER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that by milk production hygiene must be assure: milk microbiological security, increase the sensorial and nutritive properties, increase term of availability and consumption. The milk hygienic national strategies involved: raw material risk contamination avoiding and reducing as can is possible and the microorganisms destroying or stopping development of those. In this paper it is presented the results of somatic cells number determination by raw milk used in Telemea cheese technological processes within 5 research stations. Determinations were effectuated on 2 series with 57 samples each of them, prelevated in reception phase in summer and winter seasons.

  18. Excretion pattern of aflatoxins in buffalo milk and carry-over in mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gualla

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Some raw materials, used in animal feeding, can be contaminated by aflatoxins (AF. All the mammals that ingest AFB1, excrete small amounts of the hydroxylated metabolite aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 in their milk (Wood 1991. In the case of cow’s milk, the percentage excreted is 1-3% of that ingested (Veldman et al. 1992. AFM1 has been categorised as a class 2B, possible human carcinogen. AFM1 is associated with the protein fraction of milk and hence it is carried-over to cheese and to other milk products (Brackett and Marth, 1982....

  19. Invited review: Microbial evolution in raw-milk, long-ripened cheeses produced using undefined natural whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Monica; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Mucchetti, Germano

    2014-02-01

    The robustness of the starter culture during cheese fermentation is enhanced by the presence of a rich consortium of microbes. Natural starters are consortia of microbes undoubtedly richer than selected starters. Among natural starters, natural whey starters (NWS) are the most common cultures currently used to produce different varieties of cheeses. Undefined NWS are typically used for Italian cooked, long-ripened, extra-hard, raw milk cheeses, such as Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano. Together with raw milk microbiota, NWS are responsible for most cheese characteristics. The microbial ecology of these 2 cheese varieties is based on a complex interaction among starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), which are characterized by their different abilities to grow in a changing substrate. This review aims to summarize the latest findings on Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano to better understand the dynamics of SLAB, which mainly arise from NWS, and NSLAB, which mainly arise from raw milk, and their possible role in determining the characteristics of these cheeses. The review is presented in 4 main sections. The first summarizes the main microbiological and chemical properties of the ripened cheese as determined by cheese-making process variables, as these variables may affect microbial growth. The second describes the microbiota of raw milk as affected by specific milk treatments, from milking to the filling of the cheese milk vat. The third describes the microbiota of NWS, and the fourth reviews the knowledge available on microbial dynamics from curd to ripened cheese. As the dynamics and functionality of complex undefined NWS is one of the most important areas of focus in current food microbiology research, this review may serve as a good starting point for implementing future studies on microbial diversity and functionality of undefined cheese starter cultures.

  20. Ripening-induced changes in microbial groups of artisanal Sicilian goats’ milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Di Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the microbial flora of “Caprino dei Nebrodi”, a raw goat’s milk cheese produced in Sicily, were studied during ripening. From 2 batches of cheese, 4 samples were taken at day 0, 2, 15, and 30 of ripening. Also, samples of curd and milk used in the manufacturing process were analyzed. By the end of the ripening process (day 30, high log10 cfu/g were found for Lactobacilli (7.20, Lattococci (7.10, and Enterococci (7.00, whereas counts of Enterobacteriaceae (3.91, Escherichia coli (3.30, and Staphylococcus (3.89 were found to be lower. The study provides useful information on the microbiological properties of “Caprino dei Nebrodi” cheese, and the results obtained suggest that in order to increase the quality of this artisanal product, it is necessary to improve the sanitary conditions of milking and cheese-making. The study was intended as a preliminary step towards the isolation and identification of bacterial species found in this type of goat’s cheese.

  1. Analysis of dominant lactic acid bacteria from artisanal raw milk cheeses produced on the mountain Stara Planina, Serbia

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    Begovic Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Serbian cheese production has a long history and generates products with rich flavor profiles. To enable the industrial manufacture of these home-made Serbian cheeses, the lactic acid bacteria present in them needs to be characterized. Five fresh white cheeses made from raw cow’s milk without commercial starter cultures were collected from households on the mountain Stara Planina, Serbia. According to phenotypical and molecular analysis, 262 isolated Lwere found to belong to Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc or Enterococcus. The unique bacterial composition of each cheese indicates that the preservation of household industry is the way to maintain production of distinct cheeses.

  2. Physical and processing properties of milk, butter, and cheddar cheese from cows fed supplemental fish meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramis, C A; Wang, H; McBride, B W; Wright, T C; Hill, A R

    2003-08-01

    Physical, chemical, sensory and processing properties of milk produced by feeding a rumen-undegradable fish meal protein supplement to Holstein cows were investigated. The supplement contained (as fed basis) 25% soft-white wheat, 60% herring meal, and 15% feather meal. The total fat level in the milk decreased to 2.43%. For both pasteurized and ultra-high temperature processed drinking milk, no difference was found between fish meal (FM) milk and control milk in terms of color, flavor and flavor stability; in particular, no oxidized flavor was observed. Cheddar cheese made from FM milk ripened faster after 3 mo of ripening and developed a more desirable texture and stronger Cheddar flavor. The yield efficiencies for FM and control cheese, 94.4 (+/- 2.44 SE) and 96.4 (+/- 2.26 SE), respectively, were not different. Relative to controls, average fat globule size was smaller in FM milk and churning time of FM cream was longer. FM butter had softer texture and better cold spreadability, and butter oils from FM enriched milk had lower dropping points compared to control butter oil (average 32.89 versus 34.06 degrees C). These differences in physical properties of butter fat were greater than expected considering that iodine values were not different. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing high quality products from milk naturally supplemented with FM, but the results also show that dietary changes affect processing properties.

  3. Cheesemaking in highland pastures: Milk technological properties, cream, cheese and ricotta yields, milk nutrients recovery, and products composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, M; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Stocco, G; Valorz, C; Bazzoli, I; Sturaro, E; Ramanzin, M; Bittante, G

    2016-12-01

    Summer transhumance of dairy cows to high Alpine pastures is still practiced in many mountainous areas. It is important for many permanent dairy farms because the use of highland pastures increases milk production and high-priced typical local dairy products often boost farm income. As traditional cheese- and ricotta-making procedures in Alpine pastures are central to this dairy system, the objective of this study was to characterize the quality and efficiency of products and their relationships with the quality and availability of grass during the grazing season. The milk from 148 cows from 12 permanent farms reared on a temporary farm located in Alpine pastures was processed every 2wk during the summer (7 cheesemakings from late June to early September). During each processing, 11 dairy products (4 types of milk, 2 by-products, 3 fresh products, and 2 ripened cheeses) were sampled and analyzed. In addition, 8 samples of fresh forage from the pasture used by the cows were collected and analyzed. At the beginning of the pasture season the cows were at 233±90d in milk, 2.4±1.7 parities, and produced 23.6±5.7kg/d of milk. The milk yield decreased with the move from permanent to temporary farms and during the entire summer transhumance, but partly recovered after the cows returned to the permanent farms. Similar trends were observed for the daily yields of fat, protein, casein, lactose, and energy, as we found no large variations in the quality of the milk, with the exception of the first period of Alpine pasture. The somatic cell counts of milk increased during transhumance, but this resulted from a concentration of cells in a lower quantity of milk rather than an increase in the total number of cells ejected daily from the udder. We noted a quadratic trend in availability of forage (fresh and dry matter weight per hectare), with a maximum in late July. The quality of forage also varied during the summer with a worsening of chemical composition. The evening milk

  4. Modelling and predicting growth of psycrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand;

    2015-01-01

    /Bioscreen C model included the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl/aw, lactic, sorbic acid and their interaction (Le Marc et al., 2002). Then, the reference growth rate parameter (μref) was fitted to a total of 35 μmax-values from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Results: The new models were...... temperature storage conditions. Conclusions: The present study developed and validated mathematical models to predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The cottage cheese model can be used to evaluate the effect of product reformulations...... successfully validated, based on bias and accuracy factor, for 59 growth curves of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in dairy products. The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new model for cottage cheese to successfully predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads at both constant and dynamic...

  5. Characterization of Oaxaca raw milk cheese microbiota with particular interest in Lactobacillus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Irma; Mateo, Javier; Sandoval, María H; Soto, Sergio; García-Armesto, María R; Castro, José M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to identify and characterize lactobacilli strains from Mexican Oaxaca cheese. Twenty-seven lactobacilli isolated from Oaxaca cheese were identified at species level by 16S rRNA sequencing. Selected isolates were further characterized by ribotyping. Isolates were screened, among others, by acidifying capacity, antibiotic resistance, and activity against pathogens. Lactobacillus plantarum was predominant in Oaxaca cheese. The intraspecies variability of Lb. plantarum isolates was great. Multiple antibiotic resistances were observed. Eight isolates showed antimicrobial activity against the pathogenic species tested. Four Lb. plantarum strains showing low antibiotic resistance index, antimicrobial activity against enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria innocua stains, amine-negative decarboxylase activity, and resistance to NaCl and bile salt solutions, could be preselected to complete studies focused on designing a culture for use in pasteurized-milk Oaxaca cheese manufacturing.

  6. Mixing sweet cream buttermilk with whole milk to produce cream cheese

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    Bahrami Masoud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Buttermilk is an important by-product of the manufacture of butter. Sweet-cream buttermilk (SCBM is similar in composition to skim milk, except for its high phospholipid and milk fat globular membrane protein content. The main objective of this investigation was to produce optimum quality cream cheese by replacing whole milk with different proportions of SCBM (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50%. Statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences (p < 0.05 between the chemical and organoleptic properties of the samples. As the percentage of SCBM increased, the chemical composition of total solids, fat, protein, fat in dry matter (FDM and ash of cheese milk decreased significantly, leading to a softer, moister curd. Samples prepared with more than 25% SCBM were not acceptable to the taste panel. The cream cheeses prepared using 25% and 30% SCBM had the highest yields. Total solids and FDM were strong predictors of cheese yield (r2 ≈ 0.589. The results also showed that the best range for replacement using SCBM is 20–25%.

  7. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Salmonella serovars in milk and cheese in Mansoura city, Egypt

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    Amira Hussein El-Baz

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The present study confirms the presence of Salmonella in milk and cheese samples in Mansoura, Egypt, indicating that the dairy products can act as potential sources of Salmonella infection. Thus, appropriate hygienic measures are suggestive for combating Salmonellosis in Egypt. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(1.000: 45-51

  8. Factors affecting variation of different measures of cheese yield and milk nutrient recovery from an individual model cheese-manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; De Marchi, M; Bittante, G

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield (CY) is the most important technological trait of milk, because cheese-making uses a very high proportion of the milk produced worldwide. Few studies have been carried out at the level of individual milk-producing animals due to a scarcity of appropriate procedures for model-cheese production, the complexity of cheese-making, and the frequent use of the fat and protein (or casein) contents of milk as a proxy for cheese yield. Here, we report a high-throughput cheese manufacturing process that mimics all phases of cheese-making, uses 1.5-L samples of milk from individual animals, and allows the simultaneous processing of 15 samples per run. Milk samples were heated (35°C for 40 min), inoculated with starter culture (90 min), mixed with rennet (51.2 international milk-clotting units/L of milk), and recorded for gelation time. Curds were cut twice (10 and 15 min after gelation), separated from the whey, drained (for 30 min), pressed (3 times, 20 min each, with the wheel turned each time), salted in brine (for 60 min), weighed, and sampled. Whey was collected, weighed, and sampled. Milk, curd, and whey samples were analyzed for pH, total solids, fat content, and protein content, and energy content was estimated. Three measures of percentage cheese yield (%CY) were calculated: %CY(CURD), %CY(SOLIDS), and %CY(WATER), representing the ratios between the weight of fresh curd, the total solids of the curd, and the water content of the curd, respectively, and the weight of the milk processed. In addition, 3 measures of daily cheese yield (dCY, kg/d) were defined, considering the daily milk yield. Three measures of nutrient recovery (REC) were computed: REC(FAT), REC(PROTEIN), and REC(SOLIDS), which represented the ratio between the weights of the fat, protein, and total solids in the curd, respectively, and the corresponding components in the milk. Energy recovery, REC(ENERGY), represented the energy content of the cheese compared with that in the milk. This

  9. PCR verification of microplate phenotypic system identification for LAB from traditional Western Balkan raw milk cheeses

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    Diana Paveljšek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation and ripening specificity of traditional cheeses are predominantly directed by the natural microbial community present in milk selected by the cheese-making environment and technology. Therefore the traditional cheeses are unique products with specific microbiota biodiversity. There are several approaches for the identification of microbial population, however all of them have certain advantages and disadvantages. In this study the eligibility and performance of the Biolog phenotypic identification system (Biolog, Inc. with GEN III microplates was tested. Parallel to this method, polymerase chain reaction with genus- and species-specific primers was performed. One hundred sixty-five isolates from nine types of artisan cheeses were isolated and analysed. Cheeses were produced from raw ewe’s milk in Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The Biolog phenotypic identification system identified 90 isolates, but only 55 identifications acquired by the Biolog system were supported by polymerase chain reaction at a genus level and 28 at a species level. The obtained results showed that the reliability of commercial phenotypic identification systems was inadequate when analysing lactic acid bacteria isolates from natural, spontaneous fermentations and needs to be additionally corroborated by genotypic identification methods.

  10. Effect of chemical composition of sheep’s milk on the chemical composition of Livno and Travnik cheese

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    Amina Hrković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bosnia and Herzegovina has a centuries-old tradition in the family dairy products, among which 2-3 types of cheeses dominate. Well known dairy products in BiH are indigenous Livno and Travnik cheese, a group of cheeses produced from thermally untreated raw sheep milk. The aim of this study was assessing the effects of certain parameters on the chemical composition of the milk composition of indigenous cheeses - Livno and Travnik. Two manufacturers within two different locations (Livno and Travnik during summer grazing of sheep, were selected for this research. The study included 117sheep (Livno 57 sheep, Travnik 60 sheep. The cheese milk was used for determination of fat, protein and lactose content. Six samples were taken from obtained cheeses: 3 samples of Livno and 3samples of Travnik cheese, which means one for each sampling period. In cheese dry matter content, water, fat, fat in dry matter and acidity (pH were determined, and then correlation between the constituents of milk and cheese ingredients content was set. The most common causes of such phenomenon is non-standard production, storage and ripening. On Travnik area, the content of fat and milk protein varied according to sampling period, which can be attributed to the already mentioned diet and stage of lactation. At the same time the protein content decreased mainly by the end of lactating period. Lactose content has proven to be the most stable parameter of milk. In both investigated cheese samples slightly higher water content was found compared to normal values for these two local cheese, while the proportion of fat and dry matter varied within the sampling period. Variation of certain parameters of the chemical composition of investigated samples of Livno and Travnik cheese, as well as their correlation with parameters of milk is primarily a consequence of changing the chemical composition of milk as the basic raw materials and/or significant variations in technology that could

  11. Occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus on Farms with Small Scale Production of Raw Milk Cheeses in Poland

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    Jolanta G. Rola

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of a 3-year study on the prevalence, enterotoxinogenicity and resistance to antimicrobials of S. aureus isolated on dairy farms with small scale production of raw cow milk cheeses. The samples of raw milk, semi-finished products and the final products as well as swabs were collected between 2011 and 2013 from nine dairy farms in Poland. A total of 244 samples were examined, of which 122 (50.0% were contaminated with S. aureus including 18 of 26 (69.2% mature cheese samples with log10 CFU g−1 between <1- and 7.41. In swabs collected from the staff and production environment the highest contamination rate with coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS was detected on hands of cheese makers (4.34 log10 CFU/swab. None of the cheese samples contaminated with CPS contained staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs. However, 55 of 122 (45.1% S. aureus isolates possessed SEs genes, mainly (26 of 55; 47.3% a combination of the sed, sej and ser genes. Furthermore, the sep (15 of 55; 27.3% as well as seg and sei (9 of 55; 16.4% genes were also identified. The remaining S. aureus isolates possessed the sea gene (one isolate, the combination of sec, seg and sei (three isolates as well as the sed, sej, sep and ser markers together (one CPS. Resistance to penicillin (62 of 122 isolates; 50.8% was the most common among the tested isolates. Some CPS were also resistant to chloramphenicol (7; 5.7% and tetracycline (5; 4.1%. The obtained results indicated that the analyzed cheeses were safe for consumers. To improve the microbiological quality of traditional cheese products more attention should be paid to animal welfare and hygiene practices during the process of cheese manufacturing in some dairy farms.

  12. The evolution of chemical and microbiological properties of fresh goat milk cheese during its shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, F; Battelli, G; De Noni, I

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the changes in chemical and microbiological properties of fresh goat milk cheese stored in an open deck refrigerated display cabinet (6 ± 2°C) or in a dark cold room (4 ± 1°C). The effects of partial-vacuum packaging and fluorescent lighting were studied during the cheese shelf life (45 d) and 15 d after. Storage conditions did not affect the pH values (4.3), whereas a slight decrease in moisture (ca. 1%) and in water activity (cheese packaged in the presence of air and stored in a lighted cabinet. The proteolytic trend was also studied through capillary zone electrophoresis by monitoring the degradation of the main casein fractions and the formation of new peptides. In particular, 2 indices, based on peak area ratio of new-formed peptides and casein fractions were related to cheese age. Lipolysis, measured by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry of volatile fatty acids, was unaffected by air or light and did not proceed through storage. As expected, hexanal formed mainly in cheeses stored under light and packaged in air. Evaluation of sensorial quality, performed using a hedonic scale, showed significantly lower scores of cheeses kept under light compared with those kept in the dark, both at 45 and 60 d storage. Overall, the microbiological and chemical results suggested that the shelf life of soft goat milk cheese would be extended from 45 to 60 d. Such conclusion was supported also by the sensory quality evaluation.

  13. Effect of Raw-Milk Cheese Consumption on the Enterococcal Flora of Human Feces

    OpenAIRE

    Gelsomino, Roberto; Vancanneyt, Marc; Cogan, Timothy M.; Swings, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the major facultative anaerobic bacterial groups that reside in the human gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the composition of the enterococcal fecal flora in three healthy humans was analyzed before, during, and after the daily consumption of ∼125 g of a raw-milk Cheddar-type cheese containing 3.2 × 104 enterococci/g of cheese. Enterococcal counts ranged between 1.4 × 102 and 2.5 × 108 CFU/g of feces and differed from subject to subject and from week to wee...

  14. The quality of Valle del Belice sheep’s milk and cheese produced in the hot summer season in Sicily

    OpenAIRE

    Todaro, M; A. Bonanno; M.L. Scatassa

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In response to the growing consumer demand for fresh cheese in summer, this investigation was aimed to evaluate the chemical and microbiological characteristics of sheep’s milk and cheese produced in Sicily in the hot summer months. A total of 810 bulk milk samples collected from 17 farms rearing ewes of the Valle del Belice breed were analysed for chemical composition, somatic cell count, total bacterial count and clotting parameters. Samples (n = 18) of Protected Des...

  15. The incidence of Listeria spp. in soft cheeses, butter and raw milk in the province of Bologna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, S; Cesaroni, D; Poda, G; Trovatelli, L D

    1990-02-01

    Samples of soft cheese, butter and raw milk were examined for Listeria species. Listeria monocytogenes (serotype 1, haemolytic and virulent for mice) and L. innocua (the only other Listeria sp. isolated) were each found in 2/21 (1.6%) of soft cheese samples. Five per cent of butter samples were contaminated with L. innocua. No Listeria spp. were detected in 40 raw milk samples. The results were compared with similar studies in Italy and abroad.

  16. Outgrowth inhibition of Clostridium beijerinckii spores by a bacteriocin-producing lactic culture in ovine milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sonia; Avila, Marta; Arias, Ramón; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2011-10-17

    In the manufacture of model cheeses, ovine milk was deliberately contaminated with spores of Clostridium beijerinckii INIA 63, a wild isolate from Manchego cheese with late blowing defect, and inoculated with nisin- and lacticin 481-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 as starter, to test its potential to prevent the late blowing defect, or with L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415-2, a spontaneous mutant not producing bacteriocins. Cheeses made individually with the lactococcal strains, without clostridial spores, served as controls. Cheese made with clostridial spores and L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415-2 showed late blowing defect after 120days of ripening. Spoilt cheese also showed lower concentrations of lactic acid, and higher levels of acetic, propionic and butyric acids, and of other volatile compounds such as 2-propanol and 1-butanol, than control cheese. In addition, cheese made with the bacteriocin producer did not show any late blowing symptoms, despite its spore counts similar to those of blown cheese, pointing to outgrowth inhibition of C. beijerinckii spores by bacteriocins. Besides, cheese made with the bacteriocin producer showed similar concentrations of lactic acid and volatile compounds than control cheese. Inclusion of L. lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 in starter cultures seems a feasible method to prevent late blowing defect in cheese without altering its sensory characteristics.

  17. Analysis of the lactic acid bacteria microflora in traditional Caucasus cow's milk cheeses

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    Terzić-Vidojević Amarela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 157 lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from three hand-made cheeses taken from different households in the region of the Caucasus Mountains. The cheeses were manufactured from cow's milk without the addition of a starter culture. The isolates of LAB were characterized by subjecting them to phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results of identification of LAB indicate that the examined cheeses contained 10 species, viz., Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum, Lactobacillus arizonensis, Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis. The strains within the species L. plantarum, L. arizonensis, L. paraplantarum, L. farciminis, and L. pseudomesenteroides showed good proteolytic activity.

  18. Prevalence and pathogenic potential of Escherichia coli isolates from raw milk and raw milk cheese in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombarak, Rabee A; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Iguchi, Atsushi; Shima, Ayaka; Elbagory, Abdel-Rahman M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2016-03-16

    The objectives of this study were to investigate prevalence and pathogenic potential of Escherichia coli contaminating raw milk and its products in Egypt. Out of 187 dairy products including 72 raw milk samples, 55 Karish cheese and 60 Ras cheese, 222 E. coli isolates including 111, 89 and 22 were obtained from 55 raw milk samples (76.4%), 41 Karish cheese (74.5%), and 13 Ras cheese (21.7%), respectively. Isolated E. coli strains were examined for 24 representative virulence genes present in diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Among DEC and ExPEC virulence factors, genes for enteropathogenic E. coli (eaeA, bfpA, EAF), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (stx1, stx2, eaeA), enterotoxigenic E. coli (elt, est), enteroinvasive E. coli (invE), enteroaggregative E. coli (Eagg, astA), diffusely adherent E. coli (daaD), ExPEC (cdt-I to cdt-V, cnf1, cnf2, hlyA) and putative adhesins (efa1, iha, ehaA, saa, and lpfAO113) were screened by colony hybridization assay. Out of 222 E. coli strains, 104 (46.8%) isolated from 69 (36.9%) samples carried one or more virulence genes. The most prevalent gene detected was lpfAO113 (40.5%), followed by ehaA (32.4%,), astA (3.15%,), iha (1.80%), hlyA (1.35%), stx1 (0.90%), stx2 (0.90%), eaeA (0.45%), cdt-III (0.45%) and cnf2 (0.45%). Two strains isolated from Karish cheese harbored 5 virulence genes (stx1, stx2, iha, ehaA, lpfAO113). Stx subtype was determined to be stx1 (not stx1c or stx1d) and stx2d. Indeed, expression of hemolysin A, CDT-III, CNF-II, Stx1 and Stx2d was confirmed by blood agar plate, cytotoxicity assay and Western blotting, respectively. Among the 222 E. coli strains, 54 (48.6%), 38 (42.6%) and 12 (54.7%) isolated from raw milk, Karish cheese and Ras cheese were potentially virulent, respectively. O-genotyping indicated that most of the potentially virulent E. coli isolates did not belong to clinically important O serogroups except O75, O91 and O166, which have been associated with human

  19. Optimization of modified Middlebrook 7H11 agar for isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from raw milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgrave, R; Donaghy, J A; Fisher, A; Rowe, M T

    2014-10-01

    Reports have highlighted the absence of contemporary peer reviewed publications pertaining to Mycobacterium bovis culture from raw milk and cheese. By replicating traditional methods, cheese-making methodology and equipment were devised to produce Cheddar (n = 6) and Caerphilly (n = 3) artificially contaminated with M. bovis (three genotypes) under stringent laboratory-containment guidelines for handling hazardous microbiological material. Middlebrook 7H11, modified for M. bovis isolation, was assessed for capacity to enumerate M. bovis despite changing cheese microflora and prolonged M. bovis exposure to the cheese matrix using maturing cheese test portions (n = 63; up to 16 weeks). Malachite green (MG) containing media isolated M. bovis at significantly (P cheese types, Cheddar and Caerphilly. Significance and impact of the study: Following increased M. bovis infection of UK cattle, the risk posed to consumers from consumption of unpasteurized milk and dairy products has changed. Furthermore, published methods for the culture and molecular detection of M. bovis in raw milk products are limited. Cheese-making protocols and M. bovis culture media reported here provide tools for further investigation of M. bovis survival during all stages of cheese manufacture and could inform future assessment of the risk to consumers from M. bovis contamination of unpasteurized dairy products.

  20. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Gkogka, Elissavet;

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth...... rate model was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter μref25°C-broth of 1.031/h was calibrated by fitting the model to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. This resulted in a μref25°C-cottage cheese value of 0.621/h...... with cultured cream dressing and in non-heated milk (n=26) resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1.43 (μref25°C-cottage cheese). Lag phase models were developed by using relative lag times and data from both the present study and from literature. The acceptable simulation zone method showed the developed models...

  1. Nitrogen matter changes during ripening of semihard cheese based on milk protein coaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Jovanović

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cheeses made on milk protein coaggregate basis are different thantraditionally made cheeses, in technological production process and sensory characteristics, especially texture and taste. In this research it was assumed that applied milk thermal treatment, as well as curd processing, will have appropriate influence on proteins as substratum. During ripening, due to a presence of whey proteins, which influence decrease of casein content in total cheese proteins, substratum is hydrolyzed. In traditionally made cheeses, casein is the basis of protein matrix. In comparison to whey proteins, casein is substantially faster changed during ripening, while whey proteins incorporated in the curd give so called «unspecific» ripening. Besides, application of high temperatures influences decrease of plasmin activity in cheese, regardless of its significant thermal stability. During 4 months ofexperimental cheeses ripening, changes of nitrogen matter were investigated. Significant changes of milk proteins, such as increase of soluble nitrogen matter content, the primary and secondary nitrogen products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening, as well as non-protein nitrogen (12 % TCA and phospho-tungstic-soluble nitrogen (5 % PTA were observed. The average content of soluble nitrogen after production after 15, 30, 60 and 120 days of ripening were: 135.48 mg %, 358.72 mg %, 473.52 mg %, 672.32 mg % and 845.13 mg %,respectively. According to soluble nitrogen content increase, coefficient of ripening also increased and for the same ripening period was: 4.42 %, 10.14 %, 12.95 %, 18.21 % and 23.60 %, respectively. Content of primary and secondary products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening had significant rising trend from the first day of production to 120th day of ripening. At the end of investigated ripening period, content of primary products of protein decomposition was 4.90 times higher compared to the first day of ripening, while content of

  2. High-pressure homogenization of raw and pasteurized milk modifies the yield, composition, and texture of queso fresco cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, D; Clark, S; Ganesan, V; Repiso, L; Waller, J; Harte, F

    2011-03-01

    High-pressure homogenization (HPH) of milk was studied as an alternative processing operation in the manufacturing of queso fresco cheese. Raw and pasteurized (65°C for 30 min) milks were subjected to HPH at 0, 100, 200, and 300 MPa and then used to manufacture queso fresco. The cheeses were evaluated for yield, moisture content, titratable acidity, nitrogen content, whey protein content, yield force, yield strain, and tactile texture by instrumental or trained panel analyses. The combination of HPH and thermal processing of milk resulted in cheeses with increased yield and moisture content. The net amount of protein transferred to the cheese per kilogram of milk remained constant for all treatments except raw milk processed at 300 MPa. The highest cheese yield, moisture content, and crumbliness were obtained for thermally processed milk subjected to HPH at 300 MPa. The principal component analysis of all measured variables showed that the variables yield, moisture content, and crumbliness were strongly correlated to each other and negatively correlated to the variables yield strain, protein content (wet basis), and sensory cohesiveness. It is suggested that the combination of thermal processing and HPH promotes thermally induced denaturation of whey protein, together with homogenization-induced dissociation of casein micelles. The combined effect results in queso fresco containing a thin casein-whey matrix that is able to better retain sweet whey. These results indicate that HPH has a strong potential for the manufacture of queso fresco with excellent yield and textural properties.

  3. Influence of milk centrifugation, brining and ripening conditions in preventing gas formation by Clostridium spp. in Gouda cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y C; Ingham, S C

    2000-03-25

    This study examined milk centrifugation, increased salt concentration, and low ripening temperature as potential strategies to prevent late blowing caused by gas-forming Clostridium spp. in Gouda cheese. The survival of clostridia spores in cheese brine and their ability to enter Gouda cheese during brining was also evaluated. Centrifugation (3000 x g for 30 s) of contaminated milk resulted in > 60% spore reduction, with increased spore reduction at greater centrifugal forces. Low levels of C. tyrobutyricum and C. sporogenes spores survived in saturated (23%, w/v) brine with 2% (v/v) added whey at 15 degrees C for 63 days, while C. beijerinckii and C. butyricum spores were not detectable on days 4 and 35, respectively. Spores of C. tyrobutyricum in brine infiltrated Gouda cheese during 2 h of brining at 13 degrees C resulted in production of small gas holes during ripening. In Gouda cheese slurry stored at 13 degrees C, three C. tyrobutyricum strains plus one of three C. sporogenes strains germinated in the slurry with no added salt. Of three C. tyrobutyricum strains stored at 13 degrees C in slurries with higher water-phase salt concentrations of 2.4 and 3.6%, two strains and one strain germinated, respectively. No germination of spores was detected in any cheese slurry stored at 5 or 8 degrees C. Milk centrifugation, increased percent water-phase salt, absence of spores in brine, and decreased ripening temperature are all potentially important measures against gas production by Clostridium spp. in Gouda cheese.

  4. Low-fat Gouda cheese made from bovine milk-olive oil emulsion: physicochemical and sensory attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfoul, Imène; Bornaz, Salwa; Baccouche, Aroua; Sahli, Ali; Attia, Hamadi

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the effect of milk-fat replacement on Gouda cheeses composition, lipolysis and sensory characteristics. A Gouda cheese-like product was prepared from the substitution of milk fat with emulsified olive oil. For comparison, the low-fat variant without fat replacers and the full-fat cheese were also studied. Milk samples are initially pasteurized at 72 °C for 3 s, cooled to 35 °C, and added with 0.016 g L(-1) of lactic ferments and 0.30 mL L(-1) of microbial rennet. Total solids content was lower in cheeses containing fat replacers than in full and low-fat control cheeses due to the higher water-binding capacity of fat replacers. Free fatty acids rates were the highest in the case of reduced fat cheese-like product. The full-fat cheese showed a significantly higher overall impression score than all low-fat products.

  5. Effect of dairy calcium from cheese and milk on fecal fat excretion, blood lipids, and appetite in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Vejrum; Thorning, Tanja K; Astrup, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium from different dairy sources might affect blood lipids and fecal fat excretion differently because of differences in the food matrix and nutritional composition. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether milk- and cheese-based diets with similar calcium contents affect a saturated...... with the control diet, milk- and cheese-based diets attenuated saturated fatty acid-induced increases in total and LDL cholesterol and resulted in increased fecal fat excretion; however, effects of milk and cheese did not differ. Because the diets contained similar amounts of saturated fat, similar increases...... fatty acid-induced increase in blood lipids differently. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy, young men participated in a randomized 3 × 2-wk crossover study in which the following 3 isocaloric diets that were similar in fat contents and compositions were compared: control diet [nondairy diet (~500 mg Ca/d)], milk...

  6. Behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 during the cheese making of traditional raw-milk cheeses from Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cosciani-Cunico

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 was studied during the manufacture and ripening of two traditional Italian Alps cheeses. Each cheese type was manufactured in a pilot plan from raw cow milk (without the addition of starter cultures artificially inoculated with L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 to a final concentration of about 4 log CFU/mL. The pathogens were enumerated throughout the cheese making and ripening processes to study their behaviour. When the milk was inoculated with 4 Log CFU/mL, the pathogens counts increased in the first time during the manufacturing process and then remained constant, until the end of ripening, or decreased significantly. Results indicate that the environment and nature of food borne pathogens affected the concentration of the bacteria during the manufacturing and ripening process. Thus, the presence of low cells numbers of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 in milk destined for the production of raw milk cheeses characterized by a cooking of the curd less than 48°C can constitute a hazard for the consumer.

  7. MICROSTRUCTURE AND TEXTURE OF PANELA TYPE CHEESE-LIKE PRODUCTS: USE OF LOW METHOXYL PECTIN AND CANOLA OIL AS MILK-FAT SUBSTITUTES

    OpenAIRE

    C. Lobato-Calleros; L. Ramos-Solís; A. Santos-Moreno; M. E. Rodríguez-Huezo

    2006-01-01

    Three Panela type white fresh cheese-like products (PCLP) were prepared using skim milk incorporated with 6.8 g L- 1 of emulsified canola oil (CO) and different concentrations of low methoxyl pectin (P): 0, 1.25 and 2.5 g L-1. In addition, full-milk fat (FFC) and low-milk fat (LFC) Panela type cheeses were manufactured from milk containing 27 and 6.8 g L-1 of milk-fat (MF), respectively. After 72 h of storage (4 ºC), the cheese systems were subjected to proximal chemical analysis, instrumenta...

  8. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria in two Flemish artisan raw milk Gouda-type cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorde, Koenraad; Verstraete, Tine; Vandamme, Peter; Huys, Geert

    2008-10-01

    PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to study the diversity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in two Flemish artisan raw milk Gouda-type cheeses. In parallel, conventional culturing was performed. Isolates were identified using (GTG)(5)-PCR and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and pheS genes. Discriminant analysis revealed some differences in overall LAB diversity between the two batches and between the two cheeses. Within each batch, the diversity of 8- and 12-week-old cheeses was relatively similar. Conventional isolation mainly revealed the presence of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Pediococcus pentosaceus. PCR-DGGE revealed the presence of three species of which no isolates were recovered, i.e. Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus parabuchneri and Lactobacillus gallinarum. Conversely, not all isolated bacteria were detected by PCR-DGGE. We recommend the integrated use of culture-dependent and -independent approaches to maximally encompass the taxonomic spectrum of LAB occurring in Gouda-type and other cheeses.

  9. Effect of feeding management and seasonal variation on fatty acid composition of Mexican soft raw goats’ milk cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pérez-Gíl Romo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feeding management and seasonal variation (summer and winter 2007 on fatty acid composition of Mexican soft raw goats’ milk cheese. Four groups were formed. During the summer, group A grazed on a natural semiarid rangeland. group B was kept in confinement, fed with concentrate grains and lucerne hay. Through the winter group C grazed on the same rangeland with supplementation and group D was fed as the group B. Thereafter, four kinds of cheeses were manufactured from milk of each animal group: grazed-summer (GS, indoor- summer (IS, grazed-winter (GW and indoor-winter (IW. Results of this study indicated that fat content in cheese was affected by season. Moreover, during the summer period, pasture-based regime increased monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations; however, winter season could diminish the cheese desirable fatty acid profile.

  10. BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA AND PREPARATION OF CAMEL MILK CHEESE BY USING STARTER CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ahmed and R. Kanwal

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from camel milk by culturing the milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub-culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram’s staining and identified by different biochemical tests. Camel milk contained lactic acid producing bacteria like Streptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus. L. acidophilus grew more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth was supported by camel milk. Ability of each strain was tested to convert lactose of milk into lactic acid. It was observed that 66% lactose was converted by S. lactis 20, whereas S. cremoris 22 and L. acidophilus 23 converted 56 and 74% lactose into lactic acid, respectively. Effect of freeze-drying was also recorded and the results showed that in all cases there was a slight decrease in the cell count before and after the freeze-drying. The decrease was approximately 0.47, 0.078 and 0.86% for S. lactis 20, S. cremoris 22 and L. acidophilus 23, respectively. Starter culture was prepared from strains isolated from camel milk. Camel and buffalo milk cheese was prepared by using starter culture. The strains isolated from camel milk were best for acid production and coagulated the milk in less time. It is concluded that cheese can be prepared successfully from camel milk and better results can be obtained by coagulating milk with starter culture.

  11. High-pressure processing of a raw milk cheese improved its food safety maintaining the sensory quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Francisco José; Delgado, Jonathan; González-Crespo, José; Cava, Ramón; Ramírez, Rosario

    2013-12-01

    The effect of high-pressure treatment (400 or 600 MPa for 7 min) on microbiology, proteolysis, texture and sensory parameters was investigated in a mature raw goat milk cheese. At day 60 of analysis, Mesophilic aerobic, Enterobacteriaceae, lactic acid bacteria and Listeria spp. were inactivated after high-pressure treatment at 400 or 600 MPa. At day 90, mesophilic aerobic, lactic acid bacteria and Micrococacceae counts were significantly lower in high-pressure-treated cheeses than in control ones. In general, nitrogen fractions were significantly modified after high-pressure treatment on day 60 at 600 MPa compared with control cheeses, but this effect was not found in cheeses after 30 days of storage (day 90). On the other hand, high-pressure treatment caused a significant increase of some texture parameters. However, sensory analysis showed that neither trained panellists nor consumers found significant differences between control and high-pressure-treated cheeses.

  12. Changes in water binding during ripening of cheeses made from raw, pasteurized or high-pressure-treated goat milk

    OpenAIRE

    Buffa, Martín; Guamis, Buenaventura; Saldo, Jordi; Trujillo, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    International audience; The different types of water contained in the matrix of cheeses made from raw (RA), pasteurized (PA; 72 °C, 15 s) or pressure-treated (PR; 500 MPa, 15 min, 20 °C) goat milk were studied throughout ripening. Water content was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by thermogravimetry. Thermogravimetric curves showed that water is lost in two successive steps (W$_1$ and W$_2$), depending on the temperature required for water to leave the cheese network. Although water...

  13. Cheese making aptitude and the chemical and nutritional characteristics of milk from Massese ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Salari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of season, locality and the different altitudes at which farms are located, on the physico-chemical composition, morphometric characteristics of fat globules, fatty acid composition and cheese making aptitude of milk of Massese ewe’s raised in 11 flocks from two provinces of north-west Tuscany (Massa Carrara and Lucca. The winter lactation shows higher percentages of casein, lactose and not fat dry matter (P≤0.01; curd firming time (k20 is significantly lower and there is a greater curd firmness (a30 (P≤0.01; while in the summer there is a higher percentage of lipids (P≤0.01. The effect of the season significantly influences (P≤0.01 the size of the fat globules and impacted significantly on the fatty acids composition of the milk. In the hills the milk has a higher percentage of dry matter, protein, casein, fat, phosphorous and not fat dry matter (P≤0.01, whereas it has a lower percentage of lactose and calcium (P≤0.05. The Somatic Cell Count (SCC and the Total Bacterial Count (TBC are statistically greater on the plains (P≤0.01, while milk produced in the hills shows higher quantity of α-linolenic acid and lower saturated fatty acids (P≤0.05. In the two typical rearing areas for Massese ewes we found differences amongst dry matter, fat, phosphorous and SCC, higher (P≤0.01 in the province of Massa Carrara that also had the best rheological parameters, but we found the highest cheese yield (P≤0.05 in the province of Lucca where there are also the greatest weight loss (P≤0.01. The milks produced in the winter season and in hilly areas present the best physico-chemical and nutritional characteristics. However, we found that the technological side should be improved by diversifying cheese-making techniques in relation to the characteristics of milk. In fact, currently these techniques do not fully exploit the potential to transform those milks with the best qualitative

  14. Comparison of FT-NIR Spectroscopy and ELISA for Detection of Adulteration of Goat Cheeses with Cow's Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Lukas; Mlcek, Jiri; Sustova, Kvetoslava

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of two methods to detect adulteration of goat cheeses via the addition of cow's milk, with a negligible effect on the raw materials. Cheeses were produced from a mixture of goat's and cow's milk and were then analyzed by Fourier transform near-IR (FT-NIR) spectroscopy and competitive ELISA. The cheese spectra were scanned in the spectroscope in reflectance mode on an integrating sphere at 80 scans and a resolution of 4 cm(-1). The spectra were evaluated via discriminant analysis, and a calibration was created via a partial least-squares algorithm to quantify the cow's milk admixture. A correlation coefficient of R = 0.999 was reached with a standard error of calibration of 0.0407. The results were statistically processed to a median value via a t-test. Adulteration detection by the ELISA method was performed using a commercial Milk Fraud/Bovine ELISA kit. It was found that the FT-NIR spectroscopy method is capable of detecting an admixture of cow's milk in goat cheese as small as 1%. The ELISA method did not return satisfactory results for the detection of adulteration with cow's milk.

  15. Volatile compounds of Domiati cheese made from buffaloe's milk with different fat content.

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    El-Mageed, Magda A. Abd

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Buffaloe's milk was manufactured to Domiati cheese with different fat content in the cheese milk (1%, 3.5% and 7%. Results obtained during the ripening period revealed that the low fat cheese (Karish is not able to long period storage, while half cream cheese had a good quality and flavour along the ripening period. The full cream cheese did not exceed the first month of ripening, then it deteriorated. The main components found were acrolein (propenal, heptanal, acetone, butan-2 one, ethanol, butan-2 ol, 2-methylpropan- 1-ol, 3-methyl butan-1-ol, ethyl propionate, propyl propionate, pentane and octane. Methyl mercaptan, methyl thiopropionate, and dimethyl trisulfide together with propyl butyrate, were existed in the samples which are characterized as bad cheese samples. Most of the previous compounds were developed after 1 month of ripening period.

    La leche de búfalo fue procesada para obtener queso Domiati con diferente contenido graso en la cuajada (1%, 3.5% y 7%. Los resultados obtenidos durante el período de maduración revelaron que el queso con bajo contenido en grasa (Karish no permite un largo período de almacenamiento, mientras que el queso con un contenido medio en grasa tuvo una buena calidad y flavor durante el período de maduración. El queso con alto contenido graso no duró más que el primer mes de maduración, deteriorándose posteriormente. Los principales componentes encontrados fueron acroleína (propenal, heptanal, acetona, butan-2-ona, etanol, butan-2-ol, 2- metil-propan-1-ol, 3 metil butan-1-ol, propionato de etilo, propionate de propilo, pentano y octano. Metil mercaptol, tiopropionato de metilo y trisulfuro de dimetilo Junto con butirato de propilo se encontraron en muestras que fueron caracterizadas como muestras de quesos malos. La mayoría de los compuestos anteriores se produjeron después de un mes de período de maduración.

  16. Effects of ultra-high pressure homogenization on the cheese-making properties of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, A; Ferragut, V; Jaramillo, P D; Guamis, B; Trujillo, A J

    2007-01-01

    The effects of single- or 2-stage ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH; 100 to 330 MPa) at an inlet temperature of 30 degrees C on the cheese-making properties of bovine milk were investigated. Effects were compared with those from raw, heat-pasteurized (72 degrees C for 15 s), and conventional homogenized-pasteurized (15 + 3 MPa, 72 degrees C for 15 s) treatments. Rennet coagulation time, rate of curd firming, curd firmness, wet yield, and moisture content of curds were assessed. Results of particle size and distribution of milk, whey composition, and gel microstructure observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy were analyzed to understand the effect of UHPH. Single-stage UHPH at 200 and 300 MPa enhanced rennet coagulation properties. However, these properties were negatively affected by the use of the UHPH secondary stage. Increasing the pressure led to higher yields and moisture content of curds. The improvement in the cheese-making properties of milk by UHPH could be explained by changes to the protein-fat structures due to the combined effect of heat and homogenization.

  17. Effect of mesophilic lactobacilli and enterococci adjunct cultures on the final characteristics of a microfiltered milk Swiss-type cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Yvette; Buchin, Solange; Duboz, Gabriel; Pochet, Sylvie; Beuvier, Eric

    2009-04-01

    The effect of four associations of adjunct cultures composed of mesophilic lactobacilli and enterococci, either solely or combined, on the microbiological, biochemical and sensory characteristics of Swiss-type cheese made using microfiltered cows' milk and supplemented with propionibacteria was studied. The global pattern of growth was similar to that generally observed in raw milk cheese and interactions between microflora were highlighted during ripening. Enterococci, which negatively affected the survival of streptococci starters, seemed to play a limited role in the formation of volatile compounds, probably due to their low levels throughout ripening. On the contrary, mesophilic lactobacilli, which affected the evolution of propionibacteria, enterococci and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis starter counts, modified free amino acid content, production of volatile compounds and organoleptic properties of mature cheese. This population appeared to be of major importance in the formation of cheese flavor as it was positively related to numerous potential flavor compounds such as alcohols and their corresponding esters, acetaldehyde and 4-methyl-4-heptanone. The original mesophilic lactobacilli present in milk could play an important role in the sensorial diversity of raw milk Swiss-type cheeses such as Comte.

  18. Changes in terpenoid composition of milk and cheese from commercial sheep flocks associated with seasonal feeding regimens throughout lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivielso, Izaskun; de Renobales, Mertxe; Aldai, Noelia; Barron, Luis Javier R

    2017-01-01

    Changes in the terpenoid content of milk and cheese from commercial sheep flocks monitored throughout lactation in the Cantabrian area of northern Spain were investigated. The flocks followed the same seasonal feeding strategy during lactation: indoor feeding in winter (early lactation) based on concentrate and forage; part-time grazing in the valley in early spring (mid lactation); and from mid spring on (late lactation), flocks were managed under extensive mountain grazing. In the present study design, seasonal feeding and lactation stage were intrinsically linked and could not be considered in isolation, and a holistic approach was necessary to consider the whole production management of the commercial flocks studied. Furthermore, the study focused on the identification of sesquiterpenoid ratios to differentiate milks and cheeses produced under extensive mountain grazing from those produced under other seasonal feeding regimens. Total abundance of mono- and sesquiterpenoids and that of individual compounds such as α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, α-amorphene, and γ-cadinene significantly increased in milk and cheese from indoor feeding to mountain extensive grazing. Sesquiterpenoid ratios such as γ-cadinene/α-muurolene, γ-cadinene/δ-cadinene, β-caryophyllene/α-muurolene, and (β-caryophyllene + γ-cadinene)/α-muurolene were used to differentiate mountain milks and cheeses from those from indoor feeding and part-time grazing in the valley. Multivariate discriminant analysis applied to individual terpenoids and sesquiterpenoid ratios showed milk and cheese samples classified into 2 groups: samples from indoor feeding and part-time grazing in the valley were classified together, and clearly separated from mountain milks and cheeses. The results of the present study showed that the sesquiterpenoid ratios approach could help to differentiate mountain dairy products from others obtained under other specific feeding regimens in a local environment.

  19. Effect of flaxseed supplementation rate and processing on the production, fatty acid profile, and texture of milk, butter, and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeffner, S P; Qu, Y; Just, J; Quezada, N; Ramsing, E; Keller, M; Cherian, G; Goddick, L; Bobe, G

    2013-02-01

    Health and nutrition professionals advise consumers to limit consumption of saturated fatty acids and increase the consumption of foods rich in n-3 fatty acids. Researchers have previously reported that feeding extruded flaxseed, which is high in C18:3n-3, improves the fatty acid profile of milk and dairy products to less saturated fatty acids and to more C18:3n-3. Fat concentrations in milk and butter decreased when cows were fed higher concentrations of extruded flaxseed. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal rate of flaxseed supplementation for improving the fatty acid profile without decreasing production characteristics of milk and dairy products. By using a double 5 × 5 Latin square design, 10 mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows were fed extruded (0, 0.91, 1.81, and 2.72 kg/d) and ground (1.81 kg/d) flaxseed as a top dressing for 2-wk periods each. At the end of each 2-wk treatment period, milk and serum samples were taken. Milk was subsequently manufactured into butter and fresh Mozzarella cheese. Increasing supplementation rates of extruded flaxseed improved the fatty acid profile of milk, butter, and cheese gradually to less saturated and atherogenic fatty acids and to more C18:3n-3 by increasing concentrations of C18:3n-3 in serum. The less saturated fatty acid profile was associated with decreased hardness and adhesiveness of refrigerated butter, which likely cause improved spreadability. Supplementation rates of extruded flaxseed did not affect dry matter intake of the total mixed ration, milk composition, and production of milk, butter, or cheese. Flaxseed processing did not affect production, fatty acid profile of milk, or texture of butter and cheese. Feeding up to 2.72 kg/d of extruded flaxseed to mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows may improve nutritional and functional properties of milk fat without compromising production parameters.

  20. Ability of 3 tanniferous forage legumes to modify quality of milk and Gruyère-type cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, M; Dohme-Meier, F; Wechsler, D; Goy, D; Kreuzer, M; Bee, G

    2016-01-01

    Condensed tannins (CT) may affect ruminal biohydrogenation of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids. A feeding experiment was conducted with 24 Holstein cows to evaluate whether diets containing CT from different forage legumes can increase polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially n-3 fatty acid content in milk and cheese, without affecting negatively their physicochemical and sensorial properties. Cows were assigned to 4 treatment groups (n=6) for 52 d, divided into 2 periods: a control period (CoP) and an experimental period (ExP). During the CoP, cows received a basal diet composed of hay, corn silage, ExtruLin (Trinova Handel & Marketing AG, Wangen, Switzerland), concentrate, and alfalfa (AF) in a ratio of 45:25:5:7:18. In the ExP, in 3 of the 4 groups AF was replaced by either sainfoin (SF; 19% CT in dry matter) or 1 of 2 cultivars of birdsfoot trefoil [Polom (BP), 3% CT; Bull (BB), 5% CT]. At the end of each period, milk was collected on 3 consecutive days and analyzed for milk gross composition and fatty acid profile and was processed to Gruyère-type cheese. A trained panel assessed the sensory quality of raw milk and cheese using discriminative and descriptive tests. This experimental design consisting of AF in both the CoP and ExP allowed us to quantify effects due to lactation stage and experimental diets. In both the CoP and ExP, dry matter intake and milk yield did not differ among treatment groups. From the CoP to the ExP, milk urea content was reduced by 23% with SF, remained unchanged with BP, and tended to increase with AF and BB. The odor of the raw BB milk was judged to be different from AF milk. With SF, switching from the CoP to the ExP resulted in a 17% increase of the 18:3n-3 proportion in milk and cheese lipids. In BP cheese, the increase was 3%, whereas it tended to decrease in BB cheese. Additionally, the 20:5n-3 and 22:5n-3 proportions tended to increase in SF cheese from the CoP to the ExP. Compared with the AF cheeses, cheeses from cows

  1. Production of farmstead lactose-free Pecorino di Osilo and ricotta cheeses from sheep’s milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Pulinas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work was aimed to define and validate farmstead production of lactose- free Pecorino di Osilo cheese, fresh ricotta cheese, and salted and smoked ricotta cheese (Ricotta mustia. The enzymatic activity of the commercial preparation containing lactase (1.1 g/mL, preliminarily tested using a spectrophotometric titration, showed activity equal to 4950±40 neutral lactase unit/g. The amount of lactase required to obtain the lactose-free milk was then established in triplicate laboratory trials, by adding the enzyme at concentrations of 0.7, 0.9 and 1.1 g/L in flasks containing 160 mL of raw sheep’s milk. Samples were incubated under conditions expected during milk storage and cheese-making. The residual lactose content in milk was determined by enzymatic method. The addition of lactase at concentration of 1.1 g/L of milk reduced the lactose concentration below the limit of detection (LOD of 0.06 g/L. The procedure was validated at a dairy farm, using three different batches of bulk raw sheep’s lactose-free milk that were transformed into Pecorino di Osilo cheese. The resulting whey was used to produce fresh ricotta and Ricotta mustia cheese. Raw milk and whey samples were always below lactose detection limit. The residual lactose was measured in Pecorino di Osilo cheese, after 24 hours and 30 days from production; in fresh ricotta cheese, after 48 hours; in Ricotta mustia cheese after 7 days. The determination of lactose content in cheese samples was conducted by a gas chromatography- flame ionization detection method, which showed a LOD and limit of quantification respectively of 1.8 and 5.6 mg/kg for cheese, and 1.35 and 4.2 mg/kg for both ricotta cheeses. The lactose concentration was always below the relevant LOD values in all samples. The mean concentration of galactose and glucose were respectively 13,000±2000 and 11,000±2000 mg/kg in fresh Pecorino di Osilo, 1100±300 and 1200±300 mg/kg in fresh ricotta, and 950±400 and 750

  2. Buffalo milk and cheese from animal to human nutrition. Part 2: tracing parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pizzoferrato

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Specific tracing parameters, also useful as quality indicators, have been utilized to evaluate if quality changes occur, due to farm, cheese production, and environmental variables, in milk and Mozzarella di Bufala Campana PDO samples of commercial and experimental origin. In particular, observing the 13 cis retinol levels it is interesting to note that, even if nutritional quality is comparable for all the studied products (see also Part 1, the analyzed experimental products seem to be handled with slightly less care than commercial products.

  3. RESEARCHES REGARDING THE MICROBIOLOGIC PARAMETERS VALUE FROM RAW MILK USED IN TELEMEA CHEESE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRA SULER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An important faze for food quality control is verification of microbiological parameters of food products. In this way is assuring the prevention of alimentation toxicological infections to consumer, avoiding the technological and economical losses as well as increasing the products conservation period. In this paper are presents the microbiological exam results from raw milk used in Telemea cheese technological process, for 5 stations studied. The determinations were made on 2 series with 57 samples each of them, prelevated in reception fase, in summer and winter season.

  4. 21 CFR 133.124 - Cold-pack cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... milkfat, dehydrated cream, skim milk cheese for manufacturing, and albumin from cheese whey. All optional... made from pasteurized milk, or are held for not less than 60 days at a temperature of not less than 35..., neufchatel cheese, cottage cheese, creamed cottage cheese, cook cheese, and skim-milk cheese...

  5. TITLE OF MANUSCRIPT IMPORTANT GROUPS OF MICROORGANISMS IN RAW GOAT MILK AND FRESH GOAT CHEESES DETERMINED DURING LACTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Kalhotka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The total counts of microorganisms, coliform bacteria, psychrotrophic microorganisms, lactic acid bacteria, enterococci and many others are ranked among the important groups of microorganisms affecting the quality of milk and cheese. In the samples of raw goat milk (farms breeding I and II collected within 24 h (morning milking - a, afternoon milking - b and fresh goat cheese, these groups of microorganisms were determined by standard methods: the total counts of microorganisms (TCM, lactic acid bacteria, coliform bacteria, psychrotrophic microorganisms and enterococci. In cheeses, there was also carried out the determination of yeasts and moulds. After the cultivation, colonies from Petri dishes were counted and the result was expressed in CFU/ml, g. Samples of raw goat milk (except farm II 27.3. corresponded the requirement of a given legislative act. However, it contained a higher number of coliform and psychrotrophic microorganisms than the stated recommendations. Microbiological analysis showed relatively high numbers of adverse coliform bacteria (up to 1.2 x 107 CFU/g in all cheeses. Counts of psychrotrophic microorganisms were relatively high as well, they moved between of 103 – 108 CFU/g.

  6. Short communication: Estimation of the financial benefit of using Jersey milk at different inclusion rates for Cheddar cheese production using partial budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, J H; Bailey, A P; Grandison, A S; Fagan, C C

    2015-03-01

    Partial budgeting was used to estimate the net benefit of blending Jersey milk in Holstein-Friesian milk for Cheddar cheese production. Jersey milk increases Cheddar cheese yield. However, the cost of Jersey milk is also higher; thus, determining the balance of profitability is necessary, including consideration of seasonal effects. Input variables were based on a pilot plant experiment run from 2012 to 2013 and industry milk and cheese prices during this period. When Jersey milk was used at an increasing rate with Holstein-Friesian milk (25, 50, 75, and 100% Jersey milk), it resulted in an increase of average net profit of 3.41, 6.44, 8.57, and 11.18 pence per kilogram of milk, respectively, and this additional profit was constant throughout the year. Sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential input on additional profit was cheese yield, whereas cheese price and milk price had a small effect. The minimum increase in yield, which was necessary for the use of Jersey milk to be profitable, was 2.63, 7.28, 9.95, and 12.37% at 25, 50, 75, and 100% Jersey milk, respectively. Including Jersey milk did not affect the quantity of whey butter and powder produced. Although further research is needed to ascertain the amount of additional profit that would be found on a commercial scale, the results indicate that using Jersey milk for Cheddar cheese making would lead to an improvement in profit for the cheese makers, especially at higher inclusion rates.

  7. RAPD and SCAR markers as potential tools for detection of milk origin in dairy products: Adulterant sheep breeds in Serra da Estrela cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Joana T; Ribeiro, Tânia I B; Rocha, João B; Nunes, João; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2016-11-15

    Serra da Estrela Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese is the most famous Portuguese cheese and has a high commercial value. However, the adulteration of production with cheaper/lower-quality milks from non-autochthones ovine breeds compromises the quality of the final product and undervalues the original PDO cheese. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method was developed for efficient detection of adulterant breeds in milk mixtures used for fraudulent production of this cheese. Furthermore, Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) markers were designed envisioning the detection of milk adulteration in processed dairy foods. The RAPD-SCAR technique is here described, for the first time, to be potentially useful for detection of milk origin in dairy products. In this sense, our findings will play an important role on the valorization of Serra da Estrela cheese, as well as on other high-quality dairy products prone to adulteration, contributing to the further development of the dairy industry.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF AUTOCHTHONUS LACTIC FLORA OF A CAMPANIAN CHILLI CHEESE PRODUCED FROM RAW SHEEP MILK

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    A. Mormile

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The natural lactic flora of the artisanal chilli “Tramonti” cheese, a typical product manufactured in the “Lattari mountains”, area of Salerno province (Italy, was investigated. Particular attention was paid to the growth dynamics assessment and to the molecular identification of the indigenous lactic acid bacteria involved in the ripening of this cheese made with raw sheep milk without starter cultures. One batch was monitored taking 4 sample on 0, 30, 50 and 105 ripening days. Lactobacillus and Lactococcus were enumerated and randomly isolated on MRS and LM17 agar (32ºC x 48h -mesophilic flora- and 42°C x 48h -thermophilic flora, respectively. N. 66 presumptive lactic acid bacteria isolates, gram positive and catalase negative, were genotipically identified by Ribotyping. Mesophilic Lactobacillus remained at levels of 107 cfu/g during whole maturation time and thermophilic Lactobacillus, from initial values of 105 cfu/g, reached concentratios of 106 cfu/g at the end of maturation. Mesophilic and thermophilic Lactococcus showed, on average, levels of 106 since the beginning of the ripening. Ribotyping allowed to detect 4 lactic acid bacteria species: Enterococcus faecium (65,15%, Lactococcus lactis spp. cremoris (24,24%, Enterococcus faecalis (6,06% and Enterococcus durans (4,54%, showing the diversity of indigenous lactic acid bacteria of chilli “Tramonti” cheese.

  9. Extruded soybean and flaxseed enhance fat composition of milk for Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

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    Andrea Formigoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty Friesian dairy cows were used in an experimental trial to study the effects of extruded full-fat soybean and flaxseed dietary supplementation, at the level authorized by Consorzio of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese(CPRC feeding guidelines (1.0 and 0.4 kg/cow/day, on milk production and fatty acid composition. Diet was typically based on alfalfa and mixed hays and cereals. Compared with the concentrations before trial start, CLA and DHA were significantly increased by dietary treatment. These results confirm that the inclusion of extruded full-fat soybean and flaxseed, in the amount authorized by CPRC rules, in the diet of dairy cows is a possible strategy to enhance milk fat composition.

  10. Comparison of SPME Methods for Determining Volatile Compounds in Milk, Cheese, and Whey Powder

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    Michael H. Tunick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS are commonly used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile compounds in various dairy products, but conditions have to be adjusted to maximize release while not generating new compounds that are absent in the original sample. Queso Fresco, a fresh non-melting cheese, may be heated at 60 °C for 30 min; in contrast, compounds are produced in milk when exposed to light and elevated temperatures, so milk samples are heated as little as possible. Products such as dehydrated whey protein are more stable and can be exposed to longer periods (60 min of warming at lower temperature (40 °C without decomposition, allowing for capture and analysis of many minor components. The techniques for determining the volatiles in dairy products by SPME and GC-MS have to be optimized to produce reliable results with minimal modifications and analysis times.

  11. Microbial characteristics of Conciato Romano: an artisanal cheese made from raw sheep’s milk

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    Amalia Mormile

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the microbial characteristics of a batch of Conciato Romano during manufacturing and ripening. Conciato Romano is a traditional cheese made from raw sheep’s milk without starter cultures in the province of Caserta (Southern Italy using traditional methods. A total of 7 samples (raw milk, curd and cheese wheels taken after 25, 60, 120 and 180 days of ripening were screened for hygiene indicators microorganisms counts (total viable count, Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, E. coli, clostridia sulphite reducing, yeasts, coagulasepositive staphylococci, enterococci, for autochthonous lactic acid flora counts (mesophilic and thermophilic lactococci and lattobacilli, and also for Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes presence. In raw milk, low values were detected for total aerobic flora (3.2 log cfu/mL, Enterobacteriaceae and total coliforms (2 cfu/mL, and the autochthonous starter lactic flora was predominant (3.2 log cfu/mL. During ripening, total aerobic flora was constant (107-108 cfu/g; total coliforms, E. coli, Enterobacteriaceae and yeasts were not detected starting from the 60th day of ripening. Enterococci ranged from 4.2 to 6.2 log cfu/g. The mesophilic lactic flora was dominant with values always >6 log cfu/g during the whole ripening period. Pathogens were never detected. The results of this study highlighted how the raw milk indigenous lactic flora, the traditional production techniques and the cheesemaker’s experience are essential to guarantee the unique nature of Conciato Romano.

  12. Commercial ripening starter microorganisms inoculated into cheese milk do not successfully establish themselves in the resident microbial ripening consortia of a South german red smear cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerges, Stefanie; Mounier, Jérôme; Rea, Mary C; Gelsomino, Roberto; Heise, Valeska; Beduhn, Rüdiger; Cogan, Timothy M; Vancanneyt, Marc; Scherer, Siegfried

    2008-04-01

    Production of smear-ripened cheese critically depends on the surface growth of multispecies microbial consortia comprising bacteria and yeasts. These microorganisms often originate from the cheese-making facility and, over many years, have developed into rather stable, dairy-specific associations. While commercial smear starters are frequently used, it is unclear to what degree these are able to establish successfully within the resident microbial consortia. Thus, the fate of the smear starters of a German Limburger cheese subjected to the "old-young" smearing technique was investigated during ripening. The cheese milk was supplemented with a commercial smear starter culture containing Debaryomyces hansenii, Galactomyces geotrichum, Arthrobacter arilaitensis, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. Additionally, the cheese surface was inoculated with an extremely stable in-house microbial consortium. A total of 1,114 yeast and 1,201 bacterial isolates were identified and differentiated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, repetitive PCR, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis analyses were used to type selected isolates below the species level. The D. hansenii starter strain was primarily found early in the ripening process. The G. geotrichum starter strain in particular established itself after relocation to a new ripening room. Otherwise, it occurred at low frequencies. The bacterial smear starters could not be reisolated from the cheese surface at all. It is concluded that none of the smear starter strains were able to compete significantly and in a stable fashion against the resident microbial consortia, a result which might have been linked to the method of application. This finding raises the issue of whether addition of starter microorganisms during production of this type of cheese is actually necessary.

  13. Short communication: Inactivation of microbial contaminants in raw milk La Serena cheese by high-pressure treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arqués, J L; Garde, S; Gaya, P; Medina, M; Nuñez, M

    2006-03-01

    La Serena cheese, a Spanish variety made from Merino ewes' raw milk, has a high pH value, low salt content, and high moisture, conditions that are all favorable for growth and survival of contaminating microorganisms, including pathogens. To improve its microbiological quality and safety, high-pressure treatments at 300 or 400 MPa for 10 min at 10 degrees C were applied to 2 batches of La Serena cheese on d 2 or 50 of ripening. Cheese treated on d 2 at 300 MPa showed viable aerobic counts that were 0.99 log units lower than those for control cheese on d 3 and showed counts of enterococci, coagulase-positive staphylococci, gram-negative bacteria, and coliforms that were 2.05, 0.49, 3.14, and 4.13 log units lower, respectively, than control cheese. For cheese treated on d 2 at 400 MPa, the respective reductions in counts were 2.02, 2.68, 1.45, 3.96, and 5.50 log units. On d 60, viable aerobic counts in cheese treated on d 50 at 300 MPa were 0.50 log units lower than those in control cheese, and counts of enterococci, gram-negative bacteria, and coliforms were 1.37, 2.30, and 4.85 log units lower, respectively. For cheese treated on d 50 at 400 MPa, the respective reductions in counts were 1.29, 1.98, 4.47, and > 5 log units. High-pressure treatments at 300 or 400 MPa on d 2 or 50 reduced significantly the counts of undesirable microorganisms, improving the microbiological quality and safety of La Serena cheese immediately after treatment and at the end of the ripening period.

  14. Processing of soft Hispanic cheese ("queso fresco") using thermo-sonicated milk: a study of physicochemical characteristics and storage life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V

    2010-01-01

    Queso fresco is a handmade cheese consumed in Latin America and some regions of the United States. However, deficient milk processing has affected its microbial quality and it has an extremely short shelf life and low yield. The objective of this work was to process queso fresco using thermo-sonicated milk; physicochemical parameters were evaluated, including microbial quality during storage (4 °C). An ultrasonic processor (UP400S, 400 W, 24 kHz, 120 μm) was used to sonicate raw milk. Seven milk systems (500 mL each) were evaluated: 1 untreated, and 6 treated at 63 °C/30 min; 63 °C/10 min + sonication; 63 °C/30 min + sonication; 72 °C/15 s; 72 °C/15 s + sonication; and 72 °C/1 min + sonication. A conventional cheese-making process was followed for all systems. The effect of sonication on milk was quite noticeable. Curdling times were reduced considerably, cheese yield (20.6%) was almost doubled, and luminosity of cheese was increased (L*). Textural properties and microstructure images matched very well. Queso fresco processed at 63 °C/120 μm/30 min had the best quality. After storage for 23 d at 4 °C mesophilic count was just 4 log; psychrophilic count, 3.5 log; and enterobacteria count, 3 log. The pH and color remained almost constant and a minor degree of syneresis was observed at end of storage. Due to microstructural rearrangement of the milk components such as fat globules and casein micelles, cheese yield was doubled compared to the traditional handmade product. Shelf life was extended considerably and the product had higher quality.

  15. Competitive advantage of bacteriocinogenic strains within lactic acid bacteria consortium of raw milk cheese

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    Irena Rogelj

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of gene determinants for different bacteriocins has been already demonstrated in traditional Slovenian types of raw milk cheeses ‘Tolminc’ and ‘Kraški’. These genes were present also in the cultivable microbiota. In this research the aim was to establish how the presence of gene determinants for bacteriocins in microbial consortia is reflected in its antimicrobial activity. In addition, one of the goals was to determine whether the strains that carry gene determinants for bacteriocins have any competitive growth advantage in microbial population. Microbial consortium of ‘Tolminc’ cheese was propagated in milk and examined at the end of propagation its antimicrobial activity and the presence of gene determinants for bacteriocins. Comparison of the results obtained before and after propagation leaded to the conclusion that most of the strains possessing gene determinants for bacteriocins were unable to persist during propagation. The strains which did persist during propagation carried gene determinants for enterocins P, L50B and cytolysin. Antimicrobial activity of consortium before and after propagation was not substantially different and cannot be attributed to any of detected bacteriocins.

  16. Biodiversity and γ-aminobutyric acid production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional alpine raw cow's milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Elena; Carafa, Ilaria; Nardin, Tiziana; Schiavon, Silvia; Poznanski, Elisa; Cavazza, Agostino; Larcher, Roberto; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2015-01-01

    "Nostrano-cheeses" are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow's milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB) developing during maturation of "Nostrano-cheeses" and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months). A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n = 97) were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg) was a Sc. thermophilus.

  17. Texture, flavor, and sensory quality of buffalo milk Cheddar cheese as influenced by reducing sodium salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, M A; Huma, N; Sameen, A; Murtaza, M S; Mahmood, S; Mueen-ud-Din, G; Meraj, A

    2014-11-01

    The adverse health effects of dietary sodium demand the production of cheese with reduced salt content. The study was aimed to assess the effect of reducing the level of sodium chloride on the texture, flavor, and sensory qualities of Cheddar cheese. Cheddar cheese was manufactured from buffalo milk standardized at 4% fat level by adding sodium chloride at 2.5, 2.0, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5% (wt/wt of the curd obtained). Cheese samples were ripened at 6 to 8 °C for 180 d and analyzed for chemical composition after 1 wk; for texture and proteolysis after 1, 60, 120, and 180 d; and for volatile flavor compounds and sensory quality after 180 d of ripening. Decreasing the salt level significantly reduced the salt-in-moisture and pH and increased the moisture-in-nonfat-substances and water activity. Cheese hardness, toughness, and crumbliness decreased but proteolysis increased considerably on reducing the sodium content and during cheese ripening. Lowering the salt levels appreciably enhanced the concentration of volatile compounds associated with flavor but negatively affected the sensory perception. We concluded that salt level in cheese can be successfully reduced to a great extent if proteolysis and development of off-flavors resulted by the growth of starter and nonstarter bacteria can be controlled.

  18. Effect of a pre-treatment of milk with high pressure homogenization on yield as well as on microbiological, lipolytic and proteolytic patterns of "Pecorino" cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Lucia; Patrignani, Francesca; Iucci, Luciana; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Vallicelli, Melania; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2008-12-10

    The principal aim of this work was to compare Pecorino cheeses obtained from ewes' milk previously subjected to high pressure homogenization (HPH) at 100 MPa with those produced from raw and heat treated ewes' milk. The HPH milk treatment induced a significant increase of the cheese yield and caused a reduction of enterococci, lactococci and yeasts in the curds. Enterococci cell loads remained at lower levels in cheeses obtained from HPH milk over the ripening period. Analyses of free fatty acids, Sodium Dodecil Sulphate (SDS)-PAGE profiles, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Solid Phase Microextraction (GC-MS-SPME) measurements of volatile compounds and sensory traits evidenced that the pressure treatment can be regarded also as a useful tool to differentiate products obtained from the same raw material. In fact such a milk treatment induced a marked lipolysis, an early proteolysis, a relevant modification of the volatile molecule profiles and sensory properties of Pecorino cheese.

  19. Bacteriocinogenic Bacteria Isolated from Raw Goat Milk and Goat Cheese Produced in the Center of México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saldaña, Oscar F; Valencia-Posadas, Mauricio; de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Bideshi, Dennis K; Barboza-Corona, José E

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there are few reports on the isolation of microorganisms from goat milk and goat cheese that have antibacterial activity. In particular, there are no reports on the isolation of microorganisms with antibacterial activity from these products in central Mexico. Our objective was to isolate bacteria, from goat products, that synthesized antimicrobial peptides with activity against a variety of clinically significant bacteria. We isolated and identified Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. plantarum, L. pentosus, L. helveticus and Enterococcus faecium from goat cheese, and Aquabacterium fontiphilum, Methylibium petroleiphilum, Piscinobacter aquaticus and Staphylococcus xylosus from goat milk. These bacteria isolated from goat cheese were able to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, L. inoccua, Pseudomona aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In addition, bacteria from goat milk showed inhibitory activity against B. cereus, L. lactis, E. coli, S. flexneri, E. cloacae and K. pneumonia; S. aureus, L. innocua, S. agalactiae and S. marcescens. The bacteriocins produced by these isolates were shown to be acid stable (pH 2-6) and thermotolerant (up to 100 °C), but were susceptible to proteinases. When screened by PCR for the presence of nisin, pediocin and enterocin A genes, none was found in isolates recovered from goat milk, and only the enterocin A gene was found in isolates from goat cheese.

  20. Volatiles and sensory evaluation of goat milk cheese Gokceada as affected by goat breeds (Gokceada and Turkish Saanen) and starter culture systems during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaloglu, A A; Tolu, C; Yasar, K; Sahingil, D

    2013-05-01

    The effect of goat breed and starter culture on volatile composition and sensory scores in goat milk cheese was studied during 90d of ripening. Milk from 2 goat breeds (Gokceada and Turkish Saanen) and different starter culture systems (no starter, mesophilic and thermophilic starters) were used in the manufacture of goat milk cheeses (called Gokceada goat cheese). Volatile composition was determined by a solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method. Sixty compounds including esters (13), carboxylic acids (7), aldehydes (6), ketones (8), alcohols (14), and miscellaneous compounds (12) were identified. Esters, alcohols, and carboxylic acids were the main classes of volatile components in the cheeses. Both qualitatively and quantitatively, the use of different starter cultures and goat breeds significantly influenced the volatile fraction of goat milk cheese. Decanoic, hexanoic, and octanoic (commonly named capric, caproic, and caprylic) acids were indicator compounds to distinguish the goat breeds. Principal component analysis grouped the cheeses based on the use of starter culture and goat breed. Starter-free cheeses were separately located on the plot and age-related changes were present in all samples. Sensory evaluation of 90-d-old cheeses showed that the cheeses from the Gokceada breed received higher odor, flavor, and quality scores than those from the Turkish Saanen breed, and cheeses made using mesophilic starters resulted in the most satisfactory scores for flavor and quality attributes. In conclusion, goat milk cheeses made using milk from Gokceada goats and mesophilic starter culture had the best quality in terms of volatile composition and sensory attributes.

  1. 21 CFR 133.162 - Neufchatel cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredients may be used: (1) Dairy ingredients. Milk, nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in § 133.3. (2... optional ingredients. (i) Salt. (ii) Cheese whey, concentrated cheese whey, dried cheese whey, or reconstituted cheese whey prepared by addition of water to concentrated cheese whey or dried cheese whey....

  2. The positive effects of the revised milk and cheese allowances in the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Luedicke, Joerg; Henderson, Kathryn E; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2014-04-01

    In 2009, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) implemented revisions to the WIC food packages. Milk and cheese allowances were reduced, and whole milk was disallowed for participants older than 23 months. Using a pre-post research design and scanner data from a New England supermarket chain on purchases of WIC households, this article assesses how the new WIC packages affected milk and cheese purchases and saturated fat intake among WIC households in Connecticut and Massachusetts. Milk and cheese volume purchased by 515 WIC households in Connecticut was compared before and after the WIC revisions (2009-2010) using generalized estimating equation models. Analysis for Massachusetts was descriptive. After implementation of the new WIC packages in Connecticut, whole-milk share declined from about 60% to 25% in WIC milk purchases, but remained flat at about 50% for purchases with non-WIC funds. Total milk volume fell by 14.2% (P<0.001), whole milk by half (P<0.001), and WIC-eligible cheese by 37.2% (P<0.001). Restrictions on whole milk shifted WIC purchases to reduced-fat milk in Connecticut and low-fat milk in Massachusetts, where reduced-fat milk is not permitted by WIC. The amounts of saturated fat from purchased milk and cheese declined by 85 g/month per WIC household in Connecticut and 107 g/month in Massachusetts. The 2009 WIC revisions led to a substantial decrease in purchases of whole milk and cheese among WIC families in New England. The related reduction in saturated fat intake could have important public health implications.

  3. Correction of the ratio between real cheese yield at 28 hours and protein according to chemical composition of buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Di Palo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the ratio between real cheese yield at 28 hours and proteins, after values correction according to the regression analysis. Milk characteristics of subjects characterized by a 28CY/protein ratio lower (Group A; n=212 or higher (Group B; n=108 than 56 were analysed by ANOVA in order to evaluate differences between the following milk characteristics: the lactodinamographic parameters (Formagraph, Foss, DN; the complete physic-chemical composition; fat (F, protein (P, casein, lactose, ash, urea, pH and SH; the somatic cells content (SCC using (Milkoskan; the total aerobic mesophilic flora (TAMF by the dilution method. Chemical composition of the curd was also determined (protein, fat and ash; ASPA, 1995. The milk protein content was adjusted for the non proteic N content determined in milk as urea (corrected P; the theoretic cheese yield (ThCY was obtained by the following formula: cheese yield =milk x[-0.88 + 3.50 x P(%+1.23 x F(%] x 100 -1 (Altiero et al., 1989 and the ratio between ThCY/FCY and ThCY/28CY were calculated. Other calculated variables were: FCY/Corrected P, 28CY/Corrected P, CDM/Corrected P. Regression analysis was carried out between real cheese yield at 28 hours/proteins ratio and 28CY vs. all the parameters resulted different between the two groups of buffaloes. Real cheese yield at 28 hours/proteins ratio and 28CY were corrected and ANOVA was repeated on corrected data, in order to verify the modifications of the values. These correction reduced but did not eliminate the differences.

  4. Enumeration of Escherichia coli O157 in Outbreak-Associated Gouda Cheese Made with Raw Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Alexander; Oudit, Denise

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the enumerative analysis for Escherichia coli O157 in two raw milk Gouda cheese products (A and B), implicated in an outbreak of 29 cases of E. coli O157:H7 illness that occurred across Canada in 2013. Samples were enumerated for E. coli O157 by most probable number (MPN) over a period of 30 to 60 days after the end of the outbreak. Samples (55.55 g) of product A (n = 14) were analyzed at 146 to 180 days postproduction. E. coli O157 was isolated from six samples at 19.9 to 44.6 MPN/kg. The E. coli O157 concentration of product A estimated from the results of all 14 samples was 9.5 MPN/kg. Samples (55.55 g) of product B (n = 20) were analyzed at 133 to 149 days postproduction. E. coli O157 was isolated from four samples at 19.9 MPN/kg. The E. coli O157 concentration of product B estimated from the results of all 20 samples was 3.7 MPN/kg. Analysis of a 305-g sample of product A (n = 1) stored at 4°C until 306 days postproduction revealed that the E. coli O157 concentration had declined to 3.6 MPN/kg. E. coli O157 could not be isolated from 555-g samples of product B (n = 5) after 280 days postproduction. The physicochemical parameters (pH, water activity, percent moisture, and percent salt) of both cheese products were found to be in the normal range for this type of product. The results of this study demonstrate that E. coli O157 could not replicate during storage at 4°C in the products tested but was capable of survival following aging and prolonged storage. This indicates that, if contaminated, the minimum 60-day aging period, which is required for raw milk Gouda cheeses, is not sufficient in all cases to ensure that the product does not contain viable cells of E. coli O157. The results also indicate that samples sizes greater than 100 g may be required to reliably detect E. coli O157 in cheese products associated with outbreaks.

  5. Comparison between two hay based diets in buffalo nutrition: microbiological characteristics of milk, curd and mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.P. Cuscunà

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two groups of twenty milking Mediterranean buffalo cows were fed two diets, with the same energy and protein content, based on Italian ryegrass hay (diet G1 and Italian ryegrass hay silage (diet G2. Presumptive lactobacilli and lactococci were determined on milk, curd and mozzarella cheese, collected at 30, 60, 90 days from the beginning of the trial. Milk and mozzarella cheese at 30, 60, 90 days showed significantly higher microbial counts in diet G2 with respect to diet G1, apart from lactococci in milk at 90 days. For curd at 30, 60, 90 days the numbers of lactobacilli and lactococci in diet G1 were significantly higher with respect to diet G2, apart from lactococci at 30 days. Genetic analysis by 16S rDNA characterization of colonies, randomly isolated, showed in diet G2 also the presence of not lactic species. Probably Italian ryegrass hay silage, present in diet G2, could bring bacteria in the environment and consequently in the milk that are detrimental for the proper growing of lactic microflora in the curd and that are resistant to the high temperature used in the mozzarella cheese making process.

  6. Levels of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and total phthalate esters in milk, cream, butter and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, M; Read, W A; Castle, L; Gilbert, J

    1994-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and total phthalate ester plasticizer levels were determined in milk, cream, butter and cheese samples from a variety of sources from three European countries (UK, Norway and Spain). Samples of milk (from Norway) obtained at various stages during collection, transportation and packaging operations showed no apparent trends in phthalate contamination with total phthalate levels (expressed as DEHP equivalents) in the raw milk of between 0.12 and 0.28 mg/kg. On processing the DEHP was concentrated in the cream at levels up to 1.93 mg/kg, whereas low fat milk contained from cheese, butter and other fatty products varied considerably in their levels of contamination, the highest being cheese samples containing 17 mg/kg of DEHP and 114 mg/kg total phthalate. However, the majority of samples contained 0.6-3.0 mg/kg DEHP and 4-20 mg/kg total phthalate. UK cream samples contained levels of 0.2-2.7 mg/kg DEHP and 1.8-19.0 mg/kg total phthalate. The level found in these products was too high to have resulted solely from milk by concentration in the fat phase and must therefore have arisen in other ways.

  7. Short communication: Change of naturally occurring benzoic acid during skim milk fermentation by commercial cheese starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Noori; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to investigate the change of naturally occurring benzoic acid (BA) during skim milk fermentation by 4 kinds of commercial cheese starters used in domestic cheese. The culture was incubated at 3-h intervals for 24h at 30, 35, and 40°C. The BA content during fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus STB-01 was detected after 12h at all temperatures, sharply increasing at 30°C. In Lactobacillus paracasei LC431, BA was detected after 9h at all temperatures, sharply increasing until 18h and decreasing after 18h at 30 and 35°C. In the case of R707 (consisting of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris), BA increased from 6h to 15h and decreased after 15h at 40°C. The BA during STB-01 and CHN-11 (1:1; mixture of S. thermophilus, Lc. lactis ssp. lactis, Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris, Lc. lactis ssp. diacetylactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris) fermentation was detected after 3h at 35 and 40°C, sharply increasing up to 12h and decreasing after 15h at 35°C, and after 6h, increasing up to 9h at 30°C. After 3h, it steadily decreased at 40°C. The highest amount of BA was found during the fermentation by R707 at 30°C; 15h with 12.46mg/kg.

  8. Behaviour of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 During the Manufacture and Ripening of an Italian Traditional Raw Goat Milk Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzini, Elena; D’Amico, Stefano; Sfameni, Chiara; Bertasi, Barbara; Losio, Marina Nadia; Giacometti, Federica; Daminelli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Formagelle di capra is a raw goat cheese produced from whole chilled goat milk; traditional technology involving unpasteurised milk and indigenous lactic starter cultures is employed for its production in Italy. The purpose of this study was to assess the behaviour of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during the manufacturing and ripening of this raw goat milk cheese. Raw milk was experimentally inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 in a laboratory scale plant and the count was monitored during production and 30 days of ripening required for this cheese. Results showed that E. coli O157:H7 count increased to more than 1.5 Log cfu g–1 during cheese production and remained constant until the end of ripening. The evidence that E. coli O157:H7 is able to survive during the manufacturing and ripening process suggests that the 30-day ripening period alone is insufficient to eliminate levels of viable E. coli O157:H7 in Formaggelle di capra cheese and that the presence of low numbers of E. coli O157:H7 in milk destined for the production of raw goat milk cheeses could represent a potential source of infection for humans and a threat for consumers. PMID:27800324

  9. Prevalence of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica in bulk raw milk and retail cheese in northern-west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanifian, Shahram; Khani, Sajjad

    2012-04-02

    To determine the prevalence of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica, 554 samples consisting of 354 bulk raw milks and 200 traditional cheeses were collected from different parts of Eastern-Azerbaijan province, during a 23-month period from 2008 to 2010. The occurrence of virulent strains of Y. enterocolitica in samples enriched in peptone sorbitol bile broth (PSBB) was evaluated via the detection of attachment invasion locus (ail) gene by PCR. The viability of virulent Y. enterocolitica in the PCR-positive samples was tested using conventional culture method and the isolates were confirmed by the second-phase ail-PCR. According to the results, 8.66% of total samples including 7.62% of bulk raw milks and 10.5% of raw milk cheeses were found ail-positive by PCR method; subsequently Y. enterocolitica was isolated by the culture method and confirmed by the second phase ail-PCR in 2.88% of total samples including 2.26% of raw milks and 4% of cheese samples. It was concluded that, a sample enrichment followed by ail-PCR was more sensitive and robust to detect and distinguish the virulent strains of Y. enterocolitica compared to the conventional culture method.

  10. Changes in the microbial composition of raw milk induced by thermization treatments applied prior to traditional Greek hard cheese processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelis, John; Lianou, Alexandra; Kakouri, Athanasia; Delbès, Céline; Rogelj, Irena; Bogovic-Matijasić, Bojana; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2009-04-01

    The microbiological quality, safety, and composition of mixtures of ewe's and goat's milk (90:10) used for cheesemaking were evaluated before and after thermization at 60 and 67 degrees C for 30 s. Such mild thermal treatments are commonly applied to reduce natural contaminants of raw milk before processing for traditional hard Greek cheeses. Raw milk samples had an average total bacterial count of 7.3 log CFU/ml; most of these bacteria were lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pseudomonads. The LAB flora of raw milk was dominated by enterococci (40.8%), followed by lactococci (20.4%), leuconostocs (18.4%), and mesophilic lactobacilli (10.2%). Enterococcus faecalis (30.1%) and Enterococcus faecium (13.7%) were the most common LAB isolates, followed by Enterococcus durans, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Leuconostoc lactis. Thermization at 60 degrees C for 30 s was effective for reducing raw milk contamination by enterobacteria (5.1 log CFU/ml), coagulase-positive staphylococci (3.3 log CFU/ml), and Listeria (present in 25-ml samples) to safe levels, but it also reduced mesophilic lactococci, leuconostocs, lactobacilli, and selected enterococci (72.0%) in thermized milk. Thermization at 67 degrees C for 30 s had a major inactivation effect on all bacterial groups. Two nisin-producing L. lactis subsp. lactis strains (M78 and M104) were isolated from raw milk, but neither nisin-producing nor other bacteriocin-producing LAB strains were isolated from thermized milk. Thus, thermization treatments control harmful bacteria but also may have a negative impact on milk quality by reducing desirable LAB and the biodiversity of raw milk bacteria overall, inactivating potentially protective LAB strains and enhancing the ability of potentially pathogenic enterococci to grow in fresh cheese curds.

  11. Proving the adulteration of ewe and goat cheeses with cow milk using the reference method of isoelectric focusing of γ-casein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Mikulec

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to introduce a reference method for the detection of cow milk in ewe and goat cheeses (EC 273/08 in order to protect manufacturers and consumers from adulterations and imitations, and to ensure alignment with the demands of domestic and EU markets. The method includes isolation of casein from cheese, isoelectric focusing of γ2- and γ3-casein originating from the hydrolysis of β-casein by plasmin, the detection and quantitative determination of γ-casein in cow, ewe and goat cheese by densitometry. Ewe or goat cheese products with a minimum of 1 % of cow milk are considered to be adulterated. For the quantitative determination of cow, ewe and goat milk in cheeses, standard mixtures of cow-ewe and cow-goat milk were made by adding 0; 0.5; 1; 2; 5; 10; 25; 50; 75 and 100 % (v/v of cow milk. The quantification was performed by determining the peak area ratio of cow γ-casein in comparison to ewe/goat casein in prepared standard cheeses. The calibration curves were calculated based on the relation of the peak area ratio of cow γ-caseins (calculated as the percentage of total γ-caseins in contrast to the relative content (% of cow milk in the mixture. The method proved to be adequate for the detection of raw and heat-treated cow milk in fresh and ripened cheeses made from ewe or goat milk, or a mixture of ewe and goat milk.

  12. The science of cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book describes the science of cheese in everyday language. The first chapters cover milk, mammals, and principles of cheesemaking and aging, along with lactose intolerance and raw milk cheese. Succeeding chapters deal with a category of cheese along with a class of compounds associated with it...

  13. Chemical, microbiological, textural, color, and sensory characteristics of pressed ewe milk cheeses with saffron (Crocus sativus L.) during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licón, C C; Carmona, M; Molina, A; Berruga, M I

    2012-08-01

    Adding saffron to dairy products represents an innovative practice to introduce them to niche markets. This paper represents a contribution to this field, as few studies have evaluated the influence of this spice on general aspects and ripening parameters of cheese. In this work, pasteurized ewe milk pressed cheeses with saffron were made to study compositional, microbiological, color, textural, and sensory characteristics in relation to saffron concentration and ripening time. The main changes were observed on sensory characteristics and color. In addition, compositional, textural, and microbiological changes could be observed; among them, saffron cheeses were firmer and more elastic but less prone to fracture. A remarkable result that could lead to further studies is that saffron addition slightly slowed down growth of total and lactic acid bacteria. This resulted in a slightly lower rate of pH decrease during pressing and, as a consequence, lower salt and water content. Compositional differences were not evident by the end of the ripening period.

  14. PEMANFAATAN MILK CLOTTING ENZYME DARI Lactobacillus casei D11 UNTUK PEMBUATAN KEJU MOZZARELLA [Utilization of Milk Clotting Enzyme from Lactobacillus casei D11 for Mozzarella Cheese Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohmatussolihat -

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk Clotting Enzyme (MCE is an active agent for cheese making which may be produced by Lactic acid bacteria (LAB. MCE activity differs according to the LAB strains used. Lactobacillus casei D11 could produced MCE when it is grown in MRS broth medium. In this study, MCE of L. casei D11 with the addition of rennet is used and optimized for the production of mozzarella cheese using Response Surface Method (RSM with Central Composite Design (CCD. The organoleptic properties were determined by hedonics test involving 30 respondents and analyzed statistically which was followed by a Duncan's test. Furthermore, a proximate analysis of mozzarella cheese was conducted. Our results show that the MCE activity produced by L. casei D11 was 8.471 Soxhlet Unit with protease activity of 3.28 U/mL. The ANOVA results showed that the concentration of MCE significantly influence the production of curd. Theoptimum concentration of MCE and rennet for the production of curd suited for the production of mozzarella cheese were 20 and 0.002%, respectively, with a maximum predicted curd yield of 14.996% (g/100 mL milk which is increased by 13.9% as compared to the curd yield before optimization. The statistical analysis on taste, color, flavor, and cheese texture by respondents shows that mozzarella cheese made by a combination of 15% of MCE and 0.00079 and 0.0015% of rennet, were organoleptically superior to the commercial mozzarella used in this experiment. The proximate analysis shows that mozzarella produced has a moisture content of 33.34%(w/w, 3.48% ash, 30.44% fat, 25.12% protein, 7.53% carbohydrate and energy of 404 kkal/100g.

  15. Effect of reuterin-producing Lactobacillus reuteri coupled with glycerol on the volatile fraction, odour and aroma of semi-hard ewe milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Ávila, Marta; Delgado, David; Garde, Sonia

    2016-09-02

    The effect of the biopreservation system formed by Lactobacillus reuteri INIA P572, a reuterin-producing strain, and glycerol (required for reuterin production), on the volatile fraction, aroma and odour of industrial sized semi-hard ewe milk cheese (Castellano type) was investigated over a 3-month ripening period. The volatile compounds were extracted and analyzed by SPME-GC-MS and cheese odour and aroma profiles were studied by descriptive sensory analysis. Control cheese was made only with a mesophilic starter and experimental cheeses with L. reuteri were made with and without glycerol. The addition of L. reuteri INIA P572 to milk enhanced the formation of six volatile compounds. Despite the changes in the volatile compounds profile, the use of L. reuteri INIA P572 did not noticeably affect the sensory characteristics of cheese. On the other hand, the addition of L. reuteri INIA P572 coupled with 30mM glycerol enhanced the formation of twelve volatile compounds, but decreased the formation of five ones. The use of the biopreservation system did not affect overall odour and aroma quality of cheese although it resulted in a significant decrease of the odour intensity scores. In addition, this cheese received significant higher scores for "cheesy" aroma and significant lower scores for the aroma attributes "milky", "caramel" and "yogurt-like". The first two axes of a principal component analysis (PCA) performed for selected volatile compounds and sensory characteristics, accounting for 75% of the variability between cheeses, separated cheeses made with L. reuteri INIA P572 and glycerol from the rest of cheeses, and also differentiated control cheese from cheeses made with L. reuteri INIA P572 from day 60 onward. Our results showed that the reuterin-producing L. reuteri INIA P572 strain, when coupled with glycerol, may be a suitable biopreservation system to use in cheese without affecting odour and aroma quality.

  16. The use of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to predict cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits from unprocessed bovine milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragina, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry in many countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis of fresh unprocessed milk samples for predicting cheese yield and nutrient recovery traits. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were obtained from 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows. Individual measurements of 7 new cheese yield-related traits were obtained from the laboratory cheese-making procedure, including the fresh cheese yield, total solid cheese yield, and the water retained in curd, all as a percentage of the processed milk, and nutrient recovery (fat, protein, total solids, and energy) in the curd as a percentage of the same nutrient contained in the milk. All individual milk samples were analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 over the spectral range from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). Two spectral acquisitions were carried out for each sample and the results were averaged before data analysis. Different chemometric models were fitted and compared with the aim of improving the accuracy of the calibration equations for predicting these traits. The most accurate predictions were obtained for total solid cheese yield and fresh cheese yield, which exhibited coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation (1-VR) of 0.95 and 0.83, respectively. A less favorable result was obtained for water retained in curd (1-VR=0.65). Promising results were obtained for recovered protein (1-VR=0.81), total solids (1-VR=0.86), and energy (1-VR=0.76), whereas recovered fat exhibited a low accuracy (1-VR=0.41). As FTIR spectroscopy is a rapid, cheap, high-throughput technique that is already used to collect standard milk recording data, these FTIR calibrations for cheese yield and nutrient recovery highlight additional potential applications of the technique in the dairy industry, especially for monitoring cheese

  17. Effects of temperature and supplementation with skim milk powder on microbial and proteolytic properties during storage of cottage cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Myung, Jae Hee; Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Shin, Yong Kook; Baick, Seung Chun

    2014-06-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of temperature and supplementation with skim milk powder (SMP) on the microbial and proteolytic properties during the storage of cottage cheese. Cottage cheese was manufactured using skim milk with 2% SMP and without SMP as the control, and then stored at 5°C or 12°C during 28 days. The chemical composition of the cottage cheese and the survival of the cheese microbiota containing starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and non-starter culture lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) were evaluated. In addition, changes in the concentration of lactose and lactic acid were analyzed, and proteolysis was evaluated through the measurement of acid soluble nitrogen (ASN) and nonprotein nitrogen (NPN), as well as electrophoresis profile analysis. The counts of SLAB and NSLAB increased through the addition of SMP and with a higher storage temperature (12°C), which coincided with the results of the lactose decrease and lactic acid production. Collaborating with these microbial changes, of the end of storage for 28 days, the level of ASN in samples at 12°C was higher than those at 5°C. The NPN content was also progressively increased in all samples stored at 12°C. Taken together, the rate of SLAB and NSLAB proliferation during storage at 12°C was higher than at 5°C, and consequently it led to increased proteolysis in the cottage cheese during storage. However, it was relatively less affected by SMP fortification. These findings indicated that the storage temperature is the important factor for the quality of commercial cottage cheese.

  18. Presence of adropin, nesfatin-1, apelin-12, ghrelins and salusins peptides in the milk, cheese whey and plasma of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Suleyman

    2013-05-01

    Biological fluids (milk and serum/plasma) and cheese whey milk-derived fluid contain numerous molecules, especially amino acids and proteins. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to find out whether cheese whey (n:6), cow milk (n:6) and its blood (n=6) have adropin, nesfatin-1, apelin-12, ghrelins and salusin peptides. Adropin, nesfatin-1, apelin-12 concentrations were measured by ELISA, whereas ghrelin and salusin concentrations were measured by EIA methods. It was found that adropin, nesfatin-1, apelin-12, des-acylated ghrelin and salusins in cheese whey were higher than in the corresponding milk peptides and plasma of dairy cows, with the exception of salusin alpha and acylated ghrelin in milk being the same than that of the corresponding cheese whey concentration and plasma of dairy cows. A correlation was also found between milk peptides and cheese whey, as also with plasma of dairy cows. The data suggest that peptides in cow milk might be an important and nutritious food for (neonatal) calves and human diet due to their biological and physiological properties.

  19. Molecular approaches to analysing the microbial composition of raw milk and raw milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Lisa; O'Sullivan, Orla; Beresford, Tom P; Ross, R Paul; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Cotter, Paul D

    2011-11-01

    The availability and application of culture-independent tools that enable a detailed investigation of the microbiota and microbial biodiversity of food systems has had a major impact on food microbiology. This review focuses on the application of DNA-based technologies, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE), single stranded conformation polymorphisms (SSCP), the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and others, to investigate the diversity, dynamics and identity of microbes in dairy products from raw milk. Here, we will highlight the benefits associated with culture-independent methods which include enhanced sensitivity, rapidity and the detection of microorganisms not previously associated with such products.

  20. Seasonal Variations Affect the Physicochemical Composition of Bufallo Milk and Artisanal Cheeses Produced in Marajó Island (Pa, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G., Simões

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to evaluate the influence of seasonal variation in physicochemical composition and microbiological profile of buffalo milk and of the artisanal cream and butter types cheeses produced on Marajó Island. Eighteen farms located of the island were involved in the study. Milk and cheese quality were evaluated in two typical seasons. The rainy, from January to June and dry, from July to December. Samples were submitted to a detailed set of laboratorial analyses. Physicochemical composition of buffalo milk was influenced by the seasons. Compared to rainy, the dry period showed an increase in fat (5.53±0.71 to 6.74±1.19 and lactose (4.77±0.20 to 5.20±0.20 concentrations and reduction in total solids (16.89±0.92 to 15.77±1.54, nonfat dry matter (9.94±0.36 to 8.99±1.23 and minerals (0.84±0.12 to 0.62±0.09 concentrations (p<0.05. The season influence was observed in physicochemical composition of both cheese-types. Compared to rainy season, in the cream cheese type, higher values (p<0.05 were found for titratable acidity (0.63±0.02 to 0.78±0.15, fat (32.38±3.22 to 36.89±4.59, fat in the dry matter (55.06±3.26 to 63.92±2.49 but lower values for water activity (0.99±0.02 to 0.49±0.03, minerals (2.37±0.55 to 1.40±0.02 and calcium (0.28±0.08 to 0.18±0.07. For the butter cheese type, in the dry season, higher values were found only for titratable acidity (0.49±0.02 to 0.38±0.0 and lower values for water activity (0.18±0.07 to 0.45±0.08. The study have shown that some components of the buffalo milk and artisanal cheeses produced on Marajó Island are influenced by the dry and rainy typical seasons and therefore, some sensory variations are expected around the year.

  1. Microbiological and physico-chemical changes during manufacture of an Italian goat cheese made from raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Dalzini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the microbiological and physico-chemical changes throughout three cheesemaking replicates of Italian Formaggelle di capra cheese made from raw goat milk. Therefore, during the process, three samples of milk, curd and cheese at 3, 7, 11, 14, 21 and 30 days of ripening old cheese were taken from three cheesemaking replicates. The average of total mesophilic bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae count in raw milk was 5.27±0.57 and 3.8±1.02 Log cfu/mL, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria was the predominant bacterial group during the process, and they developed in different ways in each of the media used (M17 and MRS agar. Variability of microbial concentrations was observed between three cheesemaking replicates. A correlation between the presence of higher levels of Enterobacteriaceae in milk and the presence of other contaminants bacteria such as Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase-positive and coagulase-positive staphylococci was observed. In cheesemaking replicate n. 2, E. coli level was 5.07±0.03 Log cfu/mL and increased by about 1 log until the last week of ripening, when the level decreased to 5.69±0.2 Log cfu/mL. The milk used for the cheesemaking replicate n. 2 was found to be contaminated also by coagulase-positive staphylococci (3.18±0.06 Log cfu/mL, but the behaviour of this group appeared to be very variable. In this study a first step of process control and microbial groups study was performed and the cheesemaking process was registered in the website www.ars-alimentaria.it, the Italian site supported by the Italian Board of Health.

  2. Growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 during the manufacture and ripening of raw goat milk lactic cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernozy-Rozand, C; Mazuy-Cruchaudet, C; Bavai, C; Montet, M P; Bonin, V; Dernburg, A; Richard, Y

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was studied during the manufacture and ripening of raw goat milk lactic cheeses. Cheese was manufactured from raw milk in the laboratory and inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 to a final concentration of 10, 100 and 1000 cfu ml(-1). E. coli O157:H7 was counted by CT-SMAC (Mac Conkey Sorbitol Agar with cefixim and tellurite) and O157:H7 ID throughout the manufacturing and ripening processes. When the milk was inoculated with 10, 100 or 1000 cfu ml(-1), counts decreased to less than 1 log(10) g(-1) in curds just prior to moulding. However, viable E. coli O157:H7 were found in cheeses throughout processing, and even after 42 days of ripening. Results indicate that E. coli O157:H7 survives the lactic cheese manufacturing process. Thus, the presence of low numbers of E. coli O157:H7 in milk destined for the production of raw milk lactic cheeses can constitute a threat to the consumer.

  3. Comparison of six commercial DNA extraction kits for detection of Brucella neotomae in Mexican and Central American-style cheese and other milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Tina S; Strain, Errol; Kase, Julie A

    2013-05-01

    Raw or inadequately pasteurized milk from infected animals and cheese made with such milk are a frequent vehicle for human brucellosis infection. Also, biological terrorism is a concern with certain Brucella spp. Due to matrix-associated real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) inhibitors, robust sample preparations are crucial. We compared six commercial nucleic acid extraction kits using nine Mexican and Central American-style soft cheeses or creams and three liquid milk products inoculated with Brucella neotomae, a surrogate for pathogenic Brucella spp. Kits were evaluated by purity and quantity of DNA as determined by qPCR Ct values, reproducibility across cheese and milk types, and cost. At 10(7) CFU/g in four different cheeses, Qiagen statistically outperformed all other kits. When two cheese styles were inoculated at dual levels, Qiagen and High Pure kit extracted samples at 1.5 × 10(5) CFU/g produced average Ct values of 34-39, while PrepSEQ and MagMAX kit extracted samples exhibited higher or no Ct values. High Pure and Qiagen kits excelled also with liquid milk products. Considering matrices, inoculation levels, and kits evaluated, High Pure and Qiagen products produced Brucella DNA of high quality and quantity indicated by the lowest Ct values and were the least expensive.

  4. Bioassay for nisin in milk, processed cheese, salad dressings, canned tomatoes, and liquid egg products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakovirta, J; Reunanen, J; Saris, P E J

    2006-02-01

    A sensitive nisin quantification bioassay was constructed, based on Lactococcus lactis chromosomally encoding the nisin regulatory proteins NisK and NisR and a plasmid with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant gfp(uv) gene under the control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. This strain, LAC275, was capable of transducing the signal from extracellular nisin into measurable GFPuv fluorescence through the NisRK signal transduction system. The LAC275 cells detected nisin concentrations of 10 pg/ml in culture supernatant, 0.2 ng/ml in milk, 3.6 ng/g in processed cheese, 1 ng/g in salad dressings and crushed, canned tomatoes, and 2 ng/g in liquid egg. This method was up to 1,000 times more sensitive than a previously described GFP-based nisin bioassay. This new assay made it possible to detect significantly smaller amounts of nisin than the presently most sensitive published nisin bioassay based on nisin-induced bioluminescence. The major advantage of this sensitivity was that foods could be extensively diluted prior to the assay, avoiding potential inhibitory and interfering substances present in most food products.

  5. Texture profile in processed cheese: influence of the use of milk protein concentrates and whey protein concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Borges Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The techno-functional properties of proteins related with the molecular characteristics are facilitated by partial unfolding of structures. From these interactions, the medium pH is presented as a major interferer in intensity and type of reaction that takes place. The intensity of denaturation and interaction of different proteins occur in different forms and intensity accordingly to the pH value of the medium in which they are located. This study aimed to verify the influence of interactions between whey protein concentrate/milk protein concentrate on the evolution of the texture profile of processed cheese at different pH values. We have analyzed samples of commercial whey protein concentrate (WPC and milk protein concentrate (MPC using 112.5g/kg processed cheese. The results were interpreted in terms of texture profile. It was also possible to optimize the different proportions of WPC and MPC, and pH value change the parameters of texture for creamy processed cheese and the pH was also an influencing factor in this optimization.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Factors of Escherichia coli in Cheese Made from Unpasteurized Milk in Three Cities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laryssa Freitas; Barbosa, Mayhara Martins Cordeiro; Pinto, Fernanda de Rezende; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Oliveira, Mônica Costa; de Souza, Viviane; de Medeiros, Maria Izabel Merino; Borges, Lucimara Antonio; do Amaral, Luiz Augusto; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2016-09-01

    The production of cheeses from unpasteurized milk is still widespread in Brazil, even with a legal ban imposed on its marketing. The manufacture of this cheese is a public health problem, due to the use of raw milk and the poor hygienic conditions throughout the supply chain process. Contamination may occur from several sources and involve several different pathogenic microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli. The latter can cause different clinical manifestations depending on the pathotype involved. Furthermore, some isolates manifest antimicrobial resistance and may be a risk for public health. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic E. coli in raw-milk cheese in Brazil and their possible risk to public health. A total of 83 cheeses were collected from three different cities and 169 E. coli isolates were characterized for the presence of enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigatoxigenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence genes, phylogenetic type, antimicrobial resistance, O serogroup, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The number of samples positive for E. coli was highest in Aracaju (90.32%, 28/31). The prevalence of samples positive for potential ExPEC genes was similar for Uberaba and Aracaju (23.07%); the most prevalent ExPEC virulence genes were tsh, iucD, and papC. Isolates from Uberaba had a higher prevalence of resistance to tetracycline (38.46%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (58.85%), and ampicillin (61.54%) than the other cities. Overall, antimicrobial resistance genes tetB, blaTEM, and blaCMY-2 were the most prevalent genes (26.32%, 15.79%, and 28.95%, respectively) and the most prevalent serotypes were O4 (8%), 018 (12%), and O23 (8%). Clones originating from the same regions and from different regions were observed. These results emphasize the presence of a potential danger for humans in the consumption of raw-milk cheeses in three cities in Brazil due to

  7. 21 CFR 133.173 - Pasteurized process cheese food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... milkfat, dehydrated cream, albumin from cheese whey, and skim milk cheese for manufacturing. (e) The other...-milk cheese for manufacturing, and except that hard grating cheese, semisoft part skim cheese, and part...) The optional dairy ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are cream, milk, skim...

  8. Characterization of bacterial populations in Danish raw milk cheeses made with different starter cultures by denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masoud, Wafa Mahmoud Hasan; Takamiya, Monica K Wik; Vogensen, Finn Kvist;

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial populations in Danish raw milk cheeses were identified using denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR amplicons of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene and pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the V3 and V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Both DNA and RNA extracted from...... cheeses were studied in order to determine the metabolically active bacteria. The main bacteria, which included Lactococcus, Lactobacillus and Streptococcus, were detected by pyrosequencing and DGGE in both 16S rDNA and cDNA obtained from cheeses indicating their viability and contribution to cheese...... ripening. Other bacteria like Corynebacterium, Halomonas, Pediococcus, Micrococcus and Staphylococcus, which were encountered in some cheese samples at low percentages compared with the total bacterial populations, were only detected by pyrosequencing. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing is an efficient method...

  9. Diversity and evolution of the microbial populations during manufacture and ripening of Casín, a traditional Spanish, starter-free cheese made from cow's milk

    OpenAIRE

    Alegría, Ángel; Álvarez Martín, Pablo; Sacristán, Noelia; Fernández, Elena; Delgado, Susana; Mayo Pérez, Baltasar

    2009-01-01

    Classical culturing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques have been used for studying the microbial diversity and dynamics of the traditional Spanish Casín cheese during manufacturing and ripening. As with other starter-free cheeses made from raw milk, the microbial diversity of Casín was shown to be high by both culturing and DGGE analyses. The culture technique showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species constituted the majority of the microbial populations. Of th...

  10. Autochthonous cheeses of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatan Sarić

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the migration of people towards cities, autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina survived. Technologies of these cheeses are simple and adapted to humble mountain limitations. Geographical occasions and rich mountain pastures created a certain participation of ewe's milk cheeses. Communicative isolation of hilly-mountain regions resulted in "closed" cheese production in small households. Autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina have various origins. Different cheeses are produced in different parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina. There are : Travnički cheese, Masni (fat cheese, Presukača, Sirac, Livanjski cheese, Posni (lean cheese, "Suvi" (dry cheese or "Mješinski" full fat cheese matured in sheepskin bag, fresh sour milk cheese "Kiseli" and dried sour milk cheese "Kiseli", Zajednica, Basa, Kalenderovački cheese and goat's milk cheeses (Hard and White soft goat's milk cheese, "Zarica" and Urda. Besides above-mentioned types of cheese in Bosnia and Herzegovina some other autochthonous dairy products are produced: Kajmak (Cream, Maslo (Rendered butter and Zimsko kiselo mlijeko (Winter sour milk. The specificity in Bosnia and Herzegovina is that autochthonous dairy products are still mainly both produced and consumed in small rural households. Exceptions are Travnički cheese and Kajmak that are significantly sold at market. Only Livanjski cheese is manufactured as industry dairy product.

  11. The correlation between hygienic parameters of milk and weight loss of semihard cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Bojanić-Rašović M.; Mirecki S.; Nikolić N.; Katić V.; Rašović R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the paper was to examine weight loss and correlation between total bacteria count and the somatic cells count and weight loss of semihard naturally dried cheese, product of dairy plant ZZ“Cijevna“ in Podgorica. Weigt loss was calculated on the base of difference in mass of cheese at the beginning of ripening and after specified period of ripening, exposed in percents. Examination of weight loss was done on total six product series of cheese d...

  12. Genetic parameters for lactation traits of milking ewes: protein content and composition, fat, somatic cells and individual laboratory cheese yield

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    De la Fuente Luis

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of some environmental variation factors and the genetic parameters for total milk traits (fat content, protein content, casein content, serum protein content, lactation mean of individual laboratory cheese yield (LILCY, lactation mean of somatic cell count (LSCC, and milk yield were estimated from the records of 1 111 Churra ewes. Genetic parameters were estimated by multivariate REML. Heritability for fat content was low (0.10 as is usually found in the Churra breed. Heritabilities for protein content, casein content, serum protein content, LILCY, milk yield and somatic cell count were 0.31, 0.30, 0.22, 0.09, 0.26 and 0.11, respectively. The highest heritability estimates were for protein and casein contents. Casein content is not advisable as an alternative to protein content as a selection criterion for cheese yield improvement; it does not have any compelling advantages and its measurement is costly. Our results for LSCC indicated that efforts should focus on improving the level of management rather than selecting for somatic cells, in the actual conditions of the Churra breed.

  13. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of enterotoxigenic and entero-aggregative Escherichia coli isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized cheeses

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    Mojtaba Bonyadian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains and antibiotic resistance of the isolates in raw milk and unpasteurized cheese. Out of 200 samples of raw milk and 50 samples of unpasteurized cheeses, 96 and 24 strains of E. coli were isolated, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to detect the genes encoding heat-stable enterotoxin a (STa, heat-stable enterotoxin b (STb, heat labile toxin (LT and enteroaggregative heat-stable toxin1 (EAST1. Twelve out of 120 (10.00% isolates harbored the gene for EAST1, 2(1.66% isolates were detected as producing STb and LT toxins and 12 (10.00% strains contained STb and EAST1 genes. None of the strains contain the STa gene. All of the strains were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion method. Disks included: ciprofloxacin (CFN, trimetoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TSX, oxytetracycline (OTC, gentamicin (GMN, cephalexin (CPN, nalidixic acid (NDA and nitrofurantoin (NFN, ampicillin (AMP, neomycin (NEO and streptomycin (STM. Among 120 isolated strains of E. coli, the resistance to each antibiotics were as follows: OTC100%, CPN 86.00%, NDA 56.00%, NFN 42.00%, GMN 30.00%, TSX 28.00%, CFN 20%, AM 23.40% and STM 4.25%. None of the isolates were resistant to NEO. The present data indicate that different resistant E. coli pathogens may be found in raw milk and unpasteurized cheese. It poses an infection risk for human and transferring the resistant factors to microflora of the consumers gut.

  14. New developments in the study of the microbiota of raw-milk, long-ripened cheeses by molecular methods: the case of Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano

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    Erasmo eNeviani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are an essential component of cheeses and play important roles during both cheese manufacture and ripening. Both starter and secondary flora modify the physical and chemical properties of cheese, contributing and reacting to changes that occur during the manufacture and ripening of cheese. As the composition of microbial population changes under the influence of continuous shifts in environmental conditions and microorganisms interactions during manufacturing and ripening, the characteristics of a given cheese depend also on microflora dynamics. The microbiota present in cheese is complex and its growth and activity represent the most important, but the least controllable steps. In the past, research in this area was dependent on classical microbiological techniques. However, culture-dependent methods are time-consuming and approaches that include a culturing step can lead to inaccuracies due to species present in low numbers or simply cultivable. Therefore, they cannot be used as a unique tool to monitor community dynamics. For these reasons approaches to cheese microbiology had to change dramatically. To address this, in recent years the focus on the use of culture-independent methods based on the direct analysis of DNA (or RNA has rapidly increased. Application of such techniques to the study of cheese microbiology, represents a rapid, sound, reliable and effective way for the detection and identification of the microorganisms present in dairy products, leading to major advances in understanding this complex microbial ecosystem and its impact on cheese ripening and quality. In these chapter, an overview on the recent advances in the use of molecular methods for thorough analysis of microbial communities in cheeses is given. Furthermore, applications of culture-independent approaches to study the microbiology of two important raw-milk, long-ripened cheeses such as Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano, are presented.

  15. The Use of Multiplex PCR to Determine the Prevalence of Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Raw Milk, Feta Cheese, and Hand Swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinhom, Mohamed M A; Abdel-Latef, Gihan K; Jordan, Kieran

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) can cause mastitis in cattle and, therefore, can be present in milk. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of coagulase positive S. aureus and its enterotoxin genes sea, seb, and sec in isolates recovered from raw milk, feta cheese, and human hand swabs of milk and cheese handlers in Beni-Suef province, Egypt. A total of 100 samples of raw milk and 50 samples of pasteurized-milk feta cheese were collected. In addition, 50 hand swabs from milk handlers and 25 hand swabs from cheese handlers were examined for the presence of coagulase positive S. aureus. The isolates were characterized by multiplex PCR for detection of sea, seb, and sec genes, and for resistance to 5 classes of commonly used antibiotics. Twelve (12/100), 12 (6/50), and 17% (13/75) of milk, cheese, and hand swab samples, respectively, were positive for coagulase positive S. aureus. One isolate was obtained from each positive sample (31 isolates), and none contained genes for SEA or SEC production. Twenty-five percent, 33%, and 31%, respectively, of the isolates contained the genes for SEB, resulting in 3%, 4%, and 5% of samples being positive for toxin producing coagulase positive S. aureus, respectively. At least one isolate was resistant to each of the antibiotics tested. Despite the low potential for SEB production shown, preventative measures, such as maintenance of the cold-chain and good hygienic practices should be implemented to further reduce the potential risk to public health from SEB, and to reduce the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

  16. Tolerability of a fully maturated cheese in cow's milk allergic children: biochemical, immunochemical, and clinical aspects.

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    Claudia Alessandri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: From patients' reports and our preliminary observations, a fully maturated cheese (Parmigiano-Reggiano; PR seems to be well tolerated by a subset of cow's milk (CM allergic patients. OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: To biochemically and immunologically characterize PR samples at different maturation stage and to verify PR tolerability in CM allergic children. Seventy patients, with suspected CM allergy, were enrolled. IgE to CM, α-lactalbumin (ALA, β-lactoglobulin (BLG and caseins (CAS were tested using ImmunoCAP, ISAC103 and skin prick test. Patients underwent a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge with CM, and an open food challenge with 36 months-maturated PR. Extracts obtained from PR samples were biochemically analyzed in order to determine protein and peptide contents. Pepsin and trypsin-chymotrypsin-pepsin simulated digestions were applied to PR extracts. Each PR extract was investigated by IgE Single Point Highest Inhibition Achievable assay (SPHIAa. The efficiency analysis was carried out using CM and PR oral challenges as gold standards. RESULTS: The IgE binding to milk allergens was 100% inhibited by almost all PR preparations; the only difference was for CAS, mainly α(S1-CAS. Sixteen patients sensitized to CM tolerated both CM and PR; 29 patients tolerated PR only; 21 patients, reacted to both CM and PR, whereas 4 patients reactive to CM refused to ingest PR. ROC analysis showed that the absence of IgE to BLG measured by ISAC could be a good marker of PR tolerance. The SPHIAa using digested PR preparations showed a marked effect on IgE binding to CAS and almost none on ALA and BLG. CONCLUSIONS: 58% of patients clinically reactive to CM tolerated fully maturated PR. The preliminary digestion of CAS induced by PR maturation process, facilitating a further loss of allergenic reactivity during gut digestion, might explain the tolerance. This hypothesis seems to work when no IgE sensitization to ISAC BLG is detected.

  17. Mexican chihuahua cheese: sensory profiles of young cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hekken, D L; Drake, M A; Corral, F J Molina; Prieto, V M Guerrero; Gardea, A A

    2006-10-01

    Sensory profiles of fresh semihard Chihuahua cheese produced in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua were developed to characterize the flavors and textures of this traditionally made Hispanic-style cheese. Multiple allotments of Chihuahua cheese, 9 brands made with raw milk (RM) and 5 brands made with pasteurized milk (PM), were obtained within 3 d of manufacture from 12 different cheese plants throughout Chihuahua, México. Cheeses were shipped overnight to Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, and flavor analyses were conducted within 14 to 18 d after manufacture. Four brands (2 RM and 2 PM cheeses) were then selected and multiple allotments were shipped at 3 distinct seasons over a 1-yr period for evaluation of flavor and texture. Microbial analysis was conducted prior to testing to ensure product safety. Descriptive analyses of cheese flavors and textures were conducted with panelists trained to use a universal or product-specific Spectrum intensity scale, respectively. Sensory profiles of cheeses varied among the different manufacturers. The most prominent flavor attributes were salty, sour, diacetyl, cooked, whey, bitter, and milk-fat. The RM cheeses had more intense sour, bitter, and prickle scores than the PM cheeses. Many cheese texture attributes were similar, but RM cheeses were perceived as softer than PM cheeses. As the demand for Hispanic-style cheeses increases, defining and understanding the sensory attributes of traditionally made Mexican cheeses provides guidance to cheese manufacturers as new ways are explored to improve the production and shelf life of the cheeses.

  18. Bacteriocins produced by wild Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from traditional, starter-free cheeses made of raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Angel; Delgado, Susana; Roces, Clara; López, Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2010-09-30

    Sixty bacterial strains were encountered by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) typing in a series of 306 Lactococcus lactis isolates collected during the manufacturing and ripening stages of five traditional, starter-free cheeses made from raw milk. Among the 60 strains, 17 were shown to produce bacteriocin-like compounds in both solid and liquid media. At a genotypic level, 16 of the strains were identified by molecular methods as belonging to L. lactis subsp. lactis and one to L. lactis subsp. cremoris. Among the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, phenotypic and genetic data determined that eleven produced either nisin A (nine strains) or nisin Z (two strains), and that five produced lactococcin 972. Variable levels of the two bacteriocins were produced by different strains. In addition, nisin was shown to be produced in inexpensive, dairy- and meat-based media, which will allow the practical application of its producing strains in industrial processes. Specific PCR and nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence analysis identified the inhibitor produced by the single L. lactis subsp. cremoris isolate as a lactococcin G-like bacteriocin. Beyond the use of bacteriocins as functional ingredients for the biopreservation of foods, the newly identified bacteriocin-producing L. lactis strains from traditional cheeses may also be useful for designing starter cultures with protective properties and/or adjunct cultures for accelerating cheese ripening.

  19. Diversity and dynamic of lactic acid bacteria strains during aging of a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Mancini, Andrea; Santarelli, Marcela; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore diversity and dynamic of indigenous LAB strains associated with a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter such as PDO Grana Padano cheese. Samples of milk, curd, natural whey culture and cheeses (2nd, 6th, 9th and 13th months of ripening) were collected from 6 cheese factories in northern Italy. DNA was extracted from each sample and from 194 LAB isolates. tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP was applied to identify isolates. Strain diversity was assessed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR and RAPD(P1)-PCR. Finally, culture-independent LH-PCR (V1-V2 16S-rDNA), was considered to explore structure and dynamic of the microbiota. Grana Padano LAB were represented mainly by Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus helveticus and Pediococcus acidilactici, while the structure and dynamic of microbiota at different localities was specific. The strength of this work is to have focused the study on isolates coming from more than one cheese factories rather than a high number of isolates from one unique production. We provided a valuable insight into inter and intraspecies diversity of typical LAB strains during ripening of traditional PDO Grana Padano, contributing to the understanding of specific microbial ecosystem of this cheese.

  20. Chemical and functional properties of glycomacropeptide (GMP) and its role in the detection of cheese whey adulteration in milk: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelima; Sharma, Rajan; Rajput, Yudhishthir Singh; Mann, Bimlesh

    2013-01-01

    Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a C-terminal part (f 106-169) of kappa-casein which is released in whey during cheese making by the action of chymosin. GMP being a biologically active component has gained much attention in the past decade. It also has unique chemical and functional properties. Many of the biological properties have been ascribed to the carbohydrate moieties attached to the peptide. The unique set of amino acids in GMP makes it a sought-after ingredient with nutraceutical properties. Besides its biological activity, GMP has several interesting techno-functional properties such as wide pH range solubility, emulsifying properties as well as foaming abilities which are shown to be promising for applications in food and nutrition industry. These properties of GMP have given new dimension for the profitable utilization of cheese whey to the dairy industry. A number of protocols for isolation of GMP from cheese whey have been reported. Moreover, its role in detection of sweet/rennet whey adulteration in milk and milk products has also attracted attention of various researchers, and many GMP-specific analytical methods have been proposed. This review discusses the chemico-functional properties of GMP and its role in the detection methods for checking cheese or sweet whey adulteration in milk. Recent concepts used in the isolation of GMP from cheese whey have also been discussed.

  1. Influence of feeding Mediterranean food industry by-products and forages to Awassi sheep on physicochemical properties of milk, yoghurt and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbeddou, Souheila; Rischkowsky, Barbara; Hilali, Muhi El-Dine; Hess, Hans Dieter; Kreuzer, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Feeding agro-industrial by-products and unconventional forages, rich in potentially anti-nutritional factors, may influence the quality of the raw milk and the dairy products prepared therefrom. The aim of the present study was to determine side-effects on physicochemical properties of milk, yoghurt and cheese of feeding diets where one third were feeds either rich in lipids (tomato pomace and olive cake) or phenols (olive leaves and lentil straw) or electrolytes (Atriplex leaves). The diets, including a control diet, were designed to be isoenergetic and isonitrogenous. They were fed in amounts of 25 kg dry matter/day per head during 50 days to 6×10 multiparous fat-tailed Awassi ewes. Milk samples were analysed for various physicochemical traits and fatty acid composition on days 0, 24, 36 and 48. Three times, milk pooled by group was processed to yoghurt and non-aged farmer-type cheese, which were analysed for their gross and fatty acid composition and texture, and were subjected to sensory evaluation. Feeding olive cake and tomato pomace reduced milk casein, but increased proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids. There were some variations in minerals among test diets but, contrary to expectations, Atriplex did not increase milk sodium. The nutritional composition of yoghurt and cheese was not varied much by the test feeds, except for some changes in fatty acid profile similar to the milk. Yoghurt firmness declined with all test diets, but texture score tended to be lower only for olive cake and leaf diets relative to control. Cheese firmness was increased by feeding the Atriplex leaf and olive cake diets which was also reflected in the texture scores. No off-flavours were reported. Possible reasons for effects on the dairy products are discussed. In conclusion, the feeds investigated had certain effects on the physicochemical properties of dairy products, but these were neither very systematic nor large thus not prohibiting their use in Mediterranean sheep

  2. Molecular identification of naturally occurring bacteriocinogenic and bacteriocinogenic-like lactic acid bacteria in raw milk and soft cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, M B T; Moraes, P M; Perin, L M; Viçosa, G N; Carvalho, K G; Silva Júnior, A; Nero, L A

    2010-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are currently used by food industries because of their ability to produce metabolites with antimicrobial activity against gram-positive pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to identify naturally occurring bacteriocinogenic or bacteriocinogenic-like LAB in raw milk and soft cheese and to detect the presence of nisin-coding genes in cultures identified as Lactococcus lactis. Lactic acid bacteria cultures were isolated from 389 raw milk and soft cheese samples and were later characterized for the production of antimicrobial substances against Listeria monocytogenes. Of these, 58 (14.9%) LAB cultures were identified as antagonistic; the nature of this antagonistic activity was then characterized via enzymatic tests to confirm the proteinaceous nature of the antimicrobial substances. In addition, 20 of these antagonistic cultures were selected and submitted to genetic sequencing; they were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum (n=2) and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (n=18). Nisin genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction in 7 of these cultures. The identified bacteriocinogenic and bacteriocinogenic-like cultures were highly variable concerning the production and activity of antimicrobial substances, even when they were genetically similar. The obtained results indicated the need for molecular and phenotypic methodologies to properly characterize bacteriocinogenic LAB, as well as the potential use of these cultures as tools to provide food safety.

  3. Prediction of the type of milk and degree of ripening in cheeses by means of artificial neural networks with data concerning fatty acids and near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Barajas, Milton Carlos; González-Martín, Ma Inmaculada; Salvador-Esteban, Javier; Hernández-Hierro, José Miguel; Moreno-Rodilla, Vidal; Vivar-Quintana, Ana Ma; Revilla, Isabel; Ortega, Iris Lobos; Morón-Sancho, Raúl; Curto-Diego, Belén

    2013-11-15

    The present study addresses the prediction of the time of ripening and type of mixtures of milk (cow's, ewe's and goat's) in cheeses of varying composition using artificial neural networks (ANN). To accomplish this aim, neural networks were designed using as input data the content of 19 fatty acids obtained with GC-FID of the cheese fat and scores obtained from principal component analysis (PCA) of NIR spectra. The best model of neuronal networks for the identification of the type of mixtures of milk was obtained using the information concerning the fatty acid concentration (80% of correct results in the training phase and 75% in the validation phase). Regarding the information of the near-infrared (NIR) spectra a neural network was designed. The aforesaid neural network predicted the ripening of cheeses with 100% accuracy in both training and in validation.

  4. Genetic parameters estimate for milk and mozzarella cheese yield, fat and protein percentage in dairy buffaloes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tonhati

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was analyze the (covariance components and genetic and phenotypic relationships in the following traits: accumulated milk yield at 270 days (MY270, observed until 305 days of lactation; accumulated milk yield at 270 days (MY270/ A and at 305 days (MY305, observed until 335 days of lactation; mozzarella cheese yield (MCY and fat (FP and protein (PP percentage, observed until 335 days of lactation. The (covariance components were estimated by Restricted Maximum Likelihood methodology in analyses single, two and three-traits using animal models. Heritability estimated for MY270, MY270/A, MY305, MCY, FP and PP were 0.22; 0.24, 0.25, 0.14, 0.29 and 0.40 respectively. The genetic correlations between MCY and the variables MY270, MY270/A, MY305, PP and FP was: 0.85; 1.00; 0.89; 0.14 and 0.06, respectively. This way, the selection for the production of milk in long period should increase MCY. However, in the search of animals that produce milk with quality, the genetic parameters suggest that another index should be composed allying these studied traits.

  5. The influence of dietary nitrogen reduction and conjugated linoleic acid supply to dairy cows on fatty acids in milk and their transfer to ripened cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, S; Cesaro, G; Cecchinato, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Tagliapietra, F; Bittante, G

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of reducing the dietary crude protein content, with or without a supply of protected conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), on the milk fatty acid (FA) yield and recovery in 90d ripened cheese. Twenty mid-lactation Friesian dairy cows were reared for 4 periods of 3wk each in groups of 5, following a 4×4 Latin square design. Cows were fed 4 different rations, consisting of a combination of the 2 dietary crude protein levels [150 (CP15) or 123 (CP12) g of crude protein/kg of dry matter], with or without a conjugated linoleic acid supply (80g/d, providing 5.57 and 5.40g/d of C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and C18:2 trans-10,cis-12, respectively). Milk yield was recorded. Twice in each period, milk samples were analyzed for protein, fat, and lactose content, and 10 L milk samples (pooled by group) were processed to produce 96 cheeses, which were ripened for 90d. Milk and cheese fat were analyzed for their FA profiles. Milk and cheese FA were expressed as daily yields and relative proportions, and nutrient recoveries were computed. Dietary crude protein reduction had small or no effects on the yield and relative presence of FA in milk and cheese, except for a small increase in mid-chain branched saturated fatty acids. The CLA supply strongly reduced the yield of various categories of FA, and had major effects on short-chain FA of de novo synthesis, leading to changes in the relative proportions of the various FA in milk and cheese. The addition of CLA tended to reduce uniformly the recovery of all milk constituents and of short-, medium-, and long-chain FA groups, but we observed large differences among individual FA with apparent recoveries ranging between 640 and 1,710g/kg. The highest recoveries were found for polyunsaturated long-chain FA, the lowest for saturated or monounsaturated short- or medium-chain FA. A notable rearrangement of these FA components, particularly the minor ones, took place during ripening.

  6. Detection of Shiga-like toxin producing Escherichia coli from raw milk cheeses produced in Wallonia [Belgium].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Lioui M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga-like toxin Escherichia coli (STEC implicated in aqueous diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome, has become a serious health problem in various countries. In Belgium, all cases are sporadic and no outbreak has been detected so far. Cattle are thought to be a reservoir for E. coli O157:H7, and many foodborne diseases have been associated with the consumption of minced beef, beefburgers and raw milk. Recently, foodborne outbreaks were concerned with different unusual foods such as acidic products. Although some data suggest that STEC are not prevalent within dairy products, the aim of this work was to assess the prevalence of E. coli O157 and non-O157 STEC in raw milk cheeses produced in the southern part of Belgium (Wallonia. For this purpose, 153 frozen samples of soft and semi-soft cheeses made with raw cow, ewe and goat milk were analysed for the presence of E. coli O157 and STEC. By using a dynabeads immunomagnetic separation technique (Dynabeads anti-E. coli O157, Dynal followed by streaking onto sorbitol MacConckey agar, no sample was found contaminated by E. coli O157 serotype. By using polymerase chain reaction achieved from a loopful of confluent bacterial material growing onto MacConckey agar, the use of consensus primers detected stx genes in 11.1/ of the samples but Shiga-like toxin producing strains could be isolated only in five of them (3.3/. The isolation rate seems to be optimum for samples with a thermotolerant coliform count arround or below 102 cfu per g. The five Shiga-like toxin isolates were identified as belonging to the species Hafnia alvei or Enterobacter amnigenius without any accessory virulence factors needed to cause illness. Nevertheless, because of the ability of STEC to survive adverse conditions and the possibility for commensal non-pathogenic enteric bacteria to become pathogenic, raw milk cheeses are to be considered at risk for foodborne STEC contamination.

  7. 21 CFR 133.183 - Romano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to be a semisolid mass. The... Products § 133.183 Romano cheese. (a) Romano cheese is the food prepared from cow's milk or sheep's milk or goat's milk or mixtures of two or all of these and other ingredients specified in this section, by...

  8. Effect of calcium on fatty acid bioaccessibility during in vitro digestion of Cheddar-type cheeses prepared with different milk fat fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Bribiesca, Erik; Turgeon, Sylvie L; Britten, Michel

    2017-02-08

    Calcium plays an important role in intestinal lipid digestion by increasing the lipolysis rate, but also limits fatty acid bioaccessibility by producing insoluble Ca soaps with long-chain fatty acids at intestinal pH conditions. The aim of this study was to better understand the effect of Ca on the bioaccessibility of milk fat from Cheddar-type cheeses. Three anhydrous milk fats (AMF) with different fatty acid profiles (olein, stearin, or control AMF) were used to prepare Cheddar-type cheeses, which were then enriched or not with Ca using CaCl2 during the salting step. The cheeses were digested in vitro, and their disintegration and lipolysis rates were monitored during the process. At the end of digestion, lipids were extracted under neutral and acidic pH conditions to compare free fatty acids under intestinal conditions in relation to total fatty acids released during the digestion process. The cheeses prepared with the stearin (the AMF with the highest ratio of long-chain fatty acids) were more resistant to disintegration than the other cheeses, owing to the high melting temperature of that AMF. The Ca-enriched cheeses had faster lipolysis rates than the regular Ca cheeses. Chromatographic analysis of the digestion products showed that Ca interacted with long-chain fatty acids, producing Ca soaps, whereas no interaction with shorter fatty acids was detected. Although higher Ca levels resulted in faster lipolysis rates, driven by the depletion of reaction products as Ca soaps, such insoluble compounds are expected to reduce the bioavailability of fatty acids by hindering their absorption. These effects on lipid digestion and absorption are of interest for the design of food matrices for the controlled release of fat-soluble nutrients or bioactive molecules.

  9. Effects of adsorbents in dairy cow diet on milk quality and cheese-making properties

    OpenAIRE

    Pirlo, G.; C. Tornielli; Abeni, F.; M. P. Cattaneo; L. Migliorati

    2010-01-01

    The use of adsorbents (clinoptilolite+sepiolite) in the diet of cows was evaluated in two trials. A total of 52 Italian Friesian cows were assigned to one of two dietary treatments, control and adsorbent (CON vs. ADS). Individual and bulk milk samples were collected. On individual data, no significant difference was found between treatments in milk yield, milk fat, protein, and lactose concentrations, milk protein yield, pH, and titratable acidity, both in summer and spring. In spring only, t...

  10. Fatty acid profiles of milk and Minas frescal cheese from lactating grazed cows supplemented with peanut cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Weiler Giacomazza; Viegas, Julio; Barbosa, Analívia Martins; Oliveira, Ronaldo Lopes; Dias, Carina Anunciação; Costa, Emellinne Souza; Nornberg, José Laerte; de Carvalho, Gleidson Giordano Pinto; Bezerra, Leilson Rocha; Silveira, Alisson Minozzo

    2016-02-01

    Milk and Minas frescal cheese were evaluated from crossbred Holstein × Gir cows that were fed diets enriched with 0, 33, 66 and 100% inclusion levels of palm kernel cake in a concentrated supplement in replace of soybean meal. Eight crossbred lactating cows were distributed (four animals × four treatments × four periods) in the experimental design of double 4 × 4 Latin squares. The capric (C : 10, P = 0.0270), undecylic (C : 11, P = 0.0134), and lauric (C : 12, P = 0.0342) saturated fatty acid concentrations and CLA (C18 : 2c9t11, P = 0.0164) of the milk fat decreased linearly with an increasing percentage of peanut cake in the diet. The increased peanut cake content (100%) in the diet was associated with a linear decrease in C : 10 (P = 0.0447), C : 12 (P = 0.0002), mirystic (C : 14, P 0.05) ratios were not influenced by the different peanut cake levels. The inclusion of up to 100% peanut cake as a substitution for soybean meal in the concentrate of grazing lactating cows resulted in changes in the nutritional quality of their milk products, as indicated by the increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids and the decrease of saturated fatty acids (lauric, myristic, and palmitic).

  11. Comparison of γ-aminobutyric acid and biogenic amine content of different types of ewe’s milk cheese produced in Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavina Manca

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bioactive compounds γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and biogenic amines (BA, together with protein-free amino acids, were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in ewe’s milk cheeses produced in Sardinia with different technological traits. The study included three types of cheese: Pecorino Sardo PDO, Pecorino and Casu Marzu. Farmhouse Casu Marzu and Pecorino showed GABA content (maximum levels: 1001.3 and 378.1 mg 100 g–1 respectively that had never been found so high in cheese before, suggesting that these types of cheese present ideal conditions to produce GABA. These two types of cheese also showed high levels of BA (their total maximum levels were 1035.7 and 288.0 mg 100 g–1 respectively. Pearson correlation analysis detected significant correlation between GABA and the main BA present in the cheeses (tyramine, cadaverine and putrescine, suggesting that the factors affecting the production of GABA are the same as those influencing BA formation.

  12. Proving the adulteration of ewe and goat cheeses with cow milk using the reference method of isoelectric focusing of γ-casein

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša Mikulec; Dijana Plavljanić; Jasminka Špoljarić; Biljana Radeljević; Jasmina Havranek; Neven Antunac

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a reference method for the detection of cow milk in ewe and goat cheeses (EC 273/08) in order to protect manufacturers and consumers from adulterations and imitations, and to ensure alignment with the demands of domestic and EU markets. The method includes isolation of casein from cheese, isoelectric focusing of γ2- and γ3-casein originating from the hydrolysis of β-casein by plasmin, the detection and quantitative determination of γ-casein in cow, ewe a...

  13. Foodborne pathogens and microbiological characteristics of raw milk soft cheese produced and on retail sale in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Paula Mendonça; Viçosa, Gabriela Nogueira; Yamazi, Anderson Keizo; Ortolani, Maria Beatriz Tassinari; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2009-03-01

    The consumption of raw milk soft cheeses (RMSC), which are typically manufactured in small dairy farms under unsatisfactory hygiene conditions, is common in Brazil. Due to these production characteristics, this type of cheese is a potential carrier of pathogenic microorganisms, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, and enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus spp. Considering these characteristics, in this work, we aimed to detect the presence of these pathogenic microorganisms in RMC and to evaluate their microbiological quality. Fifty-five samples of this product were collected from different noninspected commercial establishments and submitted to the enumeration of mesophilic aerobes (MA), total coliforms (TC), Escherichia coli, and coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS), and detection of L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. All analyzed samples were negative for Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes. All samples presented counts of MA higher than 10(6) colony forming units/g (CFU/g; range, 3.0x10(6) to 4.0x10(9)). TC were present at levels between 1.0x10(3) and 1.8x10(8) CFU/g, and E. coli between 1.0x10(2) and 3.5x10(6) CFU/g. CPS were detected in 17 (30.9%) samples at levels higher than 10(4) CFU/g. These results confirm the poor microbiological quality of raw milk used in the manufacturing of RMC samples, and also the inadequate production conditions. Therefore, the evaluation of microbiological safety and quality of these products must be constantly reported to alert the official agencies about the significance of proper inspection.

  14. Degree of antioxidant protection: a parameter to trace the origin and quality of goat's milk and cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoferrato, L; Manzi, P; Marconi, S; Fedele, V; Claps, S; Rubino, R

    2007-10-01

    Traceability is an essential tool in reassuring consumers and traders that food is as safe, authentic, and of good quality as expected. Today, food traceability procedures often consist of attached documents and declarations, but scientific parameters that could objectively identify a product would be preferable. Scientific efforts in this area are mostly focused on selection and validation of experimental indicators that would be useful for tracing a food product in any step of its commercial life, describing its raw materials, processing procedures, and storage conditions. In this research, milk and cheese samples from zero grazing and grazing goats were studied to identify a tracing parameter correlated to the feeding system. In particular, alpha-tocopherol and cholesterol were analyzed by HPLC on a normal phase column and were combined to calculate the degree of antioxidant protection (DAP). This parameter, expressed as the molar ratio between antioxidant compounds and an oxidation target, is useful for tracing and distinguishing products from grazing and zero-grazing animals. Degree of antioxidant protection values greater than 7.0 x 10(-3) were found in samples from grazing goats and values lower than 7.0 x 10(-3) were found in samples from zero-grazing goats, for both milk and cheese, meaning that cholesterol was highly protected against oxidative reactions when herbage was the only feed or was dominant in the goat diet. The reliability of DAP to measure the antioxidant protection of cholesterol appeared more effective when the feeding system was based on grazing than when cut herbage was utilized indoors by animals. The DAP index was able to distinguish dairy products when the grazed herbage in the goats' diet exceeded 15%.

  15. Comparison between genetic parameters of cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits measured from individual model cheese-making methods or predicted from unprocessed bovine milk samples using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittante, G; Ferragina, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A

    2014-10-01

    Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry. The aim of this study was to infer the genetic parameters of some cheese yield-related traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis and compare the results with those obtained using an individual model cheese-producing procedure. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were produced using 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows, and individual measurements were taken for 10 traits: 3 cheese yield traits (fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 milk nutrient recovery traits (fat, protein, total solids, and energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits per cow (fresh curd, total solids, and water weight of the curd). Each unprocessed milk sample was analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 (Foss, Hillerød, Denmark) over the spectral range, from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). The FTIR spectrum-based prediction models for the previously mentioned traits were developed using modified partial least-square regression. Cross-validation of the whole data set yielded coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation of 0.65 to 0.95 for all traits, except for the recovery of fat (0.41). A 3-fold external validation was also used, in which the available data were partitioned into 2 subsets: a training set (one-third of the herds) and a testing set (two-thirds). The training set was used to develop calibration equations, whereas the testing subsets were used for external validation of the calibration equations and to estimate the heritabilities and genetic correlations of the measured and FTIR-predicted phenotypes. The coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation results obtained from the training sets were very similar to those obtained from the whole

  16. Autochthonous cheeses of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatan Sarić; Sonja Bijeljac

    2003-01-01

    Despite the migration of people towards cities, autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina survived. Technologies of these cheeses are simple and adapted to humble mountain limitations. Geographical occasions and rich mountain pastures created a certain participation of ewe's milk cheeses. Communicative isolation of hilly-mountain regions resulted in "closed" cheese production in small households. Autochthonous cheeses in Bosnia and Herzegovina have various origins. Different cheeses are...

  17. 21 CFR 133.179 - Pasteurized process cheese spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are cream, milk, skim milk, buttermilk, cheese whey... cream, albumin from cheese whey, and skim milk cheese for manufacturing. (e) The emulsifying agents... more than 44 percent but not more than 60 percent, and the milk fat content is not less than 20...

  18. Lactic acid microbiota identification in water, raw milk, endogenous starter culture, and fresh Minas artisanal cheese from the Campo das Vertentes region of Brazil during the dry and rainy seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, R D; Oliveira, L G; Sant'Anna, F M; Luiz, L M P; Sandes, S H C; Silva, C I F; Silva, A M; Nunes, A C; Penna, C F A M; Souza, M R

    2016-08-01

    Minas artisanal cheese, produced in the Campo das Vertentes region of Brazil, is made from raw milk and endogenous starter cultures. Although this cheese is of great historical and socioeconomic importance, little information is available about its microbiological and physical-chemical qualities, or about its beneficial microbiota. This work was aimed at evaluating the qualities of the cheese and the components used for its production, comparing samples collected during the dry and rainy seasons. We also conducted molecular identification and isolated 50 samples of lactic acid bacteria from cheese (n=21), water (n=3), raw milk (n=9), and endogenous starter culture (n=17). The microbiological quality of the cheese, water, raw milk, and endogenous starter culture was lower during the rainy period, given the higher counts of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus and total and thermotolerant coliforms. Enterococcus faecalis was the lactic acid bacteria isolated most frequently (42.86%) in cheese samples, followed by Lactococcus lactis (28.57%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (14.29%). Lactobacillus brevis (5.88%), Enterococcus pseudoavium (5.88%), Enterococcus durans (5.88%), and Aerococcus viridans (5.88%) were isolated from endogenous starter cultures and are described for the first time in the literature. The lactic acid bacteria identified in the analyzed cheeses may inhibit undesirable microbiota and contribute to the safety and flavor of the cheese, but this needs to be evaluated in future research.

  19. Occurrence of Bacillus cereus in raw milk receiving from UF-Feta Cheese Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhila Moradi-Khatoonabadi

    2013-05-01

    Conclusion: It seems that for classifying raw milk quality, AeSC might be used as a more effective quality factor than TVC. Management commitment is effective to improve quality by balance between the amount and quality of receiving raw milk. This leads to the lower contamination in dairy plants and final products.

  20. Is there a feeding strategy to increase milk casein content?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Formigoni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Because more than 60% of milk produced in Italy is transformed into cheese, milk economical value strongly depends on cheese yield. Among the factors that influence cheese yield, milk casein and fat content plays a major role: when milk is converted into Grana Padano and Parmigiano reggiano, three grams of seasoned cheese are produced from one gram of milk casein.....

  1. Biodiversity and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Alpine Raw Cow’s Milk Cheeses

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    Elena Franciosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “Nostrano-cheeses” are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow’s milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB developing during maturation of “Nostrano-cheeses” and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months. A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n=97 were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg was a Sc. thermophilus.

  2. Sensorial characteristics and fatty acid mozzarella cheese from milk of crossbred cows fed with palm oil and coconut fat - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i4.20158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Aparecida da Silva Corradini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to improve nutritional quality of cows’ milk and use it as raw material for mozzarella cheese. Three treatments were tested with 23 healthy animals ranging power: control, palm oil and coconut oil. Collection was performed in 21 days and another after 36 days. Proximate composition (moisture, ash, fat, protein, carbohydrates, sensory, color (CIE L*, a*, b* and texture were made for mozzarella cheese. The fatty acids (FA present in mozzarella cheese were determined by chromatography. Saturated fatty acids (SFA were the most abundant in cheese. The results point that it is feasible to add various fat sources in animal feed for milk and milk products in dairy cows.   

  3. Screening for antimicrobial and proteolytic activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from cow, buffalo and goat milk and cheeses marketed in the southeast region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulini, Fabricio L; Hymery, Nolwenn; Haertlé, Thomas; Le Blay, Gwenaelle; De Martinis, Elaine C P

    2016-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can be isolated from different sources such as milk and cheese, and the lipolytic, proteolytic and glycolytic enzymes of LAB are important in cheese preservation and in flavour production. Moreover, LAB produce several antimicrobial compounds which make these bacteria interesting for food biopreservation. These characteristics stimulate the search of new strains with technological potential. From 156 milk and cheese samples from cow, buffalo and goat, 815 isolates were obtained on selective agars for LAB. Pure cultures were evaluated for antimicrobial activities by agar antagonism tests and for proteolytic activity on milk proteins by cultivation on agar plates. The most proteolytic isolates were also tested by cultivation in skim milk followed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the fermented milk. Among the 815 tested isolates, three of them identified as Streptococcus uberis (strains FT86, FT126 and FT190) were bacteriocin producers, whereas four other ones identified as Weissella confusa FT424, W. hellenica FT476, Leuconostoc citreum FT671 and Lactobacillus plantarum FT723 showed high antifungal activity in preliminary assays. Complementary analyses showed that the most antifungal strain was L. plantarum FT723 that inhibited Penicillium expansum in modified MRS agar (De Man, Rogosa, Sharpe, without acetate) and fermented milk model, however no inhibition was observed against Yarrowia lipolytica. The proteolytic capacities of three highly proteolytic isolates identified as Enterococcus faecalis (strains FT132 and FT522) and Lactobacillus paracasei FT700 were confirmed by SDS-PAGE, as visualized by the digestion of caseins and whey proteins (β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin). These results suggest potential applications of these isolates or their activities (proteolytic activity or production of antimicrobials) in dairy foods production.

  4. Associations between pathogen-specific cases of subclinical mastitis and milk yield, quality, protein composition, and cheese-making traits in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbo, T; Ruegg, P L; Stocco, G; Fiore, E; Gianesella, M; Morgante, M; Pasotto, D; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-03-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations between pathogen-specific cases of subclinical mastitis and milk yield, quality, protein composition, and cheese-making traits. Forty-one multibreed herds were selected for the study, and composite milk samples were collected from 1,508 cows belonging to 3 specialized dairy breeds (Holstein Friesian, Brown Swiss, and Jersey) and 3 dual-purpose breeds of Alpine origin (Simmental, Rendena, and Grey Alpine). Milk composition [i.e., fat, protein, casein, lactose, pH, urea, and somatic cell count (SCC)] was analyzed, and separation of protein fractions was performed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Eleven coagulation traits were measured: 5 traditional milk coagulation properties [time from rennet addition to milk gelation (RCT, min), curd-firming rate as the time to a curd firmness (CF) of 20 mm (k20, min), and CF at 30, 45, and 60 min from rennet addition (a30, a45, and a60, mm)], and 6 new curd firming and syneresis traits [potential asymptotical CF at an infinite time (CFP, mm), curd-firming instant rate constant (kCF, % × min(-1)), curd syneresis instant rate constant (kSR, % × min(-1)), modeled RCT (RCTeq, min), maximum CF value (CFmax, mm), and time at CFmax (tmax, min)]. We also measured 3 cheese yield traits, expressing the weights of total fresh curd (%CYCURD), dry matter (%CYSOLIDS), and water (%CYWATER) in the curd as percentages of the weight of the processed milk, and 4 nutrient recovery traits (RECPROTEIN, RECFAT, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY), representing the percentage ratio between each nutrient in the curd and milk. Milk samples with SCC > 100,000 cells/mL were subjected to bacteriological examination. All samples were divided into 7 clusters of udder health (UH) status: healthy (cows with milk SCC cheese production was observed in the 2 UH status groups with the highest milk SCC (i.e., contagious IMI and culture-negative samples with high SCC), revealing a discrepancy

  5. Qualitative evaluation of buffalo cheese using FTIR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Coroian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FTIR is a rapid technique based on infrared which has been used to analyze the followingsamples of cheese: traditional buffalo milk cheese, mouldy cheese traditionally produced (in Mesendorf,buffalo milk cheese (Napolact and buffalo mozzarella (Italy. Here were highlighted main wavelengths atwhich the main components were observed in cheese, namely: fat, protein, lactose and water. Thesecompounds have been outlined in terms of quality. The presence of water was observed in the region of3600-3010 cm-1, showing a high content in water for mozzarella, followed by buffalo milk cheese,traditional cheese and the lowest content being observed to mouldy cheese.

  6. Detection of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk to prevent late blowing in cheese by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panelli, Simona; Brambati, Eva; Bonacina, Cesare; Feligini, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum has been identified as the main causal agent of the late blowing defect in cheese, with major effects on quality and commercial value. In this work, for the first time, we applied automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) approach to diagnose the presence of C. tyrobutyricum in raw milk before cheesemaking. A species-specific primer set was designed and used for this original application of the ARISA. Sensitivity of detection, reproducibility of the fluorescent PCR assay, and repeatability of the capillary electrophoretic analysis of amplicons were evaluated using DNA extracted from milk added with known amounts of C. tyrobutyricum genome copies, ranging from 3 × 10(6) to 3. Results indicated that the sensitivity of the technique permits to detect the bacterium in all the samples. The reproducibility, evaluated by analyzing 3 sets of serial dilutions, resulted satisfactory, with little deviation within PCR reactions amplifying the same starting amount of template (standard deviations ≤ 0.1, coefficients of variation ≤ 3%). The peaks' fluorescence displayed an evident correspondence with the number of genome copies contained in each dilution. The capillary electrophoretic analysis, tested by running a single PCR product per dilution point in 10 repeats, resulted efficient and highly repeatable, with excellent coefficients of variation ≤ 2% and standard deviations ≤ 0.1 in all the sample sets. This application of ARISA gives good estimates of the total C. tyrobutyricum DNA content allowing a specific, fine-scale resolution of this pollutant species in a complex system as milk. A further advantage linked to the automatization of the process.

  7. Effect of dietary inclusion of lampante olive oil on milk and cheese fatty acid profiles of ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of a dietary supplementation of lampant olive oil on the fatty aid profiles of the milk and cheese of ewes. Nine lactating ewes were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Dietary treatments were supplemented with 0 (control; T0, 36 (T1 and 88 (T2 g of lampante olive oil/kg of dry matter intake (DM. DM, milk yield and milk composition (fat and protein were not affected by dietary treatments. Oleic and vaccenic acids gradually increased (P P El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de la inclusión de aceite de oliva lampante en la dieta de ovejas sobre el perfil de ácidos grasos de leche y queso. Nueve ovejas fueron utilizadas en un diseño de CuadradoLatino 3 × 3. Las dietas fueron suplementadas con 0 (control; T0, 36 (T1 y 88 (T2 g de aceite de oliva lampante por kg de materia seca de alimento. La ingesta, la producción de leche y la composición de leche (grasa y proteína no se vieron afectados por los tratamientos. Los ácidos oleico y vaccénico incrementaron (P P < 0.05 en leche y queso a medida que la inclusión de aceite de oliva lampante se incrementó en la dieta. En conclusión, la inclusión de aceite de oliva lampante en dietas de ovejas lactantes aumenta la concentración de ácidos grasos monoinsaturados y disminuye la de los saturados en leche y queso con posibles efectos benéficos sobre la salud humana.

  8. HACCP在山羊乳软质干酪加工中的应用%HACCP in Goat Milk Soft Cheese Processing Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝战斌; 马兆瑞; 姚瑞祺

    2012-01-01

    The basic principle of HACCP was used on goat milk soft cheese production and the potential risk factors in the process were analyzed.Determined the critical control point in the goat milk soft cheese production,and ensured critical control points,critical limits and monitoring measures,developed HACCP control table,verified the HACCP system test by the food safety inspection method,guaranteed the quality and safety of goat milk soft cheese production in the process.%运用HACCP基本原理对山羊乳软质干酪生产过程中潜在的危险因素进行了分析,确定了山羊乳软质干酪生产中的关键控制点,并确定了能保证关键控制点临界限度和监控措施,制定了HACCP控制表,最后用食品安全性检验方法对HACCP体系检验查证,确保山羊乳软质干酪生产过程中的质量和安全性。

  9. Microbiological quality and safety of raw milk and soft cheese and detection of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria with antagonistic activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Spp., and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolani, Maria Beatriz Tassinari; Yamazi, Anderson Keizo; Moraes, Paula Mendonça; Viçosa, Gabriela Nogueira; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to characterize the microbiological quality and safety of raw milk and soft cheese, verifying possible associations between microbial populations, and the detection of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with antagonistic activity against foodborne pathogens. Raw milk (n = 36) and soft cheese (n = 18) samples were collected and submitted for the analysis of mesophilic aerobes, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, LAB, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CPS), Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. In all, 389 LAB isolates were randomly selected and submitted for antagonistic tests against L. monocytogenes, St. aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Lactobacillus sakei. The samples presented high counts of mesophilic aerobes, total coliforms, and LAB, and also high and significant correlation indices between these populations. Low levels of CPS and E. coli were observed, as well as an absence of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes. A substantial portion of the analyzed samples presented LAB cultures with antagonistic activity, but not against Salmonella Typhimurium. The obtained results indicate the antimicrobial potential of the autochthonous microbiota of raw milk and soft cheese. Despite the spoilage potential, the LAB present in the studied food products can be isolated and properly characterized as antagonistic cultures, to be used in bioconservation studies for pathogen control in foods.

  10. 21 CFR 133.133 - Cream cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cream cheese. 133.133 Section 133.133 Food and... Products § 133.133 Cream cheese. (a) Description. (1) Cream cheese is the soft, uncured cheese prepared by..., nonfat milk, or cream, as defined in § 133.3, used alone or in combination. (2) Clotting enzymes....

  11. Surveillance of dairy production holdings supplying raw milk to the farmhouse cheese sector for Escherichia coli O157, O26 and O111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M; Buckley, J F; Whyte, P; O'Mahony, M; Anderson, W; Wall, P G; Fanning, S

    2007-01-01

    Clinically healthy domestic animals can harbour Escherichia coli O157 and other verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) strains in their faeces. Milk filters can be used to microbiologically monitor direct milk secretion and environmental contamination for these pathogens. The aim of this study was to establish baseline data on the prevalence and characteristics of VTEC organisms in lactating animals (bovine, ovine and caprine) supplying milk to the farmhouse cheese sector, with particular emphasis on serogroups O157, O111 and O26. Fifty-six bovine, 13 caprine and 5 ovine herds/flocks, the majority of which supplying milk for farmhouse cheese production, were surveyed from May 2004 to July 2005. Milk filters were analysed by immunomagnetic separation followed by PCR, on a serogroup-specific basis for E. coli O157, O26 and O111. Positive isolates were examined using a multiplex PCR protocol, for their potential to produce verocytotoxins (vt1/vt2), the haemolysin-encoding gene (hlyA) and the gene encoding attaching and effacement (eae). Five verocytotoxigenic and 22 non-virulent E. coli O157 isolates were detected. Seventeen E. coli O26 isolates were also detected, four of which were verocytotoxigenic, seven isolates contained the eae gene only and six isolates were devoid of any of the virulence factors. The VTEC O157 and O26 isolates contained the hlyA and eae genes along with the verocytotoxin genes. No E. coli O111 isolates were detected. Some of the herds were positive on more than one occasion and multiple E. coli serogroups were isolated from the same milk filter sample. Although all food products tested were VTEC negative, routine surveillance for such pathogens in raw milk/raw milk products is of public health importance. Herd-level surveillance along with subsequent risk management action may be a cost-effective component of risk reduction strategies for food production, drinking water supplies and the protection of public health.

  12. Determination of the percentage of milk (cow's, ewe's and goat's) in cheeses with different ripening times using near infrared spectroscopy technology and a remote reflectance fibre-optic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martín, I; Hernández-Hierro, J M; Morón-Sancho, R; Salvador-Esteban, J; Vivar-Quintana, A; Revilla, I

    2007-12-05

    In the present work we studied the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology employing a remote reflectance fibre-optic probe (with a 5 cm x 5 cm quartz window) for the analysis of the percentage of milk (cow's, ewe's and goat's) used in the elaboration of cheeses with different ripening times. To do so, cheeses with known and varying percentages of cow's, ewe's and goat's milk were elaborated (112 samples with milk collected in winter and 112 samples with milk collected in summer) and used as reference material, and ripening controls were performed over 6 months. The method allows immediate control of the cheese without prior sample treatment or destruction by direct application of the fibre-optic probe to the sample. The regression method employed was modified partial least squares (MPLS). Of all the samples (224), 200 formed to so-called calibration set and the other 24 were used for external validation. The calibration results obtained using 200 samples of cheese allowed the percentage of cow's, ewe's and goat's milk to be measured. The multiple correlation coefficients (RSQ) and prediction corrected standard errors (SEP(C)) obtained were respectively, 0.834 and 11.6% for cow's milk; 0.871 and 9.8% for goat's milk; 0.880 and 10.6% for ewe's milk. The ratio performance deviation (RPD) values obtained indicate that the NIRS equations can be applied to unknown samples.

  13. Effect of chestnut tannin in the diet of lactating ewes on milk and cheese quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Buccioni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A commercial product consisting of pure soluble tannins extracted from chestnut wood was introduced into the diet of lactating ewes at pasture, at the level of 20 g / head / day in the concentrate mixed feed. The supplementation with tannins did not exert any influence on milk yield and on lactose and fat content of milk, but induced an increase in milk protein yield, apparently in heat coagulable proteins. This is maybe due to an increase of the rumen undegradable fraction of dietary proteins. The somatic cells count and the bacterial load of milk were not affected as well. Further studies are needed to confirm these important results, in order to optimize the nitrogen metabolic balance of ruminant animals, among the other advantages.

  14. Bitter taste – cheese failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Bitter taste is serous and very often cheese failure in modern cheesemaking process. In this paper the sources and bitter taste development in cheese will be presented. Bitterness in cheese is linked to bitter compounds development during cheese ripening. Most of the bitter compounds come from bitter peptides, the mechanism of theirs development being due to proteasepeptidase system of the cured enzymes and the milk cultures as well as other proteases present in cheese. By the action of curd enzymes, the milk protein - casein - is firstly degraded into high molecular weight compounds possessing no bitter taste. Those compounds are then degraded, by milk protease cultures, to hydrophobic bitter peptides of low molecular weight further degraded, by bacterial endopeptidase during cheese ripening, to bitter peptides and amino acids. In the case when no balance exists, between bitter compounds development and breakdown by lactic acid bacteria peptidase, an accumulation of bitter peptides occurs thus having an influence on cheese bitterness. During cheese ripening naturally occurring milk protease – plasmin, and thermostable proteases of raw milk microflora are also involved in proteolytic process. Fat cheese lipases, initiated by lipase originating from psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk as well as other cheese lipases, are also associated with bitter taste generation. The other sources of bitterness come from the forages, the medicament residues as well as washing and disinfecting agents. In order to eliminate these failures a special care should be taken in milk quality as well as curd and milk culture selection. At this point technological norms and procedures, aimed to maintain the proteolysis balance during cheese ripening, should be adjusted, thus eliminating the bitter taste of the cheese.

  15. Seasonal trend of some parameters of the milk quality payment for Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mariani

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out during 4 years (2002¸2005 on 85587 bulk milk samples from the evening and the morning milking of 1340 dairy herds subdivided in plain, hill and mountain. All the parameters were influenced by year, season and year*season interaction. Titratable acidity showed higher values in autumn (3.28 °SH/50ml and lower in summer (3.22. Somatic cell count was lower in winter and higher in summer. The calculated casein values, were higher in autumn (2.54 g/100g and lower in spring (2.42. Fat content values were higher in autumn (3.67 g/100g and lower in spring and summer (3.47-3.46. During summer the quality of the milk had a general worsening. Such a worsening was more evident during summer of the year 2003, characterised by THI values higher than those of years 2002, 2004 and 2005.

  16. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N. Furtado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain (Lc. lactis DF4Mi, isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products.

  17. Primary proteolysis of white brined cheese prepared from raw cow milk monitored by high-molarity Tris buffer SDS-PAGE system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenko Smiljanić

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate primary proteolysis of white brined cow cheese prepared from raw milk by SDS-electrophoretic method based on high-molarity Tris buffer system and to correlate with the results of other commonly used parameters. Proteolytic changes of white brined cow cheese were monitored by three parameters: total protein, water soluble proteins and degree of proteolysis. Changes of major casein fractions were followed by SDS-electrophoretic system in reducing conditions. The total protein content and moisture content of white brined cow cheese were significantly affected by ripening. Ripening in brine increased water soluble proteins and degree of proteolysis. Major caseins were differently resistant to proteolysis; αs-CN was more susceptible than β-CN. The αs-CN content was highly and negatively correlated with time of ripening and water soluble proteins whereas no significant correlation (p<0.05 between β-CN content and these parameters was found. Also, a strong significant correlation (p<0.05 between the amount of low molecular weight products and time of ripening, water soluble proteins and αs-CN content was observed. SDS-PAGE method used in this study could be useful for monitoring the white cow cheese proteolysis.

  18. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain ( Lc . lactis DF4Mi), isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg) caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products.

  19. Identification of Clostridium beijerinckii, Cl. butyricum, Cl. sporogenes, Cl. tyrobutyricum isolated from silage, raw milk and hard cheese by a multiplex PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Paola; Vanoni, Laura; Silvetti, Tiziana; Morandi, Stefano; Brasca, Milena

    2012-08-01

    Late blowing, caused by the outgrowth of clostridial spores present in raw milk and originating from silage, can create considerable product loss, especially in the production of hard and semi-hard cheeses. The conventional method for the isolation of Clostridium spp. from cheeses with late-blowing symptoms is very complicated and the identification of isolates is problematic. The aim of this work was the development of a multiplex PCR method for the detection of the main dairy-related clostridia such as: Cl. beijerinckii, Cl. butyricum, Cl. sporogenes, Cl. tyrobutyricum. Samples derived from silage, raw milk and hard cheese were analysed by the most probable number (MPN) enumeration. Forty-four bacterial strains isolated from gas positive tubes were used to check the reliability of the multiplex PCR assay. The specificity of the primers was tested by individually analysing each primer pair and the primer pair combined in the multiplex PCR. It was interesting to note that the samples not identified by the multiplex PCR assay were amplified by V2-V3 16S rRNA primer pair and the sequencing revealed the aligned 16S rRNA sequences to be Paenibacillus and Bacillus spp. This new molecular assay provides a simple promising alternative to traditional microbiological methods for a rapid, sensitive detection of clostridia in dairy products.

  20. Evaluation of the spiral plating method for the enumeration of microorganisms throughout the manufacturing and ripening of a raw goat's milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Carballo, Javier; Capita, Rosa; Bernardo, Ana; García-López, María Luisa

    2002-02-01

    A statistical comparison of the spiral plate count (SPLPC) and the standard plate count (SPC) methods for enumeration of microorganisms in raw goat's milk cheese throughout its manufacturing and ripening was carried out. Enumeration of mesophiles, lactic acid bacteria (presumptive lactococci, presumptive leuconostocs, and presumptive lactobacilli), Micrococcaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and molds and yeasts was carried out for milk, curd, and 2-, 5-, 10-, 17-, and 27-day-old cheeses. Average counts for the SPLPC and SPC methods differed by less than half of a log cycle for all microbial groups studied (range of difference, -0.1386 [mesophiles] to +0.4397 [presumptive lactobacilli]). The results of the SPLPC method compared favorably with the results of the SPC procedure for mesophiles, presumptive lactococci, presumptive leuconostocs, Enterobacteriaceae, and molds and yeasts (the variance between replicate platings was close to 0.005, and correlation coefficients were >0.9). Correlation coefficients were lower for Micrococcaceae (r = 0.824) and presumptive lactobacilli (r = 0.670). Analysis of variance showed that the plating method was a significant factor (P microorganisms in goat cheese throughout its manufacturingand ripening processes. However, the suitability of the SPLPC method depends mainly on the microbial group studied.

  1. COTTAGE CHEESE PRODUCTS FUNCTIONALITY

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    L. V. Golubeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cottage cheese products holds a significant place among the dairy and milk-containing products. The range of products includes cheese: cheese, pastes, creams, cakes, etc. Such diversity can be attributed to their popularity among the population and benefit brought by the body from regular use. Curd protein is much better and easier to digest by the body than protein fish, meat or milk. Rich curd products lysine and methionine. Minerals contained in cheese products have a positive effect on bone formation and structure of tissues. The composition of curd products, in addition to cheese and dairy ingredients may include non-dairy ingredients origin. Today, for the production of cheese products use the most advanced technologies to further enrich its structure and significantly improve the nutritional value. Pine nut is widely used in the manufacture of many dairy products. But, in most cases, the production of dairy products as a filler used pine nut cake, which deprives the finished product valuable cedar oil. The authors proposed a technology for producing curd product with the addition of pine nuts and honey (pine nuts and fructose. Compatible with cream cheese filling insertion determined sensory organoleptic point scale. he optimum dosage of components: pine nuts – 5 %, honey – 10 % fructose – 7 %. Technological process of cottage cheese product is different from the traditional operations training components and their introduction into the finished cheese. Identify indicators of quality of the new product. Production of curd products thus expanding the range of dairy products functional orientation.

  2. 花生乳牛乳新鲜干酪加工工艺优化%Optimization of Preparation Process for Peanut-milk Fresh Cheese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤丽新; 杨柳; 马井喜; 陈海燕; 马虹; 张凤宽

    2011-01-01

    用花生乳代替部分牛乳生产新鲜干酪,对花生乳添加比例、氯化钙添加量、凝乳酶添加量3个因素对凝乳效果的影响分别进行单因素试验,确定各自合适比例后,再采用L9(3^3)正交试验,确定花生乳牛乳新鲜干酪最佳生产工艺。结果表明花生乳添加量20%、氯化钙添加量0.06%、凝乳酶添加量0.002%时制作出的新鲜花生乳牛乳干酪成品呈乳白色、柔软、有弹性、具有花生风味,产品出品率为16.33%。%In this study, peanut milk was used to partially substitute milk during the preparation process of fresh cheese. Effects of three factors including peanut milk amount, calcium amount and curd enzyme amount were explored by o one-factor-at-a-time combined with orthogonal array design method. The results indicated that the optimal formula was peanut milk 20%, calcium chloride 0.06% and curd enzyme of 0.002%. The resultant fresh peanut-milk cheese revealed milk-white color, soft and elastic texture and peanut flavor, and the yield is 16.33%.

  3. Microbiota characterization of a Belgian protected designation of origin cheese, Herve cheese, using metagenomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcenserie, V; Taminiau, B; Delhalle, L; Nezer, C; Doyen, P; Crevecoeur, S; Roussey, D; Korsak, N; Daube, G

    2014-10-01

    Herve cheese is a Belgian soft cheese with a washed rind, and is made from raw or pasteurized milk. The specific microbiota of this cheese has never previously been fully explored and the use of raw or pasteurized milk in addition to starters is assumed to affect the microbiota of the rind and the heart. The aim of the study was to analyze the bacterial microbiota of Herve cheese using classical microbiology and a metagenomic approach based on 16S ribosomal DNA pyrosequencing. Using classical microbiology, the total counts of bacteria were comparable for the 11 samples of tested raw and pasteurized milk cheeses, reaching almost 8 log cfu/g. Using the metagenomic approach, 207 different phylotypes were identified. The rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses was found to be highly diversified. However, 96.3 and 97.9% of the total microbiota of the raw milk and pasteurized cheese rind, respectively, were composed of species present in both types of cheese, such as Corynebacterium casei, Psychrobacter spp., Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Staphylococcus equorum, Vagococcus salmoninarum, and other species present at levels below 5%. Brevibacterium linens were present at low levels (0.5 and 1.6%, respectively) on the rind of both the raw and the pasteurized milk cheeses, even though this bacterium had been inoculated during the manufacturing process. Interestingly, Psychroflexus casei, also described as giving a red smear to Raclette-type cheese, was identified in small proportions in the composition of the rind of both the raw and pasteurized milk cheeses (0.17 and 0.5%, respectively). In the heart of the cheeses, the common species of bacteria reached more than 99%. The main species identified were Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, Psychrobacter spp., and Staphylococcus equorum ssp. equorum. Interestingly, 93 phylotypes were present only in the raw milk cheeses and 29 only in the pasteurized milk cheeses, showing the high diversity of the microbiota

  4. Habit Formation in Natural Cheese Consumption An Approach Based on Dynamic Demand Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    WAKABAYASHI, Katsufumi

    2010-01-01

    In expectation of growing cheese consumption, natural cheese production is being increased to reduce surplus milk and create high added value in raw milk. Other studies found positive trends in cheese consumption. However, those studies neither clarified recent trends, nor distinguished natural cheese from processed cheese. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the structure of natural cheese consumption, focusing on habit formation. We test structural changes in cheese demand using dynamic...

  5. Changes in conjugated linoleic acid and C18:1 isomers profile during the ripening of Pecorino Toscano cheese produced with raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Mele

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the evolution of the fatty acid profile, with particular attention to conjugated linoleic acid (CLA and to C18:1 isomers, during ripening of sheep cheese (Pecorino Toscano cheese produced with raw milk. After 60 days of ripening the total concentration of C18:1 isomers and that of CLA pool content decreased. In particular, if isomers profile is considered, the percentage of trans11 C18:1, trans10 C18:1 and cis9, trans11 CLA decreased as consequence of biohydrogenation or of double bonds isomerisation, while the concentration of trans10, cis12 CLA increased.

  6. POLYCHLORODIBENZODIOXINS (PCDDs, POLYCHLORODIBENZO-FURANS (PCDFs, AND DIOXIN-LIKE POLYCHLOROBIPHENYLS (DL-PCBs IN MILK, MOZZARELLA CHEESE, WHEY, AND WHEY CHEESE FROM BUFFALOES RAISED IN THE CAMPANIA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Cortesi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dioxins (PCDDs and PCDFs and PCBs are a group of and toxic organo-chlorinated chemicals comprising hundreds of structurally related compounds (congeners classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs. It is acknowledged that 17 PCDD and PCDF congeners are of major concern due to their toxicity; 12 PCB congeners are also recognized to express dioxin-like toxicity and are thereby identified as DL-PCBs. Due to their high persistence and lipophilic nature, dioxins and PCBs tend to accumulate in fat and their bio-accumulation through the food chain may pose the risk of causing adverse effects to human health. For the general population, dietary intake is the most important pathway of exposure to the aforesaid environmental contaminants: meat, milk and dairy products, and fish and other seafood products contribute to total daily intake for more than 90 %. To prevent excessive human exposure to dioxins and DL-PCBs, the European Commission established maximum levels for dioxins and the sum of dioxins and DL-PCBs in an array of food components mainly of animal origin (Regulation EC 1881/2006. In this study, dioxins and DL-PCB concentrations were measured in buffalo milk collected from three impounded Campania farms producing milk with different contamination levels. The fate of contaminants in mozzarella cheese, whey, and whey cheese was also investigated. Analyses were carried out by HRGC-HRMS using US EPA Method 1613. The results of this study show the carry-over of the contamination from milk to its dairy products.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes contamination in dairy plants: evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes environmental contamination in two cheese-making plants using sheeps milk

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    Michela Ibba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes harbouring niches established in the processing plant support post-process contamination of dairy products made from pasteurised or thermised milk. The present study investigated L. monocytogenes environmental contamination in two sheep’s milk cheese-making plants. Persistence of contamination in the area at higher risk was also investigated. During a one-year survey 7 samplings were carried out in each dairy plant, along the production lines of Pecorino Romano and ricotta salata cheese. A total of 613 environmental samples collected from food contact and non-food contact surfaces were analysed according to ISO 11290-1:2005 standard method. Identification of the isolated strains was carried out by polymerase chain reaction. L. monocytogenes prevalence was 23.2% in dairy A and 13.1% in dairy B, respectively. The higher prevalence rate was found in the following areas: salting, products washing, packaging, ricotta salata storage and Pecorino Romano ripening rooms. L. monocytogenes was never found in the cheese-making area. The probability of observing samples positive for the presence of L. monocytogenes was asso- ciated with dairy plant, sampling area and the period of cheese-making (P<0.001. The greater persistence of contamination over time was observed in the washing, salting, and Pecorino Romano ripening areas. The control of persistent environmental contamination relies on the identification of L. monocytogenes niches within the processing environment and the prevention of harborage sites formation. The importance of strict cleaning and sanitising procedure in controlling L. monocytogenes environmental contamination is confirmed by the lower level of contamination observed after these procedures were correctly implemented.

  8. Survival of Escherichia coli O26:H11 exceeds that of Escherichia coli O157:H7 as assessed by simulated human digestion of contaminated raw milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczycha, Stéphane D; Thévenot, Jonathan; Denis, Sylvain; Callon, Cécile; Livrelli, Valérie; Alric, Monique; Montel, Marie-Christine; Blanquet-Diot, Stéphanie; Thevenot-Sergentet, Delphine

    2014-02-17

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of human foodborne outbreaks. The consumption of raw milk dairy products may be an important route of STEC infection. For successful foodborne transmission, STEC strains must survive stress conditions met during gastrointestinal transit in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of two STEC strains of serotypes O157:H7 and O26:H11 during simulated human digestion in the TNO gastro-Intestinal tract Model (TIM) of contaminated uncooked pressed cheeses. The survival of cheese microflora during in vitro gastrointestinal transit was also determined for the first time. The level of STEC increased from 2 log₁₀ CFU/ml to 4 log₁₀ CFU/g during the first 24h of cheese making and remained stable at around 4 log₁₀ CFU/g during cheese ripening and conservation. During transit through the artificial stomach and duodenum, levels of STEC decreased: 0.2% of E. coli O157:H7 and 1.8% of E. coli O26:H11 were recovered at 150 min in the gastric compartment, compared with 14.3% for the transit marker. Bacterial resumption was observed in the jejunum and ileum: 35.8% of E. coli O157:H7 and 663.2% of E. coli O26:H11 were recovered at 360 min in the ileal compartment, compared with 12.6% for the transit marker. The fate of STEC was strain-dependent, the survival of E. coli O26:H11 being 13 times greater than that of E. coli O157:H7 at the end of digestion in the cumulative ileal deliveries. These data provide a better understanding of STEC behavior during gastrointestinal transit in humans after ingestion of contaminated cheese.

  9. Genetic and environmental relationships of different measures of individual cheese yield and curd nutrients recovery with coagulation properties of bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationships between various cheesemaking-related traits, namely the well-known traditional milk coagulation properties (MCP), the new curd firming and syneresis traits, the cheese yield, and the curd nutrient recoveries or whey losses (all measured at the individual level). Data were obtained from 1,167 Brown Swiss cows reared in 85 herds. A 2-L milk sample was collected once from each animal and assessed for 10 phenotypes related to changes in curd firmness (CF) over time, plus 7 cheesemaking traits. The CF-related traits included 4 traditional single-point lactodynamographic properties [rennet coagulation time (RCT, min); time to a CF of 20mm, min; and the CF 30 and 45 min after rennet addition (a30 and a45, respectively)], 4 parameters used to model the 360 CF data recorded over time for each milk sample [the potential asymptotic CF at infinite time (CFP, mm); the CF instant rate constant, % × min(-1); the syneresis instant rate constant, % × min(-1); and the RCT obtained from modeling individual samples], and 2 traits calculated from individual equations [the maximum CF(CFmax, mm); and the time at CFmax, min]. The cheesemaking traits included 3 cheese yield traits (weights of the fresh curd, curd solids and curd moisture as percent of the weights of the processed milk) and 4 milk nutrient recoveries in the curd (calculated as the percent ratios between a given nutrient in the curd versus that in the processed milk). Bayesian methodology-based multivariate analyses were used to estimate the phenotypic, additive genetic, herd/date, and residual relationships between the aforementioned traits, whereas statistical inferences were based on the marginal posterior distributions of the parameters of concern. The a45, CFP, and CFmax traits were genetically associated with all of the percent cheese yield traits (the additive genetic correlations varied from 0.752 to 0.855 for a45; 0.496 to 0.583 for CFP; and 0.750 to 0

  10. Determination of volatile fractions in raw milk and ripened cheese by means of GC-MS. Results of a survey performed in the marginal area between Italy and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Stefanon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The volatile fractions of milk and their evolution in ripened cheese were studied using purge and trap extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS. Eighteen samples of raw milk and cheese ripened for 70 days were collected in 2 consecutive years from dairy farms located in the border area between Italy and Slovenia. Twenty one volatile compounds not detected in the fresh milk used for cheese manufacturing, belonging mainly to the class of esters and alcohols, were found, while 8 compounds detected in milk were not found in cheese after 70 days of ripening. In cheese the majority of compounds increased significantly, even though the variations differed between the classes of volatile compounds. Concentration of alcohols, in particular ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-pentanol, increased considerably, while the content of ketones and terpenes was characterized by a significant, although small, rise that was largely related to a quantitative variation of only few compounds. Also esters, despite the high number of volatile compounds of new formation, showed a lower increase of concentration than that observed for the alcohols. Concentration of aldehydes, hydrocarbons and sulphur compounds remained unchanged, despite relevant variations involving the individual chemical compounds. Significant differences were also observed between the dairy product of the two countries, mainly for the concentration of volatile compounds belonging to the classes of alcohols, ketones and esters.

  11. The nonlinear effect of somatic cell count on milk composition, coagulation properties, curd firmness modeling, cheese yield, and curd nutrient recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbo, T; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between somatic cell count (SCC) in milk and several milk technological traits at the individual cow level. In particular, we determined the effects of very low to very high SCC on traits related to (1) milk yield and composition; (2) coagulation properties, including the traditional milk coagulation properties (MCP) and the new curd firming model parameters; and (3) cheese yield and recovery of milk nutrients in the curd (or loss in the whey). Milk samples from 1,271 Brown Swiss cows from 85 herds were used. Nine coagulation traits were measured: 3 traditional MCP [rennet coagulation time (RCT, min), curd firming rate (k20, min), and curd firmness after 30 min (a30, mm)] and 6 new curd firming and syneresis traits [potential asymptotic curd firmness at infinite time (CFP, mm), curd firming instant rate constant (kCF, % × min(-1)), syneresis instant rate constant (kSR, % × min(-1)), rennet coagulation time estimated using the equation (RCTeq, min), maximum curd firmness achieved within 45 min (CFmax, mm), and time at achievement of CFmax (tmax, min)]. The observed cheese-making traits included 3 cheese yield traits (%CYCURD, %CYSOLIDS, and %CYWATER, which represented the weights of curd, total solids, and water, respectively, as a percentage of the weight of the processed milk) and 4 nutrient recoveries in the curd (RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY, which each represented the percentage ratio between the nutrient in the curd and milk). Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model with the fixed effects of days in milk, parity, and somatic cell score (SCS), and the random effect of herd-date. Somatic cell score had strong influences on casein number and lactose, and also affected pH; these were traits characterized by a quadratic pattern of the data. The results also showed a negative linear relationship between SCS and milk yield. Somatic cell score influenced almost all of the tested

  12. Quantitative screening of strains for milk mozzarella cheese from Chinese buffalo milk%量化筛选中国水牛奶生产Mozzarella干酪所需发酵剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢毅; 李全阳; 王芳

    2013-01-01

    为了获得水牛奶Mozzarella干酪生产发酵剂所需菌种及其配比和用量的最佳方案,以自行筛选的保加利亚乳杆菌、嗜热链球菌、乳酸乳球菌、干酪乳杆菌为素材进行研究.通过检测所得水牛奶Mozzarella干酪样品的10项质量参数,对参数统计处理分析得到量化筛选结果,发现同时选用4个菌种、以相同的比例和3.0%的总添加量作为发酵剂制作的中国水牛奶Mozzarella干酪品质较优.%Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophiles, Lacto-bacillus lactis and Lactobacillus casei were studied to find out the components, proportion and dosage of Chinese buffalo milk Mozzarella cheese starters. Ten quality parameters of mozzarella cheese samples were examined and parameter statistical analysis from the 10 items was compared to get the quantitative screening results. The results showed that the optimal combination culture starters among the ratio of 4 species of strain were identical and the addition of the strain reached to 3.0% to produce Mozzarella cheese of Chinese buffalo milk.

  13. The Physicochemical Quality of Traditional Burduf Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Pop; Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc; Sorin Apostu; Ancuţa Mihaela Rotar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is the assessmentof the quality control of raw milk and traditional burduf cheese obtained fromcow milk mixed with 10% sheep milk. Appreciation of the integrity and freshness assessmentof milk (cow and sheep) was tested by physico-chemical analysis.On theshelf-live were determined the physico-chemical parameters in cheese samples. Theantibiotics residues were tested of the milk samples with portable analyser,model Rosa Charm Reader. Theresults of physico-chemical determi...

  14. First study on characterization of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes in verotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic E. coli isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized traditional cheeses in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaran, Alexandra; Mihaiu, Marian; Tăbăran, Flaviu; Colobatiu, Liora; Reget, Oana; Borzan, Mihai Marian; Dan, Sorin Daniel

    2017-03-01

    The study focused on the incidence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) in raw milk and traditional dairy cheeses marketed in Romania, characterizing the virulence and antibiotic resistance genes of these isolates. One hundred and twenty samples of raw milk and 80 samples of unpasteurized telemy cheese were collected and cultured according to the international standard protocol. All the characteristic E. coli cultures were analyzed for the presence of STa, STb, LT, stx1, and stx2 toxicity genes. The ETEC/VTEC strains were tested for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes, such as aadA1, tetA, tetB, tetC, tetG, dfrA1, qnrA, aaC, sul1, bla SHV , bla CMY , bla TEM , and ere(A), using PCR. The results showed that 27 samples (18.62%) were positive for one of the virulence genes investigated. 48.1% (n = 13) tested positive at the genes encoding for tetracycline resistance, tetA being the most prevalent one (61.5%; n = 8). A high percent (33.3%; n = 9) revealed the beta-lactamase (bla TEM ) resistance gene, and none of the samples tested positive for bla CMY and bla SHV genes. The genes responsible for resistance to sulfonamides (sul1) and trimethoprim (dfrA1) were detected in rates of 14.8% (n = 4) and 7.4% (n = 2), respectively. E. coli is highly prevalent in raw milk and unpasteurized cheeses marketed in Romania. These strains might represent an important reservoir of resistance genes which can easily spread into other European countries, given the unique market.

  15. Effect of different pastures on CLA content in milk and sheep cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Piredda

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that milk composition included conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is affected by animal feeding system (Cabiddu et al., 2001. In Sardinia dairy sheep feeding is mainly based on pastures. Most of them are characterised by self-regenerating species, like annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum Gaudin and burr medic (Medicago polymorpha L.. Non conventional species belonging to the Compositae family such as (Chrysanthemum coronarium L. seem interesting for sheep feeding when other herbages decrease in quality (late spring- early summer...

  16. Influence of ripening time on the amount of certain biogenic amines in rind and core of cow milk Livno cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonela Marijan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining the levels of biogenic amines in cheese except that it has significance for determining the nutritional value and hygienic accuracy, cheese as food can be used as a parameter to evaluate the conditions of production and/or ripening of products, and particularly in the selection of bacterial cultures. The purpose of this paper was to determine the effect of the ripening process on the amount of biogenic amines in cheese. For this purpose were conducted physico-chemical analysis, determination of biogenic amines and microbiological analysis. During the process of ripening Livno cheese from three different batches was taken one cheese from prime day and 9th, 20th, 29th, 50th, 60th and 105th day. From each cheese two samples were taken, one from the middle and one from the cheese rind. During 105th day of ripening Livno cheese, the presence of triptamin, ß-feniletlamine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, spermine and spermidine were determinated. The maximum total values of searched biogenic amines were found 105th day, in the middle 184.13 mg/kg and 76.26 mg/kg in the rind of cheese. With an indication that the largest share of value rep¬resent histamine with 43.9 % and tyramine with 38.2 % in the middle, respectively histamine with 31.6 % and tyramine with 31.5 % in the rind of cheese. The values of putrescine and spermine were in small ranges and they are not identified in all samples. The values of histamine and tyramine are almost a third more at 105th than 60th day. There was a significant difference between the middle and the rind of cheese in the values of biogenic amines. Correlation between biogenic amines and microorganisms has not been determined.

  17. Effect of feeding buckwheat and chicory silages on fatty acid profile and cheese-making properties of milk from dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälber, Tasja; Kreuzer, Michael; Leiber, Florian

    2013-02-01

    Fresh buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) and chicory (Cichorium intybus) had been shown to have the potential to improve certain milk quality traits when fed as forages to dairy cows. However, the process of ensiling might alter these properties. In the present study, two silages, prepared from mixtures of buckwheat or chicory and ryegrass, were compared with pure ryegrass silage (Lolium multiflorum) by feeding to 3 × 6 late-lactating cows. The dietary dry matter proportions realised for buckwheat and chicory were 0.46 and 0.34 accounting also for 2 kg/d of concentrate. Data and samples were collected from days 10 to 15 of treatment feeding. Buckwheat silage was richest in condensed tannins. Proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and α-linoleic acid in total fatty acids (FA) were highest in the ryegrass silage. Feed intake, milk yield and milk gross composition did not differ among the groups. Feeding buckwheat resulted in the highest milk fat concentrations (g/kg) of linoleic acid (15.7) and total PUFA (40.5; both P silage shortened rennet coagulation time by 26% and tended (P silage seems to have a certain potential to modify the transfer of FA from feed to milk and to contribute to improved cheese-making properties.

  18. The Physicochemical Quality of Traditional Burduf Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pop

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the assessmentof the quality control of raw milk and traditional burduf cheese obtained fromcow milk mixed with 10% sheep milk. Appreciation of the integrity and freshness assessmentof milk (cow and sheep was tested by physico-chemical analysis.On theshelf-live were determined the physico-chemical parameters in cheese samples. Theantibiotics residues were tested of the milk samples with portable analyser,model Rosa Charm Reader. Theresults of physico-chemical determinations for the milk and cheese samples werewithin the maximum permissible by data legislation. Regardingthe content of antibiotics, the results were negative both for cow milk and forsheep milk. The sensorycharacteristics of burduf cheese are influenced by the different types of milk.

  19. Pathway-based genome-wide association analysis of milk coagulation properties, curd firmness, cheese yield, and curd nutrient recovery in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadousis, C; Pegolo, S; Rosa, G J M; Gianola, D; Bittante, G; Cecchinato, A

    2017-02-01

    It is becoming common to complement genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with gene-set enrichment analysis to deepen the understanding of the biological pathways affecting quantitative traits. Our objective was to conduct a gene ontology and pathway-based analysis to identify possible biological mechanisms involved in the regulation of bovine milk technological traits: coagulation properties, curd firmness modeling, individual cheese yield (CY), and milk nutrient recovery into the curd (REC) or whey loss traits. Results from 2 previous GWAS studies using 1,011 cows genotyped for 50k single nucleotide polymorphisms were used. Overall, the phenotypes analyzed consisted of 3 traditional milk coagulation property measures [RCT: rennet coagulation time defined as the time (min) from addition of enzyme to the beginning of coagulation; k20: the interval (min) from RCT to the time at which a curd firmness of 20 mm is attained; a30: a measure of the extent of curd firmness (mm) 30 min after coagulant addition], 6 curd firmness modeling traits [RCTeq: RCT estimated through the CF equation (min); CFP: potential asymptotic curd firmness (mm); kCF: curd-firming rate constant (% × min(-1)); kSR: syneresis rate constant (% × min(-1)); CFmax: maximum curd firmness (mm); and tmax: time to CFmax (min)], 3 individual CY-related traits expressing the weight of fresh curd (%CYCURD), curd solids (%CYSOLIDS), and curd moisture (%CYWATER) as a percentage of weight of milk processed and 4 milk nutrient and energy recoveries in the curd (RECFAT, RECPROTEIN, RECSOLIDS, and RECENERGY calculated as the % ratio between the nutrient in curd and the corresponding nutrient in processed milk), milk pH, and protein percentage. Each trait was analyzed separately. In total, 13,269 annotated genes were used in the analysis. The Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway databases were queried for enrichment analyses. Overall, 21 Gene Ontology and 17 Kyoto Encyclopedia of

  20. Composition, thermotropic properties, and oxidative stability of freeze-dried and spray-dried milk fat globule membrane isolated from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2011-08-24

    The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) was isolated from cheese whey using a recently developed novel method. The cheese-derived MFGM contained about 17-19% lipids and 65-70% protein on a dry weight basis. About 50% of the lipids in MFGM were phospholipids. Compositional analysis of the cheese whey-derived MFGM showed that it is a rich source of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, and bioactive proteins CD36, butyrophilin, xanthine oxidase, and mucin 1. Utilization of MFGM in foods as a source of nutraceutical lipids depends on its oxidative stability. In this context, the impact of drying methods, namely, freeze-drying versus spray-drying, on the storage stability of MFGM was studied. Freeze-dried (FD) and spray-dried (SD) MFGM samples were morphologically very different when examined by light microscope: The thermotropic phase transition temperature (T(m)) of lipids in the FD-MFGM was 37.8 °C, and it was 48 °C in SD-MFGM. This 10 °C difference in T(m) indicated that the drying method altered the thermodynamic state of phospholipids in MFGM. At all storage temperatures studied, the zero-order rate constant of lipid oxidation, as measured by hexanal production, was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater in the spray-dried than in the freeze-dried MFGM. The results clearly indicated that the choice of drying method affects morphological characteristics, the T(m) and oxidative stability of phospholipids in MFGM.

  1. Risk-Based Approach for Microbiological Food Safety Management in the Dairy Industry: The Case of Listeria monocytogenes in Soft Cheese Made from Pasteurized Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Daudin, Jean-Jacques; Maffre, Alexandre; Sanaa, Moez

    2014-01-01

    According to Codex Alimentarius Commission recommendations, management options applied at the process production level should be based on good hygiene practices, HACCP system, and new risk management metrics such as the food safety objective. To follow this last recommendation, the use of quantitative microbiological risk assessment is an appealing approach to link new risk-based metrics to management options that may be applied by food operators. Through a specific case study, Listeria monocytogenes in soft cheese made from pasteurized milk, the objective of the present article is to practically show how quantitative risk assessment could be used to direct potential intervention strategies at different food processing steps. Based on many assumptions, the model developed estimates the risk of listeriosis at the moment of consumption taking into account the entire manufacturing process and potential sources of contamination. From pasteurization to consumption, the amplification of a primo-contamination event of the milk, the fresh cheese or the process environment is simulated, over time, space, and between products, accounting for the impact of management options, such as hygienic operations and sampling plans. A sensitivity analysis of the model will help orientating data to be collected prioritarily for the improvement and the validation of the model. What-if scenarios were simulated and allowed for the identification of major parameters contributing to the risk of listeriosis and the optimization of preventive and corrective measures.

  2. Diversity and evolution of the microbial populations during manufacture and ripening of Casín, a traditional Spanish, starter-free cheese made from cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Angel; Alvarez-Martín, Pablo; Sacristán, Noelia; Fernández, Elena; Delgado, Susana; Mayo, Baltasar

    2009-11-30

    Classical culturing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques have been used for studying the microbial diversity and dynamics of the traditional Spanish Casín cheese during manufacturing and ripening. As with other starter-free cheeses made from raw milk, the microbial diversity of Casín was shown to be high by both culturing and DGGE analyses. The culture technique showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species constituted the majority of the microbial populations. Of the 14 bacterial species identified, Lactococcus garvieae was predominant in the three-day-old cheese sample, although it was replaced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis at day 30. As expected, the DGGE profiles obtained were complex, consisting, depending on the sample, in five to ten different amplification bands. Among these, a band corresponding to Streptococcus thermophilus was observed throughout the whole manufacturing process. This species had never been identified from traditional Spanish cheeses previously. Culturing and molecular methods showed high populations of undesirable microorganisms, arguing for a required improvement in the hygiene of Casín manufacture. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling suggested that the L. garvieae and L. lactis populations were composed of one and five strains, respectively. In addition, only a single L. lactis RAPD pattern was stably maintained from day three to day 30, indicating high succession of strains along ripening. After a thoroughly characterisation, strains of the two Lactococcus species could be used in designing specific starter cultures for Casín. Additional species (such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Corynebacterium variabile) might be included as adjunct cultures.

  3. BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA AND PREPARATION OF CAMEL MILK CHEESE BY USING STARTER CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ahmed and R. Kanwal

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from camel milk by culturing the milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub-culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram’s staining and identified by different biochemical tests. Camel milk contained lactic acid producing bacteria like Streptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus. L. acidophilus grew more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth was supported by camel milk...

  4. Screening of Probiotic Activities of Lactobacilli Strains Isolated from Traditional Tibetan Qula, A Raw Yak Milk Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Wang, Yanping; Tan, Zhongfang; Li, Zongwei; Jiao, Zhen; Huang, Qunce

    2016-10-01

    In this study, 69 lactobacilli isolated from Tibetan Qula, a raw yak milk cheese, were screened for their potential use as probiotics. The isolates were tested in terms of: Their ability to survive at pH 2.0, pH 3.0, and in the presence of 0.3% bile salts; tolerance of simulated gastric and intestinal juices; antimicrobial activity; sensitivity against 11 specific antibiotics; and their cell surface hydrophobicity. The results show that out of the 69 strains, 29 strains (42%) had survival rates above 90% after 2 h of incubation at pH values of 2.0 or 3.0. Of these 29 strains, 21 strains showed a tolerance for 0.3% bile salt. Incubation of these 21 isolates in simulated gastrointestinal fluid for 3 h revealed survival rates above 90%; the survival rate for 20 of these isolates remained above 90% after 4 h of incubation in simulated intestinal fluid. The viable counts of bacteria after incubation in simulated gastric fluid for 3 h and simulated intestinal fluid for 4 h were both significantly different compared with the counts at 0 h (plactobacilli strains exhibited inhibitory activity against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115, and Salmonella enterica ATCC 43971. Moreover, all of the strains were resistant to vancomycin and streptomycin. Of the 20 strains, three were resistant to all 11 elected antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, penicillin G, ampicillin, streptomycin, polymyxin B, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and gentamicin) in this study, and five were sensitive to more than half of the antibiotics. Additionally, the cell surface hydrophobicity of seven of the 20 lactobacilli strains was above 70%, including strains Lactobacillus casei 1,133 (92%), Lactobacillus plantarum 1086-1 (82%), Lactobacillus casei 1089 (81%), Lactobacillus casei 1138 (79%), Lactobacillus buchneri 1059 (78%), Lactobacillus plantarum1141 (75%), and Lactobacillus plantarum 1197 (71%). Together, these

  5. Genetic parameters of cheese yield and curd nutrient recovery or whey loss traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of samples collected during milk recording on Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, A; Albera, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Ferragina, A; Bittante, G

    2015-07-01

    Cheese yield is the most important technological parameter in the dairy industry in many countries. The aim of this study was to infer (co)variance components for cheese yields (CY) and nutrient recoveries in curd (REC) predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of samples collected during milk recording on Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental dairy cows. A total of 311,354 FTIR spectra representing the test-day records of 29,208 dairy cows (Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental) from 654 herds, collected over a 3-yr period, were available for the study. The traits of interest for each cow consisted of 3 cheese yield traits (%CY: fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 curd nutrient recovery traits (REC: fat, protein, total solids, and the energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits (daily fresh curd, total solids, and the water of the curd per cow). Calibration equations (freely available upon request to the corresponding author) were used to predict individual test-day observations for these traits. The (co)variance components were estimated for the CY, REC, milk production, and milk composition traits via a set of 4-trait analyses within each breed. All analyses were performed using REML and linear animal models. The heritabilities of the %CY were always higher for Holstein and Brown Swiss cows (0.22 to 0.33) compared with Simmental cows (0.14 to 0.18). In general, the fresh cheese yield (%CYCURD) showed genetic variation and heritability estimates that were slightly higher than those of its components, %CYSOLIDS and %CYWATER. The parameter RECPROTEIN was the most heritable trait in all the 3 breeds, with values ranging from 0.32 to 0.41. Our estimation of the genetic relationships of the CY and REC with milk production and composition revealed that the current selection strategies used in dairy cattle are expected

  6. Desenvolvimento experimental de queijo fresco de leite da espécie bubalina Experimental development of a fresh cheese from buffalo’s milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Maria YUNES

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver um queijo fresco, utilizando como matéria prima o leite de búfala, na tentativa de introduzir esta rica fonte de proteína no hábito alimentar do brasileiro. Foram realizados experimentos buscando estabelecer o valor ideal de alguns parâmetros fundamentais do processamento de queijos (cloreto de cálcio, coalho e tempo de salga: teor de cloreto de sódio, combinando-os entre si. O leite e os queijos resultantes dos experimentos foram caracterizados físico-químicamente. Em média, a composição química do queijo foi: gordura 21,40; proteína 12,68; extrato seco 40,36; cinzas 3,13; umidade 58,77 e rendimento 29,25. A análise sensorial mostrou que os queijos elaborados encontravam-se dentro dos padrões aceitáveis de qualidade para os atributos de intensidade de sabor, sabor salgado, consistência e sabor amargo. A aceitabilidade geral dos queijos obtidos foi considerada satisfatória e os resultados mostraram quais fatores devem ser considerados mais importantes, permitindo delinear futuros processos para obter produtos de maior qualidade.The main objective of this work, was to develop a fresh cheese using buffalo’s milk, as the main raw material, in attempt to introduce this proteins rich source in the brazilian’s alimentary habits. Several experiments were done to establish the optimum values for fundamental cheesemaking parameters (calcium cloride, rennet and salting time: sodium cloride value, and combinations. Physical and chemical characteristics of the milk and the resulting cheese were described. The cheese’s average composition was: fat 21,50%; protein12,68%; dry extract 40,36%; ash 3,13%; moisture 58,77%; with a yield of 29,25%. Sensory analysis showed that the buffalo cheese was within quality standards for flavor intensity, saltness, consistency and bitterness. The general acceptance of the cheeses was satisfactory . The results showed which factors should be considered

  7. Avaliação química e nutricional do queijo mozzarella e iogurte de leite de búfala Chemical and nutritional evaluation of mozzarella cheese and yogurt made from buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Verruma

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo verificar a composição química e nutricional do queijo e iogurte elaborados com leite de búfala e comparados com aqueles elaborados com leite de vaca. Dos resultados obtidos foram obtidas as seguintes conclusões: o queijo tipo mozzarella e o iogurte elaborado com leite de búfala apresentaram níveis superiores em proteína, gordura, cinzas, cálcio e fósforo, estando relacionados com a composição química inicial do leite. Os níveis de digestibilidade in vitro dos queijos tipo mozzarella e iogurte de leite de búfala apresentaram resultados semelhantes aos elaborados com leite de vaca, indicando níveis adequados de digestibilidade para consumo humano.The chemical and nutritional compositions of cheese and yogurt made from buffalo and cow milk were compared. The following conclusions were obtained: mozzarella type cheese and yogurt made from buffalo milk exhibited higher content of protein, fat, minerals, calcium and phosphorus when compared to those made from cow milk; in vitro digestibility tests of mozzarella type cheese and yogurt made from buffalo milk were similar to those of cow milk, indicantig suitable digestibility levels for human consumption.

  8. Protein characterization of pasteurized milk, cheese whey and their mixtures by using the CEM SprintTM analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Moura de Paiva; Virgílio de Carvalho dos Anjos; Maria José Valenzuela Bell; Marco Antônio Moreira Furtado

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the protein analyzer SprintTM was assessed regarding its capacity of predicting addition of whey in milk. This type of practice is relatively common in dairy plants, since whey, as it is a protein component, may be added with little loss of milk protein content. Besides,its incorrect elimination contributes to environmental pollution. Mixtures of milk and whey were prepared in different levels of addition and two methods of milk partition were tested. The results indicated that ...

  9. Effect of feeding goats with distilled and non-distilled thyme leaves (Thymus zygis subp. gracilis) on milk and cheese properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutoial, Khalid; García, Victor; Rovira, Silvia; Ferrandini, Eduardo; Abdelkhalek, Oussama; López, María Belén

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of feeding goats with distilled and non-distilled thyme leaves (Thymus zygis subsp. gracilis) on the physicochemical composition and technological properties of pasteurised goat milk, and on the physicochemical composition, phenolic content, oxidative stability, microbiology, sensory and texture profile of Murcia al Vino goat cheese. One group of goats was fed the basal diet (control), the second and third groups were fed with different levels of distilled (10 and 20%) or non-distilled (3·75 and 7·5%) thyme leaves. Goat milk physicochemical composition was significantly affected by the substitution of 7·5% of basal goat diet with non-distilled thyme leaves (increase in fat, protein, dry matter and PUFA content), while goat milk clotting time was increased significantly by the introduction of 20% distilled thyme leaves, which reduces its technological suitability. Microbiology, sensory and texture profiles were not affected by the introduction of distilled thyme leaves. The introduction of distilled and non-distilled thyme leaves as an alternative feed to diet can lead to an inhibition of lipids oxidation. The introduction of distilled and non-distilled thyme leaves into goat's diet can be successfully adopted as a strategy to reduce feeding costs and to take advantage of the waste from the production of essential oils, minimising waste removing costs and the environmental impact.

  10. Detection and confirmation of milk adulteration with cheese whey using proteomic-like sample preparation and liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Motta, T M; Hoff, R B; Barreto, F; Andrade, R B S; Lorenzini, D M; Meneghini, L Z; Pizzolato, T M

    2014-03-01

    Caseinomacropeptide (CMP) is a peptide released by chymosin in cheese production, remaining in whey. Thus, CMP can be used as a biomarker to fluid milk adulteration through whey addition. Commonly, CMP is analyzed by reversed phase (RP-HPLC) or size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). However, some psychrotropic microorganisms - specially Pseudomonas fluorescens - when present in storaged milk, can produce, by enzymatic pathway, a CMP-like peptide generally called pseudo-CMP. These two peptides differ from each other only by one amino acid. RP-HPLC and SEC methods are unable to distinguish these two peptides, which demand development of a confirmatory method with high selectivity. Considering the several degrees of glycosilation and phosphorylation sites in CMP, allied with possible genetic variation (CMP A and CMP B), analytical methods able to differentiate these peptides are extremely complex. In the present work, we developed a proteomic-like technique for separation and characterization of these peptides, using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization able to differentiate and subsequently quantify CMP and pseudo-CMP in milk samples in order to identify adulteration or contamination of these products. The method shows satisfactory precision (<11%) with a detection limit of 1.0 µg mL(-1) and quantification limit of 5.0 µg mL(-1). Specificity, matrix effects and applicability to real samples analysis were also performed and discussed.

  11. Effect of zinc fortification on Cheddar cheese quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, O; Ustunol, Z

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-fortified Cheddar cheese containing 228 mg of zinc/kg of cheese was manufactured from milk that had 16 mg/kg food-grade zinc sulfate added. Cheeses were aged for 2 mo. Culture activity during cheese making and ripening, and compositional, chemical, texture, and sensory characteristics were compared with control cheese with no zinc sulfate added to the cheese milk. Compositional analysis included fat, protein, ash, moisture, zinc, and calcium determinations. The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay was conducted to determine lipid oxidation during aging. Texture was analyzed by a texture analyzer. An untrained consumer panel of 60 subjects evaluated the cheeses for hardness, off-flavors, appearance, and overall preference using a 9-point hedonic scale. Almost 100% of the zinc added to cheese milk was recovered in the zinc-fortified cheese. Zinc-fortified Cheddar cheese had 5 times more zinc compared with control cheese. Zinc-fortified cheese had higher protein and slightly higher fat and ash contents, whereas moisture was similar for both cheeses. Zinc fortification did not affect culture activity during cheese making or during the 2-mo aging period. The TBA value of control cheese was higher than that of zinc-fortified cheese at the end of ripening. Although zinc-fortified cheese was harder as determined by the texture analyzer, the untrained consumer panel did not detect differences in the sensory attributes and overall quality of the cheeses. Fortification of 16 mg/kg zinc sulfate in cheese milk is a suitable approach to fortifying Cheddar cheese without changing the quality of Cheddar cheese.

  12. 21 CFR 133.187 - Semisoft cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... percent, calculated as anhydrous calcium chloride, of the weight of the milk) is added to set the milk to... of identity are not prescribed by other sections of this part. They are made from milk and other... the milk used is not pasteurized, the cheese so made is cured at a temperature of not less than 35...

  13. Research of Fresh Soft Cheese Made of Milk and Peanut Protein%新鲜花生牛乳软质干酪的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 于国萍; 王麟艳

    2013-01-01

    This research is part of the defatted peanut flour,milk as the main raw materials to produce a fresh soft cheese.The fresh soft cheese process parameters were optimized.Determined parameters of the production process were:peanut protein amount 1.1%,starter conten 0.250dcu/L,CaCl2 content 0.06%,rennet content 150u/100g.%以花生粉、牛乳为主要原料制作新鲜软质干酪,对新鲜软质干酪的工艺参数进行了优化.确定最优工艺参数:花生粉添加量为1.1%,发酵剂接种量为0.250dcu/L,氯化钙添加量为0.06%,凝乳酶添加量为150U/100g.

  14. The 9-MilCA method as a rapid, partly automated protocol for simultaneously recording milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A; Stocco, G; Bittante, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and test a new laboratory cheesemaking procedure [9-mL milk cheesemaking assessment (9-MilCA)], which records 15 traits related to milk coagulation, curd firming, syneresis, cheese yield, and curd nutrients recovery or whey loss. This procedure involves instruments found in many laboratories (i.e., heaters and lacto-dynamographs), with an easy modification of the sample rack for the insertion of 10-mL glass tubes. Four trials were carried out to test the 9-MilCA procedure. The first trial compared 8 coagulation and curd firming traits obtained using regular or modified sample racks to process milk samples from 60 cows belonging to 5 breeds and 3 farms (480 tests). The obtained patterns exhibited significant but irrelevant between-procedure differences, with better repeatability seen for 9-MilCA. The second trial tested the reproducibility and repeatability of the 7 cheesemaking traits obtained using the 9-MilCA procedure on individual samples from 60 cows tested in duplicate in 2 instruments (232 tests). The method yielded very repeatable outcomes for all 7 tested cheese yield and nutrient recovery traits (repeatability >98%), with the exception of the fresh cheese yield (84%), which was affected by the lower repeatability (67%) of the water retained in the curd. In the third trial (96 tests), we found that using centrifugation in place of curd cooking and draining (as adopted in several published studies) reduced the efficiency of whey separation, overestimated all traits, and worsened the repeatability. The fourth trial compared 9-MilCA with a more complex model cheese-manufacturing process that mimics industry practices, using 1,500-mL milk samples (72 cows, 216 tests). The average results obtained from 9-MilCA were similar to those obtained from the model cheeses, with between-method correlations ranging from 78 to 99%, except for the water retained in the curd (r=54%). Our results indicate that new 9-MilCA method is a

  15. Proteolysis of prato type cheese produced using ultrafiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Spadoti Leila Maria; Dornellas José Raimundo Ferreira; Roig Salvador Massaguer

    2005-01-01

    The application of milk ultrafiltration technology for cheese manufacture presents several advantages. However, it also influences proteolysis and, consequently, cheese ripening. The effects of five different processing methods for Prato cheese were evaluated with respect to the time evolution of the extent and depth of proteolysis indexes (EPI and DPI). The following treatments (T) for cheese production were studied: T1 - without ultrafiltration (standard); T2, T3, T4 and T5 - using milk con...

  16. Behavior of Staphylococcus aureus in culture broth, in raw and thermized milk, and during processing and storage of traditional Greek Graviera cheese in the presence or absence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris M104, a wild, novel nisin A-producing raw milk isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelis, John; Lianou, Alexandra; Pappa, Eleni C; Bogovič-Matijašić, Bojana; Parapouli, Maria; Kakouri, Athanasia; Rogelj, Irena

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the behavior of Staphylococcus aureus during processing, ripening, and storage of traditional Greek Graviera cheese in accordance with European Union Regulation 1441/2007 for coagulase-positive staphylococci in thermized milk cheeses. Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris M104, a wild, novel nisin A-producing (NisA+) strain, also was evaluated as an antistaphylococcal adjunct. A three-strain cocktail of enterotoxigenic (Ent+) S. aureus increased by approximately 2 log CFU/ml when co-inoculated (at approximately 3 log CFU/ml) in thermized Graviera cheese milk (TGCM; 63°C for 30 s) with commercial starter culture (CSC) and/or strain M104 at approximately 6 log CFU/ml and then incubated at 37°C for 3 h. However, after 6 h at 37°C, significant retarding effects on S. aureus growth were noted in the order TGCM + M104 > TGCM + CSC = TGCM + CSC + M104 > TGCM. Additional incubation of TGCM cultures at 18°C for 66 h resulted in a 1.2-log reduction (P cheeses prepared from TGCM + CSC or TGCM + CSC + M104, ripened at 18°C and 90% relative humidity for 20 days, and stored at 4°C in vacuum packages for 2 months. A rapid 10-fold decrease (P cheese fermentation. Reductions of S. aureus were greater by approximately 0.4 log CFU/g in CSC + M104 than in CSC only cheeses, concomitantly with the presence of NisA + M104 colonies and nisin-encoding genes in the CSC plus M104 cheeses and their corresponding microbial consortia only. A high level of selective survival of a naturally nisin-resistant EntC z S. aureus strain from the cocktail was noted in CSC + M104 cheeses and in coculture with the NisA + M104 strain in M-17 broth. In conclusion, although S. aureus growth inhibition is assured during Graviera cheese ripening, early growth of the pathogen during milk curdling and curd cooking operations may occur. Nisin-resistant S. aureus strains that may contaminate Graviera cheese milks postthermally may be difficult to control even by the

  17. Retail Survey of Brazilian Milk and Minas Frescal Cheese and a Contaminated Dairy Plant To Establish Prevalence, Relatedness, and Sources of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J. Renaldi F.; Santos, Emilia M. P.; Arcuri, Edna F.; Lange, Carla C.; Brito, Maria A. V. P.; Souza, Guilherme N.; Cerqueira, Mônica M. P. O.; Beltran, J. Marcela Soto; Call, Jeffrey E.; Liu, Yanhong; Porto-Fett, Anna C. S.; Luchansky, John B.

    2008-01-01

    A study was designed to recover Listeria monocytogenes from pasteurized milk and Minas frescal cheese (MFC) sampled at retail establishments (REs) and to identify the contamination source(s) of these products in the corresponding dairy processing plant. Fifty milk samples (9 brands) and 55 MFC samples (10 brands) were tested from REs located in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. All milk samples and 45 samples from 9 of 10 MFC brands tested negative for L. monocytogenes; however, “brand F” of MFC obtained from REs 119 and 159 tested positive. Thus, the farm/plant that produced brand F MFC was sampled; all samples from the milking parlor tested negative for L. monocytogenes, whereas several sites within the processing plant and the MFC samples tested positive. All 344 isolates recovered from retail MFC, plant F MFC, and plant F environmental samples were serotype 1/2a and displayed the same AscI or ApaI fingerprints. Since these results established that the storage coolers served as the contamination source of the MFC, plant F was closed so that corrective renovations could be made. Following renovation, samples from sites that previously tested positive for the pathogen were collected from the processing environment and from MFC on multiple visits; all tested negative for L. monocytogenes. In addition, on subsequent visits to REs 159 and 119, all MFC samples tested negative for the pathogen. Studies are ongoing to quantify the prevalence, levels, and types of L. monocytogenes in MFC and associated processing plants to lessen the likelihood of listeriosis in Brazil. PMID:18502929

  18. 21 CFR 136.130 - Milk bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., buttermilk product, cheese whey, cheese whey product, or milk protein is used. (b) The name of the food is... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Milk bread, rolls, and buns. 136.130 Section 136....130 Milk bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods milk bread, milk rolls, and milk buns...

  19. Short communication: characterization of microflora in Mexican Chihuahua cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renye, J A; Somkuti, G A; Van Hekken, D L; Guerrero Prieto, V M

    2011-07-01

    This work was performed to identify the bacterial species present in 10 Chihuahua cheeses obtained from commercial producers in Mexico using 16S rRNA gene analysis. As expected, some of the agar media initially used for isolation were not very selective, supporting the growth of several unrelated bacterial species. Sequence analysis identified potential pathogens, including Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, in all raw milk samples and 2 pasteurized milk samples. Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis were identified in 9 and 6 samples, respectively, and would serve as acidifying agents during cheese production. Lactobacilli were identified in all cheeses, with the most prevalent being Lactobacillus plantarum identified in 7 raw milk and 1 pasteurized milk cheeses. Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Streptococcus macedonicus were identified in 4 raw milk cheeses and both were present in all pasteurized milk samples, suggesting that they may play a role in the development of traditional Chihuahua cheese attributes.

  20. The extraordinary potential of metagenomic tools for food microbiology: an example with bacterial microbiota of raw and pasteurized milk cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Delhalle, Laurent; Nezer, Carine; Taminiau, Bernard; Darcis, Amelie; Daube,Georges

    2012-01-01

    Among the culture-independent techniques, ultra-sequencing has contributed to place metagenomic analysis as the best alternative to study complex microbiota. During the last three years, metagenomic studies were used essentially for environmental samples but it could be used also to analyse bacterial populations of food samples. This work describes the application of this technique to study the bacterial population of different types of soft cheeses. Among these, three of them are a typical B...

  1. Influence of microfiltration and adjunct culture on quality of Domiati cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, S; Ahmed, N; El Soda, M

    2010-05-01

    The effects of microfiltration and pasteurization processes on proteolysis, lipolysis, and flavor development in Domiati cheese during 2 mo of pickling were studied. Cultures of starter lactic acid bacteria isolated from Egyptian dairy products were evaluated in experimental Domiati cheese for flavor development capabilities. In the first trial, raw skim milk was microfiltered and then the protein:fat ratio was standardized using pasteurized cream. Pasteurized milk with same protein:fat ratio was also used in the second trial. The chemical composition of cheeses seemed to be affected by milk treatment-microfiltration or pasteurization-rather than by the culture types. The moisture content was higher and the pH was lower in pasteurized milk cheeses than in microfiltered milk cheeses at d 1 of manufacture. Chemical composition of experimental cheeses was within the legal limits for Domiati cheese in Egypt. Proteolysis and lipolysis during cheese pickling were lower in microfiltered milk cheeses compared with pasteurized milk cheeses. Highly significant variations in free amino acids, free fatty acids, and sensory evaluation were found among the cultures used in Domiati cheesemaking. The cheese made using adjunct culture containing Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Enterococcus faecium received high scores in flavor acceptability. Cheeses made from microfiltered milk received a higher score in body and texture compared with cheeses made from pasteurized milk.

  2. Protein characterization of pasteurized milk, cheese whey and their mixtures by using the CEM SprintTM analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Moura Paiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the protein analyzer SprintTM was assessed regarding its capacity of predicting addition of whey in milk. This type of practice is relatively common in dairy plants, since whey, as it is a protein component, may be added with little loss of milk protein content. Besides,its incorrect elimination contributes to environmental pollution. Mixtures of milk and whey were prepared in different levels of addition and two methods of milk partition were tested. The results indicated that the concentration of trichloroacetic acid (TCA from the selected method was not suitable for the present purpose while the chosen method using glacial acetic acid (GAA has presented a satisfactory separation of the soluble and insoluble milk components. Even though the concentration of whey protein and casein are the essential parameters for determining whey addition in milk, the use of measurements from total protein was important in order to improve the linearity of the method due to the fact that the rates whey protein/total protein and casein/total protein presented the best results concerning fraud prediction capacity. Therefore, as the equipment is a rapid, safe and efficient platform, it can be used as an alternative to be implemented in laboratories of food quality control which perform or plan to perform assays to verify the whey addition in fluid milk.

  3. Invited review: Artisanal Mexican cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Córdova, Aarón F; Yescas, Carlos; Ortiz-Estrada, Ángel Martín; De la Rosa-Alcaraz, María de Los Ángeles; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this review is to present an overview of some of the most commonly consumed artisanal Mexican cheeses, as well as those cheeses that show potential for a protected designation of origin. A description is given for each of these cheeses, including information on their distinguishing characteristics that makes some of them potential candidates for achieving a protected designation of origin status. This distinction could help to expand their frontiers and allow them to become better known and appreciated in other parts of the world. Due to the scarcity of scientific studies concerning artisanal Mexican cheeses, which would ultimately aid in the standardization of manufacturing processes and in the establishment of regulations related to their production, more than 40 varieties of artisanal cheese are in danger of disappearing. To preserve these cheeses, it is necessary to address this challenge by working jointly with government, artisanal cheesemaking organizations, industry, academics, and commercial partners on the implementation of strategies to protect and preserve their artisanal means of production. With sufficient information, official Mexican regulations could be established that would encompass and regulate the manufacture of Mexican artisanal cheeses. Finally, as many Mexican artisanal cheeses are produced from raw milk, more scientific studies are required to show the role of the lactic acid bacteria and their antagonistic effect on pathogenic microorganisms during aging following cheese making.

  4. Aerobic deterioration influences the fermentative, microbiological and nutritional quality of maize and sorghum silages on farm in high quality milk and cheese production chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Borreani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Maize and sorghum silages are good sources of energy for lactating dairy cows that produce milk destined for fresh and matured cheeses. Silages are usually stored in horizontal silos with or without side walls on commercial farms throughout the world. The main microbiological and nutritional quality problems are related to harvesting time, ensiling technology, and management practices during filling and feed-out. Aerobic deterioration is a key point that must avoided on farms in order to improve the hygienic, chemical and sensorial quality of milk and cheeses. Aerobic deterioration causes large losses of dry matter (DM and quality, and it can cause health problems for animals and humans through the transfer of pathogens and mycotoxins from feed and livestock to food products. The objectives of the present work were to overview management practices connected to the storage of maize and sorghum in horizontal silos on farms producing milk for make Protected Designation of Origin (PDO hard ripened cheese, to define good management practices that should be applied as the basis for safe silage production and to reduce the extent of aerobic deterioration.As silagens de milho e de sorgo são importantes fontes de energia em rações utilizadas na bovinocultura leiteira, sendo que a estocagem desses volumosos é realizada em silos horizontais com ou sem a presença de paredes laterais (trincheira ou superfície, respectivamente, os quais são atrativos em razão do baixo custo de armazenamento, porém suas conformações determinam grande superfície de exposição, o que torna as silagens mais susceptíveis a deterioração aeróbia. Os maiores problemas envolvendo a qualidade microbiológica e nutricional em silagens, estão relacionados às práticas de manejo na colheita, no abastecimento e compactação da massa, na vedação e, principalmente, durante o desabastecimento do silo. O controle da deterioração aeróbia em silagens pode ser o principal

  5. Chemical and biochemical study of industrially produced San Simón da Costa smoked semi-hard cow's milk cheeses: Effects of storage under vacuum and different modified atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabal, J I; Rodríguez-Alonso, P; Franco, D; Centeno, J A

    2010-05-01

    Two batches of smoked, semi-hard (ripened for 45 d) San Simón da Costa cow's milk cheeses with Protected Designation of Origin were used to investigate the chemical, biochemical, and sensorial parameters that may be affected by modified-atmosphere packaging. Cheeses were packaged for 45 d as follows: vacuum packaging, packaging in 100% N(2), packaging in a gas mixture of 20% CO(2)/80% N(2), and packaging in a gas mixture of 50% CO(2)/50% N(2). The San Simón da Costa cheeses were characterized by high contents of lactic, oxalic, and citric organic acids. The main free amino acids found were isoleucine, phenylalanine, serine, valine, lysine, and glutamic acid, and the most abundant volatile compounds included ethanol, diacetyl, 2-butanol, isopropyl alcohol, furfural, acetaldehyde, 2-butanone, acetone, and 2-methylfuran. Modified atmospheres appeared to alter the ripening processes by affecting lipolysis, as indicated by the lower concentrations of butyric and propionic acids compared with control cheeses. In addition, modified-atmosphere packaging altered the proteolysis processes, yielding higher amounts of branched-chain alcohols. The results revealed that storage under modified atmosphere contributes to the accumulation of several compounds probably derived from smoke, including aldehydes such as 2-furancarboxaldehyde (furfural), alcohols such as 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), ketones such as 2-cyclopenten-1-one, and esters such as methyl furancarboxylate, which were negatively correlated with flavor. Vacuum packaging was the most useful technique in terms of preserving the sensory quality of San Simón da Costa Protected Designation of Origin cheeses. Considering the current demands for packaged portions of food at the distribution and retail levels and the potential health risks associated with some smoke-derived compounds usually present in some smoked foods, the results obtained in this study may be of special interest to the cheese industry.

  6. Enumeration of coagulase and thermonuclease-positive Staphylococcus spp. in raw milk and fresh soft cheese: an evaluation of Baird-Parker agar, Rabbit Plasma Fibrinogen agar and the Petrifilm Staph Express count system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viçosa, Gabriela Nogueira; Moraes, Paula Mendonça; Yamazi, Anderson Keizo; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2010-06-01

    Staphylococcus spp. are microorganisms that are naturally present in milk and dairy products and are often associated with food-borne diseases outbreaks due to the ability of some strains to produce thermostable enterotoxins. This ability is usually associated with coagulase and thermonuclease production, characteristics that are considered in the microbiological analyses for the control of such microorganisms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the culture media and the methodologies used for the enumeration of coagulase and thermonuclease-positive Staphylococcus spp. in raw milk and fresh soft cheese. Samples of artificially contaminated milk (with coagulase-positive Staphylococcus reference strains) and samples of naturally contaminated raw milk and cheese were submitted for enumeration in Baird-Parker agar (BP), Rabbit Plasma Fibrinogen agar (RPFA) and in the Petrifilm Staph Express count system (STX). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the mean counts obtained in all of the evaluated culture media. RPFA and STX had good correlation indices between the total and typical colony counts as well as with coagulase and the thermonuclease-positive colony counts. Thus, there is a better association between coagulase and thermonuclease production to typical colony morphology developed on these culture media, leading to more accurate and reliable results than with BP, which demonstrated lower correlation indices between these counts.

  7. Major technological advances and trends in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M E; Lucey, J A

    2006-04-01

    Over the last 25 yr, cheese production in the United States has more than doubled with most of the increase due to production in the western states. Processing large volumes of milk into cheese has necessitated changes in vat size and design, reliance on computer software, and milk standardization, including use of membrane concentration of milk either at the cheese plant or on the farm. There has been increased interest in specialty cheeses including cheese made from sheep, goat, and organic milks. In addition, membrane processing of whey into various value-added components has become routine. Changes in cheese manufacturing protocols have resulted in a reduction of the manufacturing time and the necessity for consistent and reliable starter activity. Major advances in the genetics of microorganisms have not only resulted in widespread use of fermentation-produced chymosin but also in starter bacteria with improved resistance to bacteriophage infection. Genomics and proteomics have increased the likelihood of the development of nonstarter adjuncts with specific enzymatic activity. Indeed, the use of adjunct microorganisms to produce cheese with a unique flavor profile or to produce cheese with more consistent or better quality flavor has gained almost universal acceptance.

  8. Sensitivity analysis for critical control points determination and uncertainty analysis to link FSO and process criteria: application to Listeria monocytogenes in soft cheese made from pasteurized milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamboni, Matieyendou; Sanaa, Moez; Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny

    2014-04-01

    Microbiological food safety is an important economic and health issue in the context of globalization and presents food business operators with new challenges in providing safe foods. The hazard analysis and critical control point approach involve identifying the main steps in food processing and the physical and chemical parameters that have an impact on the safety of foods. In the risk-based approach, as defined in the Codex Alimentarius, controlling these parameters in such a way that the final products meet a food safety objective (FSO), fixed by the competent authorities, is a big challenge and of great interest to the food business operators. Process risk models, issued from the quantitative microbiological risk assessment framework, provide useful tools in this respect. We propose a methodology, called multivariate factor mapping (MFM), for establishing a link between process parameters and compliance with a FSO. For a stochastic and dynamic process risk model of Listeriamonocytogenes in soft cheese made from pasteurized milk with many uncertain inputs, multivariate sensitivity analysis and MFM are combined to (i) identify the critical control points (CCPs) for L.monocytogenes throughout the food chain and (ii) compute the critical limits of the most influential process parameters, located at the CCPs, with regard to the specific process implemented in the model. Due to certain forms of interaction among parameters, the results show some new possibilities for the management of microbiological hazards when a FSO is specified.

  9. Mediterranean milk and milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Jörg

    2004-03-01

    Milk and dairy products are part of a healthy Mediterranean diet which, besides cow's milk, also consists of sheep's, goat's and buffalo's milk--alone or as a mixture---as raw material. The fat and protein composition of the milk of the various animal species differs only slightly, but in every case it has a high priority in human nutrition. The milk proteins are characterized by a high content of essential amino acids. Beyond that macromolecules,which have various biological functions, are available or may be formed by proteolysis in milk. Taking this into consideration, the technology of different well-known Italian and German cheese types is presented and the differences as well as correspondences regarding nutrition are discussed. Especially Ricotta and Mascarpone are discussed in detail. Ricotta represents a special feature as this cheese is traditionally made of whey and cream. Thus the highly valuable whey proteins which contain a higher amount of the amino acids lysine, methionine and cysteic acid in comparison to casein and, additionally, to soy protein, are made usable for human nutrition. Finally, it is pointed out on the basis of individual examples that technologies to enrich whey proteins in cheese are already available and in use. Thus, the flavor of low fat cheese is improved and the nutritional value is increased.

  10. Volatile and non-volatile compounds in ripened cheese: their formation and their contribution to flavour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, W.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flavour is one of the most important attributes of cheese. Cheese flavour is the result of the breakdown of milk protein, fat, lactose and citrate due to enzymes from milk, rennet and microorganisms during production and ripening of cheese. For a large part the development of flavour during the ripe

  11. Physical properties of pizza Mozzarella cheese manufactured under different cheese-making conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banville, V; Morin, P; Pouliot, Y; Britten, M

    2013-08-01

    The effect of manufacturing factors on the shreddability and meltability of pizza Mozzarella cheese was studied. Four experimental cheeses were produced with 2 concentrations of denatured whey protein added to milk (0 or 0.25%) and 2 renneting pH values (6.4 or 6.5). The cheeses were aged 8, 22, or 36d before testing. Shreddability was assessed by the presence of fines, size of the shreds, and adhesion to the blade after shredding at 4, 13, or 22°C. A semi-empirical method was developed to measure the matting behavior of shreds by simulating industrial bulk packaging. Rheological measurements were performed on cheeses with and without a premelting treatment to assess melt and postmelt cheese physical properties. Lowering the pH of milk at renneting and aging the cheeses generally decreased the fines production during shredding. Adding whey protein to the cheeses also altered the fines production, but the effect varied depending on the renneting and aging conditions. The shred size distribution, adhesion to the blade, and matting behavior of the cheeses were adversely affected by increased temperature at shredding. The melting profiles obtained by rheological measurements showed that better meltability can be achieved by lowering the pH of milk at renneting or aging the cheese. The premelted cheeses were found to be softer at low temperatures (50°C) compared with the cheeses that had not undergone the premelting treatment. Understanding and controlling milk standardization, curd acidification, and cheese aging are essential for the production of Mozzarella cheese with desirable shreddability and meltability.

  12. Evaluation of Natural Food Preservatives in Domestic and Imported Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In milk and milk products, a number of organic acids naturally occur. We investigated the contents of some naturally occurred food preservatives (sorbic acid, benzoic acid, propionic acid, nitrite, and nitrate) contained in domestic and imported cheeses to establish the standard for the allowable range of food preservatives content in cheese. 8 kinds of domestic precheeses (n=104), 16 kinds of domestic cured cheeses (n=204) and 40 kinds of imported cheeses (n=74) were collected. Each domestic cheese was aged for a suitable number of months and stored for 2 mon at 5℃ and 10℃. No preservatives were detected in domestic soft and fresh cheeses, except cream cheese. In case of semi-hard cheeses, 2-5 mg/kg of benzoic acid was detected after 1-2 mon of aging. In imported cheeses, only benzoic acid and propionic acid were detected. The average benzoic acid and propionic acid contents in semi-hard cheese were 8.73 mg/kg and 18.78 mg/kg, respectively. Specifically, 1.16 mg/kg and 6.80 mg/kg of benzoic acid and propionic acid, respectively, were contained in soft cheese, 3.27 mg/kg and 2.84 mg/kg, respectively, in fresh cheese, 1.87 mg/kg and not detected, respectively, in hard cheese, and 2.07 mg/kg and 182.26 mg/kg, respectively, in blended processed cheese. PMID:27621695

  13. Evaluation of Natural Food Preservatives in Domestic and Imported Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Young; Han, Noori; Kim, Sun-Young; Yoo, Mi-Young; Paik, Hyun-Dong; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In milk and milk products, a number of organic acids naturally occur. We investigated the contents of some naturally occurred food preservatives (sorbic acid, benzoic acid, propionic acid, nitrite, and nitrate) contained in domestic and imported cheeses to establish the standard for the allowable range of food preservatives content in cheese. 8 kinds of domestic precheeses (n=104), 16 kinds of domestic cured cheeses (n=204) and 40 kinds of imported cheeses (n=74) were collected. Each domestic cheese was aged for a suitable number of months and stored for 2 mon at 5℃ and 10℃. No preservatives were detected in domestic soft and fresh cheeses, except cream cheese. In case of semi-hard cheeses, 2-5 mg/kg of benzoic acid was detected after 1-2 mon of aging. In imported cheeses, only benzoic acid and propionic acid were detected. The average benzoic acid and propionic acid contents in semi-hard cheese were 8.73 mg/kg and 18.78 mg/kg, respectively. Specifically, 1.16 mg/kg and 6.80 mg/kg of benzoic acid and propionic acid, respectively, were contained in soft cheese, 3.27 mg/kg and 2.84 mg/kg, respectively, in fresh cheese, 1.87 mg/kg and not detected, respectively, in hard cheese, and 2.07 mg/kg and 182.26 mg/kg, respectively, in blended processed cheese.

  14. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter culture screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, H; Kruijswijk, Z; Molenaar, D; Kleerebezem, M; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E T

    2009-12-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing protocols are cumbersome. To reduce screening costs, several models have been developed to miniaturize the cheese manufacturing process. However, these models are not able to accommodate the throughputs required for systematic screening programs. Here, we describe a protocol that allows the parallel manufacturing of approximately 600 cheeses in individual cheese vats each with individual process specifications. Protocols for the production of miniaturized Gouda- and Cheddar-type cheeses have been developed. Starting with as little as 1.7 mL of milk, miniature cheeses of about 170 mg can be produced and they closely resemble conventionally produced cheese in terms of acidification profiles, moisture and salt contents, proteolysis, flavor profiles, and microstructure. Flavor profiling of miniature cheeses manufactured with and without mixed-strain adjunct starter cultures allowed the distinguishing of the different cheeses. Moreover, single-strain adjunct starter cultures engineered to overexpress important flavor-related enzymes revealed effects similar to those described in industrial cheese. Benchmarking against industrial cheese produced from the same raw materials established a good correlation between their proteolytic degradation products and their flavor profiles. These miniature cheeses, referred to as microcheeses, open new possibilities to study many aspects of cheese production, which will not only accelerate product development but also allow a more systematic approach to investigate the complex biochemistry and microbiology of cheese making.

  15. Cheese yield as affected by some parameters Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A.M. Abd El-Gawad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheese yield is defined as the amount of cheese, expressed in kilograms, obtained from 100 kg of milk. It is a very important parameter: the higher the recovered percentage of solids, the greater is the amount of cheese obtained and therefore gains in economic terms.The definition of cheese yield, or how to express yield, is important in two main applications: 1. Economic control of cheesemaking; 2. Expressing the results of cheesemaking experiments. Cheese yield is affected by many factors including milk composition, amount and genetic variants of casein, milk quality, somatic cell count (SCC in milk, milk pasteurization, coagulant type, vat design, curd firmness at cutting, and manufacturing parameters.

  16. Short communication: norbixin and bixin partitioning in Cheddar cheese and whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Li, X E; Drake, M A

    2014-01-01

    The Cheddar cheese colorant annatto is present in whey and must be removed by bleaching. Chemical bleaching negatively affects the flavor of dried whey ingredients, which has established a need for a better understanding of the primary colorant in annatto, norbixin, along with cheese color alternatives. The objective of this study was to determine norbixin partitioning in cheese and whey from full-fat and fat-free Cheddar cheese and to determine the viability of bixin, the nonpolar form of norbixin, as an alternative Cheddar cheese colorant. Full-fat and fat-free Cheddar cheeses and wheys were manufactured from colored pasteurized milk. Three norbixin (4% wt/vol) levels (7.5, 15, and 30 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk) were used for full-fat Cheddar cheese manufacture, and 1 norbixin level was evaluated in fat-free Cheddar cheese (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk). For bixin incorporation, pasteurized whole milk was cooled to 55 °C, and then 60 mL of bixin/454 kg of milk (3.8% wt/vol bixin) was added and the milk homogenized (single stage, 8 MPa). Milk with no colorant and milk with norbixin at 15 mL/454 kg of milk were processed analogously as controls. No difference was found between the norbixin partition levels of full-fat and fat-free cheese and whey (cheese mean: 79%, whey: 11.2%). In contrast to norbixin recovery (9.3% in whey, 80% in cheese), 1.3% of added bixin to cheese milk was recovered in the homogenized, unseparated cheese whey, concurrent with higher recoveries of bixin in cheese (94.5%). These results indicate that fat content has no effect on norbixin binding or entrapment in Cheddar cheese and that bixin may be a viable alternative colorant to norbixin in the dairy industry.

  17. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter culture screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Kruijswijk, Z.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing prot

  18. Complete Genome Sequence for Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 32, an Industrial Cheese Starter and Cheese Flavor Adjunct

    OpenAIRE

    Broadbent, Jeff R.; Hughes, Joanne E.; Welker, Dennis L.; Tompkins, Thomas A.; James L Steele

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus is a lactic acid bacterium widely used in the manufacture of cheese and for production of bioactive peptides from milk proteins. We present the complete genome sequence for L. helveticus CNRZ 32, a strain particularly recognized for its ability to reduce bitterness and accelerate flavor development in cheese.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus in locally produced white cheese in Tirana market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELVIRA BELI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheese has nutritional value, its consumption is very common in Albania, but is also excellent medium for bacterial growth, source of bacterial infection, particularly when it is produced from raw poor quality or unpasteurized milk. Microbial safety of cheeses may be enhanced by usage good quality raw milk, pasteurized milk, following GMP in aim to prevent cross-contamination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and amount of Staphylococcus aureus in white cheeses, as an Albanian traditional product. Totally 120 samples of white cheese, produced in small big plant at different Albanian district, by raw milk or pasteurized milk, were collected from Tirana market. All samples were tested by phosphatase test to determine whether raw milk or pasteurized milk it was used for cheese production. 53/120 samples (44% resulted produced by pasteurized milk, 67/120 samples (56 % resulted produced by raw milk. The S. aureus was isolated in Baird Parker agar, and submitted to coagulase and API-staph test. Out of 120 cheese samples, 47 showed contamination by S. aureus coagulase-positive corresponding to 39.16%, otherwise 58 out of 120, 48.33 % of cheeses samples being contaminated with coagulase-negative strain of S. aureus. The occurrence S. aureus coagulase-positive in cheeses produced by pasteurized milk and raw milk it was respectively 7/53 (13.2 % and 40/67 (59.7%. 10% of the samples had high levels 105- 106cfu/g of S. aureus coagulase-positive, suggested that white cheese, may represent a health risk for the consumers

  20. 21 CFR 133.178 - Pasteurized neufchatel cheese spread with other foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., hydrolyzed lactose. (5) Cream, milk, skim milk, buttermilk, cheese whey, any of the foregoing from which part of the water has been removed, anhydrous milkfat, dehydrated cream, and albumin from cheese whey. (c... is added to this food, but the moisture content in no case is more than 65 percent. (ii) The milk...

  1. Extra Cheese, Please! Mozzarella's Journey from Cow to Pizza [and] Teaching Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Chris

    This book traces Annabelle the dairy cow's milk from the farm to the top of a Friday night pizza. The book relates that when Annabelle gives birth to her calf she also begins to produce milk; the milk is then processed into cheese, and from the cheese, pizza is made (recipe included). The book features color photographs of the entire process which…

  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF A HYGIENE PROCEDURE IN A CHEESE FARMER ARTISANAL MINAS CHEESE

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Adbeel de Lima; Costa Júnior, Luiz Carlos Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    The food safety and the economical viability of milk processing depend on appropriated higyenization techniques. The main goal of this work was to evaluate higienics conditions of food processing environment and surfaces of a producer farm of Canastra cheese by using ATP - Bioluminescence. In addition it was also proposed a higyenization procedure to improve safety and quality of manufacture proceeding. It was also evaluated the water quality used in milking and during cheese production. Duri...

  3. 添加大豆分离蛋白对羊乳干酪风味物质的影响%Influence of soy protein isolate addition to volatile compounds of goat milk cheese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝敏; 杜金华; 吴晓英

    2013-01-01

    In this study,with the addition of different proportion (0,4% and 10% m/m) of fresh goat milk and Soy protein isolate (SPI),high concentration direct-set lactic bacterial including Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc,and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp.Shermanii were used as the raw material,main culture and secondary culture,respectively,to make goat milk and SPI mixed cheese.Volatile compounds of the cheese were enriched by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and determined by GC/MS after the cheese maturation.The influence of SPI to volatile compounds of cheese was studied and the appropriate ratio of SPI addition was determined.The result indicated that the major volatile compounds of cheese were acid compounds,following the ketone,alcohol,aldehyde,and ester compounds.SPI addition reduced the contents of acid and ketone compounds of cheese significantly and increased the contents of alcohol compounds.The complexity of the cheese flavor was enhanced when SPI addition was 4%,with a rich cream,butter aroma and less special flavor of goat milk,phenol and pyrrole compounds appeared as well.%以新鲜羊乳为原料,直投式乳酸菌混合菌种为主发酵剂,费氏丙酸杆菌为次级发酵剂,添加不同比例(0、4%、10% m/m)大豆分离蛋白(soy protein isolate,SPI)制作混合型干酪.完全成熟之后利用固相微萃取(SPME)萃取富集干酪挥发性物质、气相色谱-质谱联用(GC/MS)检测干酪风味物质.以研究添加大豆分离蛋白对干酪风味物质的影响,确定适宜添加比例.实验结果表明:干酪中主要风味物质是酸类,其次是酮,醇,醛,酯类化合物;添加大豆分离蛋白使干酪中酸类、酮类化合物种类及含量明显减少;醇类化合物增加.大豆分离蛋白添加比为4%时,干酪有浓郁的奶香及黄油香气,羊乳膻味减少,并检出苯酚、吡咯等化合物,提高了干酪风味物质种类的丰富性.

  4. Minas-type fresh cheese developed from buffalo milk with addition of L. acidophilus Desenvolvimento de queijo minas frescal de leite de búfala com adição de L. acidophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Marcatti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective incorporation of a probiotic into foods requires the culture to remain viable all along processing and storage, without adverse alterations to sensory characteristics. The objective of this work was developing Minas-type fresh cheese with probiotic properties from buffalo milk. Four batches of Minas-type fresh cheese were prepared using buffalo milk: batch T1 in which neither culture nor lactic acid added; batch T3 in which only lactic acid added; batches T2 and T4 , both added of Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC 4, but T4 was also acidified. Resulting cheeses were evaluated for probiotic culture stability, texture profile, sensory acceptance, and changes in pH. The T4 probiotic cheese presented hardness, gumminess, and chewiness significantly lower than the other treatments. However, values for springiness and cohesiveness did not differ between all cheeses, and no sensory differences (p > 0.05 were found between treatments for texture, taste, and overall acceptance. The addition of probiotic to the acidified cheese (T4 yielded best aroma. The populations of L. acidophilus were greater than 10(6 CFU g-1 after 28 days of storage all products. Minas-type fresh cheese from buffalo milk is a suitable food for the delivery of L. acidophilus, since the culture remained viable during the shelf life of the products and did not negative affect analysed parameters.Para incorporação efetiva de probióticos em alimentos é imprescindível que a cultura mantenha-se viável durante todo o processamento e a estocagem e que não ocorram alterações adversas nas características sensoriais do produto. O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver queijo Minas frescal com propriedades probióticas a partir do leite de búfala. Foram avaliados quatro tratamentos (T1 a T4, sendo T1 e T3 controles, sem e com acidificação, respectivamente em T2 e T4 foram adicionados da cultura probiótica Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC 4, porém T4 foi também acidificado

  5. Qualidade de queijo minas frescal preparado com leite com diferentes quantidades de células somáticas Quality of minas frescal cheese prepared from milk with different somatic cell counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelise Andreatta

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of using bulk milk with different somatic cell counts (SCC on the quality of minas frescal cheese. A randomized complete block design was used, with 3x5 factorial treatments, with three SCC levels (low, 125,000 cells mL-1; intermediate, 437,000 cells mL-1; and high, 1,053,000 cells mL-1 and five storage durations. Cheese was vacuum-packed in plastic bags and analyzed after 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 days of storage at 4ºC. Somatic cell counts did not affect dry matter, fat, ash content, pH, free fatty acid concentrations and sensory parameters of minas frescal cheese. However, SCC in milk increased losses of protein in whey and decreased the cheese protein content. These changes did not affect the moisture-adjusted cheese yield and proteolysis during 30 days of storage. An interaction effect between SCC and time of storage was observed for firmness and sensory grades of cheeses. Results indicated that raw milk used to produce minas frescal cheese should not contain high SCC, in order to avoid lower acceptance of the product after 30 days of storage.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do uso de leite com diferentes contagens de células somáticas (CCS, na qualidade do queijo minas frescal. Utilizou-se delineamento de blocos ao acaso, em esquema fatorial 3x5, com três níveis de CCS (baixa, 125.000 células mL-1; intermediária, 437.000 células mL-1; e alta, 1.053.000 células·mL-1 e cinco tempos de armazenamento. Os queijos foram embalados a vácuo, em embalagens de plástico, e analisados após 2, 9, 16, 23 e 30 dias de armazenamento a 4ºC. A contagem de células somáticas não afetou a matéria seca, a gordura, as cinzas, o pH, a concentração de ácidos graxos livres e os parâmetros sensoriais do minas frescal. A CCS no leite aumentou as perdas de proteína no soro e diminuiu o teor de proteína no queijo. Essas alterações não afetaram o rendimento com umidade ajustada e a

  6. Thermal properties of selected cheeses samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika BOŽIKOVÁ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermophysical parameters of selected cheeses (processed cheese and half hard cheese are presented in the article. Cheese is a generic term for a diverse group of milk-based food products. Cheese is produced throughout the world in wide-ranging flavors, textures, and forms. Cheese goes during processing through the thermal and mechanical manipulation, so thermal properties are one of the most important. Knowledge about thermal parameters of cheeses could be used in the process of quality evaluation. Based on the presented facts thermal properties of selected cheeses which are produced by Slovak producers were measured. Theoretical part of article contains description of cheese and description of plane source method which was used for thermal parameters detection. Thermophysical parameters as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volume specific heat were measured during the temperature stabilisation. The results are presented as relations of thermophysical parameters to the temperature in temperature range from 13.5°C to 24°C. Every point of graphic relation was obtained as arithmetic average from measured values for the same temperature. Obtained results were statistically processed. Presented graphical relations were chosen according to the results of statistical evaluation and also according to the coefficients of determination for every relation. The results of thermal parameters are in good agreement with values measured by other authors for similar types of cheeses.

  7. Effect of aging on the rheology of full fat and low fat Cheddar-like caprine cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rheological properties of aging full fat (FF) and low fat (LF) caprine milk cheeses were characterized to determine the changes in the cheese matrix during storage. Six batches of high moisture, Cheddar-like cheese were manufactured from whole or skim caprine milk and were aged at 4 deg C for u...

  8. Flavor comparison of natural cheeses manufactured in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri; Chambers, Delores H

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the main flavor components of different natural aged cheese types from various countries and determine whether a unique sensory characteristic exists within specific countries for European cheeses. The flavor of 152 cheeses from Estonia, France, Italy, Germany, Holland, Austria, England, Greece, Ireland, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, Belgium, and Denmark were described during 4 independent studies. The sensory data from these studies were combined. The cheeses were sorted according to milk type and texture, and flavor characteristics of these groups were described. The main flavor characteristics of the cheeses tested were salty, sweet, sour, astringent, biting, pungent, sharp, nutty, musty/earthy, dairy fat, buttery, and dairy sweet. The cluster analysis divided the cheeses into 4 clusters: clusters 1 and 2 were sour, dairy sour, salty, astringent, biting, and varied in buttery (cluster 1) and sharp notes (cluster 2). Cluster 1 and 2 were mainly composed of French cheeses, while clusters 3 and 4 represented cheeses from various countries. Cluster 3 and 4 were sweet, with cooked milk and nutty characteristics and varied from buttery (cluster 3) to sharp notes (cluster 4). Cheeses from some countries, for example, France and Estonia, generally exhibited common sensory characteristics within the specific country, but cheeses from some other countries, such as Italy, varied widely, and seemed to have no common sensory theme. Most regional cheese standards are not specific about flavor profiles and these results suggest it may be possible to start a further characterization of cheeses in some countries.

  9. Quantitative risk assessment of haemolytic and uremic syndrome linked to O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli strains in raw milk soft cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Frédérique; Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Michel, Valérie; Miszczycha, Stéphane; Bel, Nadège; Sanaa, Moez

    2015-01-01

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains may cause human infections ranging from simple diarrhea to Haemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). The five main pathogenic serotypes of STEC (MPS-STEC) identified thus far in Europe are O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8, and O145:H28. Because STEC strains can survive or grow during cheese making, particularly in soft cheeses, a stochastic quantitative microbial risk assessment model was developed to assess the risk of HUS associated with the five MPS-STEC in raw milk soft cheeses. A baseline scenario represents a theoretical worst-case scenario where no intervention was considered throughout the farm-to-fork continuum. The risk level assessed with this baseline scenario is the risk-based level. The impact of seven preharvest scenarios (vaccines, probiotic, milk farm sorting) on the risk-based level was expressed in terms of risk reduction. Impact of the preharvest intervention ranges from 76% to 98% of risk reduction with highest values predicted with scenarios combining a decrease of the number of cow shedding STEC and of the STEC concentration in feces. The impact of postharvest interventions on the risk-based level was also tested by applying five microbiological criteria (MC) at the end of ripening. The five MCs differ in terms of sample size, the number of samples that may yield a value larger than the microbiological limit, and the analysis methods. The risk reduction predicted varies from 25% to 96% by applying MCs without preharvest interventions and from 1% to 96% with combination of pre- and postharvest interventions.

  10. Influence of a vegetable fat blend on the texture, microstructure and sensory properties of kashar cheese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkci, N.; Kesenkas, H.; Seckin, A. K.; Kinik, O.; Gonc, S.

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of using a commercial vegetable fat blend in Kashar cheese was investigated. Kashar cheeses were manufactured by replacing the milk fat (MF) with a vegetable fat (VF) blend. Kashar cheeses from whole milk were also manufactured to compare textural, microstructural, meltability, color and sensory characteristics during a ripening period of 90 days. The use of vegetable fat decreased the meltability, hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and chewiness of the cheese; while increasing adhesiveness where springiness was not affected. Differences became less notable toward the end of ripening. Scanning electron micrographs displayed VF cheese with a compact network with small and uniform fat globules embedded in the protein matrix. The MF cheese exhibited an open protein matrix containing milk fat globules of various sizes and forms. The color analysis demonstrated significant differences between cheeses. Finally, all sensory characteristics of the cheese were affected by the vegetable fat blend. (Author) 36 refs.

  11. Selenium content of milk and milk products of Turkey. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanardağ, R; Orak, H

    1999-04-01

    Selenium content of 1028 milk and milk products of Turkey are presented in this study. The selenium content of human milk (colostrum, transitional, and mature milk), various kinds of milk [cow, sheep, goat, buffalo, paper boxes (3%, 1.5%, 0.012% fat), bottled milk, condensed milk (10% fat), mineral added milk (1.6%), and banana, strawberry, and chocolate milk] and milk products (kefir, yogurt, Ayran, various cheese, coffee cream, ice cream, butter, margarine, milk powder, and fruit yogurt) in Turkey were determined by a spectrofluorometric method. The selenium levels of cow milks collected from 57 cities in Turkey were also determined. Selenium levels in cow milk varied with geographical location in Turkey and were found to be lowest for Van and highest for Aksaray. The results [milk (cow, sheep, goat, buffalo and human) and milks products] were compared with literature data from different countries.

  12. Study on key process and ripening characteristic of goat's milk soft cheese%羊奶软质奶酪关键工艺及成熟特性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾建勤; 刘兴龙; 于倩

    2012-01-01

    The goat milk soft cheese were investigated and the main technology parameters were optimized. The physical and chemical indicators and the microstructure of cheese were also observed during ripening. The results showed that best process parameters of goat milk soft cheese were the sterilization temperature at 72- 75℃,sterilization time at 15-20s,added lactic acid bacteria at 0.4%,curd temperature of 36℃,calcium chloride concentration at 0.03%,rennet at 0.55mL/1001U and pH at 5.9.As time increasing,the degree of cheese protein degradation increased,the smaller hole appeared at protein structure and the structure became rough,the unique smell of mutton were greatly reduced by fermentation action.%以酒泉肃北县山羊乳为原料,优化了羊奶软质奶酪的工艺参数,并观察成熟期间奶酪理化指标和微观结构的变化。结果显示:羊奶软质奶酪最佳工艺参数为杀菌温度控制在72-75℃,杀菌时间为15-20s。乳酸菌发酵剂添加量为0.4%,凝乳温度36℃,氯化钙添加量为0.03%,凝乳酶添加量为0.55mL/100IU,凝乳pH为5.9;随着时间的增加,奶酪蛋白质降解程度加大,蛋白质结构壁上出现更小的孔眼,而且结构变得粗糙,同时羊奶所特有的膻味通过奶酪的发酵作用世.大大降低一

  13. Mold Flora of Traditional Cheeses Produced in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Yalman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In our country, there are many cheese types that are produced traditionally. Cheeses which produced from cows, sheep and goat milk that matured with spontaneous growth of molds present in livestock skins, pots and similar environments are among them. They are produced traditionally in Mediterrian, Central and Eastern Anatolia regions. Molds that grow spontaneously in cheeses could create public health risk because of their secondary metabolites. Penicillium spp. are the most isolated mold from these cheeses and Penicillium roqueforti is determined as the dominant species. Furthermore, Aspergillus, Alternaria, Mucor, Geotrichum, Cladosporium species have been isolated. It is very important to control the ripening conditions and starter strain selection since some strains were reported as mycotoxin producers. In this review, it has been tried to give general information about traditional production of mold-ripened cheese in Turkey and the mold flora found in traditional cheeses. In addition, public health risk of these cheeses is reported.

  14. Sensory and protein profiles of Mexican Chihuahua cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Moushumi; Nuñez, Alberto; Van Hekken, Diane L; Renye, John A

    2014-11-01

    Native microflora in raw milk cheeses, including the Mexican variety Queso Chihuahua, contribute to flavor development through degradation of milk proteins. The effects of proteolysis were studied in four different brands of Mexican Queso Chihuahua made from raw milk. All of the cheeses were analyzed for chemical and sensory characteristics. Sensory testing revealed that the fresh cheeses elicited flavors of young, basic cheeses, with slight bitter notes. Analysis by gel electrophoresis and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) revealed that the Queseria Blumen (X) and Queseria Super Fino (Z) cheeses show little protein degradation over time while the Queseria America (W) and Queseria Lago Grande (Y) samples are degraded extensively when aged at 4 °C for 8 weeks. Analysis of the mixture of water-soluble cheese proteins by mass spectrometry revealed the presence of short, hydrophobic peptides in quantities correlating with bitterness. All cheese samples contained enterococcal strains known to produce enterocins. The W and Y cheese samples had the highest number of bacteria and exhibited greater protein degradation than that observed for the X and Z cheeses.

  15. Conditions allowing the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, H.M.L.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken to reveal the conditions that allow the formation of biogenic amines in cheese.The starters most commonly used in the Dutch cheese industry do not have decarboxylative properties. Only if the milk or curd is contaminated with non-starter bacteria, amine formation may be observ

  16. Starter bacteria are the prime agents of lipolysis in cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Dara K; Kilcawley, Kieran N; Beresford, Tom P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2006-10-18

    To assess the contribution of starter lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to lipolysis in Cheddar cheese, the evolution of free fatty acids (FFAs) was monitored in Cheddar cheeses manufactured from pasteurized milks with or without starter. Starter-free cheeses were acidified by a combination of lactic acid and glucono-delta-lactone. Starter cultures were found to actively produce FFAs in the cheese vat, and mean levels of FFAs were significantly higher in starter cheeses over ripening. The contribution of nonstarter LAB toward lipolysis appears minimal, especially in starter-acidified cheeses. It is postulated that the moderate increases in FFAs in Cheddar cheese are primarily due to lack of access of esterase of LAB to suitable lipid substrate. The results of this study indicate that starter esterases are the primary contributors to lipolysis in Cheddar cheese made from good quality pasteurized milk.

  17. Optimization of processing technology of black soybean-milk cheese by response surface methodology%响应面法优化黑豆干酪工艺条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭淑君; 蒋爱民; 胡利辉

    2011-01-01

    采用Box-Behnken中心组合响应面试验,研究黑豆干酪的最佳工艺条件,建立氯化钙添加量、凝乳酶添加量以及凝乳温度对凝乳效果影响的二次多项回归模型,并验证模型的有效性.结果表明,黑豆干酪的最佳工艺条件:氯化钙添加量0.06%、凝乳酶添加量0.025%、凝乳温度32℃.此时模型预测凝乳效果评分为88.5,验证实验结果为88.0,与理论预测值基本吻合.%Box-Behnken response surface methodology was employed to optimize processing technology of black soybean-milk cheese. And the second order quadratic equation for amount of calcium chloride,a-mount of rennet, curd temperature was built and the applicability of the model equation was verified. The result of response surface showed that the optimum process parameters for black soybean-milk cheese as: amount of calcium 0. 06%,amount of rennet 0. 025%, curd temperature 32 ℃ and the model gave the prediction of 88. 5. The confirmatory test showed that the curd effect was 88, and fitted the predicted value.

  18. Shreddability of pizza Mozzarella cheese predicted using physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banville, V; Morin, P; Pouliot, Y; Britten, M

    2014-07-01

    This study used rheological techniques such as uniaxial compression, wire cutting, and dynamic oscillatory shear to probe the physical properties of pizza Mozzarella cheeses. Predictive models were built using compositional and textural descriptors to predict cheese shreddability. Experimental cheeses were made using milk with (0.25% wt/wt) or without denatured whey protein and renneted at pH 6.5 or 6.4. The cheeses were aged for 8, 22, or 36 d and then tested at 4, 13, or 22°C for textural attributes using 11 descriptors. Adding denatured whey protein and reducing the milk renneting pH strongly affected cheese mechanical properties, but these effects were usually dependent on testing temperature. Cheeses were generally weaker as they aged. None of the compositional or rheological descriptors taken alone could predict the shredding behavior of the cheeses. Using the stepwise method, an objective selection of a few (<4) relevant descriptors made it possible to predict the production of fines (R(2)=0.82), the percentage of long shreds (R(2)=0.67), and to a lesser degree, the adhesion of cheese to the shredding blade (R(2)=0.45). The principal component analysis markedly contrasted the adhesion of cheese to the shredding blade with other shredding properties such as the production of fines or long shreds. The predictive models and principal component analysis can help manufacturers select relevant descriptors for the development of cheese with optimal mechanical behavior under shredding conditions.

  19. Addition of whey protein to fresh cheese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rafael Arce-Méndez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been conducted in order to assess the effect of adding whey protein (WP to fresh cheese. The yield, proximal chemical composition, tryptophan content,and texture and consumer sensorial acceptance were obtained. The study was conducted at a cheese factory located in San Carlos, Costa Rica, in 2011. The protein obtained from whey was added during the cheese manufacturing process, before adding the microbial rennet; and four enrichment levels were evaluated, including one control. The supplemented cheese showed an acceptance rating between 6.8 and 7.1. Products with 75 and 120 g of added whey protein per kilogram of milk showed no significant differences versus non-supplemented cheese, while the preference towards the cheese with 150 g WP/kg was less than that of the control (p<0.05. A cluster analysis revealed the existence of two consumer groups: one, accounting for 65% of the members of the panel, whose preference was unaffected by the protein supplemented; and, the other group where the added protein affected their liking negatively. Adding whey protein to the cheese resulted in a significant increase in yield and in the protein-to-water ratio, as well as a reduction in fat content (p<0.05. Nevertheless, there were structural changes in the cheese that caused the reduction of certain texture properties, generating changes in their sensory properties that reduced the preference of a representative group of consumers towards the product.

  20. Genome sequence of Lactococcus garvieae IPLA 31405, a bacteriocin-producing, tetracycline-resistant strain isolated from a raw-milk cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Flórez García, Ana Belén; Reimundo, Pilar; Delgado, Susana; Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Guijarro, José A; Mayo Pérez, Baltasar

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus garvieae IPLA 31405, isolated from a traditional Spanish cheese. The genome contains a lactose-galactose operon,a bacteriocin locus, two integrated phages, a transposon harboring an active tet(M) gene, and two theta-type plasmid replicons. Genes encoding virulence factors were not recorded. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Serra da Estrela Cheese: evaluation of the thistle ecotype on the physical, chemical and sensorial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Tenreiro, Marlene; Guiné, Raquel; Barracosa, Paulo; Correia, Paula; Correia, Ana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Serra da Estrela cheese is the most famous variety of farm cheese manufactured in Portugal. Its manufacture is artisanal, from raw ewe's milk of a native breed (Bordaleira da Serra da Estrela), which is coagulated using an aqueous extract of the wild thistle (Cynara cardunculus), without deliberate addition of any starter culture [1-2]. The study of microstructure in specialty cheeses is relevant to sensory features and to fundamental explanation of the changes observed throughout cheese r...

  2. Biogenic amines in Italian Pecorino cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eSchirone

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (approximately 53.727t of production. Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or thermized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA’s in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, aw, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge and the presence of cofactor. Generally, the total content of BA’s can range from about 100-2400 mg/kg, with a prevalence of toxicologically important BA’s, tyramine and histamine. The presence of BA in Pecorino cheeses is becoming increasingly important to consumers and cheese-maker alike, due to the potential threats of toxicity to humans and consequent trade implications.

  3. Effect of lupine as cheese base substitution on technological and nutritional properties of processed cheese analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezik Azab Awad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthy foods have been met with marked success in the last two decades. Lupine flours, protein concentrates, and isolates can be applied as a substance for enriching different kinds of food systems such as bakery products, lupine pasta, ice cream, milk substitutes. Imitation processed cheese is made from mixtures of dairy and/or non dairy proteins and fat/oils and is variously labeled analogue, artifi cial, extruded, synthetic and/or fi lled. Processed cheese can be formulated using different types of cheese with different degree of maturation, fl avorings, emulsifying, salts, and/or several ingredients of non-dairy components. Non-dairy ingredients have been used in processed cheese for many dietary and economic reasons. In this study, lupine paste was used to substitute 25, 50, 75 and 100% of cheese in base formula of processed cheese analogue (PCA. Material and methods. Matured Ras cheese (3 months old was manufactured using fresh cow milk. Soft cheese curd was manufactured using fresh buffalo skim milk. Emulsifying salts S9s and Unsalted butter were used. Lupine termis paste was prepared by soaking the seeds in tap water for week with changing the water daily, and then boiled in water for 2 hrs, cooled and peeled. The peeled seeds were minced, blended to get very fi ne paste and kept frozen until used. Results. Lupine paste was used to substitute 25, 50, 75 and 100% of cheese in base formula of processed cheese analogue (PCA. The obtained PCA were analysed when fresh and during storage up to 3 months at 5±2°C for chemical composition, physical and sensory properties. The histopathological effect of lupines on alloxan diabetic albino rats and nutritional parameters were also investigated. Incorporation of lupine paste in PCA increased the ash and protein contents while meltability and penetration values of resultant products were decreased. Adding lupine in PSA formula had relatively increased the oil index and fi rmness of

  4. Substituição do leite de cabra por soro de queijo bovino para cabritos alpinos Replacement of goat milk for cattle cheese whey in artificial feeding of Alpine kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Germano Costa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho foi conduzido para avaliar a substituição do leite de cabra por soro de queijo bovino no aleitamento de cabritos alpinos. Os animais foram distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em arranjo fatorial 4 × 2, composto de quatro níveis de substituição do leite de cabra por soro de queijo (0, 15, 30 e 45% e dois sexos (três machos e quatro fêmeas por tratamento. A inclusão do soro de queijo na dieta não afetou o desenvolvimento ponderal dos cabritos dos 7 aos 42 dias de idade. Os cabritos alimentados com leite de cabra apresentaram maiores pesos finais, em torno de 13,0 kg; consumiram 70,0 litros/animal de leite de cabra, 172,0 g MS/animal/dia de concentrado e tiveram ganho médio de 137,5 g/dia. Nos cabritos alimentados com a dieta com 15, 30 e 45% de soro de queijo, os pesos finais foram de 11,1; 9,88 e 10,27 kg; o consumo de leite foi de 59,5; 49,0 e 38,4 litros/animal; e o de concentrado, 148,0; 117,0 e 135 g MS/animal/dia, com ganhos de 122,2; 99,5 e 100,8 g/dia, respectivamente. A conversão alimentar não diferiu entre as dietas. O efeito do sexo evidenciou-se a partir dos 21 dias de idade, mas não houve interação dieta × sexo. Ao final do estudo, aos 70 dias de idade, o peso dos machos (12,4 kg foi maior que o das fêmeas (10,6 kg. A maior rentabilidade média (168,15% foi obtida com o fornecimento dos níveis mais altos de soro de leite. O aleitamento de cabritos com até 45% de soro de queijo é tecnicamente viável e proporciona melhor retorno econômico. O uso de leite integral de cabra para criação de cabritos em rebanhos leiteiros é economicamente inviável.The objective of this work was to evaluate the replacement of whole goat milk for cattle cheese whey in the artificial nursing of alpine kids. The animals were distributed in a complete randomized design in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement made up with four levels of goat milk replacing for cheese whey (0, 15, 30 and 45% and two sexes (three

  5. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FLORA OF KONYA KUFLU CHEESE: A TRADITIONAL CHEESE FROM KONYA PROVINCE IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Guley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the lactic acid bacteria flora of mature Konya Kuflu cheese. Konya Kuflu cheese is a traditional blue cheese which is produced from raw milk without starter culture addition and mould growth occurs in uncontrolled conditions during its ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from 9 mature Konya Kuflu cheese samples were investigated using a combination of conventional biochemical tests, API test kits, and molecular approaches. For some isolates, different results were obtained according to the identification technique. The overall LAB profile of Konya Kuflu cheese samples revealed that Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paracasei/Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis are the predominant species. In addition, 1 Pediococcus parvulus and 1 Enterococcus durans were also identified.

  6. Proteolysis of prato type cheese produced using ultrafiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spadoti Leila Maria

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of milk ultrafiltration technology for cheese manufacture presents several advantages. However, it also influences proteolysis and, consequently, cheese ripening. The effects of five different processing methods for Prato cheese were evaluated with respect to the time evolution of the extent and depth of proteolysis indexes (EPI and DPI. The following treatments (T for cheese production were studied: T1 - without ultrafiltration (standard; T2, T3, T4 and T5 - using milk concentrated by ultrafiltration (UFCM and respectively: T2 - without pre-fermentation of the UFCM; T3 - pre-fermentation of 10% of the UFCM; T4 - pre-fermentation of 20% of the UFCM, and T5 - pre-fermentation of 20% of the UFCM plus indirect heating. Treatments affected the EPI and DPI of the cheeses (T1 lower values for EPI and DPI and T4 higher values for EPI and DPI. The time influenced the extent and depth of proteolysis indexes.

  7. Biogenic amines in italian pecorino cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Visciano, Pierina; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    The quality of distinctive artisanal cheeses is closely associated with the territory of production and its traditions. Pedoclimatic characteristics, genetic autochthonous variations, and anthropic components create an environment so specific that it would be extremely difficult to reproduce elsewhere. Pecorino cheese is included in this sector of the market and is widely diffused in Italy (∼62.000t of production in 2010). Pecorino is a common name given to indicate Italian cheeses made exclusively from pure ewes' milk characterized by a high content of fat matter and it is mainly produced in the middle and south of Italy by traditional procedures from raw or pasteurized milk. The microbiota plays a major role in the development of the organoleptic characteristics of the cheese but it can also be responsible for the accumulation of undesirable substances, such as biogenic amines (BA). Bacterial amino acid decarboxylase activity and BA content have to be investigated within the complex microbial community of raw milk cheese for different cheese technologies. The results emphasize the necessity of controlling the indigenous bacterial population responsible for high production of BA and the use of competitive adjunct cultures could be suggested. Several factors can contribute to the qualitative and quantitative profiles of BA's in Pecorino cheese such as environmental hygienic conditions, pH, salt concentration, water activity, fat content, pasteurization of milk, decarboxylase microorganisms, starter cultures, temperature and time of ripening, storage, part of the cheese (core, edge), and the presence of cofactor (pyridoxal phosphate, availability of aminases and deaminases). In fact physico-chemical parameters seem to favor biogenic amine-positive microbiota; both of these environmental factors can easily be modulated, in order to control growth of undesirable microorganisms. Generally, the total content of BA's in Pecorino cheeses can range from about 100-2400

  8. Rennet coagulation of heated milk concentrates

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, Regina; Hinrichs, Jörg

    2000-01-01

    International audience; The high temperature heating of cheese milk is a useful tool for preventing late fermentation during cheese ripening if the renneting properties remain unchanged. The aim of the investigations was to find heating conditions which guarantee the inactivation of clostridia spores but still enable rennet coagulation of the heated milk and milk concentrates respectively. The gel strength of the rennet gels increased the more the casein content increased. The native whey pro...

  9. The properties and acceptability of fresh cheese produced using the mixture probiotic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajka Božanić

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation and production of dairy food with probiotic cultures isincreasing due to its health and nutritive benefits. In this paper the probiotic fresh cheese was produced from skim milk samples with 0,1% fat (A and 1,0% fat (B. Fermentation of skim milk samples was conducted at 40°C by 2% addition of DVS-ABT4 mixture probiotic cultures inoculum with selected bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium ssp. and Streptococcus thermophilus and without rennet addition. After milk coagulation (about 7-9 hours, the curd was gently cut and drained overnight. Produced of skim milk cheese samples (A had approximately 23.4% total solids, 1.8% fat in total solids and yield about 24.5% (w/v, while the low fat cheese samples (B had 26.2% total solids, 16.2% fat in total solids and yield about 27.3% (w/v. The skim milk cheeses (A had higher protein and mineral matter content compared to low fat cheeses (B. All samples of probiotic fresh cheese were a like to traditional fresh cheese according to general appearance and consistency. However, they had slightly lower aroma and acidity, expecially skim milk cheese samples (A. Better sensory properties had low fat cheesesamples (B during total time of storage (14 days. Acceptability of probiotic fresh cheese was evalueted by hedonic scale from 63 consumers. Statistic shows that all samples were 100% desirable, but average score for skim milk cheese (A was some lower (x = 7.33 than average score (x = 8.11 for low fat cheese (B. Variance analysis also shows that there is significantly important difference (p= 0,05 between analysed fresh cheese samples

  10. Artisanal and experimental Pecorino Siciliano cheese: Microbial dynamics during manufacture assessed by culturing and PCR-DGGE analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randazzo, C.L.; Vaughan, E.E.; Caggia, C.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional artisanal Pecorino Siciliano (PS) cheeses, and two experimental PS cheeses were manufactured using either raw or pasteurised ewes' milk with the addition of starter cultures. The bacterial diversity and dynamics of the different cheese types were evaluated both by culturing and character

  11. The effect of using a vegetable fat blend on some attributes of kashar cheese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesemkas, H.; Dinkci, N.; Seckin, K.; Kinik, O.; Gonc, S.

    2009-07-01

    Kashar cheese was produced from whole milk (MF) or skim milk homogenized with a commercial vegetable fat blend (VF) by the traditional procedure. The resulting cheese was stored for 3 months at 5 degree centigrade, and analyzed initially for its gross composition and cholesterol content. In addition, the proteolysis and lipolysis, organic acid content and fatty acid composition were studied during the ripening of the cheese. The replacement of milk fat with a vegetable fat blend mainly affected pH, total solids and cholesterol content in the initial composition of the cheese (P < 0.05). The acid degree value and tyrosine contents in both types of cheese increased throughout ripening and significant differences were found between the cheeses after only 30 days of ripening (P < 0.05). The organic acid concentrations of both cheeses changed during ripening (P < 0.05) except for citric and oxalic acids. MF cheese showed higher levels of citric, succinic and oxalic acids especially towards to the end of ripening. Palmitic acid was the dominant fatty acid in MF cheese while the most abundant fatty acids in VF cheese were palmitic and oleic acid. The higher unsaturated fatty acid composition of the VF cheese has attracted attention from the healthy food image point of view. (Author) 44 refs.

  12. Consumers’ preferences and composition of Livanjski cheese in relation to its sensory characteristics

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    Anto Matić

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate consumers’ preferences of Livanjski cheese depending on the type of milk (cow’s milk or a mixture of sheep’s and cow’s milk and the originality of production (farm or industrially produced. Also correlations between sensorial scores and the composition of Livanjski cheese were determined. Sixty day old Livanjski cheese samples produced on four family farms and under industrial conditions produced cheese were used for sensory evaluation. During the cheese sampling every producer was visited regularly (every two weeks to evaluate the ripening conditions of the cheeses (temperature, relative air humidity and ventilation. Sensory evaluation was performed by 160 consumers and 6 experts. Cheese from farm 1 received the highest scores (P<0.05 in general and for every single attribute as well. The production of Livanjski cheese on farm 1 was distinct due to mixing sheep’s and cow’s milk (70:30 % and due to good controlled ripening conditions (15-18 °C, relative air humidity 80-90 %, regular air ventilation. Sheep’s milk was an important factor for the higher scoring of Livanjski cheese. In opposite to the consumers’ preference, experts evaluated industrially produced Livanjski cheese with the highest score. Significantly high and negative correlations (P<0.05 between total solids of cheese and scores for taste and odour judged by experts were obtained. Moreover, significantly higher and negative correlations (P<0.05 between the total solids of cheese and all sensorial attributes were obtained by consumers. On the contrary, preserving factors i.e. higher salt content and acidity positively influenced the sensory attributes of Livanjski cheese.

  13. Genetic aspects of milk coagulation properties in Italian Holstein cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bittante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the quota of national production of cow milk destined for cheese yield isabout 73% of total marketable milk (Osservatorio del latte, 2002. Hence, the improvement of renneting propertiesof milk is an important objective for the dairy sector. Favorable conditions of milk reactivity with rennet,curd formation rate and curd strength, as well as curd syneresis, have a positive effect on the wholecheese-making process and, later, on the ripening development of cheese.

  14. Caciotta della Garfagnana cheese: selection and evaluation of autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Cerri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and select, with respect to acidification and proteolytic activities, the autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB present in milk and Caciotta della Garfagnana, a cheese produced either with raw or thermised cow’s milk in small dairies and family plants of Garfagnana (Tuscany, to obtain LAB strains with attributes suitable to be employed as starter cultures in this type of cheese, particularly when thermised milk is used to control spoilage microflora. Samples of raw milk, curd and cheese were collected from three representative farmers of the production area and used to isolate autochthonous LAB. Phenotypic and genotypic (species-specific PCR assay identification of isolated LAB was done. Twenty-eight strains of LAB isolated from milk, curd and cheese were screened for acidifying and proteolytic activities. LAB strains with the better attributes were used as mesophilic starter cultures in technological trials: experimental cheeses manufactured with the addition of autochthonous LAB and control cheeses were compared for LAB and pH evolution. Experimental cheeses presented a significant increase in the mesophilic lactic acid microflora up to 14 days of ripening and significantly lower pH values up to seven days of ripening. The use of wild selected mesophilic lactic acid bacteria, together with thermisation of milk, for the Caciotta della Garfagnana looks very promising and could help to both standardise the production and improve quality and traditional characteristics of this type of cheese.

  15. Caciotta della Garfagnana cheese: selection and evaluation of autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Turchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available he aim of this study was to isolate, identify and select, with respect to acidification and proteolytic activities, the autochthonous mesophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB present in milk and Caciotta della Garfagnana, a cheese produced either with raw or thermised cow’s milk in small dairies and family plants of Garfagnana (Tuscany, to obtain LAB strains with attributes suitable to be employed as starter cultures in this type of cheese, particularly when thermised milk is used to control spoilage microflora. Samples of raw milk, curd and cheese were collected from three representative farmers of the production area and used to isolate autochthonous LAB. Phenotypic and genotypic (species-specific PCR assay identification of isolated LAB was done. Twenty-eight strains of LAB isolated from milk, curd and cheese were screened for acidifying and proteolytic activities. LAB strains with the better attributes were used as mesophilic starter cultures in technological trials: experimental cheeses manufactured with the addition of autochthonous LAB and control cheeses were compared for LAB and pH evolution. Experimental cheeses presented a significant increase in the mesophilic lactic acid microflora up to 14 days of ripening and significantly lower pH values up to seven days of ripening. The use of wild selected mesophilic lactic acid bacteria, together with thermisation of milk, for the Caciotta della Garfagnana looks very promising and could help to both standardise the production and improve quality and traditional characteristics of this type of cheese.

  16. A comparative study of the fatty acid profiles in commercial sheep cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the FA profile of sheep cheese marketed in Chile. Fifty-eight cheeses were collected from supermarkets of 5 different Chilean cities including 34 sheep cheeses, 7 from goat’s milk, 11 from cow’s milk, 4 from a mixture of sheep, goat and cow’s milk and 2 from a mixture of sheep and cow’s milk. Compared to the cow and goat cheese (3.4 and 2.5 g·100g−1), the sheep cheese (3.8 g·100g−1) contained higher contents of C18:1t. The saturated and polyun...

  17. Genomic Regions Affecting Cheese Making Properties Identified in Danish Holsteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard; Poulsen, Nina Aagaard

    The cheese renneting process is affected by a number of factors associated to milk composition and a number of Danish Holsteins has previously been identified to have poor milk coagulation ability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genomic regions affecting the technological...

  18. 21 CFR 133.165 - Parmesan and reggiano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the same physical and chemical properties as the cheese produced when the procedure set forth in... milk or added thereto. Sufficient rennet, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that produces... larger than wheat kernels, heated, and stirred until the temperature reaches between 115 °F and 125...

  19. Starter culture development for improving safety and quality of Domiati cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayad, Eman H E

    2009-08-01

    Eleven lactococci strains (sp. lactis and cremoris) were collected according to specific or selected characteristics for development of defined strain starter (DSS) to improve safety and nutritional quality of traditional and low salt Domiati cheese. Thirteen DSS; nisin-producing system or/and folate-producing strains were prepared. The behaviour of the strains in DSS was studied in milk and in two series of Domiati cheese; the first one made with 5% NaCl and salt tolerant strains, the second made with 3% NaCl and the control cheeses were made without starters. The population dynamics of strains and sensory evaluation of cheese corroborated the results in milk. All strains can grow well together and appeared to produce pleasant flavours, normal (typical) body and texture Domiati cheese. There was no apparent difference in cheese composition between cheeses in each series; the levels were within margins for composition of Domiati cheese. The levels of nisin (IU g(-1)) ranged from 204 to 324 IU g(-1) in 3-months' cheeses. Folate concentration increased in cheeses made with DSS cultures than control and the level ranged from 5.5 to 11.1 microg 100 g(-1) in cheeses after 3 months. All results revealed that selected DSS can be used for improving Domiati cheese.

  20. Proteolysis of Livanjski cheese during ripening

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    Samir KALIT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Livanjski cheese belongs to the group of hard cheeses which is traditionally produced in Livno (Bosnia and Herzegovina. Proteolytic changes during the ripening of Livanjski cheese have not been investigated extensively. The aim of this paper was to determine its proteolytic changes during the different stages of ripening. Five Livanjski cheeses (from raw cow’s or a mixture of sheep’s and cow’s milk were observed during the ripening to evaluate its typical proteolytic profile. An electophoretic profile of Livanjski cheese was determined by Urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (urea-PAGE and a densitometric evaluation of the urea-PAGE gels was performed using a densitometer. The water-soluble nitrogen fraction in the total nitrogen (WSN %TN and the 12%-TCA-soluble nitrogen fraction in the total nitrogen (TCA-SN %TN of the cheese were determined using the Kjeldahl method. Degradation of αs1-casein by chymosin caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05 of relative content of this protein in Livanjski cheese at the sixth week point of ripening. Due to the activity of chymosin on αs1-casein, αs1-I-casein and αs1-II-casein developed, which caused a significant increase (P < 0.05 of Index alpha. The relative ratio of β-casein significantly decreased (P < 0.05 during ripening leading to a significant accumulation (P < 0.05 of degraded product (sum γ1-casein, γ2-casein and γ3-casein. These proteolytic changes caused a significant increase (P < 0.05 of Index betta. Accumulation of medium, small peptides and amino acids caused a significant (P < 0.05 increase of the relative content of WSN %TN and TCA-SN %TN. In general, proteolysis of Livanjski cheese during ripening was moderate probably due to the low moisture content and low water activity, although it was produced from raw milk. Taking into account that the ratio β-casein : αs1-casein at the end of ripening was 1.46, it could be concluded that degradation of αs1-casein could be the

  1. Physical sample structure as predictive factor in growth modeling of Listeria innocua in a white cheese model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sandie M.; Bertram, Hanne C.; Andersen, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Growth of Listeria innocua at 9 °C was investigated in white cheeses manufactured from ultra-filtrate milk concentrate added varying amounts of skimmed milk powder, NaCl and glucono-delta-lactone. Characterization of the white cheese structures was performed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T...

  2. Cheese whey wastewater: characterization and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fátima; Prazeres, Ana R; Rivas, Javier

    2013-02-15

    Cheese whey wastewater (CWW) is a strong organic and saline effluent whose characterization and treatment have not been sufficiently addressed. CWW composition is highly variable due to raw milk used, the fraction of non valorized cheese whey and the amount of cleaning water used. Cheese whey wastewater generation is roughly four times the volume of processed milk. This research tries to conduct an exhaustive compilation of CWW characterization and a comparative study between the different features of CWW, cheese whey (CW), second cheese whey (SCW) and dairy industry effluents. Different CWW existing treatments have also been critically analyzed. The advantages and drawbacks in aerobic/anaerobic processes have been evaluated. The benefits of physicochemical pre-stages (i.e. precipitation, coagulation-flocculation) in biological aerobic systems are assessed. Pre-treatments based on coagulation or basic precipitation might allow the application of aerobic biodegradation treatments with no dilution requirements. Chemical precipitation with lime or NaOH produces a clean wastewater and a sludge rich in organic matter, N and P. Their use in agriculture may lead to the implementation of Zero discharge systems.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF PROBIOTIC POTENTIAL OF LACTOBACILLUS SP. ISOLATED FROM CHEESE AND PREPARATION OF PROBIOTIC ICE-CREAM

    OpenAIRE

    Patil Liladhar Shivram; Pandav Parag Vishwanath

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are naturally present in milk and fermented milk products such as different kinds of cheese, yogurt, butter etc. The aim of the present study was isolation and taxonomic determination of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from cheese (wild type). Lactobacillus sp. was isolated from indigenous cheese sample, identified and characterized on the basis of their morphological and biochemical characteristics at genus level. The pure isolated Lactobacillus was assessed for various p...

  4. 7 CFR 58.518 - Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Milk. 58.518 Section 58.518 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....518 Milk. The selection of raw milk for cottage cheese shall be in accordance with §§ 58.132...

  5. Roquefortine C occurrence in blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, C; Vecchio, A; Galli, A; Dragoni, I

    2001-02-01

    Several strains of Penicillium are used for the production of mold-ripened cheeses, and some of them are able to produce mycotoxins. The aims of the research were the determination of roquefortine C and PR toxin in domestic and imported blue cheeses, the identification of the penicillia used as starter, and the investigation of their capacity for producing toxins in culture media. Roquefortine C was always found in the cheeses at levels ranging from 0.05 to 1.47 mg/kg, whereas the PR toxin was never found. The identification of the fungal strains present in the domestic cheeses included Penicillium glabrum, Penicillium roqueforti, and Penicillium cyclopium in the Gorgonzola "dolce" and Penicillium roqueforti in the Gorgonzola "naturale"; in one case, the presence of Penicillium crustosum was observed. The strains isolated from the foreign cheeses belonged to P. roqueforti. The strains were able to produce between 0.18 and 8.44 mg/liter of roquefortine in yeast extract sucrose medium and between 0.06 and 3.08 mg/liter and less than 0.05 mg/liter when inoculated in milk at 20 degrees C for 14 days and 4 degrees C for 24 days, respectively. Linear relations between production of roquefortine in culture media and cheeses did not emerge. PR toxin ranged from less than 0.05 to 60.30 mg/liter in yeast extract sucrose medium and was produced in milk at 20 degrees C from only one strain. The low levels and the relatively low toxicity of roquefortine make the consumption of blue cheese safe for the consumer.

  6. Queijo gorgonzola fabricado com leite pasteurizado por ejetor de vapor e HTST: parâmetros físico-químicos e sensoriais Gorgonzola type cheese manufactured with milk pasteurized by the HTST and steam ejector systems: physic-chemical and sensory parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Gattini Sbampato

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a influência de dois sistemas de pasteurização (High Temperature Short Time ¾ HTST¾ e ejetor de vapor nas características físico-químicas e sensoriais do queijo tipo Gorgonzola. As coletas de amostras de queijo e análises foram realizadas aos 5, 25, 45, 65 e 85 dias de maturação. Durante o período de maturação ocorreu aumento gradual de pH, sal/umidade e índice de acidez nos dois tratamentos. Os queijos fabricados com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema HTST obtiveram valores médios de pH superiores aos dos queijos fabricados com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema ejetor de vapor; os queijos fabricados com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema ejetor de vapor, obtiveram teores de índice de acidez e metilcetonas superiores aos dos queijos fabricados com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema HTST, indicando maior atividade lipolítica nesses queijos. Pela análise sensorial realizada aos 65 dias de maturação, pode se observar que não houve diferença significativa entre os tratamentos em relação à aparência, cor, consistência, textura e sabor. Porém foi observada diferença significativa com relação ao desenvolvimento do mofo e aroma. Os queijos fabricados com leite pasteurizado pelo sistema ejetor de vapor apresentaram maior atividade lipolítica e massa mais macia e fechada.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of two pasteurization systems (HTST and steam ejector on the physic-chemical and sensory characteristics of Gorgonzola type cheese. Sampling and analysis were conducted at 5, 25, 45, 65 and 85 days of ripening. Along the maturation period, pH, acidity index, salt/humidity, gradually increased. Cheeses manufactured with milk pasteurized by the HTST system had average values of pH higher than those manufactured with milk pasteurized by the steam ejector system. Milk pasteurized by the steam ejector system produced cheeses with higher acidity index (lipolysis and

  7. Chromium, lead and cadmium in Danish milk products and cheese determined by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after direct injection or pressurised ashing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Rasmussen, L.

    1991-01-01

    -degrees-C and then further ashed at 1 100-degrees-C with argon as the purge gas. Zeeman background correction was used in the atomisation step at 2 300-degrees-C. The detection limit was 0.7 ng/g. Direct detection of chromium in milk, using only argon as purge gas, was inferior. Non-homogeneous and solid...

  8. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process.

  9. Production technology and some quality parameters of Njeguši cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Mirecki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization of agricultural production and depopulation of areas that are recognized by traditional products, reached its peak during the last few decades. This represents a significant risk that the technology of traditional agricultural products, especially cheeses, can go into oblivion. Njeguši cheese is one of the famous Montenegrin traditional dairy products which originates from the mountain Lovćen and its peripheral areas. Produced by traditional technology, it belongs to a group of full fat, hard cheeses. Owing to its characteristic, spicy taste and pleasant odour, Njeguši cheese can be compared with some of the most famous hard cheeses. Originally it is made from ewe’s milk, but also, cow’s, goat’s and their mixture in different proportions, are increasingly used, which may be the treat to the originality of Njeguši cheese. The present study offers a description of original Njeguši cheese technology, followed by analysis of the chemical quality of ewe’s milk, cheese and whey. Thereat milk, cheese and whey samples were taken from 5 households located at the place of cheese origin - the Njeguši village. Chemical quality of ewe’s milk, cheese and whey was determined by method of FTIR spectrophotometry. Milk fat in the dry matter and moisture in cheese non-fat basis were mathematically calculated. The average content of milk fat in ewe’s milk was 4.92 %, proteins 4.59 %, lactose 4.14 % and total solids non-fat 9.46 %. Accordingly, the analysed cheeses belonged to full fat, semi-hard cheese due to 51.73 % fat in total solids and 60.07 % moisture in non-fat basis. The only deviation from original technology was shortening of the ripening period. Apart from the main objective - the preservation of the original technology, this study could significantly contribute to the process of protection of origin of Njeguši cheese, because the technology of cheese fulfilled the requirements listed in the National Law on the

  10. NMR-based milk metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine S.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality...... and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking...... the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive...

  11. Raw milk consumption and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranješ, Anka Popović; Popović, Milka; Jevtić, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the safe practices of milk pasteurization or sterilization, which effectively reduce foodborne outbreaks incidence associated with raw milk and dairy products use, outbreaks caused by such products continue to occur. Despite this fact, a worldwide movement advocating for the rights of raw milk and cheese selling and consumption, due to their specific nutritive characteristics, has strengthened significantly in recent years. Traditional agricultural manufacturers from Serbia still sell products related to thermally unprocessed milk, such as cottage cheese and raw cream. In AP Vojvodina during the period of 1981-2010 a total of 179 foodborne outbreaks were reported, where the incriminated cause of the outbreak were milk or diary. In 126 (70.39%) outbreaks, totaling 2276 sick individuals and one casualty, it was confirmed that the incriminated food was from the group of dairy products. In 48 instances (26.82%), bacteriological tests confirmed that milk and dairy products were excluded as the outbreak causes, while in another 5 (2.79%) outbreaks, microbiological analysis of food failed to confirm any relation to the actual epidemiological instances. In some cases, bacteriological testing of incriminated foods was not possible. In the cases of outbreaks associated with the consumption of milk and dairy products, traditional raw milk products were cited as being used. Consumption of unpasteurized milk and cheese represents public health threat. National and international rules ensuring use of safe products for human consumption have to set rules of trade of thermally processed milk and products on the market.

  12. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (pnisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption.

  13. Identification of the risk factors associated with cheese production to implement the hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) system on cheese farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Conrado; Millán, Rafael; Saavedra, Pedro; Jaber, José Raduán; Raposo, António; Sanjuán, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate, by statistical analyses, risk factors on cheese farms that can influence the microbial contamination of their products. Various assessment tools, such as cheese production questionnaires, food handlers' knowledge testing, and hygiene assessment system surveys, were used on 39 cheese farms on the island of Gran Canaria, Spain. The microbiological status of 773 raw milk and cheese samples from the cheese farms was assessed by enumerating total viable counts and 4 pathogens: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. The results revealed that the highest contamination by Staph. aureus (4.39%, >10(5)cfu/mL) was found in milk, and the highest contamination by E. coli (5.18%, >10(3) cfu/mL) was found in cheese. Very few samples (0.52%) were contaminated by L. monocytogenes or Salmonella spp. The factors associated with any tested microorganism were "handling," "knowledge," and "type of milk." Subsequently, multidimensional logistic analysis for contamination by E. coli showed an independent association for factors "cleaning and disinfection test" and "type of milk." The probability of total aerobic contamination of milk increased with lower hygiene assessment system survey scores. These results emphasize the need to apply and maintain good hygiene practices, and to study risk factors to prevent contamination and bacterial growth. Further research is required in other areas with different cheese farm types to reinforce the validity of these results.

  14. Rendimento, composição e análise sensorial do queijo minas frescal fabricado com leite de vacas mestiças alimentadas com diferentes volumosos Yield, composition and sensory analysis of Minas cheese made with milk from crossbred cows fed different roughages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susi Cristina dos Santos Guimarães Martins

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a qualidade físico-química e sensorial e o perfil de ácidos graxos do queijo minas frescal produzido com o leite de vacas mestiças alimentadas com dietas contendo quatro volumosos: canade-açúcar, silagem de sorgo, silagem de girassol e pastagem de Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia. Foram avaliados o rendimento, a composição físico-química e o perfil de ácidos graxos. Também foi realizada a análise sensorial do queijo minas frescal e da composição físico-química do leite. Utilizaram-se oito vacas mestiças 1/2 Holandês/Gir, com período de lactação de 180 ± 12 dias, distribuídas em dois quadrados latinos 4 × 4, com quatro animais, quatro dietas e quatro períodos. Os períodos foram de 18 dias, sendo 15 dias de adaptação e três dias de coletas de dados. Após o processamento do queijo, foi feita análise microbiológica, físico-química e posteriormente análise sensorial. Amostras do queijo foram congeladas e analisadas quanto ao perfil de ácidos graxos. O teor de gordura do queijo foi maior para as dietas com cana-de-açúcar e silagem de girassol em relação à silagem de sorgo e ao pasto de Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia, que não diferiram entre si. O queijo produzido a partir do leite de vacas alimentadas com silagem de girassol apresentou melhor perfil de ácidos graxos e índices de qualidade nutricional, maior proporção e melhor perfil de ácidos graxos insaturados. O rendimento do queijo foi igual para todas as dietas, independentemente do volumoso utilizado em sua composição. O queijo produzido com o leite de vacas alimentadas com silagem de girassol tem maior preferência pelos julgadores no teste de análise sensorial, especialmente quanto ao atributo aparência.The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical-chemical and sensory quality and fatty acid profile of Minas cheese produced from milk from crossbred cows fed diets with four roughages (sugar cane

  15. Behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes during the manufacture and ripening of Manchego and Chihuahua Mexican cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-López, C; Hernández-Sánchez, H

    2000-12-05

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to survive the Mexican Manchego and Chihuahua cheese-making processes and its persistence during the ripening stages of both cheeses was examined. Commercial pasteurized and homogenized whole milk was inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes (strain ATCC 19114) to a level between 2 x 10(6) and 9 x 10(6) CFU/ml. The milk was used to make Mexican Manchego and Chihuahua cheeses in a 25-l vat. Mexican Manchego cheese was ripened for 5 days and Chihuahua cheese for 6 weeks at 12 degrees C and 85% RH. Listeria present in the cheese was enumerated by diluting samples in sterile 0.1% peptone water and plating on Oxford agar. Duplicate samples were taken at each step of the manufacturing process. During the first week of ripening samples were taken daily from both cheeses. For Chihuahua cheese, samples were taken weekly after the first week of the ripening stage. During the manufacture of Mexican Manchego cheese, Listeria counts remained relatively constant at 10(6) CFU/ml, while with Chihuahua cheese there was a one log decrease in numbers (10(6) to 10(5) CFU/ml). After pressing both curds overnight, numbers of bacteria decreased in Mexican Manchego cheese to 8.2 x 10(5) but increased in Chihuahua cheese from 1.7 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(6) CFU/ml. During the ripening stage, counts of Listeria remained constant in both cheeses. However, since the Chihuahua cheese ripening stage is about 6 weeks, the number of bacteria decreased from 2 x 10(6) to 4 x 10(4) CFU/g. The results show that Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive the manufacture and ripening processes of both Mexican cheeses.

  16. Microbiology, biochemistry, and volatile composition of Tulum cheese ripened in goat's skin or plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayaloglu, A A; Cakmakci, S; Brechany, E Y; Deegan, K C; McSweeney, P L H

    2007-03-01

    Tulum cheeses were manufactured from raw ewe's milk and ripened in goat's skin bags (tulums) or plastic containers to understand the effect of ripening container on the chemical composition, biochemistry, microbiology, and volatile composition of Tulum cheeses during 150 d of ripening. Chemical compositions of the cheeses ripened in tulums were significantly different and the moisture contents decreased rapidly in those cheeses because of the porous structure of the tulum. Higher microbial counts were detected in the cheeses ripened in plastic than in cheeses ripened in tulums. Differences in nitrogenous compounds and total free AA of the cheeses were not significant. Total concentrations of free AA in cheeses increased with age and Glu, Ala, Val, Leu, and Phe were the most abundant AA in the cheeses. Urea-PAGE of pH 4.6-insoluble fractions of the cheeses during ripening showed similar degradation patterns in all cheeses. Peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC of pH 4.6- and ethanol-soluble or ethanol-insoluble fractions of the cheeses revealed only minor differences in the concentrations of some peptides among the cheeses; however, age-related changes in peptide concentrations were significantly different among the cheeses. Cheeses were analyzed at 90 d of ripening for volatile compounds by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. One hundred volatile components were identified, including 11 acids, 16 esters, 12 methyl ketones, 7 aldehydes, 22 alcohols, 7 sulfur compounds, 6 terpenes, and 19 miscellaneous compounds. The main components were short-chain fatty acids, 2-butanone, diacetyl, and primary alcohols. Quantitative differences in several volatile compounds were evident among the cheeses. Cheeses ripened in tulums or plastic had similar aroma patterns, but the concentrations of some components were different.

  17. Prevalence and Characterization of Listeria Species in Domestic and Industrial Cheeses of Isfahan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zamani-Zadeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Listeria monocytogenes is of major concern to the food industry in general and the dairy industry in particular. Little is known about incidence of this pathogenic bacterium in dairy products in Iran.Methods: A survey was made from 23 September 2006 to 22 June 2007 for Listeria species in ninety samples of tradi­tional and industrial cheeses, in milk and surface where the cheeses were manufactured from unpasteurized raw milk in the province of Isfahan (Iran.Results: Listeria murrayi, L. grayi and L. ivanovii, were detected in nine traditional cheeses and one raw milk sample. None of the different Listeria species were isolated from the industrial cheeses and their environment.Conclusion: There are almost good hygienic conditions in domestic cheese manufacturing farmhouses in Isfahan area, but we should try to improve hygienic levels until we have none of the Listeria spp. in our samples.

  18. Determination of free amino acids in whole-fat Turkish White Brined Cheese produced by animal and microbial milk-clotting enzymes with and without the addition of starter culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ufuk Eren-Vapur; Tulay Ozcan

    2012-01-01

    Coagulating enzymes are essential ingredients for the production of different cheese varieties. The objective of this research was to summarize the effect of rennet type (calf rennet and microbial rennet from Rhizomucor miehei) and starter culture on the sensory properties and free amino acids (FAA) release during the ripening of Turkish White brined cheese. The concentrations of FAA and sensory properties were similar for cheeses made with both types of coagulant and starter culture. Aminoac...

  19. SEARCH FOR MICROORGANISMS IN UTENSILS, MILK AND CHEESE OF THE CRAFT PRODUCTION IN SMALL UNITS OF PRODUCTION IN SEROPÉDICA, RIO DE JANEIRO PESQUISA DE MICRORGANISMOS EM UTENSÍLIOS, LEITE E QUEIJOS DE PRODUÇÃO ARTESANAL EM UNIDADES DE PRODUÇÃO FAMILIAR NO MUNICÍPIO DE SEROPÉDICA, RIO DE JANEIRO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Landgraf Botteon

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed in order to evaluate the hygienical and sanitary features of homemade production of “Minas Frescal” cheese in small units of production in Seropédica, RJ. Samples of subclinical and clinical mastitic cows milk, production stuffs and cheese were analyzed. Several microorganisms were detected in 100% of the samples, including Salmonella spp. in a sample of cheese. The main isolated agents were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi coagulans, Staphylococcus spp., Enterobacter spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacillus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus spp. and Micrococcus spp. Microorganisms were isolated from the milk of clinical and subclinical mastitis cows, the production stuffs and storage and also from the cheese, confirming the inadequate thermic treatment and hygienic procedures of the utensils. The inadequate hygienic quality of the homemade cheese evaluated is of concern once the isolated microorganisms represent potential hazards to health and the product sale is direct to the consumers.

    KEY WORDS: Food safety, homemade cheese, hygienic quality.
    Este trabalho foi desenvolvido para avaliar aspectos higiênico-sanitários da produção artesanal de queijo minas frescal em pequenas unidades de produção em um assentamento de reforma agrária em Seropédica, RJ. Analisaram-se amostras de leite, queijo e utensílios utilizados em diferentes etapas da linha de produção. Verificou-se a presença de microrganismos diversos, incluindo-se Salmonella spp. em uma amostra de queijo. Os principais agentes isolados foram Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus schleiferi coagulans, Staphylococcus spp., Enterobacter spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacillus spp, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus spp. e Micrococcus spp. Isolaram-se microrganismos de quartos mamários de vacas com mastite clínica ou subcl

  20. Determination of free amino acids in whole-fat Turkish White Brined Cheese produced by animal and microbial milk-clotting enzymes with and without the addition of starter culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Eren-Vapur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coagulating enzymes are essential ingredients for the production of different cheese varieties. The objective of this research was to summarize the effect of rennet type (calf rennet and microbial rennet from Rhizomucor miehei and starter culture on the sensory properties and free amino acids (FAA release during the ripening of Turkish White brined cheese. The concentrations of FAA and sensory properties were similar for cheeses made with both types of coagulant and starter culture. Aminoacids Phe, Leu - Ile, Gln, Val, Pro and Ala were the principal FAAs in the White brined cheeses at all stages of ripening.

  1. Probiotic Cheese Attenuates Exercise-induced Immune Suppression In Wistar Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lollo P.C.B.; Cruz A.G.; Morato P.N.; Moura C.S.; Carvalho-Silva L.B.; Oliveira C.A.F.; Faria J.A.F.; Amaya-Farfan J.

    2012-01-01

    Intense physical activity results in a substantial volume of stress and hence a significant probability of immunosuppression in athletes, with milk proteins being, perhaps, the most recommended protein supplements. Consumption of a probiotic cheese can attenuate immune suppression induced by exhausting exercise in rats. A popular Brazilian fresh cheese (Minas Frescal cheese) containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA14 and Bifidobacterium longum BL05 was fed for 2 wk to adult Wistar rats, which ...

  2. Production of probiotic fresh white cheese using co-culture with Streptococcus thermophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Oktay Yerlikaya; Elif Ozer

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the probiotic Streptococcus thermophilus was inoculated into milk as co-culture to produce probiotic cheese. The effects of using Streptococcus thermophilus with other probiotic bacteria on cheese composition, and microbiological viability during 28 days of storage were investigated. Sensorial properties were determined only at 1st and 28th days of storage. The results showed that the use of Streptococcus thermophilus as co-culture in probiotic cheese production did not affe...

  3. Microbial ecology of artisanal italian cheese: Molecular microbial characterization by culture-independent method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, E.; Scarpellini, M.; Franzatti, L.; Dioguardi, L.

    2009-07-01

    Present study will treat the next topics: ecology of the natural and man made environments and functional diversity of bacteria. The microbial communities in artisanal goat cheeses produced in mountain pastures (typical farms) in Piemonte mountain (North of Italy) change a lot during precessing and ripening time. Moreover cheese microbial ecosystems are different in each small dairy because adventitious microflora can come from the environment and contamination the milk before the cheese making process and the product during manufacture and ripening. (Author)

  4. Chemometric analysis of Ragusano cheese flavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, S; Acree, T E; Barbano, D M; Licitra, G; Siebert, K J

    2002-02-27

    Ragusano cheeses were produced in duplicate from milk collected from pasture-fed and total mixed ration (TMR)-fed cattle at four time intervals. The cheeses were subjected to chemical analysis, conventional sensory testing, and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GCO). Data from each type of analysis were examined by principal component and factor analysis and by pattern recognition (SIMCA) to see if sufficient information for classification into pasture-fed and TMR-fed groups was contained therein. The results clearly indicate that there are significant differences in sensory panel and chemical analysis results between the two cheeses. The data were also examined to see if models of sensory responses as a function of analytical or GCO results or both could be constructed with the modeling technique partial least-squares regression (PLS). Strong PLS models of some sensory responses (green and toasted odor; salt, pungent, bitter, and butyric sensations; and smooth consistency) were obtained.

  5. Bioconversion of Cheese Waste (Whey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    1998-03-11

    The US dairy industry produces 67 billion pounds of cheese whey annually. A waste by-product of cheese production, whey consists of water, milk sugar (lactose), casein (protein), and salts amounting to about 7% total solids. Ultrafiltration is used to concentrate cheese whey into a protein-rich foodstuff; however, it too produces a waste stream, known as ''whey permeate,'' (rejected water, lactose, and salts from the membrane). Whey permeate contains about 4.5% lactose and requires treatment to reduce the high BOD (biological oxygen demand) before disposal. Ab Initio, a small business with strong chemistry and dairy processing background, desired help in developing methods for bioconversion of whey permeate lactose into lactic acid. Lactic acid is an organic acid primarily used as an acidulant in the food industry. More recently it has been used to produce polylactic acid, a biodegradable polymer and as a new method to treat meat carcasses to combat E. coli bacteria. Conversion of whey permeate to lactic acid is environmentally sound because it produces a valued product from an otherwise waste stream. FM&T has expertise in bioconversion processes and analytical techniques necessary to characterize biomass functions. The necessary engineering and analytical services for pilot biomass monitoring, process development, and purification of crude lactic acid were available at this facility.

  6. Cheese / Eero Epner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Epner, Eero, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Fotoajakirjast "Cheese". Fotograafia uurimisest, fotoajaloo läbikirjutatusest Eestis. Samas "Cheese'i" toimetaja Tiit Lepp ajakirja erainitsiatiivil väljaandmisest, Eesti Kultuurkapitali ebapiisavast ja määramatust toetusest

  7. A laboratory micro-manufacturing method for assessing individual cheese yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bittante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to propose a micro-manufacturing method for assessing individual cheese yield (CY from dairy milk and to provide first evaluations of the method. Two water baths (WB provided with 8 stainless containers (SC each were used. The cheese making procedure involved coagulation of 500 ml of milk per SC previously inoculated with starter, cutting of the curd, separation of whey through drainage and pressure and weighing of the curd residue for computing CY. Spraydried milk powder and bulk milk were used to validate the procedure. For each type of milk, 5 cheese making sessions (CMS were performed during 5 consecutive days by the same operator; for each trial 80 records (8 replicates x 2WB x 5CMS were available. Sources of variation of CY were investigated separately for type of milk, and variance components were estimated using REML procedure for computing instrumental repeatability and reproducibility. Cheese yield averaged 11% and 13.4% for standard milk powder and bulk milk, respectively. Cheese making session significantly influenced CY, along with WB in the case of milk powder, while SC did not influence CY. Reproducible and repeatable measures of CY were obtained, indicating the method is suitable for assessing individual CY.

  8. Mexican Queso Chihuahua: functional properties of aging cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D W; Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Tomasula, P M; Molina-Corral, F J; Gardea, A A

    2011-09-01

    Queso Chihuahua, a semi-hard cheese manufactured from raw milk (RM) in northern Mexico, is being replaced by pasteurized milk (PM) versions because of food safety concerns and the desire for longer shelf life. In this study, the functional traits of authentic Mexican Queso Chihuahua made from RM or PM were characterized to identify sources of variation and to determine if pasteurization of the cheese milk resulted in changes to the functional properties. Two brands of RM cheese and 2 brands of PM cheese obtained in 3 seasons of the year from 4 manufacturers in Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed after 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 wk of storage at 4°C. A color measurement spectrophotometer was used to collect color data before and after heating at 232°C for 5 min or 130°C for 75 min. Meltability was measured using the Schreiber Melt Test on samples heated to 232°C for 5 min. Sliceability (the force required to cut through a sample) was measured using a texture analyzer fitted with a wire cutter attachment. Proteolysis was tracked using sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Compared with PM cheeses, RM cheeses showed less browning upon heating, melted more at 232°C, and initially required a greater cutting force. With aging, cheeses increased in meltability, decreased in whiteness when measured before heating, and required less cutting force to slice. Seasonal variations in the cheesemilk had minimal or no effect on the functional properties. The differences in the functional properties can be attributed, in part, to the mixed microflora present in the RM cheeses compared with the more homogeneous microflora added during the manufacture of PM cheeses. The degree of proteolysis and subsequent integrity of the cheese matrix contribute to melt, slice, and color properties of the RM and PM cheeses. Understanding the functional properties of the authentic RM cheeses will help researchers and cheesemakers develop pasteurized versions that maintain the traditional traits desired in the

  9. Improvement in melting and baking properties of low-fat Mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwani, R; McManus, W R; McMahon, D J

    2011-04-01

    Low-fat cheeses dehydrate too quickly when baked in a forced air convection oven, preventing proper melting on a pizza. To overcome this problem, low-fat Mozzarella cheese was developed in which fat is released onto the cheese surface during baking to prevent excessive dehydration. Low-fat Mozzarella cheese curd was made with target fat contents of 15, 30, 45, and 60 g/kg using direct acidification of the milk to pH 5.9 before renneting. The 4 portions of cheese curd were comminuted and then mixed with sufficient glucono-δ-lactone and melted butter (45, 30, 15, or 0 g/kg, respectively), then pressed into blocks to produce low-fat Mozzarella cheese with about 6% fat and pH 5.2. The cheeses were analyzed after 15, 30, 60, and 120 d of storage at 5°C for melting characteristics, texture, free oil content, dehydration performance, and stretch when baked on a pizza at 250°C for 6 min in a convection oven. Cheeses made with added butter had higher stretchability compared with the control cheese. Melting characteristics also improved in contrast to the control cheese, which remained in the form of shreds during baking and lacked proper melting. The cheeses made with added butter had higher free oil content, which correlated (R2≥0.92) to the amount of butterfat added, and less hardness and gumminess compared with the control low fat cheese.

  10. The influence of fat and monoacylglycerols on growth of spore-forming bacteria in processed cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauerlandová, Iva; Lorencová, Eva; Buňka, František; Navrátil, Jan; Janečková, Kristýna; Buňková, Leona

    2014-07-16

    Highly undesirable microbial contaminants of processed cheese are endospore-forming bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium. Survival of Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, Clostridium butyricum and C. sporogenes was examined in model processed cheese samples supplemented with monoacylglycerols. In processed cheese samples, monoacylglycerols of undecanoic, undecenoic, lauric and adamantane-1-carboxylic acid at concentration of 0.15% w/w prevented the growth and multiplication of both Bacillus species throughout the storage period. The two species of Clostridium were less affected by monoacylglycerols in processed cheese samples and only partial inhibition was observed. The effect of milk fat content on microbial survival in processed cheese was also evaluated. The growth of Bacillus sp. was affected by the fat level of processed cheese while population levels of Clostridium sp. did not differ in processed cheese samples with 30, 40 and 50% fat in dry matter.

  11. [Examination of Staphylococcus aureus survival and growth during cheese-making process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Kenji; Takahashi, Chitose; Yamauchi, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Fumihiko; Igarashi, Hideo; Yanahira, Syuichi; Konishi, Hiroaki

    2008-04-01

    Inoculation tests of Staphylococcus aureus were performed to evaluate the risk of toxic hazard in cheese manufacturing processes. S. aureus was inoculated into pasteurized milk or cheese curd, and the survival and growth were examined. S. aureus grew only slightly or decreased in cell number under the manufacturing condition of semi-hard type cheese or soft-type cheese. Under the conditions of the fresh cheese making process, S. aureus slightly increased in cell number, though no enterotoxin was detected. In processed cheese, S. aureus did not grow at all. Growth inhibition of S. aureus by lactic acid produced from starter culture was suggested to be the cause of growth inhibition in the natural cheese.

  12. Short communication: Effect of genetic type on antioxidant activity of Caciocavallo cheese during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Annamaria; Intaglietta, Immacolata; Simonetti, Amalia; Gambacorta, Emilio

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the antioxidant activity of Caciocavallo cheese made from the milk of 2 breeds, Italian Brown and Italian Holstein, and ripened for 1, 30, 60, 90, and 150 d. The antioxidant activity of cheese was measured using the 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and thiol assays. Statistical analysis showed a significant effect of the studied factors. Italian Brown cheese had higher antioxidant activity than Italian Holstein cheese, and antioxidant activity increased during ripening of both cheeses types. Moreover, antioxidant activity varied during ripening depending on the rate of formation of soluble peptides. To date, few studies have evaluated the effect of genetic type on antioxidant capacity of the pasta filata cheeses; thus, this study forms the basis of new knowledge that could lead to the production of a pasta filata cheese with specific nutraceutical characteristics.

  13. 78 FR 9247 - Milk in the Northeast and Other Marketing Areas; Final Decision on Proposed Amendments to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... and dry whey for manufacturing plants located in Federal milk marketing areas. The established... prices for milk used in Class III products from surveyed cheese and dry whey prices; and a nonfat solids... cheese, whey powder, butter, and nonfat dry milk plants (located outside of California). The...

  14. Dynamics of complex microbiota and enzymes in Divle Cave cheese and their biochemical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozturkoglu Budak, S.

    2016-01-01

    Divle Cave cheese is a raw ewe’s milk cheese ripened with the aid of a rich microbiota and a wide range of protease and lipase enzymes secreted by individual strains belong to this microbial community. The study presented in this thesis mainly aims to define the diversity and evolution of the comple

  15. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZAION OF A TYPICAL ITALIAN CHEESE: PECORINO DI LATICAUDA (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.T.R. Proroga

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pecorino di Laticauda is a traditional Italian goat milk cheese carrying a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO. Previously there was no information available on the microbiological characterization of Pecorino di Laticauda. The present work deals with the studies carried out on the microflora evolution during all the stages of maturation of cheese.

  16. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZAION OF A TYPICAL ITALIAN CHEESE: PECORINO DI LATICAUDA (PART I)

    OpenAIRE

    Y.T.R. Proroga; Cerrone, A; O. Valvini; Castellano, S.; M.R. Carullo; Bove, D; Guarino, A; G. Iovane

    2009-01-01

    Pecorino di Laticauda is a traditional Italian goat milk cheese carrying a Protected Designation of Origin (PDO). Previously there was no information available on the microbiological characterization of Pecorino di Laticauda. The present work deals with the studies carried out on the microflora evolution during all the stages of maturation of cheese.

  17. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus brevis Strain D6, Isolated from Smoked Fresh Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Uroić, Ksenija; Hynönen, Ulla; Kos, Blaženka; Šušković, Jagoda; Palva, Airi

    2016-04-07

    The autochthonousLactobacillus brevisstrain D6, isolated from smoked fresh cheese, carries a 45-kDa S-layer protein. Strain D6 has shown adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells, as well as immunomodulatory potential and beneficial milk technological properties. Hence, it could be used as a potential probiotic starter culture for cheese production.

  18. Latin American cheeses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latin American (or Hispanic-style) cheeses are a category of cheeses that were developed in Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean and have become increasingly popular in the U.S. Although research has been conducted on some of the cheeses, quantitative information on the quality traits of most L...

  19. Effect of dairy production systems on the sensory characteristics of Cantal cheeses: a plant-scale study

    OpenAIRE

    AGABRIEL, C.; Martin, B; Sibra, C.; Bonnefoy, J.C.; Montel, M C; DIDIENNE, R.; Hulin, S.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; A study was conducted to verify whether bulk milk produced according to specific conditions of production would lead to distinctive cheeses. Milk from two groups of farms that mainly differ in their level of intensification of dairy cow and forage area management was processed into cheese in the same Cantal dairy plant, during 4 periods of 3 consecutive days each. The milk chemical composition differed little between the two producing groups whereas the differences wer...

  20. Impact of nisin producing culture and liposome-encapsulated nisin on ripening of Lactobacillus added-Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, R O; Kheadr, E E; Lacroix, C; Fliss, I

    2003-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of incorporating liposome-encapsulated nisin Z, nisin Z producing Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis UL719, or Lactobacillus casei-casei L2A adjunct culture into cheese milk on textural, physicochemical and sensory attributes during ripening of Cheddar cheese. For this purpose, cheeses were made using a selected nisin tolerant cheese starter culture. Proteolysis, free fatty acid production, rheological parameters and hydrophilic/hydrophobic peptides evolution were monitored over 6 mo ripening. Sensory quality of cheeses was evaluated after 6 mo. Incorporating the nisin-producing strain into cheese starter culture increased proteolysis and lipolysis but did not significantly affect cheese rheology. Liposome-encapsulated nisin did not appear to affect cheese proteolysis, rheology and sensory characteristics. The nisinogenic strain increased the formation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic peptides present in the cheese water extract. Sensory assessment indicated that acidic and bitter tastes were enhanced in the nisinogenic strain-containing cheese compared to control cheese. Incorporating Lb. casei and the nisinogenic culture into cheese produced a debittering effect and improved cheese flavor quality. Cheeses with added Lb. casei and liposome-encapsulated nisin Z exhibited the highest flavor intensity and were ranked first for sensory characteristics.

  1. Yeast and mould dynamics in Caciofiore della Sibilla cheese coagulated with an aqueous extract of Carlina acanthifolia All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Federica; Taccari, Manuela; Milanović, Vesna; Osimani, Andrea; Polverigiani, Serena; Garofalo, Cristiana; Foligni, Roberta; Mozzon, Massimo; Zitti, Silvia; Raffaelli, Nadia; Clementi, Francesca; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2016-08-01

    Caciofiore della Sibilla is a speciality ewes' milk cheese traditionally manufactured in a foothill area of the Marche region (Central Italy) with a crude extract of fresh young leaves of Carlina acanthifolia All. subsp. acanthifolia as a coagulating agent. The fungal dynamics and diversity of this speciality cheese were investigated throughout the manufacturing and 20-day ripening process, using a combined PCR-DGGE approach. The fungal biota of a control ewes' milk cheese, manufactured with the same batch of milk coagulated with a commercial animal rennet, was also monitored by PCR-DGGE, in order to investigate the contribution of the peculiar vegetable coagulant to the fungal diversity and dynamics of the cheese. Based on the overall results collected, the raw milk and the dairy environment represented the main sources of fungal contamination, with a marginal or null contribution of thistle rennet to the fungal diversity and dynamics of Caciofiore della Sibilla cheese. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Metabolomics investigation to shed light on cheese as a possible piece in the French paradox puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian C; Clausen, Morten R;

    2015-01-01

    and TMAO levels and increased fecal excretion of acetate, propionate and lipid. Compared with milk intake, cheese consumption significantly reduced urinary citrate, creatine and creatinine levels and significantly increased the microbial-related metabolites butyrate, hippurate and malonate. Correlation...

  3. 应用模糊数学方法评价水牛乳Mozzarella干酪发酵剂%Application of Fuzzy Mathematical Comprehensive Evaluation to Study Culture Starter of Mozzarella Cheese by Buffalo Milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐辉; 钟瑞敏; 刘小玲

    2011-01-01

    Use Fuzzy Mathematical Comprehensive Evaluation to study that how Coccus and Bacillus were mixed of Mozzarella cheese leaven by buffalo milk,and the following factors were determinded.The factors including: the indexes of the acid-forming performance,the size of viscosity,the diacetyl content,pH 4.6 soluble nitrogen content and the taste of spawn fermentation liquid etc.The results showed that,when Lb.and St.were mixed by 1∶1.2,the fuzzy probability of the strain reached 0.83 and the comprehensive quality was the best.Compared with the other ratio of bacteria had significant differences in statistically(p0.05).%以发酵剂的产酸性能、黏度大小、双乙酰含量、pH4.6可溶性氮含量、滋味等五项为评价指标,应用模糊数学综合评价方法评价水牛乳Mozzarella干酪发酵剂中球菌与杆菌比例。结果表明,Lb.与St.以1∶1.2的比率混合时,模糊概率达0.83,菌种的综合品质最好,且与其它比率的菌种在统计学上存在显著差异(p〈0.05)。

  4. 7 CFR 58.714 - Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. 58.714 Section 58.714 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.714 Cream cheese, Neufchatel cheese. These cheeses when mixed with other foods, or used...

  5. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTINI PANGASTUTI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Estikomah SA, Sutarno, Pangastuti A 2010. Ripening for improving the quality of inoculated cheese Rhizopus oryzae. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 1-6. Cheese is dairy product resulted from fermented milk in which the fermentation process can be done by lactic acid bacteria or fungus. Rhizopus oryzae is able to produce lactic acid, protease and lipase. The ripening process changes the taste and texture. The purpose of this study is ripening to improve the quality of inoculated cheese R. oryzae. In this research the ripening was conducted the concentration variation of temperature (5oC, 10oC, 15oC, and time (7 days, 14 days. The procedure of research consisted of two steps, namely un-ripened cheese preparation followed by ripening cheese preparation. Cheese produced in this study analyzed the value of pH, fat content, protein content, amino acid levels and identification of microbe with ANOVA then followed by DMRT at 5% level of significance. Data results were analyzed with the like’s nonparametric statistical test, followed by Fridman Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test (WSRT at 5% level significance. The results showed that the preferred ripened cheese panelist was at a temperature of 15oC for 14 days. Ripening conditions affect pH, fat content, protein content and do not affect the levels of amino acids that formed ripened cheese. The best quality ripened cheese i.e. at a temperature of 15°C for 14 days, had a pH value of 4.40, the highest protein content of 9.78%, and fat content of 35.02%. The results of identified microbe in un-ripened cheese and ripened cheese include Enterococcus hirae (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, and Aspergillus sp.

  6. Molecular interactions between green tea catechins and cheese fat studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, Edward J; Hindmarsh, Jason; Everett, David W

    2017-01-15

    Molecular integrations between green tea catechins and milk fat globules in a cheese matrix were investigated using solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Full-fat cheeses were manufactured containing free catechin or free green tea extract (GTE), and liposomal encapsulated catechin or liposomal encapsulated GTE. Molecular mobility of the carbon species in the cheeses was measured by a wide-line separation technique. The (1)H evolution frequency profile of the (13)C peak at 16ppm obtained for the control cheese and cheeses containing encapsulated polyphenols (catechin or GTE) were similar, however, the spectrum was narrower for cheeses containing free polyphenols. Differences in spectral width indicates changes in the molecular mobility of --CH3- or -C-C-PO4- species through hydrophobic and/or cation-π associations between green tea catechins and cheese fat components. However, the similar spectral profile suggests that encapsulation protects cheese fat from interaction with catechins.

  7. Chemical, Nutritional and Microbiological Evaluation of Some Egyptian Soft Cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *Ghada, Z. A. A., 2*Alia, M. H., 3**Soha, Al-S., 4*Magdy, N. A., and 5*Mohammed, F. S

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk and dairy products is considered the most complete foodstuff that provide human either infants or adults with most of their vital needs. Milk and cheese have high nutritive value due to its high content of protein, fat, minerals especially calcium (Ca2+ & phosphorous, and vitamins. Two hundred samples produced and sold in Egypt during 2001-2003 were collected from allover the country. The cheese samples were subjected to microbiological and chemical analysis. Samples were microbiologically tested for total aerobic bacterial count (TABC, Colifrm, Escherichia coli (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, mould and yeast, salmonella and shigella, and listeria species. Protein, fat, carbohydrates, moisture, ash, lactose, Calcium (Ca, phosphorous (P and Ca/P were evaluated. The analysis showed that total aerobic bacterial count did not exceed 1.4X105±1.7X105 cells/gm, which is close to what allowed by the Standard Egyptian Guidelines (2001 and 47.5 % of the tested cheese are free from coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli. Ninety-eight and half percent, 97 %, 97 % and 91.5 % of the tested cheese (kareish, feta, thalaga, double cream respectively, either made in plant or home or farmers' cheese sample have zero Staphylococcus aureus count or mould and yeast; or salmonella and shigella, or listeria species respectively, i. e. free from them. Double cream cheese has the lowest protein content (7.79±0.78 gm% while kareish cheese has the highest protein content (19.99±1.32 gm%, but for fat content the opposite is true, double cream cheese have the highest fat content (24.56±1.78 gm% while kareish cheese have the lowest fat content (3.87±0.97 gm %. Feta cheese has high ash content while kareish cheese has the highest moisture content with the lowest ash content (68.97±1.86 & 1.81±0.47 gm% respectively. Lactose content varies widely from 1.50±0.26 (double cream cheese to 3.25±0.50 (feta cheese. Kareish cheese has higher content of calcium and

  8. Comparison of original and adulterated Oscypek cheese based on volatile and sensory profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Majcher

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper describes a preliminary studies aiming to compare volatile fractions of Oscypek and oscypek-like cheeses with SPME-GC/TOFMS to determine the possibility of applying for future routine investigation of adulteration of Polish PDO cheeses. Material and methods. For sensory and volatiles analysis four different cheeses were compared: Oscypek cheese prepared according to PDO regulations and three oscypek-like cheeses: type “CM industry” – produced from pasteurised cow milk in dairy plant, type “EM-industry” – produced from pasteurised ewe milk in dairy plant and type “CM-shep­herds” – produced from unpasteurised cow milk in shepherds huts. Isolation of volatiles was performed with PDMS/CAR/DVB fiber. Compounds identification was performed using gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry. Results. Headspace SPME-GC/TOFMS method revealed a total of 51 compounds in Oscypek and oscypek-like cheeses representing nine chemical groups such as: free fatty acids, esters, ketones, alcohols, aldehydes, furans and furanones, phenols, sulfur compounds and terpenes. Results showed that original Oscypek, PDO labeled was represented by the largest number of volatiles identified compared to oscypek-like cheeses, which also showed a relationship with sensory analysis where Oscypek has been described as a cheese with mostly developed flavour bouquet. Additionally it could be observed that cheeses made from unpasteurised milk using traditional method of preparation in shepherds huts (Oscypek and CM-shepherds had superior volatile profiles and enhanced aroma compared to cheeses made industrially. Conclusions. The differences showed in volatile fraction of original Oscypek cheese and adulterated ones provide possibility of employing SPME-GC/TOFMS technique to find adulteration in PDO labelled Oscypek.

  9. Monitoring the presence of Staphylococcus coagulaso positive in Sharri cheese during the traditional ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ferati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sharri cheese is a farming traditional product of Sharra region. Sharri cheese is prepared from sheep milk. While the chemical and physical aspect of this type of cheese is already completed the aspect of safety is much less studied. The safety of Sharra cheese may be compromised because it is produced from unpasteurized sheep's milk. Staphylococcal food poisoning is one of the most common food-borne diseases worldwide resulting from the ingestion of Staphylococcal enterotoxins preformed in food by enterotoxigenic strains of coagulase positive Staphylococci, mainly S. aureus. Staphylococcus coagulase positive is considered one of the most problematic bacteria presented in sheep milk. If it is presented in milk in a certain level has the ability to produce Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE. The milk contaminated with these enterotoxina can cause foodborne intoxication, in consummators. Taking in consideration the lack of this information in my country is considered of great value the conclusion released from this study. The study was performed on cheese and not on the raw milk. The test for the thermostable thermonuclease (TNase was conducted to detect the potential presence of thermostable thermonucleases (TNase. The data performed that Staphylococcus coagulase positive was not presented in cheese. Although the results and conclusions achieved from this study are of great importance not only for this scientific research but also for public health. Taken together, this study should lead to better control and a subsequent reduction of Staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks.

  10. Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria biofilms and calcium lactate crystals in Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S; Sharma, K; Swanson, B G; Yüksel, G U; Clark, S

    2006-05-01

    A sanitized cheese plant was swabbed for the presence of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) biofilms. Swabs were analyzed to determine the sources and microorganisms responsible for contamination. In pilot plant experiments, cheese vats filled with standard cheese milk (lactose:protein = 1.47) and ultrafiltered cheese milk (lactose:protein = 1.23) were inoculated with Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris starter culture (8 log cfu/mL) with or without Lactobacillus curvatus or Pediococci acidilactici as adjunct cultures (2 log cfu/mL). Cheddar cheeses were aged at 7.2 or 10 degrees C for 168 d. The raw milk silo, ultrafiltration unit, cheddaring belt, and cheese tower had NSLAB biofilms ranging from 2 to 4 log cfu/100 cm2. The population of Lb. curvatus reached 8 log cfu/g, whereas P. acidilactici reached 7 log cfu/g of experimental Cheddar cheese in 14 d. Higher NSLAB counts were observed in the first 14 d of aging in cheese stored at 10 degrees C compared with that stored at 7.2 degrees C. However, microbial counts decreased more quickly in Cheddar cheeses aged at 10 degrees C compared with 7.2 degrees C after 28 d. In cheeses without specific adjunct cultures (Lb. curvatus or P. acidilactici), calcium lactate crystals were not observed within 168 d. However, crystals were observed after only 56 d in cheeses containing Lb. curvatus, which also had increased concentration of D(-)-lactic acid compared with control cheeses. Our research shows that low levels of contamination with certain NSLAB can result in calcium lactate crystals, regardless of lactose:protein ratio.

  11. From Pasteur to Probiotics: A Historical Overview of Cheese and Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Catherine W

    2013-10-01

    Cheese is a food which has been produced for centuries. While cheese was originally developed as a product which extended the shelf life of milk, over time distinct cheese varieties arose, being shaped by geographic, climate, cultural, and economic factors. Global demand for artisan cheeses is creating new economic opportunities. Consumers seeking distinctive products with regional flavor, or terroir, are becoming connoisseurs of hand-crafted cheeses with distinctive tastes and character. These demands have spurred new inquiry into microorganisms used as starter cultures and adjunct cultures, as well as the microbiological consortia of finished cheeses. Such demands have also created new concerns for food safety and international trade. New bacterial pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 have emerged in the food supply, causing a reevaluation of the efficacy of traditional cheesemaking procedures to control these pathogens. Similarly, pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes pose problems to susceptible human populations, and cheese can be a vehicle of transmission for this deadly pathogen. With changes in sanitary requirements due to the globalization of the food industry, governments around the world are increasingly requiring assurances of cheese safety. While many governments recognize the safety of traditional artisan cheeses manufactured from raw milk, others are demanding pasteurization of all milk intended for cheesemaking to provide assurance of microbiological safety. In response, new technologies are being proposed to increase cheese safety, but these technologies fundamentally alter the traditional artisan practices and may not enhance microbiological safety. A reevaluation of the safety of traditional artisan practices, validation thereof, and communication of the scientific principles which promote safety will be necessary to enable the continued production of traditional artisan cheeses in global

  12. Factors influencing chymosin-induced gelation of milk from individual dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, F.; Glantz, M; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Optimisation of cheese yield is crucial for cheese production; a previous study showed large variations in chymosin-induced coagulation in milk from the second most common Swedish dairy breed, Swedish Red. In the present study, the effect of gross composition, protein composition, total and ionic...... was, theoretically, four times larger than the amount of calcium that is normally added in cheese processing......Optimisation of cheese yield is crucial for cheese production; a previous study showed large variations in chymosin-induced coagulation in milk from the second most common Swedish dairy breed, Swedish Red. In the present study, the effect of gross composition, protein composition, total and ionic...

  13. Microbiological quality of milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Kozačinski

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work microbiological acceptability has been determined for 802 samples of consume milk and dairy products produced in Križevci region, by 11 producers from northwest Croatia. From the total number of analysed samples the requirements for microbiological acceptability did not fulfilled 147 (18.33% samples: 42.86% goat’s milk, 36.36% fruit yoghurt, 20.51% consume milk, 33.33% sweet cream, 31.51% sour cream, 26.77% soft (fresh cheeses, 20% cheese spreads, 15% semi-hard cheeses, 2.63% butters, 1.72% processed cheese, and 1.16% yoghurts. The main reasons for microbiological not-acceptability of the samples were higher number of enterobacteriae, yeast and moulds, higher number of total bacteria, E. coli and Staphyloccocus aureus. In the same samples Streptococcus faecalis, S. pyogenes and Pseudomonas were found.

  14. Influence of selected lab cultures on the evolution of free amino acids, free fatty acids and Fiore Sardo cheese microflora during the ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Nicoletta P; Murgia, Marco A; Garau, Giovanni; Sanna, Maria G; Deiana, Pietrino

    2008-04-01

    Fiore Sardo Protected Denomination of Origin is a traditional Sardinian (Italy) hard cheese produced exclusively from whole raw ovine milk and coagulated with lamb rennet paste. Currently, Fiore Sardo is still produced by shepherds at the farmhouse level without the addition of any starter culture and the cheese-making process is characterized by significant waste. The first objective of the present work was to investigate the autochthonous microflora present in milk and Fiore Sardo cheese in order to select lactic acid bacterial (LAB) cultures with suitable cheese-making attributes and, possibly reduce the production waste. Secondly, the ability of selected cultures to guarantee cheese healthiness and quality was tested in experimental cheese-making trials. In this study, we show that the typical lactic microflora of raw ewe's milk and Fiore Sardo cheese is mostly composed of mesophilic LAB such as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei. Moreover, strains belonging to the species were selected for cheese-making attributes and used in experimental cheese-making trials carried out in different farms producing Fiore Sardo. The evolution of the cheese microflora, free amino acids and free fatty acids during the ripening showed that the experimental cheeses were characterized by a balanced ratio of the chemical constituents, by a reduced number of spoilage microorganisms and, remarkably, by the absence of production waste that were significant for the control cheeses.

  15. Buffalo milk: proteins electrophoretic profile and somatic cell count

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mattii

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water buffalo milk differs from the cow’s milk for greater fat and protein content, very important features in cheese making. Proteins, casein and whey-proteins in particular, are the most important factors determining cheese yield. Several previous research discussed the rule of SCC in cow milk production (Varisco, 1999 and the close relationship existing between cow’s milk cheese yield and somatic cell count (Barbano, 2000. In particular the inverse correlation between cheese yields and somatic cells’content have been demonstrated. In Italy the regulation in force DPR 54/97 acknowledges what expressed in EEC 46/92 Directive (Tripodi, 1999 without fixing the limit threshold of somatic cells for buffalo’s milk....

  16. Microbial interactions in cheese: implications for cheese quality and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Irlinger, Françoise; Mounier, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The cheese microbiota, whose community structure evolves through a succession of different microbial groups, plays a central role in cheese-making. The subtleties of cheese character, as well as cheese shelf-life and safety, are largely determined by the composition and evolution of this microbiota. Adjunct and surface-ripening cultures marketed today for smear cheeses are inadequate for adequately mimicking the real diversity encountered in cheese microbiota. The inte...

  17. Temporal and Spatial Differences in Microbial Composition during the Manufacture of a Continental-Type Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; O'Sullivan, Orla; McSweeney, Paul L. H.; Sheehan, Jeremiah J.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine if the time, within a production day, that a cheese is manufactured has an influence on the microbial community present within that cheese. To facilitate this, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was used to elucidate the microbial community dynamics of brine-salted continental-type cheese in cheeses produced early and late in the production day. Differences in the microbial composition of the core and rind of the cheese were also investigated. Throughout ripening, it was apparent that cheeses produced late in the day had a more diverse microbial population than their early equivalents. Spatial variation between the cheese core and rind was also noted in that cheese rinds were initially found to have a more diverse microbial population but thereafter the opposite was the case. Interestingly, the genera Thermus, Pseudoalteromonas, and Bifidobacterium, not routinely associated with a continental-type cheese produced from pasteurized milk, were detected. The significance, if any, of the presence of these genera will require further attention. Ultimately, the use of high-throughput sequencing has facilitated a novel and detailed analysis of the temporal and spatial distribution of microbes in this complex cheese system and established that the period during a production cycle at which a cheese is manufactured can influence its microbial composition. PMID:25636841

  18. Biogenic amines determination in some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Razavi Rohani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines (BA are nitrogenous compounds that possess biological activity. The source of production is the microbial decarboxylation of amino acids. This compounds are found in various types of cheese. The aim of this work was to evaluate the BA content of some traditional cheeses in West Azerbaijan province Iran. For this purpose, 70 samples of Koopeh, 10 samples of Lighvan and 5 samples of Red Salmas cheeses were obtained from local supermarkets of different cities of West Azerbaijan province. After preparation of samples, biogenic amines content was evaluated by modified HPLC method. The presence of histamine, cadaverine, putrescine and tyramine in tested cheeses were observed. Total amount of biogenic amines was highest in Red Salmas cheese with 1426.91 ppm. It followed by Lighvan cheese and Koopeh cheese with 1008.98 and 517.71 ppm, respectively. Putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were detected in Koopeh cheese at levels up to 156.09, 282.34, 70.80, 8.48 ppm respectively. These amines were detected also in Lighvan cheese at levels up to 277.53, 342.74, 37.58, 351.12 ppm and in Red Salmas cheese samples at levels up to 438.03, 701.05, 105.21, 182.62 ppm, respectively. Large amounts of biogenic amines can indicate non hygienic conditions and contamination of used milk for cheese production.

  19. Dynamics of complex microbiota and enzymes in Divle Cave cheese and their biochemical consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ozturkoglu Budak, S.

    2016-01-01

    Divle Cave cheese is a raw ewe’s milk cheese ripened with the aid of a rich microbiota and a wide range of protease and lipase enzymes secreted by individual strains belong to this microbial community. The study presented in this thesis mainly aims to define the diversity and evolution of the complex microbiota of this raw milk cheese during traditional ripening in a cave, to describe the protease and lipase activities of the determined strains and to select the dominant contributors to ripen...

  20. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from uruguayan artisan cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Fraga Cotelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uruguayan artisan cheese is elaborated with raw milk and non-commercial starters. The associated native microbiota may include lactic acid bacteria and also potentially pathogenic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from artisan cheese, raw milk, and non-commercial starter cultures, and their potential bacteriocin production was assessed. A culture collection of 509 isolates was obtained, and five isolates were bacteriocin-producers and were identified as Enterococcus durans,Lactobacillus casei, and Lactococcus lactis. No evidence of potential virulence factors were found in E. durans strains. These are promising results in terms of using these native strains for cheese manufacture and to obtain safe products.

  1. Physicochemical and microbiological evaluation of corrientes artisanal cheese during ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Myriam Vasek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate some physical and chemical parameters (total solids, pH, acidity, fat, acid degree value of fat, salt, protein and nitrogen fractions and their effects on the beneficial (lactic acid bacteria: LAB and undesirable microbial populations (coliforms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, moulds, and yeast during ripening of Artisanal Corrientes Cheese, an Argentinian cow's milk variety, to determine whether a longer ripening period than usual improve its hygienic-sanitary quality. The protein content was much higher than that of other cow's milk cheeses with similar values of fat. The larger peptides showed values three times higher in the 30 day-old cheese than those obtained in the beginning of the process. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were detected (3.04 ± 1.48 log10 cfu/g of cheese, 2.21 ± 0.84 log10 MPN/g of cheese even at 15 and 30 days of ripening, respectively. The distribution of three hundred LAB strains classified to the genus level (lactococci:lactobacilli:leuconostocs was maintained during the ripening period. The high number of LAB in rennet may have contributed to the fermentation as a natural whey starter, unknown source of LAB for this specific cheese so far. The physicochemical changes that occur during ripening were not big enough to inhibit the growth of undesirable microorganisms.

  2. Probiotic in rennet paste can affect lipase activity of rennet and lipolysis in ovine cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Albenzio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lambs were subjected to three different feeding regimes (mother suckling MS, artificial rearing AR, and artificial rearing with 7log10 cfu/ml Lactobacillus acidophilus supplementation to the milk substitute ARLb and slaughtered at 20d and 40d of age for each feeding treatment. Lambs abomasa were processed to rennet paste and lipases activity was evaluated. Rennet paste was used for Pecorino cheese production. Free fatty acids (FFAs and conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs were detected in cheese at 60d of ripening. Lipase activity was found higher in ARLb than in MS and AR rennet from lambs slaughtered at an older age. A reduction of all FFAs was observed in all cheeses when passing from 20 d to 40d of slaughtering. CLAs were more abundant in ARLb cheeses at both 20 and 40d. Milk substitute with Lb. acidophilus improves enzymatic features of rennet, and health and nutritional characteristics of ovine cheese.

  3. Microbiological aspects of the biofilm on wooden utensils used to make a Brazilian artisanal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinari, Éder; da Nóbrega, Juliana Escarião; de Andrade, Nélio José; de Luces Fortes Ferreira, Célia Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    The artisanal Minas cheese is produced from raw cow's milk and wooden utensils were employed in its manufacture, which were replaced by other materials at the request of local laws. This substitution caused changes in the traditional characteristics of cheese. Due to the absence of scientific studies indicating the microbial composition of biofilms formed on wooden forms, tables and shelves used in these cheese production, the present work evaluated the counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, coliforms at 32 °C, yeasts, presumptive mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. in these biofilms, milk, whey endogenous culture and ripened cheese in two traditional regions: Serro and Serra da Canastra. Also, we checked for the presence of Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the ripened cheeses. The ultra structure of the biofilms was also assessed. Counts above legislation (> 2 log cfu/mL) for the pathogens evaluated were found in milk samples from both regions. Only one shelf and one form from Serro were above limits proposed (5 cfu/cm(2) for S. aureus and E. coli and 25 cfu/cm(2) for coliforms) in this study for contaminants evaluated. In Canastra, few utensils presented safe counting of pathogens. There was no Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the cheeses after ripening. Thus, the quality of the cheese is related to improving the microbiological quality of milk, implementation and maintenance of good manufacturing practices, correct cleaning of wooden utensils, and not its replacement.

  4. Microbiological aspects of the biofilm on wooden utensils used to make a Brazilian artisanal cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinari, Éder; da Nóbrega, Juliana Escarião; de Andrade, Nélio José; de Luces Fortes Ferreira, Célia Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    The artisanal Minas cheese is produced from raw cow’s milk and wooden utensils were employed in its manufacture, which were replaced by other materials at the request of local laws. This substitution caused changes in the traditional characteristics of cheese. Due to the absence of scientific studies indicating the microbial composition of biofilms formed on wooden forms, tables and shelves used in these cheese production, the present work evaluated the counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, coliforms at 32 °C, yeasts, presumptive mesophilic Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus spp. in these biofilms, milk, whey endogenous culture and ripened cheese in two traditional regions: Serro and Serra da Canastra. Also, we checked for the presence of Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the ripened cheeses. The ultra structure of the biofilms was also assessed. Counts above legislation (> 2 log cfu/mL) for the pathogens evaluated were found in milk samples from both regions. Only one shelf and one form from Serro were above limits proposed (5 cfu/cm2 for S. aureus and E. coli and 25 cfu/cm2 for coliforms) in this study for contaminants evaluated. In Canastra, few utensils presented safe counting of pathogens. There was no Salmonella sp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the cheeses after ripening. Thus, the quality of the cheese is related to improving the microbiological quality of milk, implementation and maintenance of good manufacturing practices, correct cleaning of wooden utensils, and not its replacement. PMID:25242963

  5. Effects of breed and casein genetic variants on protein profile in milk from Swedish Red, Danish Holstein, and Danish Jersey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Frida; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Johansson, M

    2014-01-01

    In selecting cows for higher milk yields and milk quality, it is important to understand how these traits are affected by the bovine genome. The major milk proteins exhibit genetic polymorphism and these genetic variants can serve as markers for milk composition, milk production traits, and techn......, for example, the processing of cheese...

  6. Hot cheese: a processed Swiss cheese model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Thimbleby, H

    2014-01-01

    James Reason's classic Swiss cheese model is a vivid and memorable way to visualise how patient harm happens only when all system defences fail. Although Reason's model has been criticised for its simplicity and static portrait of complex systems, its use has been growing, largely because of the direct clarity of its simple and memorable metaphor. A more general, more flexible and equally memorable model of accident causation in complex systems is needed. We present the hot cheese model, which is more realistic, particularly in portraying defence layers as dynamic and active - more defences may cause more hazards. The hot cheese model, being more flexible, encourages deeper discussion of incidents than the simpler Swiss cheese model permits.

  7. Sensory properties and chemical composition of Sharri cheese from Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agim Rysha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Food sensory properties, analyses and chemical composition are very important because they provide information about product quality and end-user acceptance or preferences. An assessment of sensory characteristics and chemical composition of mountain sheep and cow’s-milk cheese from shepherd’s huts and industrial manufacturers in Kosovo was carried out. Consumer-oriented tests using a 9 point hedonic scale were conducted in order to determine Sharri cheese acceptability. Chemical parameters (fat content, fat content of dry matter, acidity, protein, dry matter, mineral and water content and sodium chloride content of 45-day brine cheese samples were also analyzed. Chemical and sensory assessment demonstrated large property differences. A recommendation stems from the results showing that the standardization of both artisanal and industrial production of Sharri cheese is required.

  8. 7 CFR 58.716 - Nonfat dry milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonfat dry milk. 58.716 Section 58.716 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.716 Nonfat dry milk. Nonfat dry milk used in cheese products should meet the...

  9. For Strong Bones...For Lifelong Health...Milk Matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... free milk instead of water to tomato soup. • Make a smoothie with fruit, ice, and low-fat or fat-free milk. • Try flavored low- fat or fat-free milk like chocolate or strawberry. • Have a ... string cheese. • Make a salad with dark green, leafy vegetables. • Serve ...

  10. Tool for quantification of staphylococcal enterotoxin gene expression in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquenne, Manon; Fleurot, Isabelle; Aigle, Marina; Darrigo, Claire; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Derzelle, Sylviane; Bouix, Marielle; Deperrois-Lafarge, Véronique; Delacroix-Buchet, Agnès

    2010-03-01

    Cheese is a complex and dynamic microbial ecosystem characterized by the presence of a large variety of bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Some microorganisms, including species of lactobacilli or lactococci, are known to contribute to the organoleptic quality of cheeses, whereas the presence of other microorganisms may lead to spoilage or constitute a health risk. Staphylococcus aureus is recognized worldwide as an important food-borne pathogen, owing to the production of enterotoxins in food matrices. In order to study enterotoxin gene expression during cheese manufacture, we developed an efficient procedure to recover total RNA from cheese and applied a robust strategy to study gene expression by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). This method yielded pure preparations of undegraded RNA suitable for RT-qPCR. To normalize RT-qPCR data, expression of 10 potential reference genes was investigated during S. aureus growth in milk and in cheese. The three most stably expressed reference genes during cheese manufacture were ftsZ, pta, and gyrB, and these were used as internal controls for RT-qPCR of the genes sea and sed, encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins A and D, respectively. Expression of these staphylococcal enterotoxin genes was monitored during the first 72 h of the cheese-making process, and mRNA data were correlated with enterotoxin production.

  11. Optimization of pH, temperature and CaCl2 concentrations for Ricotta cheese production from Buffalo cheese whey using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Abdul Ahid; Huma, Nuzhat; Zahoor, Tahir; Asgher, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    The recovery of milk constituents from cheese whey is affected by various processing conditions followed during production of Ricotta cheese. The objective of the present investigation was to optimize the temperature (60-90 °C), pH (3-7) and CaCl2 concentration (2·0-6·0 mm) for maximum yield/recovery of milk constituents. The research work was carried out in two phases. In 1st phase, the influence of these processing conditions was evaluated through 20 experiments formulated by central composite design (CCD) keeping the yield as response factor. The results obtained from these experiments were used to optimize processing conditions for maximum yield using response surface methodology (RSM). The three best combinations of processing conditions (90 °C, pH 7, CaCl2 6 mm), (100 °C, pH 5, CaCl2 4 mm) and (75 °C, pH 8·4, CaCl2 4 mm) were exploited in the next phase for Ricotta cheese production from a mixture of Buffalo cheese whey and skim milk (9 : 1) to determine the influence of optimized conditions on the cheese composition. Ricotta cheeses were analyzed for various physicochemical (moisture, fat, protein, lactose, total solids, pH and acidity indicated) parameters during storage of 60 d at 4 ± 2 °C after every 15 d interval. Ricotta cheese prepared at 90 °C, pH 7 and CaCl2 6 mm exhibited the highest cheese yield, proteins and total solids, while high fat content was recorded for cheese processed at 100 °C, pH 5 and 4 mm CaCl2 concentration. A significant storage-related increase in acidity and NPN was recorded for all cheese samples.

  12. USE OF PROBIOTIC BACTERIA IN THE PRODUCTION OF CHEESE : PROBIOTIC CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz GÜRSOY

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of the gastrointestinal microflora with human health have been the subject of considerable debate in recent years. Disruption of the ecologic equilibrium of the normal intestinal flora may result in gastrointestinal diseases. Functional foods, which are used in prevention and treatment of some intestinal diseases, are defined as "foods that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition". Probiotics are constituted an important part of functional foods. Probiotics are live microbial food supplements that beneficially affect the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. To date, the most popular food delivery systems for probiotic cultures have been fermented milks and yogurts, as well as unfermented milk with cultures added. In an effort to expand the probiotic product range, a small number of researchers and dairy companies have endeavoured to production cheeses, which sustain a high viable count of probiotic cultures. This paper will first outline some of the main aspects about probiotics, cheese microbilogy and probiotic cheese development, and give examples of studies where probiotic microorganisms have been incoorporated into cheese.

  13. Developing ripened cheese production in three municipalities in the Caldas department of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel H. Mazzeo Meneses

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Responding to the need to provide added value to milk produced in the towns of Salamis, Aranzazu and Viterbo in the Caldas department, a project was formulated with the overall objective of developing the production of ripened cheeses destined for do- mestic and international markets. The physicochemical characteristics of raw milk from these municipalities were thus studied ini- tially, finding that standards regarding milk quality and density (1.030-1.033 g / l, total dry extract (11.30% and defatted dry ex- tract (8.30% for the first two came within the range considered normal for cheese-making. Subsequently, Camembert, Cheddar, Emmental, Gruyere and Gouda cheese-making processes were developed in the University of Caldas’ Food Technology Unit, using an pre-experimental design having a single measurement and using techniques currently validated for ripened cheese pre- paration. Such processes were analysed for the sensory characteristics and evolution involved in ripening (proteolysis and lipolysis changes. Standardising Camembert, Cheddar and Gouda cheese production should be stressed among the results as they e- ventually complied with the highest sensory preferences and optimum ripening as verified by parameters such as degree of acidi- ty, ripeness and protein and moisture percentage. It was thus found feasible to develop some ripened cheeses from milk produ- ced in the northern municipalities of Caldas and transfer the results to its collection centres for providing greater added value to raw milk production at semi-industrial level.

  14. 21 CFR 133.188 - Semisoft part-skim cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... lactic-acid-producing bacteria or other harmless flavor-producing bacteria, present in such milk or added... mold-inhibiting ingredient consisting of sorbic acid, potassium sorbate, sodium sorbate, or any... acid. (e) The name of each semisoft part-skim cheese for which a definition and standard of identity...

  15. Reduced-fat Cheddar and Swiss-type cheeses harboring exopolysaccharide-producing probiotic Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, P M; Burdíková, Z; Beresford, T; Auty, M A E; Fitzgerald, G F; Ross, R P; Sheehan, J J; Stanton, C

    2015-12-01

    Exopolysaccharide-producing Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 was previously shown to have promising hypocholesterolemic activity in the atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) murine model. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of reduced-fat Cheddar and Swiss-type cheeses as functional (carrier) foods for delivery of this probiotic strain. All cheeses were manufactured at pilot-scale (500-L vats) in triplicate, with standard commercially available starters: for Cheddar, Lactococcus lactis; and for Swiss-type cheese, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Propionibacterium freudenreichii. Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 was used as an adjunct culture during cheese manufacture, at a level of ~10(6) cfu·mL(-1) cheese milk (subsequently present in the cheese curd at>10(7) cfu·g(-1)). The adjunct strain remained viable at >5×10(7) cfu·g(-1) in both Swiss-type and Cheddar cheeses following ripening for 6 mo. Sensory analysis revealed that the presence of the adjunct culture imparted a more appealing appearance in Swiss-type cheese, but had no significant effect on the sensory characteristics of Cheddar cheeses. Moreover, the adjunct culture had no significant effect on cheese composition, proteolysis, pH, or instrumentally quantified textural characteristics of Cheddar cheeses. These data indicate that low-fat Swiss-type and Cheddar cheeses represent suitable food matrices for the delivery of the hypocholesterolemic Lactobacillus mucosae DPC 6426 in an industrial setting.

  16. Consumers’ attitude and opinion towards different types of fresh cheese: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Pereira de BARROS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fresh cheese stands out for its tradition and widespread consumption in Brazil. However, there is a lack of information on motivation towards the consumption of available fresh cheeses in the Brazilian market. Focus group sessions were used to explore consumers’ attitude and opinion about fresh cheese. Products with different characteristics were used to stimulate discussion among participants including cheese with “no added salt”, the claim “contains probiotic microorganisms” and products processed with goat milk. The salt content played an important role on the consumer intention to purchase of fresh cheese. Participants stated that they would consume cheese without salt only by following a medical prescription. However, the subjects declared that they would buy reduced salt cheese if such reduction would not compromise the flavor. The meaning of the claim “contains probiotic microorganisms” was often declared as unknown during the discussion. However, they would buy a probiotic product. In addition, it was mentioned that a premium price would be paid for such functional cheese. Participants declared that would buy goat cheese. Nevertheless, to pay a higher price over the conventional one was a controversial and debatable issue among consumers. Results revealed important implications for the development of marketing strategies for fresh cheese.

  17. Characterization of Fiore Sardo cheese manufactured with the addition of autochthonous cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, M Barbara; Elisabetta Fadda, M; Deplano, Maura; Corda, Arianna; Casula, Maddalena; Cosentino, Sofia

    2007-08-01

    This work evaluated the effect of adjunct autochthonous cultures on the chemical, microbiological and sensory characteristics of Fiore Sardo cheese during ripening. A total of twelve batches of cheeses were manufactured according to the technical Disciplinary of Fiore Sardo cheese, with and without different combinations of autochthonous strains isolated from the native microflora of artisanal Fiore Sardo. There were no significant differences in the cheese compositional parameters between experimental and control cheeses, but the addition of cultures led to a statistically significant decrease in pH values in experimental cheeses. The evolution of total mesophilic bacteria, total coliforms and lactic acid bacteria were significantly influenced by the addition of autochthonous cultures in most of the experimental cheeses. As for sensory characteristics, all the experimental cheeses reported significantly higher scores especially for shape, texture, interior openings, taste and aftertaste. This study demonstrated the beneficial effect of the addition of selected autochthonous cultures in accelerating the disappearance of undesirable flora and improving the typical sensory characteristics of the cheese, and confirmed the importance of ewes' milk as a source of technologically interesting strains that could be used to ensure a higher quality of artisanal cheese productions.

  18. Segmentation of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies according to cheese-making technology and relationships with the aspect of the cheese curd surface at the moment of its extraction from the cheese vat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchetti, G; Gatti, M; Nocetti, M; Reverberi, P; Bianchi, A; Galati, F; Petroni, A

    2014-03-01

    Parmigiano Reggiano cheese dairies develop specific cheese-making strategies to adapt the variable characteristics of raw, not standardized milk to the final goal of obtaining cheese consistent with the standard. Analyzing 1,175 cheese-making reports from 30 out of 383 dairies associated with the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium in 2010 and 2011, 4 groups of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies using specific cheese-making technologies were discriminated by means of multiple linear discriminant analysis. Cheese makers manage cheese-making practices to obtain curd with different roughness properties, classified according to jargon words such as "rigata" and "giusta" or synonyms, because they believe that the roughness of the cheese curd surface immediately after the extraction from the vat is associated with different whey-draining properties and to the final outcome of the cheese. The aspect of the surfaces of the curds produced by the 4 groups of dairies was different according to the technology applied by each group. Cutting of the coagulum when it is still soft for a longer time and faster cooking of the cheese curd grains were associated with a less rough appearance of the surface of the curd, whereas under the opposite conditions, cutting the coagulum when it is firm for a shorter time, led to a curd with a rougher surface. These findings partially support the traditional feeling of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese makers, who consider the curd surface aspect one of the main drivers for their technological choices; to date, however, no data are provided about correlation between the aspect of the curd and the quality of the ripened cheese. If a sufficiently strong correlation could be demonstrated by the future development of the research, the operational effectiveness of Parmigiano Reggiano dairies will be able to largely benefit from the availability of sound and early process markers.

  19. Lipid oxidation in fish oil enriched oil-in-water emulsions and cream cheese with pre-emulsified fish oil is affected differently by the emulsifier used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    will include results from studies on lipid oxidation in simple oil-in-water emulsions prepared with milk proteins alone or combinations of milk proteins and phospholipids. In addition, a study on fish oil enriched cream cheese will be presented. In this study, the cream cheese was enriched with either neat...... and phospholipids as emulsifier had lower oxidative stability compared with emulsions prepared with milk proteins only. In cream cheese the opposite was the case. Furthermore, delivery emulsions prepared with milk proteins only were even found to increase oxidation compared to cream cheese prepared with neat fish...... oil. The findings in cream cheese could to some extent be explained by differences in the microstructure as observed from confocal laser scanning microscopy....

  20. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne C. Bertram

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits.

  1. The occurrence of noncoagulating milk and the association of bovine milk coagulation properties with genetic variants of the caseins in 3 Scandinavian dairy breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Bertelsen, Henriette Pasgaard; Jensen, Hanne Bak

    2013-01-01

    Substantial variation in milk coagulation properties has been observed among dairy cows. Consequently, raw milk from individual cows and breeds exhibits distinct coagulation capacities that potentially affect the technological properties and milk processing into cheese. This variation is largely...... breeds, which more or less reflected the single gene results. Overall, our results strongly suggest that milk coagulation is under the influence of additive genetic variation. Optimal milk for future cheese production can be ensured by monitoring the frequency of unfavorable variants and thus preventing...... an increase in the number of cows producing milk with impaired coagulation. Selective breeding for variants associated with superior milk coagulation can potentially increase raw milk quality and cheese yield in all 3 Scandinavian breeds...

  2. Raw milk consumption and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović-Vranješ Anka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the safe practices of milk pasteurization or sterilization, which effectively reduce foodborne outbreaks incidence associated with raw milk and dairy products use, outbreaks caused by such products continue to occur. Despite this fact, a worldwide movement advocating for the rights of raw milk and cheese selling and consumption, due to their specific nutritive characteristics, has strengthened significantly in recent years. Traditional agricultural manufacturers from Serbia still sell products related to thermally unprocessed milk, such as cottage cheese and raw cream. In AP Vojvodina during the period of 1981-2010 a total of 179 foodborne outbreaks were reported, where the incriminated cause of the outbreak were milk or diary. In 126 (70.39% outbreaks, totaling 2276 sick individuals and one casualty, it was confirmed that the incriminated food was from the group of dairy products. In 48 instances (26.82%, bacteriological tests confirmed that milk and dairy products were excluded as the outbreak causes, while in another 5 (2.79% outbreaks, microbiological analysis of food failed to confirm any relation to the actual epidemiological instances. In some cases, bacteriological testing of incriminated foods was not possible. In the cases of outbreaks associated with the consumption of milk and dairy products, traditional raw milk products were cited as being used. Consumption of unpasteurized milk and cheese represents public health threat. National and international rules ensuring use of safe products for human consumption have to set rules of trade of thermally processed milk and products on the market. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31095

  3. METHOD FOR MAKING CHEESE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for making Cheddar type and Continental type cheese with an adjunct culture comprising a Lactobacillus helveticus strain.......The present invention relates to a method for making Cheddar type and Continental type cheese with an adjunct culture comprising a Lactobacillus helveticus strain....

  4. Technological suitability of sheep milk for processing

    OpenAIRE

    Romualda Danków; Jan Pikul

    2011-01-01

    Annual world sheep milk production is estimated at the level of 8.2 million tons and constitutes 1.5% of the total milk production obtained from various species of mammals. Majority of this milk is used to manufacture cheeses and fermented beverages. These products are commonly considered as regional articles and are protected by legal regulations which guarantee their taste and aroma typical for a given region and which they owe to traditional production technologies. In Poland, sheep are re...

  5. Survival of Brucella abortus aqpX mutant in fresh and ripened cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodríguez, María Del Rosario; Díaz-Aparicio, Efrén; Arellano-Reynoso, Beatriz; García-Lobo, Juan M; Gimeno, Miquel; Palomares-Reséndiz, Erika G; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the survival of a Brucella abortus aqpX mutant during the elaboration and conservation of fresh and ripened cheeses at 4 °C and 24 °C. The pH values and water activity were monitored for each type of cheese. The fresh cheese was elaborated with raw milk inoculated with 6×10⁸ colony-forming units (CFU)/mL each of parental and mutant strain. Ripening cheeses were elaborated with both raw and pasteurized milk and inoculated with 12×10⁸ CFU/mL each of parental and mutant strains. In fresh cheese, survival was observed during elaboration and conservation for 7 days at 4 °C in mutant and parental strains. The number of survivors of the mutant strain was 10 times lower compared with the parental strain at pH 5 and a(w) of 0.930. In the cheese elaborated with raw milk and ripened at 24 °C, both strains survived until day 17 at pH 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. However, when the cheese was elaborated with pasteurized milk, the parental strain survived until day 31 of ripening, and the mutant strain survived 24 days at pH 4 and a(w) of 0.886. The survival of the mutant strain showed a diminution of one logarithm during elaboration and ripening of cheese as compared with the parental strain. When the cheese was elaborated with raw milk and ripened at 4 °C, survival of the parental strain was 24 days, whereas the mutant strain survived only 17 days (pH 5 and a(w) 0.90). Regarding the cheese elaborated with pasteurized milk and maturated at 4 °C, both strains survived 31 days (pH 5 and a(w) 0.90), with the same survival diminution during elaboration and ripening. Our results show that in both types of cheese, the mutated aqpX strain survived 10 times less than the parental strain, which shows that the aqpX gene can be related to the survival of Brucella abortus in this type of cheese.

  6. Relationships between buffalo milk components and curd characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zicarelli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the coefficients of correlation between curd chemical composition and milk characteristics, theoretical and real cheese yield and ratios between cheese yield and protein percentage. The analysis were performed on 326 milk samples collected from 60 half sib buffaloes, ascertained by DNA test, every 50 days. The percentages of dry matter, proteins and fat of the curd were inversely correlated to the curd firmness (a30, a low enzymatic phase of coagulation and low pH value. Percentage of dry matter in the curd was positively correlated with proteins, casein and fat of the milk and negatively with lactose. Furthermore, dry matter and proteins percentages are also positively correlated with theoretical cheese yield and its ratio with real cheese yield, curd dry matter from 1 litre of milk and the ratio between curd dry matter and protein percentage. Negative correlations were found with real cheese yield at 28 hours (r = - 0.100; P< 0.01 and its ratio with protein percentage. An inverse relationship was highlighted between curd proteins percentage and fat of either milk and curd, while a direct association was present with lactose. A higher protein percentage in the curd was linked to a lower cheese yield and a lower ratio between cheese yield and proteins. Ash of the curd, finally, showed similar association to those described for proteins.

  7. Qualidade de leites fermentados funcionais elaborados a partir de bactérias ácido-lácticas isoladas de queijo de coalho Quality of functional fermented milks produced by the use of lactic acid bacteria isolated from coalho cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Viegas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Leites fermentados foram elaborados a partir de bactérias ácido-lácticas com propriedades funcionais, isoladas de queijo de coalho com e sem a adição de concentrado proteico de soro (CPS. Características físico-químicas, microbiológicas e sensoriais dos produtos elaborados foram analisadas durante 40 dias de estocagem sob refrigeração a 8-10ºC. Todos os leites fermentados elaborados, independentemente da adição de CPS e da cultura utilizada, apresentaram contagens adequadas de bactérias (>10(8UFC/mL durante todo o período de avaliação, o que garantiria seu possível potencial funcional. Leites fermentados por Lactobacillus acidophilus apresentaram melhor aceitação (PFermented milks were produced using whey protein concentrate (WPC and potentially functional lactic acid bacteria, which were isolated from coalho cheese produced in. Physical-chemical, microbiological, and sensorial characteristics of the fermented milks were analyzed during 40 days under refrigeration at 8-10ºC. All products, irrespectively of WPC adding or culture used, showed appropriated bacterial counts (>10(8CFU/mL throughout the evaluation time, which would guarantee their functional potential. Lactobacillus acidophilus fermented milks presented better sensorial approval (P<0.05 when evaluated at 10-day storage; while Weissella confusa fermented milks presented lower acceptance (P<0.05 at 40-day storage. The association of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Weissella confusa or Lactobacillus acidophilus isolatedly, irrespectively of WPC adding, should be recommended for the industrial elaboration of novel functional fermented milks using Brazilian lactic cultures as starters.

  8. The effect of milk processing on the microstructure of the milk fat globule and rennet induced gel observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, L; Dagastine, R R; Kentish, S E; Gras, S L

    2010-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was successfully used to observe the effect of milk processing on the size and the morphology of the milk fat globule in raw milk, raw ultrafiltered milk, and standardized and pasteurized milk prepared for cheese manufacture (cheese-milk) and commercial pasteurized and homogenized milk. Fat globule size distributions for the milk preparations were analyzed using both image analysis and light scattering and both measurements produced similar data trends. Changes to the native milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were tracked using a MFGM specific fluorescent stain that allowed MFGM proteins and adsorbed proteins to be differentiated on the fat globule surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the identity of native MFGM proteins isolated from the surface of fat globules within raw, UF retentate, and cheese-milk preparations, whereas only casein was detected on the surface of fat globules in homogenized milk. The microstructure, porosity, and gel strength of the rennet induced gel made from raw milk and cheese-milk was also found to be comparable and significantly different to that made from homogenized milk. Our results highlight the potential use of CLSM as a tool to observe the structural details of the fat globule and associated membrane close to its native environment.

  9. Direct amino acid analyses of mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, M N

    1985-12-01

    The amino acid content of mozzarella (low moisture, part skim milk) and asadero cheeses was determined by the column chromatographic method. Data from the direct analyses of the mozzarella cheeses were compared with the calculated amino acid composition reported in tables in Agriculture Handbook No. 8-1. Phenylalanine and tyrosine contents were found to be higher in the direct analyses than in the calculated data in Handbook No. 8-1 (1.390 gm and 1.127 gm for phenylalanine, and 1.493 gm and 1.249 gm for tyrosine per 100 gm edible portion, respectively). That is of particular concern in the dietary management of phenylketonuria, in which accuracy in computing levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine is essential.

  10. Potential estimation of titratable acidity in cow milk using mid-infrared spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Colinet, Frédéric; Soyeurt, Hélène; Anceau, Christine; Vanlierde, Amélie; Keyen, Nicolas; Pierre DARDENNE; Gengler, Nicolas; Sindic, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Milk coagulation has a direct effect on cheese yield. Several factors influence the milk coagulation kinetics. In addition to calcium and milk protein concentrations, titratable acidity influences all the phases of milk coagulation. The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of prediction of titratable acidity directly in bovine milk using mid-infrared spectrometry. In order to maximize the variability in the measurements of titratable acidity, milk samples were collected on ...

  11. One approach in using multivariate statistical process control in analyzing cheese quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija Djekic

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to investigate possibility of using multivariate statistical process control in analysing cheese quality parameters. Two cheese types (white brined cheeses and soft cheese from ultra-filtered milk were selected and analysed for several quality parameters such as dry matter, milk fat, protein contents, pH, NaCl, fat in dry matter and moisture in non-fat solids. The obtained results showed significant variations for most of the quality characteristics which were examined among the two types of cheese. The only stable parameter in both types of cheese was moisture in non-fat solids. All of the other cheese quality characteristics were characterized above or below control limits for most of the samples. Such results indicated a high instability and variations within cheese production. Although the use of statistical process control is not mandatory in the dairy industry, it might provide benefits to organizations in improving quality control of dairy products.

  12. Nucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel J; Giblin, Linda; McSweeney, Paul L H; Sheehan, Jeremiah J; Cotter, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    The microbial profile of cheese is a primary determinant of cheese quality. Microorganisms can contribute to aroma and taste defects, form biogenic amines, cause gas and secondary fermentation defects, and can contribute to cheese pinking and mineral deposition issues. These defects may be as a result of seasonality and the variability in the composition of the milk supplied, variations in cheese processing parameters, as well as the nature and number of the non-starter microorganisms which come from the milk or other environmental sources. Such defects can be responsible for production and product recall costs and thus represent a significant economic burden for the dairy industry worldwide. Traditional non-molecular approaches are often considered biased and have inherently slow turnaround times. Molecular techniques can provide early and rapid detection of defects that result from the presence of specific spoilage microbes and, ultimately, assist in enhancing cheese quality and reducing costs. Here we review the DNA-based methods that are available to detect/quantify spoilage bacteria, and relevant metabolic pathways in cheeses and, in the process, highlight how these strategies can be employed to improve cheese quality and reduce the associated economic burden on cheese processors.

  13. Nucleic acid-based approaches to investigate microbial-related cheese quality defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eO Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe microbial profile of cheese is a primary determinant of cheese quality. Microorganisms can contribute to aroma and taste defects, form biogenic amines, cause gas and secondary fermentation defects, and can contribute to cheese pinking and mineral deposition issues. These defects may be as a result of seasonality and the variability in the composition of the milk supplied, variations in cheese processing parameters, as well as the nature and number of the non-starter microorganisms which come from the milk or other environmental sources. Such defects can be responsible for production and product recall costs and thus represent a significant economic burden for the dairy industry worldwide. Traditional non-molecular approaches are often considered biased and have inherently slow turnaround times. Molecular techniques can provide early and rapid detection of defects that result from the presence of specific spoilage microbes and, ultimately, assist in enhancing cheese quality and reducing costs. Here we review the DNA-based methods that are available to detect/quantify spoilage bacteria, and relevant metabolic pathways, in cheeses and, in the process, highlight how these strategies can be employed to improve cheese quality and reduce the associated economic burden on cheese processors.

  14. Effect of adjuncts on microbiological and chemical properties of Scamorza cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidone, Angela; Braghieri, Ada; Cioffi, Silvia; Claps, Salvatore; Genovese, Francesco; Morone, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Fabio; Parente, Eugenio

    2015-03-01

    Scamorza is a semi-hard, pasta filata cheese resembling low-moisture Mozzarella cheese, with a short ripening time (cheeses, it was manufactured using 2 types of milk in the current study: 100% Italian Friesian milk (F) or 90% F and 10% Jersey cow milk (mixed, M), and 2 types of starter: Streptococcus thermophilus or S. thermophilus with peptidolytic Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, and Lactobacillus paracasei strains as adjuncts). The cheeses were ripened for 30d. The adjunct did not significantly affect acid production or growth of the primary starter; 2 of the species used in the adjunct (Lb. paracasei and Lb. helveticus) rapidly colonized the cheese and persisted until the end of ripening, whereas the counts of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria in the control cheese were low until the end of ripening. The use of adjuncts affected pH, microbial composition (as assessed by both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods), total free amino acid content, and volatile profile (measured using an electronic nose), whereas milk type had only a minor effect. Although differences in primary proteolysis were found, they were probably indirect and related to the effects on pH and moisture. We conclude that, even with a short ripening time (30d), use of a peptidolytic adjunct may significantly affect important features of Scamorza and may be used to create a product that is measurably different from competing products.

  15. Effect of season on characteristics of pecorino cheese and ricotta of Pistoiese Appennine: first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Giustini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The “Pecorino pistoiese” is made from milk of Massese Sheep. The flocks are reared by grazing on natural pastures of Pistoiese Appennine. The farms product cheeses by milk without pasteurization. The handmade cheeses are characterized by a remarkable variability due to farm and to season. The aim of this work is to study the effect of season on characteristics of the pecorino e ricotta pistoiese with particular attention for the determination of the yield. One trial was run in each season (4 trials and in 3 farms. Every phases of the cheesemaking were controlled and milk, cheese and ricotta were weighed and analysed. The season showed some significant effects on the chemical composition of milk: lactose and SNF showed lower values in summer. The pecorino cheese showed 18.5% of fat and 24.7% of protein on average. In spring and in summer the yield in pecorino cheese (15.8% was significantly worse than in winter (19.3%. The ricotta cheese was fatter in summer (27.6% than in winter (17.5%. The yield of ricotta at 24 hours was 13.5% on average.

  16. Production of fresh probiotic cheese with addition of transglutaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinka Radošević

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the influence of probiotic culture Lactobacillus acidophilus and enzyme transglutaminase (TG on quality and sensory properties of autochthonous fresh cheese from Zagreb region. Fresh, unpasteurized, skimmed milk was inoculated with TG at different temperatures and activation time (8 h at 11 ºC and 4 h at 25 ºC. Inactivation of the enzyme was carried out during the process of pasteurization (65ºC/30 min. The milk for fresh cheese production was further inoculated with mesophilic culture of lactic acid bacteria MM101 and probiotic strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAC-1. Besides the trial samples with addition of TG and probiotic bacteria, control samples without addition of TG and probiotic were produced, as well as the samples without addition of TG but with probiotic bacteria addition. Samples of fresh cheese produced with addition of TG, especially in which TG was active at 11 ºC, had greater weight then samples produced without the enzyme addition. Therefore, their yield was also greater then yield of cheese produced without the addition of the enzyme. Furthermore, the samples of fresh cheese produced with addition of TG have shown lesser syneresis than other samples during 10 days of storage at 10 ºC. The same samples also had the best sensory properties. Metabolic activity of mesophilic culture MM101 and probiotic culture L. acidophilus LAC-1 has resulted in better taste and odour of fresh cheese. The viable cell number of probiotic strain L. acidophilus LAC-1 in prepared samples was around 5 x 106 cells/g after 10 days of storage at 10 ºC, which is higher than the minimal dose required for 27 probiotic products. Addition of transgultaminase contributed to better consistency and general appearance of produced fresh cheese.

  17. Biogas yield from Sicilian kitchen waste and cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Comparetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the chemical composition of kitchen waste and cheese whey, as well as the biogas yield obtained from the Anaerobic Digestion (AD tests of these two raw materials. Since the separated waste collection is performed in the town of Marineo (Palermo, a sample of kitchen waste, different from food industry one and included in the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW, was collected from the mass stored at the households of this town. Moreover, a sample of cheese whey was collected in a Sicilian mini dairy plant, where sheep milk is processed. This investigation was carried out inside laboratory digesters of Aleksandras Stulginskis University (Lithuania. Total Solids (TS resulted 15.6% in kitchen waste and 6% in cheese whey, while both the raw materials showed a high content of organic matter, 91.1% and 79.1%, respectively. The biogas yield resulted 104.6 l kg–1 from kitchen waste and 30.6 l kg–1 from cheese whey. The biogas yield from TS resulted 672.6 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 384.7 l kg–1 using cheese whey. The biogas yield from Volatile Solids (VS resulted 738.9 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 410.3 l kg–1 using cheese whey.

  18. Identification of Clostridium tyrobutyricum as the causative agent of late blowing in cheese by species-specific PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klijn, N; Nieuwenhof, F F; Hoolwerf, J D; van der Waals, C B; Weerkamp, A H

    1995-08-01

    Butyric acid fermentation, the late-blowing defect in cheese, caused by the outgrowth of clostridial spores present in raw milk, can create considerable loss of product, especially in the production of semihard cheeses like Gouda cheese, but also in grana and Gruyère cheeses. To demonstrate the causative relationship between Clostridium tyrobutyricum and late blowing in cheese, many cheesemaking experiments were performed to provoke this defect by using spores from several strains of the major dairy-related clostridia. A method of PCR amplification of a part of the 16S rRNA gene in combination with hybridization with species-specific DNA probes was developed to allow the specific detection of clostridial sequences in DNAs extracted from cheeses. The sensitivity was increased by using nested PCR. Late blowing was provoked in experimental cheeses with 28 of the 32 C. tyrobutyricum strains tested, whereas experimental cheeses made with spores from C. beijerinckii, C. butyricum, and C. sporogenes showed no signs of butyric acid fermentation. In all experimental and commercial cheeses with obvious signs of late blowing, DNA from C. tyrobutyricum was detected; in some cheeses, signals for C. beijerinckii were also found. It was concluded that only C. tyrobutyricum strains are able to cause butyric acid fermentation in cheese.

  19. Bacterial dynamics in model cheese systems, aiming at safety and quality of Portuguese-style traditional ewe's cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cláudia I; Graça, João A; Ogando, Natacha S; Gomes, Ana M P; Malcata, F Xavier

    2009-11-01

    An experiment using model ewe's milk cheeses was designed to characterize microbial interactions that arise in actual raw milk cheese environments. These model cheeses were manufactured according to Portuguese artisanal practices, except that the microbial load and biodiversity were fully controlled: single potential pathogens and spoilage bacteria, or a combination thereof, were combined at various initial inoculum levels in sterilized raw ewe's milk with several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) normally found in traditional cheeses. Viable microbial counts were monitored throughout a 60-day ripening period. Two alternative mathematical approaches were used to fit the experimental data generated in terms of population dynamics: percent of inhibition and D-values. These were able to explain the complex competitive interactions between the contaminant microorganisms and the LAB adventitious populations. In general, the tested LAB were less able to inhibit contaminants present in combination and in higher concentrations. Lactococcus lactis, with its strong acidifying potential, was the most effective factor in controlling the unwanted bacterial population, especially single Staphylococcus aureus. The two lactobacilli studied, especially Lactobacillus brevis, were shown to be less effective; Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua were the contaminants least inhibited by the LAB.

  20. Dominant lactic acid bacteria in artisanal Pirot cheeses of different ripening period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić-Vidojević Amarela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study two raw cow's milk cheeses of a different ripening period were examined. The cheeses were taken from a country household in the region of mountain Stara Planina and manufactured without adding of starter culture. A total 106 lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains were isolated from both cheeses. They are tested by classical physiological tests as well as by API 50 CH tests. Proteolytic and antimicrobial activities were done too. Identification of LAB isolates was done by repetitive extragenic palindromic-polimerase chain reaction (rep-PCR with (GTG5 primer. The LAB isolates from cheese BGPT9 (four days old belonged to the eight species of LAB (Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus brevis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus durans and Leuconostoc garlicum, while in the BGPT10 cheese (eight months old only two species were present (Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium. Proteolytic activity showed 30 LAB from BGPT9 cheese, mainly enterococci. From BGPT10 cheese only one isolate (which belonged to the Lactobacillus plantarum species possessed partial ability to hydrolyze β-casein. Seven enterococci from BGPT9 cheese and four enterococci from BGPT10 cheese produced antimicrobial compounds.

  1. Does fat in milk, butter and and cholesterol differently?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T,; Høy, Carl-Erik; Andersen, L.N.

    2004-01-01

    and 8 hours following intake of the meals. Results: Fasting LDL cholesterol concentration was significantly higher after butter than cheese diet (p 0.037), with a borderline significant difference in total cholesterol (p = 0.054) after the experimental periods of three weeks. Postprandial glucose showed...... a higher response after cheese diet than after milk diet (p = 0.010, diet X time interaction). Conclusions: A different effect of fat in milk and butter could not be confirmed in this study. The moderately lower LDL cholesterol after cheese diet compared to butter diet should be investigated further....

  2. Improving the Chemical and Sensory Characteristics of Goat Cheese by the Addition of Cranberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Apostu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the goat milk cheeses have gained popularity due to the increased interest of consumers in both the tradition of cheesemaking and the sensorial and nutritional value attributed to goat milk. This study aimed to assess and compare the chemical and sensory characteristics of fresh cheese with a mixture of cranberry fruits in different concentrations. The following average values were obtained for the chemical parameters analyzed: pH 4.85 ± 0.155, titratable acidity (°T 150 ± 0,094, dry matter (% 58.33 ± 1.55, and fat (% 27.74 ± 53.24. Sensory evaluation highlighted the influence of the addition of cranberry on the eating quality of goat cheese and its consumer acceptability. Results showed that the goat cheese supplementation with 9% cranberry significantly improves the stability of acidic flavor during storage.

  3. Variations in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of processed cheese by lactation time, feeding regimen, and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kwon, O-Jun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Oh, Se Jong; Jeong, Ha-Yeon; Song, Man-Kang; Jeong, Inhye; Kim, Young Jun

    2009-04-22

    Dairy products are major sources of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA); thus, an increase in CLA content can improve the quality value of dairy products. The objective of this work was to determine the effects of lactation time, feeding regimen, and ripening period on the level of CLA in processed cheese. CLA content in milk varied with the period of lactation; high in spring (April and May, about 6.8 mg CLA/g fat) and relatively low in mid summer and winter (about 4.3 mg CLA/g fat). The effects of dietary regimen and ripening period were determined in milk, which was obtained from March to May. After aging for 4 months, the cheese made from milk obtained from cows fed on pasture contained relatively higher levels of CLA compared to cheese made from milk obtained from cows fed indoors (8.12 mg CLA/g fat vs 6.76 mg CLA/g fat), but there was no difference in 7 month-aged cheeses. In both pasture and indoor feeding, 7 month-aged cheeses showed higher CLA content than 4 month-aged cheeses. The contents of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3) were significantly higher in cheese from pasture fed cows compared to those in cows fed indoors. These findings should be helpful for the efficient production of functional dairy products with high CLA contents.

  4. HPLC quantification of biogenic amines in cheeses: correlation with PCR-detection of tyramine-producing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María; Linares, Daniel M; Del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2007-08-01

    The consumption of food and beverages containing high amounts of biogenic amines (BA) can have toxicological effects. BA found in foods and beverages are synthesized by the microbial decarboxylation of certain amino acids. This paper reports the concentrations of BAs in a number of commercial cheeses, as determined by HPLC. The cheeses studied were made from raw and pasteurized milk of different origin, and were subjected to different ripening periods. BA concentrations were lower in short ripening period than in long ripening period cheeses, and higher in cheeses made from raw milk than in those made from pasteurized milk. The highest BA concentrations were recorded in blue cheeses made from raw milk. Tyramine was the most commonly recorded and abundant BA. The presence of tyramine-producing bacteria was determined by PCR, and a good correlation obtained between the results of this method and tyramine detection by HPLC. These methods could be used to complement one another in the detection and quantification of tyramine in cheese prevention of tyramine accumulation in cheese.

  5. Effect of feeding systems on aromatic characteristics of buffalo mozzarella cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Di Napoli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to evaluated the effect of feeding systems (hay vs ray-grass silage on volatile compounds profiles of mozzarella cheese. Three mozzarella cheese making trials for each experimental group were conducted at our dairy technology laboratory. Mozzarella cheese was manufactured from whole raw water buffalo milk with the addition of natural starter. Volatile compounds were extracted by “purge and trap” system coupled to a gas chromatograph and detected operating with a mass-selective detector (Ciccioli et al., 2004 A total of 84 compounds of the following chemical families were detected: hydrocarbons, fatty acids, esters, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and terpenes. The data overall indicated difference between the aromatic profiles of mozzarella cheese as consequence of feeding systems. Thus, differences in mozzarella cheese flavour are primarily caused by concentration differences of a common set of flavour compounds, rather than by the occurrence of compounds uniquely associated with a particular feed.

  6. First mass spectrometry metabolic fingerprinting of bacterial metabolism in a model cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Boucher, C; Courant, F; Jeanson, S; Chereau, S; Maillard, M-B; Royer, A-L; Thierry, A; Dervilly-Pinel, G; Le Bizec, B; Lortal, S

    2013-11-15

    Metabolic fingerprinting is an untargeted approach which has not yet been undertaken to investigate cheese. This study is a proof of concept, concerning the ability of mass spectrometry (MS) metabolic fingerprinting to investigate modifications induced by bacterial metabolism in cheese over time. An ultrafiltrated milk concentrate was used to manufacture model cheeses inoculated with Lactococcus lactis LD61. Metabolic fingerprints were acquired after 0, 8 and 48h from two different fractions of the metabolome: the water-soluble fraction using liquid chromatography-high resolution-MS and a volatile fraction using gas chromatography-MS. Metabolic fingerprints differed significantly over time. Forty-five metabolites were identified, including well-known cheese metabolites, such as 12 amino acids and 25 volatile metabolites, and less studied ones, such as four vitamins, uric acid, creatine and l-carnitine. These results showed the relevance of cheese MS fingerprinting to generate new findings and to detect even slight differences between two conditions.

  7. THE STUDY OF FISH SUPPLEMENT AND BUTTERFAT SUBSTITUTE EFFECT ON EXPIRY DATE OF PROCESSED CHEESE PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATALIYA LOTYSH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The sector of functional products has top-priority meaning – it is the most convenient and natural form of introduction and enrichment of the human organism with vitamins, mineral substances, microelements and other components. Attraction into the branch of raw materials of non-milk origin – fish supplements and substitutes of butterfat – served the basis of technology development of processed cheese products of combined content, which in accordance with acting terminology are called processed cheese products. The technology of processed cheese products allows easily regulating their content by introduction of corresponding supplement that facilitates obtainment of product with set properties and content. Inclusion of meat and fish as the raw materials in the processed cheese content results in enrichment of the product with macro- and microelements, unsaturated fatty acids, except for regulation of fatty acid content of cheese products is executed by substitution of butterfat by butterfat substitute.

  8. Influence of lamb rennet paste on the lipolytic and sensory profile of Murcia al Vino cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandini, E; Castillo, M; de Renobales, M; Virto, M D; Garrido, M D; Rovira, S; López, M B

    2012-06-01

    The influence of lamb rennet paste (71.1% chymosin, 177 international milk-clotting units/mL, 4.57U/g of lipase activity) during the ripening of Murcia al Vino goat cheese was studied. The aim of this study was to improve the knowledge of the effect of lamb rennet paste on the lipolytic patterns in this type of cheese by reference to the evolution of total and free fatty acids. A sensory analysis was carried out to compare cheeses made with commercial and paste rennet. The rennet paste showed higher lipolytic activity, enhancing the production of short-chain free fatty acids. In addition, the cheese produced with lamb rennet paste had a slightly more bitter and piquant taste, making it an attractive commercial alternative that can be used to develop new varieties of goat cheese.

  9. Proteolytic Activity in Reduced-Fat Cheddar Cheese Made with Lactic Acid Bacteria and Camel Chymosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Mette Winther

    be the need of an extended ripening period to reach a similar cheese structure as in cheeses produced with BC. The aim of this project was to compensate for the lower proteolytic activity in cheese produced with CC compared to BC. Selection of dairy lactic acid bacteria (LAB) for cheese production with high...... for their ability to influence proteolysis and structure during cheese ripening. In an attempt to improve the screening methods and contribute to the development of a new classification system of Latcococcus lactic strains, the peptide profile formed by selected strains after growth in milk was analyzed...... mediated an increase in the total amount of amino acids as well as a shorter structure. A model system, used to study the retention of chymosin in a curd, showed that the retention of CC was less dependent on pH compared to BC, and the retention of CC was higher than BC in the pH interval 6...

  10. Survey on the community and dynamics of lactic acid bacteria in Grana Padano cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Marcela; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Grana Padano (GP) is a Protected Designation of Origin cheese made with raw milk and natural whey culture (NWC) that is characterised by a long ripening period. In this study, six GP productions were considered in order to evaluate the trend of microbial dynamics and compare lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population levels in cheeses during the entire cheese-making process. To reach this goal, for each GP production, samples of vat raw milk, NWC and cheeses at 48h, 2, 6, 9 and 13 months were subjected to plate counts and direct counts by fluorescence microscopy, as well as amplicon length heterogeneity-PCR (LH-PCR). Statistical analysis was applied to the results and ecological indices were estimated. It was demonstrated that the LAB able to grow in the cheese-environment conditions could arise from both raw milk and NWC. Starter lactobacilli (SLAB) from NWC were the main species present during acidification, and non-starter LAB (NSLAB), mainly from milk but also from NWC, were able to grow after brining and they dominated during ripening. The peak areas of LH-PCR profiles were used to determine ecological indices during manufacture and ripening. Among cheese ecosystems with different ageing times, diversity, Evenness and Richness were different, with highest bacterial growth and diversity occurring in cheese ripening at 2 months. At this time point, which seemed to be a crucial moment for GP microbial evolution, cell lysis of both SLAB and NSLAB was also observed. Sampling modality and statistical analysis gave greater significance to the results used to describe the microbiological characteristics of a cheese recognised worldwide.

  11. Evaluation of hygiene and safety criteria in the production of a traditional Piedmont cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Astegiano

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional products and related processes must be safe to protect consumers’ health. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbiological criteria of a traditional Piedmont cheese, made by two different cheese producers (A and B. Three batches of each cheese were considered. The following seven samples of each batch were collected: raw milk, milk at 38°C, curd, cheese at 7, 30, 60, 90 days of ripening. During cheese making process, training activities dealing with food safety were conducted. Analyses regarding food safety and process hygiene criteria were set up according to the EC Regulation 2073/2005. Other microbiological and chemical-physical analyses [lactic streptococci, lactobacilli, pH and water activity (Aw] were performed as well. Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli, aflatoxin M1 and antimicrobial substances were considered only for raw milk. All samples resulted negative for food safety criteria; Enterobacteriaceae, E.coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS were high in the first phase of cheese production, however they decreased at the end of ripening. A high level of CPS in milk was found in producer A, likewise in some cheese samples a count of >5 Log CFU/g was reached; staphylococcal enterotoxins resulted negative. The pH and Aw values decreased during the cheese ripening period. The competition between lactic flora and potential pathogen microorganisms and decreasing of pH and Aw are considered positive factors in order to ensure safety of dairy products. Moreover, training activities play a crucial role to manage critical points and perform corrective action. Responsible application of good manufacturing practices are considered key factors to obtain a high hygienic level in dairy products.

  12. Evaluation of Hygiene and Safety Criteria in the Production of a Traditional Piedmont Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellio, Alberto; Adriano, Daniela; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Gallina, Silvia; Gorlier, Alessandra; Gramaglia, Monica; Lombardi, Giampiero; Macori, Guerrino; Zuccon, Fabio; Decastelli, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Traditional products and related processes must be safe to protect consumers’ health. The aim of this study was to evaluate microbiological criteria of a traditional Piedmont cheese, made by two different cheese producers (A and B). Three batches of each cheese were considered. The following seven samples of each batch were collected: raw milk, milk at 38°C, curd, cheese at 7, 30, 60, 90 days of ripening. During cheese making process, training activities dealing with food safety were conducted. Analyses regarding food safety and process hygiene criteria were set up according to the EC Regulation 2073/2005. Other microbiological and chemical-physical analyses [lactic streptococci, lactobacilli, pH and water activity (Aw)] were performed as well. Shiga-toxin Escherichia coli, aflatoxin M1 and antimicrobial substances were considered only for raw milk. All samples resulted negative for food safety criteria; Enterobacteriaceae, E.coli and coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) were high in the first phase of cheese production, however they decreased at the end of ripening. A high level of CPS in milk was found in producer A, likewise in some cheese samples a count of >5 Log CFU/g was reached; staphylococcal enterotoxins resulted negative. The pH and Aw values decreased during the cheese ripening period. The competition between lactic flora and potential pathogen microorganisms and decreasing of pH and Aw are considered positive factors in order to ensure safety of dairy products. Moreover, training activities play a crucial role to manage critical points and perform corrective action. Responsible application of good manufacturing practices are considered key factors to obtain a high hygienic level in dairy products.

  13. Autochthonous "Bjelovars dried cheese"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available «Dried cheese» is in autochthonous group of Bjelovar region cheeses which is still produced in rural domestic scale. The name of cheese originates from production procedure - drying for longer or shorter period in airy place after which the cheese is smoked, or is smoked only without drying. This type of cheese is produced in whole central region of Croatia which includes Međimurje, Podravina, Bilogora; Moslavina, Posavina and region around the capital. The aim of this paper is to describe and determine sensory, chemical and microbiological composition to determine its characteristics and production standards. As standards for sensory properties following characteristics can be used: a Outer shape: dimensions: diameter: 140-145 mm, height: 58-61 mm, mass: 700-750 g, equal, rounded shape, smooth skin, equal colour; b Consistency: easily cut, elastic, soft; c Cut: nicely combined white body, few improper holes of equal size; d Odour: pleasant milky acid odour, fairly smoky; e Taste: Fairly milky acidic taste, medium salty, fairly smoky taste. Depending on fat in dry matter content and water content in non fat dry matter, analyzed samples can be characterized as quarter fat, soft and semidry cheese. Higher acidity and saltiness was determined in some samples, microbiological analyses has shown that the most common contaminants are yeasts and moulds.

  14. Microbial interactions in cheese: implications for cheese quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlinger, Françoise; Mounier, Jérôme

    2009-04-01

    The cheese microbiota, whose community structure evolves through a succession of different microbial groups, plays a central role in cheese-making. The subtleties of cheese character, as well as cheese shelf-life and safety, are largely determined by the composition and evolution of this microbiota. Adjunct and surface-ripening cultures marketed today for smear cheeses are inadequate for adequately mimicking the real diversity encountered in cheese microbiota. The interactions between bacteria and fungi within these communities determine their structure and function. Yeasts play a key role in the establishment of ripening bacteria. The understanding of these interactions offers to enhance cheese flavour formation and to control and/or prevent the growth of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms in cheese.

  15. Assessing the yield, microstructure, and texture properties of miniature Chihuahua-type cheese manufactured with a phospholipase A1 and exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancoso-Reyes, N; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Sepulveda, D R; Hernández-Ochoa, L R

    2014-02-01

    Chihuahua cheese or Mennonite cheese is one of the most popular and consumed cheeses in Mexico and by the Hispanic community in the United States. According to local producers the yield of Chihuahua cheese ranges from 9 to 9.5 kg of cheese from 100 kg of milk. Cheese yield is a crucial determinant of profitability in cheese-manufacturing plants; therefore, different methods have been developed to increase it. In this work, a miniature Chihuahua-type cheese model was used to assess the effect of a phospholipase A1 (PL-A1) and exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria (separately and in combination) on the yield, microstructure, and texture of cheese. Four different cheeses were manufactured: cheese made with PL-A1, cheese made with EPS-producing bacteria, cheese with both PL-A1 and EPS-producing bacteria, and a cheese control without PL-A1 or EPS-producing bacteria. The compositional analysis of cheese was carried out using methods of AOAC International (Washington, DC). The actual yield and moisture-adjusted yield were calculated for all cheese treatments. Texture profile analyses of cheeses were performed using a texture analyzer. Micrographs were obtained by electron scanning microscopy. Fifty panelists carried out sensorial analysis using ranking tests. Incorporation of EPS-producing bacteria in the manufacture of cheese increased the moisture content and water activity. In contrast, the addition of PL-A1 did not increase fat retention or cheese yield. The use of EPS alone improved the cheese yield by increasing water and fat retention, but also caused a negative effect on the texture and flavor of Chihuahua cheese. The use of EPS-producing bacteria in combination with PL-A1 improved the cheese yield and increased the moisture and fat content. The cheeses with the best flavor and texture were those manufactured with PL-A1 and the cheeses manufactured with the combination of PL-A1 and EPS-producing culture.

  16. Effect of Milk Fat Substitution of Rennet Milk Induced Coagulation on Physico-Chemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imène Felfoul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to study the effect of milk fat substitution by (W1/O/W2 multiple emulsions based on olive oil in comparison with full and low-fat milks on milk behavior during rennet coagulation. Therefore, based on the turbidimetric and conductivimetric methods, a follow up of enzymatic coagulation is realized. Drainage of renneted gels was followed by syneresis study and cheese yield. The comparison between the coagulation aptitude of low fat milk and milk-olive oil emulsion showed that the hydrolysis phase extended up to 35 minutes for full fat milk and up to 38 minutes for milk-olive oil emulsion. The transition phase solid/gel was shorter in the case of the whole milk. The reticulation phase was shorter in the case of milk-olive oil emulsion. The milk conductivity depended on the milk richness in fat content. Milk-olive oil emulsion showed the lowest cheese-making yield compared to its full and low-fat counterpart.

  17. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM CAMEL MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toqeer Ahmad, Rashida Kanwal, Izhar Hussain Athar1, Najam Ayub

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from camel milk by culturing the camel milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram's staining and identified by different bio-chemical tests. Camel milk contains lactic acid producing bacteria including Strpptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus L. acidophilus grows more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth is supported by camel milk. A variety of food can be preserved by lactic acid fermentation, so starter culture was prepared from strains which were isolated from camel milk. Camel and buffalo's milk cheese was prepared by using starter culture. The strains isolated from camel milk were best for acid production and can coagulate the milk in less lime. Camel milk cheese was prepared and compared with buffalo's milk cheese. It is concluded that cheese can be prepared successfully from camel milk and better results can be obtained by coagulating milk with starter culture.

  18. Study on Processing Conditions of Cheese Sauce Made with Cream Cheese%用Cream Cheese 生产芝士酱的工艺条件研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐吉祥; 楚炎沛

    2015-01-01

    Take cream cheese as raw material,the cream cheese fermented broth is obtained by lactic bacteria fermentation using fermentation accelerator.The fermented broth is mixed with some additive materials including milk powder,modified starch to produce a new type of cheese sauce.The sensory and texture of the cheese sauce are investigated by single factor experiment for material ratio, fermentation time,sugar amount and cooking time.The optimum formula is determined as follows:when the ratio of cream cheese to fermented broth with sugar additive amount of 5% is 20∶5 ,the fermentation time is 1 hour,the flavor of cheese can be improved obviously,and the ideal cream cheese fermented broth can be obtained.When the ratio of fermented broth to other materials is 20∶80,the sugar additive amount is 5%,the cooking time is 40 min,the ideal cheese sauce can be made.%以 cream cheese 为原料,利用原料自身特性,借助于发酵促进剂先进行乳酸发酵,形成 cream cheese发酵液。然后与奶粉、变性淀粉等添加物溶液混合后,升温熬制,开发出一种新型芝士酱。通过对cream cheese等物料配比、发酵时间、加糖量及熬制时间进行对比实验,并主要从感官和质构上进行评价,最终确定出理想的工艺配方为:cream cheese与浓度5%含糖量的发酵促进液的质量比为20∶5,进行发酵1 h可明显改善芝士风味,获得理想的cream cheese 发酵液。该发酵液与其他物料的配比为20∶80,白砂糖添加量为总物料重量比的5%,熬煮时间为40 min,可制得理想的芝士酱。

  19. Association between a case study of asymptomatic ovine listerial mastitis and the contamination of soft cheese and cheese processing environment with Listeria monocytogenes in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, Cristina M B S; Grant, Kathie A; Halford-Maw, Robin; Hampton, Mike D; Ferreira, Maria A S S; McLauchlin, Jim

    2009-06-01

    For 5 months, the udders of milking ewes, raw ewe's milk, cheese, and the plant and environment of a cheese manufacturer in Portugal were investigated using standard methods for the presence of Listeria spp. An association between subclinical mastitis and Listeria monocytogenes in a single lactating sheep was investigated by visual inspection of udders for signs of inflammation, application of somatic cell counts, the California mastitis test, pH measurement to milk, and culture of L. monocytogenes and Staphylococcus spp. To track the routes of contamination by L. monocytogenes, 103 isolates were characterized by molecular serotyping and amplified fragment length polymorphism, and a selection was further tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. This study provides molecular and epidemiological evidence tracking the persistence of a single L. monocytogenes strain causing a subclinical udder infection without obvious inflammation in a single ewe. This infection was the likely source of contamination of raw milk that was subsequently used to produce unpasteurised milk cheese and resulted in a single strain of this bacterium colonizing the processing environment and the final cheese product.

  20. Mechanical properties of cottage cheese-fortified wheat dough and loaf bread

    OpenAIRE

    Guemes-Vera, Norma; Gonzalez-Victoriano, Lizbeth; Soto-Simental, Sergio; Hernandez-Chavez, Juan Francisco; Reyes-Santamaria, Ma. Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Milk whey and its derivatives are commonly used to fortify food products. A study was done on the effect of seven cottage cheese (sour/sweet whey mixture) inclusion concentrations (5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5 and 20 %) on the mechanical properties of white wheat bread dough using a texture analyser. Cottage cheese protein content was 10.05 %. Loaf bread made using the 7.5, 12.5 and 17.5 % cottage cheese concentrations showed crumb quality similar to the control in the 12.5 and 17.5 % treatment...

  1. Technological suitability of goat milk for processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualda Danków

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The world population of dairy goats is estimated at 300 million of which approximately 56% is reared in Asia. Goats raised in Europe (about 12 million constitute 4% of the world herd of these animals. The world goat milk production is assessed to be at the level of about 12 million tons and constitutes over 2% of the global milk obtained from different animal species. In many European countries, goat milk as a dairy raw material comes second after cow milk. The goat population in Poland is estimated at 190 000 heads. With regard to the content of basic constituents, goat milk is similar to cow milk, although it differs from it as to the qualitative composition of fat and protein. Species protein structure of goat milk, different from that of cow milk, causes fewer allergic reactions which are observed to occur in the case of intolerance to cow milk proteins. Rennin curd from goat milk is softer and less compact. A wide range of different products is manufactured from goat milk including: liquid milk (pasteurised and UHT, rennin and cottage cheeses, fermented beverages such as yoghurt, kefir, butter milk, cream, condensed milk, powdered milk, rice goats, butter and even chocolates “Goat’s Milk”.

  2. The “maturation” of milk for Parmigiano- Reggiano cheesemaking: effects on mineral equilibria and technological properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, P; Vecchia, P; A. Tambini; Pecorari, M; Franceschi, P.; A. Summer; M. Malacarne; Formaggioni, P.

    2010-01-01

    The “maturation” of milk for Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese is characterised by natural creaming process: the full cream milk is placed in large flat vats, for about 10-12 hours, to obtain the gravity separation of milk fat. The modifications of mineral equilibria and technological properties of milk during the “maturation” phase, were studied. To this aim 24 full cream (FC) milk samples and the corresponding partially skimmed (PS) milk, by natural creaming, were analysed....

  3. Inhibition of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in Vidiago cheese by Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IPLA 729, a nisin Z producer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilla, Natalia; Martínez, Beatriz; Delgado, Teresa; Rodríguez, Ana

    2003-08-15

    Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IPLA 729 is a nisin Z producer isolated from raw milk cheese able to grow and produce nisin Z in milk. The ability of this strain to inhibit the growth of Clostridium tyrobutyricum CECT 4011, a late blowing agent, in Vidiago cheese, a semi-hard farmhouse variety, manufactured in Asturias, Northern Spain, was investigated. For control purposes, cheeses were manufactured with the mesophilic mixed starter IPLA-001. In experimental cheeses, the nisin-producing strain L. lactis IPLA 729 was combined with this starter. Nisin Z activity reached a concentration of 1600 AU/ml in 1-day cheeses and this level was maintained until 15 days of ripening. Furthermore, to compare the inhibitory activity of the nisin-producing strain to nitrate, cheeses were also manufactured with a commercial starter culture and potassium nitrate as anti-blowing agent was added in accordance with Vidiago's cheesemakers. The control, experimental and commercial cheeses were contaminated with C. tyrobutyricum CECT 4011. The composition of the three different cheeses showed only slight differences with respect to total solids, protein and fat, although control and experimental cheeses showed a richer flavour-compound profile than commercial cheeses. The level of the spoilage strain C. tyrobutyricum CECT 4011 decreased from 1.2x10(6) to 1.3x10(3) cfu/g during ripening in presence of the nisin Z producer, while it increased to 1.99x10(9) cfu/g in control cheeses and to 3.5x10(7) cfu/g in commercial cheeses.

  4. Q fever through consumption of unpasteurised milk and milk products - a risk profile and exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, P; Kelly, L; Mearns, R; Duggan, J; Snary, E L

    2015-05-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii which is endemic in cattle, sheep and goats in much of the world, including the United Kingdom (UK). There is some epidemiological evidence that a small proportion of cases in the developed world may arise from consumption of unpasteurised milk with less evidence for milk products such as cheese. Long maturation at low pH may give some inactivation in hard cheese, and viable C. burnetii are rarely detected in unpasteurised cheese compared to unpasteurised milk. Simulations presented here predict that the probability of exposure per person to one or more C. burnetii through the daily cumulative consumption of raw milk in the UK is 0·4203. For those positive exposures, the average level of exposure predicted is high at 1266 guinea pig intraperitoneal infectious dose 50% units (GP_IP_ID50 ) per person per day. However, in the absence of human dose-response data, the case is made that the GP_IP_ID50 unit represents a very low risk through the oral route. The available evidence suggests that the risks from C. burnetii through consumption of unpasteurised milk and milk products (including cheese) are not negligible but they are lower in comparison to transmission via inhalation of aerosols from parturient products and livestock contact.

  5. Characterization of volatiles in Beaten cheeses (bieno sirenje by SPME/GC-MC: Influence of geographical origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulejmani Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the volatile profiles of a type of economically important cheeses for the FYR Macedonian dairy sector were characterized. A total of eighteen samples belonged to 6 different geographical regions of Beaten cheese, including cheeses from Kumanovo, Tetovo, Struga, Resen, Veles and Radovish were comparatively studied for their volatile profiles. Sixty two volatile compounds were identified in the cheeses by solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the results are discussed based on their chemical classes (18 esters, 13 ketones, 10 acids, 8 alcohols, 5 terpenes, and 8 miscellaneous compounds. Acids, esters and alcohols were the most abundant classes identified and were highly dependent on the geographical origin of cheeses. Beaten cheese from Struga had the highest levels of carboxylic acids, ketones, alcohols, esters and terpenes. The Beaten cheese from other geographical origin had low levels of volatiles probably from the effect of variable characteristics of used milk and different cheese making process which affects the biochemical processes. The results suggest that each cheese from different geographical regions had different volatiles profile and the manufacturing technique as well as the ripening stage of the cheeses played a major role on the volatile compounds’ distribution.

  6. Inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus plantarum TF711 against Clostridium sporogenes when used as adjunct culture in cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Lorena; Zárate, Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria are of great interest to the food-processing industry as natural preservatives. This work aimed to investigate the efficacy of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus plantarum TF711, isolated from artisanal Tenerife cheese, in controlling Clostridium sporogenes during cheese ripening. Cheeses were made from pasteurised milk artificially contaminated with 10(4) spores m/l C. sporogenes. Experimental cheeses were manufactured with Lb. plantarum TF711 added at 1% as adjunct to commercial starter culture. Cheeses made under the same conditions but without Lb. plantarum TF711 served as controls. Evolution of microbiological parameters, pH and NaCl content, as well as bacteriocin production was studied throughout 45 d of ripening. Addition of Lb. plantarum TF711 did not bring about any significant change in starter culture counts, NaCl content and pH, compared with control cheese. In contrast, clostridial spore count in experimental cheeses were significantly lower than in control cheeses from 7 d onwards, reaching a maximum reduction of 2·2 log units on day 21. Inhibition of clostridia found in experimental cheeses was mainly attributed to plantaricin activity, which in fact was recovered from these cheeses.

  7. Starter cultures and cattle feed manipulation enhance conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in Cheddar cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, M S; Anand, S; Kalscheur, K F; Hassan, A N; Hippen, A R

    2013-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid (FA) that provides several health benefits to humans. The feeding of fish oil-supplemented diets to dairy cows has been extensively studied as a means to improve the CLA content in milk. Several studies have also been conducted on the ability of many microorganisms to produce CLA by utilizing substrates containing linoleic acid. In the present study, the dietary manipulated milk was used in combination with the CLA-producing culture to manufacture Cheddar cheese. The two diets fed to cattle were control and treatment diets to obtain control and treatment milk, respectively. The treatment diet containing fish oil (0.75% of dry matter) was fed to 32 dairy cows grouped in a pen for 18 d to increase the total CLA content in milk. Treatment milk had a CLA content of 1.60 g/100g of FA compared with 0.58 g/100g of FA in control milk obtained by feeding the control diet. A 2 × 2 factorial design with 3 replicates was used to test the combined effect of the CLA-producing starter culture of Lactococcus lactis (CI4b) versus a commercial CLA nonproducing cheese starter as the control culture, and type of milk (control vs. treatment milk) on CLA content in Cheddar cheese. Chemical composition (moisture, salt, fat, and protein) was not affected by the type of culture used. However, the age of the cheese affected the sensory properties and microbiological counts in the different treatments. Ripening with the CI4b culture was found to be effective in further enhancing the CLA content. The CI4b cheeses made from control milk and treatment milk contained 1.09 and 2.41 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 1 mo of ripening, which increased to 1.44 and 2.61 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 6 mo of ripening, respectively. The use of treatment milk resulted in an increase in the CLA isomers (trans-7,cis-9+cis-9,trans-11, trans-9,cis-11+cis-10,trans-12, trans-10,cis-12, cis-9,cis-11, trans-11,cis-13, cis-11,cis-13, trans-11,trans

  8. Tratamiento Térmico de Leche: Influencia del pH y CaCl2 en la Elaboración de Queso Cuartirolo Thermally Treated Milk: Influence of pH and CaCl2 on Cuartirolo Cheese-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Sbodio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objeto de mejorar la propiedad de coagular de leche entera tratada bajo condiciones moderadas de temperatura, 10 minutos a 73 °C, se estudió el efecto del pH (6.2-6.6 y la adición de CaCl2 (200 y 600 mg L-1. El proceso de la coagulación enzimática, con la acidificación de Glucono-5-Lactona, fue medido con el método del alambre caliente. A pH 6.4 y 6.6 los coágulos obtenidos a partir de leche entera tratada, mostraron tiempos de coagulación significativamente inferiores (PThe effect of pH (6.2-6.6 and CaCl2 addition (200 - 600 mg L-1 was studied, with the objective of improving the coagulation properties of whole milk treated under mild condition of temperature, 10 min at 73 °C. The hot wire method to monitor rennet coagulation induced through acidification with Glucono-5-Lactone was employed. At pH 6.4 and 6.6 the coagulum of heated milk presented lower coagulation time (P<0.05, increased máximum voltage and time where they reach máximum voltage, and a decreased in whey separation, compared to those of coagulum produced by unheated milk. The selected conditions of pH 6.4 and CaCl2 added 400 mg L-1, used in the process of cuartirolo cheese proved to be the best condition to increase the yield in 8.9% on a dry basis, without loosing consumer's acceptance.

  9. 78 FR 24334 - Milk in the Northeast and Other Marketing Areas; Order Amending the Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ...) allowances for cheese, butter, nonfat dry milk (NFDM) and dry whey contained in the Class III and Class IV... whey for manufacturing plants located in Federal milk marketing areas. The established criteria for the... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1000 Milk in the Northeast and Other Marketing Areas; Order...

  10. Comparison of the level of residual coagulant activity in different cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nidhi; Fox, Patrick F; McSweeney, Paul L H

    2009-08-01

    The coagulant retained in cheese curd is a major contributor to proteolysis during ripening. The objective of this study was to quantify residual coagulant in 9 cheese varieties by measuring its activity on a synthetic heptapeptide (Pro-Thr-Glu-Phe-[NO2-Phe]-Arg-Leu) assayed using reversed-phase HPLC. The level of residual coagulant activity was highest in Camembert cheese, probably due to its low pH at whey drainage and the high moisture content of the cheese, followed in order by Feta=Port du Salut=Cheddar>Gouda>Emmental=Parmigiano Reggiano=low-moisture part-skim Mozzarella=Mozzarella di Bufala Campana. The high cooking temperature (50-54 degrees C) used during the manufacture of Emmental and Parmigiano Reggiano cheeses and the cooking and stretching step in hot water during the manufacture of Mozzarella cheese may be the reasons for the lowest residual coagulant activity in these cheeses. The level of residual coagulant activity was higher in Feta cheese made from milk concentrated by ultrafiltration than in conventional Feta.

  11. Selection of dairy culture and changes of Podravec cheese acidity during production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The selection and characteristics of dairy culture play a basic role in all types of cheese production process. The most important characteristic is acidification ability i.e. lactic acid formation, which regulates manufacturing and maturing conditions of cheese, thus affecting its organoleptic characteristics as well. In this work the results on control of acidity increase in Podravec cheeseproduction are presented. In the production process, a technical culture as well as identical frozen and concentrated culture, with and without auxiliary Streptococcus thermophilus for direct milk inoculation, were used. It was established that the acidity, expressed as pH value, is more intensively developed in cheeses produced with culture for direct inoculation. This was especially evident in the first phases of production i.e. before cheese salting. During salting the acidity of cheeses, in both cases, was almoust identical. Cheeses produced with identical frozen culture and auxiliary Streptococcus thermophilus culture had more pronounced acidity before salting and lower after salting in comparison with cheeses with the mentioned two cultures. Organoleptic and other characteristics of mature cheeses were identical.

  12. Effects of supercritical fluid extraction pressure on chemical composition, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Macías, D; Laubscher, A; Castro, N; Argüello, A; Jiménez-Flores, R

    2013-03-01

    candidate as a low-fat goat cheese, lower in triglycerides and cholesterol but still with all the health benefits inherent in goat milk.

  13. Fatty Acid Profile of Cheese from Dairy Goats Fed a Diet Enriched with Castor, Sesame and Faveleira Vegetable Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertha Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of vegetable oils to the diets of dairy goats is an alternative to supplemental feeding during the dry period and improves the lipid profile of milk and by-products. Cheeses were produced using milk from cross bred goats (Saanen × Alpina fed diets enriched with 4% vegetable oil (faveleira, sesame or castor, the fatty acid profile of cheeses was studied. Supplementation with vegetable oils did not increase the total fat percentage of the cheese (p ≥ 0.05 but did increase the percentage of CLA isomers, long-chain fatty acids (LCFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; in addition, the index of desirable fatty acids (DFA - expressed as the sum of unsaturated fatty acids plus stearic acid was increased for cheese made from milk from goats fed sesame or faveleira oil. Cheeses may have had increased percentages of cis-9,trans-11-CLA due to the supplementation of animal diets with vegetable oils rich in C18:2, such as faveleira and sesame oils. The fatty acid profile of goat cheese did not change significantly in response to the use of castor oil. Thus, the addition of sesame and faveleira oils to goat diets positively altered the fatty acid profile, which improved the nutritional characteristics of the fat present in goat cheese.

  14. Iodixanol Development of a Laboratory-Scale Technique to Monitor the Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cheddar Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Donaghy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map is a potential human pathogen known to be present in raw milk from infected dairy herds. Current pasteurisation regimes do not totally inactivate Map resulting in the possibility of viable cells being present in pasteurised milk used for Cheddar cheese production. A laboratory-based method, ensuring strict safety precautions, was developed to manufacture 800-g Cheddar blocks, experimentally contaminated (postpasteurisation with two different strains of Map. The composition of the model Cheddar produced was consistent with commercial product. Syneresis of the cheese curd caused a 1 log10 concentration of Map numbers from milk to cheese for a strain isolated from pasteurised milk. The type strain NCTC 8578 did not show a similar concentration effect, but did however survive the Cheddar manufacturing process. A small percentage (<5% of the Map load for each strain was recovered in the whey fraction during the process.

  15. Organochlorine Pesticide Residues in the Processing of Pressed Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Ţibulcă

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of pesticide residues in food and environment determined UN institutions to track their presence and establish rules of tolerance in foodstuffs of animal origin. Pesticide use leads to their presence as residue in foods. The research objectives were to establish the level of organo-chlorine pesticides in raw milk and their evolution during the process of obtaining pressed cheese.

  16. Microbial biodiversity in cheese consortia and comparative Listeria growth on surfaces of uncooked pressed cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callon, Cécile; Retureau, Emilie; Didienne, Robert; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2014-03-17

    The study set out to determine how changes in the microbial diversity of a complex antilisterial consortium from the surface of St-Nectaire cheese modify its antilisterial activities. On the basis of the microbial composition of a natural complex consortium named TR15 (Truefood consortium 15), three new consortia of different species and strain compositions were defined: TR15-SC (58 isolates from TR15 collection), TR15-M (pools of isolates from selective counting media) and TR15-BHI (pools of isolates from BHI medium). Their antilisterial activities on the surfaces of uncooked pressed cheese made with pasteurised milk were compared with the activity of complex consortium TR15 and a control cheese inoculated only with starter culture (Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii). The natural consortium TR15 was the most inhibitory, followed by reconstituted consortium TR15-BHI. The dynamics of the cheese rind microbial flora were monitored by counting on media and by isolate identification using 16S rDNA sequencing and direct 16S rDNA Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism analysis. The combination of these methods showed that rind with natural consortium TR15 had greater microbial diversity and different microbial dynamics than cheese rinds with reconstituted consortia. Cheese rind with the natural consortium showed higher citrate consumption and the highest concentrations of lactic and acetic acids, connected with high levels of lactic acid bacteria such as Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Vagococcus fluvialis, Enterococcus gilvus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Brochothrix thermosphacta and Lactococcus lactis, ripening bacteria such as Arthrobacter nicotianae/arilaitensis, and Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas psychrophila and Enterobacter spp.). The highest L. monocytogenes count was on rind with TR15-M and was positively associated with the highest pH value, high succinic and citric acid contents, and the highest levels of Marinilactibacillus

  17. 40 CFR 405.50 - Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. 405.50 Section 405.50 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Cottage Cheese and Cultured Cream Cheese Subcategory § 405.50 Applicability; description of the cottage cheese and cultured cream cheese subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  18. Multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Clostridium tyrobutyricum strains isolated from cheese production environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hajime; Sudo, Tomoko; Kyoi, Daisuke; Kawahara, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Takashi; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon; Yanahira, Shuichi

    2014-11-03

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a gram-positive spore-forming anaerobe that is considered as the main causative agent for late blowing in cheese due to butyric acid fermentation. In this study, multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) for C. tyrobutyricum was developed to identify the source of contamination by C. tyrobutyricum spores in the cheese production environment. For each contig constructed from the results of a whole genome draft sequence of C. tyrobutyricum JCM11008(T) based on next-generation sequencing, VNTR loci that were effective for typing were searched using the Tandem Repeat Finder program. Five VNTR loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine their number of repeats by sequencing, and MLVA was conducted. 25 strains of C. tyrobutyricum isolated from the environment, raw milk, and silage were classified into 18 MLVA types (DI=0.963). Of the C. tyrobutyricum strains isolated from raw milk, natural cheese, and blown processed cheese, strains with identical MLVA type were detected, which suggested that these strains might have shifted from natural cheese to blown processed cheese. MLVA could be an effective tool for monitoring contamination of natural cheese with C. tyrobutyricum in the processed cheese production environment because of its high discriminability, thereby allowing the analyst to trace the source of contamination.

  19. Fate of Staphylococcus aureus in cheese treated by ultrahigh pressure homogenization and high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pedemonte, T; Brinez, W J; Roig-Sagués, A X; Guamis, B

    2006-12-01

    We evaluated the influence of ultrahigh pressure homogenization (UHPH) treatment applied to milk containing Staphylococcus aureus CECT 976 before cheese making, and the benefit of applying a further high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment to cheese. The evolution of Staph. aureus counts during 30 d of storage at 8 degrees C and the formation of staphylococcal enterotoxins were also assessed. Milk containing approximately 7.3 log(10) cfu/mL of Staph. aureus was pressurized using a 2-valve UHPH machine, applying 330 and 30 MPa at the primary and the secondary homogenizing valves, respectively. Milk inlet temperatures (T(in)) of 6 and 20 degrees C were assayed. Milk was used to elaborate soft-curd cheeses (UHPH cheese), some of which were additionally submitted to 10-min HHP treatments of 400 MPa at 20 degrees C (UHPH+HHP cheese). Counts of Staph. aureus were measured on d 1 (24 h after manufacture or immediately after HHP treatment) and after 2, 15, and 30 d of ripening at 8 degrees C. Counts of control cheeses not pressure-treated were approximately 8.5 log(10) cfu/g showing no significant decreases during storage. In cheeses made from UHPH treated milk at T(in) of 6 degrees C, counts of Staph. aureus were 5.0 +/- 0.3 log(10) cfu/g at d 1; they decreased significantly to 2.8 +/- 0.2 log(10) cfu/g on d 15, and were below the detection limit (1 log(10) cfu/g) after 30 d of storage. The use of an additional HHP treatment had a synergistic effect, increasing reductions up to 7.0 +/- 0.3 log(10) cfu/g from d 1. However, for both UHPH and UHPH+HHP cheeses in the 6 degrees C T(in) samples, viable Staph. aureus cells were still recovered. For samples of the 20 degrees C T(in) group, complete inactivation of Staph. aureus was reached after 15 d of storage for both UHPH and UHPH+HHP cheese. Staphylococcal enterotoxins were found in controls but not in UHPH or UHPH+HHP treated samples. This study shows a new approach for significantly improving cheese safety by means of

  20. 21 CFR 133.171 - Pasteurized process pimento cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... solids is not less than 49 percent. (b) The cheese ingredient is cheddar cheese, washed curd cheese... purposes of this section, cheddar cheese for manufacturing, washed curd cheese for manufacturing, colby..., washed curd cheese, colby cheese, and granular cheese, respectively. (d) The only fruit, vegetable,...

  1. Effect of medium-chain fatty acids in mould ripened cheese on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinderlerer, J L; Matthias, H E; Finner, P

    1996-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and List. innocua were isolated from commercial soft ripened and blue-veined cheeses manufactured in France, mainly from Brie cheese made from unpasteurized milk. Five isolates were List. monocytogenes serotype 1/2 and two were List. innocua. Examination of Bleu d'Auvergne cheese with the cryoscanning electron microscope showed that many conidia spores were present in the blue veins in close contact with the cheese surface. There were few conidia spores in the Brie, mostly on the outside of the cheese but not in contact with the surface. High concentrations of free dodecanoic (lauric) acid (1.77-2.50 g/kg cheese) and tetradecanoic (myristic) acid (2.54-6.38 g/kg cheese) were found in the veins of the blue cheese, but concentrations in the white regions were much lower. Free lauric and myristic acids were not detected in the Brie cheeses. There was no difference in the overall fatty acid composition of the fat in the surface ripened and blue-veined cheeses, although higher concentrations of free medium-chain fatty acids were found in a blue cheese compared with a surface ripened cheese. The pH and fat content were higher in regions with obvious fungal growth, the blue veins of Fourme d'Ambert and the rind of Brie. Free lauric acid dissolved in butteroil inhibited multiplication in broth at pH 7.0 of a test strain of List. monocytogenes isolated from Bleu d'Auvergne. Some inhibition was seen with hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic and tetradecanoic acids. We suggest that the presence of localized concentrations of free medium-chain fatty acids (dissolved in the fat) in the blue veins of blue mould ripened cheese could act as natural preservatives and inhibit the growth of listerias in conditions where (if present), one would otherwise expect them to grow.

  2. Ripened Semihard Cheese Covered with Lard and Dehydrated Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Leaves: Processing, Characterization, and Quality Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Marina Tolentino; Zielinski, Acácio Antonio Ferreira; Demiate, Ivo Mottin; Bersot, Luciano dos Santos; Granato, Daniel; Nogueira, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to establish a manufacturing protocol and to characterize semihard cheese covered with lard and rosemary during ripening. After the manufacturing protocol was defined, the cheeses were produced with pasteurized and raw milk from Holstein cows, with and without (control) coating, and then ripened for 60 d. During this period the physicochemical properties, color, proteolysis, texture profile, and sensory acceptance were performed. The early-ripening cheeses differed from the others in terms of color and moisture content. Multivariate statistical analysis separated chesses in groups differentiated by the effects of heat treatment of milk and ripening period. The ripened cheeses obtained from raw milk were sensorially more preferred. The coating gave the final products higher moisture content and favored color and texture characteristics. Consumer testing showed that the cheese obtained from raw milk and coated with lard and rosemary was the most preferred (acceptance of 82%) due to the specific coating of rosemary (aroma and flavor). This product has potential to add value and to diversify the production of semihard cheeses.

  3. Microbiological quality of Pecorino Siciliano "primosale" cheese on retail sale in the street markets of Palermo, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Pepe, Arcangelo; Aleo, Aurora; D'Agostino, Valentina; Milone, Samuela; Mammina, Caterina

    2011-04-01

    Pecorino Siciliano (PS) "primosale" is a traditional Sicilian fresh soft cheese made from sheep's milk. Short-ripening time and production from unpasteurized or raw milk can facilitate bacterial contamination of PS "primosale". The microbiological quality of "primosale" on retail sale in the street markets of Palermo, Italy was studied by detecting the common food pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and indicator microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceae. In our study, 4% and 44% of the samples, respectively, did not comply with the acceptability levels fixed by European regulations for S. aureus and E. coli. A high contamination of bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceae was found in 42% and 50% of the cheeses analyzed, respectively. Such results indicate poor husbandry and poor hygiene practices during milk collection or preservation or during cheese production processes and handling. In addition, the retail sale conditions may have played a role in cheese contamination since a correlation was found between poor microbiological quality and some selling parameters. This study emphasizes the need to improve production hygiene throughout the PS food chain in line with the traditional cheese-making procedures. Labelling of PS with clear information on whether the cheese was prepared from raw milk also requires improvement.

  4. Fate of Lactococcus lactis starter cultures during late ripening in cheese models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Cocolin, Luca; Dolci, Paola

    2016-10-01

    The presence of Lactococcus lactis, commonly employed as starter culture, was, recently, highlighted and investigated during late cheese ripening. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to assess the persistence and viability of this microorganism throughout manufacturing and ripening of model cheeses. Eight commercial starters, constituted of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, were inoculated in pasteurized milk in order to manufacture miniature cheeses, ripened for six months. Samples were analysed at different steps (milk after inoculum, curd after cutting, curd after pressing and draining, cheese immediately after salting and cheese at 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of ripening) and submitted to both culture-dependent (traditional plating on M17) and -independent analysis (reverse transcription-quantitative PCR). On the basis of direct RNA analysis, L. lactis populations were detected in all miniature cheeses up to the sixth month of ripening, confirming the presence of viable cells during the whole ripening process, including late stages. Noteworthy, L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR in cheese samples also when traditional plating failed to indicate its presence. This discrepancy could be explain with the fact that lactococci, during ripening process, enter in a stressed physiological state (viable not culturable, VNC), which might cause their inability to grow on synthetic medium despite their viability in cheese matrix. Preliminary results obtained by "resuscitation" assays corroborated this hypothesis and 2.5% glucose enrichment was effective to recover L. lactis cells in VNC state. The capability of L. lactis to persist in late ripening, and the presence of VNC cells which are known to shift their catabolism to peptides and amino acids consumption, suggests a possible technological role of this microorganism in cheese ripening with a possible impact on flavour formation.

  5. A novel closed-tube method based on high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for authenticity testing and quantitative detection in Greek PDO Feta cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Sakaridis, Ioannis; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2013-11-15

    Animal species identification of milk and dairy products has received increasing attention concerning food composition, traceability, allergic pathologies and accurate consumer information. Here we sought to develop an easy to use and robust method for species identification in cheese with emphasis on an authenticity control of PDO Feta cheese products. We used specific mitochondrial DNA regions coupled with high resolution melting (HRM) a closed-tube method allowing us to detect bovine, ovine and caprine species and authenticate Greek PDO Feta cheese. The primers successfully amplified DNA isolated from milk and cheese and showed a high degree of specificity. HRM was proven capable of accurately identifying the presence of bovine milk (not allowed in Feta) down to 0.1% and also of quantifying the ratio of sheep to goat milk mixture in different Feta cheese commercial products. In conclusion, HRM analysis can be a faster, with higher resolution and a more cost effective alternative method to authenticate milk and dairy products including PDO Feta cheese and to quantitatively detect its sheep milk adulterations.

  6. Bovine chromosomal regions affecting rheological traits in rennet-induced skim milk gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Gustavsson, F; Glantz, M

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing cheese yield and quality is of central importance to cheese manufacturing. The yield is associated with the time it takes before the gel has an optimal consistency for further processing, and it is well known that gel formation differs between individual milk samples. By identifying...

  7. Automation in dairy cattle milking: experimental results and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisanna Speroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of two experimental programs financed to the Istituto Sperimentale per la Zootecnia are presented. The objective of the two Italian programs was the verify if automatic milking is a suitable practice for Italian dairy system. Results are summarised and compared to those obtained in other international projects. Results refer to animal behaviour, milk yield, milk quality an animal welfare. In a trial comparing cows milked with an automatic milking system and cows milked in a milking parlour, we observed that when the temperature and humidity are very high cows reduce their activity, have lower milking frequency and milk yield than in cold seasons. In comparison to milking parlour, automatic milking system did not increase milk yield which was affected significantly by season, stage of lactation, parity, season per treatment and parity per treatment. The causes of the negative results obtained by this group and by other international groups are discussed. We also presented the results obtained in four trials thereby four appetizers or flavourings were tested to improve efficiency of automatic milking system. Comparing the two milking systems, automatic milking determined a worsening of milk quality, but from these data is not possible to exclude the possibility to use automatic milking for Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano-type cheeses. Animal welfare is not negatively influenced by automatic milking system, which has the potentiality to improve the control and care of cows.

  8. Cheese and cardiovascular health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the number one cause of mortality worldwide. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a well-known risk factor of CVD which increases after the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Cheese is a dietary product commonly consumed in Western countries and known...

  9. Lipids in cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  10. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Hesham M.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4±1 °C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria.

  11. Efeito do aleitamento artificial à base de soro de queijo de leite cabra sobre as características da carcaça e da carne de cabritos "mamão" do tipo genético three cross Influence of the replacement of cow milk by goat milk cheese whey on meat composition carcass characteristics of three cross suckling kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico José Beserra

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a influência da substituição parcial na etapa de alimentação líquida do leite de vaca por soro de queijo de cabra (SLC sobre alguns aspectos qualitativos da carne e quantitativos da carcaça de cabritos "mamão" Three cross (½ Anglonubiana x ¼ Pardo-Alpina x ¼ Moxotó, em quatro níveis: 0% (Tratamento1; 20% (Tratamento2; 40% (Tratamento3 60% (Tratamento 4. Os pesos vivos ao abate (84 dias mostraram-se homogêneos (10,88 a 13,42kg, assim como o rendimento de carcaça (44,62 a 47,86% e a área do Longíssimus dorsi (9,55 a 10,80cm². 0 Tratamento 2 apresentou os maiores teores de tecido muscular (48,37%. A composição centesimal mostrou valores médios entre 76,78 a 77,62% de umidade; 20,39 a 21,43% de proteína; 4,86 a 6,59% de gordura e 1,06 a 1,14% de cinza. Para os minerais estudados, os valores médios variaram de 16,77 a 35,68mg/100g para o cálcio; 110,33 a 153,90mg/100g para o fósforo; 1,29 a 2,17mg/100g para o ferro; 0,72 a 1,30mg/100g para magnésio; 128,86 a 165,94mg/100g para o sódio e 404,88 a 504,73mg/100g para o potássio. Concluiu-se que os níveis de soro de leite de cabra utilizados, de uma maneira geral, não tendo influenciado de forma significativa (PIn this study, the influence of the replacement of cow milk by goat cheese whey on some quality aspects of meat and on some aspects of carcass composition of suckling kids Three cross (½ Anglonubiana x ¼ Pardo-Alpina x ¼ Moxotó was evaluated. The replacements goat cheese whey levels were: 0% (treatment 1; 20% (treatment 2; 40% (treatment 3; 60% (treatment 4. The values of live weight for all were statistically similar (10.88 to 13.42kg; the same happened to the carcass yield which ranged from 44.62 to 47.86% and to the Longissimus dorsi area (9.55 to 10.80cm². The treatment 2 showed the highest contents of muscular tissue (48.37%. Proximal composition of the meat showed mean values ranging from 76.78 to 77.62% for moisture; 20.39 to 21.43% for protein

  12. The effect of a commercial starter culture addition on the ripening of an artisanal goat's cheese (Cameros