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Sample records for checkmate bluegill kingfish

  1. CheckMATE 2: From the model to the limit

    CERN Document Server

    Dercks, Daniel; Kim, Jong Soo; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Tattersall, Jamie; Weber, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    We present the latest developments to the CheckMATE program that allows models of new physics to be easily tested against the recent LHC data. To achieve this goal, the core of CheckMATE now contains over 60 LHC analyses of which 12 are from the 13 TeV run. The main new feature is that CheckMATE 2 now integrates the Monte Carlo event generation via Madgraph and Pythia 8. This allows users to go directly from a SLHA file or UFO model to the result of whether a model is allowed or not. In addition, the integration of the event generation leads to a significant increase in the speed of the program. Many other improvements have also been made, including the possibility to now combine signal regions to give a total likelihood for a model.

  2. CheckMATE: Confronting your Favourite New Physics Model with LHC Data

    CERN Document Server

    Drees, Manuel; Kim, Jong Soo; Schmeier, Daniel; Tattersall, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    In the first three years of running, the LHC has delivered a wealth of new data that is now being analysed. With over 20 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, both ATLAS and CMS have performed many searches for new physics that theorists are eager to test their model against. However, tuning the detector simulations, understanding the particular analysis details and interpreting the results can be a tedious task. CheckMATE (Check Models At Terascale Energies) is a program package which accepts simulated event files in many formats for any model. The program then determines whether the model is excluded or not at 95% C.L. by comparing to many recent experimental analyses. Furthermore the program can calculate confidence limits and provide detailed information about signal regions of interest. It is simple to use and the program structure allows for easy extensions to upcoming LHC results in the future. CheckMATE can be found at: http://checkmate.hepforge.org

  3. Belted kingfishers as ecological monitors of contamination: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landrum, C.L. [North Texas Univ., Denton, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology; Ashwood, T.L.; Cox, D.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Aquatic systems serve as transport pathways and reservoirs for most of the contaminants known to be present on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Organisms that live in aquatic systems accumulate some of these contaminants from their food and directly from the water or sediment. A wide array of terrestrial organisms feeds on aquatic organisms and may accumulate contaminants from aquatic prey. The belted kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon) is a piscivorous and territorial avian species that may be a suitable monitor of contaminant accumulation at specific sites on the ORR. A kingfisher collected on White Oak Lake in 1991 had a {sup 137}Cs concentration of 568 pCi/g in muscle tissue, which exceeds levels found in any other waterfowl collected from the lake. An investigation into the efficacy of using the kingfisher as an ecological indicator of aquatic contaminants on the ORR was initiated in late August 1992. The primary objective of this study was to acquire information concerning the ecology of the kingfisher to determine how the species could be used within the framework of the Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A second important objective of the study was to examine the possible somatic and reproductive effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Hg, and various radioactive contaminants on piscivorous birds by reviewing pollution ecology studies conducted on those species.

  4. A framework to create customised LHC analyses within CheckMATE

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jong Soo; Tattersall, Jamie; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Checkmate is a framework that allows the user to conveniently test simulated BSM physics events against current LHC data in order to derive exclusion limits. For this purpose, the data runs through a detector simulation and is then processed by a user chosen number of experimental analyses. These analyses are all defined by signal regions that can be compared to the experimental data with a multitude of statistical tools. Due to the large and continuously growing number of experimental analyses available, users may quickly find themselves in the situation that the study they are particularly interested in has not (yet) been implemented officially into the Checkmate framework. However, the code includes a rather simple framework to allow users to add new analyses on their own. This document serves as a guide to this. In addition, Checkmate serves as a powerful tool for testing and implementing new search strategies. To aid this process, many tools are included to allow a rapid prototyping of new analyses.

  5. Mercury Concentrations of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) Vary by Sex

    OpenAIRE

    Madenjian, Charles P.; James T. Francis; Jeffrey J. Braunscheidel; Joseph R. Bohr; Matthew J. Geiger; G. Mark Knottnerus

    2015-01-01

    Patterns in relative differences in contaminant concentrations between the sexes across many species of fish may reveal clues for important behavioral and physiological differences between the sexes, and may also be useful in developing fish consumption advisories and efficient designs for programs meant to monitor contaminant levels in fish. We determined skin-off fillet and whole-fish total mercury (Hg) concentrations of 28 adult female and 26 adult male bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) from...

  6. CheckMATE: Confronting your favourite new physics model with LHC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, Manuel; Dreiner, Herbert K.; Kim, Jong Soo; Schmeier, Daniel; Tattersall, Jamie

    2015-02-01

    In the first three years of running, the LHC has delivered a wealth of new data that is now being analysed. With over 20 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, both ATLAS and CMS have performed many searches for new physics that theorists are eager to test their model against. However, tuning the detector simulations, understanding the particular analysis details and interpreting the results can be a tedious task. CheckMATE (Check Models At Terascale Energies) is a program package which accepts simulated event files in many formats for any model. The program then determines whether the model is excluded or not at 95% C.L. by comparing to many recent experimental analyses. Furthermore the program can calculate confidence limits and provide detailed information about signal regions of interest. It is simple to use and the program structure allows for easy extensions to upcoming LHC results in the future.

  7. Metallothionein and bioaccumulation of cadmium in juvenile bluegills exposed to aqueous and sediment-associated cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The author evaluated metallothionein (MT), free (unbound) hepatic cadmium and whole body cadmium as indicators of cadmium exposure in juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in laboratory tests. Two types of cadmium exposure were tested; aqueous and sediment-associated. In the aqueous tests, fish were exposed to cadmium (0.0 to 32.3 [mu]g/L) in an intermittent-flow diluter. In the sediment-associated cadmium test, fish were exposed to resuspended river sidment containing 1.3 to 21.4 [mu]g Cd/g (dry weight) at a nominal total suspended solids concentration of 1,000 mg/L in revolving, circular glass exposure chambers. Total cadmium concentrations were measured in various bluegill liver fractions, whole bluegill, water, and resuspended sediment to assess the partitioning and bioaccumulation of cadmium after the tests. Mean concentrations of MT and free cadmium in bluegill livers and concentrations of cadmium in whole bluegills were positively correlated with aqueous cadmium concentration and were equally suitable as indicators of aqueous cadmium exposure. Sediment-associated cadmium was biologically available, but to a lesser extent than aqueous cadmium. Cadmium concentrations in whole bluegills exposed to resuspended river sediment were 1.5- to 3.5-fold the concentrations in bluegills in sediment-free controls. Free cadmium and MT concentrations in bluegill liver and whole-body cadmium concentrations in bluegills were positively correlated with the cadmium concentrations in filtered water, resuspended sediment, and bulk river sediment; however, whole-body cadmim concentrations were a more sensitive indicator of exposure to sediment-associated cadmium than either free cadmium or MT concentratons in liver.

  8. The trade-off between food and temperature in the habitat choice of bluegill sunfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the trade-off between food and temperature in bluegills Lepomis macrochirus, where temperature was the primary factor used in determining the patch in which to reside.

  9. Growth, life history, and species interactions of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) under heavy predation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belk, M.C. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of this study was, first, to compare growth and life history characteristics of an unfished population of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in the presence of an abundant predator population to characteristic exhibited by bluegills in typical southeastern US reservoirs where the abundance of predators is reduced, but fishing is increased. The second objective was to determine if differences observed between populations were determined genetically or environmentally.

  10. Mercury concentrations of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) vary by sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Francis, James T.; Braunscheidel, Jeffrey J.; Bohr, Joseph R.; Geiger, Matthew J.; Knottnerus, G. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Patterns in relative differences in contaminant concentrations between the sexes across many species of fish may reveal clues for important behavioral and physiological differences between the sexes, and may also be useful in developing fish consumption advisories and efficient designs for programs meant to monitor contaminant levels in fish. We determined skin-off fillet and whole-fish total mercury (Hg) concentrations of 28 adult female and 26 adult male bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) from Squaw Lake, Oakland County, Michigan (MI), USA. Bioenergetics modeling was used to quantify the effect of growth dilution on the difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes. On average, skin-off fillet and whole-fish Hg concentrations were 25.4% higher and 26.6% higher, respectively, in females compared with males. Thus, the relative difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes for skin-off fillets was nearly identical to that for whole fish. However, mean skin-off fillet Hg concentration (363 ng/g) was 2.3 times greater than mean whole-fish Hg concentration (155 ng/g). Males grew substantially faster than females, and bioenergetics modeling results indicated that the growth dilution effect could account for females having 14.4% higher Hg concentrations than males. Our findings should be useful in revising fish consumption advisories.

  11. Sex determination of Pohnpei Micronesian kingfishers using morphological and molecular genetic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Dylan C.; Lopes, I.F.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Conservation-oriented studies of Micronesian Kingfishers (Todiramphus cinnamominus) have been hindered by a lack of basic natural history information, despite the status of the Guam subspecies (T. c. cinnamominus) as one of the most endangered species in the world. We used tissue samples and morphometric measures from museum specimens and wild-captured Pohnpei Micronesian Kingfishers (T. c. reichenbachii) to develop methods for sex determination. We present a modified molecular protocol and a discriminant function that yields the probability that a particular individual is male or female. Our results revealed that females were significantly larger than males, and the discriminant function correctly predicted sex in 73% (30/41) of the individuals. The sex of 86% (18/21) of individuals was correctly assigned when a moderate reliability threshold was set. Sex determination using molecular genetic techniques was more reliable than methods based on morphology. Our results will facilitate recovery efforts for the critically endangered Guam Micronesian Kingfisher and provide a basis for sex determination in the 11 other endangered congeners in the Pacific Basin.

  12. Updated 34-band Photometry for the Sings/KINGFISH Samples of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, D. A.; Cook, D. O.; Roussel, H.; Turner, J. A.; Armus, L.; Bolatto, A. D.; Boquien, M.; Brown, M. J. I.; Calzetti, D.; De Looze, I.; Galametz, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Groves, B. A.; Jarrett, T. H.; Helou, G.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Hinz, J. L.; Hunt, L. K.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Murphy, E. J.; Rest, A.; Sandstrom, K. M.; Smith, J.-D. T.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Wilson, C. D.

    2017-03-01

    We present an update to the ultraviolet-to-radio database of global broadband photometry for the 79 nearby galaxies that comprise the union of the KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel) and SINGS (Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey) samples. The 34-band data set presented here includes contributions from observational work carried out with a variety of facilities including GALEX, SDSS, Pan-STARRS1, NOAO, 2MASS, Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, Spitzer, Herschel, Planck, JCMT, and the VLA. Improvements of note include recalibrations of previously published SINGS BVR C I C and KINGFISH far-infrared/submillimeter photometry. Similar to previous results in the literature, an excess of submillimeter emission above model predictions is seen primarily for low-metallicity dwarf or irregular galaxies. This 33-band photometric data set for the combined KINGFISH+SINGS sample serves as an important multiwavelength reference for the variety of galaxies observed at low redshift. A thorough analysis of the observed spectral energy distributions is carried out in a companion paper.

  13. Comparison of chlorine and chlorine dioxide toxicity of fathead minnows and bluegill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Soracco, R.J.; Mayack, L.A.; Shealy, R.L.; Broadwell, T.L.; Steffen, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    The comparative toxicity of total residual chlorine (TRC) and chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) was evaluated by conducting 96 h flow-through bioassays with three types of fish. The fish were subjected to an intermittent exposure regime in which biocide residuals were present for approximately 2-h periods beginning at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h into the tests. These conditions simulated the antifouling procedure (1 h day/sup -1/ biocide addition) used to control biofouling of nuclear reactor heat exchangers at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. LC/sub 50/ values showed that ClO/sub 2/ was approximately 2 to 4 times more toxic than TRC to: (1) juvenile and 1-year-old fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas); and (2) young-of-the-year bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). The TRC mean 96-h LC/sub 50/ values were: 0.08 mg l/sup -1/ for juvenile fathead minnows, 0.35 mg l/sup -1/ for adult fathead minnows and 0.44 mg l/sup -1/ for young-of-the-year bluegills. The ClO/sub 2/ mean LC/sub 50/ values were: 0.02 mg l/sup -1/ for juvenile fathead minnows, 0.17 mg l/sup -1/ for adult fathead minnows and 0.15 mg l/sup -1/ for young-of-the-year bluegills. 31 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  14. Using the kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) as a bioindicator of PCBs and PBDEs in the dinghushan biosphere reserve, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ling; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Li, Ke-Lin; Peng, Ying; Feng, An-Hong; Zhang, Qiang; Zou, Fa-Sheng; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2013-07-01

    The Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve is a nature reserve and a site for the study of tropical and subtropical forest ecosystems. Rapid industrialization and intensive electronic waste-recycling activities around the biosphere reserve have resulted in elevated levels of industrial organic contaminants in the local environment that may cause adverse effects on wildlife that inhabits this area. In the present study, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and 2 alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs)-decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE)-were investigated in the biosphere reserve and a reference site by using the kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) as a bioindicator. Residue concentrations in kingfishers from the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve ranged from 490 ng/g to 3000 ng/g, 51 ng/g to 420 ng/g, 0.44 ng/g to 90 ng/g, and 0.04 ng/g to 0.87 ng/g lipid weight for ∑PCBs, ∑PBDEs, DBDPE, and BTBPE, respectively. With the exception of the BTBPE, these levels were 2 to 5 times higher than those detected in kingfishers from the reference site. The contaminant patterns from the biosphere reserve were also different, with larger PCB contributions in comparison with the reference site. The estimated predator-prey biomagnification factors (BMFs) showed that most of the PCB and PBDE congeners and BTBPE were biomagnified in kingfishers from the biosphere reserve. The calculated toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) concentrations of major coplanar PCB congeners in kingfishers from the biosphere reserve ranged from 18 pg/g to 66 pg/g wet weight, with some of these TEQ concentrations reaching or exceeding the levels known to impair bird reproduction and survival.

  15. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P. Palstra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s-1 or body lengths s-1, BL s-1 were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145 mm, 206 mm and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: 1 0.70 m s-1 or 4.83 BL s-1, 2 0.82 m s-1 or 3.25 BL s-1 and 3 0.85 m s-1 or 2.73 BL s-1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s-1 = 234.07(BL-0.779 (R2= 0.9909 was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s-1 (‘swimmers’ or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (‘resters’ in a newly designed 3,600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor, were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n= 23 showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n= 23. As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31% in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 mL min-1 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min-1, respectively, under anesthesia. Thus growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  16. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the ecological assessment task, Kingfisher Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation Ecological Assessment Task, Kingfisher Study, including information that will contribute to safe completion of the project. The report includes historical background; a site map; project organization; task descriptions and hazard evaluations; controls; and monitoring, personal protective equipment, decontamination, and medical surveillance program requirements. The report also includes descriptions of site personnel and their certifications as well as suspected WAG 2 contaminants and their characteristics. The primary objective of the WAG 2 Kingfisher Study is to assess the feasibility of using kingfishers as biological monitors of contaminants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Kingfisher sample collection will be used to determine the levels of contaminants and degree of bioaccumulation within a common piscivorous bird feeding on contaminated fish from streams on the ORR.

  17. Gill lesions and death of bluegill in an acid mine drainage mixing zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, T.B.; Irwin, E.R.; Grizzle, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Wildhaber, M.L. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States). Alabama Cooperative of Fish & Wildlife Research Unit

    2001-07-01

    The toxicity of an acid mine drainage (AMD) mixing zone was investigated by placing bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) at the confluence of a stream contaminated by AMD and a stream having neutral pH. A mixing channel receiving water from both streams was assembled in the field, during July and October 1996, to determine the toxicity of freshly mixed and aged water (2.9-7.5 min). The AMD stream had elevated concentrations of Al and Fe, which precipitated upon mixing, and of Mn, which did not precipitate in the mixing zone. Fish exposed to freshly mixed water had higher mortality than fish exposed to water after aging. Precipitating Al, but not Fe, accumulated on the gills of bluegill, and accumulation was more rapid early during the mixing process than after aging. Fish exposed for 3.5 h to freshly mixed water had hypertrophy and hyperplasia of gill filament and lamellar epithelial cells. Similar lesions were observed after 6.0 h in fish exposed to water aged after mixing. Results demonstrated that Al was the predominant metal accumulating on the gills of fish in this AMD mixing zone, and that mixing zones can be more toxic than AMD streams in equilibrium.

  18. Testing a bioenergetics-based habitat choice model: bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) responses to food availability and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Using an automated shuttlebox system, we conducted patch choice experiments with 32, 8–12 g bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to test a behavioral energetics hypothesis of habitat choice. When patch temperature and food levels were held constant within patches but different between patches, we expected bluegill to choose patches that maximized growth based on the bioenergetic integration of food and temperature as predicted by a bioenergetics model. Alternative hypotheses were that bluegill may choose patches based only on food (optimal foraging) or temperature (behavioral thermoregulation). The behavioral energetics hypothesis was not a good predictor of short-term (from minutes to weeks) patch choice by bluegill; the behavioral thermoregulation hypothesis was the best predictor. In the short-term, food and temperature appeared to affect patch choice hierarchically; temperature was more important, although food can alter temperature preference during feeding periods. Over a 19-d experiment, mean temperatures occupied by fish offered low rations did decline as predicted by the behavioral energetics hypothesis, but the decline was less than 1.0 °C as opposed to a possible 5 °C decline. A short-term, bioenergetic response to food and temperature may be precluded by physiological costs of acclimation not considered explicitly in the behavioral energetics hypothesis.

  19. Ontogeny of body density and the swimbladder in yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, L D; Qin, J G

    2013-02-01

    The ontogeny of larval body density and the morphological and histological events during swimbladder development were investigated in two cohorts of yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae to understand the relationship between larval morphology and body density. Larvae inflation occurred on 3 dph, and the inflation window was 3-5 dph when the pneumatic duct was still connected to the gut. The swimbladder volume increased with larval age and the epithelial lining on the swimbladder became flattened squamous cells after initial inflation. Seriola lalandi developed into a physoclist with the formation of the rete mirabile and the gas-secreting gland comprised low-columnar epithelial cells. Larvae with successfully inflated swimbladders remained positively buoyant, whereas larvae without SB inflation became negatively buoyant and their body density gradually reached 1.030 ± 0.001 g cm(-3) by 10 dph. Diel density changes were observed after 5 dph, owing to day time deflation and night-time inflation of the swimbladder. These results show that SB inflation has a direct effect on body density in larval S. lalandi and environmental factors should be further investigated to enhance the rate of SB inflation to prevent the sinking death syndrome in the early life stage of the fish larvae.

  20. Mapping the cold dust temperatures and masses of nearby Kingfish galaxies with Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Galametz, M; Albrecht, M; Aniano, G; Armus, L; Bertoldi, F; Calzetti, D; Crocker, A F; Croxall, K V; Dale, D A; Meyer, J Donovan; Draine, B T; Engelbracht, C W; Hinz, J L; Roussel, H; Skibba, R A; Tabatabaei, F S; Walter, F; Weiss, A; Wilson, C D; Wolfire, M G

    2012-01-01

    Taking advantage of the sensitivity and angular resolution of the Herschel Space Observatory at far-infrared and submm wavelengths, we aim to characterize the physical properties of cold dust within nearby galaxies and study the robustness of the parameters we derive using different modified blackbody models. For a pilot subsample of the KINGFISH program, we perform 2 temperature fits of the Spitzer and Herschel photometric data (24 to 500um), with a warm and a cold component, globally and in each resolution element.At global scales, we observe ranges of values for beta_c(0.8 to 2.5) and Tc(19.1 to 25.1K).We compute maps of our parameters with beta fixed or free to test the robustness of the temperature and dust surface density maps we deduce. When the emissivity is fixed, we observe temperature gradients as a function of radius.When the emissivity is fitted as a free parameter, barred galaxies tend to have uniform fitted emissivities.Gathering resolved elements in a Tc-beta_c diagram underlines an anti-corre...

  1. HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED AND SUBMILLIMETER PHOTOMETRY FOR THE KINGFISH SAMPLE OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Aniano, G.; Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J. L.; Montiel, E. J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Krause, O.; Groves, B. A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Roussel, H. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Armus, L.; Beirao, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Calzetti, D.; Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hao, C.-N., E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); and others

    2012-01-20

    New far-infrared and submillimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500 {mu}m emission shows evidence for a submillimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photodissociation regions is found to be (21 {+-} 4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine and Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.

  2. The Emission by Dust and Stars of Nearby Galaxies in the Herschel KINGFISH Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Skibba, Ramin A; Dale, Daniel; Hinz, Joannah; Zibetti, Stefano; Crocker, Alison; Groves, Brent; Hunt, Leslie; Johnson, Benjamin D; Meidt, Sharon; Murphy, Eric J; Appleton, Philip; Armus, Lee; Bolatto, Alberto; Brandl, Bernhard; Calzetti, Daniela; Croxall, Kevin; Galametz, Maud; Gordon, Karl D; Kennicutt, Robert C; Koda, Jin; Krause, Oliver; Montiel, Edward; Rix, Hans-Walter; Roussel, Helene; Sandstrom, Karin; Sauvage, Marc; Schinnerer, Eva; Smith, J D; Walter, Fabian; Wilson, Christine D; Wolfire, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Using new far-infrared imaging from the Herschel Space Observatory with ancillary data from ultraviolet to submillimeter wavelengths, we estimate the total emission from dust and stars of 62 nearby galaxies in the KINGFISH survey in a way that is as empirical and model-independent as possible. We collect and exploit these data in order to measure from the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) precisely how much stellar radiation is intercepted and re-radiated by dust, and how this quantity varies with galaxy properties. By including SPIRE data, we are more sensitive to emission from cold dust grains than previous analyses at shorter wavelengths, allowing for more accurate estimates of dust temperatures and masses. The dust/stellar flux ratio, which we measure by integrating the SEDs, has a range of nearly three decades. The inclusion of SPIRE data shows that estimates based on data not reaching these far-IR wavelengths are biased low. We find that the dust/stellar flux ratio varies with morphology and total IR...

  3. Herschel Far-Infrared and Sub-millimeter Photometry for the KINGFISH Sample of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Engelbracht, C W; Hinz, J L; Krause, O; Montiel, E J; Roussel, H; Appleton, P N; Armus, L; Beirao, P; Bolatto, A D; Brandl, B R; Calzetti, D; Crocker, A F; Croxall, K V; Draine, B T; Galametz, M; Gordon, K D; Groves, B A; Hao, C -N; Helou, G; Hunt, L K; Johnson, B D; Kennicutt, R C; Koda, J; Leroy, A K; Li, Y; Meidt, S E; Miller, A E; Murphy, E J; Rahman, N; Rix, H -W; Sandstrom, K M; Sauvage, M; Schinnerer, E; Skibba, R A; Smith, J -D T; Tabatabaei, F S; Walter, F; Wilson, C D; Wolfire, M G; Zibetti, S

    2011-01-01

    New far-infrared and sub-millimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially-integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500um emission shows evidence for a sub-millimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photo-dissociation regions is found to be (21+/-4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine & Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust tempera...

  4. Three new species of chewing lice of the genus Emersoniella Tendeiro, 1965 (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) from Papua New Guinean kingfishers and kookaburras (Aves: Coraciiformes: Alcedinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Daniel R; Bush, Sarah E

    2014-05-20

    Three new species of the ischnoceran louse genus Emersoniella (Phthiraptera) are described from four species of New Guinean kingfishers and kookaburras (Coraciiformes: Alcedinidae: Halcyoninae). They are: Emersoniella crassicarina n. sp. ex Dacelo gaudichaud Quoy & Gaimard (rufous-bellied kookaburra) and Dacelo leachii intermedia Salvadori (blue-winged kookaburra); E. reninoda n. sp. ex Melidora macrorrhina macrorhina Lesson (hook-billed kingfisher); and E. persei n. sp. ex Tanysiptera danae Sharpe (brown-headed paradise-kingfisher). In addition, we illustrate Emersoniella regis Emerson & Price, Emersoniella halcyonis Tendeiro, and the male genitalia of Emersoniella galateae Emerson & Price, as well as provide a complete host-louse checklist, and an updated key to all seven species of this genus. 

  5. KINGFISH -- Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel: Survey Description and Image Atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Kennicutt, R C; Aniano, G; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Beirao, P; Bolatto, A D; Brandl, B; Crocker, A; Croxall, K; Dale, D A; Meyer, J Dononvan; Draine, B T; Engelbracht, C W; Galametz, M; Gordon, K D; Groves, B; Hao, C -N; Helou, G; Hinz, J; Hunt, L K; Johnson, B; Koda, J; Krause, O; Leroy, A K; Li, Y; Meidt, S; Montiel, E; Murphy, E J; Rahman, N; Rix, H -W; Roussel, H; Sandstrom, K; Sauvage, M; Schinnerer, E; Skibba, R; Smith, J -D T; Srinivasan, S; Vigroux, L; Walter, F; Wilson, C D; Wolfire, M; Zibetti, S

    2011-01-01

    The KINGFISH project (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel) is an imaging and spectroscopic survey of 61 nearby (d < 30 Mpc) galaxies, chosen to cover a wide range of galaxy properties and local interstellar medium (ISM) environments found in the nearby Universe. Its broad goals are to characterize the ISM of present-day galaxies, the heating and cooling of their gaseous and dust components, and to better understand the physical processes linking star formation and the ISM. KINGFISH is a direct descendant of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), which produced complete Spitzer imaging and spectroscopic mapping and a comprehensive set of multi-wavelength ancillary observations for the sample. The Herschel imaging consists of complete maps for the galaxies at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns. The spectal line imaging of the principal atomic ISM cooling lines ([OI]63um, [OIII]88um, [NII]122,205um, and [CII]158um) covers the subregions in the centers and di...

  6. Fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish life-stage responses to 17β-estradiol exposure in outdoor mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah M.; Kiesling, Richard L.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Rearick, Daniel C.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Gaikowski, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental and reproductive effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) exposure on two generations of fathead minnows and one generation of bluegill sunfish were assessed. Fish were exposed to E2 for six continuous weeks in outdoor mesocosms simulating natural lake environments. First generation fish were exposed while sexually mature. Second generation fathead minnows were exposed either during early development, sexual maturity, or both stages. Multiple endpoints were measured to assess effects of E2 exposure on fecundity and fish health and development. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations were highly variable in all fish. Differences in egg production timing for both species indicate differences in fecundity between females exposed to E2 and controls. First generation fathead minnows exposed to E2 had lower body condition factors and reduced secondary sexual characteristic expression by males. Only a difference in relative liver weight was observed in second generation fathead minnows. First generation bluegill males exposed to E2 had significantly smaller testes compared to controls. Although fish response was highly variable, results indicate that exposure to E2 at environmentally relevant concentrations affect fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish health and development, which may have implications for the health and sustainability of fish populations. Furthermore, exposure timing and environmental factors affect fish response to E2 exposure.

  7. Brain Transcriptional Profiles of Male Alternative Reproductive Tactics and Females in Bluegill Sunfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Charlyn G.; MacManes, Matthew D.; Knapp, Rosemary; Neff, Bryan D.

    2016-01-01

    Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) are one of the classic systems for studying male alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) in teleost fishes. In this species, there are two distinct life histories: parental and cuckolder, encompassing three reproductive tactics, parental, satellite, and sneaker. The parental life history is fixed, whereas individuals who enter the cuckolder life history transition from sneaker to satellite tactic as they grow. For this study, we used RNAseq to characterize the brain transcriptome of the three male tactics and females during spawning to identify gene ontology (GO) categories and potential candidate genes associated with each tactic. We found that sneaker males had higher levels of gene expression differentiation compared to the other two male tactics. Sneaker males also had higher expression in ionotropic glutamate receptor genes, specifically AMPA receptors, compared to other males, which may be important for increased spatial working memory while attempting to cuckold parental males at their nests. Larger differences in gene expression also occurred among male tactics than between males and females. We found significant expression differences in several candidate genes that were previously identified in other species with ARTs and suggest a previously undescribed role for cAMP-responsive element modulator (crem) in influencing parental male behaviors during spawning. PMID:27907106

  8. Pectoral fins aid in navigation of a complex environment by bluegill sunfish under sensory deprivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V

    2013-08-15

    Complex structured environments offer fish advantages as places of refuge and areas of greater potential prey densities, but maneuvering through these environments is a navigational challenge. To successfully navigate complex habitats, fish must have sensory input relaying information about the proximity and size of obstacles. We investigated the role of the pectoral fins as mechanosensors in bluegill sunfish swimming through obstacle courses under different sensory deprivation and flow speed conditions. Sensory deprivation was accomplished by filming in the dark to remove visual input and/or temporarily blocking lateral line input via immersion in cobalt chloride. Fish used their pectoral fins to touch obstacles as they swam slowly past them under all conditions. Loss of visual and/or lateral line sensory input resulted in an increased number of fin taps and shorter tap durations while traversing the course. Propulsive pectoral fin strokes were made in open areas between obstacle posts and fish did not use the pectoral fins to push off or change heading. Bending of the flexible pectoral fin rays may initiate an afferent sensory input, which could be an important part of the proprioceptive feedback system needed to navigate complex environments. This behavioral evidence suggests that it is possible for unspecialized pectoral fins to act in both a sensory and a propulsive capacity.

  9. Final critical habitat for the Mariana Fruit Bat and Guam Micronesian Kingfisher on Guam and the Mariana Crow on Guam and in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To provide the user with a general idea of areas where final critical habitat for Mariana fruit bat (Pteropus mariannus mariannus), Guam Micronesian kingfisher...

  10. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ~90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection.Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic

  11. Trace element content of fish feed and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) from aquaculture and wild source in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikem, Abua; Egilla, Jonathan

    2008-09-15

    Trace element content of fish feed and bluegill sunfish muscles (Lepomis macrochirus) from aquaculture and natural pond in Missouri were determined using the inductively coupled-plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) and the direct mercury analyzer (DMA). Dietary intake rates of trace elements were estimated. Dogfish muscle (DORM-2) and lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2) reference standards were used in trace element recovery and method validations. The average elemental concentrations (mg/kg diet, dry wt.) of fish feed were: As 1.81, Cd 2.37, Co 0.10, Cr 1.42, Cu 8.0, Fe 404, Mn 35.9, Ni 0.51, Pb 9.16, Se 1.71, Sn 20.7, V 0.09, Zn 118 and Hg 0.07. The mean elemental concentrations (μg/kg wet wt.) in bluegill muscles from both aquaculture and wild (in parenthesis) sources were: As 0.36 (0.06), Cd 0.28 (0.01), Co 0.0 (0.0), Cr 0.52 (0.05), Cu 0.38 (0.18), Fe 17.5 (2.43), Mn 0.18 (0.24), Ni 0.18 (0.04), Pb 1.03 (0.04), Se 0.34 (0.30), Sn 0.66 (0.42), V 0.02 (0.01), Zn 6.97 (9.13) and Hg 0.06 (0.24). Kruskal-Wallis chi square indicated significant differences in As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Sn, V, Zn and Hg (Paquaculture and wild bluegills, posed no health risks for approximately 85% of all samples.

  12. Chronic kisspeptin administration stimulated gonadal development in pre-pubertal male yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi; Perciformes) during the breeding and non-breeding season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocillado, Josephine N; Zohar, Yonathan; Biran, Jakob; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Elizur, Abigail

    2013-09-15

    The kisspeptin system is now accepted as a key regulator of vertebrate reproductive function, particularly the onset of puberty. In teleosts, the stimulatory effect of exogenous kisspeptins has been demonstrated mainly at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels of the reproductive axis, with very limited information pertaining to gonadal response. We determined the effect of chronic peripheral administration of the conserved kisspeptin decapeptides (YNLNSFGLRY or Kiss1-10; and FNFNPFGLRF or Kiss2-10) on gonadal development of pre-pubertal yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi), a Perciform teleost, during the breeding and non-breeding season. We utilized slow-release implants to chronically deliver the synthesized peptides, which were based on the yellowtail kingfish kiss1 and kiss2 cDNA sequences that we isolated. The expression level of kiss2r and gnrh1 in the brain or hypothalamus did not vary between treated and control groups. Pituitary expression of fshβ and lhβ was upregulated only with Kiss1-10 treatment regardless of the season. Based on histological evidence, gonadal development was stimulated in male fish with either Kiss1-10 or Kiss2-10, with Kiss2-10 being more effective during the non-breeding period. Overall, our results suggest that kisspeptins modulate the early gonadal development of male yellowtail kingfish, however that may vary with the breeding season.

  13. A Detailed Study of the Radio--FIR Correlation in NGC6946 with Herschel-PACS/SPIRE from KINGFISH

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Murphy, E J; Beck, R; Groves, B; Meidt, S; Krause, M; Rix, H-W; Sandstrom, K; Crocker, A F; Galametz, M; Helou, G; Wilson, C D; Kennicutt, R; Calzetti, D; Draine, B; Aniano, G; Dale, D; Dumas, G; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Hinz, J; Kreckel, K; Montiel, E; Roussel, H

    2013-01-01

    We derive the distribution of the synchrotron spectral index across NGC6946 and investigate the correlation between the radio continuum (synchrotron) and far-infrared (FIR) emission using the KINGFISH Herschel PACS and SPIRE data. The radio--FIR correlation is studied as a function of star formation rate, magnetic field strength, radiation field strength, and the total gas surface brightness. The synchrotron emission follows both star-forming regions and the so-called magnetic arms present in the inter-arm regions. The synchrotron spectral index is steepest along the magnetic arms ($\\alpha_n \\sim 1$), while it is flat in places of giant H{\\sc ii} regions and in the center of the galaxy ($\\alpha_n \\sim 0.6-0.7$). The map of $\\alpha_n$ provides an observational evidence for aging and energy loss of cosmic ray electrons propagating in the disk of the galaxy. Variations in the synchrotron--FIR correlation across the galaxy are shown to be a function of both star formation and magnetic fields. We find that the syn...

  14. Ultramorphological and histological studies on the tongue of the common kingfisher in relation to its feeding habit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh.A. Al-Zahaby

    2014-05-01

    The tongue of the studied bird is an elongated, tubby and consistent organ of triangular shape of about 8.9 mm in length. It drops in the posterior quarter of the lower part of the very long bill. It is composed of three successive regions; blunt apex, stocky body and root. In addition to the giant conical papillae demarcating the tongue’s body from root, numerous caudally directed spiny conical papillae are differently distributed on the dorsal and lateral surfaces of the lingual body and root. Both papillae appears to help catching and directly swallowing preys, however the apex is covered with superposed foliate papillae. By light microscope, the dorsal lingual epithelium is composed of a keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The stratum basale is followed by a thick stratum spinosum of polyhedral cells containing some deeply embedded taste buds and gives rise to the stratum corneum cell layer. The loose connective tissue core (lamina propria which embraces some blood vessels and melanocytes forms finger-like dermal papillae of different heights under the epithelium. It also contains branched tubulo-alveolar salivary glands mainly of massive gelatinous mucus secreted on the epithelial surface to facilitate food-intake indicating a close relationship of the lingual structure with the common kingfisher feeding habit which feeds mainly on fishes and aquatic arthropods.

  15. Hardware Assisted Stealthy Diversity (CHECKMATE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    called architectural shifting. Architectural shifting is the computer architecture analog to frequency hopping in radio systems. Instead of rapidly...update the "gas" ( GNU Assembler) to emit modified instructions. The assembler approach is applicable to approximately 95% of instructions; however...information; however linker modification was complex and forced modification of standard application development tools. Next, the GNU objdump tool

  16. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus and crappie (Pomoxis anularis at varied time intervals and storage temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jami George

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill—Lepomis macrochirus; crappie—Pomoxis annularis, at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at −20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis.

  17. Relationship of weed shiner and young-of-year bluegill and largemouth bass abundance to submersed aquatic vegetation in Navigation Pools 4, 8, and 13 of the Upper Mississippi River, 1998-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLain, Steven A.; Popp, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation provides food resources and shelter for many species of fish. This study found a significant relationship between increases in submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) in four study reaches of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) and increases in catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) of weed shiners (Notropis texanus) and age-0 bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) when all of the study reaches were treated collectively using Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) vegetation and fish data for 1998–2012. The selected fishes were more abundant in study reaches with higher SAV frequencies (Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4) and less abundant in reaches with lower SAV frequencies (Pool 13 and Upper Pool 4). When each study reach was examined independently, the relationship between SAV frequency and CPUE of the three species was not significant in most cases, the primary exception being weed shiners in Lower Pool 4. Results of this study indicate that the prevalence of SAV does affect relative abundance of these vegetation-associated fish species. However, the poor annual relationship between SAV frequency and age-0 relative abundance in individual study reaches indicates that several other factors also govern age-0 abundance. The data indicate that there may be a SAV frequency threshold in backwaters above which there is not a strong relationship with abundance of these fish species. This is indicated by the high annual CPUE variability of the three selected fishes in backwaters of Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4 when SAV exceeded certain frequencies.

  18. “鱼狗”箱式鱼雷发射装置对我国舰用鱼雷发射装置的启示%Inspiration of Shipborne Torpedo Launchers in China from the British Kingfisher Box-type Torpedo Launcher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹美方; 徐先勇; 李阳

    2013-01-01

      英国海军的“鱼狗”箱式鱼雷发射装置集储存与发射功能于一身,具有大大简化发射准备工作、根据实际情况模块化组合并通过机械形式集中施力等特点,近年来已逐渐成为鱼雷发射装置的研究热点。通过对英国“鱼狗”箱式鱼雷发射装置结构特点的详细分析,提出了我国舰用鱼雷发射装置应加强标准化、模块化设计,加强箱式发射装置、加强便捷化、加强新的发射技术等方面的研究,从而进一步提高舰艇快速反应能力,应对日益复杂的海洋战争。%British Navy′s kingfisher box-type torpedo launcher integrates storage function with launching function to greatly simplify the launching preparation. And it possesses the advantages of modular combination according to actual situation and exerting concentrated force on torpedo mechanically. Hence, it has become a hot spot in torpedo launcher research. In this paper, the structural characteristics of the kingfisher box-type torpedo launcher are analyzed. And sug-gestions about researches on shipborne torpedo launchers in China are offered, i.e. more attention should be paid to standardized and modular design, box-type torpedo launcher, convenient operation, and new launching technologies for gaining rapid reaction ability of warships.

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Kingfisher, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5 into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  1. A Checkmate, Not a Stalemate: Turkey Versus the PKK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Partiya Karkerên Kurdistan , PKK, Turkey, Stalemate, Ripeness, Abdullah Öcalan, Counterterrorism, Kurds, Insurgency 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 97 16... Kurdistan Democratic Confederation (KCK, Koma Ciwaken Kurdistan ) ............................................................... 34 11...Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) ............................ 35 12. Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) and Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP

  2. 合并规制“破产公司抗辩”原则的应用及启示--以英国Kingfisher及Stericycle公司收购案为例%Application and Inspiration of Failing Firm Defense in Merger Control:Based on Kingfisher Acquisition of 30 Former Focus Stores and Stericycle Acquisition of SRCL in UK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕; 马海峰

    2015-01-01

    Merger is a path of recovery for failing companies but it might be alleged monopoly. This paper researches how anti-trust organizations regulate merger with Failing Firm Defense based on the cases of acquisitions of UK Kingfisher and Stericy-cle. Thus this paper puts forward the application rules of Failing Firm Defense that on one side antitrust law should add speed-ing process;on the other side aiming failing firm defense antitrust authority should assess the real reasons that lead to failing, preventing purchasers intend to plunges acquired firms into debt by malicious competition which will weaken competition and consumer interests.%合并是濒临破产公司的一条重生之路,但这可能会涉嫌垄断。以英国Kingfisher及Stericycle公司收购案为例,本文探讨反垄断机构如何运用“破产公司抗辩”原则进行合并审查,从而明晰“破产公司抗辩”实施的要点。结论是反垄断法应当增加加速程序的相应规定;对以破产抗辩为理由提出的合并申请,应评估导致一家公司濒临倒闭的真实原因,避免一方恶意竞争导致另一方陷入危机,再以破产公司抗辩为理由而成功购并其竞争对手,最终弱化市场竞争,损害消费者利益。

  3. Checkmate: Linguistic and Literary Play in Salman Rushdie's "Haroun and the Sea of Stories"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongartz, Christiane; Richey, Esther Gilman

    2010-01-01

    The authors use Noam Chomsky's theories about generative grammar to discuss the notion of linguistic creativity they believe lies at the core of storytelling as Salman Rushdie pictures it in his novel, "Haroun and the Sea of Stories." The production of meaning through the use of narrative helps explain the rules of the literary game,…

  4. Nivolumab versus chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma who progressed after anti-CTLA-4 treatment (CheckMate 037)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Jeffrey S; D'Angelo, Sandra P; Minor, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, can result in durable responses in patients with melanoma who have progressed after ipilimumab and BRAF inhibitors. We assessed the efficacy and safety of nivolumab compared with investigator's choice of chemothe......BACKGROUND: Nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, can result in durable responses in patients with melanoma who have progressed after ipilimumab and BRAF inhibitors. We assessed the efficacy and safety of nivolumab compared with investigator's choice......, and progressed after ipilimumab, or ipilimumab and a BRAF inhibitor if they were BRAF(V 600) mutation-positive. Participating investigators randomly assigned (with an interactive voice response system) patients 2:1 to receive an intravenous infusion of nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks or ICC (dacarbazine 1000 mg....../m(2) every 3 weeks or paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) combined with carboplatin area under the curve 6 every 3 weeks) until progression or unacceptable toxic effects. We stratified randomisation by BRAF mutation status, tumour expression of PD-L1, and previous best overall response to ipilimumab. We used...

  5. Growth, survival, and fatty acid composition of coppernose bluegill offered different winter feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter fish losses are routinely reported by Arkansas sportfish producers in the spring. Juvenile centrarchid species (less than 7.6 cm) are quite susceptible to harsh winter conditions. While some of these winter fish losses can be attributed to predation by fish eating birds and water quality fact...

  6. Formal Verification of Full-Wave Rectifier: A Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Lata, Kusum

    2009-01-01

    We present a case study of formal verification of full-wave rectifier for analog and mixed signal designs. We have used the Checkmate tool from CMU [1], which is a public domain formal verification tool for hybrid systems. Due to the restriction imposed by Checkmate it necessitates to make the changes in the Checkmate implementation to implement the complex and non-linear system. Full-wave rectifier has been implemented by using the Checkmate custom blocks and the Simulink blocks from MATLAB from Math works. After establishing the required changes in the Checkmate implementation we are able to efficiently verify the safety properties of the full-wave rectifier.

  7. Effects of Pro-Tex on zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae, adult common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and adult yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerrigter, J.G.J.; Vis, van de J.W.; Bos, van den R.; Abbink, W.; Spanings, T.; Zethof, J.; Louzao Martinez, L.; Andel, van W.F.M.; Lopez-Luna, J.; Flik, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture practices bring several stressful events to fish. Stressors not only activate the hypothalamus–pituitary–interrenal-axis, but also evoke cellular stress responses. Up-regulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is among the best studied mechanisms of the cellular stress response. An extract

  8. EVIDENCE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN BLUEGILL SUNFISH (LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS) LIVER MICROSOMES SIMULTANEOUSLY EXPOSURE TO SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND ANTHRACENE. (R823873)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. The affect of computer and internet supported chess instruction on university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiz Arabacı

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to teach subjects of "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate" in chess with a computer program on a web page and compare the computer - internet supported instruction method with traditional instruction method.  For this reason, an experimental group (n=33, mean age=22.1 years and a control group (n=35, mean age=22.6 years were set up from participants of non-major Elective Chess course (VIII taught in Uludag University, Faculty of Education, Department of Physical Education and Sports.  As subjects of application, the fundamental chess topics of "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate" were selected.  After chess instruction of 2 hours every 5 weeks, the topics of "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate" were taught to both groups in 6th and 7th weeks respectively.  While traditional instruction methods were applied to control group, internet and computer supported education was given to experimental group. After the lessons, the students of both groups were asked to make "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate". The analysis of the obtained data were made on SPSS 12 statistic program and evaluated with Chi - Square test.  Significance level was accepted as p

  10. Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Deanna; Boss, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Discusses four automated serials control systems which have been installed by at least six general libraries: OCLC's Serials Control Subsystem, Faxon's LINX, Ebsco's EBSCONET, and CLASS' CHECKMATE. Features of each system, accessibility, and costs are noted. (EJS)

  11. Does prey community composition affect the way different behavioral types interact with their environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannini, Michael A; Wahl, David H

    2016-10-01

    We examined how different exploratory behavioral types of largemouth bass responded to differing prey communities by determining effects on growth, survival and diet in experimental ponds. We found evidence that non-explorer largemouth bass target young-of-year bluegill early on in life, but bluegill were not an important diet item by late summer. The presence of young-of-year bluegill as prey does appear to affect the foraging strategy of the two exploring types differently. In the absence of small bluegill, both behavioral types feed primarily on benthic invertebrates and zooplankton. When small bluegill were present, we saw a shift away from zooplankton as prey for largemouth bass. However, that shift was toward more benthic invertebrates for non-exploring behavioral types and toward terrestrial insects for exploring behavioral types. Thus, it appears that prey community composition can have important effects on the way in which different behavioral types interact with their environment.

  12. Sand Negro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Mira Skadegård

    2016-01-01

    relationship. I see this as an impasse, or an ongoing, deep-seated form of asymmetric check-mate. I suggst that there is a shared framework for understanding that must exist as a premise for the kinds of conflict between majoritized and minoritized positions in question here. To address this, I implement...

  13. Creating Point Sources for Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) with Low-Volume Sprays of a Microencapsulated Sex Pheromone Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to examine the depositioin of microcapsules and the attractiveness of treated apple leaves for codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), following low volume concentrated sprays of a microencapsulated (MEC) sex pheromone formulation (CheckMate CM-F). Nearly 30% of leaves collected f...

  14. Fishery survey and related limnological conditions of Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, W.W.; LaBaugh, J.W.; Freeberg, M.H.; Dowling, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), yellow perch (Perca flavescens) rock bass (Amploplites rupestris), black crappie (Pomozis nigromaculatus), and northern pike (Esox lucius) were found in Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, during a fishery survey of the lake in late August 1982. The most abundant fish were the bluegills. These fish live in the large littoral zone of the lake; this zone underlies 55% of the surface area of the lake. The most ubiquitous benthic invertebrate in the littoral zone (amphipods) and the most abundant benthic invertebrate (chironomid larvae) were major food sources for the bluegill. Other organisms found in the stomach contents of fish collected in this survey were zooplankton, gastropods, Diptera larvae, odonates, terrestrial insects, and other fish. Daphnia were the only zooplankters of a diverse plankton community that were found in stomach contents. The abundance of fish other than bluegill was typical for a system in which northern pike is the major predator.

  15. Annual Project Report, 1978 : Fishery Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fourteen miles of shoreline are open to surf fishing on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Freshwater fishing for largemouth bass, bluegill, and redear sunfish...

  16. Mercury and Selenium Concentrations in Fishes of the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From February 16 to May 6, 1988, sixteen largemouth bass, fifteen bluegill, and thirteen brown bullhead, were collected from three fresh water ponds at St. Vincent...

  17. Biointerfaces for Two-way Communication to Assess Hazards in the Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    evolution discrimination) for discriminate analysis of sonar signals; and 4) application of these technologies in environmental use (bluegill ventilatory...successfully developed three dimensional radio linked ultrasonic positioning systems and a number of novel sensor systems for fish and cephalopod

  18. Morphological change and phenotypic plasticity in native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish in response to competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavno, Stan; Rooke, Anna C.; Fox, Michael G.

    2014-06-01

    Non-indigenous species are oftentimes exposed to ecosystems with unfamiliar species, and organisms that exhibit a high degree of phenotypic plasticity may be better able to contend with the novel competitors that they may encounter during range expansion. In this study, differences in morphological plasticity were investigated using young-of-year pumpkinseed sunfish ( Lepomis gibbosus) from native North American and non-native European populations. Two Canadian populations, isolated from bluegill sunfish ( L. macrochirus) since the last glaciation, and two Spanish populations, isolated from bluegill since their introduction in Europe, were reared in a common environment using artificial enclosures. Fish were subjected to allopatric (without bluegill) or sympatric (with bluegill) conditions, and differences in plasticity were tested through a MANOVA of discriminant function scores. All pumpkinseed populations exhibited dietary shifts towards more benthivorous prey when held with bluegill. Differences between North American and European populations were observed in body dimensions, gill raker length and pelvic fin position. Sympatric treatments induced an increase in body width and a decrease in caudal peduncle length in native fish; non-native fish exhibited longer caudal peduncle lengths when held in sympatry with bluegill. Overall, phenotypic plasticity influenced morphological divergence less than genetic factors, regardless of population. Contrary to predictions, pumpkinseeds from Europe exhibited lower levels of phenotypic plasticity than Canadian populations, suggesting that European pumpkinseeds are more canalized than their North American counterparts.

  19. Cross-species Virus-host Protein-Protein Interactions Inhibiting Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    SUBJECTTERMS viral pathogen, zoonotic, arenavirus, host tropism, protein - protein interactions, RIG-I, Z protein , CARD domain, MAVS 16. SECURITY...individually subcloned into Checkmate M2H System (Promega) bait and prey reporter plasmids. The genes encoding the viral Z proteins were synthesized... viral proteins were calculated with PhyML. While several residue positions are highly conserved across Z proteins (Figure 8), significant sequence

  20. Shaw Air Force Base Infrastructure Project Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    various sunfish, bullhead catfish , and largemouth bass and birds such as resident Canada geese, mallards, and kingfishers (Air Force, 2004a...Reptiles Micrurus fulvius Eastern coral snake ─ SC Hardwood forest; pine flatwoods; marshes Mammals Corynorhinus rafinesquii Rafinesque’s big-eared

  1. Ballistic Missile Proliferation a National Security Focus for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-21

    of Sonda sounding rockets, originally built for their civilian space program, to make artillery rockets. Because of their similar technological base...OTR21) 70 480 IS SS-1,ScudB(R-17) 300 985 IS AS4,Kitchen(KH-22) 400 1000 is, AS6,Kingfish(KSR-5) 400 1000 WS Belgium MGM52,Lance 130 450 IS Brazil Sonda

  2. Installation Restoration Program Records Search for Bergstrom Air Force Base, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    Johnson grass, buffalograss, Bermudagrass, fescue, and Texas wintergrass. Spring wildflowers , including Texas bluebonnet and indian paintbrush, are...kingfisher. The California jack rabbit is very common on the grassy areas of the base. Other mammals known to be present in the wooded ravines include

  3. 75 FR 23800 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Stendahl.'' Representatives of the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes, specifically the L kaax. di clan, a Tlingit clan, have identified that this headdress represents the Kingfisher Fort. The.... Representatives of the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes have also provided evidence that...

  4. Dissemination of Values and Culture through the E-Folklore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Normaliza Abd; Affendi, Nik Rafidah Nik Muhammad; Pawi, Awang Azman Awang

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the values and culture in the e-folklore. The objectives of the study were to identify and discuss the values in the song lyric "The Stork and the Mouse Deer." The song was taken from phone application in the compilation of the "Kingfisher stories" copyrighted by Dewan Bahasa and Pustaka. The e-folklore…

  5. A Dynamic Recommender System for Improved Web Usage Mining and CRM Using Swarm Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphy, Anna; Prabakaran, S

    2015-01-01

    In modern days, to enrich e-business, the websites are personalized for each user by understanding their interests and behavior. The main challenges of online usage data are information overload and their dynamic nature. In this paper, to address these issues, a WebBluegillRecom-annealing dynamic recommender system that uses web usage mining techniques in tandem with software agents developed for providing dynamic recommendations to users that can be used for customizing a website is proposed. The proposed WebBluegillRecom-annealing dynamic recommender uses swarm intelligence from the foraging behavior of a bluegill fish. It overcomes the information overload by handling dynamic behaviors of users. Our dynamic recommender system was compared against traditional collaborative filtering systems. The results show that the proposed system has higher precision, coverage, F1 measure, and scalability than the traditional collaborative filtering systems. Moreover, the recommendations given by our system overcome the overspecialization problem by including variety in recommendations.

  6. A Dynamic Recommender System for Improved Web Usage Mining and CRM Using Swarm Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern days, to enrich e-business, the websites are personalized for each user by understanding their interests and behavior. The main challenges of online usage data are information overload and their dynamic nature. In this paper, to address these issues, a WebBluegillRecom-annealing dynamic recommender system that uses web usage mining techniques in tandem with software agents developed for providing dynamic recommendations to users that can be used for customizing a website is proposed. The proposed WebBluegillRecom-annealing dynamic recommender uses swarm intelligence from the foraging behavior of a bluegill fish. It overcomes the information overload by handling dynamic behaviors of users. Our dynamic recommender system was compared against traditional collaborative filtering systems. The results show that the proposed system has higher precision, coverage, F1 measure, and scalability than the traditional collaborative filtering systems. Moreover, the recommendations given by our system overcome the overspecialization problem by including variety in recommendations.

  7. Predator avoidance, microhabitat shift, and risk-sensitive foraging in larval dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, C L

    1988-10-01

    Dragonfly larvae (Odonata: Anisoptera) are often abundant in shallow freshwater habitats and frequently co-occur with predatory fish, but there is evidence that they are underutilized as prey. This suggests that species which successfully coexist with fish may exhibit behaviors that minimize their risk of predation. I conducted field and laboratory experiments to determine whether: 1) dragonfly larvae actively avoid fish, 2) microhabitat use and foraging success of larvae are sensitive to predation risk, and 3) vulnerability of larvae is correlated with microhabitat use. I experimentally manipulated the presence of adult bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) in defaunated patches of littoral substrate in a small pond to test whether colonizing dragonfly larvae would avoid patches containing fish. The two dominant anisopteran species, Tetragoneuria cynosura and Ladona deplanata (Odonata: Libellulidae), both strongly avoided colonizing patches where adult bluegills were present. Laboratory experiments examined the effects of diel period and bluegills on microhabitat use and foraging success, using Tetragoneuria, Ladona and confamilial Sympetrum semicictum, found in a nearby fishless pond. Tetragoneuria and Ladona generally occupied microhabitats offering cover, whereas Sympetrum usually occupied exposed locations. Bluegills induced increased use of cover in all three species, and use of cover also tended to be higher during the day than at night. Bluegills depressed foraging in Tetragoneuria and to a lesser extent in Ladona, but foraging in Sympetrum appeared unaffected. Other laboratory experiments indicated that Sympetrum were generally more vulnerable than Tetragoneuria or Ladona to bluegill predation, and that vulnerability was positively correlated with use of exposed microhabitats. Both fixed (generally low use of exposed microhabitats, diel microhabitat shifts) and reactive (predator avoidance, predator-sensitive microhabitat shifts) behavioral responses appear to

  8. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  9. Command in Air War: Centralized vs. Decentralized Control of Combat Airpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-19

    would like to thank them for taking the time to educate me: � Calvin ,� �Zam,� �UB,� �Stilly,� �Alien,� �Zing,� �Goldie,� �Knob,� TSgt Frank Lofton... Calvin , Gen., USA Deputy Commander, CENTCOM during Desert Storm Warden, John, Col., USAF Director of Checkmate during Desert Storm Welch, Larry, Gen...Proverbs 16:9, New American Standard Bible Air Force aircraft were not involved in the battle in Mogadishu, Somalia on October 3, 1993� Army helicopters

  10. Ecological Effects of Exotic and Native Aquatic Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    ponds (α=0.05). ..............................................72 Figure 58. Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) counts were highest in hydrilla ponds...Anax Odonata Dragonflies & damselflies Baetidae Callibaetis Ephemeroptera Mayflies Caenidae Caenis Notonectidae Buenoa Belastomatidae...nificantly smaller and in poorer condition in the latter. Numbers of ERDC/EL TR-09-10 74 bluegills were low in hydrilla ponds. Odonata November Pond

  11. Environmental Assessment: Relocation and Construction of the Panama City-Bay County International Airport (PFN) Doppler Very High Frequency Omni-Directional Radio Range Tactical Air Navigation Aid (VORTAC) to Tyndall Air Force Base (TAFB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    vicinity of TAFB include largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), red-breasted sunfish (Lepomis auritus), catfish ...Approximately nine, round burrows were observed onsite, presumably occupied by small mammals and armadillos, as evidenced by tracks observed at the...Loggerhead sea turtle Caretta caretta T T Marine, barrier island Southern Hognose Snake Heterodon simus Sandhill, pine flatwood, dunes MAMMALS

  12. Water Operations Technical Support Program. Water Quality Management for Reservoirs and Tailwaters. Report 1. In-Reservoir Water Quality Management Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    malathion, diazinon , and Baytex, for which the 48-hr LC50 concentration to zooplankton is less than 1.0 pg C-1. Copper sulfate, the most commonly used...lesions and liver , blood, and central nervous sys- tem abnormalies in bluegills. It apparently does not bioaccumulate to sig- nificant levels in tissues

  13. Foraging behavior of selected insectivorous birds in Cauvery Delta region of Nagapattinam District, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Asokan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the foraging behavior of five insectivorous birds, namely White-breasted Kingfisher Halcyon smyrnensis, Small Bee-eater Merops orientalis, Indian Roller Coracias benghalensis, Common Myna Acridotheres tristis and Black Drongo Dicrurus macrocercus in Nagapattinam District of Tamil Nadu, India. The birds used a variety of perch types for hunting insect prey; in general the electric power line was a common perch type used by all species except the Common Myna. The perching and foraging height used by birds were classified into 3 meter categories, up to 12m. Aerial feeding or hawking in Bee-eaters and ground feeding in Common Mynas were major feeding techniques, recorded 68% and 86% of the time respectively. The other three species used gleaning as a feeding technique. The highest niche overlap was recorded between Indian Rollers and Black Drongos and between White-breasted Kingfishers and Indian Rollers.

  14. Patterns of organic contaminants in eggs of an insectivorous, an omnivorous, and a piscivorous bird nesting on the Hudson River, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, Thomas W.; Dummer, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Belted kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon), spotted sandpiper (Actitus macularia), and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs were collected in 2004 from the upper Hudson River, New York, USA. This area is one of the most polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated locations in North America. Multivariate analyses indicated among species differences in the concentration and composition of PCB congeners, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD), and dibenzofuran (PCDF, PCDD-F when combined with PCDDs) congeners, and chlorinated pesticides. Total PCB concentrations followed the typical food chain biomagnification paradigm of higher concentrations in piscivorous bird eggs and lower concentrations in eggs of species that feed at lower trophic levels. Concentrations in the insectivorous swallows (geometric mean=6.8μg/g wet wt) were approximately half the concentrations present in the piscivorous kingfisher (11.7μg/g) or omnivorous sandpiper (12.6μg/g). In contrast, PCB toxic equivalents (TEQs) were higher in swallows (1,790 pg/g wet wt) than in either kingfishers (776pg/g) or sandpipers (881pg/g). This difference can be mainly attributed to higher PCB77 concentrations in swallows relative to the other two species. Also contrary to the accepted food-chain paradigm, the sum of PCDD-F concentrations and the sum of their TEQs were higher in swallows than in either sandpipers or kingfishers. Metabolic pathway differences in the respective food chains of the three species probably accounted for the differences observed in PCB TEQ, total PCDD-F, and PCDD-F TEQ concentrations among species.

  15. Automated purification of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. PCR products with KingFisher{sup TM} magnetic particle processor prior to genome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekinen, Johanna E-mail: johanna.makinen@utu.fi; Marttila, Harri; Viljanen, Matti K

    2001-07-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genospecies were differentiated by PCR-based sequencing of the borrelial flagellin gene. To evaluate the usefulness of KingFisher{sup TM} magnetic particle processor in PCR product purification, borrelia PCR products were purified with KingFisher{sup TM} magnetic particle processor prior to cycle sequencing and the quality of the sequence data received was analyzed. KingFisher was found to offer a rapid and reliable alternative for borrelial PCR product purification.

  16. Photonic Crystals on the Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    0.35 µm, causing a bluish reflection. The inner space of the barbules is filled with melanin pigment concentrated in rodlets that are neatly arranged...Kingfisher, Alcedo atthis. (A) Back feather barbs with mainly similar bluish color cells. Occasionally an aberrant cell with a different color (here...Wakakuwa M, Stavenga DG, Arikawa K (2007) Spectral organization of ommatidia in flower -visiting insects. Photochem Photobiol 83:27-34 5. Takemura

  17. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer – role of nivolumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Giulia; Muller, Mirte; van den Heuvel, Michel; Baas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017) and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057). In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively). Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. PMID:27536062

  18. Prevalence, diversity and characterization of enterococci from three coraciiform birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splichalova, Petra; Svec, Pavel; Ghosh, Anuradha; Zurek, Ludek; Oravcova, Veronika; Radimersky, Tomas; Bohus, Mirko; Literak, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    Coraciiform birds hoopoe (Upupa epops), common kingfisher (Alcedo atthis) and European roller (Coracius garrulus) were examined for enterococci in their cloacae and uropygial glands. The enterococcal isolates were identified at the species level using several genomic and proteomic methods, screened for antibiotic susceptibility and genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Clonality of isolates from the common kingfisher was also assessed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Using selective media, putative enterococcal isolates (n = 117) were recovered from 74% (32 out of a total of 43) of the bird samples and 114 isolates were confirmed as enterococci. Overall, among the total of 6 different species detected, Enterococcus faecalis was dominant (59%) in all three bird species. The second most frequently isolated species was Enterococcus casseliflavus (32%). PFGE revealed great diversity of strains from different bird species and anatomic location. Closely related strains were found only from nestlings from the same nest. No genes conferring resistance to vancomycin (vanA, vanB, vanC1 and van C2/C3) or erythromycin (erm A, ermB and mefA/E) were detected. MLST analysis and eBURST clustering revealed that sequence types of E. faecalis from the common kingfisher were identical to those of isolates found previously in water, chickens, and humans.

  19. Final Environmental Assessment: Williams Lake Wildlife Control Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    stocking program. Following the fish kill of summer 2005, Williams Lake was stocked in spring 2006 with bass, bluegill, and catfish . In order to...includes 337 birds, 43 mammals , 20 reptiles, and seven amphibians (USAF 2008). The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) protects raptors and other...species. The black-tailed prairie dog is the most abundant small mammal in the grassland habitats at BAFB (USAF 2001a, 2008). The INRMP (USAF 2008) and

  20. ブルーギルの部分強化効果に関する予備的研究

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Masato

    1982-01-01

    Two groups of bluegill sunfish were trained and extinguished in a corridor-type straight alley under partial or continuous reinforcement. They received 70 acquisition trials and 32 extinction trials. Performance of continuous group was superior to that of partial group all over the acquisition days, although there was no significant difference between groups. During extinction two groups did not differ on resistance to extinction. However, rate-transformed extinction data yielded the partial ...

  1. Recreational Reuse of Waste Disposal Sites: Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    could be stocked per acre. These fish would be catchable immediately and should grow rapidly. In addition, another put-and-take trout stocking could...fish populations in ways that will provide optimal numbers of catchable -size fish. Fish management is a science because it acknowledges and uses...for example, are more catchable than largemouth bass; and bluegill are more vulnerable to being caught than redear sunfish. No matter which tools

  2. Evaluation of Selected Subacute Effects of the Nitrotoluene Group of Munitions Compounds on Fish and Potential Use in Aquatic Toxicity Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    most cases. It is not possible to distinguish an anterior and posterior region in the juvenile bluegill. Spermatozoa are not usually present in the...Seminiferous tubules with spermatozoa (a) filling the lumen of each Vf I tubule. Note numerous mitotic figures in the L epithelium of the tubules. F...198 Cardwell, R.D., Foreman, D.G., Payne, T.R. and Wilber, D.J., "Acute toxicity of selenium dioxide to fresh water fishes", Arch. Envir. Contam

  3. Upper Mississippi River Wing Dam Notching: The Pre-Notching Fish Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    the Iowa Acadamy of Science 64: 589- 600. Bur, M.T. 1976. Age , growth, and food habits of Catostomidae in Pool 8 of the Upper Mississippi River. M.S...channel catfish, in side channel hoop nets. No bluegill, black crappie, or sauger older than age IV, and only one freshwater drum older than IV were caught...91 vi TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) Age and Growth .. .. ..... ......... ......... 95 Mortality .. .. ......... ......... ...... 107

  4. Multiple stressors in amphibian communities: Effects of chemical contamination, bullfrogs, and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Doyle, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    A leading hypothesis of amphibian population declines is that combinations of multiple stressors contribute to declines. We examined the role that chemical contamination, competition, and predation play singly and in combination in aquatic amphibian communities. We exposed larvae of American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (R. catesbeiana), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the insecticide carbaryl, and ammonium nitrate fertilizer in 1000-L mesocosms. Most significantly, our study demonstrated that the presence of multiple factors reduced survival of B. americanus and A. maculatum and lengthened larval periods of R. sphenocephala. The presence of bluegill had the largest impact on the community; it eliminated B. americanus and A. maculatum and reduced the abundance of R. sphenocephala. Chemical contaminants had the second strongest effect on the community with the insecticide, reducing A. maculatum abundance by 50% and increasing the mass of anurans (frogs and toads) at metamorphosis; the fertilizer positively influenced time and mass at metamorphosis for both anurans and A. maculatum. Presence of overwintered bullfrogs reduced mass and increased time to metamorphosis of anurans. While both bluegill and overwintered bullfrog tadpoles had negative effects on the amphibian community, they performed better in the presence of one another and in contaminated habitats. Our results indicate that predicting deleterious combinations from single-factor effects may not be straightforward. Our research supports the hypothesis that combinations of factors can negatively impact some amphibian species and could contribute to population declines. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Thermoregulation of fish and other aquatic vertebrates in thermally stressed habitats: roles of behavior, competition, predation and nutrients. Progress report, 1 January 1984-31 December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.; Standora, E.A.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanisms by which fish and turtles thermoregulate in thermally stressed habitats were quantitatively determined. Experiments on the roles of behavior, competition and predation on the thermoregulation of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in extreme environments are described. The presence of the bass changes the upper avoidance temperature of a bluegill. Bass from Par Pond and Pond C on the Savannah River Plant have the same selected temperature but the responses of small bass to tests of selected temperature and upper avoidance temperature are altered by the presence of large conspecific. Field enclosure experiments documented the complex nature of the bluegill-bass interaction in Pond C. The effect of diet protein content and temperature on the growth and assimilation efficiency of the turtle Pseudemys scripta are related. Growth rate increased when turtles were fed diets with a higher protein content. Yearling snapping turtles, Chelydra serpentina, did not grow when kept at 15/sup 0/C. Those kept at 25/sup 0/C grew rapidly. There was no difference in selected temperature between the two groups, although CTM's were significantly different. Mathematical modeling focused on an analysis of the relationship between the thermal conductance of animals, the insulative properties of skin and fur and the external properties of animal-environmental interactions. 70 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Persistence of viral RNA in fish infected with VHSV-IVb at 15°C and then moved to warmer temperatures after the onset of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, A E; Merry, G E; Noyes, A D

    2012-07-01

    Smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu Lacepède, bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque (coppernose strain), koi carp, Cyprinus carpio L., and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), were infected by intraperitoneal injection with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus genotype IVb (VHSV-IVb) at 15 °C. When clinical signs of disease developed, one-third of the fish was moved to 20°C and one-third to 25°C. Mortality in challenged fish at all three temperatures ranged from 25 to 45% in smallmouth bass and from 70 to 90% in bluegill. No koi carp or channel catfish died during the study. Viral copy numbers detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qrt-RTPCR) in fish dying at 20 and 25°C decreased over time. In survivors of the challenge, viral copy numbers were higher in the more susceptible species (smallmouth bass and bluegill) than in the more VHSV-IVb disease-resistant species (koi carp and channel catfish). In fish surviving 28days post-infection, prevalence of infection was 66-100% depending on species and temperature, and VHSV-IVb was detected at 10(3) -10(5) copies μg(-1) host RNA. Our results show that qrt-RTPCR is a useful tool to investigate fish kills even 28days after temperatures are elevated above those known to be permissive for VHSV replication.

  7. Uranium bioaccumulation in a freshwater ecosystem: Impact of feeding ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Lisa D., E-mail: lisakraemer@trentu.ca [Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada); Evans, Douglas [Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, K9J 7B8 (Canada)

    2012-11-15

    Uranium bioaccumulation in a lake that had been historically affected by a U mine and (2) to use a combined approach of gut content examination and stable nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis to determine if U bioaccumulation in fish was linked to foodweb ecology. We collected three species of fish: smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), in addition to several invertebrate species including freshwater bivalves (family: Sphaeriidae), dragonfly nymphs (order: Odonata), snails (class: Gastropoda) and zooplankton (family: Daphniidae). Results showed significant U bioaccumulation in the lake impacted by historical mining activities. Uranium accumulation was 2-3 orders of magnitude higher in invertebrates than in the fish species. Within fish, U was measured in operculum (bone), liver and muscle tissue and accumulation followed the order: operculum > liver > muscle. There was a negative relationship between stable nitrogen ratios ({sup 15}N/{sup 14}N) and U bioaccumulation, suggesting U biodilution in the foodweb. Uranium bioaccumulation in all three tissues (bone, liver, muscle) varied among fish species in a consistent manner and followed the order: bluegill > yellow perch > smallmouth bass. Collectively, gut content and stable isotope analysis suggests that invertebrate-consuming fish species (i.e. bluegill) have the highest U levels, while fish species that were mainly piscivores (i.e. smallmouth bass) have the lowest U levels. Our study highlights the importance of understanding the feeding ecology of fish when trying to predict U accumulation.

  8. Nivolumab versus Everolimus in Advanced Renal-Cell Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motzer, Robert J; Escudier, Bernard; McDermott, David F;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab, a programmed death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor, was associated with encouraging overall survival in uncontrolled studies involving previously treated patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma. This randomized, open-label, phase 3 study compared nivolumab with everolimus...... in patients with renal-cell carcinoma who had received previous treatment. METHODS: A total of 821 patients with advanced clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma for which they had received previous treatment with one or two regimens of antiangiogenic therapy were randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio) to receive 3 mg...... patients with previously treated advanced renal-cell carcinoma, overall survival was longer and fewer grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred with nivolumab than with everolimus. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb; CheckMate 025 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01668784.)....

  9. Visual search in ecological and non-ecological displays: evidence for a non-monotonic effect of complexity on performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Chassy

    Full Text Available Considerable research has been carried out on visual search, with single or multiple targets. However, most studies have used artificial stimuli with low ecological validity. In addition, little is known about the effects of target complexity and expertise in visual search. Here, we investigate visual search in three conditions of complexity (detecting a king, detecting a check, and detecting a checkmate with chess players of two levels of expertise (novices and club players. Results show that the influence of target complexity depends on level of structure of the visual display. Different functional relationships were found between artificial (random chess positions and ecologically valid (game positions stimuli: With artificial, but not with ecologically valid stimuli, a "pop out" effect was present when a target was visually more complex than distractors but could be captured by a memory chunk. This suggests that caution should be exercised when generalising from experiments using artificial stimuli with low ecological validity to real-life stimuli.

  10. Concrete evidence of change (Mt 3:1–12; Lk 3:8–14: The prophetic challenge of the Church to civil governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Olufemi Folarin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Democracy is not just about governing by the majority, but also respect and protection of the right of the weak and the minority. The tendency in any government is that the rights of the weak and the minority are denied them and their members are marginalised. In such a situation, what is the role expected of the church which perceives itself to be the mouth-piece of God to checkmate the abuse and promote the positive use of governance for the good of all? In this article, ‘John the Baptist’s ministry’ is used as the springboard for this paper. Grammatical exegesis is adopted to study Matthew 3:1–2 and Luke 3:8–14. The paper integrates the message of John the Baptist in the context of the contemporary democratic experience in such a way that the prophetic voice of the church is heard afresh.

  11. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer – role of nivolumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Giulia Zago,1,2,* Mirte Muller,1,* Michel van den Heuvel,1 Paul Baas1 1Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (NKI-AvL, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Medical Oncology 2, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV, Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017 and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057. In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively. Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. Keywords: nivolumab, advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, immunotherapy, anti-PD-1

  12. Development and evaluation of an emulsified paraffin wax dispenser for season-long mating disruption of Grapholita molesta in commercial peach orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lame, Frédérique M; Miller, James R; Attrerholt, Cynthia A; Gut, Larry J

    2007-08-01

    The University of California at Davis patented the use of emulsified wax to release pheromones for mating disruption. Advantages of these dispensers include low cost, self-adhesion, and biodegradation. We compared the efficacy and practicality of Confuse-OFM, a commercial emulsified wax formulation of oriental fruit moth, Grapiholita molesta (Busck), pheromone with those of Check-Mate OFM-F sprayable pheromone and Isomate-M 100 polyethylene tube dispensers in commercial peach (Prunus spp.) orchards. Efficacy was measured with male captures in pheromone-, virgin female-, and liquid attractant-baited bucket traps as well as by noting injury to shoots and fruit. Two applications of Confuse-OFM were as effective as two applications of CheckMate OFM-F and one application of Isomate-M 100. However, Confuse-OFM was tedious to apply and wasted pheromone with an initially high release rate. We developed a new emulsified wax formulation (Wax Dollops) that maintained release rates above a 5 mg/ha/h threshold twice as long as Confuse-OFM in the laboratory. Field trials confirmed that one application of 3-ml dollops (590 dollops per ha) provided season-long (approximately 15 wk) control equivalent to that of Isomate-M 100 and Confuse-OFM applied as described above. Several applicators were developed for Wax Dollops, including a pneumatic gun that shot dollops >2 m. However, the most efficient method for application was wiping dollops onto tree branches by using a flat-bladed spatula. This research was the basis for a new line of commercial pheromone pest control products equally effective to current commercial formulations but with advantages in cost and flexibility.

  13. Timing is everything: coordination of strike kinematics affects the force exerted by suction feeding fish on attached prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Roi; Day, Steven W; Wainwright, Peter C

    2007-10-01

    During aquatic suction feeding, the predator opens its mouth and rapidly expands its buccal cavity, generating a flow field external to the mouth. The rapid expansion of the buccal cavity produces high fluid velocities and accelerations that extend only a short distance from the mouth (about half of one mouth diameter), and only persist for several milliseconds. Therefore, the predator must precisely time its strike to locate the prey within the narrow region of high flow, during the brief period when flow is at its peak. With flow being the agent for transferring force to the prey, the predator may enhance these forces by producing higher water velocities and faster acceleration at the mouth, but also through increasing the strike's accuracy, i.e. locating the prey closer to the mouth at the instant of peak flow speed. The objectives of this study were to directly measure forces exerted by bluegill Lepomis macrochirus on their prey and to determine how bluegill modify force output. Bluegill were offered ghost shrimp tethered to a load cell that recorded force at 5000 Hz, and feeding sequences were synchronously recorded using 500 Hz video. Peak forces exerted on attached 20 mm shrimp ranged from 0.005 N to 0.506 N. In accordance with the short duration of the strikes (average time to peak gape of approximately 13 ms), the forces recorded were brief (approximately 12 ms from initiation to peak force), and force magnitude declined rapidly after peak force. Statistical analysis indicated that rate of buccal expansion, and prey size, but not strike initiation distance, significantly affected peak force. These observed variables were used with results from flow visualization studies to estimate the flow at the prey's location, which allowed the calculation of drag, pressure gradient force and acceleration reaction force. The relationship between these calculated forces and the measured forces was strong, indicating that the model can be used to estimate forces from

  14. Naricolax hoi n. sp. (Cyclopoida: Bomolochidae) from Arius maculatus (Siluriformes: Ariidae) off Taiwan and a redescription of N. chrysophryenus (Roubal, Armitage & Rohde, 1983) from a new host, Seriola lalandi (Perciformes: Carangidae), in Australian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Kate S; Tang, Danny

    2007-10-01

    We propose that Naricolax stocki (Roubal, 1981) (Cyclopoida: Bomolochidae) of Ho & Lin (2005), reported from the spotted catfish Arius maculatus (Thunburg) off Taiwan, represents a new species, N. hoi n. sp. N. hoi can be distinguished from six known congeners by the shape of the rostral area, the maxillary armature and the structural details of legs 3 and 4. N. chrysophryenus (Roubal, Armitage & Rohde, 1983) is redescribed on the basis of recently collected material from wild and farmed yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi Valenciennes in southern and eastern Australian waters, providing the first record of Naricolax Ho, Do & Kasahara, 1983 from a carangid host. A key to the species of Naricolax is provided.

  15. The influence of finfish aquaculture on benthic fish and crustacean assemblages in Fitzgerald Bay, South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jason E; Williams, Kane

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sea-cage aquaculture on wildfish assemblages has received little attention outside of Europe. Sea-cage aquaculture of finfish is a major focus in South Australia, and while the main species farmed is southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii), there is also an important yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) industry. Yellowtail kingfish aquaculture did not appear to have any local or regional effects on demersal assemblages (primarily fish, but also some crustaceans) surveyed by baited remote underwater video (BRUV) in Fitzgerald Bay. We did, however, detect small scale spatial variations in assemblages within the bay. The type of bait used strongly influenced the assemblage recorded, with significantly greater numbers of fish attracted to deployments where sardines were used as the bait to compared to those with no bait. The pelleted feed used by the aquaculture industry was just as attractive as sardines at one site, and intermediate between sardines and no bait at the other. There was significant temporal variability in assemblages at both farm sites and one control site, while the second control site was temporally stable (over the 9 weeks of the study). Overall, the results suggested that aquaculture was having little if any impact on the abundance and assemblage structure of the demersal macrofauna in Fitzgerald Bay.

  16. The Impact of Molecular Gas on Mass Models of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Bradley S; Walter, F; Leroy, A; Carignan, C

    2015-01-01

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from the HERACLES survey. We combine our data with literature THINGS, SINGS and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (${\\rm H{\\scriptstyle I}}$ from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and ${\\rm H{\\scriptstyle I}}$ kinematics with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors $\\mathrm{\\alpha_{CO}}$ to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density - the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES and KINGFISH data. We study t...

  17. The Impact of Molecular Gas on Mass Models of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B. S.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A.; Carignan, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors αCO to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro-Frenk-White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of αCO can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.

  18. Determining Type Ia Supernovae Host galaxy extinction probabilities and a statistical approach to estimating the absorption-to-reddening ratio $R_V$

    CERN Document Server

    Cikota, Aleksandar; Marleau, Francine

    2016-01-01

    We investigate limits on the extinction values of Type Ia supernovae to statistically determine the most probable color excess, E(B-V), with galactocentric distance, and use these statistics to determine the absorption-to-reddening ratio, $R_V$, for dust in the host galaxies. We determined pixel-based dust mass surface density maps for 59 galaxies from the Key Insight on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with \\textit{Herschel} (KINGFISH, Kennicutt et al. (2011)). We use Type Ia supernova spectral templates (Hsiao et al. 2007) to develop a Monte Carlo simulation of color excess E(B-V) with $R_V$ = 3.1 and investigate the color excess probabilities E(B-V) with projected radial galaxy center distance. Additionally, we tested our model using observed spectra of SN 1989B, SN 2002bo and SN 2006X, which occurred in three KINGFISH galaxies. Finally, we determined the most probable reddening for Sa-Sap, Sab-Sbp, Sbc-Scp, Scd-Sdm, S0 and Irregular galaxy classes as a function of $R/R_{25}$. We find that the larges...

  19. Birds Communities at Mangrove of Batu Ampar, Kubu Raya District, West Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarwadi Budi Hernowo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Batu Ampar mangrove is an important bird habitat especially for birds which have relation to mangrove ecosystem in West Kalimantan. The research was conducted in February to March 2007, at mangrove Batu Ampar demo site. Sampling was done to get representative area for bird survey. The 19 transects were chosen as sampling site to collect bird data such as species and number of individual. Bird surveys were carried out using Reconnaissance method and index point of abundance (IPA count method. The length of each transect was approximately 500 m. The results showed that the bird community's structure dominated by insectivorous birds represented approximately 60 % of total bird's species at mangrove Batu Ampar demo site. The abundance numbers of the individual with the bird's species has relation pattern like J opposite. Percentage of dominant bird species was approximately 11%, those are such as stork billed kingfisher, white-collared kingfisher, common iora, chestnuts-rumped babbler, Strip-Tit Babbler, magpie robin, ashy tailorbird, mangrove blue flycatcher, pied fantail, mangrove whistler, Brown-throated Sunbird and Cooper-Throated Sunbird. Vertical structure of mangrove vegetation was used by birds at mangrove Batu Ampar demo site is mainly B stratum, and it used around 60% birds species. Based on dendrogram analysis there were 5 cluster birds species. The mangrove bird specialists found at sampling area were mangrove blue flycatcher and Cooper throated sunbird.

  20. Visibility from roads predict the distribution of invasive fishes in agricultural ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Kizuka

    Full Text Available Propagule pressure and habitat characteristics are important factors used to predict the distribution of invasive alien species. For species exhibiting strong propagule pressure because of human-mediated introduction of species, indicators of introduction potential must represent the behavioral characteristics of humans. This study examined 64 agricultural ponds to assess the visibility of ponds from surrounding roads and its value as a surrogate of propagule pressure to explain the presence and absence of two invasive fish species. A three-dimensional viewshed analysis using a geographic information system quantified the visual exposure of respective ponds to humans. Binary classification trees were developed as a function of their visibility from roads, as well as five environmental factors: river density, connectivity with upstream dam reservoirs, pond area, chlorophyll a concentration, and pond drainage. Traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction (road density and proportion of urban land-use area were alternatively included for comparison instead of visual exposure. The presence of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus was predicted by the ponds' higher visibility from roads and pond connection with upstream dam reservoirs. Results suggest that fish stocking into ponds and their dispersal from upstream sources facilitated species establishment. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides distribution was constrained by chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting their lower adaptability to various environments than that of Bluegill. Based on misclassifications from classification trees for Bluegill, pond visual exposure to roads showed greater predictive capability than traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction. Pond visibility is an effective predictor of invasive species distribution. Its wider use might improve management and mitigate further invasion. The visual exposure of recipient ecosystems to humans is important for many

  1. Lakeshore zoning has heterogeneous ecological effects: an application of a coupled economic-ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsic, Van; Lewis, David J; Radeloff, Volker C

    2010-04-01

    Housing growth has been widely shown to be negatively correlated with wildlife populations, avian richness, anadromous fish, and exotic invasion. Zoning is the most frequently used public policy to manage housing development and is often motivated by a desire to protect the environment. Zoning is also pervasive, taking place in all 50 states. One relevant question that has received little research concerns the effectiveness of zoning to meet ecological goals. In this paper, we examined whether minimum frontage zoning policies have made a positive impact on the lakes they were aimed to protect in Vilas County, Wisconsin, U.S.A. We used an economic model that estimated when a given lot will be subdivided and how many new lots will be created as a function of zoning. Using the economic model, we simulated the effects of multiple zoning scenarios on lakeshore development. The simulated development patterns were then input to ecological models that predicted the amount of coarse woody debris (CWD) and the growth rate of bluegills as a function of residential density. Comparison of the ecological outcomes under different simulated zoning scenarios quantified the effect of zoning policies on residential density, CWD, and bluegill growth rates. Our results showed that zoning significantly affected residential density, CWD counts, and bluegill growth rates across our study area, although the effect was less clear at the scale of individual lake. Our results suggest that homogeneous zoning (i.e., for a county) is likely to have mixed results when applied to a heterogeneous landscape. Further, our results suggest that zoning regimes with a higher minimum shoreline frontage are likely to have larger ecological effects when applied to lakes that are less developed.

  2. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors.

  3. Effects of thermal discharges on the distribution and abundance of adult fishes in the Savannah River and selected tributaries: Annual report, November 1984-August 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M.H.; Saul, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the juvenile and adult fish community in streams draining the SRP and in the Savannah River in the area of the SRP was conducted between September 1984 and September 1985. The major objectives were to examine the abundance and distribution of fishes near the Savannah River Plant in relation to thermal discharges into the river, creeks, and floodplain swamps and to determine the rate of impingement of adult and juvenile fishes on the intake screens at the SRP pumphouses. The most abundant fishes (excluding minnows) taken by electrofishing were the redbreast sunfish (41.6%), spotted sucker (8.8%), spotted sunfish (8.2%), largemouth bass (5.7%), bluegill (5.6%), and American eel (5.4%). The most abundant fishes taken by hoop netting were the flat bullhead (38.0%), channel catfish (11.9%), bluegill (9.4%), white catfish (7.9%), black crappie (6.5%), and redbreast sunfish (5.5%). Dominant species in the intake canals were the bluegill, redbreast sunfish, and black crappie. Dominant species in the nonthermal river were the redbreast sunfish, spotted sunfish, spotted sucker, largemouth bass, channel catfish, white catfish, and flat bullhead. Dominant species in the nonthermal creeks were fairly similar to river species except that the catfishes were not as well represented. The thermal river and creek habitats differed from the nonthermal habitats in having higher percentages (although often lower numbers) of channel catfish, white catfish, largemouth bass, and coastal shiner and a lower percentage of flat bullhead.

  4. Susceptibility of various Japanese freshwater fish species to an isolate of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Takafumi; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    mortalities in bluegill Lepomis macrochirus used as positive controls, Japanese fluvial sculpin Cottus pollux, and iwana Salvelinus leucomaenis pluvius were 50, 80 and 0%, respectively. In Expt 2, cumulative mortalities of 100, 100 and 10% were observed in Japanese fluvial sculpin C. pollux, Japanese rice...... fish Oryzias latipes and yoshinobori Rhinogobius sp., respectively. No mortality was observed in honmoroko Gnathopogon caerulescens, akaza Liobagrus reini or Japanese striped loach Cobitis biwae. VHSV was detected by RT-PCR from samples of kidney, spleen, and brain from all dead fish, and virus re...

  5. Inter-laboratory comparison of cell lines for susceptibility to three viruses: VHSV, IHNV and IPNV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ellen; Carstensen, Bendix; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Eleven European National Reference Laboratories participated in an inter-laboratory comparison of the susceptibility of 5 selected cell lines to 3 fish pathogenic viruses. The test included viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and infectious...... pancreatic necrosis Virus (IPNV), and the cell lines derived from bluegill fry (BF-2), chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214), epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC), fathead minnow (FHM) and rainbow trout gonad (RTG-2). The results showed that for isolation of VHSV, BF-2 and RTG-2 cells performed equally well...

  6. Population characteristics and ecological role of northern pike in shallow natural lakes in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Northern pike Esox lucius were sampled in Nebraska's Sandhill lakes during 1998 and 1999 to determine population characteristics and their influence on the fish community in these shallow, warm lakes at the southwestern edge of this species' natural range. Density-dependent growth, size structure, and condition were not evident in the northern pike populations sampled. Relative abundance of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides was positively related to size structure of yellow perch Perca flavescens and bluegills Lepomis macrochirus when northen pike were absent. When northern pike and largemouth bass populations were sympatric, these relationships were less evident. Population size structure of yellow perch was lower in lakes with northern pike, but decreased size structure was not evident for bluegills. Northern pike growth decreased with July bottom water temperature, which ranged from 20??C to 25??C. Recruitment patterns of northern pike in the Sandhill lakes appeared to be lake-specific, strong and weak year-classes occurring in the same year among different populations. Northern pike in these shallow, warm lakes act as a top-down predator and appear to structure fish communities predominated by largemouth bass and panfish. Biologists managing warmwater Midwestern lakes thus should consider the effect of northern pike on fish communities.

  7. Potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on a shallow natural lake fish assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeggemann, Jason J.; Kaemingk, Mark A.; DeBates, T.J.; Paukert, Craig P.; Krause, J.; Letvin, Alexander P.; Stevens, Tanner M.; Willis, David W.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Much uncertainty exists around how fish communities in shallow lakes will respond to climate change. In this study, we modelled the effects of increased water temperatures on consumption and growth rates of two piscivores (northern pike [Esox lucius] and largemouth bass [Micropterus salmoides]) and examined relative effects of consumption by these predators on two prey species (bluegill [Lepomis macrochirus] and yellow perch [Perca flavescens]). Bioenergetics models were used to simulate the effects of climate change on growth and food consumption using predicted 2040 and 2060 temperatures in a shallow Nebraska Sandhill lake, USA. The patterns and magnitude of daily and cumulative consumption during the growing season (April–October) were generally similar between the two predators. However, growth of northern pike was always reduced (−3 to −45% change) compared to largemouth bass that experienced subtle changes (4 to −6% change) in weight by the end of the growing season. Assuming similar population size structure and numbers of predators in 2040–2060, future consumption of bluegill and yellow perch by northern pike and largemouth bass will likely increase (range: 3–24%), necessitating greater prey biomass to meet future energy demands. The timing of increased predator consumption will likely shift towards spring and fall (compared to summer), when prey species may not be available in the quantities required. Our findings suggest that increased water temperatures may affect species at the edge of their native range (i.e. northern pike) and a potential mismatch between predator and prey could exist.

  8. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amidan, B. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the “worst case” pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  9. Differences between main-channel and off-channel food webs in the upper Mississippi River revealed by fatty acid profiles of consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, James H.; Bartsch, Michelle; Gutreuter, Steve; Knights, Brent C.; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Arts, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Large river systems are often thought to contain a mosaic of patches with different habitat characteristics driven by differences in flow and mixing environments. Off-channel habitats (e.g., backwater areas, secondary channels) can become semi-isolated from main-channel water inputs, leading to the development of distinct biogeochemical environments. Observations of adult bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in the main channel of the Mississippi River led to speculation that the main channel offered superior food resources relative to off-channel areas. One important aspect of food quality is the quantity and composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). We sampled consumers from main-channel and backwater habitats to determine whether they differed in PUFA content. Main-channel individuals for relatively immobile species (young-of-year bluegill, zebra mussels [Dreissena polymorpha], and plain pocketbook mussels [Lampsilis cardium]) had significantly greater PUFA content than off-channel individuals. No difference in PUFA was observed for the more mobile gizzard shad (Dorsoma cepedianum), which may move between main-channel and off-channel habitats even at early life-history stages. As off-channel habitats become isolated from main-channel waters, flow and water column nitrogen decrease, potentially improving conditions for nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and vascular plants that, in turn, have low PUFA content. We conclude that main-channel food webs of the upper Mississippi River provide higher quality food resources for some riverine consumers as compared to food webs in off-channel habitats.

  10. Susceptibility of various Japanese freshwater fish species to an isolate of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takafumi; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2013-11-25

    Genotype IVb of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was isolated for the first time in the Great Lakes basin in 2003, where it spread and caused mass mortalities in several wild fish species throughout the basin. In order to prevent further spreading of the disease and to assess risks of new genotypes invading new watersheds, basic microbiological information such as pathogenicity studies are essential. In this study, experimental infections were conducted on 7 indigenous freshwater fish species from Japan by immersion with a VHSV genotype IVb isolate. In Expt 1, cumulative mortalities in bluegill Lepomis macrochirus used as positive controls, Japanese fluvial sculpin Cottus pollux, and iwana Salvelinus leucomaenis pluvius were 50, 80 and 0%, respectively. In Expt 2, cumulative mortalities of 100, 100 and 10% were observed in Japanese fluvial sculpin C. pollux, Japanese rice fish Oryzias latipes and yoshinobori Rhinogobius sp., respectively. No mortality was observed in honmoroko Gnathopogon caerulescens, akaza Liobagrus reini or Japanese striped loach Cobitis biwae. VHSV was detected by RT-PCR from samples of kidney, spleen, and brain from all dead fish, and virus re-isolation by cell culture was successful from all dead fish. We detected the virus in the brain from a few surviving bluegill 50 d post exposure by both cell culture and RT-PCR. These results revealed that VHSV IVb could become a serious threat to wild freshwater fish species in Japan, and that some surviving fish might become healthy carriers of the virus.

  11. Isolation and molecular characterization of a novel picornavirus from baitfish in the USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas B D Phelps

    Full Text Available During both regulatory and routine surveillance sampling of baitfish from the states of Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, and Wisconsin, USA, isolates (n = 20 of a previously unknown picornavirus were obtained from kidney/spleen or entire viscera of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas and brassy minnows (Hybognathus hankinsoni. Following the appearance of a diffuse cytopathic effect, examination of cell culture supernatant by negative contrast electron microscopy revealed the presence of small, round virus particles (∼ 30-32 nm, with picornavirus-like morphology. Amplification and sequence analysis of viral RNA identified the agent as a novel member of the Picornaviridae family, tentatively named fathead minnow picornavirus (FHMPV. The full FHMPV genome consisted of 7834 nucleotides. Phylogenetic analysis based on 491 amino acid residues of the 3D gene showed 98.6% to 100% identity among the 20 isolates of FHMPV compared in this study while only 49.5% identity with its nearest neighbor, the bluegill picornavirus (BGPV isolated from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus. Based on complete polyprotein analysis, the FHMPV shared 58% (P1, 33% (P2 and 43% (P3 amino acid identities with BGPV and shared less than 40% amino acid identity with all other picornaviruses. Hence, we propose the creation of a new genus (Piscevirus within the Picornaviridae family. The impact of FHMPV on the health of fish populations is unknown at present.

  12. Cool dust heating and temperature mixing in nearby star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, L K; Bianchi, S; Gordon, K D; Aniano, G; Calzetti, D; Dale, D A; Helou, G; Hinz, J L; Kennicutt, R C; Roussel, H; Wilson, C D; Bolatto, A; Boquien, M; Croxall, K V; Galametz, M; de Paz, A Gil; Koda, J; Munoz-Mateos, J C; Sandstrom, K M; Sauvage, M; Vigroux, L; Zibetti, S

    2014-01-01

    Physical conditions of the interstellar medium in galaxies are closely linked to the ambient radiation field and the heating of dust grains. In order to characterize dust properties in galaxies over a wide range of physical conditions, we present here the radial surface brightness profiles of the entire sample of 61 galaxies from Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH). The main goal of our work is the characterization of the grain emissivities, dust temperatures, and interstellar radiation fields responsible for heating the dust. After fitting the dust and stellar radial profiles with exponential functions, we fit the far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) in each annular region with single-temperature modified black bodies using both variable (MBBV) and fixed (MBBF) emissivity indices beta, as well as with physically motivated dust models. Results show that while most SED parameters decrease with radius, the emissivity index beta also decreases with radius in...

  13. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  14. THE IMPACT OF MOLECULAR GAS ON MASS MODELS OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, B. S.; Blok, W. J. G. de [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Carignan, C., E-mail: frank@astron.nl [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2016-04-15

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors α{sub CO} to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro–Frenk–White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of α{sub CO} can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.

  15. Using the Bayesian network relative risk model risk assessment process to evaluate management alternatives for the South River and upper Shenandoah River, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Annie F; Graham, Scarlett E; Harris, Meagan J; Markiewicz, April J; Stinson, Jonah M; Landis, Wayne G

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted a series of regional scale risk assessments using the Bayesian Network Relative Risk Model (BN-RRM) to evaluate the efficacy of 2 remediation options in the reduction of risks to the South River and upper Shenandoah River study area. The 2 remediation options were 1) bank stabilization (BST) and 2) the implementation of best management practices for agriculture (AgBMPs) to reduce Hg input in to the river. Eight endpoints were chosen to be part of the risk assessment, based on stakeholder input. Although Hg contamination was the original impetus for the site being remediated, multiple chemical and physical stressors were evaluated in this analysis. Specific models were built that incorporated the changes expected from AgBMP and BST and were based on our previous research. Changes in risk were calculated, and sensitivity and influence analyses were conducted on the models. The assessments indicated that AgBMP would only slightly change risk in the study area but that negative impacts were also unlikely. Bank stabilization would reduce risk to Hg for the smallmouth bass and belted kingfisher and increase risk to abiotic water quality endpoints. However, if care were not taken to prevent loss of nesting habitat to belted kingfisher, an increase in risk to that species would occur. Because Hg was only one of several stressors contributing to risk, the change in risk depended on the specific endpoint. Sensitivity analysis provided a list of variables to be measured as part of a monitoring program. Influence analysis provided the range of maximum and minimum risk values for each endpoint and remediation option. This research demonstrates the applicability of ecological risk assessment and specifically the BN-RRM as part of a long-term adaptive management scheme for managing contaminated sites. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:100-114. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. DETERMINING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HOST GALAXY EXTINCTION PROBABILITIES AND A STATISTICAL APPROACH TO ESTIMATING THE ABSORPTION-TO-REDDENING RATIO R{sub V}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cikota, Aleksandar [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Deustua, Susana [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Marleau, Francine, E-mail: acikota@eso.org [Institute for Astro- and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25/8, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-03-10

    We investigate limits on the extinction values of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to statistically determine the most probable color excess, E(B – V), with galactocentric distance, and use these statistics to determine the absorption-to-reddening ratio, R{sub V}, for dust in the host galaxies. We determined pixel-based dust mass surface density maps for 59 galaxies from the Key Insight on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH). We use SN Ia spectral templates to develop a Monte Carlo simulation of color excess E(B – V) with R{sub V} = 3.1 and investigate the color excess probabilities E(B – V) with projected radial galaxy center distance. Additionally, we tested our model using observed spectra of SN 1989B, SN 2002bo, and SN 2006X, which occurred in three KINGFISH galaxies. Finally, we determined the most probable reddening for Sa–Sap, Sab–Sbp, Sbc–Scp, Scd–Sdm, S0, and irregular galaxy classes as a function of R/R{sub 25}. We find that the largest expected reddening probabilities are in Sab–Sb and Sbc–Sc galaxies, while S0 and irregular galaxies are very dust poor. We present a new approach for determining the absorption-to-reddening ratio R{sub V} using color excess probability functions and find values of R{sub V} = 2.71 ± 1.58 for 21 SNe Ia observed in Sab–Sbp galaxies, and R{sub V} = 1.70 ± 0.38, for 34 SNe Ia observed in Sbc–Scp galaxies.

  17. Design and Implementation of an IP-Based Security Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Eke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous loss of lives and properties that may be attributed to criminals in recent times worldwide has become a source of worry to all and sundry. The situation has come to the alarming rate that the authority has sought for the immediate means of checkmating it without delay. Therefore, this work centers on the design and implementation of an Internet Protocol (IPbased security surveillance system. It incorporates remote viewing and storage of live video feeds and also remote motion control of the camera, all monitored with the use of a Personal Computer (PC. All the designs in this paper are software based. Hence, the software applications are developed using Visual C-Sharp (C# programming language to enable the proper monitoring and control of the entire system in which video feeds from the camera are viewed and also recorded on PC. The result obtained showed that with proper implementation, the surveillance system was found to be superb in all its ramifications.

  18. Nurturing Corporate Governance System: The Emerging Trends in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin James Inyang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper traced the nascent history of corporate governance system in Nigeria and noted the paucity of literature in the subject. Mainstream issues of corporate governance in the country emerged with the enactment of the Companies and Allied Matters Act of 1990 (CAMA 1990, which established the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC, and charged it with the responsibility of overseeing the regulation and supervision of the formation, incorporation, registration, management and winding up of companies. The corporate governance codes of both the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC and the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN, gave impetus for the development of corporate governance structure, to ensure transparency, accountability, probity, integrity and fairness in the management and control of the public corporations, and thereby creating value for the shareholders and stakeholders. Major challenges which required urgent attention to enhance the effectiveness of the system were noted thus: making the voluntary codes mandatory; developing more effective mechanisms for monitoring compliance and enforcement; developing strong internal control mechanisms to checkmate the boards oversight responsibility; crafting strategies to enhance shareholders activism and the extension of the codes to state-owned enterprises with more cases of corporate governance abuses.

  19. An Overview of the Legal framework of Advanced Fee Fraud and Cybercrime in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu’azu Abdullahi Saulawa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper seeks to discuss an overview on the advanced fee fraud offences as well as cybercrime in Nigerian. The aims of the paper focus on discussing the advanced fee fraud under the related provisions of Advanced Fee Fraud Act 2006 on the success of the law in addressing the practices of crimes in relation to information technology. The paper also discusses the cybercrimes in Nigeria with a brief look out on the Cybercrime (Prohibition and Prevention Act 2015. Further, it also aims at examining the application of the law in the fraud offences which raises an issue of the regulatory framework of the cybercrime. The methodology adopted by the paper is doctrinal approach method wherein both primary and secondary sources of data were analysed, particularly the local laws and other relevant documents. The finding of the paper reveals that the relevant section of the in the Advanced Fee Fraud Act that deals with electronic communication has not been invoked. This is because the discussed relevant law under the advanced fee fraud did not in any away deal with cases concerning electronic communication under section 13. The paper recommends that there is a need to strengthen the adequacy of the legal framework on the Cybercrimes so as to checkmate such practices in Nigeria.

  20. The mate-in-n problem of infinite chess is decidable

    CERN Document Server

    Hamkins, Joel David

    2012-01-01

    Infinite chess is chess played on an infinite edgeless chessboard. The familiar chess pieces move about according to their usual chess rules, and each player strives to place the opposing king into checkmate. The mate-in-n problem of infinite chess is the problem of determining whether a designated player can force a win from a given finite position in at most n moves. A naive formulation of this problem leads to assertions of high arithmetic complexity with 2n alternating quantifiers---there is a move for white, such that for every black reply, there is a move for white, and so on. In such a formulation, the problem does not appear to be decidable; and one cannot expect to search an infinitely branching game tree even to finite depth. Nevertheless, the main theorem of this article, confirming a conjecture of the first author and C. D. A. Evans, establishes that the mate-in-n problem of infinite chess is computably decidable, uniformly in the position and in n. Furthermore, there is a computable strategy for ...

  1. Scalar versus fermionic top partner interpretations of $t\\bar t + E_T^{\\rm miss}$ searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kraml, Sabine; Panizzi, Luca; Prager, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    We assess how different ATLAS and CMS searches for supersymmetry in the $t\\bar t + E_T^{\\rm miss}$ final state at Run 1 of the LHC constrain scenarios with a fermionic top partner and a dark matter candidate. We find that the efficiencies of these searches in all-hadronic, 1-lepton and 2-lepton channels are quite similar for scalar and fermionic top partners. Therefore, in general, efficiency maps for stop-neutralino simplified models can also be applied to fermionic top-partner models, provided the narrow width approximation holds in the latter. Owing to the much higher production cross-sections of heavy top quarks as compared to stops, masses up to $m_T\\approx 850$ GeV can be excluded from the Run 1 stop searches. Since the simplified-model results published by ATLAS and CMS do not extend to such high masses, we provide our own efficiency maps obtained with CheckMATE and MadAnalysis 5 for these searches. Finally, we also discuss how generic gluino/squark searches in multi-jet final states constrain heavy to...

  2. Radiative Type III Seesaw Model and its collider phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    von der Pahlen, Federico; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the present bounds of a scotogenic model, the Radiative Type III Seesaw (RSIII), in which an additional scalar doublet and at least two fermion triplets of $SU(2)_L$ are added to the Standard Model (SM). In the RSIII the new physics (NP) sector is odd under an exact global $Z_2$ symmetry. This symmetry guaranties that the lightest NP neutral particle is stable, providing a natural dark matter (DM) candidate, and leads to naturally suppressed neutrino masses generated by a one-loop realization of an effective Weinberg operator. We focus on the region with the highest sensitivity in present and future LHC searches, with light scalar DM and at least one NP fermion triplet at the sub-TeV scale. This region allows for significant production cross-sections of NP fermion pairs at the LHC. We reinterpret a set of searches for supersymmetric particles at the LHC obtained using the package CheckMATE, to set limits on our model as a function of the masses of the NP particles and their Yukawa interactions. The...

  3. Laboratory studies of the effects of pressure and dissolved gas supersaturation on turbine-passed fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amidan, B. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Designing advanced turbine systems requires knowledge of environmental conditions that injure or kill fish such as the stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes fish experience during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. The study investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

  4. Simulated passage through a modified Kaplan turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Amidan, B. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-04-01

    A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the “worst case” pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more “fish-friendly” mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). These data indicate that altered operating conditions that raise the nadir (low point) of the turbine passage pressure regime could reduce the injury and mortality rates of fish during turbine passage. Fall Chinook salmon were not injured or killed when subjected to the modified pressure scenario. Bluegills were more sensitive to pressure effects than fall Chinook salmon, but injury and mortality rates were lower under the modified Kaplan pressure regime. This improvement was particularly significant among fish that were acclimated to greater water pressures (traveling at greater depth).

  5. Propagation and isolation of ranaviruses in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Nicolajsen, Nicole; Christophersen, Maj-Britt

    2009-01-01

    fish were sampled twice weekly and 7 organs were processed separately according to the three methods. Samples incubated on BF-2 cells at 22 °C for 2 weeks+1 week sub-cultivation (method 1) provided more positive results than the other 2 methods and when using the EPC cell line. Virus was most......The optimal in vitro propagation procedure for a panel of ranavirus isolates and the best method for isolation of Epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) from organ material in cell-culture were investigated. The panel of ranavirus isolates included: Frog virus 3 (FV3), Bohle iridovirus (BIV......), Pike-perch iridovirus (PPIV), European catfish virus (ECV), European sheatfish virus (ESV), EHNV, Doctor fish virus (DFV), Guppy virus 6 (GF6), short-finned eel virus (SERV) and Rana esculenta virus Italy 282/102 (REV 282/102). Each isolate was titrated in five cell lines: bluegill fry (BF-2...

  6. Comparative toxicity of methanol and N,N-dimethylformamide to freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, S.H.; Knuth, M.L.; Anderson-Buchou, C.D.; Brooke, L.T.; Lima, A.R.; Shubat, P.J.

    1986-10-01

    The organic solvents methanol and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) are used widely as industrial solvents. Although some toxicity data appear in the literature for methanol and DMF, there have been few studies which have been flow-through tests for a standard 48- or 96-h exposure period with measured toxicant concentrations. In this study, 96-h flow-through acute toxicity tests with methanol and DMF were conducted with three species of freshwater fish - rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Static acute toxicity tests (48 h) were conducted with DMF and two species of freshwater invertebrates - a midge (Paratanytarsus parthenogeneticus) and a daphnid (Daphnia magna). Median lethal (LC50) and median effect (EC50) concentrations for 96-h exposures were determined for fish and 48-h EC50's were determined for invertebrates.

  7. Exposure-related effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Denise A. Mayer,

    2015-01-01

    The exposure-related effects of a commercially prepared spray-dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, were evaluated on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. Nine species of young-of-the-year fish were exposed to SDP for 24 hours by using continuous-flow, serial-dilution exposure systems at temperatures of 12 degrees Celsius (°C; 2 species; Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout] and Salvelinus fontinalis [brook trout]), 17 °C (3 species; Perca flavescens [yellow perch], Sander vitreus [walleye], and Acipenser fulvescens [lake sturgeon]), or 22 °C (4 species; Micropterus salmoides [largemouth bass], Micropterus dolomieu [smallmouth bass], Lepomis macrochirus [bluegill sunfish], and Ictalurus punctatus [channel catfish]).

  8. Microscopic examination of skin in native and nonnative fish from Lake Tahoe exposed to ultraviolet radiation and fluoranthene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevertz, Amanda K., E-mail: agevertz@geiconsultants.com [Miami University, Department of Zoology, 212 Pearson Hall, Oxford 45056, Ohio (United States); GEI Consultants, Inc. , 4601 DTC Blvd, Suite 900, Denver 80237, Colorado (United States); Oris, James T., E-mail: orisjt@miamioh.edu [Miami University, Department of Zoology, 212 Pearson Hall, Oxford 45056, Ohio (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: •PAH cause photo-induced toxicity in aquatic organisms in the natural environment. •Montane lakes like Lake Tahoe receive PAH exposure from recreational watercraft. •These lakes are susceptible to invasion and establishment of non-native species. •Non-natives were less tolerant to photo-toxicity compared to native species. •Sensitivity differences were related to levels of oxidative damage in epidermis. -- Abstract: The presence of nonnative species in Lake Tahoe (CA/NV), USA has been an ongoing concern for many decades, and the management of these species calls for an understanding of their ability to cope with the Lake's stressors and for an understanding of their potential to out-compete and reduce the populations of native species. Decreasing levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) due to eutrophication and increasing levels of phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to recreational activities may combine to affect the relative ability of native versus nonnative fish species to survive in the lake. Following a series of toxicity tests which exposed larvae of the native Lahontan redside minnow (Richardsonius egregius) and the nonnative warm-water bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to UVR and FLU, the occurrence of skin damage and/or physiologic defense mechanisms were studied using multiple microscopic techniques. The native minnow appeared to exhibit fewer instances of skin damage and increased instances of cellular coping mechanisms. This study supports the results of previous work conducted by the authors, who determined that the native redside minnow is the more tolerant of the two species, and that setting and adhering to a water quality standard for UVR transparency may aid in preventing the spread of the less tolerant nonnative bluegill and similar warm-water species.

  9. Revealing the cold dust in low-metallicity environments. I. Photometry analysis of the Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Herschel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Madden, S. C.; Galliano, F.; Hony, S.; Sauvage, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Roussel, H.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Galametz, M.; Cormier, D.; Lebouteiller, V.; Wu, R.; Baes, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; De Looze, I.; Karczewski, O. Ł.; Panuzzo, P.; Spinoglio, L.; Vaccari, M.; Wilson, C. D.

    2013-09-01

    Context. We present new photometric data from our Herschel guaranteed time key programme, the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), dedicated to the observation of the gas and dust in low-metallicity environments. A total of 48 dwarf galaxies were observed with the PACS and SPIRE instruments onboard the Herschel Space Observatory at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm. Aims: The goal of this paper is to provide reliable far-infrared (FIR) photometry for the DGS sample and to analyse the FIR/submillimetre (submm) behaviour of the DGS galaxies. We focus on a systematic comparison of the derived FIR properties (FIR luminosity, LFIR, dust mass, Mdust, dust temperature, T, emissivity index, β) with more metal-rich galaxies and investigate the detection of a potential submm excess. Methods: The data reduction method is adapted for each galaxy in order to derive the most reliable photometry from the final maps. The derived PACS flux densities are compared with the Spitzer MIPS 70 and 160 μm bands. We use colour-colour diagrams to analyse the FIR/submm behaviour of the DGS galaxies and modified blackbody fitting procedures to determine their dust properties. To study the variation in these dust properties with metallicity, we also include galaxies from the Herschel KINGFISH sample, which contains more metal-rich environments, totalling 109 galaxies. Results: The location of the DGS galaxies on Herschel colour-colour diagrams highlights the differences in dust grain properties and/or global environments of low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. The dust in DGS galaxies is generally warmer than in KINGFISH galaxies (TDGS ~ 32 K and TKINGFISH ~ 23 K). The emissivity index, β, is ~1.7 in the DGS, however metallicity does not make a strong effect on β. The proportion of dust mass relative to stellar mass is lower in low-metallicity galaxies: Mdust/Mstar ~ 0.02% for the DGS versus 0.1% for KINGFISH. However, per unit dust mass, dwarf galaxies emit about six times more in the FIR/submm than

  10. Current land bird distribution and trends in population abundance between 1982 and 2012 on Rota, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Brinck, Kevin W.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Amidon, Fred A.; Radley, Paul M.; Berkowitz, S. Paul; Banko, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The western Pacific island of Rota is the fourth largest human-inhabited island in the Mariana archipelago and designated an Endemic Bird Area. Between 1982 and 2012, 12 point-transect distance-sampling surveys were conducted to assess bird population status. Surveys did not consistently sample the entire island; thus, we used a ratio estimator to estimate bird abundances in strata not sampled during every survey. Trends in population size were reliably estimated for 11 of 13 bird species, and 7 species declined over the 30-y time series, including the island collared-dove Streptopelia bitorquata, white-throated ground-dove Gallicolumba xanthonura, Mariana fruit-dove Ptilinopus roseicapilla, collared kingfisher Todiramphus chloris orii, Micronesian myzomela Myzomela rubratra, black drongo Dicrurus macrocercus, and Mariana crow Corvus kubaryi. The endangered Mariana crow (x̄  =  81 birds, 95% CI 30–202) declined sharply to fewer than 200 individuals in 2012, down from 1,491 birds in 1982 (95% CI  =  815–3,115). Trends increased for white tern Gygis alba, rufous fantail Rhipidura rufifrons mariae, and Micronesian starling Aplonis opaca. Numbers of the endangered Rota white-eye Zosterops rotensis declined from 1982 to the late 1990s but returned to 1980s levels by 2012, resulting in an overall stable trend. Trends for the yellow bittern Ixobrychus sinensis were inconclusive. Eurasian tree sparrow Passer montanus trends were not assessed; however, their numbers in 1982 and 2012 were similar. Occupancy models of the 2012 survey data revealed general patterns of land cover use and detectability among 12 species that could be reliably modeled. Occupancy was not assessed for the Eurasian tree sparrow because of insufficient detections. Based on the 2012 survey, bird distribution and abundance across Rota revealed three general patterns: 1) range restriction, including Mariana crow, Rota white-eye, and Eurasian tree sparrow; 2) widespread distribution, low

  11. Final integrated trip report: site visits to Area 50, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam National Wildlife Refuge, War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Guam, Rota and Saipan, CNMI, 2004-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steven C.; Pratt, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Limestone forests are the most diverse natural plant communities of Guam. Like other natural vegetation types, these forests have a long history of anthropogenic disturbances, being altered and shaped by humans for more than 4,000 years. Although this occupation represents a relatively long human influence in comparison to other Pacific islands, animals associated with humans, such as commensal rodents, arrived in these islands beginning only 1,000 years ago, and larger mammals, such as pigs (Sus scrofa), may not have arrived until European contact. Limestone forests, which also occur on several other Mariana Islands, developed in the presence of frequent tropical storms and are therefore well adapted to this type of natural disturbance regime. However, recent human activities including large scale clearing and conversion combined with the presence of high levels of alien herbivores and seed predators, and the loss of ecological services provided by the former native avifauna may be causing the decline of Guam's forests. Limestone forests on northern Guam, much like those of other Mariana Islands, were heavily cleared for the construction of military installations during World War II. The accidental introduction of the Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis; BTS) around this same period subsequently accelerated the disappearance of Guam's native avifauna and other endemic terrestrial vertebrates, and with them, seed dispersal, pollination, and the predatory regulation of herbivorous insects. Guam and the Mariana Islands contained a high proportion (32 pecent) of endemic bird species, with 4 forms endemic to Guam alone: the now extinct Guam Flycatcher (Myiagra freycineti), and Guam Bridled White-eye (Zosterops conspicillatpicillata), one of three island endemic subspecies from the Marianas; Guam rail (Rallus owstonii); and Guam Kingfisher (Todiramphus cinnamominus cinnamominus), an island endemic subspecies of the regionally endemic Micronesian Kingfisher. Guam once

  12. Vanguardias: institución y Representación en el Campo Cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strá, Sebastián Matías

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available [es] Este trabajo plantea, básicamente, la indagación sobre un momento determinado del Campo de Producción Cultural. Un momento que nos posibilitó la pregunta por algunos conceptos que aparecen viabilizados en la existencia de las vanguardias europeas de principios de siglo XX. Este período de la historia del arte puso en jaque la Representación y la Institución, sobre todo mediante las “tomas de posición” de aquellos grupos, presentes no sólo en las obras concretas, sino en sus producciones discursivas.En estas producciones nos centraremos, indagándolas a partir de la lectura de los manifiestos publicados por dichas vanguardias. De allí el intento de acercarnos a un momento que aparece como prólogo general a la problemática relación entre lenguaje, estética y representación en una forma de experiencia que para muchos puede ser denominada posmoderna. [en] This work basically raises inquiries about some concepts which appeared among the European avant gardes at the beginning of the 20th century. This period of the art history checkmated the Representation and the Institution, especially due to positions taken by the avant gardes, depicted not only on specific art works but in discourse production as well.Important emphasis will be put on this production scrutinizing the manifestos published by these groups of artists. Therefore, this attemp to approach a moment which seems to be a general prologue to the problematic relationship between language, aesthetics and representation that many people would call a postmodern experience.

  13. Status and trends of the land bird avifauna on Tinian and Aguiguan, Mariana Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Richard J.; Pratt, Thane K.; Amidon, Fred; Marshall, Ann P.; Kremer, Shelly; Laut, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Avian surveys were conducted on the islands of Tinian and Aguiguan, Marianas Islands, in 2008 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to provide current baseline densities and abundances and assess population trends using data collected from previous surveys. On Tinian, during the three surveys (1982, 1996, and 2008), 18 species were detected, and abundances and trends were assessed for 12 species. Half of the 10 native species—Yellow Bittern (Ixobrychus sinensis), White-throated Ground-Dove (Gallicolumba xanthonura), Collared Kingfisher (Todiramphus chloris), Rufous Fantail (Rhipidura rufifrons), and Micronesian Starling (Aplonis opaca)—and one alien bird—Island Collared-Dove (Streptopelia bitorquata)—have increased since 1982. Three native birds—Mariana Fruit-Dove (Ptilinopus roseicapilla), Micronesian Honeyeater (Myzomela rubratra), and Tinian Monarch (Monarcha takatsukasae)—have decreased since 1982. Trends for the remaining two native birds—White Tern (Gygis alba) and Bridled White-eye (Zosterops saypani)—and one alien bird—Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus)—were considered relatively stable. Only five birds—White-throated Ground-Dove, Mariana Fruit-Dove, Tinian Monarch, Rufous Fantail, and Bridled White-eye—showed significant differences among regions of Tinian by year. Tinian Monarch was found in all habitat types, with the greatest monarch densities observed in limestone forest, secondary forest, and tangantangan (Leucaena leucocephala) thicket and the smallest densities found in open fields and urban/residential habitats. On Aguiguan, 19 species were detected on one or both of the surveys (1982 and 2008), and abundance estimates were produced for nine native and one alien species. Densities for seven of the nine native birds—White-throated Ground-Dove, Mariana Fruit-Dove, Collared Kingfisher, Rufous Fantail, Bridled White-eye, Golden White-eye (Cleptornis marchei), and Micronesian Starling—and the alien bird— Island

  14. Risks to Ecological Receptors Posed by Contaminants of Potential Concern in the Lower Three Runs Cooling Ponds and Canals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Blas, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-21

    The upper portion of Lower Three Runs includes several ponds, reservoirs, and canals that were formerly used as a cooling system for nuclear production reactors. This area was divided into nine exposure areas (EAs) for the assessment of environmental contamination resulting from past reactor operations and other industrial processes. A tiered screening process identified several contaminants of potential concern including aluminum, cyanide, lead, manganese, mercury, DDD, DDE, and DDT. Risks posed by these contaminants to ecological receptors (river otter, belted kingfisher, raccoon, and blue heron) were assessed using contaminant exposure models that estimated contaminant intake resulting from ingestion of food, water, and sediment/ soil and compared these intakes with toxicity reference values (TRVs). The contaminant exposure models showed that the TRVs were not exceeded in the otter model, exceeded by aluminum in EA 7 (Pond 2 and associated canals) in the raccoon model, and exceeded by mercury in EAs 2, 3 (Pond B), 6 (Par Pond), and 8 (Ponds 4 and 5 and Canal to Pond C) in both the kingfisher and blue heron models. Hazard quotients (total exposure dose divided by the TRV) were 2.8 for aluminum and 1.7- 3.6 for mercury. The primary route of exposure for aluminum was the ingestion of soil, and the primary route of exposure for mercury was the ingestion of mercury contaminated fish. Elevated levels of mercury in fish were at least partly the result of the aerial deposition of mercury onto Lower Three Runs and its watershed. The atmospheric deposition of mercury creates pervasive contamination in fish throughout the Savannah River basin. Another possible source of mercury was the discharge of mercury contaminated Savannah River water into the Lower Three Runs cooling ponds and canals during previous years of reactor operation. This contamination originated from industries located upstream of the SRS. The aluminum exceedance for the raccoon was likely the result of

  15. Modeling Dust and Starlight in Galaxies Observed by Spitzer and Herschel: NGC 628 and NGC 6946

    CERN Document Server

    Aniano, G; Calzetti, D; Dale, D A; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Hunt, L K; Kennicutt, R C; Krause, O; Leroy, A K; Rix, H-W; Roussel, H; Sandstrom, K; Sauvage, M; Walter, F; Armus, L; Bolatto, A D; Crocker, A; Meyer, J Donovan; Galametz, M; Helou, G; Hinz, J; Johnson, B D; Koda, J; Montiel, E; Murphy, E J; Skibba, R; Smith, J -D T; Wolfire, M G

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the dust in NGC628 and NGC6946, two nearby spiral galaxies in the KINGFISH sample. With data from 3.6um to 500um, dust models are strongly constrained. Using the Draine & Li (2007) dust model, (amorphous silicate and carbonaceous grains), for each pixel in each galaxy we estimate (1) dust mass surface density, (2) dust mass fraction contributed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s, (3) distribution of starlight intensities heating the dust, (4) total infrared (IR) luminosity emitted by the dust, and (5) IR luminosity originating in regions with high starlight intensity. We obtain maps for the dust properties, which trace the spiral structure of the galaxies. The dust models successfully reproduce the observed global and resolved spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The overall dust/H mass ratio is estimated to be 0.0082+/-0.0017 for NGC628, and 0.0063+/-0.0009 for NGC6946, consistent with what is expected for galaxies of near-solar metallicity. Our derived dust masses are larger (by...

  16. The Ionized Gas in Nearby Galaxies as Traced by the [NII] 122 and 205 \\mu m Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Camus, R; Smith, J D; Draine, B; Pellegrini, E; Wolfire, M; Croxall, K; de Looze, I; Calzetti, D; Kennicutt, R; Crocker, A; Armus, L; van der Werf, P; Sandstrom, K; Galametz, M; Brandl, B; Groves, B; Rigopoulou, D; Walter, F; Leroy, A; Boquien, M; Tabatabaei, F S; Beirao, P

    2016-01-01

    The [NII] 122 and 205 \\mu m transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ~1 kiloparsec, with observations of both [NII] far-infrared lines. We measure [NII] 122/205 line ratios in the ~0.6-6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities $n_e$~1-300 cm$^{-3}$, with a median value of $n_e$=30 cm$^{-3}$. Variations in the electron density within individual galaxies can be as a high as a factor of ~50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that $n_e$ increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star formation rate surface density ($\\Sigma_{SFR}$). As the intensity of the [NII] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the star formation rate (SFR). We derive relations between the [NII] emission and...

  17. Untangling the Nature of Spatial Variations of Cold Dust Properties in Star Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Kennicutt, Robert; Galametz, Maud; Gordon, Karl; Groves, Brent; Hunt, Leslie; Dale, Daniel; Hinz, Joannah; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the far-infrared (IR) dust emission for 20 local star forming galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-IR Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. We model the far-IR/submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) using images from Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory. We calculate the cold dust temperature (T(cold)) and emissivity (beta) on a pixel by pixel basis (where each pixel ranges from 0.1-3 kpc^2) using a two temperature modified blackbody fitting routine. Our fitting method allows us to investigate the resolved nature of temperature and emissivity variations by modeling from the galaxy centers to the outskirts (physical scales of ~15-50 kpc, depending on the size of the galaxy). We fit each SED in two ways: (1) fit T(cold) and beta simultaneously, (2) hold beta constant and fit T(cold). We compare T(cold) and beta with star formation rates (calculated from L(Halpha) and L(24)), the luminosity of the old stellar population (traced through L(3.6), and ...

  18. Final integrated trip report: site visits to Area 50, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam National Wildlife Refuge, War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Guam, Rota and Saipan, CNMI, 2004-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steven C.; Pratt, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Limestone forests are the most diverse natural plant communities of Guam. Like other natural vegetation types, these forests have a long history of anthropogenic disturbances, being altered and shaped by humans for more than 4,000 years. Although this occupation represents a relatively long human influence in comparison to other Pacific islands, animals associated with humans, such as commensal rodents, arrived in these islands beginning only 1,000 years ago, and larger mammals, such as pigs (Sus scrofa), may not have arrived until European contact. Limestone forests, which also occur on several other Mariana Islands, developed in the presence of frequent tropical storms and are therefore well adapted to this type of natural disturbance regime. However, recent human activities including large scale clearing and conversion combined with the presence of high levels of alien herbivores and seed predators, and the loss of ecological services provided by the former native avifauna may be causing the decline of Guam's forests. Limestone forests on northern Guam, much like those of other Mariana Islands, were heavily cleared for the construction of military installations during World War II. The accidental introduction of the Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis; BTS) around this same period subsequently accelerated the disappearance of Guam's native avifauna and other endemic terrestrial vertebrates, and with them, seed dispersal, pollination, and the predatory regulation of herbivorous insects. Guam and the Mariana Islands contained a high proportion (32 pecent) of endemic bird species, with 4 forms endemic to Guam alone: the now extinct Guam Flycatcher (Myiagra freycineti), and Guam Bridled White-eye (Zosterops conspicillatpicillata), one of three island endemic subspecies from the Marianas; Guam rail (Rallus owstonii); and Guam Kingfisher (Todiramphus cinnamominus cinnamominus), an island endemic subspecies of the regionally endemic Micronesian Kingfisher. Guam once

  19. Enhanced dust heating in the bulges of early-type spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbracht, C W; Skibba, R A; Hinz, J L; Calzetti, D; Gordon, K D; Roussel, H; Crocker, A F; Misselt, K A; Bolatto, A D; Kennicutt, R C; Appleton, P N; Armus, L; Beirão, P; Brandl, B R; Croxall, K V; Dale, D A; Draine, B T; Dumas, G; de Paz, A Gil; Groves, B; Hao, C -N; Johnson, B D; Koda, J; Krause, O; Leroy, A K; Meidt, S E; Murphy, E J; Rahman, N; Rix, H -W; Sandstrom, K M; Sauvage, M; Schinnerer, E; Smith, J -D T; Srinivasan, S; Vigroux, L; Walter, F; Warren, B E; Wilson, C D; Wolfire, M G; Zibetti, S

    2010-01-01

    Stellar density and bar strength should affect the temperatures of the cool (T ~ 20-30 K) dust component in the inner regions of galaxies, which implies that the ratio of temperatures in the circumnuclear regions to the disk should depend on Hubble type. We investigate the differences between cool dust temperatures in the central 3 kpc and disk of 13 nearby galaxies by fitting models to measurements between 70 and 500 microns. We attempt to quantify temperature trends in nearby disk galaxies, with archival data from Spitzer/MIPS and new observations with Herschel/SPIRE, which were acquired during the first phases of the Herschel observations for the KINGFISH (key insights in nearby galaxies: a far-infrared survey with Herschel) sample. We fit single-temperature modified blackbodies to far-infrared and submillimeter measurements of the central and disk regions of galaxies to determine the temperature of the component(s) emitting at those wavelengths. We present the ratio of central-region-to-disk-temperatures ...

  20. Mercury contamination in fish in midcontinent great rivers of the united states: Importance of species traits and environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, D.M.; Blocksom, K.A.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Jicha, T.; Angradi, T.R.; Bolgrien, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    We measured mercury (Hg) concentrations in whole fish from the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers to characterize the extent and magnitude of Hg contamination and to identify environmental factors influencing Hg accumulation. Concentrations were generally lower (80% of values between 20?200 ng g1 wet weight) than those reported for other regions (e.g., upper Midwest and Northeast U.S.). Mercury exceeded the risk threshold for belted kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon, the most sensitive species considered) in 33?75% of river length and 1?7% of river length for humans. Concentrations were lower in the Missouri than in the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, consistent with continental-scale patterns in atmospheric Hg deposition. Body size and trophic guild were the best predictors of Hg concentrations, which were highest in large-bodied top predators. Site geochemical and landscape properties were weakly related with fish Hg. Moreover, relationships often ran contrary to conventional wisdom, and the slopes of the relationships (positive or negative) were inconsistent among fish guilds and rivers. For example, sulfate is positively associated with fish Hg concentrations but was negatively correlated with Hg in five of six regression models of tissue concentrations. Variables such as pH, acid neutralizing capacity, and total phosphorus did not occur at levels associated with high fish Hg concentrations, partially explaining the relatively low Hg values we observed. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Australian seafood compositional profiles: A pilot study. Vitamin D and mercury content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, David; Greenfield, Heather; Cunningham, Judy; Kiermeier, Andreas; McLeod, Catherine

    2016-02-15

    Given the scarcity of comprehensive nutritional data for Australia's >400 commercially produced seafood species a pilot study was undertaken to collect and analyse 22 species of wild and aquaculture seafood in order to develop a model for future comprehensive surveys. The species analysed were: Atlantic salmon, Australian sardine, prawn (six species), barramundi, abalone (three species), blue sprat, burrowing blackfish, gummy shark, oyster (four species), ocean trout and yellowtail kingfish. The analyses undertaken in this pilot study were: moisture, protein, total fat, cholesterol, fatty acids, vitamin C, vitamins A and D, and 21 mineral elements (including total mercury and methyl mercury). The data reported here are for vitamin D and mercury only. Comprehensive data have already been published elsewhere. Issues identified that should be addressed prior to undertaking a more extensive and representative study of the remaining major edible commercial Australian seafood species include: choice of samples and nutrients for analysis, facilities for sample handling and storage, data management and scrutiny, and laboratory quality control.

  2. [CII] 158 $\\mu$m Emission as a Star Formation Tracer

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Camus, R; Wolfire, M G; Smith, J D; Croxall, K V; Kennicutt, R C; Calzetti, D; Helou, G; Walter, F; Leroy, A K; Draine, B; Brandl, B R; Armus, L; Sandstrom, K M; Dale, D A; Aniano, G; Meidt, S E; Boquien, M; Hunt, L K; Galametz, M; Tabatabaei, F S; Murphy, E J; Appleton, P; Roussel, H; Engelbracht, C; Beirao, P

    2014-01-01

    The [CII] 157.74 $\\mu$m transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [CII] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [CII] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGN). The uncertainty of the $\\Sigma_{\\rm [CII]}-\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ calibration is $\\pm$0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted $\\Sigma_{\\rm[CII]}-\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$ correlation is valid over almost 5 orders of magnitude in $\\Sigma_{\\rm SFR}$, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [CII] luminosity instead of surface bright...

  3. Heating and cooling of the neutral ISM in the NGC4736 circumnuclear ring

    CERN Document Server

    van der Laan, T P R; Beirao, P; Sandstrom, K; Groves, B; Schinnerer, E; Draine, B T; Smith, J D; Galametz, M; Wolfire, M; Croxall, K; Dale, D; Camus, R Herrera; Calzetti, D; Kennicutt, R C

    2015-01-01

    The manner in which gas accretes and orbits within circumnuclear rings has direct implications for the star formation process. In particular, gas may be compressed and shocked at the inflow points, resulting in bursts of star formation at these locations. Afterwards the gas and young stars move together through the ring. In addition, star formation may occur throughout the ring, if and when the gas reaches sufficient density to collapse under gravity. These two scenarios for star formation in rings are often referred to as the `pearls on a string' and `popcorn' paradigms. In this paper, we use new Herschel PACS observations, obtained as part of the KINGFISH Open Time Key Program, along with archival Spitzer and ground-based observations from the SINGS Legacy project, to investigate the heating and cooling of the interstellar medium in the nearby star-forming ring galaxy, NGC4736. By comparing spatially resolved estimates of the stellar FUV flux available for heating, with the gas and dust cooling derived from...

  4. Comparing [CII], HI, and CO dynamics of nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    de Blok, W J G; Smith, J -D T; Herrera-Camus, R; Bolatto, A D; Requena-Torres, M A; Crocker, A F; Croxall, K V; Kennicutt, R C; Koda, J; Armus, L; Boquien, M; Dale, D; Kreckel, K; Meidt, S

    2016-01-01

    The HI and CO components of the interstellar medium (ISM) are usually used to derive the dynamical mass M_dyn of nearby galaxies. Both components become too faint to be used as a tracer in observations of high-redshift galaxies. In those cases, the 158 $\\mu$m line of atomic carbon [CII] may be the only way to derive M_dyn. As the distribution and kinematics of the ISM tracer affects the determination of M_dyn, it is important to quantify the relative distributions of HI, CO and [CII]. HI and CO are well-characterised observationally, however, for [CII] only very few measurements exist. Here we compare observations of CO, HI, and [CII] emission of a sample of nearby galaxies, drawn from the HERACLES, THINGS and KINGFISH surveys. We find that within R_25, the average [CII] exponential radial profile is slightly shallower than that of the CO, but much steeper than the HI distribution. This is also reflected in the integrated spectrum ("global profile"), where the [CII] spectrum looks more like that of the CO tha...

  5. The CO-to-H2 Conversion Factor and Dust-to-Gas Ratio on Kiloparsec Scales in Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sandstrom, K M; Walter, F; Bolatto, A D; Croxall, K V; Draine, B T; Wilson, C D; Wolfire, M; Calzetti, D; Kennicutt, R C; Aniano, G; Meyer, J Donovan; Usero, A; Bigiel, F; Brinks, E; de Blok, W J G; Crocker, A; Dale, D; Engelbracht, C W; Galametz, M; Groves, B; Hunt, L K; Koda, J; Kreckel, K; Linz, H; Meidt, S; Pellegrini, E; Rix, H -W; Roussel, H; Schinnerer, E; Schruba, A; Schuster, K -F; Skibba, R; van der Laan, T; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Brandl, B; Gordon, K; Hinz, J; Krause, O; Montiel, E; Sauvage, M; Schmiedeke, A; Smith, J D T; Vigroux, L

    2012-01-01

    We present maps of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor (alpha_co) and dust-to-gas ratio (DGR) in 26 nearby, star-forming galaxies with ~kiloparsec spatial resolution. We have simultaneously solved for alpha_co and DGR by assuming that the DGR is approximately constant on kpc scales. With this assumption, we can combine maps of dust mass surface density, CO integrated intensity and HI column density to solve for both alpha_co and DGR with no assumptions about their value or dependence on metallicity or other parameters. Such a study has just become possible with the availability of high resolution far-IR maps from the Herschel key program KINGFISH, 12CO J=(2-1) maps from the IRAM 30m large program HERACLES and HI 21-cm line maps from THINGS. We use a fixed ratio between the (2-1) and (1-0) lines to present our alpha_co results on the more typically used 12CO J=(1-0) scale and show using literature measurements that variations in the line ratio do not effect our results. In total, we derive 782 individual solutions ...

  6. Star Formation Rates in Resolved Galaxies: Calibrations with Near and Far Infrared Data for NGC5055 and NGC6946

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yiming; Calzetti, Daniela; Wilson, Christine D; Kennicutt, Robert C; Murphy, Eric J; Brandl, Bernhard R; Draine, B T; Galametz, M; Johnson, B D; Armus, L; Gordon, K D; Croxall, K; Dale, D A; Engelbracht, C W; Groves, B; Hao, C -N; Helou, G; Hinz, J; Hunt, L K; Krause, O; Roussel, H; Sauvage, M; Smith, J D T

    2013-01-01

    We use the near--infrared Br\\gamma hydrogen recombination line as a reference star formation rate (SFR) indicator to test the validity and establish the calibration of the {\\it Herschel} PACS 70 \\mu m emission as a SFR tracer for sub--galactic regions in external galaxies. Br\\gamma offers the double advantage of directly tracing ionizing photons and of being relatively insensitive to the effects of dust attenuation. For our first experiment, we use archival CFHT Br\\gamma and Ks images of two nearby galaxies: NGC\\,5055 and NGC\\,6946, which are also part of the {\\it Herschel} program KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel). We use the extinction corrected Br\\gamma emission to derive the SFR(70) calibration for H{\\sc ii} regions in these two galaxies. A comparison of the SFR(70) calibrations at different spatial scales, from 200 pc to the size of the whole galaxy, reveals that about 50% of the total 70\\mu m emission is due to dust heated by stellar populations that are unr...

  7. The Radio Spectral Energy Distribution and Star Formation Rate Calibration in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Krause, M; Dumas, G; Meidt, S; Beck, R; Damas-Segovia, A; Murphy, E J; Mulcahy, D D; Groves, B; Bolatto, A; Dale, D; Galametz, M; Sandstrom, K; Boquien, M; Calzetti, D; Kennicutt, R C; Hunt, L K; De Looze, I; Pellegrini, E W

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum emission from the KINGFISH sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4GHz, 4.8GHz, 8.5GHz, and 10.5GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-radio continuum (1-10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations vs. the monochromatic radio luminosities. The radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Marchov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index (a_nt) and the thermal fraction (fth) with mean values of a_nt~ 0.97 for the 1-10 GHz frequency rang and fth~10% at 1.4GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ~3 orders of magnitude in the sample. The thermal emission is responsible for ~23% of the MRC on average. We also compare the extinction-corrected diagnostics of star formation rate with the thermal and nonthermal radio tracers and derive the fir...

  8. Classification and authentication of unknown water samples using machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Palash K; Panchariya, P C; Kundu, Madhusree

    2011-07-01

    This paper proposes the development of water sample classification and authentication, in real life which is based on machine learning algorithms. The proposed techniques used experimental measurements from a pulse voltametry method which is based on an electronic tongue (E-tongue) instrumentation system with silver and platinum electrodes. E-tongue include arrays of solid state ion sensors, transducers even of different types, data collectors and data analysis tools, all oriented to the classification of liquid samples and authentication of unknown liquid samples. The time series signal and the corresponding raw data represent the measurement from a multi-sensor system. The E-tongue system, implemented in a laboratory environment for 6 numbers of different ISI (Bureau of Indian standard) certified water samples (Aquafina, Bisleri, Kingfisher, Oasis, Dolphin, and McDowell) was the data source for developing two types of machine learning algorithms like classification and regression. A water data set consisting of 6 numbers of sample classes containing 4402 numbers of features were considered. A PCA (principal component analysis) based classification and authentication tool was developed in this study as the machine learning component of the E-tongue system. A proposed partial least squares (PLS) based classifier, which was dedicated as well; to authenticate a specific category of water sample evolved out as an integral part of the E-tongue instrumentation system. The developed PCA and PLS based E-tongue system emancipated an overall encouraging authentication percentage accuracy with their excellent performances for the aforesaid categories of water samples.

  9. Gas-to-Dust mass ratios in local galaxies over a 2 dex metallicity range

    CERN Document Server

    Rémy-Ruyer, A; Galliano, F; Galametz, M; Takeuchi, T T; Asano, R S; Zhukovska, S; Lebouteiller, V; Cormier, D; Jones, A; Bocchio, M; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; DeLooze, I; Doublier-Pritchard, V; Hughes, T; Karczewski, O Ł; Spinoglio, L

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the behaviour of the gas-to-dust mass ratio (G/D) of local Universe galaxies over a large metallicity range. We combine three samples: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey, the KINGFISH survey and a subsample from Galametz et al. (2011) totalling 126 galaxies, covering a 2 dex metallicity range, with 30% of the sample with 12+log(O/H) < 8.0. The dust masses are homogeneously determined with a semi-empirical dust model, including submm constraints. The atomic and molecular gas masses are compiled from the literature. Two XCO are used to estimate molecular gas masses: the Galactic XCO, and a XCO depending on the metallicity (as Z^{-2}). Correlations with morphological types, stellar masses, star formation rates and specific star formation rates are discussed. The trend between G/D and metallicity is empirically modelled using power-laws (slope of -1 and free) and a broken power-law. We compare the evolution of the G/D with predictions from chemical evolution models. We find that out of the five tested...

  10. A checklist of avifauna from Malgaon-Bagayat and Malvan towns of Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayura Khot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried out in Malgaon-Bagayat (16009’04.35”N & 73033’04.7”E and Malvan Taluka (16005’00”N & 73030’00”E of Sindhudurg District.  The paper represents the first document on birds as there are no published records from Sindhudurg District.  The study was conducted for a period of two years to explore the avifauna as no records have been published yet from this area.  A total of 101 species of birds belonging to 17 orders and 45 families and were recorded in the study areas inhabiting different types of habitats.  The Order Passeriformes contributed the maximum species (44.9% followed by Pelecaniformes (9.2%, Charadriiformes (8.2% and Accipitriformes (6.1%.  The species such as the Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Common Hoopoe, and Pied Kingfisher were observed only once in the study area.  The common occurrence of the Near Threatened Malabar Pied Hornbill in Bagayat signifies the ornithological importance of this site.  Long-term studies on distribution and abundance are required to prepare a conservation plan for avifauna in Sindhudurg District.  The data generated can be considered as baseline data for future conservation and management of existing species. 

  11. Comparative metabolic rates of common western North Atlantic Ocean sciaenid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodysky, A Z; Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G; Musick, J A; Latour, R J

    2011-07-01

    The resting metabolic rates (R(R)) of western North Atlantic Ocean sciaenids, such as Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus, spot Leiostomus xanthurus and kingfishes Menticirrhus spp., as well as the active metabolic rates (R(A)) of M. undulatus and L. xanthurus were investigated to facilitate inter and intraspecific comparisons of their energetic ecology. The R(R) of M. undulatus and L. xanthurus were typical for fishes with similar lifestyles. The R(R) of Menticirrhus spp. were elevated relative to those of M. undulatus and L. xanthurus, but below those of high-energy-demand species such as tunas Thunnus spp. and dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus. Repeated-measures non-linear mixed-effects models were applied to account for within-individual autocorrelation and corrected for non-constant variance typical of noisy R(A) data sets. Repeated-measures models incorporating autoregressive first-order [AR(1)] and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) covariances provided significantly superior fits, more precise parameter estimates (i.e. reduced s.e.) and y-intercept estimates that more closely approximated measured R(R) for M. undulatus and L. xanthurus than standard least-squares regression procedures.

  12. MAPPING DUST THROUGH EMISSION AND ABSORPTION IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; Groves, Brent; Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon E.; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S. [Max Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Johnson, Benjamin D. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98 bis Bvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Aniano, Gonzalo [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), Batiment 121, Universite Paris-Sud 11 and CNRS (UMR 8617), F-91405 Orsay (France); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, Kevin V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Draine, Bruce T. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Gordon, Karl D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Crocker, Alison F.; Smith, J. D. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Hunt, Leslie K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Kennicutt, Robert C., E-mail: kreckel@mpia.de [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Dust has long been identified as a barrier to measuring inherent galaxy properties. However, the link between dust and attenuation is not straightforward and depends on both the amount of dust and its distribution. Herschel imaging of nearby galaxies undertaken as part of the KINGFISH project allows us to map the dust as seen in emission with unprecedented sensitivity and {approx}1 kpc resolution. We present here new optical integral field unit spectroscopy for eight of these galaxies that provides complementary 100-200 pc scale maps of the dust attenuation through observation of the reddening in both the Balmer decrement and the stellar continuum. The stellar continuum reddening, which is systematically less than that observed in the Balmer decrement, shows no clear correlation with the dust, suggesting that the distribution of stellar reddening acts as a poor tracer of the overall dust content. The brightest H II regions are observed to be preferentially located in dusty regions, and we do find a correlation between the Balmer line reddening and the dust mass surface density for which we provide an empirical relation. Some of the high-inclination systems in our sample exhibit high extinction, but we also find evidence that unresolved variations in the dust distribution on scales smaller than 500 pc may contribute to the scatter in this relation. We caution against the use of integrated A{sub V} measures to infer global dust properties.

  13. Linking dust emission to fundamental properties in galaxies: The low-metallicity picture

    CERN Document Server

    Rémy-Ruyer, A; Galliano, F; Lebouteiller, V; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Boselli, A; Ciesla, L; Cormier, D; Cooray, A; Cortese, L; De Looze, I; Doublier-Pritchard, V; Galametz, M; Jones, A P; Karczewski, O Ł; Lu, N; Spinoglio, L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we aim at providing a consistent analysis of the dust properties from metal-poor to metal-rich environments by linking them to fundamental galactic parameters. We consider two samples of galaxies: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS) and KINGFISH, totalling 109 galaxies, spanning almost 2 dex in metallicity. We collect infrared (IR) to submillimetre (submm) data for both samples and present the complete data set for the DGS sample. We model the observed spectral energy distributions (SED) with a physically-motivated dust model to access the dust properties. Using a different SED model (modified blackbody), dust composition (amorphous carbon), or wavelength coverage at submm wavelengths results in differences in the dust mass estimate of a factor two to three, showing that this parameter is subject to non-negligible systematic modelling uncertainties. For eight galaxies in our sample, we find a rather small excess at 500 microns (< 1.5 sigma). We find that the dust SED of low-metallicity galaxies is ...

  14. The Radio Spectral Energy Distribution and Star-formation Rate Calibration in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Schinnerer, E.; Krause, M.; Dumas, G.; Meidt, S.; Damas-Segovia, A.; Beck, R.; Murphy, E. J.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Groves, B.; Bolatto, A.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sandstrom, K.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Hunt, L. K.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E. W.

    2017-02-01

    We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum (RC) emission from the Key Insight in Nearby Galaxies Emitting in Radio (KINGFISHER) sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4, 4.8, 8.4, and 10.5 GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-RC (1–10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations versus the monochromatic radio luminosities. The 1–10 GHz radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index ({S}ν ∼ {ν }-{α {nt}}) and the thermal fraction ({f}{th}) with mean values of {α }{nt}=0.97 +/- 0.16(0.79 +/- 0.15 for the total spectral index) and {f}{th} = (10 ± 9)% at 1.4 GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ∼3 orders of magnitude in the sample, 4.3× {10}2 {L}ȯ population in galaxies. Comparing the radio and IR SEDs, we find that the FIR-to-MRC ratio could decrease with SFR, due to the amplification of the magnetic fields in star-forming regions. This particularly implies a decrease in the ratio at high redshifts, where mostly luminous/star-forming galaxies are detected.

  15. Dissecting the origin of the submillimeter emission in nearby galaxies with Herschel and LABOCA

    CERN Document Server

    Galametz, M; Kennicutt, R; Aniano, G; Bertoldi, F; Calzetti, D; Croxall, K V; Dale, D; Draine, B; Engelbracht, C; Gordon, K; Hinz, J; Hunt, L K; Kirkpatrick, A; Murphy, E; Roussel, H; Skibba, R A; Walter, F; Weiss, A; Wilson, C D

    2014-01-01

    We model the infrared to submillimeter spectral energy distribution of 11 nearby galaxies of the KINGFISH sample using Spitzer and Herschel data and compare model extrapolations at 870um (using different fitting techniques) with LABOCA 870um observations. We investigate how the differences between predictions and observations vary with model assumptions or environment. At global scales, we find that modified blackbody models using realistic cold emissivity indices (beta_c=2 or 1.5) are able to reproduce the 870um observed emission within the uncertainties for most of the sample. Low values (beta_c<1.3) would be required in NGC0337, NGC1512 and NGC7793. At local scales, we observe a systematic 870um excess when using beta_=2.0. The beta_c=1.5 or the Draine and Li (2007) models can reconcile predictions with observations in part of the disks. Some of the remaining excesses occur towards the centres and can be partly or fully accounted for by non-dust contributions such as CO(3-2) or, to a lesser extent, free...

  16. Towards universal hybrid star formation rate estimators

    CERN Document Server

    Boquien, M; Calzetti, D; Dale, D; Galametz, M; Sauvage, M; Croxall, K; Draine, B; Kirkpatrick, A; Kumari, N; Hunt, L; De Looze, I; Pellegrini, E; Relano, M; Smith, J -D; Tabatabaei, F

    2016-01-01

    To compute the SFR of galaxies from the rest-frame UV it is essential to take into account the obscuration by dust. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the IR. Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. Doing so, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation, taking into account the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies. We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially-resolved FUV to FIR SED of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said p...

  17. Investigating the presence of 500 um submillimeter excess emission in local star forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Galametz, Maud; Kennicutt, Rob; Dale, Daniel; Aniano, Gonzalo; Sandstrom, Karin; Armus, Lee; Crocker, Alison; Hinz, Joannah; Hunt, Leslie; Koda, Jin; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Submillimeter excess emission has been reported at 500 microns in a handful of local galaxies, and previous studies suggest that it could be correlated with metal abundance. We investigate the presence of an excess submillimeter emission at 500 microns for a sample of 20 galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) that span a range of morphologies and metallicities (12+log(O/H)=7.8-8.7). We probe the far-infrared (IR) emission using images from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory in the wavelength range 24-500 microns. We model the far-IR peak of the dust emission with a two-temperature modified blackbody and measure excess of the 500 micron photometry relative to that predicted by our model. We compare the submillimeter excess, where present, with global galaxy metallicity and, where available, resolved metallicity measurements. We do not find any correlation between the 500 micron excess and metallicity. A few individual sources do...

  18. The Spatially Resolved [CII] Cooling Line Deficit in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, J D T; Draine, Bruce; De Looze, Ilse; Sandstrom, Karin; Armus, Lee; Beirao, Pedro; Bolatto, Alberto; Boquien, Mederic; Brandl, Bernhard; Crocker, Alison; Dale, Daniel A; Galametz, Maud; Groves, Brent; Helou, George; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Hunt, Leslie; Kennicutt, Robert; Walter, Fabian; Wolfire, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We present [CII] 158um measurements from over 15,000 resolved regions within 54 nearby galaxies of the KINGFISH program to investigate the so-called [CII] "line cooling deficit" long known to occur in galaxies with different luminosities. The [CII]/TIR ratio ranges from above 1% to below 0.1% in the sample, with a mean value of 0.48+-0.21%. We find that the surface density of 24um emission dominates this trend, with [CII]/TIR dropping as nuInu{24um} increases. Deviations from this overall decline are correlated with changes in the gas phase metal abundance, with higher metallicity associated with deeper deficits at a fixed surface brightness. We supplement the local sample with resolved [CII] measurements from nearby luminous infrared galaxies and high redshift sources from z=1.8-6.4, and find that star formation rate density drives a continuous trend of deepening [CII] deficit across six orders of magnitude in SFRD. The tightness of this correlation suggests that an approximate star formation rate density ca...

  19. A eutanásia e os paradoxos da autonomia Euthanasia and the paradoxes of autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Siqueira-Batista

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O princípio de respeito à autonomia tem se mostrado muito útil para a argumentação bioética em favor da eutanásia. Sem embargo, a despeito de sua inquestionável eficácia teórica, inúmeras aporias podem ser levantadas, no momento em que se procede a uma análise rigorosa deste conceito, sendo possível colocá-lo em xeque. Com base nesta ponderação, o presente artigo busca investigar o princípio de autonomia, partindo de suas origens nas tradições grega e cristã e mapeando alguns desdobramentos na tradição ocidental, até sua formulação na modernidade, legado de Immanuel Kant. A seguir, são apresentados seus principais paradoxos, no âmbito da filosofia, biologia, psicanálise e política, expondo-se, assim, várias das dificuldades teóricas que precisam ser enfrentadas, a fim de tornar possível sua aplicabilidade no âmbito das decisões relativas ao fim da vida.The principle of respect for autonomy has proved very useful for bioethical arguments in favor of euthanasia. However unquestionable its theoretical efficacy, countless aporiae can be raised when conducting a detailed analysis of this concept, probably checkmating it. Based on such considerations, this paper investigates the principle of autonomy, starting with its origins in Greek and Christian traditions, and then charting some of its developments in Western cultures through to its modern formulation, a legacy of Immanuel Kant. The main paradoxes of this concept are then presented in the fields of philosophy, biology, psychoanalysis and politics, expounding several of the theoretical difficulties to be faced in order to make its applicability possible within the scope of decisions relating to the termination of life.

  20. Um método rápido para análise de glicose em mostos e sua quantificação em algumas cultivares do Rio Grande do Sul A quick method for glucose analysis in musts and its measurement in some grape varieties of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eugenio Daudt

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visa relatar um novo método empregado para analisar a glicose em mostos e sua quantificação em algumas cultivares do Rio grande do Sul. Para isso foram utilizadas cinco cv. de videiras de Santana do Livramento, RS, as quais foram analisadas em um aparelho utilizado para determinar glicose no sangue. Não houve interferência de frutose ou sacarose. A quantidade de açúcares redutores totais foi também determinada, por método químico, e a quantidade aproximada de frutose foi obtida pela diferença entre estas duas determinações. O método provou ser confiável, rápido e acessível para uso em qualquer indústria que necessite de resultados rápidos sem preocupação com muita precisão. Por outro lado, a evolução destes açúcares foi também acompanhada desde a "véraison" até a colheita em cinco cultivares de uvas tintas. A glicose predominou sobre a frutose em todas as cultivares, da "véraison" até a colheita; a exceção foi a cv. Tannat na qual os valores de glicose e frutose foram praticamente semelhantes em todas as amostras analisadas. As quantidades, mínimas e máximas, de açúcares redutores totais e de glicose nas diferentes cultivares, na colheita, ficaram entre os limites de 162-212g.¹ e 99-111g.¹, respectivamente.Glucose was analyzed in an eletronic equipment for glucose blood analysis (Checkmate Blood Glucose Monitoring System. There was no interference from fructose or sucrose. The amount of total reducing sugars was also analyyzed, by chemical methods, and fructose was calculated, approximatelly, by the difference between the two analysis. The method was quick, cheap, reliable and easy to handle in any industry which most of the time needs fast and practical results with little preocupations with accuracy. On the other hand, the evolution of these sugars was followed, from véraison to the harvest, in five red grape varieties. The amount of glucose was higher than fructose in all varieties with

  1. 渔业生态环境

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    961631 蓝鳃太阳鱼幼鱼对捕食者的侦察和生境选择:混浊度和不同饵料生物的影响=Detection of predators and habitat choice bysmall bluegills:Effects of turbidity and al-ternative prey[刊,英]/Miner J G,stein R A//Trans.Am.Fish.Soc..—1996,125(1).—97~103对太阳鱼的研究已证明捕食可调节种内和种间各个个体的生境利用及竞争的相互关系。然而,所有这些研究都是在长有茂密的沿岸的清水中进行的。有关栖息在较混浊的湖泊水库中鱼类之间捕食——猎物的相互关系,人们了解极少。在实验室中定量测定了蓝

  2. Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project : FY 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None given

    2000-12-01

    The Moses Lake Project consists of 3 phases. Phase 1 is the assessment of all currently available physical and biological information, the collection of baseline biological data, the formulation of testable hypotheses, and the development of a detailed study plan to test the hypotheses. Phase 2 is dedicated to the implementation of the study plan including data collection, hypotheses testing, and the formulation of a management plan. Phase 3 of the project is the implementation of the management plan, monitoring and evaluation of the implemented recommendations. The project intends to restore the failed recreational fishery for panfish species (black crappie, bluegill and yellow perch) in Moses Lake as off site mitigation for lost recreational fishing opportunities for anadromous species in the upper Columbia River. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 investigations and presents the study plan directed at initiating Phase 2 of the project. Phase 1of the project culminates with the formulation of testable hypotheses directed at investigating possible limiting factors to the production of panfish in Moses Lake. The limiting factors to be investigated will include water quality, habitat quantity and quality, food limitations, competition, recruitment, predation, over harvest, environmental requirements, and the physical and chemical limitations of the system in relation to the fishes.

  3. A molecular genetic examination of the mating system of pumpkinseed sunfish reveals high pay-offs for specialized sneakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Cardenas, Oscar; Webster, Michael S

    2008-05-01

    Intrasexual variation in reproductive behaviour and morphology are common in nature. Often, such variation appears to result from conditional strategies in which some individuals (e.g. younger males or those in poor condition) adopt a low pay-off phenotype as a 'best of a bad job'. Alternatively, reproductive polymorphisms can be maintained by balancing selection, with male phenotypes having equal fitnesses at equilibrium, but examples from nature are rare. Many species of sunfish (genus Lepomis) are thought to have alternative male reproductive behaviours, but most empirical work has focused on the bluegill sunfish and the mating systems of other sunfish remain poorly understood. We studied a population of pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) in upstate New York. Field observations confirm the existence of two male reproductive strategies: 'parentals' were relatively old and large males that maintained nests, and 'sneakers' were relatively young and small males that fertilize eggs by darting into nests of parentals during spawning. The sneaker and parental male strategies appear to be distinct life-history trajectories. Sneaker males represented 39% of the males observed spawning, and sneakers intruded on 43% of all mating attempts. Microsatellite analyses revealed that sneaker males fertilized an average of 15% of the eggs within a nest. This level of paternity by sneaker males appears to be higher than seen in most other fishes, and preliminary analyses suggest that the two male reproductive strategies are maintained as a balanced polymorphism.

  4. First record of Neoergasilus japonicus (Poecilostomatoida: Ergasilidae), a parasitic copepod new to the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Bowen, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The parasitic copepod Neoergasilus japonicus, native to eastern Asia, was first collected from 4 species of fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; pumpkinseed sunfish, Lepomis gibbosus; and yellow perch, Perca flavescens) in July 1994 in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, Michigan. Further sampling in the bay in 2001 revealed infections on 7 additional species (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; carp, Cyprinus carpio; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; goldfish, Carassius auratus; green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus; rock bass, Ambloplites rupestris; and smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu). An additional 21 species examined in 2001 were devoid of the parasite. A limited collection of fish from Lake Superior (n = 8) and Lake Michigan (n = 46) in 1994 showed no infection. Neoergasilus japonicus is most frequently found attached to the dorsal fin and, in decreasing frequency, on the anal, tail, pelvic, and pectoral fins. Prevalence generally ranged from 15 to 70 and intensity from 1 to 10. The greatest number of copepods on a single host was 44. The copepod Neoergasilus japonicus appears to disperse over long distances rather quickly, spreading across Europe in 20 yr and then moving on to North America over a span of 10 yr. Its main vehicle of transport and introduction into the Great Lakes is probably exotic fish hosts associated with the fish-culture industry.

  5. Experimental study to control the upstream migration of invasive alien fish species by submerged weir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Masami; Kunimatsu, Fumihiro; Tsuchiya, Taku; Kawamura, Makiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    Largemouth bass and Bluegill, major invasive alien fish species in Japan, have been extending their habitat ranges over not only Lake Biwa and the lagoons but also surrounding waters connected to them through small rivers and canals. Their increasing number is bringing about the reduction in the number of native fish species. To prevent the spread of these alien species through small rivers and canals during breeding season of the native fish (crucian carp), this study experimentally examined the effect of a submerged weir on controlling upstream migration of the alien species and the native fish. As a result of the experiment, the ratio of the alien species migrating upstream decreased as the weir height rose, whereas the ratio did not show the same trend in the case of the native fish. The ratio of the alien species also decreased as the overflow velocity over the weir rose. On the other hand, the ratio of the native fish increased as the overflow velocity rose up to 1.0m/s and decreased thereafter. These results suggest that the submerged weir may control upstream migration of the alien species to surrounding waters through small rivers and canals without interfering with the reproductive migration of the native fish.

  6. Using hierarchical Bayesian multi-species mixture models to estimate tandem hoop-net based habitat associations and detection probabilities of fishes in reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models are useful tools to evaluate habitat relationships of fishes. We used hierarchical Bayesian multispecies mixture models to evaluate the relationships of both detection and abundance with habitat of reservoir fishes caught using tandem hoop nets. A total of 7,212 fish from 12 species were captured, and the majority of the catch was composed of Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus (46%), Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus(25%), and White Crappie Pomoxis annularis (14%). Detection estimates ranged from 8% to 69%, and modeling results suggested that fishes were primarily influenced by reservoir size and context, water clarity and temperature, and land-use types. Species were differentially abundant within and among habitat types, and some fishes were found to be more abundant in turbid, less impacted (e.g., by urbanization and agriculture) reservoirs with longer shoreline lengths; whereas, other species were found more often in clear, nutrient-rich impoundments that had generally shorter shoreline length and were surrounded by a higher percentage of agricultural land. Our results demonstrated that habitat and reservoir characteristics may differentially benefit species and assemblage structure. This study provides a useful framework for evaluating capture efficiency for not only hoop nets but other gear types used to sample fishes in reservoirs.

  7. Fluctuating Asymmetry in Two Common Freshwater Fishes as a Biological Indicator of Urbanization and Environmental Stress within the Middle Chattahoochee Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Lutterschmidt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deviations in bilateral symmetry or fluctuating asymmetry of an organism may result under environmental stressors that reduce developmental homeostasis and stability. Anthropogenic stressors such as increased urbanization can negatively impact environmental quality of aquatic ecosystems. Researchers have stressed the value in finding easy, accurate and inexpensive methods for assessing potential stress within ecosystems. Here we use fluctuating asymmetry (FA as a useful quantitative tool in assessing the environmental quality and potential urban-based stressors within eight creeks of the Bull and Upatoi Creeks Watershed within the larger watershed of the Middle Chattahoochee. Using Geographic Information System (GIS, we characterize land-use patterns and a decreasing urbanization gradient as related to each creek’s eastward position from Columbus, Georgia. We collected two common fishes (redbreast sunfish; Lepomis auritus and bluegill; Lepomis macrochirus, measured both metric and meristic traits and investigated if the degree of FA in these two common fishes correlated with the urbanization gradient across creeks. We found significant differences in FA among creeks with one of the highest FA measures for the most urban creek. Principal component analysis (PCA scores of urbanization and water chemistry were regressed against FA scores. We found no significant relationship between urbanization and FA nor environmental water chemistry and FA among creeks. We comment on the use of FA as a potential response variable and biological indicator of environmental stress within this watershed.

  8. Replication and persistence of VHSV IVb in freshwater turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew E; Merry, Gwenn E

    2011-05-09

    With the emergence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) strain IVb in the Great Lakes of North America, hatchery managers have become concerned that this important pathogen could be transmitted by animals other than fish. Turtles are likely candidates because they are poikilotherms that feed on dead fish, but there are very few reports of rhabdovirus infections in reptiles and no reports of the fish rhabdoviruses in animals other than teleosts. We injected common snapping turtles Chelydra serpentine and red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans intraperitoneally with 10(4) median tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) of VHSV-IVb and 21 d later were able to detect the virus by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qrt-RTPCR) in pools of kidney, liver, and spleen. In a second experiment, snapping turtles, red-eared sliders, yellow-bellied sliders T. scripta scripta, and northern map turtles Grapetemys geographica at 14 degrees C were allowed to feed on tissues from bluegill dying of VHSV IVb disease. Turtle kidney, spleen, and brain pools were not positive by qrt-RTPCR on Day 3 post feeding, but were positive on Days 10 and 20. Map turtles on Day 20 post-feeding were positive by both qrt-RTPCR and by cell culture. Our work shows that turtles that consume infected fish are a possible vector for VHSV IVb, and that the fish rhabdoviruses may have a broader host range than previously suspected.

  9. Comparison of treatments to inactivate viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV-IVb) in frozen baitfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Nicholas B D; Goodwin, Andrew E; Marecaux, Emily; Goyal, Sagar M

    2013-02-28

    Current US state and federal fish health regulations target the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus-IVb (VHSV-IVb) through movement restrictions of live fish; however, they largely ignore the potential for the virus to be spread through commercial distribution and use of frozen baitfish from VHSV-IVb-positive regions. Some state laws do require treatment of frozen baitfish to inactivate VHSV, and additional methods have been proposed, but few scientific studies have examined the efficacy of these treatments. In this study, bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were challenged with VHSV-IVb and frozen to represent standard industry methods, disinfected by various treatments, and tested for infectious VHSV-IVb using virus isolation. The virus was isolated from 70% of fish subjected to 3 freeze/thaw cycles. All other treatment methods were effective in inactivating the virus, including treatment with isopropyl alcohol, mineral oil, salt and borax, and dehydration. Dehydration followed by rehydration is rapid and effective, and therefore, seems to be the best option for inactivating VHSV-IVb present in frozen baitfish while maintaining their usefulness as bait.

  10. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-Pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approximately three orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated by assuming that actinide behavior in their bodies was similar to that defined for Standard Man by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (approx.1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 years. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Potential radiation dose from eating fish exposed to actinide contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, R.M.; Klopfer, D.C.; Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (USA))

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a maximum potential for transporting actinides to man via fish consumption. The study took place in U-pond, a nuclear waste pond on the Hanford Site. It has concentrations of /sup 238/U, /sup 238/Pu, sup(239,240)Pu and /sup 241/Am that are approx. 3 orders of magnitude greater than background levels. Fish living in the pond contain higher actinide concentrations than those observed in fish from any other location. Experiments were performed in U-Pond to determine maximum quantities of actinides that could accumulate in fillets and whole bodies of two centrarchid fish species. Doses to hypothetical consumers were then estimated. Results indicate that highest concentrations occurring in bluegill or bass muscle after more than a year's exposure to the pond would not be sufficient to produce a significant radiation dose to a human consumer, even if he ate 0.5 kg (of the order of 1 lb) of these fillets every day for 70 yr. Natural predators (heron or coyote), having lifetime diets of whole fish from U-Pond, would receive less radiation dose from the ingested actinides than from natural background sources.

  12. Neurological effects on startle response and escape from predation by medaka exposed to organic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.; Drummond, R.; Hammermeister, D.; Bradbury, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1995-12-31

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and behavioral studies were performed on juvenile Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to representative neurotoxic organic chemicals at sublethal concentrations. Non-invasive recordings were made of the electrical impulses generated within giant neuronal Mauthner cells, associated interneurons or motoneurons, and musculature, all of which initiate the startle or escape response in fish. Timing in milliseconds between these electrical sequelae was measured for each fish before and at 24 and 48 hours exposure to a chemical. Also noted was the number of startle responses to number of stimuli ratio (R/S). Other groups of medaka were fed to bluegills and consumption times recorded to assess their ability to escape predation. These results were compared to neurophysiological effect levels. Phenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, chlorpyrifos, fenvalerate, and 1-octanol impaired the ability of medaka to escape predation at all concentrations. Medaka were more susceptible to predation in high concentrations of carbaryl and strychnine, but less susceptible at low concentrations, whereas the reverse was true for endosulfan. The variety of neurological effects detected at these concentrations suggest that different mechanisms may be responsible. Phenol and strychnine affected Mauthner cell to motoneuron transmission, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl showed neuromuscular effects, and R/S was affected by most chemicals. Although a variety of neurotoxic mechanisms were examined, the exposure threshold for significant effects for each specific compound was found to be consistent for both the neurophysiological and behavioral endpoints.

  13. Acute toxicity of metals and reference toxicants to a freshwater ostracod, Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 and correlation to EC{sub 50} values of other test models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangarot, B.S., E-mail: bkhangarot@hotmail.com [Ecotoxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly: Industrial Toxicology Research Centre), Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Das, Sangita [Ecotoxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly: Industrial Toxicology Research Centre), Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2009-12-30

    The ostracod Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 static bioassay test on the basis of a 48 h of 50% of immobilization (EC{sub 50}) has been used to measure the toxicity of 36 metals and metalloids and 12 reference toxicants. Among the 36 metals and metalloids, osmium (Os) was found to be the most toxic in the test while boron (B), the least toxic. The EC{sub 50} values of this study revealed positive linear relationship with the established test models of cladoceran (Daphnia magna), sludge worm (Tubifex tubifex), chironomid larvae (Chironomus tentans), protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and aquatic macrophyte duckweed (Lemna minor). Correlation coefficients (r{sup 2}) for 17 physicochemical properties of metals or metal ions and EC{sub 50}s (as pM) were examined by linear regression analysis. The electronegativity, ionization potential, melting point, solubility product of metal sulfides (pK{sub sp}), softness parameter and some other physicochemical characteristics were significantly correlated with EC{sub 50}s of metals to C. subglobosa. The reproducibility of toxicity test was determined using 12 reference toxicants. The coefficient of variability of the EC{sub 50}s ranged from 6.95% to 55.37% and variability was comparable to that noticed for D. magna and other aquatic test models. The study demonstrated the need to include crustacean ostracods in a battery of biotests to detect the presence of hazardous chemicals in soils, sewage sludges, sediments and aquatic systems.

  14. In vivo and in vitro phenotypic differences between Great Lakes VHSV genotype IVb isolates with sequence types vcG001 and vcG002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanse, Sierra M.; Cornwell, Emily R.; Getchell, Rodman G.; Kurath, Gael; Bowser, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is an aquatic rhabdovirus first recognized in farmed rainbow trout in Denmark. In the past decade, a new genotype of this virus, IVb was discovered in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin and has caused several massive die-offs in some of the 28 species of susceptible North American freshwater fishes. Since its colonization of the Great Lakes, several closely related sequence types within genotype IVb have been reported, the two most common of which are vcG001 and vcG002. These sequence types have different spatial distributions in the Great Lakes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genotypic differences between representative vcG001 (isolate MI03) and vcG002 (isolate 2010-030 #91) isolates correspond to phenotypic differences in terms of virulence using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. In vitro infection of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC), bluegill fry (BF-2), and Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE) cells demonstrated some differences in onset and rate of growth in EPC and BF-2 cells, without any difference in the quantity of RNA produced. In vivo infection of round gobies (Neogobius melanostomus) via immersion exposure to different concentrations of vcG001 or vcG002 caused a significantly greater mortality in round gobies exposed to 102 plaque forming units ml− 1 of vcG001. These experiments suggest that there are phenotypic differences between Great Lakes isolates of VHSV genotype IVb.

  15. Steel Creek fish: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.; Kissick, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    Fish samples were collected from Steel Creek during 1986 and 1987 following the impoundment of the headwaters of the stream to form L-Lake, a cooling reservoir for L-Reactor which began operating late in 1985. Electrofishing and ichthyoplankton sample stations were located throughout the creek. Fykenetting sample stations were located in the creek mouth and just above the Steel Creek swamp. Larval fish and fish eggs were collected with 0.5 m plankton nets. Multivariate analysis of the electrofishing data suggested that the fish assemblages in Steel Creek exhibited structural differences associated with proximity to L-Lake, and habitat gradients of current velocity, depth, and canopy cover. The Steel Creek corridor, a lotic reach beginning at the base of the L-Lake embankment was dominated by stream species and bluegill. The delta/swamp, formed where Steel Creek enters the Savannah River floodplain, was dominated by fishes characteristic of slow flowing waters and heavily vegetated habitats. The large channel draining the swamp supported many of the species found in the swamp plus riverine and anadromous forms.

  16. Mercury concentrations in fish from a Sierra Nevada foothill reservoir located downstream from historic gold-mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K; Martin, Barbara A; May, Thomas W; Alpers, Charles N

    2010-04-01

    This study examined mercury concentrations in whole fish from Camp Far West Reservoir, an 830-ha reservoir in northern California, USA, located downstream from lands mined for gold during and following the Gold Rush of 1848-1864. Total mercury (reported as dry weight concentrations) was highest in spotted bass (mean, 0.93 microg/g; range, 0.16-4.41 microg/g) and lower in bluegill (mean, 0.45 microg/g; range, 0.22-1.96 microg/g) and threadfin shad (0.44 microg/g; range, 0.21-1.34 microg/g). Spatial patterns for mercury in fish indicated high concentrations upstream in the Bear River arm and generally lower concentrations elsewhere, including downstream near the dam. These findings coincided with patterns exhibited by methylmercury in water and sediment, and suggested that mercury-laden inflows from the Bear River were largely responsible for contaminating the reservoir ecosystem. Maximum concentrations of mercury in all three fish species, but especially bass, were high enough to warrant concern about toxic effects in fish and consumers of fish.

  17. Trigo duro: comportamento de genótipos no estado de São Paulo Durum wheat: evaluation of genotypes for the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo de Oliveira Camargo

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Compararam-se 25 linhagens de trigo duro (Triticum durum L., um cultivar de triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack e quatro cultivares de trigo (T. aestivum L. em seis experimentos em condição de irrigação por aspersão, analisando-se a produção de grãos, características agronômicas e resistência às doenças. As linhagens de trigo duro 14 (61150/Leeds//Gallo "S"/3/Garza "S"/4/Mexicali "S"/5/S-15-Crane "S", 21 (Boyeros "S"/Cocorit-71/5/Crane "S"/Ganso "S"//Marte "S"/3/Tildillo "S"/4/Memo "S", 25 (Gallareta "S" e 8 (Gediz "S"/Yavaros "S", de porte baixo a médio, foram resistentes às ferrugens-do-colmo (com exceção da 21 e da-folha, moderadamente resistentes ao oídio, suscetíveis à mancha foliar, e destacaram-se quanto à produção de grãos em solos com baixa acidez, não diferindo nem do trigo comum IAC-60, o mais cultivado atualmente no Estado de São Paulo, nem do triticale Álamos. Em condições de campo, a linhagem de trigo duro 19 (Mindum/Kingfisher "S"//Sandpiper apresentou imunidade às ferrugens-do-colmo e da-folha e foi moderadamente resistente ao oídio. O triticale Álamos e o trigo comum IAC-29 foram imunes ao oídio. Todos os genótipos avaliados foram altamente suscetíveis à mancha foliar, com exceção da linhagem 6 (Dackiye/Gerardo Vezio 394, moderadamente resistente.Twenty-five durum wheat (Triticum durum L. lines, one triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack cultivar and four wheat (T aestivum L. cultivars were evaluated in six trials under sprinkler irrigation taking into account the grain yield, agronomic characteristics and disease resistance. The durum wheat lines 14 (61150/Leeds//Gallo "S"/3/Garza "S"/4/Mexicali "S"/5/S-15-Crane "S", 21 (Boyeros "S"/Cocorit-71/5/Crane "S"/Ganso "S"//Marte "S"/3/Tildillo "S"/4/Memo "S", 25 (Gallareta "S" and 8 (Gediz "S"/Yavaros "S", showed the following traites: resistant to stem and leaf rusts; moderately resistant to powdery mildew; susceptible to leaf spot, and short to

  18. [C II] 158 μm EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION TRACER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Smith, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Croxall, K. V. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 4051 McPherson Laboratory, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C.; Boquien, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Helou, G. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Walter, F.; Meidt, S. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Draine, B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sandstrom, K. M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Aniano, G. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS (UMR8617) Université Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 121, Orsay (France); Hunt, L. K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Galametz, M. [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2015-02-10

    The [C II] 157.74 μm transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [C II] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [C II] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The uncertainty of the Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} calibration is ±0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} correlation is valid over almost five orders of magnitude in Σ{sub SFR}, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [C II] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [C II] finds that heating efficiencies are 1%-3% in normal galaxies.

  19. DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AS A TRACER OF GAS MASS IN GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, Brent A.; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, Adam [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Galametz, Maud [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hunt, Leslie [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Dale, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Croxall, Kevin [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 4051 McPherson Laboratory, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert Jr., E-mail: brent@mpia.de [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-20

    We use a sample of 36 galaxies from the KINGFISH (Herschel IR), HERACLES (IRAM CO), and THINGS (Very Large Array H I) surveys to study empirical relations between Herschel infrared (IR) luminosities and the total mass of the interstellar gas (H{sub 2} + H I). Such a comparison provides a simple empirical relationship without introducing the uncertainty of dust model fitting. We find tight correlations, and provide fits to these relations, between Herschel luminosities and the total gas mass integrated over entire galaxies, with the tightest, almost linear, correlation found for the longest wavelength data (SPIRE 500). However, we find that accounting for the gas-phase metallicity (affecting the dust to gas ratio) is crucial when applying these relations to low-mass, and presumably high-redshift, galaxies. The molecular (H{sub 2}) gas mass is found to be better correlated with the peak of the IR emission (e.g., PACS160), driven mostly by the correlation of stellar mass and mean dust temperature. When examining these relations as a function of galactocentric radius, we find the same correlations, albeit with a larger scatter, up to a radius of r ∼ 0.7 r {sub 25} (containing most of a galaxy's baryonic mass). However, beyond that radius, the same correlations no longer hold, with increasing gas (predominantly H I) mass relative to the infrared emission. The tight relations found for the bulk of the galaxy's baryonic content suggest that total gas masses of disk-like (non-merging/ULIRG) galaxies can be inferred from far-infrared continuum measurements in situations where only the latter are available, e.g., in ALMA continuum observations of high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Composition and Dynamics of Migratory and Resident Avian Population in Wintering Wetlands from Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushalendra Kumar JHA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Twelve wetlands occurring in four different ecozones in Uttar Pradesh (UP, India, were selected for studying the winter composition and dynamics of avian populations. Wetland information was collected from office records of the UP Forest department. Bird populations were estimated by transect method and block-in-flock-in-sector method for woodland and aquatic birds, respectively. Across the twelve selected wetlands a total of 486,182 individuals belonging to 161 species of birds on 15,592 ha were recorded during the winter of 2010-11. The data were analyzed to assess the relationship between wetland characteristics and avian populations. Aquatic vegetation, surrounding vegetation, water availability and climate were found as important factors related to avian populations. January was found to be the peak of bird assemblage, while winter times before and after January were the waxing and waning period, respectively. Species richness and species diversity of aquatic birds varied between 18-58 and 1.90-3.20, respectively, and of all bird species between 23-109, and 1.73-3.81, respectively. The density of aquatic birds ranged between 17-384 ha-1. The most common migratory birds in wetlands were Northern Pintail, Common Teal and Greylag Goose. Common resident birds included Asian Openbill, Darter, Little Egret, Common Coot, Little Cormorant, Grey Heron, Purple Heron, Indian Pond Heron, Common Moorhen, Purple Swamphen, Cattle Egret, Indian Sarus Crane and White-throated Kingfisher. For improved conservation of aquatic avian fauna, management prescriptions are suggested for wetlands under current management which could also be extended to other wetlands, whereas conservation of avian fauna to be the emphasis.

  1. BIN PIXEL COUNT, MEAN AND TOTAL OF INTENSITIES EXTRACTED FROM PARTITIONED EQUALIZED HISTOGRAM FOR CBIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Kekre

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have introduced three simple feature vector extraction ideas to retrieve the images from database of 2000 images includes 20 different classes into it. The feature extraction process mainly based on splitting the image into three planes, for each plane an equalized histogram will be calculated which is divided in two, three and four equal parts to form the 8, 27 and 64 bins respectively. Three simple ways are used to extract the information in these three different sizes of bin sets. One is, ‘Count’ of the pixels falling in specific range of the histogram of each plane into its destination bin. Second, ‘Total’ intensities of these pixels in each of these bins is taken into consideration, and in third variation is the ‘Mean’ of these intensities is considered to represent the feature vector. Determination of the destination bin address for each pixel under process depends upon the R,G, B value of that pixel which falls in any one part of the equalized partitioned histogram, because based on it the 3digits flag will be assigned to that pixel with respect to its R, G, and B values. This way, sixfeature vector databases are prepared for 2000 images with three variable sizes and 3 variations in the extraction methods. We have maintained the separate set of bins for each plane and that way we have 3 more variations in databases. Means in all we have 18 feature vector databases that is six databases for each Red, Green and Blueplane. Experimentation uses image database of 20 classes having 100 images of each of the following classes: Flower, Sunset, Mountain, Buliding, Bus, Dinosaur, Elephant, Barbie, Mickey, Horses,Kingfisher, Dove, Crow, Rainbowrose, Pyramids, Plates, Car, Trees, Ship and Waterfall. Performance of our approaches is evaluated using two parameters LIRS and LSRR and results are refined and combined using three criteria Criterion1, 2 and 3.

  2. The multiple stressor ecological risk assessment for the mercury-contaminated South River and upper Shenandoah River using the Bayesian network-relative risk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Wayne G; Ayre, Kimberley K; Johns, Annie F; Summers, Heather M; Stinson, Jonah; Harris, Meagan J; Herring, Carlie E; Markiewicz, April J

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted a regional scale risk assessment using the Bayesian Network Relative Risk Model (BN-RRM) to calculate the ecological risks to the South River and upper Shenandoah River study area. Four biological endpoints (smallmouth bass, white sucker, Belted Kingfisher, and Carolina Wren) and 4 abiotic endpoints (Fishing River Use, Swimming River Use, Boating River Use, and Water Quality Standards) were included in this risk assessment, based on stakeholder input. Although mercury (Hg) contamination was the original impetus for the site being remediated, other chemical and physical stressors were evaluated. There were 3 primary conclusions from the BN-RRM results. First, risk varies according to location, type and quality of habitat, and exposure to stressors within the landscape. The patterns of risk can be evaluated with reasonable certitude. Second, overall risk to abiotic endpoints was greater than overall risk to biotic endpoints. By including both biotic and abiotic endpoints, we are able to compare risk to endpoints that represent a wide range of stakeholder values. Third, whereas Hg reduction is the regulatory priority for the South River, Hg is not the only stressor driving risk to the endpoints. Ecological and habitat stressors contribute risk to the endpoints and should be considered when managing this site. This research provides the foundation for evaluating the risks of multiple stressors of the South River to a variety of endpoints. From this foundation, tools for the evaluation of management options and an adaptive management tools have been forged. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:85-99. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. Fish protein hydrolysates: application in deep-fried food and food safety analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Franco, Christopher; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Four different processes (enzymatic, microwave-intensified enzymatic, chemical, and microwave-intensified chemical) were used to produce fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) from Yellowtail Kingfish for food applications. In this study, the production yield and oil-binding capacity of FPH produced from different processes were evaluated. Microwave intensification significantly increased the production yields of enzymatic process from 42% to 63%. It also increased the production yields of chemical process from 87% to 98%. The chemical process and microwave-intensified chemical process produced the FPH with low oil-binding capacity (8.66 g oil/g FPH and 6.25 g oil/g FPH), whereas the microwave-intensified enzymatic process produced FPH with the highest oil-binding capacity (16.4 g oil/g FPH). The FPH from the 4 processes were applied in the formulation of deep-fried battered fish and deep-fried fish cakes. The fat uptake of deep-fried battered fish can be reduced significantly from about 7% to about 4.5% by replacing 1% (w/w) batter powder with FPH, and the fat uptake of deep-fried fish cakes can be significantly reduced from about 11% to about 1% by replacing 1% (w/w) fish mince with FPH. Food safety tests of the FPH produced by these processes demonstrated that the maximum proportion of FPH that can be safely used in food formulation is 10%, due to its high content of histamine. This study demonstrates the value of FPH to the food industry and bridges the theoretical studies with the commercial applications of FPH.

  4. Functional implications of species differences in the size and morphology of the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Gutiérrez-Ibáñez

    Full Text Available In birds, there is a retinofugal projection from the brain to the retina originating from the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in the midbrain. Despite a large number of anatomical, physiological and histochemical studies, the function of this retinofugal system remains unclear. Several functions have been proposed including: gaze stabilization, pecking behavior, dark adaptation, shifting attention, and detection of aerial predators. This nucleus varies in size and organization among some species, but the relative size and morphology of the ION has not been systematically studied. Here, we present a comparison of the relative size and morphology of the ION in 81 species of birds, representing 17 different orders. Our results show that several orders of birds, besides those previously reported, have a large, well-organized ION, including: hummingbirds, woodpeckers, coots and allies, and kingfishers. At the other end of the spectrum, parrots, herons, waterfowl, owls and diurnal raptors have relatively small ION volumes. ION also appears to be absent or unrecognizable is several taxa, including one of the basal avian groups, the tinamous, which suggests that the ION may have evolved only in the more modern group of birds, Neognathae. Finally, we demonstrate that evolutionary changes in the relative size and the cytoarchitectonic organization of ION have occurred largely independent of phylogeny. The large relative size of the ION in orders with very different lifestyles and feeding behaviors suggest there is no clear association with pecking behavior or predator detection. Instead, our results suggest that the ION is more complex and enlarged in birds that have eyes that are emmetropic in some parts of the visual field and myopic in others. We therefore posit that the ION is involved in switching attention between two parts of the retina i.e. from an emmetropic to a myopic part of the retina.

  5. Evaluation of four different systems for extraction of RNA from stool suspensions using MS-2 coliphage as an exogenous control for RT-PCR inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lester M Shulman

    Full Text Available Knowing when, and to what extent co-extracted inhibitors interfere with molecular RNA diagnostic assays is of utmost importance. The QIAamp Viral RNA Mini Kit (A; MagNA Pure LC2.0 Automatic extractor (B; KingFisher (C; and NucliSENS EasyMag (D RNA extraction systems were evaluated for extraction efficiency and co-purification of inhibitors from stool suspensions. Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (rRT-PCR of MS-2 coliphage spiked into each system's lysis buffer served as an external control for both. Cycle thresholds (Cts of the MS2 were determined for RNA extracted from stool suspensions containing unknown (n = 93 or varying amounts of inhibitors (n = 92. Stool suspensions from the latter group were also used to determine whether MS-2 and enterovirus rRT-PCR inhibitions were correlated. Specifically 23 RNA extracts from stool suspensions were spiked with enterovirus RNA after extraction and 13 of these stool suspension were spiked with intact enterovirus before extraction. MS2 rRT-PCR inhibition varied for RNAs extracted by the different systems. Inhibition was noted in 12 (13.0%, 26 (28.3%, 7 (7.6%, and 7 (7.6% of the first 93 RNA extracts, and 58 (63.0%, 55 (59.8%, 37 (40.2% and 30 (32.6% of the second 92 extracts for A, B, C, and D, respectively. Furthermore, enterovirus rRT-PCR inhibition correlated with MS2 rRT-PCR inhibition for added enterovirus RNA or virus particles. In conclusion, rRT-PCR for MS-2 RNA is a good predictor of inhibition of enterovirus RNA extracted from stool suspensions. EasyMag performed the best, however all four extraction methods were suitable provided that external controls identified problematic samples.

  6. Analysis of the complete genome sequence of Nocardia seriolae UTF1, the causative agent of fish nocardiosis: The first reference genome sequence of the fish pathogenic Nocardia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Nishiki, Issei; Iwasaki, Yuki; Nakamura, Yoji; Fujiwara, Atushi; Shimahara, Yoshiko; Kamaishi, Takashi; Yoshida, Terutoyo; Nagai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Katoh, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    Nocardiosis caused by Nocardia seriolae is one of the major threats in the aquaculture of Seriola species (yellowtail; S. quinqueradiata, amberjack; S. dumerili and kingfish; S. lalandi) in Japan. Here, we report the complete nucleotide genome sequence of N. seriolae UTF1, isolated from a cultured yellowtail. The genome is a circular chromosome of 8,121,733 bp with a G+C content of 68.1% that encodes 7,697 predicted proteins. In the N. seriolae UTF1 predicted genes, we found orthologs of virulence factors of pathogenic mycobacteria and human clinical Nocardia isolates involved in host cell invasion, modulation of phagocyte function and survival inside the macrophages. The virulence factor candidates provide an essential basis for understanding their pathogenic mechanisms at the molecular level by the fish nocardiosis research community in future studies. We also found many potential antibiotic resistance genes on the N. seriolae UTF1 chromosome. Comparative analysis with the four existing complete genomes, N. farcinica IFM 10152, N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and N. cyriacigeorgica GUH-2 and N. nova SH22a, revealed that 2,745 orthologous genes were present in all five Nocardia genomes (core genes) and 1,982 genes were unique to N. seriolae UTF1. In particular, the N. seriolae UTF1 genome contains a greater number of mobile elements and genes of unknown function that comprise the differences in structure and gene content from the other Nocardia genomes. In addition, a lot of the N. seriolae UTF1-specific genes were assigned to the ABC transport system. Because of limited resources in ocean environments, these N. seriolae UTF1 specific ABC transporters might facilitate adaptation strategies essential for marine environment survival. Thus, the availability of the complete N. seriolae UTF1 genome sequence will provide a valuable resource for comparative genomic studies of N. seriolae isolates, as well as provide new insights into the ecological and functional diversity of

  7. Perception Mapping of Travelers: Case of Six Indian Domestic Airlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhit Agarwal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A comparison of customer satisfaction based on service quality as perceived by air travelers was done among six domestic airlines. Literature review suggested that flying experience has three stages: Pre-flight, in-flight and post-flight and a set of six variables can be used to measure satisfaction. These variables are: Ease of bookings through the website/call center; Hassle free check in/efficient ticketing staff/regular announcements during flight delays at airport; on time performance of flights; in flight experience; baggage handling and value for money. Approach: A questionnaire was designed with above set of variables and responses of 150 fliers of six domestic airlines viz., GoAir, Kingfisher, Jet Airways, Indigo, SpiceJet and Air India (Domestic was recorded on a five point Likert scale. About 150 respondents were interviewed from different places in NCR: Delhi, Gurgaon, Noida, Greater Noida and Faridabad. A convenient sampling method was followed. Perceptions of only those travelers were captured who had actually undergone the experience of travelling by an airline. The range for the number of respondents was between 103 (for GoAir and 133 (for Jet Air. Results: Using one way ANOVA, it was checked whether travelers perceive any significant difference between six airlines for each of the above six identified variables. With Tukey-Kramer test the airlines which are significantly different from the rest were identified. Perceptual maps with combination of up to two variables (attributes were drawn to infer about the positioning of six different airlines. Conclusion: This study will help marketers of domestic airlines and designers of flight service offerings to enhance the satisfaction level of air travelers.

  8. Mercury risk to avian piscivores across western United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Allyson K.; Evers, David C.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Josh; Willacker, James J.; Elliott, John E.; Lepak, Jesse M; Vander Pol, Stacy S.; Bryan, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread distribution of mercury (Hg) threatens wildlife health, particularly piscivorous birds. Western North America is a diverse region that provides critical habitat to many piscivorous bird species, and also has a well-documented history of mercury contamination from legacy mining and atmospheric deposition. The diversity of landscapes in the west limits the distribution of avian piscivore species, complicating broad comparisons across the region. Mercury risk to avian piscivores was evaluated across the western United States and Canada using a suite of avian piscivore species representing a variety of foraging strategies that together occur broadly across the region. Prey fish Hg concentrations were size-adjusted to the preferred size class of the diet for each avian piscivore (Bald Eagle = 36 cm, Osprey = 30 cm, Common and Yellow-billed Loon = 15 cm, Western and Clark's Grebe = 6 cm, and Belted Kingfisher = 5 cm) across each species breeding range. Using a combination of field and lab-based studies on Hg effect in a variety of species, wet weight blood estimates were grouped into five relative risk categories including: background ( 3 μg/g). These risk categories were used to estimate potential mercury risk to avian piscivores across the west at a 1 degree-by-1 degree grid cell resolution. Avian piscivores foraging on larger-sized fish generally were at a higher relative risk to Hg. Habitats with a relatively high risk included wetland complexes (e.g., prairie pothole in Saskatchewan), river deltas (e.g., San Francisco Bay, Puget Sound, Columbia River), and arid lands (Great Basin and central Arizona). These results indicate that more intensive avian piscivore sampling is needed across Western North America to generate a more robust assessment of exposure risk.

  9. Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation

  10. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds.

  11. Impacts of golden alga Prymnesium parvum on fish populations in reservoirs of the upper Colorado River and Brazos River basins, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Farooqi, Mukhtar; Farquhar, B.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    Several reservoirs in the upper Colorado River and Brazos River basins in Texas have experienced toxic blooms of golden alga Prymnesium parvum and associated fish kills since 2001. There is a paucity of information, however, regarding the population-level effects of such kills in large reservoirs, species-specific resistance to or recovery from kills, or potential differences in the patterns of impacts among basins. We used multiple before-after, control-impact analysis to determine whether repeated golden alga blooms have led to declines in the relative abundance and size structure of fish populations. Sustained declines were noted for 9 of 12 fish species surveyed in the upper Colorado River, whereas only one of eight species was impacted by golden alga in the Brazos River. In the upper Colorado River, White Bass Morone chrysops, White Crappie Pomoxis annularis, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, River Carpsucker Carpiodes carpio, Freshwater Drum Aplodinotus grunniens, Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus, Flathead Catfish Pylodictis olivaris, and Blue Catfish I. furcatus exhibited sustained declines in relative abundance, size structure, or both; Gizzard Shad Dorosoma cepedianum, Longnose Gar Lepisosteus osseus, and Common Carp Cyprinus carpio did not exhibit those declines. In the Brazos River, only the relative abundance of Blue Catfish was impacted. Overall, toxic golden alga blooms can negatively impact fish populations over the long-term, but the patterns of impact can vary considerably among river basins and species. In the Brazos River, populations of most fish species appear to be healthy, suggesting a positive angling outlook for this basin. In the upper Colorado River, fish populations have been severely impacted, and angling opportunities have been reduced. Basin-specific management plans aimed at improving water quality and quantity will likely reduce bloom intensity and allow recovery of fish populations to the

  12. Fish community dynamics following dam removal in a fragmented agricultural stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornis, Matthew; Weidel, Brian C.; Powers, Stephens; Diebel, Matthew W.; Cline, Timpthy; Fox, Justin; Kitchell, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation impedes dispersal of aquatic fauna, and barrier removal is increasingly used to increase stream network connectivity and facilitate fish dispersal. Improved understanding of fish community response to barrier removal is needed, especially in fragmented agricultural streams where numerous antiquated dams are likely destined for removal. We examined post-removal responses in two distinct fish communities formerly separated by a small aging mill dam. The dam was removed midway through the 6 year study, enabling passage for downstream fishes affiliated with a connected reservoir into previously inaccessible habitat, thus creating the potential for taxonomic homogenization between upstream and downstream communities. Both communities changed substantially post-removal. Two previously excluded species (white sucker, yellow perch) established substantial populations upstream of the former dam, contributing to a doubling of total fish biomass. Meanwhile, numerical density of pre-existing upstream fishes declined. Downstream, largemouth bass density was inversely correlated with prey fish density throughout the study, while post-removal declines in bluegill density coincided with cooler water temperature and increased suspended and benthic fine sediment. Upstream and downstream fish communities became more similar post-removal, represented by a shift in Bray-Curtis index from 14 to 41 % similarity. Our findings emphasize that barrier removal in highly fragmented stream networks can facilitate the unintended and possibly undesirable spread of species into headwater streams, including dispersal of species from remaining reservoirs. We suggest that knowledge of dispersal patterns for key piscivore and competitor species in both the target system and neighboring systems may help predict community outcomes following barrier removal.

  13. Urbanization is a major influence on microplastic ingestion by sunfish in the Brazos River Basin, Central Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Colleen A; Bratton, Susan P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics, degraded and weathered polymer-based particles, and manufactured products ranging between 50 and 5000 μm in size, are found within marine, freshwater, and estuarine environments. While numerous peer-reviewed papers have quantified the ingestion of microplastics by marine vertebrates, relatively few studies have focused on microplastic ingestion by freshwater organisms. This study documents microplastic and manufactured fiber ingestion by bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and longear (Lepomis megalotis) sunfish (Centrarchidae) from the Brazos River Basin, between Lake Whitney and Marlin, Texas, USA. Fourteen sample sites were studied and categorized into urban, downstream, and upstream areas. A total of 436 sunfish were collected, and 196 (45%) stomachs contained microplastics. Four percent (4%) of items sampled were debris on the macro size scale (i.e. >5 mm) and consisted of masses of plastic, metal, Styrofoam, or fishing material, while 96% of items sampled were in the form of microplastic threads. Fish length was statistically correlated to the number of microplastics detected (p = 0.019). Fish collected from urban sites displayed the highest mean number of microplastics ingested, followed by downstream and upstream sites. Microplastics were associated with the ingestion of other debris items (e.g. sand and wood) and correlated to the ingestion of fish eggs, earthworms, and mollusks, suggesting that sunfish incidentally ingest microplastics during their normal feeding methods. The high frequency of microplastic ingestion suggest that further research is needed to determine the residence time of microplastics within the stomach and gut, potential for food web transfer, and adverse effects on wildlife and ecosystemic health.

  14. Evaluating the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for pesticide hazard screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaberman, Scott; Padilla, Stephanie; Barron, Mace G

    2016-10-04

    Given the numerous chemicals used in society, it is critical to develop tools for accurate and efficient evaluation of potential risks to human and ecological receptors. Fish embryo acute toxicity tests are 1 tool that has been shown to be highly predictive of standard, more resource-intensive, juvenile fish acute toxicity tests. However, there is also evidence that fish embryos are less sensitive than juvenile fish for certain types of chemicals, including neurotoxicants. The utility of fish embryos for pesticide hazard assessment was investigated by comparing published zebrafish embryo toxicity data from pesticides with median lethal concentration 50% (LC50) data for juveniles of 3 commonly tested fish species: rainbow trout, bluegill sunfish, and sheepshead minnow. A poor, albeit significant, relationship (r(2 ) = 0.28; p zebrafish embryo and juvenile fish toxicity when pesticides were considered as a single group, but a much better relationship (r(2)  = 0.64; p pesticide mode of action was factored into an analysis of covariance. This discrepancy is partly explained by the large number of neurotoxic pesticides in the dataset, supporting previous findings that commonly used fish embryo toxicity test endpoints are particularly insensitive to neurotoxicants. These results indicate that it is still premature to replace juvenile fish toxicity tests with embryo-based tests such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity Test for routine pesticide hazard assessment, although embryo testing could be used with other screening tools for testing prioritization. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2016 SETAC.

  15. A naturally occurring substitution in the E2 protein of Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 changes viral fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Marius; Andersen, Linda; Blindheim, Steffen H; Rimstad, Espen; Nylund, Are

    2015-01-22

    Phylogenetic analyses of the Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV3) epizootic have suggested that a substitution from proline to serine in the receptor binding protein E2 position 206 has occurred after the introduction of virus from a wild reservoir to farmed salmonid fish in Norway. We modelled the 3D structure of P62, the uncleaved E3-E2 precursor, of SAVH20/03 based on its sequence homology to the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and studied in vitro and in vivo effects of the mutation using reverse genetics. E2(206) is located on the surface of the B-domain of E2, which is associated with receptor attachment in alphaviruses. Recombinant virus expressing the E2(206S) codon replicated slower and produced significantly less genomic copies than virus expressing the ancestral E2(206P) codon in vitro in Bluegill Fry (BF2) cells. The E2(206S) mutant was out-competed by the E2(206P) mutant after 5 passages in an in vitro competition assay, confirming that the substitution negatively affects the efficacy of virus multiplication in cell culture. Both mutants were highly infectious to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), produced similar viral RNA loads in gills, heart, kidney and brain, and induced similar histopathologic changes in these organs. The E2(206S) mutant produced a less persistent infection in salmon and was shed more rapidly to water than the E2(206P) mutant. Reduced generation time through more rapid shedding could therefore explain why a serine in this position became dominant in the viral population after SAV3 was introduced to farmed salmon from the wild reservoir.

  16. Growth, condition, diet, and consumption rates of northern pike in three Arizona reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, J.M.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) introductions are controversial in the western United States due to suspected impacts they might have on established sport fisheries and potential illegal introductions. Tbree Arizona reservoirs, Parker Canyon Lake, Upper Lake Mary and Long Lake were sampled to examine the diet, consumption dynamics, and growth of northern pike. Northern pike diets varied by season and reservoir. In Parker Canyon Lake, diets were dominated by rainbow trout in winter and spring and bluegill and green sunfish in the fall. In Long Lake the northern pike ate crayfish in spring and early summer and switched to young of the year common carp in summer and fall. Black crappie, golden shiners, and crayfish were the major prey in Upper Lake Mary during spring, but they switched to stocked rainbow trout in the fall. Northern pike growth was in the high range of growth reported throughout the United States. Estimated northern pike specific consumption rate (scr) of rainbow trout (g/g/d ?? 10-6) was greatest in Upper Lake Mary (scr = 329.1 ?? 23.7 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where stocked fingerling (280 mm TL) rainbow trout stocked in Long Lake (scr = 1.4 ?? 0.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) and Parker Canyon Lake (scr = 287.2 ?? 15.1 g/g/d ?? 10-6) where catchable-sized rainbow trout were stocked. Managers should consider the cost-benefits of stocking fish >200 mm TL in lakes containing northern pike. ?? Copyright by the North American Lake Management Society 2008.

  17. Enhanced detection of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus by pretreatment of cell monolayers with polyethylene glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To improve quantification of very low levels of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in samples of tissue, ovarian fluid, or natural water supplies, we tested the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to enhance the sensitivity and speed of the plaque assay system. We compared 4, 7, and 10% solutions of PEG of molecular weight 6,000, 8,000, or 20,000 applied at selected volumes and for various durations. When cell monolayers of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC), fathead minnow (FHM), chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214), and bluegill fry (BF2) were pretreated with 7% PEG-20,000, they produced 4-17-fold increases in plaque assay titers of IHNV. The plaque assay titers of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, chum salmon reovirus, and chinook salmon paramyxovirus were also enhanced by exposure of CHSE-214 cells to PEG, but the titers of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus and Oncorhynchus masou virus were not substantially changed. Plaques formed by IHNV on PEG-treated EPC cells incubated at 15°C had a larger mean diameter at 6 d than those on control cells at 8 d; this suggests the assay could be shortened by use of PEG. Pretreatment of EPC cell monolayers with PEG enabled detection of IHNV in some samples that appeared negative with untreated cells. For example, when ovarian fluid samples from chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were inoculated onto untreated monolayers of EPC cells, IHNV was detected in only 11 of 51 samples; 17 of the samples were positive when PEG-treated EPC cells were used.PDF

  18. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracheil, Brenda M; Marshall Adams, S; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Greeley, Mark S; Murphy, Cheryl A; Mathews, Teresa J; Peterson, Mark J

    2016-08-01

    A 4.1 million m(3) coal ash release into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in east Tennessee, USA, prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on resident biota. Because of the magnitude of the ash spill and the potential for exposure to coal ash-associated contaminants [e.g., selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg)] which are bioaccumulative and may present human and ecological risks, an integrative, bioindicator approach was used. Three species of fish were monitored-bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), redear sunfish (L. microlophus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-at ash-affected and reference sites annually for 5 years following the spill. On the same individual fish, contaminant burdens were measured in various tissues, blood chemistry parameters as metrics of fish health, and various condition and reproduction indices. A multivariate statistical approach was then used to evaluate relationships between contaminant bioaccumulation and fish metrics to assess the chronic, sub-lethal effects of exposure to the complex mixture of coal ash-associated contaminants at and around the ash spill site. This study suggests that while fish tissue concentrations of some ash-associated contaminants are elevated at the spill site, there was no consistent evidence of compromised fish health linked with the spill. Further, although relationships between elevated fillet burdens of ash-associated contaminants and some fish metrics were found, these relationships were not indicative of exposure to coal ash or spill sites. The present study adds to the weight of evidence from prior studies suggesting that fish populations have not incurred significant biological effects from spilled ash at this site: findings that are relevant to the current national discussions on the safe disposal of coal ash waste.

  19. In vitro infection of a cell line from Ictalurus nebulosus with Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendras, F E; Jones, S R; Fuentealba, C; Wright, G M

    1997-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis, the etiologic agent of salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS), affects several species of salmonids. Previous reports using the appearance of cytopathic effect (CPE) as the criterion for susceptibility, showed that Piscirickettsia salmonis (ATCC strain) can be grown in vitro in some cells lines derived from salmonid fish, but not in BB cells from brown bullhead (Ictalurus nebulosus) and BF-2 cells from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). In this study we describe growth of P. salmonis (ATCC strain VR 1361) in a cell line previously believed to be nonpermissive for this organism. CPE was first detected in chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) and epithelioma papulosum ciprini (EPC) cell lines at 6 d postinfection (dpi). In contrast, using BB cell line, CPE was first detected 45 dpi and the monolayer completed CPE by 78 dpi. Electron microscopic examination of BB cells 78 dpi revealed free, intracytoplasmic and extracellular localization of the agent. P. salmonis was also observed within membrane-bounded vacuoles in BB cells, similar to that described in CHSE 214 cells. Contrary to earlier reports, results from the present study show that the BB cell line, is susceptible to Piscirickettsia salmonis infection. The delayed onset of CPE in BB cells in comparison to other permissive cell lines suggests that BB cells are not ideal hosts for P. salmonis. Interestingly, however, these results demonstrate that P. salmonis can infect non-salmonid cell lines, and raises the possibility that non-salmonid fish may play a role in the persistence and transmission of SRS in the natural environment.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Four Presumptive Tests for Blood to Detect Epithelial Injury on Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Smokorowski, Karen; Haxton, Tim; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Current methods of fish epithelial injury detection are limited to gross macroscopic examination that has a subjective bias as well as an inability to reliably quantify the degree of injury. Fluorescein, a presumptive test for blood, has been shown to have the capability to detect and quantify fish epithelial injury. However, there are several other presumptive tests for blood (Bluestar*, phenolphthalein, and HemastixH) that may have benefits over the use of fluorescein, particularly for field research on wild fish. This study investigated the capabilities of these four tests to detect and quantify a variety of injuries commonly encountered by fish (abrasion, cuts, fin frays, and punctures) using the freshwater bluegill Lepomis macrochirus as a model. Fluorescein was consistently found to be the most reliable (i.e., detected the highest proportion of true positive results and rarely detected false positive reactions) of the four presumptive tests for blood compared. Further testing was conducted to examine the reliability of fluorescein. By 24 h after an injury was inflicted, the injury was no longer detectable by fluorescein, and when fluorescein was applied to an injured fish, the fluorescein was no longer detectable 3 h after application. In a comparison of two common anaesthetics used in fisheries research, there was no significant difference in the proportion of injury detected when 3- aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester methanesulfate (tricaine) was used compared with a clove oil and ethanol (1:9) solution. In summary, fluorescein was the most reliable presumptive test for blood examined in this study for the detection and quantification of recent (hours) fish epithelial injury.

  1. Ability of freshwater fish to extract oxygen at different hydrogen-ion concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, A.H.; McGavock, A.M.; Fuller, A.C.; Markus, H.C.

    1934-01-01

    Pruthi's observations on the stickleback at pH 3.1 have been confirmed for the stickleback as well as several other species of fresh-water fish. Pruthi's criticism of the work of Powers is invalid within the pH range to which the fish are acclimated. The initial oxygen has either no effect on the lethal oxygen or the effect is in the opposite direction from that suggested by Pruthi. Outside of the pH range normal to the species in question the lethal oxygen is dependent in a large measure on the initial oxygen. Several species of freshwater fish--largemouth blackbass, smallmouth blackbass, white crappie, yellow perch, rainbow trout, as well as the goldfish and green sunfish--have the ability to extract oxygen from the water at low oxygen tensions equally well over a fairly wide range of hydrogen-ion concentration. The bluegill has a somewhat narrower range of toleration. The two species of minnow--steel-colored and bluntnose--tolerate a markedly narrower range of difference in hydrogen-ion concentration as shown by the lethal oxygen. The ability of fish to extract oxygen from the water at low pressure depends more or less on the hydrogen-ion concentration of water. The results obtained in this investigation confirm the studies on pH tolerance of fish previously published. These results also confirm the observations that in highly alkaline water fish require a higher concentration of oxygen to survive.

  2. Effects of introduced fishes on wild juvenile coho salmon in three shallow pacific northwest lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Bolding, B.D.; Divens, M.; Meyer, W.

    2005-01-01

    Declines in Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been blamed on hydropower, overfishing, ocean conditions, and land use practices; however, less is known about the impacts of introduced fish. Most of the hundreds of lakes and ponds in the Pacific Northwest contain introduced fishes, and many of these water bodies are also important for salmon production, especially of coho salmon O. kisutch. Over 2 years, we examined the predation impacts of 10 common introduced fishes (brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus, black crappie Pomoxis nigro-maculatus, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas, green sunfish L. cyanellus, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, pumpkinseed L. gibbosus, rainbow trout O. mykiss, warmouth L. gulosus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens) and two native fishes (cutthroat trout O. clarkii and prickly sculpin Cottus asper) on wild juvenile coho salmon in three shallow Pacific Northwest lakes, all located in different watersheds. Of these species, largemouth bass were responsible for an average of 98% of the predation on coho salmon in all lakes, but the total impact to each run varied among lakes and years. Very few coho salmon were eaten by black crappies, brown bullheads, cutthroat trout, prickly sculpin, or yellow perch, whereas other species were not observed to eat coho salmon. Juvenile coho salmon growth in all lakes was higher than in nearby streams. Therefore, food competition between coho salmon and introduced fishes in lakes was probably not limiting coho salmon populations. Largemouth bass are widespread and are present in 85% of lowland warmwater public-access lakes in Washington (n = 421), 84% of those in Oregon (n = 179), and 74% of those in the eight northwesternmost counties in California (n = 19). Future research would help to identify the impact of largemouth bass predation across the region and prioritize lakes where impacts are most severe. Nevertheless, attempts to transplant or increase largemouth bass

  3. Do trout swim better than eels? Challenges for estimating performance based on the wake of self-propelled bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytell, Eric D.

    Engineers and biologists have long desired to compare propulsive performance for fishes and underwater vehicles of different sizes, shapes, and modes of propulsion. Ideally, such a comparison would be made on the basis of either propulsive efficiency, total power output or both. However, estimating the efficiency and power output of self-propelled bodies, and particularly fishes, is methodologically challenging because it requires an estimate of thrust. For such systems traveling at a constant velocity, thrust and drag are equal, and can rarely be separated on the basis of flow measured in the wake. This problem is demonstrated using flow fields from swimming American eels, Anguilla rostrata, measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed video. Eels balance thrust and drag quite evenly, resulting in virtually no wake momentum in the swimming (axial) direction. On average, their wakes resemble those of self-propelled jet propulsors, which have been studied extensively. Theoretical studies of such wakes may provide methods for the estimation of thrust separately from drag. These flow fields are compared with those measured in the wakes of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In contrast to eels, these fishes produce wakes with axial momentum. Although the net momentum flux must be zero on average, it is neither spatially nor temporally homogeneous; the heterogeneity may provide an alternative route for estimating thrust. This review shows examples of wakes and velocity profiles from the three fishes, indicating challenges in estimating efficiency and power output and suggesting several routes for further experiments. Because these estimates will be complicated, a much simpler method for comparing performance is outlined, using as a point of comparison the power lost producing the wake. This wake power, a component of the efficiency and total power, can be estimated in a straightforward way from the flow

  4. Investigation of Fish Caudal Fin Locomotion Using a Bio-inspired Robotic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyu Ren

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to its advantages of realizing repeatable experiments, collecting data and isolating key factors, the bio-robotic model is becoming increasingly important in the study of biomechanics. The caudal fin of fish has long been understood to be central to propulsion performance, yet its contribution to manoeuverability, especially for homocercal caudal fin, has not been studied in depth. In the research outlined in this paper, we designed and fabricated a robotic caudal fin to mimic the morphology and the three-dimensional (3D locomotion of the tail of the Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus. We applied heave and pitch motions to the robot to model the movement of the caudal peduncle of its biological counterpart. Force measurements and 2D and 3D digital particle image velocimetry were then conducted under different movement patterns and flow speeds. From the force data, we found the addition of the 3D caudal fin locomotion significantly enhanced the lift force magnitude. The phase difference between the caudal fin ray and peduncle motion was a key factor in simultaneously controlling the thrust and lift. The increased flow speed had a negative impact on the generation of lift force. From the average 2D velocity field, we observed that the vortex wake directed water both axially and vertically, and formed a jet like structure with notable wake velocity. The 3D instantaneous velocity field at 0.6 T indicated the 3D motion of the caudal fin may result in asymmetry wake flow patterns relative to the mid-sagittal plane and change the heading direction of the shedding vortexes. Based on these results, we hypothesized that live fish may actively tune the movement between the caudal fin rays and the peduncle to change the wake structure behind the tail and hence obtain different thrust and lift forces, which contributes to its high manoeuvrability.

  5. Novel chlorambucil-conjugated anionic linear-globular PEG-based second-generation dendrimer: in vitro/in vivo improved anticancer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assadi A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Artin Assadi,1 Vahideh Sharifi Najafabadi,1 Seyed Ataollah Sadat Shandiz,2 Azadah Shayeq Boroujeni,1 Sepehr Ashrafi,1 Ali Zaman Vaziri,1 Seyedeh Masoumeh Ghoreishi,1 Mohammad Reza Aghasadeghi,3 Seyed Esmaeil Sadat Ebrahimi,4 Morteza Pirali-Hamedani,4 Mehdi Shafiee Ardestani1 1Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2Young Researchers and Elite Club, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, 3Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, 4Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Abstract: Evaluating the efficacy of anticancer drugs is an evolving and research-oriented issue. The objective of this study was to reduce the insolubility of chlorambucil (CBL in water and improve the anticancer activity of CBL in vitro and in vivo through the conjugation of CBL with anionic linear-globular dendrimer (second generation, G2. In the current study, the anticancer activity among three groups that include CBL, CBL–G2 dendrimer, and control was measured in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies showed that G2 anionic linear-globular polyethylene-glycol-based dendrimer, which conjugated to the CBL exterior through an ester linkage, was able to significantly improve the treatment efficacy over clinical CBL alone with respect to proliferation assay, 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide; half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 was calculated to be 141 µg/mL for CBL alone and 27.7 µg/mL for CBL–G2 dendrimer; P<0.05. In addition, CBL–G2 dendrimer conjugate forestalled the growth of MCF-7 cancerous cells in addition to enhancing the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells as demonstrated by an annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate assay. CBL–G2 dendrimer conjugate was able to checkmate antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression and Bcl-2/Bax ratio in a large scale compared with the control group and

  6. Determination of the ratio between phosphorus and uranium in surface waters selected in the State of Mexico; Determinacion de la relacion entre fosforo y uranio en cuerpos de agua seleccionados en el Estado de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E

    2001-07-01

    The agricultural regions lately, they have suffered a severe contamination for the big ones quantities of chemical fertilizers and of pesticides applied to improve their production and quality, increasing these in areas with temperatures but you lower that the average. For the importance of the physicochemical processes that they are made in the waters to settle down surface near to agricultural fields, the physicochemical characteristics were analysed of these waters to determine the contributions that they carry out the phosphate fertilizers that are carried by the escorrentia toward the borders and to make a pursuit of their variability during an agricultural cycle, in times of the summertime and of rains, as well as to observe the effect of the depth in these physicochemical properties. Its were sampling three borders and a spring that it served of white, all them located in the suburbs of the Xinantecatl (Nevado de Toluca), municipality of Zinacantepec, State of Mexico, area with the temperatures but drops registered in the region. They were carried out samplings in the first days of the months of April, July and November. The points of those sampled borders were the influent, the effluent and 3 different depths (lm, 3m and 5m). where was not possible sampling all the points, its were sampling only the one influent and the effluent. The selected physicochemical parameters were the temperature, the pH, the conductivity electric and the one oxygenates dissolved This determination in situ you carries out with a team portable of type Check-Mate, of interchangeable electrodes. The certain anions they were phosphates, nitrates, sulfates and bicarbonates; the measurement of the concentration of anions, one carries out for ultraviolet-visible light spectroscopy and titration. The cations analysed they were sodium, potassium, iron, calcium and magnesium. The cations concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The determination of the uranium

  7. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  8. Effects of logging and recovery process on avian richness and diversity in hill dipterocarp tropical rainforest-Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husin, Mohamed Zakaria; Rajpar, Muhammad Nawaz

    2015-01-01

    The effects of logging and recovery process on avian richness and diversity was compared in recently logged and thirty year post-harvested hill dipterocarp tropical rainforest, using mist-netting method. Atotal of 803 bird individuals representing 86 bird species and 29 families (i.e., 37.90% from recently logged forest and 62.10% from thirty year post-harvested forest) were captured from October 2010 to September, 2012. Twenty one bird species were commonly captured from both types of forests, 37 bird species were caught only in thirty year post-harvested forest and 28 bird species were caught only from recently logged forest. Arachnothera longirostra--Little Spiderhunter, Malacopteron magnum--Rufous-crowned Babbler, Alophoixus phaeocephalus -Yellow-bellied Bulbul and Meiglyptes tukki--Buff-necked Woodpecker were the most abundant four bird species in the thirty year post-harvested forest. On the contrary, seven bird species, i.e., Trichastoma rostratum - White-chested Babbler, Lacedo pulchella - Banded Kingfisher, Picus miniaceus--Banded Woodpecker, Enicurus ruficapillus - Chestnut-naped Forktail, Anthreptes simplex--Plain Sunbird, Muscicapella hodgsoni--Pygmy Blue Flycatcher and Otus rufescens--Reddish Scope Owl were considered as the rarest (i.e., each represented only 0.12%). Likewise, A. longirostra, Pycnonotus eythropthalmos - Spectacled Bulbul, P. simplex--Cream-vented Bulbul and Merops viridis--Blue-throated Bee-eater were the most dominant and Copsychus malabaricus--White-rumped Shama Eurylaimus javanicus--Banded Broadbill /xos malaccensis - Streaked Bulbul and Harpactes diardii--Diard's Trogon (each 0.12%) were the rarest bird species in recently logged forest. CAP analysis indicated that avian species in thirty year post-harvested forest were more diverse and evenly distributed than recently logged forest. However, recently logged forest was rich in bird species than thirty year post- harvested forest. The results revealed that logging and retrieval

  9. THE BIODIVERSITY AT SANDI BIRD SANCTUARY, HARDOI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MIGRATORY BIRDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-09-01

    heron, pond heron, night heron, large, medium and little egrets, painted stork, open billed stork, cattle egret, black necked stork(endangered, combduck, lesser whistling teal, common pariah kite, brahminy kite, shikra, sparrow, hawk, tawny eagle, greater spotted eagle, crested hawk eagle, lagger falcon rain quail, jungle bush quail, painted bush quail, black partridge, grey partridge, common peafowl, water hens, purple moor hens, jacanas, black winged stilt, lap wing, blue rock pigeon, dove spp., parakeets, crow pheasants, owl, swifts, kingfishers, blue jay, hoopoe, mynas, crow, drongo, bulbul, babblers, cormorants, sarus cranes, etc. There are 38195 local birds and 11378 migratory birds (total 49572 observed during period of study. The migratory birds represent the economic importance of that particular area and faunal biodiversity along with health of ecosystem.

  10. Water Velocity and Bioturbation Alter Sediment Resuspension and Biogeochemistry in an Experimental Freshwater Mesocosm System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, A.; Vanni, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Processes such as bioturbation and resuspension can affect organic matter decomposition by altering sediment redox conditions. Increased oxygen availability may, in turn, affect remineralization rates and larger scale processes such as benthic-pelagic coupling. However, relatively few studies have explicitly tested the simultaneous effects of bioturbation and water velocity on benthic biogeochemistry and sediment resuspension. Using a mesocosm system we conducted two experiments testing the effects of bioturbator identity on particulate and dissolved nutrient dynamics before and after a resuspension event (i.e. water velocity held constant at 0.12 m s-1 for 2 hr; Expt. 1) and rates of sediment resuspension with increasing water velocity (0.00 - 0.20 m s-1; Expt. 2). We manipulated bioturbator identity across four levels as sediments were undisturbed (control), manually punctured (2% of surface area), or disturbed by one of two fish species, either bluegill or catfish. For Expt. 1, the bioturbation treatments were applied for several days and measurements were made before and after the resuspension event. Initially, water column chlorophyll and total suspended sediment (TSS) concentrations were highest in the catfish treatments. Bioturbator identity did not affect the stoichiometry of TSS as strongly; C:N was unaffected by our treatments while N:P was lowest in the disturbed treatments. After the resuspension event, there was no difference in TSS concentrations or stoichiometric ratios across the bioturbation treatments. Dissolved nutrient flux rates were insensitive to the bioturbation treatments and were more strongly influenced by the resuspension event. For instance, sediment NO3- fluxes were negative (i.e. net flux into sediments) until after the resuspension event when they became positive. In Expt. 2, we gradually increased water velocity from 0.00 - 0.20 m s-1 and measured TSS concentrations only. TSS was initially highest in catfish treatments and lowest in

  11. In Vivo Mass-independent Fractionation of Mercury Isotopes in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R.; Odom, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent experimental work and analyses of natural samples have revealed both mass-dependent and mass- independent isotope fractionation effects in mercury. These findings portend new avenues toward understanding the global mercury cycle. It has been shown experimentally that photo reduction of Hg+2 and methylmercury in water with concomitant release of the reduced, gaseous species Hg° results in the residual methylmercury possessing a mass-independent isotope effect. This effect is a relative enrichment of isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg over the even mass number isotopes when compared to the mercury standard NIST SRM3133. Large mass independent fractionation (MIF) effects (Δ199Hg values of a few ‰) have been found in mercury in fish and interpreted as isotope effects inherited from the water. To evaluate the possibility that MIF might be produced within the fish, we have analyzed 38 samples that include zooplankton and twelve different species of fish from a single lake collected over a 2-month time period for mercury isotopic compositions. Trophic levels of the same fish specimens had previously been determined from stomach contents and nitrogen isotopes. Zooplankton in the lake contain mercury with Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values of +0.43 (±0.07) and +0.44 (±0.07) respectively. Among the fish species there is a striking correspondence between trophic level and Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values for primary, secondary, and tertiary consumers. The Δ199Hg values ranges over ~1‰ from ~+0.4 in zooplankton, juvenile bluegill and several other small fishes to Δ199Hg = + 1.36 for the Florida gar that is the top predator fish in the lake. These observations indicate that the MIF effect, rather than being an artifact of the water column is produced in vivo. Partial separation of 199Hg and 201Hg from isotopes of even neutron number can be achieved by the magnetic isotope effect in reactions involving sufficiently long-lived intermediate free radicals, where nuclear - electron

  12. Locomotor forces on a swimming fish: three-dimensional vortex wake dynamics quantified using digital particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker; Lauder

    1999-01-01

    Quantifying the locomotor forces experienced by swimming fishes represents a significant challenge because direct measurements of force applied to the aquatic medium are not feasible. However, using the technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV), it is possible to quantify the effect of fish fins on water movement and hence to estimate momentum transfer from the animal to the fluid. We used DPIV to visualize water flow in the wake of the pectoral fins of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) swimming at speeds of 0.5-1.5 L s(-)(1), where L is total body length. Velocity fields quantified in three perpendicular planes in the wake of the fins allowed three-dimensional reconstruction of downstream vortex structures. At low swimming speed (0.5 L s(-)(1)), vorticity is shed by each fin during the downstroke and stroke reversal to generate discrete, roughly symmetrical, vortex rings of near-uniform circulation with a central jet of high-velocity flow. At and above the maximum sustainable labriform swimming speed of 1.0 L s(-)(1), additional vorticity appears on the upstroke, indicating the production of linked pairs of rings by each fin. Fluid velocity measured in the vicinity of the fin indicates that substantial spanwise flow during the downstroke may occur as vortex rings are formed. The forces exerted by the fins on the water in three dimensions were calculated from vortex ring orientation and momentum. Mean wake-derived thrust (11.1 mN) and lift (3.2 mN) forces produced by both fins per stride at 0.5 L s(-)(1) were found to match closely empirically determined counter-forces of body drag and weight. Medially directed reaction forces were unexpectedly large, averaging 125 % of the thrust force for each fin. Such large inward forces and a deep body that isolates left- and right-side vortex rings are predicted to aid maneuverability. The observed force balance indicates that DPIV can be used to measure accurately large-scale vorticity in the wake of

  13. Hydrodynamics of C-Start Escape Responses of Fish as Studied with Simple Physical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, William C; Wen, Li; Lauder, George V

    2015-10-01

    One of the most-studied unsteady locomotor behaviors exhibited by fishes is the c-start escape response. Although the kinematics of these responses have been studied extensively and two well-defined kinematic stages have been documented, only a few studies have focused on hydrodynamic patterns generated by fishes executing escape behaviors. Previous work has shown that escape responses by bluegill sunfish generate three distinct vortex rings, each with central orthogonal jet flows, and here we extend this conclusion to two other species: stickleback and mosquitofish. Jet #1 is formed by the tail during Stage 1, and moves in the same direction as Stage-2 movement of the fish, thereby reducing final escape-velocity but also rotating the fish. Jet #2, in contrast, moves approximately opposite to the final direction of the fish's motion and contains the bulk of the total fluid-momentum powering the escape response. Jet #3 forms during Stage 2 in the mid-body region and moves in a direction approximately perpendicular to jets 1 and 2, across the direction of movement of the body. In this study, we used a mechanical controller to impulsively move passively flexible plastic panels of three different stiffnesses in heave, pitch, and heave + pitch motions to study the effects of stiffness on unsteady hydrodynamics of escape. We were able to produce kinematics very similar to those of fish c-starts and also to reproduce the 3-jet hydrodynamic pattern of the c-start using a panel of medium flexural stiffness and the combined heave + pitch motion. This medium-stiffness panel matched the measured stiffness of the near-tail region of fish bodies. This motion also produced positive power when the panel straightened during stage 2 of the escape response. More flexible and stiffer panels resulted in non-biological kinematics and patterns of flow for all motions. The use of simple flexible models with a mechanical controller and program of fish-like motion is a promising approach

  14. Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation

  15. Monitoring Environment with GIS for Part of Thiruvallur Town Using Cartosat 1 Stereo, Pan & Resourcesat Liss 4 MSS Merged Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, G. S.; Venkatchalam, R. V.; Ramamurthhy, M.; Gummidipoondi, R. J.; Ramillah, M.

    2012-07-01

    Thiruvallur town is about 44 km from Chennai in Tamil nadu state of India with a population of 130000 , covering 10.75 sq km area. It is about 2km from Sri Venkateswara College of Engineering and Technology. It was Taluk (Sub Division'.s) head quarters and from 1991 it was upgraded as District head quarters after the formation of Thiruvallur District. With rapid growth of town the Population density of Thiruvallur has increased in the past three decades from 300 persons/sq.km in 1951, to 6000 persons/sq.km in 1981 and now it is 12925 persons/sq.km in 2011. The creation of District administrative collector office, headquarters offices for police, judicial courts and Tamil Nadu and Federal Government development department's offices, establishment of multinationals major industries like Caterpillar, Kingfishers,Hindustan Motors, Mahendra Automobiles, Coco cola, Japanese Glass industry, Korean LOTO etc apart from mushrooming growth of about 41 Engineering, Nursing, Education, Medical, Naval, Arts and Science colleges, International Public schools,Governmentt, Private schools and Polytechnics added to the population of this Town. It is well connected by National Highways and Railways and upgraded as District Municipality. This resulted in urban drainage problem and conversion of Agriculture land and lakes for housing, establishment of major Govt and Private Hospitals including special units for Eye care, Cardiology, and Health Clinics, pharmacies etc. The effect of urbanization on environment of this once silent rural temple town which was supporting intensive agriculture activities , green with paddy fields is studied with high resolution satellite data is know the impact on health and environment changes from 2008 to 2011, using 2.5m resolution PAN stereo data of Cartosat 1 merged with 5.8 m resolution Multi Spectral data of LISS 4 of Resourcesat 1 of Indian Remote sensing satellites and Geo Eye satellite image of 2011 from Google Earth web site for the western part

  16. Mercury bioaccumulation in fishes from subalpine lakes of the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, northeastern Oregon and western Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herring, Garth; Johnson, Branden L.; Graw, Rick

    2013-01-01

    within a lake’s catchment was by far the most important variable explaining fish THg concentrations, with an increase in THg concentrations of more than 400 percent across the forest density spectrum. Across all study lakes, fish THg concentrations ranged from 0.004 to 0.438 milligrams per kilogram wet weight (mg/kg ww). Only a single individual fish sample exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) human health tissue residue criteria of 0.3 mg/kg ww. However, 54 percent of fish (N=177) exceeded the more stringent tissue residue criteria (0.04 mg/kg ww) adopted by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to better protect subsistence fishers. Additionally, 2 and 10 percent of fish exceeded levels associated with reduced common loon reproduction and behavior, respectively. Whereas 25 and 68 percent of fish sampled exceeded concentrations deemed protective of mink and kingfisher, respectively. These results suggest that THg concentrations may be present in these lakes at levels associated with ecological risk. It is important to note however, that accurate inference on potential impairment cannot be made within the context of this study design and further research is needed to better quantify these risks.

  17. Unicapsula species (Myxosporea: Trilosporidae) of Australian marine fishes, including the description of Unicapsula andersenae n. sp. in five teleost families off Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T L; Adlard, R D

    2013-08-01

    , off Lizard Island. U. seriolae Lester 1982 is reported here from Yellowtail Kingfish, Seriola lalandi, from sites off Queensland and from Jurien Bay, Western Australia. Comparative genetic analyses also revealed that an unidentified species of Unicapsula from Epinephelus septemfasciatus off Japan whose rDNA sequence data are available on GenBank is consistent with U. seriolae. This suggests that U. seriolae may also exhibit low host specificity and may be distributed widely throughout the Indo-West Pacific region. In comparison to other myxozoan genera, it is clear that the species richness of Unicapsula spp. falls well below that displayed by either Ceratomyxa spp. or Kudoa spp. The discovery of a further new species of Unicapsula in Australia now brings the total worldwide number of formally described Unicapsula species to a modest 11. Nonetheless, this taxon remains of significant interest to commercial and recreational fisheries through the potential production of macroscopic pseudocysts in fish muscle and post-mortem muscle liquefaction, both of which can render fish fillets unpalatable and unmarketable.

  18. Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1999-2003 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Desmond J.

    2003-02-25

    -reared salmon. After release, hatchery-reared fish are inefficient foragers and are often found with empty stomachs or stomachs filled with indigestible debris (Miller 1953, Hochachka 1961, Reimers 1963, Sosiak et al. 1979, Myers 1980, O'Grady 1983, Johnsen and Ugedal 1986). Their social behavior also differs, with hatchery-reared fish congregating at higher densities, being more aggressive, and displaying less territory fidelity than wild-reared fish (Fenderson et al. 1968, Bachman 1984, Swain and Riddell 1990). In the natural environment this results in hatchery-reared fish spending more time in high-risk aggressive behavior and less time in beneficial foraging behavior than their wild-reared counterparts. Hatchery-reared fish are also more surface oriented than wild-reared salmonids (Mason et al. 1967, Sosiak 1978). This increases their risk of being attacked by avian predators, such as kingfishers (Ceryle spp.), which search for fish near the surface. Although some of the differences between wild and hatchery-reared fish are innate (Reisenbichler and McIntyre 1977, Swain and Riddell 1990), many are conditioned and can be modified by altering the hatchery rearing environment. NATURES studies are aimed at developing a more natural salmon culture environment to prevent the development of these unnatural attributes in hatchery-reared fish. NATURES fish culture practices are already producing salmon with up to about 50% higher in-stream survival than conventionally-reared fish (Maynard et al. 1996b). When these techniques are incorporated into production releases, they should also translate into increased smolt-to-adult survival. Conservation and supplementation programs can use NATURES-reared salmonids to rebuild stocks currently listed as endangered and threatened into healthy self-sustaining runs more rapidly than traditional programs. Traditional production programs can also use high-survival NATURES-reared fish to reduce their impact on wild populations, while still

  19. Environmental Factors Affecting Mercury in Camp Far West Reservoir, California, 2001-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Stewart, A. Robin; Saiki, Michael K.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Topping, Brent R.; Rider, Kelly M.; Gallanthine, Steven K.; Kester, Cynthia A.; Rye, Robert O.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; De Wild, John F.

    2008-01-01

    water were observed in samples collected during summer from deepwater stations in the anoxic hypolimnion. In the shallow (less than 14 meters depth) oxic epilimnion, concentrations of methylmercury in unfiltered water were highest during the spring and lowest during the fall. The ratio of methylmercury to total mercury (MeHg/HgT) increased systematically from winter to spring to summer, largely in response to the progressive seasonal decrease in total mercury concentrations, but also to some extent because of increases in MeHg concentrations during summer. Water-quality data for Camp Far West Reservoir are used in conjunction with data from linked studies of sediment and biota to develop and refine a conceptual model for mercury methylation and bioaccumulation in the reservoir and the lower Bear River watershed. It is hypothesized that MeHg is produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the anoxic parts of the water column and in shallow bed sediment. Conditions were optimal for this process during late summer and fall. Previous work has indicated that Camp Far West Reservoir is a phosphate-limited system - molar ratios of inorganic nitrogen to inorganic phosphorus in filtered water were consistently greater than 16 (the Redfield ratio), sometimes by orders of magnitude. Therefore, concentrations of orthophosphate were expectedly very low or below detection at all stations during all seasons. It is further hypothesized that iron-reducing bacteria facilitate release of phosphorus from iron-rich sediments during summer and early fall, stimulating phytoplankton growth in the fall and winter, and that the MeHg produced in the hypolimnion and metalimnion is released to the entire water column in the late fall during reservoir destratification (vertical mixing). Mercury bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were computed using data from linked studies of biota spanning a range of trophic position: zooplankton, midge larvae, mayfly nymphs, crayfish, threadfin shad, bluegill,

  20. Selenium in ecosystems within the mountaintop coal mining and valley-fill region of southern West Virginia-assessment and ecosystem-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Theresa S.

    2013-01-01

    acted as an integrator of organic-rich, fine-grained biomass present in streams. The base-case food web modeled for streams was suspended particulate material to aquatic insect to creek chub, with comparative modeling of a direct particulate-to-stoneroller food web. Model species for a reservoir setting were based on an earlier study of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Several reservoir food webs were considered based on a variety of invertebrates (insect, snail, clam). For stream and reservoir settings, predicted Se concentrations in exposure scenarios showed a high degree of correlation (r2 = 0.91 for invertebrates and 0.75 for fish) with field observations of Se concentrations when modeling was initiated from suspended-particulate-material Se concentrations and model transfer parameters defined previously in the literature were used. These strong correlations validate the derived site-specific model and establish sufficient confidence that the predictions from the developed model can be quantitatively applied to the ecosystems in southern West Virginia. An application of modeling used a metric describing the partitioning of Se between particulate material and dissolved phases (Kd) to allow determination of a dissolved Se concentration that would be necessary to attain a site-specific Se fish body burden. The operationally defined Kd quantifies the complex process of transformation at the base of a food web on a site-specific basis. The magnitude of this metric is known to vary with such factors as Se speciation, particulate-material type, and hydrology. This application (1) ties dissolved Se concentrations to fish tissue concentrations; (2) allows consideration of different choices for intervening site-specific exposure steps that set Se bioaccumulation, partitioning, and bioavailability; and (3) generates implications for management decisions that define protection through

  1. Selenium in ecosystems within the mountaintop coal mining and valley-fill region of southern West Virginia-assessment and ecosystem-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Theresa S.

    2013-01-01

    acted as an integrator of organic-rich, fine-grained biomass present in streams. The base-case food web modeled for streams was suspended particulate material to aquatic insect to creek chub, with comparative modeling of a direct particulate-to-stoneroller food web. Model species for a reservoir setting were based on an earlier study of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Several reservoir food webs were considered based on a variety of invertebrates (insect, snail, clam). For stream and reservoir settings, predicted Se concentrations in exposure scenarios showed a high degree of correlation (r2 = 0.91 for invertebrates and 0.75 for fish) with field observations of Se concentrations when modeling was initiated from suspended-particulate-material Se concentrations and model transfer parameters defined previously in the literature were used. These strong correlations validate the derived site-specific model and establish sufficient confidence that the predictions from the developed model can be quantitatively applied to the ecosystems in southern West Virginia. An application of modeling used a metric describing the partitioning of Se between particulate material and dissolved phases (Kd) to allow determination of a dissolved Se concentration that would be necessary to attain a site-specific Se fish body burden. The operationally defined Kd quantifies the complex process of transformation at the base of a food web on a site-specific basis. The magnitude of this metric is known to vary with such factors as Se speciation, particulate-material type, and hydrology. This application (1) ties dissolved Se concentrations to fish tissue concentrations; (2) allows consideration of different choices for intervening site-specific exposure steps that set Se bioaccumulation, partitioning, and bioavailability; and (3) generates implications for management decisions that define protection through

  2. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Deep PATTANAYAK

    2012-06-01

    of children with epilepsy. J Child Neurol 1997;12(3:187-92.44. Pavlou E, Gkampeta A. Learning disorders in children with epilepsy. Childs Nerv Sys 2011;27(3:373-9.45. Fastenau PS, Shen J, Dunn DW, Perkins SM, Hermann BP, Austin JK. Neuropsychological predictors of academic underachievement in pediatric epilepsy: moderating roles of demographic, seizure, and psychosocial variables. Epilepsia 2004;45(10:1261-72.46. Austin JK, Caplan R. Behavioral and psychiatric comorbidities in pediatric epilepsy: toward an integrative model. Epilepsia 2007;48(9:1639-51.47. Austin JK, McNelis AM, Shore CP, Dunn DW, Musick B. A feasibility study of a family seizure management program ‘Be seizure smart’. J Neurosci Nurs 2002;34:30-7.48. Ronen GM, Streiner DL, Rosenbaum P. Health-related quality of life in childhood epilepsy: Moving beyond ‘seizure control with minimal adverse effects’. Health Qual Life Outcomes 2003;1:36.49. Smith K, Siddarth P, Zima B, Sankar R, Mitchell W Gowrinathan R, et al. Unmet mental health needs in pediatric epilepsy: insights from providers. Epilepsy Behav 2007;11(3:401-8.50. Goldstein J, Plioplys S, Zelko F, Mass S, Corns C, Blaufuss R, et al. Multidisciplinary approach to childhood epilepsy: exploring the scientific rationale and practical aspects of implementation. J Child Neurol 2004;19(5:362-78.51. Achenbach TM. Manual for the child behavior checklist/4-18 and 1991 profile. Burlington, VT: Univ. of Vermont Department of Psychiatry; 1991.52. Gadow KD, Sprafkin J. Child symptom inventory-4 norms manual. Stony Brook, NY: Checkmate Plus; 1997.53. Sabaz M, Cairns DR, Lawson JA, Nheu N, Bleasel AF, Bye AM. Validation of a new quality of life scale for children with epilepsy. Epilepsia 2000;41(6:765-74.54. Camfield C, Breau L, Camfield P. Impact of pediatric epilepsy on the family: a new scale for clinical and research use. Epilepsia 2001;42(1:104-12.55. Lewis MA, Salas I, de la Sota A, Chiofalo N, Leake B. Randomized trial of